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Scout

October 2019 Vol. 54, Issue 1 Lake Central High School St. John, Ind.

T H ROUGH

OU R

EYE S

Individuals explore personal experiences with misrepresentation in media and in the community

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Scout

October 2019 Contents Life & News

JOSHUA CHEN Editor-in-Chief JADE MEHOK NITYA SHAH AVA SOLIS

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180 Days Away from Home

Italian foreign exchange student broadens her expertise in language

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Boba Break

A guide to understanding the phenomenon of boba tea

Design Editors

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CHARMAGNE ABANGAN FRIDA ARELLANO EMILY BELL CLAIRE FABERBOCK RILEY KNESTRICT HANNAH KOSINSKI MIA MARTINEZ YOUSEF NAMMARI TIFFANIE RICHERME ADRIANA RODRIGUEZ JOHN SANCHEZ BRIAN SCOTT KILEY SZATKOWSKI MAISIE WESTERFIELD

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Editors

MIA BORN KELLY HAYES JUSTYCE REED HAILEY PRASOPOULOS BRENNA SEALY MORGAN TAYLOR

Emilia Harvey (10) recently cut her hair after seeing trends on TikTok. Photo by: John Sanchez

Team Leaders

TAYLOR ANDERSON KYLIE BIEHLER ISABELLA BRAZZALE JEANOA CAMERON MINA CARDENAS CALEB CHEN WILLIAM CHURCHILL COLLEEN DYRA BAILEY EGAN OLIVIA FIGG MAYA FIRLEJ DELANIE FLYNN MATT GACEK ANNIKA GORNEY MACKENZIE GUTHRIE LUKE HAMILTON ALISON IRACE ANDIE KALEMBA ALYSSA KLIMOWSKI CORI LOLLIS ICYSS MEREDITH ANNALISE NELSON LILAH NELSON LITA NIGHBERT JACKSON NOVAK BRENNA POLOVINA ALLISON POTPORA EMILY PRINCE CELESTE RECIO LEXI RIGG JONA RIVERA AVERY ROBINSON EDEN SCHILLING LILLY SCHROEDER ELIZABETH SULEK MOLLY TKACH ISABELLA VILLARREAL MIA VUKAS ALAYNA WILKENING JORDAN ZNOSKO

Mrs. Andrea Balcerak prepares hamburger patties during lunch. Photo by: Joshua Chen

Athletics 10

Leaving a Legacy

The seniors of the volleyball team push to transform the group into a family

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Got It in the (Sports) Bag

Athletes show off all kinds of items found in their sports bag

Features 14

Through Our Eyes

Marginalized voices explain what proper representation means to them

22 The Rise of TikTok Culture

Teens embrace the new video app and all the trends that come with it

26 Around the Clock

Take a deeper look into the busy world of the high school kitchen staff

For the Culture 30 Hottest of the Hot

Keep up with the latest music, film and T.V. releases

On the Cover Dontreal Butler (12) and Kimberly Hestermann (10). See Page 14. Scout is a student publication of Lake Central High School in Saint John, Indiana. All content is student directed and produced. Opinions are those of the writers and do not imply the position of the school. Questions and comments can be directed to Joshua Chen at joshshuenchen@gmail.com. Businesses interested in advertising should contact 219-365-3886.

Staff Members MRS. APRIL FLORES MRS. SARAH VERPOOTEN MS. CARRIE WADYCKI

Advisers

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ONLINE

EDITOR’S NOTE My freshman year at Lake Central, I found out that Asian people made up less than 4 percent of the school’s student population. But that figure didn’t shock me. It seemed normal to me — it was just how things were, how living in Indiana has always been. My junior year, I saw Crazy Rich Asians in theaters, and it was literally an experience I’ve never had before. For the first time in my life, I watched a movie that had main characters who all looked like me, a movie with which I was able to connect like never before, just from relating so personally and deeply to the culture in which I grew up. It felt so unbelievably fulfilling to finally see a story about Asians and Asian Americans portrayed in complex, nuanced characters for the world to see. So, when choosing a cover story for this year’s very first issue, the topic of representation seemed like such a relevant — and necessary— choice. The radical change in Hollywood and Western pop culture in the past few years makes this such an opportune time to cover representation. Crazy Rich Asians, Black Panther, Coco, Moonlight, Love, Simon, On the Block, K-Pop music, Latin music… the list goes on. This change is increasing visibility for groups, including racial, ethnic and LGBTQ, that have been ignored or mischaracterized for too long. It’s an extraordinarily important issue that needs to be explored in the context of both pop culture at large and the local community, especially in a predominantly white area. (The U.S. Census Bureau shows the 2018 population of St. John to be 94%.) The intent behind the representation story package is to tell the stories of people who have felt unheard—and to tell those stories correctly. The design and photography are simple and drawn back to emphasize these individuals themselves. Through telling these stories, hopefully people may begin to think about others’ experiences that have not previously been considered.

Joshua Chen, Editor-in-Chief

#sippinonspice It’s that time of year again. Pumpkin spice is the flavor trending for every coffee lover to enjoy. You either love it or you hate it, so let’s take a look at how our peers feel about it. Students tweeted out using the hashtag #sippinonspice for this issue of Scout; be sure to look out for the next hashtag to be featured in the next issue. SNAPCHAT TWITTER

@LCNEWS @LCHSNEWS

FACEBOOK

@LAKECENTRALNEWS

INSTAGRAM @LAKECENTRALNEWS

Kathrynn Vettas (12)

@KathrynnLettuce pumpkin spice is pumpkin nice #sippinonspice Peyton Halfeldt (12) @peytonhalfeldt Unpopular opinion: pumpkin spice is trash #sippingonspice

Giulia Marciano (12) @giulia_marciano #sippinonspice I’ve only had it once and didn’t get the hype

Katelyn Ruse (9) @ KatelynRuse #sippinonspice I think it’s a good seasonal drink; the mood for Halloween

Nehemiah Cameron (9) @xdNeyo #sippinonspice It was my first drink I ever got and it lived up to the hype

Ahbigail Holmes (9) @abbeyholmess #sippinonspice I like pumpkin spice coffee

Morgan Lareau (12) @MorganLareau #sippinonspice I’m actually obsessed with pumpkin spice everything

Alyssa Woznicki (12) @alyssawoznicki #sippinonspice apple cinnamon is better

Claire Bandstra (12) @claire_1159 #sippinonspice not a fan

Emily Mosher (12) @EmilyMosher2 #sippinonspice Pumpkin spice cream cheese slaps on a bagel

Abigail Barrett (10) @abbybarrettx #sippinonspice pumpkin spice is disgusting

Contents / 3

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Life & News

Quick Facts

PAGE BY MIA BORN, OLIVIA FIGG ALISON IRACE, EDEN SCHILLING AND AVA SOLIS

“We do not recommend you wait until the last minute,” Mrs. Sherrie Bereda, Guidance, said about submitting application materials for colleges with a Nov. 1 deadline.

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1,758 Number of homecoming tickets sold this year

“It really was a success. We are going to try and make it a lot bigger next year. Our community sold 115 shirts, Lowell sold 103. We want to sell a lot more than that next year.”

the highest mileage the girls cross country team runs in a week

636

Number of likes recieved on a Sept. 27 Instagram post by @LakeCentralNews about the homecoming pep rally

“We are trick-ortreating for others.” Jackson Lopez (11) said about participating in TOTS, an International Thespian Society event in which members collect non-perishable food on Halloween.

Mr. Ralph Holden, Social Studies, said about the first annual Battle of the Wooden Racket, which raised money for a veteran non-profit group through a shirt-selling competition.

50.8% Percent of 260 students polled who trick-or-treat on Halloween

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Number of bags the Environment Club filled with trash collected at its first meeting in early Oct.

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180 Days Away from Home Sixteen-year-old, Elena Ferrari (11), shares her story on adapting to American life STORY BY MIA BORN, OLIVIA FIGG, ALISON IRACE, EDEN SCHILLING AND AVA SOLIS Speaking four languages, Ferrari decided to take the nine-hour flight from her hometown of Seriate, Italy, to study at Lake Central for the school year. Ferrari has been studying Spanish, French and English for most of her life because it is her favorite thing to do in school. “I’ve studied French for six years, and at the beginning it was a bit difficult. Spanish is similar to Italian, so it was not difficult. I like English and Spanish the best because they are easier to speak,” Ferrari said. Ferrari was exposed to a study abroad program at her school. She always wanted to come to America because she thought it would be a great opportunity to overcome some of her obstacles. “I decided to do this experience because I wanted to improve my English, become more independent, and defeat my shyness,” Ferrari said. Ferrari said tests and quizzes in Italy are taken very seriously, and students are expected to be on their best behavior all the time. Phones are not allowed at the school, and students could fail a grade if their behavior does not meet what is expected. “In Italy we don’t have fun. It is boring, especially attending classes that you don’t like. You have to study a lot, because there are weeks full of oral and regular tests,” Ferrari said. Ferrari is excited to be immersed into American culture and learn new things through the people she meets. She loves living with her host mom, dad and younger brother and sister. “It’s beautiful. I get along with them, and it’s so interesting talking with them and learning new things every day,” Ferrari said. Ferrari explains that in Italy appearance is typically valued more than other things. Similar to teenagers in America, some value fashion more than others. “In Italy girls usually care a lot about their looks at school, but it depends on the person. There are girls that wear more comfortable clothing,” Ferrari said. At Lake Central, Elena has more options for classes.

Elena Ferrari (11) holds up a pillow her friends in Italy made for her. Ferrari travelled to America August 19, and started school August 26. Photo by: Mia Born

She likes that she can take different types of science and math. Ferrari is in linguistic school back in Italy, which is focused on the study of foreign languages. “In Italy, you can’t choose which subjects you want to take,” Ferrari said. Ferrari was worried about becoming accustomed to American life. However, according to Ferrari, her experience at Lake Central has been positive because of the interactions with the people she has met. “I feel welcomed here. The people are so nice, and they help me along. At the beginning it was very hard for me, because I didn’t know anybody and I’m so shy. But now it’s okay,” Ferrari said.

BRIEF

Ferrari’s Favorite Multi-Lingual Sayings Nessun non ce la farai vale quanto un non mollare

Italian for “I believe in what I say; I do what I believe.”

Je crois ce que je dis, je fais ce ce French for “I believe in what I say; I do what I believe.”

Hay palabras que dicen poco y silencios que dicen todo

Spanish for “There are words that say little and silences that say all.”

Life & News / 5

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Life & News

Boba Break

The trend of boba tea spreads to Northwest Indiana through pop culture PAGE BY DELANIE FLYNN, ANNALIESE NELSON, JONAREENE RIVERA, BRENNA SEALY, AVA SOLIS, ALAYNA WILKENING

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he rise of bubble tea, also known as boba, has taken the world by storm, and has recently spread to Northwest Indiana. With many different options, the trend has appealed to a large variety of consumers and has made a name for itself in the region. Alexis Casillas (10) is one of many who have joined the boba trend. “A lot of people think it looks different [than] normal drinks and the more [that] people try it, other people get intrigued to try it, too,” Casillas said. In places like Chicago’s Chinatown, boba is more available. Now that there are more boba places in the region, the constant exposure of bubble tea has increased students’ desire to try the drink. “There [aren’t many] bubble tea places around here so it’s something new and everyone wants to try it,” Nyah Gomez (9) said. The spread of bubble tea throughout Northwest Indiana is also due to the pop culture it creates and the major influence of social media on the expansion of trends. Adriana Klein (12) explains how she found out about the boba trend through Snapchat. “I saw my friends post some pictures at Motea and wanted to try it,” Klein said. As more boba shops are opening, more people are trying the new drinks and becoming more aware of the Asian culture surrounding the trend. According to the Daily Meal, Boba tea originated in Taichung, Taiwan in the 1980s and has increased in popularity since then. It first spread to East and Southeast Asia. There are shops on nearly every street corner in Taiwan and they can now be spotted in almost every corner of the world. This spread has made the tea more accessible to the general public and it has intrigued more students to try it. Today, due to the actions of their peers, people are more willing to try new things and broaden their horizons. “My cousins were talking about it and I had seen

Emily Dahn (11) joins the boba trend by enjoying an oolong milk tea with tapioca. Photo by: Brenna Sealy

it on social media, so I felt like I had to try it. I did, and it’s been my favorite drink since,” Casillas said. We live in a society where culture is constantly changing in order to create new trends. Cindy Lin (12), a Motea employee, touches on how the spread of bubble tea is aiding the spread of Asian culture,

and how it is Americanized. “I am a full-blood Asian, and I love Chinese food, so I am totally fine with it spreading. I hope it [spreads] a bit more because all food around Northwest Indiana is Americanized Chinese food so I wish for it to be spreading more authentic [foods],” Lin said. Between the different flavors and toppings to add in, the uniqueness of bubble tea has captured the attention of many people. Abigail Burton (10) discusses purchasing bubble tea at least twice a

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BRIEF

Quick Reviews “[I had] brown sugar, it was disgusting.”

“When I went to Sip in Crown Point, I saw it on the menu and wanted to try it.” Nicole Kenda (12)

“When Motea first opened up, I saw the new franchise and it seemed interesting.”

Adriana Klein (12)

“[I had] strawberry, I did not like it.

Sarimarie Pama (11)

“[I had] mango. It was okay, kinda soso.”

Sara Steven (12)

Sophia Textor (10)

“[My typical order is] the strawberrybanana smoothie with mango popping [boba].”

“[I buy bubble tea] at least twice a week, if not more.”

Nyah Gomez (9)

Abigail Burton (10)

IN-DEPTH

Anatomy of a Drink Tea Flavor The possibilities of tea flavors are endless. Choose from regular black tea, taro, oolong, green tea, rose, mango, strawberry, passionfruit, coffee and ginger. Flavors vary across the Region and the nation.

Toppings Like the flavors, the number of toppings is quite high. As toppings are added, the price usually increases. Toppings include tapioca, rainbow jelly, grass jelly, custard pudding and various fruit-flavored popping boba.

Sugar Level Unlike most drinks ordered in the U.S., sugar level can be adjusted, ranging: 0%, 25%, 50%, 75% and 100%. The levels also vary according to store.

week because she enjoys appealing aspects of the tea such as popping the bubbles, and the uncommon flavors. Young people are responsible for the spread of new trends and the influence they have on pop culture. Because of this, teenagers tend to spend a lot of time at new trendy shops. “It’s more like a place a lot of teenagers like to go because all the workers are students and so they spread the word and bring friends,” Lin said.

Ice Level The level of ice can be adjusted from normal, moderate and no ice.

Life & News / 7

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Fore the Team

Sarah Sanders (12) shows intense concentration before she follows through on her play. On Sept. 20, the girls golf team went to Sectionals and finished second behind Crown Point. “In this picture I was putting for birdie and I was really determined to make it, which I did, I wanted to do good for my team and myself,” Sanders said. Photo by Charmagne Abangan

Lens / 9

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Athletics

Leaving a Legacy Volleyball team stresses Ohana to strengthen bonding PAGE BY KYLIE BIEHLER, COLLEEN DYRA, KELLY HAYES, ALYSSA KLIMOWSKI, ICYSS MEREDITH, NITYA SHAH AND MIRJANA VUKAS

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he buzzer rang loudly as the team walked off the court at halftime, sweat beading on their foreheads. By the middle of the game, the Varsity team was losing by seven points. They sat in silence. Sweat dripped off their faces as they thought about what they could improve. The girls’ faces lit up as they thought about how they could unite. One word popped into their heads as they thought about how they were going to race back into the lead: “Ohana!”

The team walked onto the court to finish the game. They played as if it was their last game and they proved that they could work hard—not only to themselves, but to their volleyball family. To help his team grow more as a group, Coach Matthew Clark introduced them to “Ohana.” This word became a major part of the team. Ohana is the Hawaiian word for family. This can refer to anyone, not just blood relatives. “#Culture #Ohana” can be seen on the back of the

players team shirts along with: “Culture: what we value, what we believe, what we hold true, demonstrated by what we do.” The girls view each other as one big family. No matter what age or team they are, they act and treat each other one unit. “My coach always says we’re not just one Varsity, JV or Freshman team. We’re all one big team. That’s why we say Ohana. We’re all there to support each other, no matter what. We’re all a big family,” Samantha Hurubean (12) said. All of the girls are constantly working together, whether it’s on or off the court, making sure each girl feels like a part of the family. They want to leave a legacy that the team can benefit from for years to come. “The seniors this year are really good at enforcing the fact we need to be a team. They are doing a good

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that Ohana holds us together,” Nikolic said. The seniors choose to leave their legacy by coming together and bonding. By incorporating Ohana into their practices, games and time together, they hope to create a long lasting bond and loving memories of their time together. “This year we really started putting [Ohana] together and becoming more like a team and remembering we are all just one big family, and if anything happens, we have to stick together,” Josephine Mulligan (11) said. Last month, Dawn Kusbel, a loving and supportive team mom, died of paneratic cancer. The team has been supporting her since her sickness began, holding fundraisers to show their love for her. The

“We’re not just one Varsity, JV, or Freshman team, we’re all one big team. That’s why we say Ohana. We’re all there to support each other, no matter what.” Samantha Hurubean (12)

The senior girls hold hands uniting as one. They expereinced exciting moments together and hope to leave Ohana as a legacy for the next group of senior girls. Photo by: Colleen Dyra

job with keeping us as a family. They are really nice and not mean about anything. As a freshman, I want to keep doing what the seniors are doing,” Katarina Nikolic (9) said. The varsity team is trying to create a welcoming atmosphere for the new members of their volleyball family. The volleyball team reported that previously they had problems with attitudes, lack of maturity and the seniors not being welcoming. For the years to come, they wish to change that stigma. “When we get in the huddle before our game, we remind ourselves to not bring each other down and

loss of Dawn Kusbel has strengthened their bond and reminded them of how they must support each other. “We believe we can honor Kusbel’s legacy through dedicating every practice, every game, every serve to her passionate nature for sports that we all knew and loved. We will always have the phrase, Play for Dawn, running through our minds throughout the rest of the season because of our sheer love and support for [Mackenzie Kusbel (12)], a forevermember of our LC volleyball Ohana,” Madeline Bailey (12) said. Tragedies can affect bonds in different ways based on the group. The volleyball team allowed this tragedy to bring them closer together, strengthening their bond. “The last couple of months have been kind of tough because of Kenzie Kusbel. She was a part of the volleyball team, but didn’t get the chance to play this year because of her Mom [Dawn Kusbel]. The death of Dawn Kusbel has brought us closer than we have ever been before because together we are supporting one another through these hard times. Ohana is a bond in which we all genuinely share,” Maddie Bailey (12) said.

Q&A

Matthew Clark, Head Coach

How do you feel about the seniors changing the culture? “That’s what we encourage. We want them to understand, and this goes for all the players every year, that as seniors, it’s your last year, your last year to help the incoming freshmen and to understand that their impact should be more than just stats on a court. We are looking for them to leave here and be able to say that I was part of starting something, that we had success when I was there and able to build on it and even increase the success after I left.”

How do you help the girls change the image of the team? “We are really encouraging them to take ownership of their success and take ownership of their development of them and the program. All of our seniors wanted to be team captains as a group; we thought that was a good idea. When we told them we wanted to make a change, the biggest change we wanted to make was to come together more as a family. Whenever I am in charge of a program, I want that program to feel like a family.”

What are some goals you have for your team? “My goal is always to do better than what we did last year. Last year we finished tied for fourth in the DAC. We are currently in third and have a shot at either going first or second depending on how we do in the second half and how some other teams do. We feel like we have a really good shot for sure third but potentially second or first. Besides that, my goal is always to get the best out of [the team] and help them reach their potential.”

Athletics / 11

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Athletics

Got it in the (Sports) Bag Athletes unpack their must-have items crucial to their athletic success PAGE BY MIA BORN, ISABELLA BRAZZALE, WILLIAM CHURCHILL, JACKSON NOVAK, ADRIANA RODRIGUEZ, NITYA SHAH

Marc-Henry Derogene (12)

Tatum Damron (11) SPORT SOCCER

“I keep a car air freshener in my soccer bag. I am a goalie and my gloves can smell really bad after games, so I keep a car air freshener in my bag so it doesn’t smell bad. You know how it makes your car smell better? Well, it makes my bag smell better and the smell is not just the reek of my glove. I have done this for about a year, so when the car fresheners start to not smell anymore, I just switch them.”

SPORT FOOTBALL

Jayden Lazowski (10)

“I keep a Harry Potter book. I do it because it’s good luck. I’ve never actually read a Harry Potter book. I just keep it in there. I’ve done it since last year, and I think it works. So I’m going to keep doing it.”

SPORT HOCKEY

“I always tape my stick with neon green tape and I’ve always just kept it in the bag. I’ve had it since 2011, [since] I was 8 years old.”

Jarred Ivey (12) SPORT FOOTBALL

“I keep nail clippers in my bag. I do it because sometimes [when] grabbing onto people, your nails will get ripped off. So I keep them in there just in case my nails get ripped off, and I need them.” 12

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Jackson Sarbieski (12) SPORT FOOTBALL

“I keep glue in my sports bag, like Elmers glue. You never know if you are going to have to stick something or when it might come in handy. It’s not good luck. I just keep it in there just in case. I’ve done it since freshman year.”

“I keep a picture of my grandma in my bag. She died, so I keep it around so I will remember her. When I have it in my bag, it reminds me that she is there at every game with me and watching over me. I have had it in my bag since the beginning of last year and I really think it helps my game knowing she is there with me in spirit.” Desmonn Smith (12) SPORT FOOTBALL

Shamiyah Cunningham (12) SPORT FOOTBALL

“I keep a controller in my bag. I do it because I don’t trust my little brother. I take the controller so he can’t play my game. I’ve done this since sometime in my sophomore year. I’m going to keep doing it because I don’t trust anyone with my stuff.”

Bryan Stokes (11) SPORT BASKETBALL

“I have the the left shoe of my old basketball shoes. At one tournament I had a really good weekend, and when I came back that day, I just couldn’t find the right shoe. So I keep the left shoe in [my bag] just in case I find the right one.”

Athletics / 13

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T H R O U G H O U R E Y E S LACK OF REPRESENTATION IN MEDIA, SCHOOL AND COMMUNITY AFFECTS MARGINIALIZED GROUPS STORIES BY TAYLOR ANDERSON, BAILEY EGAN, ALLISON POTPORA, EMILY PRINCE, JUSTYCE REED, ELIZABETH SULEK, MOLLY TKACH, JORDAN ZNOSKO DESIGN BY JADE MEHOK PHOTOS BY JOSHUA CHEN

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Outnumbered

Dontreal Butler (12) feels excluded and left out when it comes to the racial makeup of the school Imagine walking into class and being outnumbered by people who are not the same race as you. Many people feel comforted when they can relate to the people around them, and being a minority in any situation can cause discomfort for those who are experiencing it. Dontreal Butler (12) speaks on how being in uncomfortable situations can affect his mindset going into a new class or school. “It most definitely affects me, and the one thing I look for whenever I go to a school is how many black kids go there and how many black teachers are there are, too. I feel more comfortable with a black person, even if I don’t know them. Having zero black students or teachers makes me feel like sometimes people are not as accepting toward black people as they are to white. I don’t know, that’s just what

I feel,” Butler said. While people of color are faced with subtle microaggressions and different treatment daily, things are starting to take a turn for the better in our society. Celebrities and influencers are trying to dispel negative stereotypes nowadays more than ever. “Unconsciously, [African Americans] get treated differently, almost like it’s second nature for white people to view blacks differently. But a lot of rappers nowadays are trying to switch it up the flow and go against those stereotypes. [Making a generalization that we are all ignorant]. Just because I’m black does not mean I can’t be respectable and have a higher sense of class.” Butler said.

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QUOTE

Ian-Violet Butler (12): Safe Haven I wanted to create [Gay Straight Alliance] just because, as somebody who is very outspoken when it comes to my sexuality, there wasn’t a community here, and the one that was, was small. I wanted to create that positive space because I felt like there wasn’t one. I thought it was weird for a school to have 3,000 kids and not have a safe space for some of them to go to. I think it’s necessary because there are a lot of gay people here and, if I’m being perfectly honest, the student body is not the most accepting people. We can’t fix that, but what I can do is create that positive space where if you go to a homophobic school or at home, you have somewhere to go once a week where you feel safe. The only open LGBT teacher is Ms. [Wadycki], who is our club sponsor. I’m not saying that teachers have to be open about that kind of stuff, but it would help students if teachers were openly accepting and making sure that their door is always open. When it comes to the student body, I feel like every year there are a few more people who are open, and especially underclassmen.

Underestimated Kimberly Hestermann (10) weighs the positives and negatives of Asian representation Imagine not feeling included because of the lack of diversity inthe media. Even though there are predominantly white influencers, Kimberly Hestermann (10) discusses how Hollywood has begun to show diversity. There have been recent milestones for Asian representation in films like Crazy Rich Asians and Netflix’s To All the Boys I Loved Before. “There isn’t a lot of Asian representation in a lot of movies, so I feel like it was good to hone in on some of those things and then more of the traditional aspects but then tie it in to pop culture. [Crazy Rich Asians] was a movie that was really popular with wellknown actors and actresses that were were part of it ,and they made it a comedy and more people were willing to watch it,” Kimberly Hestermann (10) said. Hestermann recognizes that the racist jokes will always be there but tries her best to not let it affect her. Many ethnicities are targeted with stereotypes, and Hestermann knows which ones to believe.

“There’s always going to be racist jokes about minorities. I don’t really let them affect me but there are some with stereotypical ‘Asians are good at math’ and ‘Asians are smart.’ It doesn’t get to me in a negative way, but I do hear it,” Hestermann said. When it comes to media, Hestermann is able to see more diversity. “I feel like there are a lot more influencers who are different races, ethnicities and have different body types that are positive,” Hestermann said. As for the school, Hestermann feels like it is a diverse community. She notes how we offer increasingly inclusive clubs. “Because we are such a big school, it is diverse and there’s lots of different people with different ethnicities and clubs that incorporate everyone. I haven’t surrounded myself with people who make me feel bad about anything like that. It is diverse, and there [are] so many people in it,” Hestermann said. Features / 17

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Misunderstood

Encouraged

Imagine not feeling included because of your sexuality. Briana Sambrooks (12) goes through her day feeling like this. Movies, TV shows and music are a few examples from which Sambrooks feels she is excluded. “I think a lot of movies, even if they do include LGBTQ+, don’t include lesbians and are poorly represented, and they include stereotypes. I just think the LGBT group as a whole is poorly represented and not included in media,” Sambrooks said. Stereotypes surrounding lesbians and the LGBTQ+ community as a whole are prevalent everywhere, whether they are intentional or not. When it comes to the online factor of stereotyping, Sambrooks is afraid to express who she is because of the judgement she might receive. “I think it’s really hurtful to see so much stereotyping. Especially when movies only show a certain type of lesbians. I think it’s hurtful to the community from people who aren’t LGBT and who see movies with such strong stereotyping and that’s all they know. A lot of people have stereotypes about lesbians based on what the media has shown and then not shown. Although it’s gotten better, there is still a long way we can go because there is still a lot of discrimination that exists,” Sambrooks said.

Imagine walking around the school and noticing you are the only member of your ethnicity in your graduating class. Mrs. Sumera Shakir, Mathematics, has been able to see the diversity of the students and faculty change over the years since she graduated in 1996. “Comparing it to when I graduated from here, it’s a lot more diverse than it used to be. Maybe not as much as a lot of other areas, but I can see that the diversity is growing in this area. It’s nice to see that not only is it becoming diverse, but all the students are getting along.” Shakir said. Shakir explains the racial makeup when she attended the school and the differences from then to now. “I don’t see very many differences made between each other. When I went to school here, in my class, I was the only [Pakistani]. I think there was one other Indian girl. In the school, we maybe had 10 black kids, but it was predominantly white. Some Hispanic people, but even then, they didn’t show up very much,” Shakir said. Although Shakir sees that diversity is still needed, she notices the effort and is not too critical on the subject. “At least there is an effort being made. If it’s not perfect, I don’t care, that’s fine. It’s the thought that counts, and I think we should really appreciate that and help support it instead of criticize it,” Shakir said.

Briana Sambrooks (12) explains the stereotypes surrounding the lesbian community

Sumera Shakir, Mathematics, discusses how the school’s diversity has changed over the years

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Overlooked Emilio Zambrano (11) explains the impact of diversity and inclusion in his day-to-day life Imagine overhearing an opponent call your teammate a racially charged comment while playing a sport. Emilio Zambrano (11) experienced this firsthand during a soccer game. “There was a kid on the soccer team. We were playing against Portage and he was lightskin. Someone else called him a ‘zebra’. Seeing that and hearing that and now being a junior and captain of the soccer team, taking care of my teammates and taking care of people are important to me. That example changed the way I viewed other people in general,” Zambrano said. This also changed the way Zambrano viewed himself and his race. He doesn’t perceive Mexicans as a priority in today’s world. Zambrano noticed that his culture is not a topic of discussion and feels that his culture is viewed negatively. “I feel like we just aren’t included, so I feel like people look at us as a minority instead of [being] involved,” Zambrano said. Zambrano knows there is still room for improvement, but at the same time, he has noticed changes in media representation. With the negative situations in his life, he has realized the steps that need to be taken to see change. “I feel like we just need to accept everybody. People these days have this judgement of not being accepted to a community. Whether you are white or you are Mexican, you should be involved in being together into one group. There shouldn’t be one white group and one Mexican group. We should always be together,” Zambrano said. One of the many things that influenced Zambrano with his culture is a movie called Nacho Libre, a movie about Mexican culture, that included different types of Mexcian food, wrestling and beliefs when it comes to religion. It is categorized as a comedic movie, but people, including Zambrano, noticed Mexican cultural representation shown throughout the film. The movie started out with a monk who lived and worked at an orphanage. The lead role, played by Jack Black, trained to become a Luchador (Mexican wrestler). Nacho Libre exposed the world to Mexican culture. “In Mexico, wrestling or boxing represents our nation and our country. So that’s one of the movies I think that stereotypes, in a good way, our Mexican background,” Zambrano said. Talking to people about the current issues that both Zambrano and Hispanics as a group face helps Zambrano recognize the similarities and differences that various groups go through. “Being able to talk to the people about how I feel about my race or ethnicity shows how I feel about this compared to somebody else. I see the world differently than other people see it,” Zambrano said.

Features / 19

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LET’S BREAK Racial Makeup of LC Data from 2019 Information from Lake Central High School Guidance Department

White

63.9% American Indian or Alaskan Native

0.5% Asian

2.9% Black or African American

6.7% Multi- Racial

2.2% Hispanic/Latino Ethnicity

14.7%

Overshadowed

Publications Staff Breakdown

Brooke-Logan Garcia (11) talks about the difficult conversation with transitioning

Data from 2019

Imagine having to find ways to connect your identity to the media. It can be challenging, escpecially for transgender people. Almost never do we see movies or tv shows about people being transgender. The topic is virtually untouched online and most people avoid even discussing it. “Not very often [am I able to relate to characters in movies], but when I do it’s a strong connection. It’s a one-to-one connection like the movie was made for me.” Garcia said. Circumstances such as being misgendered or being called the wrong name can occur for many people in the LGBTQ+ community. “I just feel that sometimes it’s hard to start the discussion [about being treated properly]. It feels uncomfortable when I have to start the conversation every time. I feel like if [I] start it, [other people] will have a good response but sometimes they need to start [the

conversation]. [I feel uncomfortable] more so [when people call] me the wrong name or [call] me by the wrong pronouns. They don’t intend to do that and I know it’s a conversation that I know I have to start. It’s something I let slide even though I know I shouldn’t,” Garcia said. Often, LGBTQ+ media is not written by someone who is part of the community. Being represented is extremely important for minorities, but according what’s most important is that they are accurately represented. “What’s most important is having queer writers writing the shows and accurately representing themselves and being able to see themselves. It’s better to have a minority write about how it is to live and be like a minority,” Garcia said.

White

77.2% Asian

6.5% Black or African American

4.3% Hispanic/Latino Ethnicity

12%

45% 68%

of Publications editors are minorities of editors are female

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OPINION

IT DOWN FOR YOU

Diversity from Within

Racial Representation of Movies in 2018 Information from USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative Report Data out of top 100 films of 2018

8.2%

5.9%

5.3%

One editor’s take on social media’s influence in and around Publications

White Black Latino

63.7%

16.9%

STORY BY MIA MARTINEZ

Asian Other

LGBT Characters in Films from 2014-2018

116

46

Gay

30

Lesbian

1

Bisexual

Transgender

Information from USC Annenberg Inclusion Initiative Report Data out of 4,387 speaking characters

OUR VOICE Do you feel represented through LC Publications’ social media?

65.8% Yes

34.2% No

Poll out of 342 students

Do you feel that our publications is diverse enough?

66.6% 33.3% Yes

No

Poll out of 81 students in publications

IN-DEPTH

Represented Right Crazy Rich Asians Crazy Rich Asians is a 2018 film that follows Rachel Chu, a Chinese-American economics professor, through her experience travelling to Singapore to go to her longtime boyfriend Nick Young’s best friend’s wedding.

Love, Simon

The drama comedy was released in March 2018 and follows 17-year old Simon Spier as he tries to navigate his sexuality. Simon messages a boy by the name of Blue, but he doesn’t know who Blue really is.

The Hate U Give

Released October 19, 2018, The Hate U Give is a controversial, yet very impactful movie. Based off of the book by Angie Thomas, this movie follows a 16-year-old girl named Starr Carter who is constantly switching between two worlds. Starr is drawn to activism after she witnesses the police shooting of a childhood friend.

As a Hispanic-American coming from a school district of 91.3% Hispanics for 10 years, then all of a sudden being immersed in a high school that is 73% white, I was out of my comfort zone. Scared of the drastic change, I thought I wouldn’t find my place in this foreign school with more than 3,000 students. I was no longer attending the small Chicago public school that had been my home for so long. As a current Social Media Editor-in-Chief in Publications, I cover a diverse amount of activities in the school on a daily basis. However when it comes to racial diversity on our social media feed, even I can admit that it lacks diversity. Over the years with the growing diversity of Lake Central, more people of color are applying to Publications and diversifying what we publish. As a minority who holds an editor position, the pressure to make sure everyone is covered no matter what race, sex or sexuality can be overwhelming. I’ve learned that journalism is something that takes a lot of patience, hard work and effort. If you are to pursue journalism as a career, you must have it in you to find people of different experiences and give them a voice or amplify their message. For example, this story and other stories in this year’s Scout may not have come to life if a minority student did not become its editor. In Publications we learn a variety of skills, but many of us often forget to delve deep and find stories highlighting people with differing experiences or opinions. As social media editors, we could do better. We are working toward incorporating all kinds of students into our platforms. With the rise of social media and its growing impact on our generation, people now have platforms to keep informed at all times. Younger generations have become more involved in politics and world issues that have an effect on ourselves as well as future generations. Each year I believe that the generations become more and more informed of what is happening in the world; they start conversations about these important topics. The same reflects in our own publication’s editors and staff. Features / 21

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TIKT THE RISE OF

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TOK

CULTURE

Teens embrace the highly popular video app to find new ways to express themselves STORY BY JEANOA CAMERON, MINA CARDENAS, LUKE HAMILTON, HAILEY PRASOPOULOS, BRENNA POLOVINA, ALEXANDRA RIGG, AVERY ROBINSON DESIGN BY NITYA SHAH PHOTOS BY JOHN SANCHEZ

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Caroline Krueger (10), downloaded TikTok as a joke right after winter break. Little did she know her videos would go viral. She “TikTok and Vine are similar because they both is not the only student to gain a sizeable following contain videos that are funny and edgy. I think on the app. Multiple students have become “TikTok Vine is better just because TikTok has a Musical. famous” through sharing a wide selection of videos ly aspect where people are lip syncing, which Vine with the world. Her most viral video got 2.8M views didn’t have. Vine was just raw funny videos. I think and 358K likes. they are making a comeback because that’s what “It was to the song where it goes ‘I think moto people want to see most. Most people can’t sit and moto likes you.’ Two of my other friends were in watch a long video and still find it funny. TikTok is the video, Brooke Burks (10) and Malik Smothers addictive because of the amount of things you can (10). The video wasn’t even that funny, but Smothers do on the app. You can make your own videos, you made a weird face at the end. I wasn’t really paying can watch other people’s videos or even recreate attention to it. I watched it two days later and people someone’s video and post it on your own account. I were still liking it. My goal wasn’t to get a lot of likes. think Tiktok and Vine are addictive for all the same I was just posting stuff to be funny. My mindset on reasons,” Teigen Pollack (10) said. TikTok didn’t change after my video got popular, but From E-Girls to VSCO Girls, beauty standards are I was still doing stupid videos. And I wasn’t trying to changing and unique styles are emerging. With new impress anyone; I was just trying to have fun with beauty standards arising on TikTok, new forms of my friends,” Krueger said. bullying and negative comments are surfacing. Evolving from video apps Carly Forsman (11) like Musical.ly and Vine, mentioned that differing TikTok has everything beauty standards have from the “clown check” caused a change in style. challenge to the VSCO girl “Honestly, my style changes trend. TikTok users make every day. I’d describe my short videos using either outfits as vintage, but it their own words or one of also can be a kind of edgy. thousands of soundtracks I definitely think that some to lip-sync to and make of my outfits resemble content. These videos can the aesthetic of an E-girl, Carly Forsman (11) spread rapidly and quickly but I don’t like to put become viral. According myself in boxes and live to CNN, the app’s 1 billion up to stereotypes. My most users prompted its $75 popular TikTok is about billion value. Beauty standards and stereotypes my clothes and it has over 7,000 likes and some formed from the use of TikTok have affected people say I look ‘basic’ or I dress like everyone else students in both positive and negative ways. Out of on the internet. But when I look around our school, 454 students polled, 67% admit to owning this app. I don’t see anyone else who dresses like me. I love “I think TikTok has shaped the school by creating what I wear, so it doesn’t affect me. In today’s society, a common unity between students, because we can beauty is what sells, and TikTok follows that same all relate to each other based on the videos that we principle,” Carly Forsman (11) said. watch. It has such an impact because everyone likes In the comments section on TikTok people voice to have things in common with each other. We all their opinions about others apperances. These have trends that we know, and it becomes popular words can either make or break how someone views to say them,” Krueger said. themselves. Another app that brought people together was “I feel like if I were to get TikTok famous, it Vine. Users created six-second-long videos with the would make me feel a little better about myself app. The Vine community website ‘died’ in January and definitely boost my self-esteem. If I was able of 2017, leaving users without access to the popular to get popular I could be able to spread support and social media app. Many people agree Vine and confidence,” Emilia Harvey (10) said. TikTok share similar aspects.

“Beauty is what sells, and TikTok follows that same principle.”

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CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Hair Play Emilia Harvey (10) recently cut her bangs for a change in her lifestyle. Shortly after cutting her bangs, she paired her new hair with an “e-girl” outfit, and she got a lot of compliments. Harvey explained that these compliments boosted her self-esteem. Confidence from Fashion Carly Forsman (10) shows off her outfit. Her unique style, inspired by TikTok, has helped her become more confident. Forsman has gained self confidence despite negative comments on her posts calling her “too basic.” That has only given her more motivation to be herself. Forsman explained that her outfits express how she felt day to day. Curly Hair Check Tiegan Pollack (10) runs his hand through his curly brown hair. His curls led to his popularity on TikTok through likes and followers. His first viral TikTok was a video of him and his friends, featuring the sound “Curly Hair Check”; the video gained over 480K views and 78K likes. Pollack’s video ended up on the For You 1 page, and thousands of people flooded the post with comments.

POLL

What do students watch on TikTok? 4% 6% 12%

50%

29%

*poll out of 345 students

Comedy Don’t Watch TikToks Dances Art & Fashion Music

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AROUND THE CLOCK Each day, the cafeteria staff come together like an assembly line in order to cook and serve food, wash dishes, run registers and perform other necessary tasks to run a successful lunchroom Story by Caleb Chen, Maya Firlej, Annika Gorney, Cori Lollis, Lilah Nelson, Lita Nighbert and Morgan Taylor Design by Ava Solis

Mrs. Andrea Balcerak, Cook, smiles as she grabs a tray of flatbread pizza. Balcerak makes sure that each server has enough fresh food throughout the lunches. Photo by: Lilah Nelson

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1 On a typical day in the kitchen, the chaotic sounds of trays banging together, water running and oven timers beeping fill the air. Many students only see the serving lines throughout their four years in high school, but beyond the walls and into the kitchen, an efficient system runs every single school day to ensure students are fed. From the moment their hair nets are put on, the cafeteria staff is ready for the nonstop hustle of running a lunch room. “From the time we come in to the time we leave we’re moving. Everything is on a time basis. The food has to be ready and cooked so when the servers come in they can start putting it out and prepare to serve. Our big thing is making sure we have enough food because the last person that comes in should get the same thing that the first person was offered,” Wendy Livingston, Manager, said. During the lunch periods, everyone from the cooks to the cashiers are on a very fast-paced, constant cycle to make sure each task gets done in a timely and efficient manner. The staff forms their own assembly line and relies on teamwork and their fellow employees to help make the day run smoothly. “If the cooks need help or they’re running into a

2

crunch they will call us and we’ll help them, or another cook if they don’t have as much to do they’ll come over and help that other person. We all help each other. To be successful you have to work as a team and all pull together,” Livingston said.

“I get students to interact with me because I think ‘What if I’m the only one that talks to them today?’” Greda Jackson, Cashier The servers and cashiers are responsible for interacting with each student that comes in the lunch line. Making sure students have a positive experience can help make the serving process easier. “Students for the most part are really good kids. Some are not so nice and are rude to us, but we just nod and smile politely. We just go with the flow. I am one where if I see you I’m going to talk to you to

make sure someone is talking to you today, and I do that every single day. I get students to interact with me because I think ‘What if I’m the only one that talks to them today?’” Greda Jackson, Cashier, said. Another thing the staff tries to be aware of is safety. Making sure that spills are mopped and the lunch rooms stay clean as well as the safety of the staff is an important aspect of their job. “I just want to let the kids know that the trays come down the conveyor belt by themselves and there’s no reason to whip them down the line because the ladies are working to pull the trays down the line and they’re getting hit,” Livingston said. Amidst all the chaos, the staff is able to bond due to the nonstop work environment. Being able to have conversations with coworkers can make the days fly by and ease the tension of a busy shift. “I love working here because of the other ladies, and now we have two gentlemen we just hired. I really like hanging out with the kids. They’re usually nice and a lot of fun. Overall, it’s a very fun job to have. This job has definitely taught me to laugh more and to not be so serious which has humbled me,” Diana West, Cashier, said.

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4 TIMELINE

1. Nichole Johnsen, Cook, poses for a photo holding a container of freshlycooked vegetables. Cooks arrive early in the morning to make sure that food is cooked and ready for the servers to hand out throughout the lunch periods. Photo by: John Nick Sanchez 2. Daureen Gallas, Server, grabs trays off of a conveyor belt to clean them. Servers are responsible for washing dishes and setting up the lines inbetween lunches. Photo by: Annika Gorney 3. Andrea Balcerak, Cook, puts cookies on a tray to prepare for the upcoming lunches. The cafeteria staff moves like clockwork to make each day in the kitchen successful. Photo by: Joshua Chen 4. Angela Kruger, Server, prepares a lunch tray for a student. One of the main focuses of the cafeteria staff is to make sure they don’t run out of food and that each student gets a complete lunch. Photo by: Lilah Nelson

A Day in the Life of the Lunchroom Staff 10:15 a.m.

Before the start of lunches, cashiers are responsible for gathering clip boards. They also need to make sure that each lunch line is filled with the hot food that will be served during the day

11:00 a.m.

In between lunch periods, cashiers will replenish the lines with any food needed as well as restock drinks and silverware

11:30 a.m.

Also in between lunch periods, cashiers will wipe down the tables located in Town Square. They also stand by the garbage cans to ensure students dispose of their trays correctly

12:30 p.m.

After lunches, cashiers count the money in their designated register, wipe down the tables and mop the perimeter of the dining rooms

1:00 p.m.

Also after lunches, cashiers will do any laundry that needs to be done as well as sweep and mop the laundry room

Features / 27

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For the Culture

Hottest of the Hot

Stay updated on the most popular releases in entertainment in the last few months PAGE BY MATT GACEK, MACKENZIE GUTHRIE, JADE MEHOK, CELESTE RECIO AND BRENNA SEALY

Music 1

“The Big Day” by Chance the Rapper

2

“Lover” by Taylor Swift

After five released mixtapes from Chance, he finally decided to drop his first album. Chance was influenced by his recent marriage to write the 22 songs on the album. The album includes features from John Legend, Shawn Mendes, Gucci Mane and more.

Swift described the album as a “love letter to love.” This album has a more cheerful tone opposed to her previously released album “Reputation.” Swift includes artists including Brendon Urie from Panic! At the Disco and the Dixie Chicks.

3

“Norman F— Rockwell!” by Lana Del Rey

4

“Hollywood’s Bleeding” by Post Malone

Lana Del Ray’s sixth album features a soft-rock sound throughout the 14 songs, and includes a lot of electric guitar and piano ballads. There are no feature artists on the album, proving Del Ray’s vocal power and talent on its own. With features from Travis Scott, Ozzy Osbourne, Halsey, Future and many more, Post Malone is able to show emotions through his songs. This album is about dealing with fake friends and not taking negativity from anybody.

T.V. 1

Chernobyl

2

Euphoria

Chernobyl depicts the real life events of the nuclear power plant explosion at Chernobyl. The show goes through the details of how the government dealt with the incident in a well put story, and the real characters are the actual real life people that dealt with it. Starring Zendaya, Euphoria depicts the life of a girl named Rue and her struggle in highschool with drug use, friends, sexuality and the life of other teens. The show highlights the dark sides of high school.

3

Stranger Things

4

13 Reasons Why

Set in Hawkins, Indiana, in the 1980s, Stranger Things follows a girl who escapes from a secret government test. After the test accidentally opens a portal, a boy named Will disappears, and his friends set out on a journey to look for him. Hannah Baker struggles with depression and commits suicide. Before that she made 13 tapes to the 13 reasons why she killed herself.

“This album feels really special because it’s Taylor’s first album that she fully owns by herself. I love that it is so much lighter. I think she is a really good role model for everyone; Taylor wanted to share to her fans that there is a brighter side to darker situations and to spread happiness among everyone. This is a new era for Taylor. She’s happier and in better moods.”

Audrey DiFilippo (11)

“I think I cried the first time I listened to [Norman F— Rockwell] and I almost cry every single time I listen to it now. You can feel her pain and you can hear it in her voice and I relate to her pain. There are songs about how she loves this person so much and I feel the same amount of love toward someone. It’s one of those albums that I can’t just listen to one song off of it. I have to listen to the whole thing.”

Emily Dahn (11)

I thought the cinematography was very symbolic, and it had great transitions [and] the actors did a good job at becoming the characters. They all portrayed the emotions that they were supposed to, and it felt like a real story and not just some show.”

Katie Cluck (10)

“I liked the first two seasons, but I didn’t like the third season because the storyline felt like it was a lot weaker than the first two seasons. You could really relate the show to your highschool life because the basis of the show is people spreading rumors and those rumors turning into new rumors which happens a lot in high school.”

Sydney Bach (10)

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IN-DEPTH

Disney Plus

Taylor Swift’s new album was released on Aug. 23, 2019. Swift also released an exclusive deluxe bundle with extras for her dedicated fans. Photo by: John Sanchez

Movies Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark

1

A horror film based on the children’s book series by Alvin Schwartz. Scary Stories follows three teenage friends in a small town of Mill Valley, Pennsylvania stumble upon a journal that contains stories that end up becoming all too real.

Good Boys

2

Starring Jacob Tremblay, Keith Williams and Brady Noons, the film describes three sixth-graders who find themselves involved in a series of misadventures as all three try to attend a party hosted by popular classmates.

3

IT Chapter 2

4

Spider-Man: Far From Home

The sequel to the 2017 film IT, both based on the 1986 novel by Stephen King, IT Chapter 2 focuses on the “Losers Club,” who reunites at a local restaurant and slowly begin to uncover their memories, but are terrified of taunts caused by It.

A superhero film about a teenage boy named Peter Parker based on the Marvel Comics character Spider-Man. Parker was recruited by Nick Fury and Mysterio to face the Elementals while he’s on a school trip to Europe.

“I liked this movie because it had really cool effects. When I was younger, I read the book. The special effects look so real. I would recommend this movie to a friend. It was actually good.”

Julian Rodriguez (10) “I absolutely enjoyed the movie because the special effects in it were outstanding and the acting was very good — a lot better than the other one. They chose a lot of nice scenic locations that they could do a lot with. I would 100% recommend this movie because it’s such an entertaining movie and it’s so well done.”

Disney Plus is a new streaming service that will be released on Nov. 12. It is a paid service without advertisements starting at $7 a month. It is meant to rival services such as Netflix and Apple TV, and people will be able to bundle the service with other disney services such as Hulu and sports-focused ESPN Plus because they run on the same tech platform. The service is expected to amass around 60 to 90 million users by 2025, and will be seen as a major source of revenue for Disney. The platform will have a wide range of disney owned films, Fox legacy content and new content exclusive to Disney Plus, that is sure to please fans around the world.

1

The Disney Brand Itself

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Pixar

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Marvel and Star Wars

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National Geographic

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New Fox Franchise

There will be original Disney movies, and some new exclusive content specifically made to be featured on Disney Plus.

All Pixar movies, such as Finding Nemo,Toy Story and WALL-E, are rumored to be put on the platform.

The Marvel and Star Wars franchises are owned by Disney, and all of the movies will be on this new streaming service.

National Geographic is partnering with Disney and there will be content from Nat Geo on the platform also.

The Fox Franchise is creatings a new generation with Disney Plus. Shows such as the Simpsons and Avatar will be included.

Information from CNN, TechRadar, cnet.com

Lee Cameron (12)

Features / 31

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Profile for Lake Central Scout

Scout - October 2019  

Volume 54 / October Issue / Lake Central High School / St. John, IN. Scout is a student publication of Lake Central High School in St. John,...

Scout - October 2019  

Volume 54 / October Issue / Lake Central High School / St. John, IN. Scout is a student publication of Lake Central High School in St. John,...

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