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SUM M E R

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S M I T H

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L A K E

Welcome to Wonderland

Camp McDowell

Summertime at Silverock Cove

Peeking through the looking glass at the Methvins’ artful and whimsical lakeside property

One of the community’s best kept secrets – God’s backyard on the banks of Lewis Smith Lake

An in-depth tour of the stunning and spacious McBride Family Lake House

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Wh at ’ s I n s ide S U M M E R

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LOCAL TRAVEL AND THINGS TO DO

FEATURE NEIGHBOR PAGE 48 Shane Cook, WakeFactory

BUSINESS SPOTLIGHT PAGE 88 Seibels

SPOTLIGHT ON THE WATER PAGE 86 Safer Smith Lake

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PAGE 60 Bankhead National Forest and Sipsey Wilderness

FEATURE ARTICLE

PAGE 72 McDowell Camp and Conference Center Something About Smith .....................................06 #howilake .......................................................................10 #spotsonsmith ............................................................ 12 Barry and Connie Methvin .................................14 The McBride Lake Home .................................... 28 Catching up with Kane Ward...........................56 Seibels ............................................................................. 88 From the Heart of Smith Lake ....................... 92 #smithlakekids............................................................94 Native Plants | Spring ............................................96 #smithlakepets ........................................................102 Advertiser Index .................................................... 104

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ON THE COVER

Sunset near the Dam Ryan Creek, Lewis Smith Lake

PHOTOGRAPHER THE LAKESIDE LIFE TEAM

PARTNER/EDITOR IN CHIEF: Syndi Sumner Hanna MANAGING EDITOR/ CREATIVE DIRECTOR: Sandra Slate PARTNER/MANAGING EDITOR/ SALES DIRECTOR: Scott Hanna EXECUTIVE EDITOR: John David Palmer MARKETING DIRECTOR: Cathy Wolfe CREATIVE ADVISOR: Emma Doss CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS: Arley Women’s Club Jennifer Beckman (JWB Photography) Rob Beckman Megan Cook (Konagraphs) Shane Cook (WakeFactory) Scott Eric Day Photography and Videography Rodrigo Donoso ( @rodrigosnaps) Reggie Grey Chris Grillis (Chris Grillis Photography) Peggy Hill Brian and Allison McBride McDowell Camp and Conference Center Nate Miller (In His Wakes) Roger Miller (HexaChrome Aerial Photography) Allison Rodgers Ron Scalf Terra Nova Nurseries Terry Turner Wake the World Alabama & Big Oak Ranch with photograph by Dave Warren Dave Warren (Cullman Aerial & Real Estate Photography) The Lewis Smith Lake Community The Lakeside Life Team CONTRIBUTING EDITORIALS: Peggy Hill Stephanie G. Lepore John David Palmer ( @longjohnpalmer) Ellen Roberts Beth Sargent (Arley Women’s Club) The Lakeside Life Team CONTRIBUTING GRAPHIC DESIGN: Shane Cook Sparta Creative (SpartaCreative.com) PRINTED BY: Publications Press Inc. PUBLISHED BY: The Lakeside Life – www.thelakesidelife.com FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS CALL: 256-708-7679 – or complete the subscription form @ www.thelakesidelife.com/magazine-subscription.html FOR ADVERTISING INQUIRIES CALL: 205-470-8250 – or complete the advertising form @ www.thelakesidelife.com/advertise.html INTERESTED IN SUBMITTING CONTENT? Please e-mail thelakesidelife@gmail.com to obtain a content submission form and agreement.

@THELAKESIDELIFE_SMITHLAKE https://www.instagram.com/thelakesidelife_smithlake/

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SOMETHING ABOUT

Smith Careful With Those

Cold Ones WRITER THE LAKESIDE LIFE TEAM PHOTOGRAPHER TERRY TURNER

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The fact of the matter is that many folks who regularly traverse our lake also happen to enjoy a having a drink or two from time to time. And with summertime and summer holidays now in full

swing, many dock coolers might be filled to the brim with ice-cold brews or mixers for “docktails”. But be warned, law enforcement continues to actively crack down on those who dare to crack open any cold ones on the water in a boat. While most lake goers know this all too well, some newcomers to Smith Lake may be surprised to learn that it’s illegal to drink or even possess alcohol on a boat, obviously while you are piloting the vessel–that’s just plain common sense–but also as a passenger. That’s right, no one can be caught drinking on a boat at any time. In fact, being caught with just one can, bottle, or mixed drink, even if said can or bottle is sealed, could land you and all those riding with you in big trouble, with a hefty fine; and if found to be doing it while driving, could result in much more dramatic action, such as the driver, passengers and/or the boat being towed away at the owner’s expense. This also means you are not allowed to take drinks from local restaurants off their premises and onto any marine vessel. Marine Patrol takes these offenses seriously, and can take any opportunity, if there is due cause, to search a vessel for liquid “contraband” at any given time of the day or night. A few fishermen have even reported seeing law enforcement officials camped out near shore with night vision goggles looking to pounce on unsuspecting sippers. Of course, we all know that fishermen are known to exaggerate from time to time, but it’s better to be safe than sorry. Some say this is a draconian alcohol ban, a glaring example of government overreach and an intrusion in to the lives of responsible adults who would only drink within limits as a passenger. But perhaps, understandably, such measures are justified in order to keep the reservoir safe. This is an issue the community must decide when legislation is available for a vote. It is true that there are other Southern lakes that allow passengers on board to stay within a reasonable blood alcohol limit, always with designated drivers at the helm. But that is not the case on our lake, so be careful and abstain from drinking while boating. Remember, you have a right to crack open those cold ones on your property while relaxing, grilling, celebrating, etc. But keep in mind that Smith Lake is a familyfriendly environment and does not allow drinking while boating, or encourage excessive drinking in any setting for that matter. Make it a commitment to learn and obey all boating laws this summer–official rules and regulations can be found online at Alabama Law Enforcement Agency: https://ww.alea.gov/dps/ marine-patrol/boating-rules-and-regulations. Have fun, but above all else, stay safe! t

Just a few points of friendly advice to operate your boat in good standing on Smith Lake: >> No drinking alcohol or transporting alcohol on any marine vessel on Smith Lake. >> If you are a fisherman, please check with local authorities about a proper fishing license, and be prepared to show documentation at any time whether fishing from shore or from a marine vessel. >> The driver of your vessel must have a proper boating license and be prepared to show documentation at all times during boating. >> Have boat registration paperwork on board at all times. >> Have proper up-to-date registration stickers applied to the front area of the boat, and highly visible. >> Always carry enough life jackets in proper sizes for passengers, and a throwable on the boat. >> Make sure the fire extinguisher is constantly checked so the expiration date is not past prime. >> When a vessel is undeway, passengers must stay seated inside and below the gunwale (cap), and no sitting or laying on the rear sun deck area; also, no sitting in rear facing seats near or on the swim platform on tow boats designed for waterskiing, wakeboarding and wakesurfing. >> All children under the age of 13 need to wear a proper life vest at all times while boating. >> Always have navigation lights on during the time from sunset to sunrise (we recommend just before sunset to just after sunrise). >> Don’t drive a boat or PWC on the “wrong side” of the lake – treat the narrow channels of Smith Lake like a highway and always stay right of center when traveling. >> Don’t drive jet skis (PWCs) at night, or any vessel that does not have legitimate navigation lighting for night conditions. >> Never follow right in behind another vessel’s wake day or night. Keep the front end of your boat pointed in a direction to show intent to pass in a proper manner so the driver of the boat being overtaken is made aware of the intended action visually. If following in daylight, you could accidentally run over a fallen waterskier, causing a fatality; and at night, you may not be judging the speed of another boat properly (there are no brake lights!), so following closely could easily cause a collision. >> Don’t drive a boat at night with the docking lights or decorative neon LED lights engaged (these are primarily on newer or retrofitted pontoon boats), as these are to be used in docking or anchored situations only. >> Don’t run at very high speed at night. There are often obstacles floating in the water unseen or just below the surface. Plus, there are many permanent underwater hazard markers you need to avoid, and you just shouldn’t take the chance of not being able to see something timely enough for corrective action.

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How I Lake

Reggie From The Ro ad WRITER JOHN DAVID PALMER | PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY REGGIE GREY

In 2016, a Northern Ontario man with a chronic case of wanderlust traded a life of relative comfort and stability for the freedom to travel North America in a vintage trailer named Frances. That man’s name is Reggie Grey, a 34-year-old filmmaker who is part of a growing community of minimalist nomads, mostly Millennials, who have forsaken more traditional lifestyles in favor of living lives of adventure and transience. Reggie spends five months out of each year traveling from place to place with the majority of his time spent below the Mason Dixon line. He travels with nearly all of his possessions, which are few and are carried in his restored 1970s model travel trailer nicknamed Frances, or Franny, in remembrance of his grandmother. Reggie said he parks his beloved trailer anywhere from highway rest stops to Walmart parking lots while en-route to his next destination, filming new content along the way. Due to visa restrictions, however, he must return to Canada for the remaining seven months of the year, so he tries to make the most out of every day spent in the USA. Living like Reggie is not for everyone, but he believes the benefits of such a lifestyle greatly outweigh any downsides. He particularly enjoys the feeling of freedom he now has and the ability to regularly experience new places and meet new faces. “My lifestyle is the furthest thing from monotonous,” he said. “I lived 31 years in Toronto, now all of a sudden I have friends all over America, which is so cool. Now I consider myself a citizen of North America.” Since becoming a nomad, social media, particularly Instagram, a platform on which Reggie has accumulated well over 10,000 followers

on an account called “Reggie from the Road,” has served as a vital tool that allows him to connect with like-minded individuals and fellow nomads. They often share tips with each other and help one another out on their respective journeys. Without access to such technology, Reggie said, living a nomadic lifestyle would be much more daunting. One of Reggie’s usual stops is at Lewis Smith Lake. Each year, Reggie spends approximately one month annually at Hidden Cove RV Resort in Arley where he parks Frances. Much of his time at the lake is spent filming, but he also enjoys going for swims and hunting for antiques at nearby shops. The lake, he said, gives him the feeling of being at home. “It reminds me so much of our lake in Northern Ontario,” Reggie said. “There’s something about it that transports me back to home.” Reggie left the lake earlier this year but hopes to return soon. Recently, Reggie has been traveling with a partner and released a new YouTube vlog series called “Road Couple.” The videos are uploaded to a channel called Reggie Grey. t

For more information about Reggie and to keep up with his latest adventures, follow him on Instagram @reggiefromtheroad or visit his website at www.reggiefromtheroad.com.

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Goat A Glimpse of

Island

WRITER JOHN DAVID PALMER | PHOTOGRAPHER ROGER MILLER (HEXACHROME AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY)

The island is said to get its name from a population of feral goats that called it home for decades. 12

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#SPOTSONSMITH SPOTLIGHT

While Smith Lake has its fair share of islands dotted between its shorelines, none seem to capture people’s imagination quite like Goat Island. It is one of the lake’s most iconic destinations with even a popular local brewery adopting its name. But what exactly is it about this uninhabited 56-acre island that makes it so special?

What is now known as Goat Island was once farmland, according to Mitch Baker, nephew of the island’s current owner, Larry Tucker. The island was created when Smith Lake was naturally and quickly filled in by rainwater after the completion of the dam by Alabama Power back in 1961. The land was originally purchased by Alabama Power from a man named Harold Tucker, who later bought it back from Alabama Power. Larry Tucker later purchased the island from Harold. Because of this, Goat Island is also known by some as Tucker Island. The island is said to get its name from a population of feral goats that called it home for decades. Coincidentally, as many people have pointed out, when looking at it from a top-down aerial view, the island appears to be shaped like a goat as well. Mitch said that at one time there were approximately 60 goats living on the island. He remembers having to corral them in back in the 80s when they were thriving, but he doubts if any more than two goats remain on the island today. In recent years, their numbers began to decline. Rumors circulated of goats being hunted or poisoned, but Mitch strongly suspects their disappearance is directly connected to the introduction of birds of prey to the Smith Lake area. “Back then, they didn’t have any predators but men,” he said.” They started disappearing when eagles and ospreys were introduced. The ones left started dying of old age.”

But while the feral goats that gave the island its name no longer thrive, Mitch said that deer have come to take their place, using the island as a safe haven to birth their young. They are frequently seen swimming across the lake to the island. Mitch has seen anywhere between 20 and 18 deer on the island at one time. Other animals that call the island home include armadillos, raccoons, squirrels, a variety of migratory and non-migratory birds, and at least five species of snakes. Mitch also makes an effort to remove any non-native plant species from the island such as privet hedge and ornamental plants to help keep the island in a pristine state. When a tornado blew down pine trees on the island over 25 years ago, a cabin was built from the wood. A man was said to have lived on it for a few years until the cabin burned down several years ago. There was also said to be a small farming operation at one time. But now, only a couple of old tool sheds and an old Mack truck remain. The truck has become a kind of tourist attraction, with people often stopping by to have their pictures made with it. While not much infrastructure remains other than a section of an old county road running through it, Goat Island is still equipped with running water, power, septic tanks, and permits for more. Mitch said a lot of ideas about utilizing the island have been thrown around over the years. For example, his uncle had at one point thought about selling lots on the island and establishing hiking trails. Jacob Knight, who is a co-owner of Smith Lake Marina with Larry Tucker, and is also very familiar with Goat Island, thinks it has potential for a greater degree of utilization for events like small concerts. “It sure has potential for some kind of development,” he said. “It’s too good of a situation to pass up.” For the time being, however, Goat Island remains private property, and there are said to be no immediate plans for development. t

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y k c a WWonderland Barry and Connie Methvin’s

WRITER PEGGY HILL | PHOTOGRAPHER CHRIS GRILLIS (CHRIS GRILLIS PHOTOGRAPHY)

A sign proudly proclaiming “We are alL mad here” hangs in BarRy and ConNie Methvin’s garden. This quote from Lewis CarRolL’s boOk, “Alice in Wonderland,” describes the pair of ecCentric artists perfectly. Creative and crazy is an exciting combination, and using their talents, the couple slowly constructed a menagerie of structures and then uniquely bedazzled them and their surroundings. If you visit, you might think you’ve taken a little tumble down a rabbit hole yourself. One thing is for sure, just like Alice when she was in Wonderland, you will see things you’ve never seen before.

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If you visit, you might think you’ve taken a little tumble down a rabbit hole yourself. One thing is for sure, just like Alice when she was in Wonderland, you will see things you’ve never seen before. Most of the Methvins’ art is created from objects that were either found or given to them by friends. Connie draws from a large collection of antique items when she selects the components for her glass totem poles, and then she glues everything together using a tube of weatherproof, 100% silicone.

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For instance, I’ll bet you’ve never seen so much mosaic work in a garden. There are mosaic planters, mosaic cinder blocks, and an old wood splitter transformed into a pop art portrait through the magic of mosaic (see p24). Connie even mosaics the dirt between steppingstones, sometimes adding small doll arms or legs, which is both artistic and a bit peculiar at the same time (see p22). Connie believes the world would be a prettier place if everything were covered in mosaic, and Barry jokingly warns visitors not to stand still in the garden for too long. Barry produces about half of the art in the gardens, and

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to say it’s eye-catching would be a gross understatement. One of his latest installations is a series of mirrors dangling from tree limbs, and reflecting the sun as they slowly spin and sway. The flashing lights are enough to drive some people bonkers, but in a fun way. Another recent project involved painstakingly covering a 20-foot-tall, dead, tree trunk with pieces of broken mirrors. Barry added a snake winding its way up the trunk (see p16). He topped it with a weathervane, and then he crafted a second giant snake to encircle the bottom. When’s the last time you saw something like that in a garden?

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Inside, the madness continues. Alice encountered a human-sized, white rabbit when she was in Wonderland, and at the Methvins’, you’ll see some equally strange things. One of Barry’s paintings depicts a ninja warrior brushing the fur of an enormous cat while Barry, with a cornucopia at his feet, sits on a cube looking off into the distance and perhaps pondering the philosophical question, ‘Is the cat really large, or is it a tiny ninja warrior?’ Barry has no idea what this painting means (see p16). It’s just something his wacky brain thought up, and he painted it.

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Even the buildings are insane. The main house is perched precariously on the edge of a rock wall, and the guest house is actually cantilevered six feet out over a cliff. If you’ve ever ventured up Coon Creek, just off Ryan Creek, you’ve probably noticed the structures and wondered, ‘Who would be loony enough to build such things?’ Barry Methvin of course. He’s the mad-hatter of do-it-yourselfers, and 20 years ago he built the 800-square-foot main house. He had a full-time job, so he worked nights and weekends on the house, and it took him about three years to complete. Over time he’s also erected a

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If you’ve ever ventured up Coon Creek, just off Ryan Creek, you’ve probably noticed the structures and wondered, ‘Who would be loony enough to build such things?’ Barry Methvin of course.

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‘Who would be loony enough to build such things?’ Barry Methvin of course. He’s the mad-hatter of do-it-yourselfers...

60-square-foot reading room that is a separate building, and an 800-square-foot guest house. A bizarre series of walkways and paths connect the structures. As you stroll through the compound, you’re enthralled by artistic touches everywhere you look. Visiting the Methvins’ is like being transported into a glorious wacky wonderland. t

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If you’d like to know more about Barry Methvin and his art, you can watch an episode of the show Absolutely Alabama that featured Barry. To find the video, search the internet for ‘Absolutely Alabama: Art on the Lake’.

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Silverock Cove Summertime at

The McBride Lake Home WRITER STEPHANIE G. LEPORE | PHOTOGRAPHER DAVE WARREN

N

estled in a dreamy setting that feels worlds away from, well, anywhere, sits Silverock Cove—a close-knit lakefront community developed by iconic Birmingham architect duo Dungan Nequette. With notable builds like The Narrows and Mt. Laurel fire stations in Shelby County outside Birmingham, as well as homes dotted along 30-A at Rosemary and Alys Beach in their portfolio, it comes as no surprise that this old-school sophisticated fish camp-meets-upscale lake hideaway community hits the design jackpot: homes that complement, not compete, with the surroundings; subtle, statement-making architectural details; and warm, earthy tones that respect the location but are far from boring. (Note: Jeffrey Dungan and Louis Nequette amicably parted ways in 2015 after a 16-year partnership to allow Jeffrey to focus on residential design, while Louis pursued primarily commercial design work.) It’s no wonder then that the 125-home community—with a mix of row houses and waterfront cottages—is an 85-acre treasure that caught the eyes of Memphians Allison and Brian

McBride. Already busy with separate, demanding careers, the couple found themselves entering empty nesthood and facing a new problem: staying connected with their two adult sons, Andrew and William, who are away at medical school and college. “We’re a pretty tight-knit foursome, but we were struggling to find quality downtime together, due to the boys’ schedules and our work,” says Allison. “We knew a relaxing, comfortable retreat somewhere that was easy to get to would encourage the shared time-out we desired.” Before they could start the property search, the McBrides had one negotiation to settle: “I thought our parameters equaled a getaway at the beach,” says Allison. “Brian had mountains on his mind.” Eventually they met in the middle—which, in vacation home lingo, meant a lake house. Smith Lake made the cut for its proximity to the couple’s main home in Memphis; its clean, clear water; and the holy grail: a good friend’s sparkling recommendation.

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Silverock Cove is located on the Crooked Creek section of Smith Lake, in Winston County just outside the Bankhead National Forest. Its location offers easy access to explore the in(let)s and outs of the lake, including nearby Indian Point and Indian Cave Hollow. The McBrides’ home (below, right) is in line with Allison’s desire for a classic, always-summer-feeling cottage. The enclave reminds her of a Dirty Dancing, days of yore-style retreat. The architectural cohesiveness is found in nearly every detail at Silverock Cove, including the entry gate (below, left), crafted of double-sided laser cut panels that were then powder-coated with steel spreaders. The design, by Birmingham’s The G Brand, is meant to reflect native foliage.

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Summerhousefresh with classic, clean lines and a hint of whimsy After settling on their lake house, it was time for Allison to turn her attention to making the property a lake home—and that included a few firm design directives. Specifically, no beachy vibes or of-themoment farmhouse details; either would take away from the classic feel of the neighborhood, the house’s exterior, and the landscape itself. “Summerhousefresh with classic, clean lines and a hint of whimsy” was Allison’s decor strategy. In addition, she kept to the major mantra of designer queen Bunny Williams: “You have to nail the entry, because it sets the tone for the whole house,” says Allison. The rule of like items making a big impact is enforced here too, as she chose a collection of large tortoise shells—a deliberate nod to the house’s street address on Turtle Point Drive— to showcase on the entryway’s built-in shelves. As a counterpoint to the “wit” of the tortoise shells, a bit of whimsy is found in the playful lines of the large mirror hanging above the buffet. “I absolutely love the foyer,” says Allison. Just past the entryway and centrally located stairwell—“another thing we really like,” says Allison— is the open loop of living room, dining area, kitchen. When the McBrides are hosting family and friends, it’s easy to stay connected among these areas no matter if everyone is simply hanging out, watching a game on the TV, prepping dinner, or a combination of all three. The large windows in this living space flood the area with natural light—and natural views—with woven window coverings that blend right into the wood walls, creating a seamless lookout to the outdoors.

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The McBrides’ realtor, Cindy Myrex, suggested they call in the services of Libby Crider, owner of Cullman’s White Willow, for interior collaboration. While the overall palette lends itself to watery grays and blues, neutral textures, and warm touches of leather here and there, one way Allison opted to work in color is with artwork. She is partial to the large abstract in the dining room, where she worked in just a blush of pink. “We actually purchased most of the art through an auction that supports their sons’ former childhood school, via a phone call with Brian while we were all sitting around the kitchen bar,” says Libby.

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The honey-colored wood-wrapped walls and flooring create a cohesive backdrop for understated furnishings and punches of graphic interest on accessories like sofa pillows. In keeping with the architectural style of the Silverock Cove development, the interiors retain a clean feel that reflects the true beauty of the space. Elements like an oversize coee table that resembles tree bark, woven baskets, and the same natural-fiber window coverings that are found in the dining room give the home an indoor/outdoor vibe that works perfectly with its lakefront locale. O the main common areas sits the master bedroom and bath, a tranquil study in plush comfort (cozy bedding, velvet pillows) and rustic sophistication (earth-tone bathroom tile, reverse-scallop wooden vanity mirrors).

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Upstairs, Allison wanted to continue the classic and comfortable look. “From the very first meeting, we knew one of the main concerns besides looking beautiful was making the home comfortable and functional for the entire family,” says Libby. “Allison wanted her sons’ rooms to accommodate and reflect them, and she was very deliberate in choosing the finishing touches.

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The second floor living area was created with Andrew and William in mind, right down to the pool table she tracked down. She really wanted this to be a place to relax, play and spend some fun time together.” Additional guest spaces were important, too, as Allison and Brian wanted to sleep more than a dozen family members at once as they intended to host their entire family including five younger nieces—”and hopefully a few grandkids of our own,” says Allison. “Someday!”

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Mission accomplished and then some, as the house offers beds for a total of 16 overnighters, thanks in part to the stunning custom bunk beds Libby commissioned through Tony Mallard of Mallard Construction. “They really turned out great,” she says.

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Not to be outdone by the interiors, Allison, along with Libby and her team, put plenty of effort into the home’s outdoor living spaces, too. A collective family favorite, the screened-in porch, main-level porch, and ground-floor patio alcove boast lake views shaded by towering oak and pine trees. A nonnegotiable was custom coordinating outdoor furniture from Summer Classics, headquartered down I-65 in Pelham. “We love keeping it local!” says Allison. Pops of forest green and earthy brown, lush foliage, timber beams, and ample stacked stone create a calming oasis for outdoor living.

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Just a few doors down from the McBrides’ home is one big draw of Silverock Cove, the award-winning Thunderhouse, a swanky, architectural detail-heavy “pool house” that looks out over one of two pool perks available to homeowners in the development. The structure was built intentionally low to the ground so as not to compromise sweeping views of Smith Lake from nearby homes. Inside houses cozy lounge areas, fireplaces, and a petite game room. The expansive steel windows can be opened to accommodate larger gatherings that spill out onto the pool deck. t

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Getting to Know

The McBride Family of Silverock Cove by way of Tennessee

WRITER STEPHANIE G. LEPORE | PHOTOGRAPHER ALLISON RODGERS

Meet the McBrides:

Proud Memphians who love and support

their community and church

Brian, an executive, avid cyclist, and Memphis sports fan (Grizzlies and Tigers!)

getting away together with their boys, as well as making memories with extended family and new neighbors/friends. The outdoor living areas—three total—hold the title of “Favorite Place to Hang” (besides the water, of course!), because it’s the perfect perch to take in

Allison, an executive, board member (West TN Cystic Fibrosis Foundation,

a sunrise with coffee and conversation before they head out to explore the

University of Memphis Speech and Hearing Center), and volunteer (Junior

lake in their boat. As boat-owner newbies, Allison says she’s extra-grateful for

League of Memphis, The LeBonheur Club)

the boat concierge service Silverock Cove provides. “Tony is great! He’s really

Andrew (age 25), a fourth-year medical school student at the University of Tennessee Health Sciences Center, former UT Trustee, and a University of Virginia Jefferson Scholar William (age 21), a senior at UT and an avid sportsman, including wake sports, fishing and hunting Otis (18 months), William’s German short-haired pointer, expert stickfetcher from waters of Smith Lake

helpful, especially since we’re new to boating,” she says. At any point during a weekend or extended stay at their happy hideaway, you might find the McBrides fishing, kayaking, paddle-boarding, or just unwinding while they watch the “kids”—Andrew, William, and their nieces— fine-tune their wakesurfing skills, before ending the day with a grilled feast, spectacular sunset, and “some good ol’ Tennessee-distilled spirits.” “To say we are loving the decision to settle here doesn’t do it justice,” says

The close-knit clan found themselves clamoring to get in good quality

Allison. “We have no doubt we’ll be enjoying our place for years to come.

family time—and with a resume like the above, it’s easy to see why! Allison and

We’re still Tennesseans at heart, but we have noticed that we crank up the

Brian decided that a lake house a short drive from Memphis was the ticket to

volume just a tad when “Sweet Home Alabama” pops up on the playlist.” t

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Wakeboarding Magazine shoot featuring Shaun Murray by Photographer Shane Cook

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WakeFactory WRITER JOHN DAVID PALMER | PHOTOGRAPHER SHANE COOK AND MEGAN COOK

Shane Cook is not only known for his expertise in graphic design and stunning photography but also for his direct involvement with many successful wakeboard events throughout the state of Alabama. Having grown up in a small town in South Alabama, Shane felt it was a long shot that he would one day become an artist and avid boarder. But in 1996, while studying at Auburn University, he was introduced to the world of wakeboarding, and the rest was history. Quickly falling in love with the sport, he joined the Auburn Waterski Club to spend as much time as possible wakeboarding. At the time, however, wakeboarding was new and niche, so Shane sought ways to maximize exposure, recruited new members, and reached out to companies that specialized in wakeboarding equipment for club sponsorship and donations of boards and accessories. His participation on the once active “Wake List” allowed him to become friends with both amateur and professional riders and many industry professionals. “As my knowledge of the industry grew, my contacts developed into strong business relationships.” Shane said. During his time at Auburn, Shane was contacted by a local marina to start a wakeboard pro shop. It carried three lines of boards, as well as clothing and accessories specific to the sport.

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“Ever since my introduction to wakeboarding over 20 years ago, I have been committed to its growth and positive representation in the state of Alabama and beyond.”

Shane Cook | Photographer Megan Cook (Konagraphs)

At the end of the summer of 1998, Shane organized the first Non-INT wakeboard contest on Lake Martin. And in September of 1999, he moved to Huntsville, Alabama, in order to ride and train with Clay McCoy, a friend he had met through the “Wake List.” During that time while looking for a full-time job, Shane was introduced by one of his sponsors to a local man and helped him start a pro shop in his established privately-owned sporting goods store. During this time, he continued running demos and coaching wakeboard enthusiasts. In 2002, Shane was introduced to Dustin Middlebrooks, a local marina manager who shared his vision for the sport. Together, they formulated an idea to help bring the sport of wakeboarding to the masses. “We were disappointed that boat dealerships, where the primary goal was promoting boat sales, were the most common places the sport of wakeboarding was visible,” Shane said. “We knew that without a true focus on the sport, there would be limited growth and expansion of wakeboarding in Alabama.” In response to this, Shane and Dustin started WakeFactory, a marina-based storefront, to exclusively promote wakeboarding gear. Together, they attended trade shows, met with industry representatives, interacted with sales professionals, ordered stock for their showroom, and built up a loyal customer base. WakeFactory held product demonstration days and offered

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clinics to new riders assisted by various pro wakeboarders. The marina eventually closed, but Shane and Dustin have continued the company by holding demonstrations and running contests and events for boat dealers and other interested parties. In 2008, under the WakeFactory brand, Dustin and Shane began a promotion company in order to better steer the direction of the North Alabama wake scene. That summer, the first annual Spring2Summer wakeboarding tournament was held at Lake Guntersville, which attracted over 70 riders and a large audience of spectators. The big turnout caught the attention of sponsors, as well as the city clerk and mayor of Guntersville, who recognized the potential economic impact on the tourism industry of the area. That same year, WakeFactory hosted the Rail Jam Demo for the Guntersville “Year of Alabama Small Towns” Fourth of July celebration. Over the years, WakeFactory has continued to gain recognition. For example, in 2014, Wakeboarding Magazine included two Alabama events among “The Best” in a list of 12 grassroots competitions nationwide. These included the Spring2Summer event and Montgomery’s Riverfront Wake Battle, which were both organized by WakeFactory. Spring2Summer is also recognized for its themed events and the one of a kind trophies that Shane designs for the event each year. The themes usually center around pop culture and are

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Alex Graydon | Photographer Shane Cook

based on the number of the event year. Some of these included “I don’t know where I would be if they were not here to poker chips (for Lucky #7), and Nintendo game cartridges for help,” he said. “After all these years, it’s the kids that keep me in the 8th year (titled 8 Bit Fury). The overall design theme culmithe sport, and not just mine. Watching these kids grow up and nated this year as he made custom record labels and sleeves progress in the sport is one of the most satisfying things in where the song tracks listed all twelve themes up my life. Notable riders I have enjoyed watching to that point. progress are Mary Morgan Howell, Kane “Ever since my introduction to wakeWard and Cody Hunnicutt. These kids boarding some 20 plus years ago, I are out there every day pushing the have been committed to its growth sport to its limits and it shows. Mary and positive representation in the Morgan now competes on the pro state of Alabama and beyond,” level and competed at the invitaShane said. tion only Masters this year at CallNow in his mid 40s, Shane rides away Gardens. The friends I have and competes with his daughter made in this sport will last a lifeand still finds time to coach others time, and WakeFactory contests as well. He is more involved than aren’t really contests as much as ever with WakeFactory since his they are a big family reunion for our Shane Cook partner Dustin stepped down due wake family and friends.” Photographer Megan to work and family conflicts. Shane’s WakeFactory has partnered with other Cook (Konagraphs) family stepped up to help run the business like minded people to form the “Southern and the contests. His wife, Meridith, helps on the Wake Series” which starts the season with the Mounbusiness side, and his niece Megan (Konagraphs) moved to tain Wake Games, which was started in 2018. It was held this Huntsville to help out and to be the official photographer. year on May 17-18 at Oak Mountain State Park in Pelham. The Even his daughter Abby helps out where she can. 12th season of the Spring2Summer was held this year at Lake

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Guntersville on June 15th, and the highly anticipated Smith Lake Wake Battle is to be held July 13 on Smith Lake. Shane wished to thank all the people who have helped WakeFactory out over the years, but jokes that the list would be too long and the magazine wouldn’t have enough paper. He says, “you know who you are,” and he thanks them for everything they have done. Putting on the contests are hard work, no doubt, and without dedicated volunteers, riders and their families, none of it would be possible. He extends a special thanks to Jeremey Baker of Hyperlite Mid-South, WakeFactory’s first sales rep, for his incredible support throughout the years. Shane has also worked with many professional wakeboarders like Darin Shapiro, Shaun

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Murray, Josh Twelker, Alex Graydon, Andrew Adkison, Guenther Oka, Jake Pelot and many more; and he extends his gratitude for the past and future involvement of all these incredible athletes and ambassadors for the sport. t To keep up with WakeFactory, like the Facebook page and follow @wakefactory on Instagram. Also, be sure to check out southernwakeseries.com for a comprehensive schedule of events, sponsors and competition results. Photos on this page represent the past 12 years of Spring2Summer, photographers include Ian Zinner, Jeff Mathis, Megan Cook and Shane Cook.

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Catching up with

Kane WRITER JOHN DAVID PALMER PHOTOGRAPHY ON THIS PAGE BY RODRIGO DONOSO (FIND HIM ON INSTAGRAM AS @RODRIGOSNAPS)

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Grom phenom and Cullman resident Kane Ward

has been very busy since our article featuring him last year (the Winter 2018 issue is in digital version on our website www.thelakesidelife.com). In the meantime, eight-year-old Kane has excelled in this year’s Southern Wake Series having won first place in the adult intermediate division of the Mountain Wake Games at Oak Mountain State Park in Birmingham and third place in the event’s outlaw division. At WakeFactory’s Spring2Summer event on Lake Guntersville in June, he placed first in the adult intermediate division. Furthermore, Kane has joined the official Hyperlite Team and is featured on the Hyperlite website. He has also completed more popular videos that were posted last year and this year on social media, two of those with the Hyperlite Team. In the video series called “Growing Up Hyperlite,” Kane and two other young southern wakeboarders, Cody Hunnicutt and Parker Swope, visit Orlando, Florida to tour the Nautique boat factory and ride the cable at Orlando Watersports Complex. They meet up with professional wakeboarders J.D. Webb and Shaun Murray, with appearances by another legend, Scott Byerly, as well as Hyperlite representative Jeremy Baker. You just might see a giant Raley right over Kane’s head, landed by Shaun Murray! “That was kind of every wakeboarder’s dream to hang out with guys like that,” said Kane’s father, Justin Ward. One of Kane’s previous videos called “Shred to School” uploaded by the People are Awesome Facebook page garnered over 2 million views. You can find the links to those videos through our Instagram bio (@thelakesidelife_smithlake) as well as on a companion blog to this article. Justin said Kane has displayed an incredible talent for wakeboarding since he was three-years-old, a talent that Kane continues to develop. In fact, he progressed so swiftly that he was allowed to ride in the intermediate division of tournaments where he competes against riders in their teens to late twenties. “It feels cool to be out there riding on their level, and it pushes me to try harder tricks,” Kane said when asked how it felt to compete with older riders. thelakesidelife.com | The Lakeside Life

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Photography by Shane Cook

Kane says he particularly excels at inverts (flips) because he spends so much time flipping on his trampoline and off of anything else he can find. He is also trying to improve at other tricks. “I am learning to do spins though and want to get better at them this year,” Kane said. Kane told us his favorite riders are Harley Clifford, for his ability to perform the biggest and hardest tricks; Shaun Murray, because he is a legend and fun to hang out with; and Cody Hunnicutt, for his “super stylish” riding and being like a big brother to him. Kane has won tournaments at Smith Lake, Lake Guntersville, and Tennessee’s Center Hill Lake. He is currently sponsored by Russell Marine, Flip Side Watersports, Grom, and Shred Ready. If you are interested in sponsoring Kane, please contact us, and we’ll get you in touch with the right folks. 58

We’re excited to watch as Kane’s budding wakeboarding career begins to soar. We’re proud to call him a #smithlakekid. To keep up with all things Kane, check out his social media as follows: Facebook @raisingkane210 and Instagram @_kaneward_ as well as checking out his sponsor pages. t Also, remember that there are many young folks in the Smith Lake area who are actively competing and doing extremely well, so continue to be looking for them in our social media as well as in the pages of future issues, and follow @hyperlitemidsouth, @russellmarineal and @wakefactory to keep up with all things wake in Alabama. We have an amazing group of young groms in our state, and it is a joy to showcase them all, so if you have a grom you want to feature, get in touch with us soon and be sure to tag us on social media for reposts. Get out there and SHRED, and show us what you’ve got!

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Photography by Shane Cook

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THE VERDANT

SANCTUARY WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHY JOHN DAVID PALMER

The Sipsey Wilderness, located within the William B. Bankhead National Forest, is one of the primary places from which the famously clean water of Lewis Smith Lake flows. And in the spring and summer months, it comes to life in a vibrant sea of green.

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ccording to historians, the Sipsey, also known as the “Land of a Thousand Waterfalls,” has long been considered a special place of tranquility, long before it was designated as a protected wilderness area in 1975 and even before Alabama was ever called a state. This area was considered to be so special by indigenous people that it was shared by multiple tribes. And still today, visitors like me, are awe-struck by the dozens of cascading waterfalls pouring in to crystalclear streams, the imposing sandstone rock walls, colorful wildflowers, and towering old growth hardwood trees. The Sipsey Wilderness covers 24,922 acres and is said to be the largest and most visited wilderness area not only in the state but east of the Mississippi River. For outdoor enthusiasts of all kinds, the Sipsey Wilderness and Bankhead Forest have much to offer throughout the year, including hiking, hunting, bird watching, wildlife sighting, canoeing, swimming, camping, and even horseback riding on specifically designated trails. Considering the mutual relationship between the Sipsey, Bankhead Forest, and Smith Lake, I wanted to visit and learn more about the beautiful wilderness area that surrounds a large portion of the reservoir. However, I felt I needed to experience it first accompanied by a knowledgeable guide to get the most out of the experience. Luckily, I could count on Rob Beckman, a local real estate appraiser, extreme sports enthusiast, and outdoorsman whose photography is

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frequently featured in The Lakeside Life. Rob finds himself spending many of his afternoons exploring the Bankhead Forest and Sipsey, usually accompanied by his two loyal Labrador retrievers, Tank and Maggie. In fact, he knows the area so well that he was recently on the search team for a man who got lost hiking alone in the forest. His custom-built jet boat, the Skid Vicious, which he sometimes uses to reach the forest from the lake, was also the focus of an article of mine published in a previous issue of the magazine. After reaching out to Rob and telling him my interest in learning more about the Sipsey, he kindly offered to bring me along for a hike one Friday afternoon in May. On the day of the hike, I met him at his home in Vinemont. We packed plenty of water and insect repellent and brought along Tank and Maggie. Rob said the dogs would enjoy the exercise and help scare away snakes. On the way, he told me a few interesting historical facts about Bankhead Forest, and we discussed our mutual interest in the “Joe Rogan Experience” podcast. He said that one of the guests on the podcast, a mycologist named Paul Stamets, had inspired him to start foraging for edible fungi and that he would be searching for mushrooms during the day’s hike. Before I knew it, we had reached Lawrence County where we stopped in at Warrior Mountain Trading Post for a quick yet strangely satisfying meal consisting of fried beef taquitos and Gatorade.

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Photography by Rob Beckman

Photography by Rob Beckman

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We left the convenience store and drove several more minutes before reaching the Sipsey River Picnic Area & Traihead where we crossed a narrow bridge over the river that led to the gravel parking lot. Two, maybe three cars were parked there. An elderly couple was exiting one of the marked trails. I had assumed that we would be heading down the same trail that the couple came from, but Rob had other plans. He said he wanted to take me down one of his favorite unmarked trails that led to several impressive waterfalls located deeper in the forest. Tank and Maggie ran in front of us as if to lead the way. They were clearly quite familiar with the area. It didn’t take long for me to realize why the narrow trail leading to the first waterfall was unmarked. Traversing it required climbing over fallen trees, dodging spider webs, and trying not to slip on moss-covered rocks. I could hear the sound of running water coming from a nearby stream that ran adjacent to the trail. As we proceeded, we both took our time scouring the forest floor for any flora or fauna that stood out. Between the two of us, we found several species of fungi, including hemlock reshi, false turkey tails, edible black trumpets, and several different wax caps, along with

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a few brightly-colored centipedes and some large snails. Rob took pictures of his finds to identify later. We also came across the rusted remnants of a 1930s Ford that looked like it had been sitting there for half a century. Rob was told that its owner ran off an old road and crashed near the creek many years ago. The driver was said to have survived the accident and even had the engine pulled out of the wreckage by a pair of horses. The rest of the car was left to merge with the forest. It wasn’t long before we approached the first large waterfall. It was located in the center of an enchanting clearing lined with sweet smelling mountain laurel bushes and swarming with butterflies of all different colors and sizes. The cool, misty air was a welcome relief from the muggy heat. After taking a short break and letting the dogs splash around in the creek, we explored a primitive campsite a few yards away from the waterfall. There was little in the way of litter besides a stray sock and one or two flattened beer cans, which was a pleasant surprise. I presumed the site was not used very much, at least not at this time of year. Rob led me to another waterfall he wanted to show me further down the trail. For about half a mile we continued

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I could hear the sound of running water coming from a nearby stream that ran adjacent to the trail. As we proceeded, we both took our time scouring the forest floor for any flora or fauna that stood out.

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to scan our immediate surroundings for anything of interest, coming across several more mushrooms and a fat toad. Rob told me to be on the lookout for salamanders, in particular the hellbender, a large, endangered species of salamander that inhabits the shallow creeks of the Sipsey. Naturally, I really hoped to find one. Before I knew it we had arrived at the second waterfall, which was noticeably larger and even more stunning than the first. We stopped again to take in the breathtaking scenery surrounding us, and I thought about how nice it would be to set up a hammock there. While Rob looked for more mushrooms on a fallen tree, I scoured the creek bank and peeked under rocks in hopes of finding at least one salamander to photograph. But to my disappointment, I only found a few small crayfish that scurried away as soon as I noticed them. I could have stayed there all day just taking it all in, but with only a few hours of daylight left, we turned around and made our way back to the truck. On the hike back, Rob told me about how several Native American tribes once shared this area with one another because it was considered a spiritual place. Looking at the scenery surrounding me, I had no

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trouble understanding this. There truly is something about the Sipsey that makes you feel like you are a world away from the stressors of modern civilization. And while the hike was tiring on my out-of-shape body, my mind felt rejuvenated in this verdant sanctuary. While the wilderness is an incredibly beautiful and tranquil place, it can be rather unforgiving if you enter unprepared. When venturing into the forest, it is always advised to take appropriate safety measures like carrying a backpack filled with essential items like water, food, a first aid kit, etc. Applying insect repellent, especially during warmer months when ticks, chiggers, and mosquitoes are most active, is a good idea. And perhaps most importantly, always make sure to tell someone where you are going. I plan to explore more of the Sipsey Wilderness and Bankhead National Forest when the weather cools o, so look for a follow up to this piece in the upcoming issues of the magazine. In the meantime, I hope to learn more about these fascinating places. t For more information about the Sipsey Wilderness area and the Bankhead National Forest, including a list of campsites and regulations, visit fs.usda.gov.

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God’s Backyard

Overlooking Our Lake WRITER ELLEN ROBERTS PHOTOGRAPHS PROVIDED BY MCDOWELL CAMP AND CONFERENCE CENTER

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n the banks of Smith Lake, hidden within a hillside, lies the 1,140 acres of what is a “Wonderful, Wonderful”* gem known as Camp McDowell–a vision and dream from the 1920s that has planted its roots in Winston County, claiming the title of “Beautiful Queen of Clear Creek.” We truly have “God’s Backyard” right here on our shorelines. The mission of McDowell is “to show the way the world could be through worship, learning, rest, and play in the beauty of God’s backyard.” McDowell is a ministry of the Episcopal churches in the Diocese of Alabama where all people and denominations are welcome. They do not exclude but rather open their doors and hearts to everyone. In keeping with the mission, the camp strives to exist off the grid as much as possible–using the natural resources of the land, sun and earth–it is becoming a modern-day primitive adventure simultaneously offering very modern amenities and comforts. With 834 beds, the McDowell Camp and Conference Center (Camp McDowell) is now the largest Episcopal camp and conference center in the United States. It is an environment flourishing on the acceptance of all, inviting everyone to come together as God’s people. McDowell thrives on spreading love,

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joy and rejuvenation to thousands of visitors each year. As you pass the orchards, the outdoor labyrinth, and the eclectic gift shop offering products from many local artists and vendors, you will know you have arrived at a one-stop, allinclusive retreat center with many camp-style and hotel-style rooms and accommodations for rent to the general public. With its dance hall, three dining halls, and over five miles of hiking trails surrounded by canyons, waterfalls, lakes and streams, McDowell is one of Smith Lake’s hidden treasures. Many weekend days are witness to celebrations like weddings, birthdays, or family reunions and might involve a lot of down-time relaxing on McDowell’s popular porch rockers with sweet tea or wine in hand. At any given time throughout the year, you might find a school group learning about the importance of our eco-system while canoeing through canyons on Clear Creek. Meanwhile, the Environmental Center and another school group half a mile away on the other side of camp could be harvesting sweet potatoes and learning where their food comes from with the Farm School. You might come across a small group of preschoolers on their way to their favorite hiking trail as

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they get Kindergarten-ready while learning outside with the Magnolia Nature School. A large group of 400 or more business people might be having their annual meeting in one of the larger spaces while enjoying delicious farm-to-table meals, while a smaller group of adults could be seen on the “Adventure Course” in the throes of team-building. But back in the 1920s, McDowell as we know it today was nothing more than a dream and a vision. Originally, their summer camps were held at various locations such as Mobile Bay, Shocco Springs, and Oak Mountain State Park. It was not until 1946 that it found its permanent home in Nauvoo, Alabama nestled on the edge of Bankhead National Forest and along the shoreline of Smith Lake.

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With a “Pennies for McDowell” campaign and help from Henry and Mary Calmes from St. Mary’s Episcopal Church and Reverend Scott Eppes from Jasper, they were able to purchase an initial 160 acres for $3.75 an acre in 1946. Between1947 and 1948, with the hard work and heart of three clergy, and twelve teenage boys known as “The Workboy Crew,” the land was transformed into a camp. Everything was falling into place with the faith of a few and the hand of God. Timing was perfect as World War II ended and Camp McClellan, a military base near Anniston, was downsizing. Rev. Scott Eppes put in bids, and Camp McDowell purchased 19 buildings for $1,300. Episcopalians throughout Alabama pulled together. They disassembled, hauled and rebuilt the

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huts and barracks on the land in Winston County creating an immediate pop-up community. This included nine “six-man huts” for $15 each that were set up as cabins and several longer barracks that were transformed into bunk rooms, a chapel, a recreation hall, and an infirmary. Fun fact: the most expensive building at the time was only $150. The Workboy Crew continued through to the 1980s when it became the “Work Crew” with the addition of girls and is still an integral part of every summer session to this day. McDowell would eventually become much more than just a summer camp. It has grown over the years into its own world within our world. This includes nationally (and some internationally) known programs of the McDowell Conference

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Center, the McDowell Environmental Center, the McDowell Farm School, the Magnolia Nature School, and the Alabama Folk School. The camp runs year-round providing education, appreciation of God’s world, and an invigoration to all ages and walks of life. The McDowell Conference Center was added in 1978 and hosts many events such as business meetings, team building events, conferences, weddings, family reunions, or it can function as a getaway, an excuse to gather together and tap out of the norm and live the McDowell way–“the way the world could be.” They have venues that accommodate groups of two to 800 and include casual meet-up spaces to gorgeous chapels and impressive, comfortable conference spaces.

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In 1994, Camp McDowell Environmental Center opened, creating an outreach program to thousands of people. School groups typically come for three days and two nights where they sleep in cabins and are taught using the great outdoors as their classroom. They teach the children an appreciation and respect for the environment and about the unmanufactured gifts we have surrounding us. Kids come back with a better connection to their classmates and gratitude for our world that they are eager to share with others. Students and teachers earn credits for their time in the program. Affiliated with the Environmental Center is McDowell’s Live Animal Program, which can be experienced at camp or through the traveling outreach program. Experienced and professionally trained

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educators teach at the center where children can learn about birds, reptiles, and other native critters. Camp McDowell has also been home to The Alabama Folk School since 2007, and its goal is to preserve Alabama’s cultural heritage while bringing the community together through music and art. The Folk School is a great place to get your fix of things such as weaving, crafting, dancing, pottery, quilting, painting, fly fishing, blacksmithing, bluegrass jam sessions, and countless other activities and skills. There are classes and camps year-round for people at all skill levels, taught by master artists, welcoming everyone to participate. Pull up a drum, you will be received with open arms! In 2014, Camp McDowell opened their Farm School, which

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is a 40-acre farm-based residential educational program. This is a three-day program which can be customized to specific curriculums. Honking geese, fresh eggs, and encountering “Waldo” the infamous pig are just a few of the local perks of everyday farm life at McDowell. Students learn the process of planting, harvesting and preparing food that they serve and share together in the food hall family-style. Like the Environmental Center, in addition to being a hands-on learning experience, students and teachers earn credits for their time and participation in the program. McDowell built its newest addition, Bethany Village, in 2015. This progressive and beautifully landscaped addition to the property is a fully handicapped-accessible community

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within the camp. Everything in Bethany Village was created and designed with special needs in mind. It’s a serene place where cares can be cast aside and all can live as one–no matter their physical abilities. The dining hall, the sidewalks to and from the cabins and lodges, the trail around the lake, the pool, and even the dance hall and raised stage within the dance hall are all handicap accessible. The Magnolia Nature School for preschoolers was established in 2016 and is the first Nature School in Alabama. The school is partnered with Head Start and provides hands-on learning in an outdoor environment. That’s right, we have the first Nature School in Alabama right here on our lake! Camp McDowell offers camps, retreats, and events for

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everyone. There are educational programs, mother-daughter, father-son, family-fun and family retreats, as well as traditional summer camp, special needs camp, Folk School for adults and youth, and more. And if you know any educators in your life, make sure they know about McDowell’s Teacher Professional Development Workshops that provide AMSTI and Continuing Education Credits. AMSTI is the Alabama Math, Science, and Technology Initiative built to educate and improve math and science teaching statewide. If you are interested in finding out more about using McDowell as a venue for an upcoming event or retreat, or are interested in a tour or finding out more about any of the programs mentioned in this article, please contact the

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McDowell Camp and Conference Center, visit their website, or follow them on social media. Please note, due to liability and for the safety of campers and guests, visits must be scheduled ahead of time and visitors should check in at the McDowell Welcome Center upon entering the grounds. t McDowell Camp and Conference Center 105 Delong Road | Nauvoo, AL 35578 205-387-1806 | email: wonderful@campmcdowell.com web: campmcdowell.org All are welcome! * Reference: “Wonderful, Wonderful” a 1954 Camp Song written by Harry Pritchett, Jr.

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OUT AND ABOUT ON SMITH LAKE

THE SMITH LAKE CONNECTION WRITER JOHN DAVID PALMER

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t would probably not come as a surprise to find out that some pretty famous people own homes on Smith Lake. And considering the lake is a mere two hours away from Nashville, it is only natural more and more people from the music industry are looking to Smith to find a part-time or full-time residence. LuAnn Reid, a Nashville-based real estate consultant and former songwriter, said she has seen Music City grow exponentially in recent years, and as a result, premium real estate prices in the area have continued to escalate prompting buyers to look elsewhere for a better value. However, Smith Lake has remained somewhat of a well-kept secret. “There’s a huge population of people in Tennessee who don’t know about Smith Lake,” she said. In response to this situation, LuAnn recently partnered up with fellow real estate consultant Melissa Dodge, who was featured along with her husband, Kevin Dodge, in the previous issue of The Lakeside Life, to found the Smith Lake Connection, an organization whose mission is to connect Nashville with Smith Lake. Together, the two consultants market to agents in Nashville a more affordable alternative to Middle Tennessee. They specialize in a wide variety of properties including cabins, building lots, weekend getaways, luxury homes and vacation rentals. “I’m calling it a co-venture with Melissa to introduce Middle Tennessee to the Smith Lake Community,” LuAnn said. “I just thought the creative community really needed to know about Smith Lake. It’s a nice way to combine my two loves¬–real estate and music.” Reid is an award winning song writer and has written songs recorded by Kenney Chesney, The Kinleys, John Ford Coley and numerous others. She was formerly on staff with BMG music publishing.

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Besides matching potential clients with lakefront property, the two real estate professionals also aim to cultivate a cultural exchange between the people of Smith Lake and Nashville. For example, back in May, singer-songwriters Brice Long and Phillip White were invited to the Dodge’s lake home to perform at a barbecue party. Both musicians have written thousands of songs over the course of their successful careers, many of which for some of the biggest names in modern country music, including Blake Shelton, Chris Ledoux, Darius Rucker, George Strait, Luke Bryan, and many more talented artists. Neither of the two songwriters had ever visited Smith Lake until that night, but both men were impressed with the beautiful scenery of the location and hospitality they were shown by the hosts and dozens of guests. “This house is gorgeous, and this is the cleanest lake I’ve ever seen,” Brice said after performing with Phillip. “I’ve had a ball.” Phillip, who lives in Rogersville, Alabama, said he had heard positive things about Smith Lake and found that it lived up to its reputation. The special evening was made possible by LuAnn’s longtime friend Jill Block, a Nashville-based music artist promoter who invited the two songwriters to the Dodge home. Jill also produces the Still House Sessions at Leiper’s Fork Distillery as well as The Masters at the Mockingbird Theatre in Franklin, Tennessee. t For more information about Smith Lake Connection, visit www.smithlakeconnection.com or call Melissa Dodge locally at 205-541-3894 or LuAnn Reid if you are in Nashville at 615-596-1132. For more information about Jill Block and her productions, visit www.jillblockpresents.com.

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Safer

SMITH LAKE WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHY JOHN DAVID PALMER

Jasper-based RE/MAX real estate agents Brian GlenN and DarRen Raspino have partnered up to help make Smith Lake a safer place with reflective dock signs that display the addresS of waterfront homes. Darren said the idea had been floating around their office for a long time, but when he found that he was the only one who knew the address during a gathering of 25 people at his lake home when a guest experienced a health problem requiring a trip to the emergency room, he decided it was time to do something. In early May, Brian and Darren formed Safer Smith Lake, a project focused on producing and distributing special dock signs designed to help lake goers find their bearings on the water and assist first responders in navigating the lake. The signs are designed to be highly visible and are reflective so they can be seen at night. The coloration of the signs is aligned with what first responders are most familiar with seeing. “We think that if the address is visible from the dock, that will help give 911 operators a clear location to relay to emergency personnel,” Brian said. “Also, if the marine police, conservation officers, etcetera, are nearby, this will allow them to identify the location when they arrive, avoiding slowing down unnecessarily to look for a commotion or some kind of signal. It’s true that the 911 departments can triangulate a cell phone signal to relay to first responders, but many, if not most, areas on Smith Lake do not get clear signals from three towers to triangulate with, leaving a

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“We think that if the address is visible from the dock, that will help give 911 operators a clear location to relay to emergency personnel,” Brian said. general area for response.” He said he spoke with Marine Police who acknowledged that the signs would be very helpful from the water, especially if more people were to display them on their docks. “There are others selling signs around Smith Lake, and anything is better than not having a sign, but many are smaller or more decorative leaving less information actually relayed clearly,” Brian said. “First responders are used to seeing a green sign with white letters. It’s function over fashion.” Signs cost $38, which pays for the cost of production. They can be purchased online at www.safersmithlake.com. Safer Smith Lake has also partnered with Smith Lake Concierge who has agreed to install the signs for their existing customers free of charge and only $30 for non-customers. Brian and Darren do not make any profit from the signs. “I think it’s a great idea,” said Laura Owen of Smith Lake

Concierge, “I just hope we can get the word out to everyone. Even I get turned around at the lake sometimes.” Brian and Darren said they will have a booth for the signs at this year’s Wake Battle wakeboard tournament on July 13th at Smith Lake Park. Safer Smith Lake also maintains an active Facebook page where videos related to their sign project can be viewed. Since launching in May, the project has continued to garner positive attention. Brian said that Duskin Point Marina, Trident Marina, and Triple Creek Marina have already put up signs and banners and that several other businesses around the lake are considering supporting Safer Smith Lake. “The buzz that we’re getting from partners, perspective partners, and people online is great,” Brian said. “It’s picking up and gaining momentum. It’s getting noticed well outside Walker, Winston, and Cullman counties.” t

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WilL ReEl You In WRITER ELLEN ROBERTS PHOTOGRAPHER SCOTT ERIC DAY

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ith a creative mind, hard work ethic, and a love

of the great outdoors, Kelly Seibels created a company that is helping turn lake houses into high-style hangouts inviting locals, weekenders, fisherman, and refined wine sippers together for sunsets and sleepovers. The original idea for Seibels Catalog and Co. and later Seibels Camp & Cottage grew out of an appreciation for the sporting life and Kelly’s great grandfather’s adventures in the Canadian wilderness. The business was also inspired by the first-hand experience of Dr. Howard A. Kelly, who in the 1800s built Indian Point, a family camp on a remote Northern lake, and outfitted it with handmade furnishings. From generation to generation, they passed down a style and craft that has transformed throughout the years into a thriving business that would become a household name on Smith Lake and far beyond. Kelly Seibels graduated from Mountain Brook High School in 1975 and The University of Alabama in 1979. He later went on to graduate from Piedmont Technical College in North Carolina in 1981 and won the World Taxidermy

Championship in 1986. Seibels started a catalog company in 1994 known as Seibels Sportsman’s Den where he began sharing his century old family’s style by selling sporting art, gear, and furniture with a fishing camp vibe. Although successful, it was bare bones rustic until Kelly married his wife Suzy in 1997. With the two working together, the catalog morphed from a basic fishing camp, man-cave catalog to a cottage home furnishings business with a much softer touch. The success of the catalog eventually led to a retail store that now is a staple in Homewood, Alabama with a nationwide clientele. With its rustic chic vibe, Seibels Catalog and Co. is helping thousands turn their cabins and lake houses into upscale yet cozy dream homes. The style is warm and inviting, as if the rooms are screaming for you to come in, put your feet up and live in them. “People are starting to spend more time in their second homes,” Seibels said. “It’s no longer just a weekend getaway.” Over the years, Seibels has grown with the trends continuing to create, amaze, and design some of the best furnishings in the market. Combining outdoor elements with a modern day twist, Seibels sets themselves apart with their unique pieces and style.

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“We make most of our furniture and almost everything we do is custom,” said Emma Doss, Seibels’ In-House Decorator. “As the lakehouse industry changes, we have to keep up. We work with the client and no matter if they want upscale, or fish camp style, we give them what they want.” Seibels decorates for several showhouses and also has a successful home staging business. They also make house calls. Recently, they worked with developers Melissa and Kevin Dodge in the staging of their gorgeous home featured

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in the Spring 2019 issue of The Lakeside Life. That home is currently for sale by Melissa Dodge who is also a Smith Lake real estate agent with Arc Realty. “We are very designer friendly,” Seibels said. “They can come in and we will work with them to get what they need.” Seibels will work with your decorator or Doss can help you design, stage and create a room, or house worthy of a magazine cover. With their own craftsmen, Seibels can custom build furniture to specific tastes and scales. Dream piece from

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Pinterest? Not a problem. “We can give you exactly what you need for that special spot in your home,” Doss said. “It’s important to make your home feel beautiful and inspire you each time you step through the door.” In addition to their much loved furniture, Seibels also works with local artists creating unique lake inspired decor that adds detail and heart to your home. Lake specific gifts and accessories like Alabama Power Company maps, linens, driftwood, metal, and reclaimed wood are combined with

modern day style to create statement pieces that will surely have you hooked. “We want you to think about us when you think about the lake,” Seibels said. Although the catalog is no longer being produced, you can now find Seibels online, or you can head into their store where you can kick back, put your feet up, and experience the love, inspiration and craftsmanship firsthand. Whether you share a story with the man himself, or speak with his talented crew, Seibels will definitely reel you in. t

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DIXIE DUDS AND DECOR

"A Style For Every Story"

Apparel, Gifts, Home Decor - Antiques, Vintage, and New 300 2nd St SE | Cullman AL 35055 www.dixiedudsanddecor.com @dixiedudsanddecor @DixieDuds

Melia Mead

256-841-6444 dixiedudsanddecor@icloud.com

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#SMITHLAKEGIVES #SMITHLAKEKIDS Summer is in full swing on Smith Lake for #smithlakekids with most All young folks out of school for the summer. Several exciting events have already taken place, and others are unfolding before the close of summer in mid-August. The following pictures represent a few of the successful annual events that have already transpired. We have covered these camp-like events in past issues of the magazine, and we’ll continue to cover them in the future as new information becomes available. There are some wonderful and selfless folks on our shores who continue to tirelessly and passionately organize, sponsor and volunteer in events to benefit kids all over Alabama. Be sure to refer to some of our digital issues on our website to get a little history on these regular local events and the people involved. You’ll be glad to know how active the community is in serving youth. See individual photo captions for more information.

IN HIS WAKES A national non-profit with local chapters all over the United States that brings a faith-based God-centered ministry annually to Smith Lake, serving children from all over the Alabama area for a day of learning correlations between dayto-day life struggles and water-related concepts.

WAKE THE WORLD ALABAMA Another incredible national non-profit with local chapters in many states across the U.S. continues to grow on Smith Lake providing a day of fun for kids and guardians from Big Oak Ranch.

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WAKECAMP with DARIN SHAPIRO A wakeboard and wakesurf camp coached by the legendary Darin Shapiro that helps kids of all ages and levels of experience progress in their pursuit of wakesports on Smith Lake. The second year of fun and fellowship with riders and their families learning invaluable knowledge from one of the most sought-after coaches in the U.S. Get in early for another camp later this year or go ahead and sign up for next year before the slots fill up. Contact Scott of MasterPro Audio at 205-470-8250.

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GARDENING

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Ten Native Plants for Spring WORDS AND PHOTOGRAPHY PEGGY HILL SPECIAL THANKS TO PATRICK THOMPSON AT THE DAVIS ARBORETUM IN AUBURN

“When we’re hired to work on a lake lot, we’re usually told to remove all the plants except the mountain laurel and a few trees.” A landscaper told me that years ago, and the memory

still makes me sad. Smith Lake is blessed with some of the most beautiful native plants in the world. People pay high dollar for what grows wild in our woods. Instead of discarding the treasures we already own and replacing them with plants that don’t really belong here, why not work with what’s already been given or plant something from the following list, which was practically impossible to generate. Choosing my top-ten natives was like picking a favorite child, and unlike people who profess to love their children equally, I admit to having a favorite; but it varies depending on who’s sensational at that moment. I’m even more fickle when it comes to plants, and with Spring still fresh on my mind, I’ll focus on my top-ten Spring stars, and I’ll tell you about the others in a later article. They are listed in the order they bloom, starting in March with the red maple trees and continuing to mid-May when the mountain laurels explode in clouds of pale pink or white.

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1. Red maple (Acer rubrum) doesn’t get its name from the fall color, which can be yellow, orange or red. The name comes from the flowers and seedpods which emerge in mid-March when most of the other trees are still dormant. This easy-to-grow tree reaches 40-70 feet tall and 30-50 feet wide. It grows largest in full sun, but it’s also happy as an understory tree in lower light, where it will be a little smaller. One word of caution, their fibrous roots can damage sidewalks, driveways and other structures under their dripline.

2. Redbud (Cercis canadensis) is another small tree that grows 20-30 feet tall. The name is a bit confusing because the buds and flowers are more purplish pink than red. It is deciduous, which means it drops its leaves in Fall. The flowers appear in late March, while the branches are still otherwise bare. It will grow in full sun, where it will be a little wider than it is tall, or it will grow in part shade where it stretches toward the light and grows narrower. Plant breeders have been working with redbuds, and they have developed some stunners. ‘Rising Sun’ flaunts leaves that transition from orange to gold to green.

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‘Convey’ is a dwarf, weeping redbud that only grows 4 feet tall. ‘Ruby Falls’, ‘Merlot’ and ‘Forest Pansy’ are redbuds with purple leaves. Those are just a few of the available selections. When it comes to choosing a redbud, you have quite an assortment.

3. Red buckeye (Aesculus pavia) is a 10-15 feet tall shrub that is native from Southern Florida all the way to Northern Illinois, and no matter where you live, when it starts blooming in your area, it’s time to put out your hummingbird feeders. Some people say the hummingbirds migrate North following the wave of tubular red flowers. Planting a few buckeyes is a fantastic way to support our feathered friends. Buckeyes prefer moist locations with at least some shade, but they can take drier conditions and sunnier areas, although they may not perform as well.

4. Carolina yellow jessamine (Gelsemium sempervirens) boasts sunshine yellow, funnel-shaped flowers in March and early April. This native evergreen vine will clamor 12-20 feet along a fence, arbor, pergola or other structure. When left unsupported it functions as a short ground cover which sprawls as the stems develop new roots where they touch the soil. It will grow in light shade, but it flowers best in full sun.

5 5. Native azalea (Rhododendron) is sometimes called honeysuckle bush, to distinguish it from the more commonly used, Japanese, evergreen azalea with trumpet-shaped flowers. In contrast, our native azaleas drop their leaves in Fall. In early April, flowers resembling the Japanese honeysuckle vine burst open on leafless branches. The arching stamens remind me of a women’s eyelashes. There are yellow and orange native azaleas, but the ones I see growing wild in the woods locally are white or shades of pink and peach. They perform best in acidic, well-drained soils in filtered sunlight.

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6. Dogwood (Cornus florida) start blooming just as the redbud trees are winding down, and they usually overlap for about a week. The bright white flowers are the quintessential symbol of Spring in the South. It’s also spectacular in Fall with its burgundy leaves and clusters of bright red berries, an important food source for birds. In the wild, it grows as an understory tree in light shade. You can also grow it in full sun, but the leaves will be a little smaller, and you’ll need to give it more water. Most dogwoods have white flowers, but there are cultivars with pink or red flowers; and some cultivars flaunt variegated foliage, extra-large flowers, or an unusual growth habit. For more information on the names and attributes of different varieties, visit uky.edu/hort/flowering-dogwood.

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7. Dwarf iris (Iris verna) grows wild in several areas of my property, and each clump is a little different. Some flowers are light purple and white. Other flowers are shades of blue or purple with yellow blotches on their throats. Sometimes the yellow is ringed by a white band, and sometimes the yellow is outlined in black. Dainty, little plants grow just 4-6 inches tall. They prefer partial shade but adapt to either sunnier or shadier locations. If you can’t find dwarf iris (Iris Verna) at a store or online, crested iris (Iris cristata) is a similar native iris that is more widely available.

8. Coral bells (Heuchera) are evergreen perennials that grow in the shady woods. In Spring, tall wands

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of foamy flowers rise 1-2 feet above the leaves. This is another plant that breeders have been working with, and we have an enormous selection. Leaf color has been their primary focus, and you can find red, orange, purple, chartreuse, and silver types. Be aware that not all coral bells can handle our heat and humidity. If you are not familiar with the different varieties, it’s best to visit a local garden center for advice, or stick with ones that have Southern names, such as ‘Georgia Peach’, ‘Southern Comfort’ or ‘Alabama Sunrise’. Coral bells form clumps of plants, and they should be dug and divided every 3-4 years. They require well-drained soil, so add some finely shredded bark or other organic material to your planting area.

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9. Mapleleaf viburnum (Viburnum acerifolium) thrives in dry, shady areas where other plants struggle to live. It also grows in moist, sunny locations, so basically, you can plant it just about anywhere. In late April, it’s covered in fuzzy, white flowers. In Fall, it sports clusters of dark, pea-sized berries, and the leaves turn shades of burgundy and pink. A medium-sized shrub, it grows 4-6 feet tall and about 4 feet wide.

10. Mountain laurel (Kalmia latifolia) is one

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of our showiest natives. If you have never taken a boat

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ride the first week of May when it’s in full, glorious bloom dripping off the rocky shoreline of Smith Lake, you have missed an amazing sight. It grows to be a large shrub, usually 5-15 feet tall, rarely 30 feet, but it’s

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easily pruned to a smaller size. The glossy evergreen leaves remain attractive all year long. It grows in full sun, deep shade, and everything in between. Although, if the shade is extremely dense, it won’t flower. You may read that mountain laurel is drought tolerant, and that is true, but only after the plant has been in the ground for several years and is well established. None of my mountain laurels died during our last drought, but the ones that were never watered looked terrible. It “tolerates” drought by killing branches. To keep it looking its best, water when it’s dry, and remove dead limbs. This is one shrub that can take heavy pruning, so if it is overgrown or blocking your view, you can cut it back as short as one foot, and it will regrow and be just fine.

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The color of mountain laurel’s flower and buds differ from plant to plant. Some are pure white, most are pinkish, and a few tend towards red. Flower color on plants is sometimes like hair color on people. It varies within a given range.

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Forever Purple coral bells (Heuchera ‘Forever Purple’)

Photo courtesy of Terra Nova Nurseries

Southern Comfort coral bells

(Heuchera ‘Southern Comfort’)

Red Lightning coral bells (Heuchera ‘Red Lightning’)

Photo courtesy of Terra Nova Nurseries

The plants mentioned in this article are just a few suggestions. There are many more fabulous native plants. The books “Best Native Plants for Southern Gardens” by Gil Nelson and “Gardening with Native Plants of the South” by Sally Wasowski are brimming with recommendations. Douglas W. Tallamy’s book, “Bringing Nature Home” explains the importance of native plants and how they support the local ecosystem. Another resource is the Birmingham Botanical Gardens. They offer a series of courses on native plants, they hold an annual native plant conference, and their Kaul Wildflower Garden is a living classroom. The more you learn about native plants, the more you’ll appreciate and value them. t

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#SMITHLAKEPETS

Meet Mazie

BREED: WIREHAIRED POINTING GRIFFON HOME BASE: CRANE HILL / SULPHUR SPRINGS HUMANS: RON SCALF LAKE PASTIME: SWIM FOR HOURS ON END OFF THE DOCK FAVORITE LAKE TREAT: MILK BONES, MORE MILK BONES AND MILK BONES

Meet Leia

Meet Luke

BREED: LAB/HUSKY MIX HOME BASE: CROOKED CREEK ON SMITH LAKE, AL HUMAN: CARL & JENNY BECKMAN LAKE PASTIME: SUN BATHING ON THE DECK OR BOAT FAVORITE LAKE TREAT: THE DOG TREATS AT ROCK CREEK MARINA

BREED: LAB/HUSKY MIX HOME BASE: CROOKED CREEK ON SMITH LAKE, AL HUMANS: CARL & JENNY BECKMAN LAKE PASTIME: BOAT RIDES WITH HIS HUMANS FAVORITE LAKE TREAT: THE DOG TREATS AT ROCK CREEK MARINA

(sister to Luke)

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(brother to Leia)

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Meet Otis

BREED: GERMAN SHORT-HAIRED POINTER HOME BASE: MEMPHIS AND KNOXVILLE, TENNESSEE, AND SILVEROCK COVE ON LEWIS SMITH LAKE HUMANS: THE MCBRIDE FAMILY (BUT ESPECIALLY WILLIAM) LAKE PASTIME: CHASING BUTTERFLIES, FETCHING STICKS, CHILLING ON THE BOAT, RIDING IN THE BOAT WITH HIS NOSE IN THE AIR, JUMPING IN THE WATER WHEN WILLIAM DOES, AND STROLLING ON THE BOARDWALK AND GROUNDS

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ADVERTISER INDEX ARC Realty ........................................................................................... 23 Arley Women’s Club ........................................................................... 92

Justin Dyar | Smith Lake Alabama Homes & Land | Lake Homes Realty .............................................. 31

Beckman, Rob (Beckman Appraisals) ............................................. 71

JWB Photography ............................................................................... 99

Bernard Blues & BBQ | St. Bernard Prep. School ........................ 21

Kenny Pipe ............................................................................................ 17

Birmingham Concrete Design .......................................................... 71

Lakeside Pharmacy ............................................................................. 23

Brickyard Meats .................................................................................. 79

Lakeside Sports & Recreation........................................................... 83

Brothers on Smith Lake ..................................................................... 79

MasterPro Audio ...............................................................................101

Buettner Bros. Lumber Company, Inc. ........................................... 69

MasterPro Audio | Go Surf Assist ................................................... 53

Bugs Bite Mosquito Authority .......................................................... 81

Mustard Seed Nursery ....................................................................... 99

Bully Sauce............................................................................................ 93

Nelems Marine .................................................................................... 65

Cabinet Creations by Joe ................................................................... 31

Pat’s Archery & Outdoors ................................................................. 65

Campbell’s Cleaning Your Way, LLC .............................................. 93

ReMax - Darren Raspino ................................................................... 77

Chick fil A at Cullman, AL ................................................................ 93

Renasant Bank ..................................................................................... 81

Chris Grillis (Chris Grillis Photography) ....................................... 19

Russell Marine - Smith Lake ............................................................. 55

Citizens Bank ....................................................................................... 21

SARDIS ................................................................................................. 75

City of Cullman (CWAC) .................................................................. 53

Scott Eric Day ...................................................................................... 77

Ciy of Cullman (Cross Creek Golf Course) ................................... 95

Seibels Cottage..................................................................................... 85

Comptons Veterinary Hospital ........................................................ 67 Cornerstone Beverage, Inc. ............................................................... 65

Smith Lake Flea Market & Vintage Mall (dba Blu Cat Creative) ........................................................................ 71

Cornerstone Construction ............................................................. IBC

Smith Lake Rentals and Sales ........................................................... 83

Cruise Planners.................................................................................... 87

Southern Accents Architectural Antiques .................................... 27

Cullman Furniture Market ................................................................ 63

SUI - Dish Network ............................................................................ 87

Cullman Savings Bank........................................................................ 47

Target Pest Control ............................................................................. 99

Culpepper Real Estate ........................................................................ 45

Time Tested Countertops .................................................................. 83

Dixie Duds and Décor ........................................................................ 93

Timeless Treasures.............................................................................. 21

Duskin Point Marina .........................................................................BC

The Lakeside Life................................................................................... 3

Elite Boat & RV Storage ..................................................................... 69

Tow Boat US | Smith Lake ................................................................ 59

Flotation Systems ................................................................................ 51

Townhouse Galleries .......................................................................... 47

Free State Boat Docks .......................................................................... 8

Trent Taylor .......................................................................................... 39

Gable Beach Rentals .........................................................................101

Valley Heating & Cooling .................................................................... 4

Happy Tails Groom & Board ..........................................................103

Vincent Furniture ................................................................................ 27

Harbins .................................................................................................. 75

Vintage West Interiors ....................................................................... 23

High Point Furniture .......................................................................... 63

Werner’s Trading Company .............................................................. 69

Hydrohoist of Alabama ........................................................................ 1

White Willow ....................................................................................... 31

Jeff Roberts | MavenCross Wealth Advisors ...............................IFC

Whitlock’s General Store and Café.................................................. 81

Joseph Carter Realty ........................................................................... 17 The Lakeside Life magazine offers many different advertising packages. Please do not hesitate to call us to discuss an option that will fit your marketing needs. You may call us any time at 205-470-8250 or email us at thelakesidelife@gmail.com. We are honored to have you consider us in your marketing plan, and we look forward to working with you! We are grateful for our advertisers, and we believe in going the extra mile on your behalf, and for the good of the lake lifestyle community. See you lakeside!

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Profile for The Lakeside Life

The Lakeside Life - Lewis Smith Lake - Summer Issue - 2019-QTR2  

The Lakeside Life - A Lake Living Lifestyle Magazine - featuring gorgeous Lewis Smith Lake in North Alabama.

The Lakeside Life - Lewis Smith Lake - Summer Issue - 2019-QTR2  

The Lakeside Life - A Lake Living Lifestyle Magazine - featuring gorgeous Lewis Smith Lake in North Alabama.

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