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COMPREHENSIVE INSTITUTIONAL PLAN 2017-2020


2 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020


TABLE OF CONTENTS Executive Summary

4

Accountability Statement

5

Institutional Context

6

Consultation Process

8

Goals, Priority Initiatives, and Expected Outcomes

9

Appendix A: Financial and Budget Information

13

Appendix B: Enrolment Plan and Proposed Programming Changes

18

Appendix C: Research, Applied Research, and Scholarly Activities

26

Appendix D: Community Outreach and Underrepresented Learners

30

Appendix E: Internationalization

33

Appendix F: Capital Plan

35

Appendix G: Information Technology

39

Appendix H: Environmental Scan

41

Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 3


EXECUTIVE SUMMARY As Alberta post-secondary institutions continue to face fiscal challenges, Lakeland College is solidly building on its strengths, addressing its weaknesses, opening up to new opportunities, and meeting external challenges. This 2017-20 Comprehensive Institutional Plan (CIP) captures many of the exciting developments at Lakeland as it strives to inspire learner success, foster relevant programming and research, and enhance connectivity and sustainability. Focusing on the student and exhibiting staff commitment establish the foundation for Lakeland to deal with both internal and external challenges. There is a need to address the current state of infrastructure at Lakeland as well as a desire to position technology for future growth. External opportunities for growth and engagement can be found in the telling of the Lakeland College story and partnering with industry. Lakeland is also proactively facing the challenge of legislative changes.

Lakeland’s strategic plan centres around four institutional goals:

Learner Success

Connectivity

• Increase student-led learning

• Increase sustainable resources and support student success through fundraising and external partnerships

• Maximize student engagement • Enhance supports and services for learners and faculty • Indigenize Lakeland College

Relevant Programming and Research • Ensure programs are the highest possible quality • Align programs with the labour market • Build learner pathways • Expand research capacity

• Raise Lakeland’s profile as an institution of excellence that provides program pathways for all learners

Sustainability • Modernize the learning environment to better meet student learning needs • Optimize the use of resources to support a stable learning environment • Empower staff to excel to enable excellence in teaching and learning for Lakeland learners

Lakeland College is presenting a balanced budget for 2017/18. Other than specific resource requests for information technology and capital expenditures, all current goals will be met by utilizing current resources or through cost-recovery initiatives. Lakeland College strives to ensure it can adapt to the current economic environment in a way that still enables achievement of Lakeland’s key strategies and goals as well as alignment to the Government of Alberta and the Ministry of Advanced Education’s key priorities.

4 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020


ACCOUNTABILITY STATEMENT This Comprehensive Institutional Plan was prepared under the Board’s direction in accordance with legislation and associated ministerial guidelines, and in consideration of all policy decisions and material, economic, or fiscal implication of which the Board was aware.

Darrel Howell Chair, Board of Governors Lakeland College

Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 5


INSTITUTIONAL CONTEXT Mandate Statement Established under the Post-secondary Learning Act (PSLA), the Board manages and operates the post-secondary institution within its approved mandate [PSLA Section 60(1)(a)]. Lakeland College is a public, board-governed college operating as a Comprehensive Community Institution under the authority of the PSLA. Established in 1913, Lakeland College has campuses in Vermilion and Lloydminster. Lakeland College awards certificates, diplomas, and applied degrees. The College also offers baccalaureate degree programs in collaboration with degree-granting institutions. Complementing the economic strengths of Alberta, Lakeland College’s programming seeks to meet the needs of learners, communities, business, and industry in its service region. Programming includes agricultural and environmental sciences, apprenticeship and industry training, energy, fire and emergency services training, wellness and human services, business, and university transfer. The College also designs and delivers programs to meet specific learner, community, and industry needs through continuing education and corporate training. Lakeland College promotes innovation by conducting applied research activities that are relevant to its program areas, complement teaching and learning, and advance innovation-based rural community economic development. The focus of applied research is primarily in agricultural sciences and energy and environmental sciences. Initiatives are geared towards supporting Alberta’s future economy by helping industry partners capitalize on new opportunities and find solutions to current challenges. Lakeland College’s commitment to the collaborative principles of Campus Alberta is demonstrated through partnerships and transfer agreements within the post-secondary system that strengthen its programming and service capacity while improving efficiencies. Lakeland College works with school jurisdictions to host career and technology studies courses and support learner pathways into post-secondary such as providing dual credit programming so students can earn high school and college credits at the same time. Using different instructional delivery methods including face-to-face, blended, and distance learning, Lakeland College is able to maximize learner access to high-quality and affordable lifelong learning opportunities. To inspire learner success, Lakeland College provides a learning and teaching commons that creates personalized learning pathways and supports instructional excellence. Students develop competencies in different learning methods and technologies, so they are prepared for lifelong learning. International projects, practicum experiences, and study abroad opportunities, combined with increased international student enrolment at the College’s campuses, help prepare students for participation in an interconnected world. To enhance students’ college experience, Lakeland College offers a full range of services including academic advising, athletics, cafeterias, clubs, financial aid, health, learning strategies and support, recreation, residence, student centres, student employment, and wellness services. College has numerous specialized facilities such as multiple music studios, two community theatres, two recreation centres, a swimming pool, and an indoor riding arena that are often the site of community events and activities and help support the recreational, cultural, fitness, and conferencing needs of the region it serves. Approved by the Board of Governors March 25, 2015 Approved by the Minister, Innovation and Advanced Education June 24, 2015

6 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020


VISION Transforming the future through innovative learning.

MISSION To inspire lifelong learning and leadership through experience, excellence, and innovation.

VALUES Learner Success, Integrity, Respect, Community, Excellence, Innovation

Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 7


CONSULTATION PROCESS Lakeland College supports both an internal and external consultation process at yearly meetings with students, academics, support staff, board members, and the community. In addition to providing feedback on the consultation process, these key stakeholders are engaged in long-term planning for Lakeland. Our competitive edge in recruitment and retention is based on understanding future programming and student needs. Lakeland’s external consultations, in both Alberta and Saskatchewan, help identify learner needs along with creative, collaborative measures to meet these needs. Such stakeholders include regional access advisory committees, community adult learning councils, business and industry, research organizations, regional high schools, other post-secondary institutions, government departments, and advisory committees. Lakeland is committed to open communication with Advanced Education to ensure that all provincial expectations are met while still addressing access and quality needs for our learners. Lakeland College’s Accountability Systems Committee stewards the CIP through information gathering and reviewing processes. Draft materials are regularly reviewed by Lakeland’s leadership team as well as relevant constituent departments: research, marketing, finance, registrar, deans, and communities. Following Board approval, the final CIP will be shared with the larger College community, and subsequent feedback will be built into future iterations of the plan.

8 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020


GOALS, PRIORITY INITIATIVES, AND EXPECTED OUTCOMES Institutional Goal 1 – Learner Success Students are supported and engaged with their learning and, as a result, are better prepared for the labour market or further learning.

Priority Initiatives

Expected Completion Date

P1

Increase Student-Led Learning

June 2018, 2019, 2020

P2

Maximize Student Engagement

June 2018, 2019, 2020

P3

Enhance Supports and Services for Learners and Faculty

June 2018, 2019, 2020

P4

Indigenize Lakeland College

June 2018, 2019, 2020

Expected Outcomes

Expected Completion Date

EO1

Creation of authentic learning environments that strike the right balance between discipline-specific competencies and essential skills

June 2019

EO2

Interaction with faculty providing an environment that promotes belongingness

June 2018

EO3

Provision of timely, accessible, and targeted supports to underrepresented and disadvantaged learners to ensure their success

June 2018, 2019, 2020

Responsive and accommodating interactions between staff/faculty and students

June 2018, 2019, 2020

College as a community leader in reconciliation initiatives that support Indigenous-centred services and honour cultural traditions

June 2018

EO4

Performance Measures

Expected Completion Date

PM1

June 2018

At least 85% of students are confident they have the necessary skills to take into the workforce Exceed CCSSE benchmark and be within the top 10% of performing colleges in providing an active and collaborative learning environment

PM2

PM3

PM4

June 2020

Exceed CCSSE benchmark and be within the top 10% of performing colleges in ensuring student-faculty interaction

June 2020

At least 50% of the student base is involved in some kind of extracurricular activity

June 2019, 2020

Exceed CCSSE benchmark and be within the top 10% of performing colleges in ensuring that appropriate student supports are in place

June 2020

Meet a 95% service level of requests for student support

June 2018

Indigenous-centred services support learner success

June 2018

Lakeland is a community leader in reconciliation initiatives

June 2018, 2019, 2020

Cultural traditions of Indigenous people are honoured at formal events and ceremonies

June 2018, 2019, 2020

Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 9


Institutional Goal 2 – Relevant Programming and Research Students have access to training that strongly aligns with labour market needs. Research efforts support economic innovation.

Priority Initiatives

Expected Completion Date

P1

Ensure Programs are the Highest Possible Quality

June 2018, 2019, 2020

P2

Align Programs with the Labour Market

June 2018, 2019, 2020

P3

Build Learner Pathways

June 2018, 2019, 2020

P4

Expand Research Capacity

June 2018, 2019, 2020

Expected Outcomes

Expected Completion Date

EO1

Evaluation of program learning outcomes and curriculum for quality and clarity

June 2018

Culture of instructional development and excellence with fully engaged academic staff utilizing modern equipment and facilities

June 2018

Lakeland as employer of choice for graduate hires and corporate training

June 2019

Established and active advisory committees

June 2018

New and emerging programs fill regional and provincial gaps

June 2018, 2019, 2020

Availability of transfer framework and degree-completion options (in partnership with degree-granting institutions) for learners

June 2018, 2019, 2020

Increase in learner retention and applicant conversion

June 2020

Improvement of learner access in transitional programming

June 2018

Increased research capacity in crop research, livestock research, and energy and environmental research

June 2018

Growth fostered in regional economic development

June 2018, 2019, 2020

EO2

EO3

EO4

Performance Measures

Expected Completion Date

PM1

At least 92% of graduates are satisfied with the quality of education received

June 2018, 2019, 2020

Exceed CCSSE benchmark and be within the top 10% of performing colleges in providing programming that has an academic challenge

June 2019

At least 77% of graduates are satisfied that facilities, equipment, and materials are up to date (About To Graduate Survey)

June 2018, 2019, 2020

At least 85% of graduates have an opportunity to apply knowledge to industry (About To Graduate Survey)

June 2018, 2019, 2020

Graduate employment rate exceeds 85%

June 2018, 2019, 2020

Over 85% of graduates feel the benefits of their program outweigh the financial cost

June 2018, 2019, 2020

PM2

100% of programs hold advisory committee meetings annually

June 2018, 2019, 2020

PM3

Grow inventory of transfer agreements by 5% per year

June 2018, 2019, 2020

PM4

Increase dollars to support research

June 2018, 2019, 2020

10 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020


Institutional Goal 3 – Connectivity Lakeland ensures that all resources are in place to engage community partners in educational pursuits and to provide information to prospective, current, and past students.

Priority Initiatives

Expected Completion Date

P1

Increase Sustainable Resources and Support Student Success through Fundraising and External Partnerships

June 2018, 2019, 2020

P2

Raise Lakeland’s Profile as an Institution of Excellence that provides Program Pathways for all Learners

June 2018, 2019, 2020

Expected Outcomes

Expected Completion Date

EO1

Increase in annual fundraising efforts to provide additional support to awards, scholarships, bursaries, student success, and operational needs

June 2018

Successful achievement of fundraising targets through the Leading. Learning. The Lakeland Campaign. to complete educational facilities and provide supports for student leadership and success

June 2020

Increase in alumni engagement to support student mentorship, student outreach, and school outreach with alumni partners in industry

June 2019, 2020

Successful municipal partnerships to ensure appropriate land and supports to maximize potential growth opportunities for student learning

June 2020

Clear information, in all modalities, provided to students and parents about programs, program pathways, skill development, and job placement

June 2018

EO2

Performance Measures

Expected Completion Date

PM1

$1.3 million in student awards

June 2018, 2019, 2020

$5 million of the $10 million fundraising goal has been raised

June 2018

Brand recognition survey completed

June 2018

Economic impact survey completed

September 2017

PM2

Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 11


Institutional Goal 4 – Sustainability Lakeland ensures that all resources (staff, budget, and infrastructure) are focused on providing a stable and meaningful learning experience for students.

Priority Initiatives

Expected Completion Date

P1

Modernize the Learning Environment to Better Meet Student Learning Needs

June 2018, 2019, 2020

P2

Optimize the Use of Resources to Support a Stable Learning Environment

June 2018, 2019, 2020

P3

Empower Staff to Excel to Enable Excellence in Teaching and Learning for Lakeland Learners

June 2018, 2019, 2020

Expected Outcomes

Expected Completion Date

EO1

Creation of a new Dairy Learning Centre that meets the needs of learners and the dairy industry in Western Canada

September 2017

Creation of a new Animal Health Clinic through renovation and expansion of an underutilized building

April 2018

Repair of Trades Centre roof to ensure the continued delivery of apprenticeship programming within a safe environment

June 2018, 2020

Initiation of plans for renovation and expansion of the Equine Centre

June 2018

EO2

Refresh of College IT infrastructure to address end-of-life system issues, cyber security, and changing learner needs

June 2019, 2020

EO3

Support and recognition of staff for provision of services to learners and quality work

March 2018, 2019, 2020

Performance Measures

Expected Completion Date

PM1

100% of projects completed on time and on budget

June 2018, 2019, 2020

PM2

Business continuity and risk frameworks are implemented to ensure the stability and safety of services for staff and students

June 2019, 2020

The statement of operations are balanced at fiscal year-end

June 2018, 2019, 2020

Increase 25 base points on engagement survey by end of three years

June 2020

PM3

12 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020


APPENDIX A: Financial and Budget Information Overview Lakeland College is committed to using College resources to support the achievement of its mandate from the Government of Alberta. Achieving excellence in service delivery, promoting accessibility, affordability, and ensuring sustainability in the post-secondary educational sector are at the core of Lakeland’s financial and strategic planning processes. Lakeland has a strong record of fiscal prudence and will continue to maintain this reputation. Maintaining programming and advancing College goals, while at the same time dealing with uncertainty in future funding models, is a significant challenge. Lakeland is currently predicting a balanced budget during this period through a combination of expense reduction and modest revenue generation. Lakeland’s leadership team has been closely involved in identifying sustainable expense reductions. Building a collaborative approach to strong financial management is core to the College’s ability to deliver a balanced budget. Schools and departments have built and reviewed their budgets with the support of the financial services department. In addition, a cautious but realistic approach, based on past performance, has been used in projections of enrolment and revenue increases. Lakeland College is actively engaged with other postsecondary institutions in forums such as AAHEIT and is seeking opportunities to share best practices and resources to realize efficiencies in the post-secondary sector. Lakeland’s primary sources of revenue, at 80% of all College revenues, continue to be government grants, tuition, and fees.

Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 13


Budget Assumptions All financial projections are based upon funding conditions known at the time of writing. This plan, as well as the following two years of forecasting ending in 2020, is based on the following assumptions:

Revenues:

Expenses:

• The Campus Alberta Grant will increase by 2% in each year of this plan.

• Salaries and benefits represent the most significant expense to the College and also serve as one of the largest uncertainties in preparing budget projections. The collective agreement with the Lakeland College Faculty Association expires on June 30, 2018; the salary rates for 2017/18 have not been agreed upon and will be subject to a salary reopener. As a result, the cost of any settlement remains uncertain. The AUPE collective agreement expires on June 30, 2017, and the cost of any settlement remains uncertain. The Administrative, Executive and portions of the Academic Support Group salaries are frozen until April 2018.

• Apprenticeship seats will be reduced in 2017/18 by 270 seats and will remain stable for the remainder of the plan. • Tuition fees will remain frozen at 2014/15 levels through 2017/18 and 2018/19 with a forecasted increase of 2% in 2019/20. Tuition increases will be made in accordance with both legislation and government policy. The completion of the review of the Post-Secondary Learning Act and the institutional funding model will provide clarity on this issue. • Lakeland is expecting to see a sustained modest growth in international students; international students will be charged two-and-a-half or three times the rate of domestic student tuition fees. • Lakeland currently has the lowest mandatory fees in the province. When the review of the institutional funding model is complete, the hope is to implement a mandatory fee schedule that is reflective of what other Alberta institutions are using. • Lakeland is anticipating fairly flat enrolment levels during the life of this plan; some programs such as Heavy Oil Power Engineering are seeing a reduction in applications as a result of the economic downturn although this is offset by an increase in growth in a number of other programs (e.g. University Transfer). • Investment income will remain stable. Growth was expected; however, with the continued uncertainty of the economic climate in Canada, it is unclear what the long-term impact of this will be on the Canadian economy and on the College’s investment. • Residence occupancy rates decreased considerably in 2015/16 and 2016/17. As a result, anticipated revenue is significantly reduced. This is attributed to the economic downtown that has resulted in more housing options being available to students. As a result, the College is not contemplating increases to residence rates for the duration of this plan. • Lakeland will continue to seek education related revenue generating opportunities to support a stable operating environment.

14 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020

• Lakeland’s focus on continued expense reduction, process improvement, and modernization will continue to ensure that the College develops and maintains its financial sustainability.


Statement of Expected Revenues and Expenses: Lakeland College Operating Budget Operating Budget

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

Government of Alberta grants Federal and other government grants Tuition & other fees Sales of services and products Donations Investment income

40,290,504 2,599,272 14,856,340 10,863,009 429,450 1,000,000

40,953,574 2,599,272 14,856,340 10,958,200 429,450 1,000,000

41,629,904 2,599,272 15,130,973 11,055,294 429,450 1,000,000

TOTAL revenue (by source)

70,038,575

70,796,835

71,844,893

Salary and benefits Amortization Materials, supplies and services Facility costs Utilities Scholarship expense

42,545,073 6,365,407 14,521,124 3,245,461 2,663,913 697,597

43,354,884 6,365,407 14,418,113 3,296,920 2,663,913 697,597

44,180,892 6,365,407 14,587,676 3,349,408 2,663,913 697,597

TOTAL expenses (by object)

70,038,575

70,796,835

71,844,893

Instruction and training Academic and student support Facility operations and maintenance Institutional support Ancillary operations Sponsored research

31,051,418 12,486,112 9,719,772 10,731,656 5,023,918 1,025,700

31,377,152 12,644,478 10,379,318 11,043,070 4,313,007 1,039,810

31,984,034 12,806,012 10,474,240 11,179,511 4,346,894 1,054,202

TOTAL expenses (by function)

70,038,575

70,796,835

71,844,893

Revenue (by source)

Expenses (by object)

Expenses (by function)

Excess (or deficiency) of revenue over expenses total

Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 15


Revenues by Source Government of Alberta grants 57.53%

Federal and other government grants 3.71%

Student tuition and fees 21.21%

Sales of services and products 15.51%

Donations and other grants 0.61%

Investment income 1.43%

Expenses by Object

Salary and benefits 60.75%

Amortization 9.09%

Materials, supplies and services 20.73%

Facility costs 4.63%

Utilities 3.80%

Scholarship expense 1%

Expenses by Function Instruction and training 44.33%

Academic and student support 17.83%

Facility operations and maintenance 13.88%

Institutional support 15.32%

Ancillary operations 7.17%

Sponsored research 1.46% 16 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020


Budgeted Statement of Cash Flows for the Year Ending June 30, 2018 Cash Flows

2017/18

Operating transactions —

Annual surplus Add (deduct) non-cash items: Amortization of tangible capital assets Expended capital recognized as revenue Total non-cash items

6,365,407 (3,636,468) 2,728,939

Cash provided by operating transactions

2,728,939

Capital transactions Acquisition of tangible capital assets

(1,800,000)

Cash applied to capital transactions

(1,800,000)

Investing transactions Purchases of investments Proceeds on sale of portfolio investments

1,000,000 (1,000,000)

Cash provided by (applied to) investing transactions

Financing transactions Debt - repayment

(120,000)

Cash provided by (applied to) financing cash transactions

(120,000)

809,939

Increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents

Tuition and Mandatory Fees Lakeland College’s tuition fees are managed within the provincial tuition fee policy. As per this regulation, tuition and mandatory fees will not increase for 2017/18.

Fees Tuition fees Fee increases

2016/17

2017/18

2018/19

2019/20

$4,500

$4,500

$4,500

$4,500

0%

0%

0%

0%

Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 17


APPENDIX B: Enrolment Plan and Proposed Programming Changes Overview of Programming Lakeland College’s credit and non-credit programming is divided between two primary campuses through the following academic units: • Agricultural Sciences

• Health, Wellness and University Transfer

• Business and Continuing Education

• Human Services

• Emergency Training Centre

• Trades and Technology

• Energy and Environmental Sciences During the 2016/17 academic year, Lakeland offered 56 FLE-counting programs/specializations: • 20 diploma programs/specializations

• 9 apprenticeship programs

• 6 credit continuing education programs

• 2 applied degree programs

• 18 certificate programs

• Several university transfer pathways

In addition to its credit-programming, Lakeland offers a wide variety of continuing education programs that meet the training needs of employers within the region and beyond. Many of these programs are delivered with the support of and/or in partnership with employers: • 3rd and 4th Class Power Engineering

• Truck Driver Training

• Well Site Supervisor

• Fire and Emergency Services Training

• Fired Process Heater Operator

• Pesticide Applicator Training

• Production Field Operator

• Artificial Nail Technology

Lakeland College and Campus Alberta Lakeland College contributes significantly to the overall programming diversity in Campus Alberta, and every effort is made to focus on programming that offers something unique to learners. Lakeland College has several niche programs: • Firefighter (NFPA 1001)

• Real Estate Appraisal and Assessment

• Emergency Services Technology

• Street Rod Technologies

• Sign Language Interpretation

• Human Services programming in French (offered online throughout Alberta)

• American Sign Language and Deaf Culture Studies

18 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020


Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 19


Institutional Programming Strengths Agribusiness and Commodity Agriculture Lakeland College has been specializing in agricultural training for over 100 years, and the School of Agricultural Sciences continues to be a thriving, innovative, and core part of the institution. Lakeland’s focus is on agribusiness and commercial agriculture production (crop and livestock) and features Canada’s only student-managed farming operation (powered by New Holland). Students, with faculty guidance, make all business and operational decisions relating to the various business units that are part of the farm including crop production units on over 2,000 acres of land, beef and purebred cattle herds, a dairy unit, and a sheep production unit. New to the farm in 2016/17 was a dedicated commercial beef research herd and the establishment of a student-led livestock research team. There is a similar team on the crop technology side, and they are fully involved in College crop research activities. A newly established student-managed Stewardship and Sustainability team is also focusing on green energy opportunities and sustainability on the farm. Plans are well underway for comprehensive farm revitalization, and construction has begun on two important capital projects: the new Dairy Learning Centre and the Animal Health Clinic. Lakeland has also recently completed a significant renovation and expansion to the G.N. Sweet Livestock Research Facility. All of these facilities provide significant hands-on learning opportunities for students and will play a central role in the College’s agricultural programming for many years to come. Enrolment in agriculture has grown considerably at Lakeland College with an increase of about 50% over the last five years. These capital projects, coupled with the increase to enrolment, have positioned Lakeland as a national and provincial leader for training in commercial agriculture at the diploma and certificate level, and the Agricultural Sciences programs have received national and international recognition for their innovative student-led teaching and learning models. As enrolments have increased, so has student interest and demand for an applied degree in agriculture. The School of Agricultural Sciences will be developing such an applied degree to better serve students and industry capacity for higher-level jobs. In addition, the School of Agricultural Sciences also recognizes the need for enhanced training in range and forage management as well as “smart agriculture.” Enhanced range and forage management programming would combine livestock production and management with grasslands and forage management with a deeper focus on sustainability, environmental stewardship, wetlands management, and biodiversity. Smart agriculture is embedded within the current 20 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020

agriculture curriculum as students already develop skills in soil and yield mapping, fertilizer technology application, weather data collection, monitoring and detection of reproduction in farm animals, health records and identification systems, and other crop and livestock precision farming topics. As the industry evolves technologically, there is increasing demand for expertise and programming that combines production management and technology skills to serve “smart agriculture” at the industry level.

Energy and Environmental Sciences Lakeland is located in the heart of Alberta’s heavy oil industry and has been providing heavy oil and power engineering training for over 35 years. With the construction of the new Energy Centre, which officially opened in the summer of 2015, Lakeland has a state-of-the-art power engineering training facility in Alberta and one of the most advanced training facilities in the world. Lakeland’s flagship programs in this area are Heavy Oil Operations Technician (HOOT) and Heavy Oil Power Engineering (HOPE), but we also provide programming in such areas as 3rd and 4th Class Power Engineering, Gas Process Operator, Well Site Supervisor, Petroleum Management, and Introduction to Heavy Oil and Gas. Thanks to critical targeted enrolment funding, enrolment in Lakeland’s energy programming has more than doubled into the 2016/17 academic year although it is expected that enrolments will decrease into the 2017/18 academic year as a result of the economic downturn. While Lakeland’s energy department provides training in the energy production sector, the College’s environmental sciences department trains students in the fields of land reclamation and restoration, fish and wildlife conservation, and environmental monitoring. The recently created School of Energy and Environmental Sciences is providing some of Alberta’s largest energy sector employers with the trained labour force they need to cover the full spectrum of energy production and environmental operations contributing to Alberta’s economy, society, and entrepreneurial culture and environment. Lakeland’s energy and environmental sciences programs have received provincial and national accreditation for their quality programming and applied research. Bachelor of Applied Science: Environmental Management continues to be a flagship program that is well supported by industry and is regularly oversubscribed. Environmental sciences has also been able to capitalize on Lakeland’s large land holdings and has developed oil and gas industrial infrastructure on campus that students are using to study environmental impacts and reclamation/ restoration methodologies.


Transitioning Learners Lakeland has prioritized learner transitions in recent years. The College’s focus is two-fold: 1) Transitioning learners into post-secondary programs 2) Transitioning learners from the College to other postsecondary partners for further learning Lakeland College has been a strong supporter of the dual credit initiative and has had considerable success engaging high school students in dual credit programming. This has become an important transition strategy for increasing postsecondary participation rates for students involved. The successful Academic Prep program, which provides students with free access to learning modules in math, chemistry, English, and other prerequisite subjects whenever prerequisites are barriers to admission in a post-secondary program, has allowed students who may not have met entrance requirements the opportunity to still participate in post-secondary learning. Lakeland is also expecting to offer some form of academic upgrading beginning in the 2017/18 academic year. In addition, Lakeland College has been piloting some transition programming that targets disadvantaged or underrepresented learner groups. For example, the Introduction to Heavy Oil and Gas program has been offered on the Onion Lake Cree Nation. Students successful in this bridge program are admitted into Lakeland’s Heavy Oil Operations Technician program. This program has been extremely successful, and the College will continue to explore opportunities to introduce more of these kinds of programs. Transfer opportunities with partner universities remain an important objective for the College. The majority of Lakeland’s diploma programs have block transfer agreements, and a major focus for the life of this plan will be to expand those transfer opportunities for other programs and to additional partner institutions across Alberta.

Program Planning Suspensions and Terminations Lakeland College currently has the following programs under suspension: • Emergency Medical Technologist - Paramedic • Emergency Medical Technician • Transitional Vocational

Lakeland still considers all of these suspended programs to be relevant and in-demand. The challenge to activating and offering them again relates primarily to funding availability. The College is exploring options that may allow programs to be reactivated from this list, and until those possibilities have been exhausted, there is reluctance to move ahead with formal termination. Lakeland uses an evidence-based approach when making decisions about program suspension and termination. Part of this approach consists of a rigorous program review process. All programs are reviewed annually, and a subset of programs is reviewed comprehensively once every five to six years. These program reviews are focused on currency and relevancy and are designed to improve program quality. This process also ensures that training programs are responsive to the emerging needs of employers, and to that end, program advisory committees are included in these reviews. In addition, the performance of each program is assessed against a set of targets using a key performance indicator model. Student demand, enrolment levels, completion rates, student satisfaction, employment rates, and financial viability are scored against minimum performance standards or targets for each program offered at the College. Programs that are consistently underachieving will be placed on probation for a defined length of time and will be required to demonstrate some level of improvement. Programs that are able to reach their improvement targets, and eventually reach and exceed the minimum performance standards, will come off of probation. If program performance continues to deteriorate, or if the required improvements are not realized within the given time frame, the program will be at risk of suspension. The goal is to have all College programs meeting and exceeding performance targets in these areas. The most recent analysis of 47 of Lakeland’s certificate, diploma, and applied degree programs resulted in 28 of these programs classified as “green light” meaning that they were meeting performance targets for all criteria; 16 programs scored “yellow” meaning that they were below target for at least one performance measure. “Yellow” programs will be monitored closely for improvement in areas that are below expected targets. Three programs scored “red” of which two are undergoing a comprehensive program evaluation in 2016/17, while the third is being considered for suspension heading into the 2017/18 academic year.

• Agro-Environmental Technology • Event Management • Practical Nursing Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 21


New Programming Opportunities New program development at Lakeland College is designed to meet the needs of students, the labour market, and to provide diversity to Campus Alberta programming options. All new program proposals must be supported by significant, documented evidence of student and industry demand, linkages to governmental priorities, and long-term financial sustainability. Pending resource availability, Lakeland is exploring the following new programming opportunities:

Program Proposal

Brief Description

Delivery Method

Academic Year

Hairstyling

One-year certificate

Full-time, face-to-face, on-campus

2017/18

Administrative Professional

One-year certificate (formerly called Office Administration)

Blended delivery with full- and parttime options

2017/18

2nd Class Power Engineering

One-year certificate

Full-time, face-to-face, on-campus

2017/18

Academic Upgrading

Target courses that students need to meet entrance requirements

Blended delivery, part-time

2017/18

University Transfer Courses

Individual courses to expand transfer options for students wanting two years of study at Lakeland (science/ nursing)

On-campus, mostly full-time students

2017/18

Animal Assisted Interventions

One-year certificate for people working with animals in mental health and wellness settings

Blended (online theory with oncampus practical)

2018/19

Smart Agriculture

Two-year diploma Ag Technology and Precision Agriculture

Full-time, on-campus

2018/19

Range and Forage Management

Two-year diploma in range management

Full-time, on-campus

2018/19

Bachelor of Business Administration

Degree completion option in partnership with a degree granting institution

Full-time, on-campus

2018/19

Bachelor of Arts: Psychology

Degree completion option in partnership with a degree granting institution

Full-time, on-campus

2018/19

Aircraft Rescue and Fire Fighting

NFPA 403 Compliant certificate

Full-time, on-campus, short-course

2018/19

Fire Officer Level III

NFPA certificate

Full-time, on-campus, short-course

2019/20

Bachelor of Applied Science: Agriculture

Applied Degree

Full-time, on-campus, blended options

2019/20

The development and implementation schedule for these programs may be modified based on student/labour market demand or on the availability of funding.

22 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020


Changes to Existing Programs/ Program Expansions:

The College offers a number of programs that are either designed specifically for Indigenous learners or where there are high participation rates among Indigenous learners:

• Accommodating ongoing growth in Agricultural Sciences Technology (particularly Crop Technology, Animal Science Technology, and Agribusiness diplomas)

• Introduction to Heavy Oil and Gas is a transition program offered on the Onion Lake Cree Nation that prepares learners for admission into the full-time Heavy Oil Operator Technician program

• Accommodating growth in online enrolment in Human Services programs • Development of the second-year of Street Rod Technologies • Introducing an online cohort of Animal Health Technology (beginning fall 2017) • Introducing an online option for Real Estate Appraisal and Assessment • Enabling a “French Immersion” option for Human Services students by providing access to English and French courses

Programming for Indigenous Learners: Lakeland recognizes the important role it has in providing postsecondary education opportunities to Indigenous communities. The College is making significant effort towards Indigenization and in ensuring Indigenous learners have access to the supports and training they need to be successful during their time on campus and in their careers after graduation.

• Oilfield Truck Operator is another program offered on the Onion Lake Cree Nation to prepare learners for employment in the oil and gas sector • The Tourism: Ready to Work program is designed to prepare Indigenous learners for careers in the tourism and hospitality sector • Employment Skills Enhancement is a basic education program designed to prepare learners for post-secondary programming • The Esthetician and Hairstyling programs both have very high participation rates from Indigenous learners • There is interest in the newly re-launched Event Management program (currently under suspension) that will align with the Tourism and Hospitality sector as a result of recent announcements for two large casino projects in the region

Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 23


Enrolment Plan – FLE Projections Program

15/16 Actuals

16/17 Projected

FLE DIFFERENCE

17/18 Projected

18/19 Projected

19/20 Projected

Certificates Accounting Technician

3.900

12

8

12

12

12

American Sign Language and Deaf Culture Studies

8.500

9

0

9

9

9

379.682

370

-10

330

330

330

8.600

9

0

9

9

9

Apprenticeship Business Administration Community Mental Health

0

2

2

2

10

15

Early Learning and Child Care

71.600

72

0

75

75

75

Educational Assistant

38.330

39

1

40

40

40

1.335

1

0

1

1

1

Emergency Medical Responder Esthetician

8.100

13

5

15

15

15

Firefighter Certificate of Achievement

34.504

35

1

35

35

35

General Agriculture

24.428

25

1

25

25

25

Health Care Aide

16.606

25

8

25

25

25

Heavy Oil Operations Technician

0.000

9

9

9

9

9

Office Administration/ Administrative Professional

0.000

0

0

0

10

15

Power Engineering

40.736

42

1

42

42

42

Pre-employment

44.241

45

1

35

35

35

Renewable Energy and Conservation

26.700

36

9

36

36

36

Street Rod Technologies

13.000

13

0

18

18

18

Veterinary Medical Assistant

23.999

24

0

24

24

24

Western Ranch and Cow Horse

21.800

21

-1

21

21

21

766.061

803

37

763

781

791

Agribusiness

70.899

80

9

80

80

80

Animal Health Technology

78.033

78

0

80

80

80

Subtotal

Diplomas

Animal Science Technology

89.710

120

30

120

120

120

162.939

172

9

187

187

187

19%

46%

60%

60%

60%

Child and Youth Care

41.575

51

9

55

55

55

Crop Technology

71.403

71

0

71

71

71

Early Learning and Child Care

34.975

35

0

40

40

40

Emergency Services

62.642

60

-3

60

60

60

120.670

110

-11

115

115

115

Business Administration (%) INTERNATIONAL ENROLMENTS IN BUSINESS

Technology Environmental Sciences 24 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020


Heavy Oil Power Engineering Interior Design Technology Renewable Energy and Conservation Sign Language Interpretation

166.589

140

-27

125

125

125

40.773

34

-7

34

34

34

2.001

2

0

5

5

5

8.000

7

-1

7

7

7

950.209

960

10

979

979

979

Bachelor of Applied Business: Emergency Services

0.601

10

9

10

10

10

Bachelor of Applied Science: Environmental Management

39.998

30

-10

35

35

35

Subtotal

40.599

40

-1

45

45

45

University Transfer

160.800

160

-1

175

175

175

Subtotal

160.800

160

-1

175

175

175

Employment Skills Enhancement

10.600

10

-1

10

10

10

Open Studies

28.836

30

1

30

30

30

5

5

5

5

5

39.436

45

5

45

45

45

1,957.105

2,008

50

2,008

2,026

2,036

Subtotal

Applied Degrees

University Transfer

Other Non-Credential

Tourism - Ready to Work Subtotal

TOTAL by Program

Enrolment Trends There are several forces driving enrolment increases and decreases at Lakeland: • University Transfer enrolment should increase as families look for more economical university pathway options closer to home. • As international enrolment increases, there should be a corresponding increase in Business enrolment. • Demand for online learning is driving growth in Human Services enrolment.

• The economic downturn and subsequent reduced demand for apprenticeship students will lead to enrolment decreases in apprenticeship training and in some pre-employment streams. • The economic downturn in the oil and gas sector will reduce demand for power engineers and a predicted decrease in enrolment for Heavy Oil Operations Technician and Heavy Oil and Power Engineering.

The overall enrolment at Lakeland is expected to be stable over the next three years as decreases in some program areas are offset by increases in others. Students that attend Lakeland value the hands-on learning experience as well as interactive class sizes, and the College’s goal is to continue to prioritize those learning benefits by managing enrolment at current levels. In addition, Lakeland is in a financially sustainable position at these enrolment levels, and the capacity to increase enrolment in high-demand areas will depend on emerging funding models and/or on access to new targeted enrolment funding.

Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 25


APPENDIX C: Research, Applied Research, and Scholarly Activities Overview Lakeland College supports and encourages applied research to achieve excellent student outcomes and support social, environmental, and economic life in its communities, Alberta, Canada, and the world. Through applied research, students take the lead in learning, gain wider perspective, and build important skills that contribute to industrial innovation. Applied research priorities support the College’s institutional goals of Learner Success and Relevant Programming and Research by providing flexible and creative learning opportunities that increase student-led learning, maximize student engagement, enhance supports and services for learners and faculty, and expand research capacity. Research also provides additional means to attain the College’s goals of Connectivity and Sustainability by increasing sustainable resources to support student success through fundraising and external partnerships, raising Lakeland’s profile as an institution of excellence, supporting the modernization of the learning environment, and optimizing use of College resources while empowering staff to excel. As noted in the College’s mandate, “Lakeland College promotes innovation by conducting applied research activities that are relevant to its program areas, complement teaching and learning, and advance innovation-based rural community economic development. Initiatives are geared towards supporting Alberta’s future economy by helping industry partners capitalize on new opportunities and find solutions to current challenges.” The College is an active champion for a systems approach to applied research and is in collaboration or discussion with Alberta Agriculture and Forestry, Alberta Innovates, InnoTech Alberta, the University of Alberta, University of Calgary, Red Deer College, SAIT, NAIT, Olds College, and Grande Prairie Regional College. In particular, Lakeland and Red Deer College have a longstanding mutually supportive relationship regarding research ethics reviews that increase system expertise by clustering and centralizing activities for effective resource management. Lakeland is also a partner in the Alberta Carbon Offsets Coalition and the Smart Ag Supercluster. The Alberta Innovation Network (AIN) draws together Alberta research and innovation performers from across the province, and Lakeland was pleased to host over 45 system representatives in October 2016 for the first meeting of the network in the newly established East Central Alberta region. Lakeland is also part of a working group established to foster applied research collaboration among rural Alberta colleges and increase opportunities for partnership, growing system expertise, and information sharing. Lakeland College’s Board of Governors has identified four priority areas for applied research growth: Agriculture, Environment, Energy, and Emergency Services. These were selected for their relevance to the Lakeland economic region and to complement institutional academic strengths. Lakeland will focus on these areas but also participate in supporting innovation that supports the College’s institutional goals, the Alberta Research and Innovation Plan, and provincial target outcomes: developing a strong resilient economy, promoting effective resource management and environmental stewardship, and supporting healthy Albertans in the region’s communities. As a relatively new player in applied research, all of Lakeland’s current applied research priorities still have significant opportunities for growth. The College’s tactical focus for 2017/18 is on agriculture applied research followed by four additional areas.

26 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020


Agricultural Sciences – Area of Growth Agricultural Sciences is the largest school at Lakeland College and an important industry in the region. Applied research plays an important role in commodity agricultural production. Some agricultural applied research is integrated with Lakeland’s Student-Managed Farm (SMF) − Powered by New Holland and supports learner success priorities. To this end, in 2016/17, the SMF established Crop and Livestock Research Teams that took the lead in developing applied research projects, allocating resources, and working closely with industry partners and advisory groups to align projects with industry needs. Lakeland’s applied research in agriculture will concentrate on supporting large-scale commercial agriculture for crops and livestock activities that are prevalent in the region. The College is shifting its crops applied research to focus on small plot crop research and is expanding its livestock research from a focus on feed efficiency to an array of livestock production activities. Integrating smart agricultural and ICT tools into practical projects relevant for producers is a growing priority for agriculture research. Lakeland is increasing internal capacity and building longer-term collaborations with industry and academic research partners.

Small Plot Crop Research Based on the needs of partners and a known gap in the region, Lakeland began realignment in 2014 towards small plot crop research. Several key investments have been made: small plot harvester (2015), small plot seeder (2016), small plot multiboom sprayer (2017), and the recruitment of a crop research specialist (2016). Early wins for this area include a successful 2016 crop season and emerging research collaborations with the University of Alberta, Alberta Agriculture and Forestry (AAF), and the Agriculture Research & Extension Council of Alberta. Research funding for 2017 has significantly increased over 2016. This funding will allow the College to expand labour capacity in 2017 but does not provide for long-term capacity sustainability especially as the current NSERC grant for agriculture wraps up in 2018. The College’s 2016 collaborations have laid the groundwork for expansive growth in crop research in 2017 and beyond. Based on equipment, land base availability, and labour constraints, the College is at maximum capacity for research trials for 2017. Lakeland is the lead institution on an invited full proposal to the Canadian National Barley Cluster (2018-2023). This $500,000+ project would begin in 2018 and bring together researchers from AAF, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, the University of Manitoba, the Field Crop Development Centre in Lacombe, and industry partners. As well, Lakeland has identified synergies between College projects and those at the University of Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 27


Saskatchewan Global Institute for Food Security (GIFS). For example, an expensive problem in agriculture is lodged crops (flattened/fallen over). They take longer to harvest and can lead to poor grain quality and grain yield losses. Lakeland’s Unmanned Aerial Vehicle System (UAS) and sensor systems will be used to image the 2017 plant growth regulator trials to provide data into a large-scale ICT project using spectral imaging to measure lodging in western Canadian crops. Lakeland intends to continue expanding applied research capacity in small plot crop research through grants and fundraising activities to purchase specialized research equipment. The College has requested funds from the Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI) to complete the Bioenergy Centre with the vision to transition the space into the Bioenergy and Crop Research Facility. The College’s goal is to develop Lakeland’s capacity as a provider of high-quality, small plot crop research in the agronomic region producing results of value to Western Canadian producers and the agriculture value chain. This is linked to Lakeland’s institutional academic goals and priorities and the learning system principles of quality and coordination. Lakeland has made strategic investments in core research personnel to continue growing this applied research area of critical importance to regional economic, resource management, and environmental stewardship success.

Livestock Research Lakeland has made strategic investments in 2016 and 2017 to grow the College’s research herd to a steady state of 80 head by 2018. This herd of crossbred Angus cattle and the newly opened G.N. Sweet Livestock Research Facility complement other academic and private herds and animal research centres across Alberta. Lakeland, Olds College, and the University of Alberta have complementary expertise and infrastructure and are collaborative partners on numerous past and current projects; this cluster is a particular opportunity for Alberta to demonstrate international excellence. Lakeland is building a partnership with Olds College’s Technology Access Centre for Livestock Production but will be expanding its focus from feed efficiency to an array of livestock production activities. The planned capital expansion of the College’s Animal Health Clinic in 2017 will provide opportunities for applied research activities in animal health and welfare, and the expansion of the Dairy Learning Centre will also provide opportunities to explore the economic value of automation and energy efficiencies in intensive livestock operations as well as enhance the health and quality of life of Alberta’s producers. With the establishment of the SMF-Livestock Research Team and expansion of the research herd, Lakeland has increased student engagement and operating inventory for research. After several years of close collaboration with AAF, the College 28 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020

is well positioned to continue to conduct long-term research related to feed efficiency. Existing research collaborations have produced excellent extension value including three key articles in Alberta Farm Express (online Dec 2016) and two editions of Canadian Cattlemen (Feb/Mar 2017) highlighting the student experience and research outcomes. Moreover, Lakeland is continuing to broaden its research and extension focus. 2016/17 activities laid the groundwork to better respond to partners’ needs and develop better service and operational models. Notably, Lakeland faculty are co-investigators in a submission to the Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) for the third Beef Cattle Industry Science Cluster 2018-2023 aimed at enhancing industry competitiveness, reducing production costs, and improving public confidence in the Canadian beef industry. The projects from the cluster will build on 2017 rangeland crop research activities that focus on pasture management of noxious/invasive weed species and specifically on the effects of rotational grazing on range productivity and yield, GHG effects, and carbon sequestration. In summary, Lakeland’s applied research contribution to the Alberta system includes a unique regional land base, highly specialized crop and livestock research equipment, strategic positioning in the densest cropping and cow-calf cluster in Alberta, the expertise of agriculture research specialists and faculty, and close relationships with student trainees and industry. The College’s focus on training at the farm gate and integrating research and academic training fosters higher transferability and extension of research outcomes into industry practice.

Environmental Sciences – Area of Growth Lakeland owns an abundant land base that has significant wetland and watershed research opportunities. The College’s proximity to Vermilion Provincial Park, its location in a region of abundant oil and gas production, and academic strengths in remediation, reclamation, and conservation support an array of opportunities for applied research. In 2016, Lakeland focused on its constructed wetlands, a high-level survey of College wetlands, and a reassessment of an Alberta Parks project six years post reclamation. The survey of Lakeland wetlands identified 101 areas of interest on College land with nine studied in detail. There is also opportunity to use the College’s UAS to extend aerial-based land use management applications. Lakeland is collaborating with SAIT to establish the Centre for Innovation and Research in Unmanned Systems in Alberta. Lakeland has been working with regional industry partners to establish a test site to examine the impacts of gas migration from abandoned wellheads. This has included an application


for funding in partnership with the Petroleum Technology Research Centre to develop the research infrastructure necessary for this project. This applied research program is a priority for the College as it involves energy and environment and has the potential to significantly contribute to evidencebased policy development as well as provide support to the oil and gas industry.

Energy – Area of Growth Lakeland’s Renewable Energy Learning Centre (RELC) and Bioenergy Centre, funded through investments from CFI, the Government of Alberta, and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC), provide significant infrastructure for research purposes and are very useful for public education and engagement, informal extension work, and teaching in the Renewable Energy and Conservation program. With the completion of the integrated renewable energy NSERC project funding in 2016, focus has transitioned from extensive applied research activities towards knowledge translation and industry-funded projects specifically related to the agricultural sector, rural issues and applications, and the bioeconomy. Lakeland is working with partners to publish the College’s solar photovoltaic economics calculator as part of an Alberta-based solar toolkit. Due to regional demand and the expertise and facilities available, renewable energy academic programming and services have expanded. In 2017, the School of Environmental Sciences will begin offering extension and outreach services to agricultural enterprises with the goal of increasing the adoption of energy conservation and renewable energy technologies as part of the Alberta Government’s On-Farm Energy Management programs. The School of Agricultural Science’s Dairy Learning Centre is incorporating many technologies to record and trend electricity and water usage to help develop and test technologies that increase resource efficiency and productivity. Future research funding and support needs will emerge as projects and partnerships are identified. Lakeland’s unique foundational capacity and expertise positions the College well for both applied research and academic opportunities in this sector to rapidly respond to emerging industry needs.

Innovation and Rural Economic Development – Area of Growth Lakeland has taken on a leadership role, in partnership with the Regional Business Accelerator, to coordinate participation in the Alberta Innovation Network (AIN) and the Lloydminster Entrepreneurship Incubator. Through the AIN, Lakeland assists regional entrepreneurs access the provincial innovation system.

Both the AIN and Entrepreneurship Incubator programs have defined key performance measures: • The Regional Business Accelerator, in collaboration with Community Futures, ran successful Biz Kids and Design Heroes programming to encourage youth entrepreneurship in 2016. A total of 41 student and youth jobs were created. • In the first year of activity, Lakeland and the Regional Business Accelerator supported 36 technology/innovation small-to-medium enterprise (SME) clients and completed 23 referrals to the AIN system. The College has developed unique capacity for preliminary manufacturing and prototyping through funding from CFI, NSERC and the Alberta government. Lakeland is developing access to this Maker Space to regional entrepreneurs, innovators, and SMEs and will aid them in accessing other supports in the system as they move through prototype development and commercialization.

Other Research and Scholarly Activities – Area of Growth The Emergency Training Centre at Lakeland College is a unique resource for both training and applied research. The College has partnered with industry to train students with new equipment prototypes and provide feedback on their performance under rigorous conditions. This has resulted in product revisions to increase durability and user protections prior to commercial sale. Applied research using these technologies is not always practical under the College’s academic mandate, and Lakeland has declined projects that could impact the longevity of training props. Areas of opportunity include using the UAS and other new tools for emergency services and identifying ways to support the training and health of emergency professionals. Lakeland faculty members are encouraged to enhance their professional development through scholarly learning opportunities. Lakeland has numerous examples of applied research and scholarly practice such as faculty from Human Services working on case study research to inform scholarly practice, and faculty members pursuing advanced degrees and other forms of training. Lakeland has also partnered with Red Deer College on a Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada funded knowledge synthesis study: “Applying the National Aboriginal Health Organization’s Ownership, Control, Access and Possession Principles to College Research in Central Alberta.”

Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 29


APPENDIX D: Community Outreach & Underrepresented Learners. Lakeland is committed to creating personalized learning pathways for learners to help them realize their full potential. The College’s institutional priorities focus on maximizing student engagement, establishing Indigenization efforts, enhancing learner supports and services, and providing opportunities for students to further enhance their learning. In 2017-2020, the College will work toward these priorities and have identified the following outcomes as measures of success. 30 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020


Student Engagement

efforts will be a priority for the College during the 2017-2020 planning period:

Lakeland’s Student Life Advisory Council works to ensure that students have enriching and meaningful experiences outside of the classroom, opportunities to pursue non-academic interests and develop leadership skills through extracurricular engagement, and safe, inclusive environments for students living in residence. During 2017-2020, the Council will engage with students, academic departments and the Teaching and Learning Commons to support the College’s priorities in this area:

• Lakeland will continue to be a partner in the Indigenous Economic Partnership Summit with the objective of making connections and exploring opportunities towards the goal of developing business and industry partnerships.

• Greater emphasis will be placed on student life activities including student leadership, student clubs, and on-campus recreational activities. Engagement scores and trends will be tracked using the Community College Survey of Student Engagement. • The Student Life Advisory Council will develop and manage a campus-wide events calendar with the goal of improving communication of activities and events on campus.

Communications to Prospective Students Lakeland College knows that student success begins with clearly communicating offerings to parents and prospective students. A strong visual identity, responsive website and key messages have been developed to share with various community stakeholders. The Lakeland story assists young people and parents alike in not only making the decision to pursue higher education but to understand how their education pathway at Lakeland will continue on to career opportunities. This is being done through a variety of methods: • Targeted marketing campaigns that include a mix of digital, traditional, and social media • Speaking engagements at relevant industry events, conferences, and service organizations

• Lakeland will continue to coordinate social and cultural events, such as the annual teepee raising and Truth and Reconciliation speaker series, that celebrate and promote the Indigenous way of life and honour the rich history and lived experience of Indigenous people. • Lakeland will establish an Elder-in-residence program by cultivating meaningful relationships with Elders who can visit the campus and connect with College students in an effort to enhance their educational experience. • The College’s Indigenous Student Support Specialist will promote cultural support services in the College and community and assist with making those connections for students as well as work with faculty to increase Indigenous awareness. • Lakeland will work with Indigenous communities to develop a preparatory course in a blended format with instruction occurring on reserve and on campus.

Learner Supports Lakeland strives to provide student supports that are timely, accessible, and targeted to specific needs. Through the College’s Teaching and Learning Commons, services are provided for underrepresented and disadvantaged learner groups. Annually, The Commons provides exam accommodations for over 1,200 students and receives and provides up to 250 tutor matches for learners. The College will focus on the following activities to support learners in 20172020:

Indigenization

• Lakeland offers three preparatory courses outlining important areas vital to college success: avoiding procrastination, developing higher thinking skills, and effective organizational habits for the best College experience. Courses are accessible through a massive open online course (MOOC) at no charge. In 2017, a curriculum review will be completed and enhancements will be made to include international and online students.

Lakeland is situated in the heart of Treaty 6 Territory. The College is dedicated to guiding First Nations students to be proud of their identity, language, and culture. Lakeland’s Indigenous Student Support Specialist work with the College’s Aboriginal Advisory Council to foster existing campus events as well as initiate new Indigenous programming. Indigenization

• Accessibility Services will continue to provide support services to students with disabilities. Procedures for addressing supports for students who are having trouble meeting academic expectations and who may require a psycho-educational assessment will be addressed with ways to streamline the process examined.

• Revamped communications sequence for prospective students and their parents • Academic school-specific e-newsletters created for alumni and industry representatives

Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 31


• Learner success workshops that focus on study skills, test-taking, time management, life skills, and strategies for success will be created and delivered to students in their second semester of study who have been placed on academic probation or have a GPA below 2.0. • Lakeland strives to provide students with consistent access to physical and mental health supports. The College’s Counselling and Wellness team promotes holistic mental, physical, and social wellbeing to help students achieve the best possible quality of life while at Lakeland. The College’s Counselling and Wellness plan for 2017-2020 includes several initiatives: o More opportunities will be provided for students to be involved in events that highlight wellness and stress reduction including the establishment of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy groups; “puppy rooms” during exam week; Pre-Think Your Drink campaign in partnership with Alberta Health Services; and creation and implementation of a peer-assisted wellness program. o The College has established an LGBTQ+ committee. College policies and procedures have been developed to ensure that Lakeland College is providing an inclusive learning and work environment. o Lakeland has introduced a new Sexual Violence policy in 2016/17 and will publish an approved Sexual Violence procedure in 2017.

Further Learning Lakeland offers a wide variety of flexible learning options through its Continuing Education Department. Life-long learners have options of upgrading their skills, beginning piano lessons, or taking an online course. The College is always interested in expanding course options and relies on feedback from the community on what courses they would like to see offered. • There will be a continued focus on transitional programming such as Academic Upgrading, Academic Prep and Dual Credit. o Part-time Academic Upgrading will be re-established as well as a GED preparatory course. Academic Prep online modules will continue to be available to applicants of the College in math, biology, chemistry, English, ESL, general science, and physics at no charge providing an affordable and accessible option for students. 32 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020

o Dual credit initiatives will continue to be expanded with new course offerings and school division partnerships established. Since the College began dual credit programming in 2011, close to 1,000 students have completed College courses through dual credit.

Regional Stewardship Lakeland College is committed to community engagement through regional stewardship and believes that all Albertans should receive quality education regardless of where they reside. The College continues to work with their Community Adult Learning Programs (CALPs) with the goal of understanding the diverse needs of their unique communities. • The College has partnered with the Town of Wainwright Economic Development and Wainwright Adult Learning to offer the Health Care Aide program in Wainwright. Accounting Technician, Educational Assistant, and other programming options will be explored with CALPs in Lakeland’s region. • Lakeland College, Alberta Innovates and the Regional Business Accelerator have partnered to create an East Central Alberta Regional Innovation Network (RIN) in Lloydminster in recognition of the city’s prominence as a regional economic development hub. The regional network will ensure businesses have access to commercialization expertise, training, and programs and services required to address the unique needs of a new innovation-based business.

Enhancing Community Investment Community investment occurs in many ways for Lakeland College. Strong partnerships with municipal leaders and community partners have proven to create well-informed communities and a mutually supportive environment. Investment from individuals, industry partners, and municipalities is often a way to advance scholarship, bursary and other student support programs. This activity will continue to enhance access and affordability for learners and to honour commitments to donors. Lakeland College has developed a fund development campaign – Leading. Learning. The Lakeland Campaign. – to raise $10 million through comprehensive fundraising methodologies. Funds raised will support all areas of learner success from providing state-of-the-art learning facilities to supporting leadership development and student success as well as exposing our students to the benefits of applied research.


Appendix E: Internationalization Internationalization continues to be a priority for Lakeland College. In addition to the positive impact on the College’s operating budget, internationalization increases cultural diversity on campus, allows for increased cross-cultural awareness and education, and provides domestic students as well as staff and faculty with the opportunity to study, learn, and work abroad. The College has also forged new and exciting partnerships with other Alberta postsecondary institutions as a result of collaborations on international development projects.

International Student Recruitment The cornerstone of Lakeland’s international strategy is the recruitment of international students to programs on both of Lakeland College’s campuses. International student numbers have increased from approximately 51 on campus students in January 2016 to approximately 114 in January 2017. This constitutes about 5% of total enrolment at Lakeland. Lakeland will continue to grow the international student base in programming areas that have unmet capacity. International students do not currently, and will not in the future, have access to programs with waitlists or where they would otherwise prevent domestic students from accessing a particular program. Active recruiting is a strategy that focuses on a specific target region and investing a significant effort in that region to attract students. The target region Lakeland has focused on initially is India. The College has established a contract agreement with M Square Global, a recruiting/brand building company, registered in Canada and India, to build the Lakeland brand in India and to market Lakeland programs available for international students. As a way to promote more country diversity, a contract amendment has been signed to further the target region to Pan India (India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Nepal, Sri Lanka) and continental Africa. At the heart of a robust recruitment strategy is the commitment

to international student support. A happy and successful student is an ambassador for Lakeland and perhaps the best form of marketing towards future students. This requires careful attention to laws and processes to support students along various phases of their studies at Lakeland. Lakeland has a committed coordinator on each campus to provide this support in addition to a registered international student immigration advisor who will be available in the spring of 2017. Lakeland’s student support framework begins after the recruitment stage and before the student arrives on campus and continues until the student graduates and moves on from the College. Students have full access to learning strategists, advisors, immigration consultants, student employment specialists, health services, and other supports. International students are actively involved in student clubs and student recreation programs and have become an important part of student life on campus. At this time Lakeland has not engaged in any off-shore/forprofit partnerships or in any cross-border delivery of Alberta credentials. In addition, the College has no plans to pursue these kinds of ventures at any point in the foreseeable future. Lakeland’s internationalization efforts are confined to student recruitment (as described above), as well as to international mobility for domestic students and involvement in international development projects. Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 33


International Mobility for Domestic Students Lakeland is situated in the heart of Treaty 6 Territory. The College is dedicated to guiding Indigenious students to be proud of their identity, language, and culture. Lakeland’s Indigenous Student Support Specialist will work with the College’s Aboriginal Advisory Council to foster existing campus events as well as initiate new aboriginal programming. Indigenization efforts will be a priority for the College during the 2017-2020 planning period. The second main component of Lakeland’s international strategy is to actively promote opportunities for domestic students to experience learning opportunities abroad. Although challenging to promote and administer, outbound mobility is a good way to increase the internationalization of the campuses. Some opportunities are the Campus Alberta Grant for Overseas Learning, international study abroad internships, and a future internal Lakeland grant for overseas learning. In the 2016/17 academic year, student groups traveled to the United States (Human Services and Agriculture), Kazakhstan (Agriculture), Mexico (University Transfer), Sri Lanka (Environmental Sciences), and Vietnam (Business Administration). These experiences allow students to develop a stronger global perspective, and foster a sense of global citizenship – critical skill development for an increasingly global society. Lakeland’s experience has demonstrated higher levels of academic success and student engagement as a result of opportunities such as these.

International Development The third main component is engagement in international projects that are typically funded through Global Affairs Canada (GAC) and Colleges and Institutes Canada (CICan). Lakeland has been successful in these kinds of projects in Tanzania and Belize and is exploring emerging opportunities in Africa, the Caribbean, and in other countries as well. Currently, Lakeland is involved in a three-year remedial access development project in Tanzania in partnership with NorQuest College that is due to finish in 2019. International projects have limited revenue generation potential, but they offer opportunities to establish good relations with government, with other post-secondary institutions within Canada, and in developing countries. These partnerships open doors to further collaboration around PD initiatives, program development, transfer agreements, etc. - all of which have the potential to significantly benefit Lakeland. Finally, engagement in international projects provides professional development opportunities for staff and faculty. The skills that are developed through project work are transferable to Lakeland and allow employees to grow through novel experiences and the development of new knowledge.

34 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020


APPENDIX F: Capital Plan Overview In a competitive post-secondary environment, it is vital for Lakeland to maintain and develop facilities that meet the expectations of students for modern, technologically advanced learning environments. Lakeland’s focus for capital revitalization is the Vermilion Campus where aging infrastructure no longer meets the needs of many College programs. Much of the classroom space is outdated, and classrooms are too small for current class sizes. The leaking Trades Centre roof continues to be a significant concern and safety issue; complete failure of the roof would result in significant risk to the School of Trades and Technology programming. Lakeland is moving forward with the construction of a new Dairy Learning Centre and the renovation and expansion of another building to provide a new home for animal health programming. Both of these flagship projects at the Vermilion Campus will be completed in 2017/18. The College plans to submit a funding request to the Canada Foundation for Innovation and the Alberta Research Capacity Planning for applied research infrastructure funding to complete the Bioenergy Centre with the vision to transition the space into the Bioenergy and Crop Research Facility. The new crop research lab space will be used to process grain samples and house crop research equipment. If funded, this project will begin in 2018/19. With donor support, Lakeland will also complete some final renovations to the GN Sweet Livestock Research Facility in 2017/18. Creating partnerships on the use of space and the development of programming is essential to Lakeland’s ongoing success as an institution. In its partnership with the Town of Vermilion, the College is also reviewing its future role in community recreation in Vermilion.

Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 35


Priority Projects Priority

Project Name

Description

1

Trades Centre Exterior and Roofing Repair

Scope: A pilot repair on a section of the roof was completed during the spring of 2017; this has provided information to better understand the full cost of the urgently needed repairs to the metal cladding, glazing, and roofing. This leaking roof presents safety challenges, and the longer it is left, the more expensive the needed repairs will become. Estimated cost: $4.1 million Proposed timeline: April 2017 –June 2020 Location: Vermilion Type of capital: Preservation Relationship to CIP goals: Maintaining a safe college environment is vital to College goals relating to learner success, relevant programming and sustainability. Funding sources: See cash flow and funding analysis.

2

Vermilion Campus Revitalization

Scope: The Vermilion Campus is in serious need of renovation if the College is to continue meeting the needs of learners. A whole campus plan has been developed with the following priorities: • Renovation of laboratory spaces as the current labs are too small and outdated • Renovation and modernization of the Mead & Bentley Buildings (which house the majority of Vermilion classrooms) in order to sustain appropriate learning environments • Upgrading and expansion of the Learning Commons to provide a 24/7 modern learning space that will significantly enhance the student learning experience • Creation of larger classrooms within the College’s existing footprint will allow for a phasing of the renovation process to avoid disruption to academic programming Estimated cost: $40 million Proposed timeline: April 2017 – August 2027 Location: Vermilion Type of capital: Preservation & Renewal Relationship to CIP goals: A modernized learning environment is critical to College goals relating to learner success, relevant programming and sustainability. Funding sources: See cash flow and funding analysis.

3

Equine Centre

Scope: Widely used by both the College and community, the current Equine Centre needs updating and renovating to create more flexible usage options and to better support the high demand in the region for arena space. Renovations would include upgrading of siding and roofing, new seating, a new kitchen and washrooms, and a warm up area. Estimated cost: $4.5 million Proposed timeline: April 2019 - August 2021 Location: Vermilion Type of capital: Preservation & Renewal Relationship to CIP goals: The Equine Centre is a core part of student life at Vermilion; the expanded facility will support College goals of learner success and relevant programming. Funding sources: See cash flow and funding analysis.

36 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020


4

Residence Renovation & Expansion

Scope: Despite the current downturn, the long-term trend is for a shortage of residence spaces at Vermilion; for a number of years, Lakeland has lost students who are unable to secure a place in residence. Some of the family housing units are past the point of economic repair and need to be demolished. Lakeland needs to expand the availability of apartment-style accommodation and carry out extensive renovation of residences on both campuses. Given the current downturn, the initial focus will be on renovation. Estimated cost: $20 million Proposed timeline: April 2019 - August 2022 Location: Vermilion Type of capital: Preservation & expansion Relationship to CIP goals: This relates to the College goal of learner success. Funding sources: When the College has completed the planning process, and the Board has approved the plan, the intention is to request permission from the Government of Alberta to borrow the required funds for the expansion and for some renovation. The College is currently evaluating what level of renovation can be covered from existing residence revenues.

5

Paving

Scope: The majority of roadways and some parking lots at the College are in desperate need of repaving. There are significant potholes in many areas, and there is pressure on the size of the main parking lot in Lloydminster. Concerns about parking are one of the most frequent complaints heard from Lakeland students. Estimated cost: $7 million Proposed timeline: June 2017 – June 2021 Location: Lloydminster & Vermilion Type of capital: Preservation Relationship to CIP goals: This relates to the College goal of sustainability. Funding sources: At this time, the College will attempt to self-fund the repair and replacement of paving as resources are available, including IMP, as a source of funding for some repairs.

6

Co-generation, Utilities and Lighting Retrofit Project

Scope: With the completion of the new Energy Centre and the existing opportunities on each site, the College will develop a co-generation strategy that will help to sustain building energy needs in the longer term. In addition, the current lighting systems on both campuses are outdated; light bulbs are no longer available. There will be considerable energy savings from the retrofit. This lighting retrofit is 30% complete. Estimated cost: $8 million Proposed timeline: June 2017 – June 2021 Location: Lloydminster & Vermilion Type of capital: Preservation Relationship to CIP goals: This relates to the College goal of sustainability. Funding sources: The College has been funding, and will continue to fund, some lighting retrofit each year through the IMP grant. For the execution of a co-generation strategy the options for funding may be some form of private/public partnership or borrowing by the institution.

Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 37


Cash Flow & Funding Analysis 1. Approved Projects Cashflow

Funding Source

Amount

2016/17

$4,500,000

Federal government (SIF)

$3,467,500

2017/18

$5,000,000

Lakeland College*

$6,032,500

Total project costs

$9,500,000

Total funding available

$9,500,000

*Fundraising and grant applications for expenses deemed ineligible under SIF may reduce this cost to the College

Cashflow

Funding Source

Amount

2016/17

$2,591,000

Federal government (SIF)

$2,487,500

2017/18

$4,500,000

GOA Access to the Future

$1,120,000

GOA funding

$1,760,000

Lakeland College

$3,492,500

Total funding available

$8,860,000

Total project costs

$7,091,000

2. Top Three Overall Priority Projects (in order) Cashflow

Proposed Funding Source

Amount

2016/17

$600,000

Government of Alberta

$3,100,000

2017/18

$1,100,000

Lakeland College

$1,000,000

2018/19

$1,100,000

2019/20

$1,300,000

Total project costs

$4,100,000

Total funding available

$4,100,000

Cashflow 2016/17

$320,000

Proposed Funding Source Government of Alberta

Amount $25,000,000

2017/18

$300,000

Fundraising

$8,000,000

2018/19

$5,000,000

Lakeland College

$7,000,000

2019/20

$5,000,000

Total project costs

$40,000,000

Total funding required

$40,000,000

* The Vermilion campus revitalization project is expected to take until 2027 to complete

Cashflow

Proposed Funding Source

Amount

2016/17

$200,000

Government of Alberta

2017/18

$0

Fundraising

$1,000,000

2018/19

$0

Lakeland College

$3,500,000

2019/20

$4,300,000

Total project costs

$4,500,000

Total funding required

$4,500,000

$0

Note: The projection of support from the College resources is dependent on a stable funding environment, and the College’s ongoing ability to generate a modest surplus each year.

38 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020


APPENDIX G: Information Technology Overview The College is implementing planned key strategic investments and building blocks in information technology to order to better meet business needs and user expectations. The focus is on improving the student and staff experience, enhancing access to services, and ensuring safeguards for sensitive information. The goal is that this approach will improve operational performance and end-user satisfaction while maintaining and enhancing security. In order to implement foundational technology solutions, realize savings, and continue to deliver services in a more efficient manner, Information Technology will be focusing on three key areas: • Continuation of replacement of the network and security end-of-life devices • Improvement of cyber security governance, data protection and compliance • Migration to a cloud based email solution – Office 365 Bandwidth is necessary to accommodate high-network traffic and future growth. With its infrastructure upgrade, Lakeland will be able to be more responsive to College needs and emerging technologies. The upgrade of the infrastructure is scheduled to be completed by June 2018. Recent cyber security breaches at Canadian post-secondary schools have prompted Lakeland to take a closer look at its current cyber security infrastructure and introduce new security measures as necessary to protect College data: • Establishment of a formal cyber security framework to help Lakeland drive its cyber security defense program more effectively • Implementation of framework enforcement (administrative and technical controls) to satisfy the cyber security framework • Monitoring and measurement of the status of the security posture across the enterprise to ensure compliance Information Technology continues to invest in new strategic technologies and processes with the goal of an improved user experience, operational performance, and savings. Lakeland is moving in the direction of cloud-based email solution (Office 365). As a result of this solution, Lakeland will realize several benefits: • Improved agility with scalable computing and new features/options for the College • Operational resilience with 24/7 real-time monitoring, and managed backup and security • Operational efficiency with reduced capital expenditures and a decrease in workload for IT resources

Information Technology Initiatives The following table lists Information Technology initiatives. Most items are not single-year costs; rather, they will be spread out over several years as indicated.

Priority

Item

Details

Source of funding

Cost

1

Network refresh infrastructure project

Focus on replacement /upgrade of network, security and telecommunication infrastructure

Capital budget

$1.5 million

2

Cyber security governance, data protection and compliance

Focus on defining, implementing and monitoring of cyber security environment

Capital budget

$250,000

3

Office 365

Focus on moving to a cloud-based environment

Capital budget

$150,000

Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 39


40 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020


APPENDIX H: Environmental Scan Strength: Focusing on the Student Students are the centre of Lakeland. Students receive time from all staff whether it be from Student Services, academic advisors, instructors, chairs, deans or Student Life employees. These connections also carry over into non-classroom areas of the College and prepare Lakeland students for future education and/or work. Lakeland graduates are job ready. In addition to job-specific, technical skills, they are also holistically prepared to contribute to their workplaces and society. Employers of these students remark on their energy, enthusiasm, willingness to learn, professionalism, communication skills, and ability to cooperate within a team environment. Through this focus on the student, Lakeland also demonstrates its flexibility to accommodate unique student needs: • The Inclusive Post-Secondary Education (IPSE) program assists students with developmental disabilities to succeed in regular programs of study. • The Learning Commons renovation in Lloydminster has created office space for student support positions thus reducing the stigma of seeking out academic/wellness supports.

• “Lakeland has given me many tools and opportunities to learn and grow, and working here in research this summer has furthered my knowledge, my skills,and my desire to learn even more.” (Maxi Biederstadt, Summer Student, Agricultural Research, 2016) • “I don’t think there is any better way to teach young people responsibility, teamwork, and professionalism than the Student-Managed Farm. The SMF pushed me beyond my comfort zone and allowed me to grow as a professional, a leader, and as a friend.” (Grayden Kay, Agriculture, Class of 2015)

Strength: Staff Commitment Lakeland exudes a spirit of excellence and pride. Instructors are experts in their field and bring a strong combination of academic and field experience to their work with students. Every staff member takes pride in the College and its work. This is more than a workplace; it is a committed community of hard working and humble individuals who take seriously their role as community stewards and developers of future leaders.

• Online programming in Human Services allows students the ability to maintain employment while completing their program of study.

Donor Judy Sweet said this about staff commitment at Lakeland College: “I appreciate the attitude of the instructors at Lakeland. To them, it’s all about the students. They’re really studentfocused which is great to see,” says Sweet, noting that it’s great that students have the opportunity to be involved in applied research projects and learn from the results.

• French programming provides French-speaking Albertans access to several Human Services’ programs at the College.

Several staff members also comment on the strength of the College community:

• The creation of an Indigenous Student Support Specialist supports the success of Indigenous students at the College.

• “It is in our nature to go the extra mile. As a student, my academic advisor and instructors knew me by name, provided guidance and support on assignments and even made sure I was taking the right courses. As a member of the Students’ Association, this was even felt by non-teaching staff that if they did not have an answer, they always helped find someone who did. In my role as an Enrolment Specialist, I get the opportunity to pay that forward and go the extra mile for our current and prospective students.” (Connor Roland, Business, Class of 2015 and Enrolment Specialist)

Student-led initiatives form the foundation of College programming: • Firefighter and Emergency Services Technology students are given opportunities to lead companies in simulated platoons, apparatus bays, and fire halls throughout their program. • The Student-Managed Farm — Powered by New Holland is fully managed by College students through a unique learning model. • The Early Learning and Child Care students manage a free children’s four-week play program. Lakeland College is a family built on pride, tradition, and connections, and its students speak highly of their time on campus:

• “The passion and interests of our staff allow us to instill a passion for our industry in students. Many evenings and weekends are volunteered by our people in events, trips, and clubs. Student-led farm activities like harvest and calving don’t happen from 8-5 but they are there for the students no matter what time of day.” (Darrell Hickman, Agricultural Sciences Chair)

Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 41


• “Our facilities team is very committed. Without being asked they support each other, picking up the slack if someone is away or busy. They are continually looking at new ways to do their jobs and innovate. Examples of this are moving to environmentally friendly cleaning products and grounds keeping practices. Our team is always striving to create the best possible environment for student and community success.” (Lawrence Hess, Director of Facilities)

Weakness: State of Infrastructure Renovation, maintenance, and capital expansion funding is lagging behind Lakeland’s infrastructure needs. This impacts College programming significantly: • Small classrooms and laboratories do not allow for program expansion. • Residence space at the Vermilion campus limits the number of students the College is able to accept. • Outdated laboratory spaces do not adequately meet student needs.

Lakeland is building an access and security strategy to address these concerns: • Updating the College’s ability to address risk by quickly identifying new gaps and/or weaknesses in the network system • Monitoring risk for data leakage as a result of cloud computing and increased social/mobile usage • Adopting a proactive approach to protect Lakeland and its data from the threat of cybercrime and its possible impact on College reputation

Opportunity: Telling the Lakeland College Story Lakeland has worked for several years to clarify its brand. The first phase of the process focused on understanding Lakeland’s strengths and discerning what it is that sets the College apart form other post-secondary institutions. After much consultation and research, it was determined that there are five brand elements that clearly reflect the Lakeland experience: • Student-managed learning experiences

As a result, the College has embraced a plan with identified costs to retrofit and update outdated laboratories and classrooms.

• A place to be heard

Despite funding limitations, Lakeland has attempted to move forward on some critical infrastructure initiatives such as the new Dairy Learning Centre and Animal Health Clinic. In addition, the College has undertaken five classroom renovations at the Vermilion campus. However, much remains to be done, and a detailed Vermilion campus Infrastructure Revitalization Plan is being developed to identify the renovations required in the next five to 10 years.

• Future focused

There is need for greater infrastructure maintenance funding. Internally, the College will continue to focus on improving internal project management and developing a long-term vision for required infrastructure for both campuses.

Weakness: Technology for Future Growth Technology is critical as Lakeland works to ensure the future success and sustainability of the College. Bandwidth continues to be a concern as programming and services require increased connectivity and access. In addition, social media, Bring Your Own Device (BYOD), and cloud/mobile computing are changing the landscape of student expectations as well as increasing security threats through the post-secondary sector.

42 | Lakeland College 2017- 2020

• Connected and relevant

• Academic credibility Much work was done during 2016/17 to bring Lakeland’s brand to life. A new visual identity, responsive website, and digital asset bank were created, and key messages were developed for all staff to share. The current opportunity is for College staff to take the Lakeland story and share it extensively, so people will come to know how distinctive Lakeland is. This is being done through a variety of methods: • Targeted marketing campaigns that include a mix of digital, traditional, and social media • Pursuance of speaking engagements at relevant industry events, conferences, and service organization gatherings • Revamped communications sequence for prospective students and their parents • Academic school-specific e-newsletters created for alumni and industry representatives Positive outcomes of Lakeland’s branding efforts should include an increase in enrolment, partnerships, alumni engagement, and funding for College initiatives.


Opportunity: Partnering with Industry

Challenge: Legislative Changes

Lakeland already has a successful track record when it comes to industry partnerships, but there are still opportunities to expand and build culture around it. Thus far, industry partnerships have resulted in practicum placements and employment for students, financial and in-kind donations to the College, increased curriculum and program relevancy through industrial input, and community economic development and diversification. In turn, the College supports industry with research opportunities, qualified employees, corporate training, and an enhanced community profile.

New legislation, regulations, and frameworks are challenging how Lakeland currently structures its programming, staff, and budgets. Without consultation or information on how such changes will influence the College’s current business model, forecasting future needs is becoming increasingly difficult. Such changes include compliance with OAGs, new accreditation standards (e.g. Emergency Training, Agricultural Occupational Health and Safety), labour changes (e.g. PostSecondary Learning Act, essential services lag), impact of collective agreements and negotiation frameworks, OHS standards, and bi-provincial cooperation on regulations.

The College is working on several industry partnerships to foster new opportunities: • In collaboration with over 13 economic development and business support agencies throughout the region, Lakeland is supporting entrepreneurs and innovators to develop business ideas and access grants and business supports through the East Central Alberta Regional Innovation Network. Fifteen companies received Network support in the first six months of operation (April to September 2016). • The Lloydminster hairstyling industry is in full support of the College’s proposal for the 1,400-hour Hairstyling certificate program to be offered on campus with apprenticeship support from industry. • Alberta Milk, which represents all dairy producers and the dairy industry in Alberta, has partnered with Lakeland whereby they will provide the use of approximately $4.7 million worth of milk quota towards the expansion of the dairy herd in the new Dairy Learning Centre. The College will provide basic training for dairy workers as well as continuing education programs for owners and managers of dairy operations.

In particular, Bill 7 and the anticipated changes to the PostSecondary Learning Act may both lead to organizational adjustments that will place undue pressure on College resources. As well, PSLA changes may have a wider impact: • If the scope of Lakeland’s Board of Governors and the Faculty Association changes, this may result in short-term increased organizational cost structures. • Changes to the current post-secondary collective bargaining model, including the right to strike and lock out, may negatively affect student learning and finances. • Dividing current bargaining agents into smaller units could lead to increased labour instability and uncertainty. In order to effectively integrate legislative changes into its business model, Lakeland would prefer to be involved in consultation on such changes as well as see a measured implementation of such changes over time.

Comprehensive Institutional Plan | 43


Vermilion Campus 5707 College Drive Vermilion, Alberta T9X 1K5 Lloydminster Campus 2606 59 Avenue Lloydminster, Alberta T9V 3N7 1.800.661.6490 lakelandcollege.ca

2017-20 Lakeland College Comprehensive Institutional Plan  

Every year Lakeland College, by mandate of the provincial government, provides a comprehensive institutional plan (CIP). The CIP sets goals...

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