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WEEKLY

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LAGNIAPPE

S E P T E M B E R 2 8 , 2 0 1 7 - O C T O B E R 4 , 2 0 1 7 | w w w. l a g n i a p p e m o b i l e . c o m ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com

ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com

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BAY BRIEFS

The day care driver charged with manslaughter in the death of 5-year-old Kamden Johnson was in court this week for a preliminary hearing.

COMMENTARY

South Alabama needs a little more clout in Montgomery.

BUSINESS

A groundbreaking ceremony Monday attracted city leaders to the Blue Bird Hardware & Seed Store property at 2724 Old Shell Road in Mobile.

CUISINE

An autumn guide to fresh roots, greens and those kinds of things.

ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com

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J. MARK BRYANT Sports Writer sports@lagniappemobile.com STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA RASMUSSEN Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com

COVER

TenSixtyFive returns to downtown Mobile Sept. 29-Oct. 1, featuring Cage the Elephant, St. Paul & the Broken Bones, Blackberry Smoke and more.

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BETH WILLIAMS Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com ALEEN MOMBERGER Advertising Sales Executive aleen@lagniappemobile.com

MUSIC

Fresh off of TenSixyFive, don’t miss two music festivals coming to Baldwin County in October.

RACHEL THOMAS Advertising Sales Executive rachel@lagniappemobile.com MELISSA EDGE Editorial Assistant events@lagniappemobile.com ROSS PRITCHARD Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager jackie@lagniappemobile.com CONTRIBUTORS: Ron Sivak, Jeff Poor, Asia Frey, Brian Holbert, John Mullen, Tom Ward, Nancy Adams ON THE COVER: CAGE THE ELEPHANT BY DANIEL ANDERSON POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Editorial, advertising and production offices are located at 1100B Dauphin St. Mobile, AL 36604. Mailing address is P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Phone: 251.450.4466 Fax 251.450.4498. Email: ashleytoland@lagniappemobile.com or rholbert@lagniappemobile.com LAGNIAPPE is printed at Walton Press. All letters sent to Lagniappe are considered to be intended for publication. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and Alternative Weeklies Network All rights reserved. Something Extra Publishing, Inc. Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced without the expressed permission of the publishers. Individuals may take one copy of the paper free of charge from area businesses, racks or boxes. After that, papers are $3 per issue. Removal of more than one copy from these points constitutes theft. Violators are subject to prosecution.

For Lagniappe home delivery visit

www.lagniappemobile.com/lagniappehd

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Individual defendants have been dismissed from a lawsuit against Mobile Ballet, and changes have been announced for the 2017-2018 season.

FILM

“Their Finest” is a poignant but not (too) cheesy ode to perseverance in WWII London.

GARDENING

The Gulf Coast Herb Society shares its knowledge of growing herbs in cooler weather months.

SPORTS

New York transplant Zach Pall founded Parallax Lacrosse with the goal of supporting and promoting the sport in the Mobile area.

STYLE

Hump day happiness thanks to Trombone shorty and Nic Cage.

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GOING POSTAL

Lesson Learned at the Saenger Dear Editors, As the Lagniappe is a well-known supporter of live music in the Bay City, I thought you might want the scoop on a really good deal for catching great shows in Mobile, on the cheap. If this gets you as excited about catching a concert as it does me, please don’t keep it to yourselves. My hope is that you will share the following info with all my fellow Nappie-readers. Cheers to you! Okay, my fellow concertgoers, here’s the inside skinny on the best deal in town for cheap, live music. It’s gonna surprise you, but it is floor tickets at the Saenger. That’s right, floor tickets; just like at a Dead Show! I’m talking bona fide, comeone-come-all, rush-the-stage floor tickets, at the Saenger! And the best part is, they are the cheapest seats in the place. Yep, for the same price as the cheapest, nosebleed seat in the house, you can cozy on up, down on the main floor. All you have to do is buy the least expensive seat you can, and use it. Yes, sit there, but only until right after the main act begins, because once the lights go down and the main act begins, you are free to, as they say, ‘move about the cabin.’ Now, you may go nearly any place you please. And next stop, the main floor! To hell with your cheap seats! You’re headed for the aisles and all those empty seats downstairs, between the chumps who were fool enough to pay for those fancy shmancy orchestra seats. Ha! It’s that easy.

Now, I know what you’re thinking... one of two things, either “hey, that’s dishonest” or “heyyy, what about security?” But you needn’t worry. My response is the same on both accounts. “Don’t sweat it. No one at the Saenger cares.” I repeat, “NO ONE AT THE SAENGER CARES.” Seriously, there’s no one at the wheel to care. No kidding, during a show, the whole place is being piloted by a hodgepodge of vendors and volunteers, and about two off duty cops. There are no staff nor management to be found anywhere. So when some gloomy chump gets all whiney, mewling about, saying “hey no fair, I paid for orchestra seats,” just let ‘em whine. Even if he wants to go complain, there is no one there to listen. Truly, the crybaby has few options. First choice? He might speak to the security guy guarding the door to the box seats, but big deal, you can beat him to this one by buddying up to that guard long before crybaby’s panties start to wad. Next option? Volunteer ushers. Need I say more? This option is good for a laugh! Just dance on, and watch as Mr. Whineypants is turned around by the simple truth, “Sir, I’m a volunteer.” Now at this point, Mr. Orchestra Seat’s only choice is the bar staff, whom, you guessed it, don’t even work for the Saenger anyway! Hahahaha! You have to admit it is pretty funny, the thought of some poor slob, off bleating for an employee of the Saenger, to “police those gosh-durned orchestra seats.” Ha! And then finding no one! Haha! Priceless! And in the meantime, you, of course,

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can simply move on into those recently vacated seats. That’s what I call a WIN in my book! So what if a few overpaying ding-dongs get mad. Screw ‘em if they can’t take a joke. Their mamas should have told them that life isn’t fair. You know? Just think about it this way: ultimately, you’re doing old whiney-pants a favor, by helping him learn a tough lesson or two about sour grapes. You are actually a modern-day Samaritan! And with the phat concert seats to prove it! So remember, it isn’t your fault that absentee leadership fosters a free-for-all and festival atmosphere in the Saenger. Not at all. On the contrary, it is your fortune! Now go on! Enjoy yourself! Catch a show at the Saenger Theatre in Mobile. But take my advice, don’t be fool enough to pay for those floor seats, especially when you don’t have to. Woohoo y’all! Keep on rocking, just do it on the cheap! Yours Truly, B. Nolen (AKA Dammit Boy) Mobile, AL Postscript: Don’t bother trying to squeeze into the box seats. Those are the only seats protected at the Saenger, and they are guarded like the stage is. Otherwise, buy the cheap tix because it’s laissez faire at the Saenger! Don’t be a chump, just laissez bon temps rouler! BTW, this is satire, and BAD advice. Dammit Boy = Whiney Pants = B. Nolen of Mobile, AL

Students gone wild Editor: Ashley Trice was right on the mark when she said we need “better control” over alcohol and drug use on college campuses (“Change needed on America’s college campuses,” Sept. 21-27). Her idea to put “adult medical professionals” in dorms and frat houses is a step in the right direction. I have another idea — random drug testing. Our Mobile-area private and public schools have drug testing programs in place. Some do a better job than others in administering the tests but they are in place and their primary purpose is to give kids a reason to reject illegal drugs. Why not continue the tests in our colleges and universities? Many of these young people “go wild” when their parents are not overseeing them every day. Recent national drug surveys indicate that 20 percent of 18-25-year-old people use illegal drugs. That is especially problematic because their brains are not fully developed. We have over 25,000 college-age people in Mobile so that means over 5,000 of them are purchasing and using illegal drugs. Every one of these people knows it is wrong to use these drugs and every one of them is “thumbing their nose” at thousands of dedicated law enforcement officers and military personnel who risk their lives on a daily basis to keep these drugs out of their hands. Their “loose lifestyle” encourages foreign drug smugglers to increase their invasion of our borders with their unregulated poisons. Most of the money they spend on these drugs will end up in the hands of Mexican and Colombian drug cartels. I suggest that Mobile area colleges and universities establish robust random drug testing programs for all students. If they fail the test, they could lose any financial assistance they are receiving. Once these students graduate they most likely will be asked to submit to random drug testing at their place of employment. It might be a good idea to test the professors and staff also! They might as well get used to it now. George Krietemeyer Mobile


BAYBRIEF | COURTS

Probable cause MANSLAUGHTER CASE AGAINST DAY CARE DRIVER MOVES FORWARD BY JASON JOHNSON

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istrict Judge Bob Sherling has found enough probable cause for a grand jury to consider moving forward with charges against the former van driver for an unlicensed day care center in Mobile accused of causing the death of 5-year-old Kamden Johnson last month. Johnson was found dead on the side of Demetropolis Road on Aug. 21 after police say he was likely left in a van driven by 46-yearold Valarie Rena Patterson. The day after Johnson’s death, Patterson was charged with manslaughter and abuse of a corpse. At the time, Patterson was employed as a driver at the Community Nursery and Preschool Academy on Hillcrest Road — a facility operated by Community Church Ministries Inc. that is not licensed or regularly inspected by by the state due to Alabama’s religious exemption law. At a hearing this week, Mobile Police Det. Nick Crepeau offered new insight into what police believe happened on the day Johnson died. On the stand, he discussed interviews he conducted with people who say they saw the boy that day, including his mother, day care employees and young children who were on Patterson’s van. Crepeau said he spoke with one employee who said she personally put Johnson in the van Patterson drove that morning to drop off children at various area schools. Johnson is believed to have been in Patterson’s van and was supposed to be dropped off at Collier Elementary. In his testimony, Crepeau said there was no log made of the child passengers in the van that morning. Surveillance footage shows the van arriving at Collier around 8:16 a.m., Aug. 21. He said several children can been seen exiting the bus, but not Johnson. Crepeau discussed interviews he conducted with the other children — including Patterson’s 11-year-old daughter — who said Johnson was in the van that morning. However, Crepeau said he had “fallen asleep” in the “very back seat” on the way to the school and “didn’t get off.” He went on to discuss what detectives know about Patterson’s whereabouts that day. Phone records indicate she sent a text message to another day care employee notifying her the kids had been dropped off at their schools before driving to a hotel in the Beltline area. Crepeau said keycard information indicates Patterson entered a room at the the Fairfield Inn at approximately 8:37 a.m., where she’s believed to have stayed until security footage shows her leaving the hotel roughly four hours later at 11:54 a.m. Though there was never any indication given about when or where investigators believe Johnson died, Assistant District Attorney Jennifer Wright asked Crepeau about the temperatures in Mobile on that day. He said highs that day went into the mid-90s. After leaving the hotel, Patterson went to a nearby gas station where she spent 10 to 15 minutes in the parking lot before leaving and then returning again, according to Crepeau. At 3:22 p.m., he said, Patterson returned to Collier to pick up the children. This time she

created a log of her passengers. Crepeau, who reviewed the passenger log, said Patterson had written “out” beside Kamden Johnson’s name, indicating he never boarded the van that day. At Wright’s prompting, Crepeau also discussed the multiple interviews he conducted with Patterson before and after she was charged with any crime. In their first meeting, which occurred at Community Nursery and Preschool Academy, he said Patterson seemed “a little nervous” and was reluctant to come in for an interview before “eventually agreeing to.” Patterson was interviewed a second time at MPD headquarters, and this time, Crepeau said, seemed more emotional, in his opinion. “She asked me to apologize to Kamden’s parents on her behalf,” he added. “I also asked her if there was anyone else she thought I needed to talk to, and she indicated there was not.” During cross-examination, however, Patterson’s attorney, Christine Hernandez, prodded Crepeau into discussing several of the things MPD detectives don’t know about Johnson’s death — such as where he died, how he died, when he died and how his body got to Demetropolis Road. While there have been statements suggesting Johnson died after being left in a hot van for an extended period of time, detectives are still awaiting the results of an autopsy from the Alabama Department of Forensic Sciences to determine his actual cause of death. On cross examination, Crepeau also revealed investigators have seen no video footage or heard any witness claims indicating there were any passengers in Patterson’s van after she dropped the children off at school. There’s also no known footage of Patterson moving a body out of the van that day and no witness statements describing anything similar. “What we discovered today is that officer Nick Crepeau cannot tell us how Kamden died, when Kamden died or where Kamden died,” Hernandez said after the hearing. “He can’t tell us how Kamden was placed in that location on Demetropolis Road, and he can’t tell us if the white van that’s been indicated to be Mrs. Patterson’s actually transported Kamden anywhere.” Hernandez said her client checked into the Fairfield Inn on Aug. 21 because “her air conditioning had been out the night before.” When asked about other children who claimed they saw Johnson’s on Patterson’s van that day, Hernandez said “those are some very young children, and we have information to the contrary.” “We’ll be pursuing that Kamden did not get in the van at Hillcrest and was not transported anywhere in that van,” she added. Prosecutors with the Mobile County District Attorney’s office will present evidence to a grand jury, though it’s unclear exactly when that might occur as grand jury proceedings are not disclosed to the public. From there, the grand jury can elect to indict Patterson on any number of charges related to Johnson’s death or no-bill the case — effectively erasing the charges related to her arrest.

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BAYBRIEF | BALDWIN COUNTY

Taxing the tourists

GULF SHORES, ORANGE BEACH RAISE LODGING FEE BY JOHN MULLEN

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hrough years of service on the Orange Beach City Council and as a three-term mayor, Tony Kennon says one lesson still rings true across the years. “Dealing with state and federal agencies, it’s becoming clearer and clearer to me we’re getting no help,” Kennon said at a recent council meeting. “Canal Road is going to have another lane added to it because we came up with 60-65 percent of the money through BP funds. Our lobbyists tell us if Trump does an infrastructure plan, that it will be all based on matching.” With more condos on the drawing board and single-family building permits close to record levels — in both Orange Beach and Gulf Shores — the constant traffic nightmares during the peak tourist season are just going to worsen, Kennon says. His opinion is shared by Gulf Shores Mayor Robert Craft. In meetings on Sept. 19 and Sept. 25, the two councils raised lodging taxes by 2 percentage points and earmarked the new collections to find and build traffic solutions as well as help with the clean beach initiative. The new tax takes effect May 1 in both cities. “I feeling strongly that building a road through the park solves our traffic problems for many, many years to come,” Kennon said. “And the impetus is going to be paying for it. I don’t think the state will ever do it. I think the state will have a hard time saying no if we say ‘here’s the money.’” Other projects Kennon would like to see completed are the five-laning of Canal Road from The Wharf to Alabama 161, with a pos-

sible bypass south to a new intersection of the two roadways. Gulf Shores’ wish list includes adding a third lane to the southbound side of the Intracoastal Waterway. Included in that fix would be a pedestrian/bicycle path attached to the side of the bridge. Others in Gulf Shores include median work on Alabama 182, the main beach road, improvements to the Alabama 59 intersections at County Road 6 and County Road 8, and widening portions of each of those roads. The city would also like to see a new road from County Road 8 and the Foley Beach Express south to County Road 4 and into the city’s Business and Aviation Park. Public Works Director Mark Acreman said the state is actively acquiring rights of way for that project. But money is needed, officials from both cities say. In Orange Beach, officials say the added 2 percentage points would generate more than $4 million, and in Gulf Shores it would add more than $2 million to city coffers. In 2016 Orange Beach’s revenue from the current 5 percent lodging tax was $15.7 million. Gulf Shores collected $7.7 million. The tax until May 1 will be 11 percent with each city getting 5 percent, the state 4 percent and 2 percent going to Gulf Shores and Orange Beach Tourism to market Alabama’s beachfront. In comparison with some other coastal towns, Gulf Shores and Orange Beach’s tax would still be lower than Mobile’s, even with Pensacola and Panama City and higher than Destin, Navarre Beach, Walton County and Biloxi.

BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Changing hands SPIRE ENERGY ACQUIRES MOBILE GAS

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BY DALE LIESCH

natural gas utility with a presence in three states has acquired Mobile Gas, but there will be no oversight of the new company from the Alabama Public Service Commission. Starting this week, Mobile Gas customers will begin to notice changes resulting from the August acquisition by Spire Energy, company spokeswoman Michelle Niewald wrote in an email. “Starting today, customers will see Spire employees in orange and gray uniforms with Spire logos on their vehicles,” she wrote. “They will also see a new bill starting this week — be on the lookout because it comes in an orange envelope. Look for our new trucks and hard hats in your neighborhood.” With offices in Alabama, Mississippi and Missouri, Spire serves more than 1.7 million customers, Niewald wrote. The larger customer base should result in savings from efficiencies and economies of scale. “As a growing company, we can manage costs more efficiently to keep customer bills as low as possible,” she wrote. “We’ve always promised that growing our company would benefit those we serve. We know we’re delivering on that promise because our operating costs are going down while our customer satisfaction

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scores keep going up.” Spire now serves 89,000 customers in the Mobile area. “We have a strong presence in every community we serve — from Mobile to Birmingham and beyond,” Niewald wrote. Like Mobile Gas’ parent company, Energy South, Spire will not be regulated by the Alabama Public Service Commission, according to information provided by the commission. As such, the commission did not vote on the acquisition. The commission, which is given its regulatory authority by state law, oversees investorowned utilities. However, municipal gas distribution companies and gas districts are exempt from the commission’s regulatory authority. The commission also expects greater efficiencies to lead to possible savings for customers. Niewald wrote that Spire will allow former Mobile Gas customers to pay bills at more locations than ever before. For the next week, customers can also pay their bills through the Mobile Gas website, or by calling Spire. “Starting Oct. 2, customers in Mobile will gain a new customer portal with options like reviewing gas usage, 24/7 appointment scheduling, text alerts and pay by text,” she wrote.


BAYBRIEF | BALDWIN COUNTY

Fast track

CONTROVERSIAL PLAN FOR NEW ORANGE BEACH SCHOOL OK’D

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BY JOHN MULLEN

wo Baldwin County officials are at odds over who knew what and when they knew it. Either way, the Baldwin County Board of Education fast-tracked a decision to build a new $14.9 million middle school in Orange Beach. The school will house all seventh and eighth graders in the Gulf Shores High School feeder pattern. In the same meeting, the board OK’d a new $13.4 million elementary school in Bay Minette. Folks in Gulf Shores were less than pleased with how quickly the plan came about, saying city officials were told about it just hours before Superintendent Eddie Tyler publicly announced it. “Mr. Tyler had said in the past he was going to have town hall meetings and come to the public for input,” Kevin Corcoran, co-chairman of the Island Task Force for Education, said. “Instead, we hear 48 hours before the vote what the plan is. I don’t see any transparency there.” Gulf Shores Mayor Robert Craft said he only heard about the plan about two hours before Tyler presented it to the Orange Beach City Council on Sept. 19. Craft said the move, passed in a 5-2 vote by the board on Sept. 21, “was an unexpected surprise to me and the members of our City Council.” Craft said he expected more notice for him and parents in Gulf Shores about the plan. In the 2016-17 school year, 67 percent of the students at Gulf Shores Middle School lived in the city, according to school board numbers. Others were from Orange Beach, Ono Island, the Fort Morgan peninsula and other unincorporated areas within the feeder pattern. “The complete absence of communication while this plan was being engineered is perplexing,” Craft said in an emailed statement. “While I am encouraged that the Baldwin County Board of Education now has $15 million available to invest in our feeder pattern, their neglect to incorporate any input or involvement from our community into the development of a plan of this magnitude is extremely disappointing.” Tyler said the possibility of a middle school in Orange Beach was discussed numerous times in meetings during the past year. He and leaders from Gulf Shores and Orange Beach were working to hammer out the details of forming a special tax district in the Gulf Shores High School feeder pattern. The plan would have let voters decide if they wanted to pay an extra 3 mills in property tax with all the funds being used for new buildings in the Gulf Shores feeder pattern. “For Mayor Craft to say there has been no communication is simply not so,” Tyler said, also in an emailed statement. “In fact, the idea for a new middle school located in Orange Beach came

about in a presentation that he and his team, Kevin Corcoran and others, presented to me and members of my staff when presenting a new 3 mill tax increase they wanted to pursue.” During talks about the tax district, Tyler said Gulf Shores leaders asked the county to hold off announcing construction plans in the current $60 million pay-as-you-go effort. “We waited,” Tyler said. “When they decided not to move forward, I immediately put Gulf Shores on the priority list for new expansion and we rushed to get something done. One week after we announced our plans, the city announced the idea to begin a city school split, which again froze everything. The word ‘blindsided’ was mentioned at Thursday night’s board meeting. How ironic.” Island representative Angie Swiger was one of two board members to vote against the Orange Beach plan. She made a motion to table it for a month and take time to hear from the community. It died for a lack of a second. “If it had been done in a different way and the residents had some time for some input and hear the plan and ask questions, I think it could have all gone differently,” Swiger said. “Now they’re angry and it’s harder to reach them. The Gulf Shores side, which is the majority of the students in that building, is very, very upset.” At the Orange Beach presentation, Tyler said he had the backing of Swiger for a new Orange Beach school. Both say she was told about the plan on Sept. 14. “To say that I was 100 percent on board, which is what I was told he said, was not accurate,” Swiger said. “He did meet with me and told me about the plan, but he did not tell me he was making a public presentation to Orange Beach. I told him I understood what he was trying to do and I would like to talk to the principals and some Gulf Shores citizens about the plan.” Originally, the school board was going to spend just under $4 million to add a wing of 12 classrooms and a gym to Gulf Shores Elementary. It is one of the most overcrowded schools in the system and on the same campus as the middle school. The new plan moves the middle school to Orange Beach in August 2019 and the elementary school will take over the former middle school. “This solves a myriad of problems,” Tyler said. “Relocating the Gulf Shores Middle School students to the new middle school campus will greatly alleviate the traffic congestion at Gulf Shores schools.” The city of Orange Beach donated land for the school at the site of the former wastewater treatment plant on Canal Road. Tyler said the land is worth an estimated $5 million.

MEDIA UPDATE Shunnarah firm pays AMG, ending lawsuit ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR

It didn’t take long for high-profile personal injury attorney Alexander Shunnarah to pony up after the Alabama Media Group filed suit against his firm Sept. 14. As we reported last week, the Shunnarah firm was sued in Mobile County Circuit Court by AMG for more than $270,000 in unpaid advertising fees. AMG is the parent company of al.com and the Mobile Press-Register and is owned by Newhouse Corp. According to Shunnarah & Associates LLP managing partner James T. Laura Jr., the debt was paid on the afternoon of Sept. 18. A stipulation of dismissal with prejudice was eventually signed by AMG attorney Joshua Friedman on Sept. 21, ending the legal issues between one of the state’s largest media companies and a man whose face seems to grace close to half the billboards in Alabama. A glowing 2015 al.com article about Shun-

narah’s success said the firm had more than 2,000 billboards bearing the attorney’s smiling visage, along with “thousands of television spots each month.” The firm also has run a prolific amount of digital advertising with al.com, according to documents included in AMG’s suit against Shunnarah. Laura pointed out the transfer was made prior to an article about the lawsuit running in Lagniappe’s Sept. 21 issue, and publication online at www. lagniappemobile.com on Sept. 20. However, Lagniappe did contact Shunnarah’s Mobile office on Sept. 18 — a full day before the paper’s deadline — informing an employee there that a story was being written and asking for comment from the firm. That employee said she would contact Laura concerning the matter. No one from Shunnarah’s firm contacted Lagniappe until Sept. 21; online monitoring of the lawsuit through Alacourt showed only that summonses were issued on Sept. 18. AMG attorney Friedman confirmed Sept. 22 that the stipulation of dismissal with prejudice had been signed and the matter is closed.

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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Budgeting ‘roulette’ CITY COUNCIL DELAYS VOTE ON FY 2018 BUDGET TWO WEEKS BY DALE LIESCH

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iting a need for consensus on a number of issues, the Mobile City Council delayed a vote on Mayor Sandy Stimpson’s proposed 2018 fiscal year budget for two weeks. The delay guarantees the budget won’t be approved by the start of the fiscal year on Oct. 1. However, the move to delay the vote beyond the deadline is not “unprecedented,” Council President Gina Gregory said during a pre-conference meeting. It would simply result in the city government operating on the 2017 fiscal year budget. The issues remaining to be worked out involve longevity pay for firefighters, funding for the GulfQuest Maritime Museum of the Gulf of Mexico and holiday bonuses for all city employees. Continuing on his talking points since the budget was first introduced, Councilman Levon Manzie on Tuesday was set to cut GulfQuest funding by half to support a one-time bonus for city employees making less than $45,000 per year. The $400 bonuses for 1,237 city employees would cost $535,200, Manzie said. To pay for the bonuses, Manzie suggested pulling $267,600 each from GulfQuest line-item budgets for personnel and operating expenses. The move would leave roughly $464,000 in the GulfQuest line item. “It would be so we can at least show some appreciation for our employees who work hard day in and day out,” Manzie said during the pre-conference meeting. Despite GulfQuest’s “uninspiring history,” Councilman Joel Daves said “what we have is what we have” in reference to spending almost $1 million on eight city

employees as well as utilities and maintenance costs at the museum. “I think we should do everything we can to help our city employees …,” Daves said. “We also need to continue to be careful with spending, especially in our general fund budget.” Daves also mentioned the $27 million in grants from the Federal Transportation Administration and the Federal Highway Administration that helped build the museum. The museum has to keep a maritime focus, or those agencies could ask the city to pay back all or a portion of those funds. City attorney Ricardo Woods compared taking money out of the GulfQuest budget and altering its current makeup to playing Russian roulette. He told councilors that altering the operating hours or maintenance of GulfQuest could trigger a federal inquiry into the spending of those grant funds, which could cost the city $27 million. In Russian roulette, he said, there is a 17 percent chance there’s a bullet in the chamber when a player pulls the trigger. He estimated that the chances of the federal government stepping in if the museum is altered is greater than that. “I think this is ill-advised,” Woods said. “I think this is a gamble.” Further, Woods said the money would have to come from the city’s capital budget. An expenditure of that amount would mean a 15-month shutdown of the city’s capital improvement plan. He added that a default on federal grants in this area could lead to greater scrutiny going forward on all other federal grants the city receives.

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“This is not chess or checkers, this is Jenga,” Woods said. “If you take one piece out, it all could tumble. I’m not saying it will, but it could.” City spokesman George Talbot put a finer point on it, saying it would be hard for Stimpson’s office to budge on any negotiations involving GulfQuest at this time. He added that the mayor’s office did not think taking money out of the line item for the bonuses was worth the risk, citing the federal funds. “The Christmas bonus proposal could be the most expensive Christmas bonus in the history of municipal government,” he said. Undeterred, Manzie suggested only having the museum operate two or three days per week and have it manned by staff provided by the museum’s nonprofit. He said the city could provide staff from other departments when needed. Woods said the nonprofit is healthier than it has been in the past, but can’t afford to pick up the slack yet. Woods said the city employees currently in place are specially trained to maintain the exhibits. Manzie added that the city could work with the federal government on the museum’s opening hours. It’s currently open four days per week. Councilman Fred Richardson called GulfQuest a “failure” and said it was time to “pull the plug” on it. He added that the city could work out an agreement on the grants to allow for the museum to be open part time. As for trained employees at the museum, Richardson said he can’t imagine it would be that hard to train other employees to work the museum. He used Airbus as an example. “When we recruited Airbus, they brought people in who had never been on an airplane before,” he said. “In a year, they were building airplanes. You’re telling me we can’t keep the little museum open; we can do it if we want to do it.” The administration and council seemed much closer to consensus on longevity pay for firefighters. The MFRD, under the guidance of new Chief Mark Sealy, have found savings in the 2017 budget. In a letter to councilors, Stimpson said once those savings are realized he would add the step raises to the budget, to go into effect in April. It would cost the city $925,000 to give each firefighter a 2.5 percent raise for each five years of service, up to 20 years. Councilwoman Bess Rich and members of the Mobile Firefighters Association said they would like to see that wording and the projected funds added to the 2018 budget. MFA Vice President Tony McCarron told councilors he wanted to hear a guarantee from Stimpson himself, as well as see it in the budget. In an example, he compared the city to a sports franchise, where Stimpson was the owner.


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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE COUNTY

Pay day RAISES, CAPITAL PROJECTS TARGETED IN MOBILE COUNTY BUDGET BY JASON JOHNSON

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fter taking “a conservative approach” for many years since the 2008 recession, the Mobile County Commission has approved a $141 million budget expected to fund some long-sought capital upgrades and extend pay raises to all county employees. Passed by a unanimous vote this week, the budget includes a 2.5 percent raise for all employees, a $500 “salary supplement” and an additional 7.5 percent salary increase for court police who provide security in Government Plaza and other county buildings. Finance Director Dana Foster-Allen is projecting a $4.5 million increase in revenues in the next fiscal year, including an estimated $3.4 million uptick in taxes the county expects to collect. While there have been steady increases in sales tax receipts since 2012, Foster-Allen also credited the county’s “conservative budgeting practices” for its current financial outlook. Even with revenues trending upward and a likely surplus, Foster-Allen said there would be controls in place to ensure the county does not operate at a deficit in 2018. “All of these revenues will be monitored and measured against projections, and with the county’s budget being heavily dependent on sales taxes, those will be strictly measured,” she said. “That’s key for all counties, as sales taxes are our main economic generator.” Because of the projected surplus, which includes $6 million of carryover funding from 2017, the budget for 2018 includes $5.1 million in capital improvements — a 35 percent increase from 2017. The county also maintains roughly the same level of debt service, which Foster-Allen credited for recent improvements to the county’s bond rating. “One of our investors asked the county what we were going to do [with that surplus], and we presented them with

these one-time capital purchases,” she added. “That was favorable, and subsequently the county received an increase in its bond rating.” Among other things, those one-time expenditures include $265,000 for information technology upgrades, $720,000 for new vehicles at the Mobile County Sheriff’s Office and $600,000 for software upgrades that will streamline electronic land records maintained by the Mobile County Probate Court. Another $150,000 is earmarked to reimburse Goodwill for losses it has incurred operating the county’s recycling center based on an agreement two commissioners struck with the nonprofit earlier this year. Foster-Allen said “just about every county department received capital monies” in addition to their annual budget allocations, something Commissioner Jerry Carl said was important when the commission considered how surplus monies from previous years should be allocated. “The first thing we all agreed on was pay raises, and then we started looking at capital improvement projects,” Carl said. “We went to each department and asked, ‘If you had some extra money, how would you use it?’ Everyone had some input into this budget, which has worked out much, much nicer than in previous years.”

Pay raises

Over the past three years, a regular topic of discussion during budget deliberations has been pay raises for county employees, who went several years without any adjustment until 2014, when the commission began bumping salaries up around 5 percent annually. While the proposed budget only includes a 2.5 percent increase, it also provides funding for a $500 salary supple-

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ment that employees will see in early November. For public safety employees, that 2.5 percent raise will be added to the 7.5 percent bump in salary MCSO personnel received in February after Sheriff Sam Cochran told commissioners low wages were causing the department to lose officers and recruits. A full year of statistics has yet to be collected, but Cochran thinks the raises have helped. “We’re competing against other agencies that have given raises, and against the private sector because Wal-Mart, Amazon … some of those jobs pay more than the starting salaries for our deputies,” Cochran said. “When someone compares our starting salary to other agencies, it’s beginning to give us a bit of an edge or at least putting us on an equal level with some others.” The commission also agreed to separate a cost-of-living adjustment for MCSO personnel from the merit increase other county employees will receive. Everyone will see the same bump in pay, but a merit increase moves employees up their pay scale, while a COLA raises the starting salary for new hires at MCSO. Commission President Merceria Ludgood said the distinction was important for many county employees who didn’t receive a pay increase with MCSO earlier this year. “Everybody knows I voted against the 7.5 [percent increase] because we have so many employees who are underpaid and make far less than some in the sheriff’s department,” Ludgood said. “I want to do right by everybody, but, at a minimum, I want them be able to see themselves walking up the steps in their pay range and classification.”

Grand Bay library

When an untenable lease brought the future of the Semmes branch of the Mobile Public Library into question this spring, it also highlighted a disparity in the funding for other county libraries. Commissioners have since purchased the Semmes library for $1.3 million, but that situation may have provided Carl the leverage to secure funding for a library renovation in his own district next year. “I can’t lie and say didn’t use that,” Carl said when asked if the situation in Semmes played a role in the $600,000 allocated in the 2018 budget for renovations at the Grand Bay Library. “For at least five years [Grand Bay] has been trying to raise money to do those improvements, but at the rate they were going, it would have taken another 10 years, if not more,” Carl added. “Bayou La Batre has a very small library, and that’s it in the southern part of the county. Now we’ll have one in Grand Bay; it will be properly managed, staffed and hopefully look really nice.” With renovations set aside in the budget, Carl hopes the Grand Bay Library can model itself as a “regional” library like the Semmes branch has. Additionally, the 2018 budget also allocates around $86,000 to increase the “per capita” expenditures at libraries throughout Mobile County.


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COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

South Alabama needs more clout ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

While we do have some fine people among our legislative delegation, there are also a number who just seem to be there to collect a check and lack true vision. Few appear to have any desire or ability to rise into important leadership positions. The leaders hold the purse strings. We also have a media gap that has only worsened over the years. The Birmingham News has always been the state’s big-dog newspaper. The Press-Register, while once a good-sized daily, was for years a pretty pathetic public watchdog. Now it is a shell of itself and Newhouse has centered just about everything in Birmingham. As a weekly, Lagniappe tries to cover local politics and institutions as well as we can, but we have never enjoyed the kind of support from many of the area’s bigger advertisers that would allow us to project a journalistic presence in Montgomery. Mobile is easy to ignore because of that. I know there are local “movers and shakers” banding together to try to address the power gap and flip the script. With legislative elections coming up next year there is an opportunity to get rid of some deadwood and find people who will strive for leadership positions. The irony certainly isn’t lost that at a time when Mobile and Baldwin both are on major upswings, we are becoming more and more politically irrelevant to the powers that be in Montgomery. Until we do something to create some impact north of the Dolly Parton Bridge, they’ll continue treating us like the proverbial red-headed stepchild.

THEGADFLY

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Jeremiah Denton and Jeff Sessions came from the Mobile area. And Denton only served one term. If you look at the governor’s mansion, we haven’t fared much better. Don Siegelman was the only Mobile boy to make it to the top in at least the past 100 years. (I grew tired of looking at old governors once they started resembling Grover Cleveland.) Of course things didn’t work out too well for Don either. Looking at the current state of affairs, Southwestern Alabama isn’t making many waves in Montgomery. We only have a couple of members of our legislative delegation in leadership positions, and one of those is retiring. Sen. Bill Hightower has thrown his hat into the ring to run for governor, so there is some hope. Just be careful, Bill, there seems to be a much tighter definition of ethical misconduct if you’re from Mobile than, say … if you’re from Tuscaloosa. Some of the issues that create a situation in which the second-largest population center in the state carries almost none of its political power are natural. This area was founded by Catholics and has a different flair than the rest of the state, where Protestants chased off the native inhabitants. There’s also a long, boring drive between Mobile and Montgomery that makes us physically seem a million miles away. People in the northern part of the state love the hills and mountains, while we hang out on our sugar-white beaches. But most of the power issues are selfinflicted.

Cartoon/Laura Rasmussen

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s I’ve spent the vast majority of my life living in places where the residents always felt locked outside the circle of power in their respective state capitols, the concept of projecting authority at the state level is of particular interest. Maybe that’s too many words. More simply put, the people where I’ve lived are always wondering why they get screwed over in the statehouse. Growing up in coastal Mississippi, we were labeled “Coast Trash” by the rest of the state and really, until the casino boom started in the ‘90s, the needs of mighty Jackson and parts north typically dominated. As Mississippi and Alabama frequently serve as mirrors for each other — and not just because of their oddly drawn boundaries — things look much the same here. Only worse. Mississippi has a much smaller population than Alabama, and Jackson isn’t tremendously bigger than other major metro areas, so the political power and money does seem to be spread a bit more evenly. The disparity is much greater in the Yellowhammer State. Mobile and Baldwin counties often feel like prisoners of a (sometimes) benevolent dictatorship run by clowns in the state Legislature who appear to take particular pleasure in treating the coast as little more than a great place to vacation. If you need proof of that, look no further than the massively unfair BP Settlement Plan adopted last year. Legislators took the attitude that the two coastal counties that suffered the most economic damage and the only environmental damage from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in 2012 deserved a little less than 16 percent of the $760 million coming from BP. The other 84 percent was dumped into the general fund, used to repay previous raids on the Alabama Trust Fund and poured into the gaping maw of the Alabama Medicaid Agency. We here in Southwest Alabama were left with $120 million that will be primarily turned into roads and bridges. And the general attitude projected behind the scenes by legislators leading the charge to pay for past sins with BP money was that the coast had already been “made whole” because the Baldwin County beaches were posting record numbers a couple of years after the spill. Of course, those same legislators didn’t really take into account “making whole” the shattered seafood industry in Bayou La Batre or the plethora of muchneeded environmental projects that should have been funded by the money we bled for. But why should they care? There’s really very little our part of the state could do other than pull a Bobby Knight and lie back and enjoy it. Imagine if the roles were reversed and it was Birmingham that was about to get screwed out of $100 million. You can’t imagine that because it would never happen. The Big Ham has the clout. The Big Azalea doesn’t. Can you imagine trying to redistribute the TVA money enjoyed by and handful of counties in North Alabama? They’d scream bloody murder. I write this as we get ready to select the Republican candidate in the race for U.S. Senator. No matter who wins in the runoff or general election, our area loses clout. Homeboy Jeff Sessions is gone, to be replaced by Luther Strange of Birmingham, Roy Moore of Gadsden or Doug Jones of Birmingham. Having worked for a U.S. Senator, I can tell you that while they do represent the whole state, their home counties tend to get a little extra love. There’s this urban legend that typically we elect a senator for northern Alabama and one for the southern part of the state. The reality, though, is since 1940 only

TENSIXTYFIVE MUSIC FEST BRINGS MOBILIANS A ROCKIN’ RESPITE FROM ALL THE WORLD’S WOES.


COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

Holy shiplap! Is the end near? ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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oomsday conspiracy theorist David Meade prophesied the world would end last week on Sept. 23. Since that didn’t happen, he now says the rapture will be Oct. 15. Funny, I didn’t think important dates like the end of times got to be rescheduled, like, say, a child’s soccer game, but what do I know? Meade subscribes to the theory that a 10th planet, known as Planet X (which NASA says doesn’t exist), will collide with Earth on this day, which will ultimately lead to the rapture. Bummer. But the upside is that after the rapture, he says, there will be a millennium of peace, so at least we have that going for us … I mean, the ones of us that are still here. Oh wait! No, that wouldn’t be right. I’m confused. Anyway, Meade said he thought Sept. 23 just marked the beginning of the oncoming rapture. We won’t be full-on into it until October. He even excitedly added, “Hold on and watch — wait until the middle of October and I don’t believe you’ll be disappointed.” So … what? Are we are supposed to be like “Yay! These signs of the apocalypse are so freakin’ awesome, David. You are right. I am not disappointed at all! Except I really thought there would be more fire and a little more brimstone. I was kind of let down by that.” I’ll have to admit I’m hoping we have a little more time on this Earth, despite all of its many troubles. One more Thanksgiving and Iron Bowl would be nice at least. But, unfortunately, Meade said we should start seeing signs very soon. I don’t know, Dave. I’m pretty sure we have already started seeing them. Maybe not signs that Doomsday is imminent. Just signs that we are doomed in general.

Two horsemen of the apocalypse?

Without question, Roy Moore and Luther Strange have to be the first two Horsemen of the Apocalypse. Moore even rode his doomsday horse named Sundance to vote. (This is not a joke.) Voting in the Republican Senate runoff on Tuesday was like picking between diarrhea and vomit. As I am writing this, there are a handful of people going to the polls to make this impossible choice. Many more are just at home crying into their pillows. Though we will not know the victor before these words are inked on this page, I am absolutely positive we are screwed either way. Moore is the odds on favorite. Just in case he thought we had forgotten how embarrassing he is for our state, he made sure to remind us all on election eve. Donning a vest and cowboy hat, he looked more like Woody from “Toy Story” than a candidate for the U.S. Senate. Although I guess that is insulting to Woody since he never brandished a firearm on stage, as Moore did at Oak Hollow Farm on Monday night. Why would he do this, you ask? To prove he loves the Second Amendment and his gun so much he would marry it. Well, as long as it’s not gay. But I’ll have to say, Roy, if you are going to pull a firearm out onstage in

front of the national media, you should have gone bigger. That teeny little gun you pulled out looked like one used by a murderer in a “Matlock” episode when that murderer was a girl. Yep, that’s right. I called Roy’s gun girlie. It was! Couldn’t Clint Eastwood have loaned you his “Dirty Harry” piece, for heaven’s sake? It really doesn’t matter how small his weapon is, though, he will still most likely win. And I’m sure he will continue to embarrass us. He’ll probably ride Sundance to his swearing-in ceremony. (I am not joking. This is real life.) The only solace we have is knowing he can’t issue “orders” like he did when he was a judge. He will only have one vote and will be a lowly junior senator, so hopefully he can’t inflict too much damage. And at least it isn’t a full term. Trust me, I know these thoughts are about as comforting as infected hemorrhoids, but it’s the best we can hope for if we end up with Sen. Ray, I mean, Roy Moore. IF Big Luther manages to pull off the upset, it will be a BIG surprise. Despite millions of dollars poured into the market to tell us how much Donald Trump loves him and how much Luther loves guns and a border wall, he killed his chances BIG time when he accepted the appointment from former Gov. Robert Bentley. Even though it is more exciting for the national media to make this a referendum on Trump, Strange could never scrub off the “Bentley cooties,” nor did he ever really try to address the shadiness surrounding his appointment. Probably because he had no good way to address it. It was just shameful, if not criminal. Sigh. So yeah, diarrhea or vomit. It will be interesting to see which one of these nasty excretions will face Doug Jones in the general, but it doesn’t matter. Though the national media will try to make us think a Democrat could win in ‘Bama, we all know even vomit or diarrhea has a better chance. Sad!

False (home renovating) prophets?

In much, much sadder and far more disturbing news, America’s favorite home renovating couple, Chip and Joanna Gaines, announced this week that the upcoming season of “Fixer Upper” will be their last. Oh no, say it ain’t so, Chip and Jo! How could you leave us? I thought we would be together forever. What will Waco do? How will the company that makes the giant “before” signs carry on? And Clint? Jesus, did you guys think about him? Will there be a glut of shiplap on the market? What will old people who sit and watch “Fixer Upper” marathons all day long do? They can’t just magically be expected to feel about the “Property Brothers” the way they do the Gaineses. And don’t even mention those weirdos from “Love It or List It.” They can’t hold an overpriced, hand-poured, soy wax candle from the Magnolia Store to Chip and Jo (they cost $26). What an absolutely devastating loss to the world. Maybe Mr. Meade is right. This is the beginning of the end. At least it feels like it.

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COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

Why going after NFL is a winner for Trump BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM

HUNTSVILLE — We won’t remember President Donald Trump’s fifth appearance in Alabama as a politician for its original intended purpose, which was to promote the Senate candidacy of Luther Strange. Instead, we will remember it as the time he took on the National Football League and called out players he said were disrespecting the flag. “Wouldn’t you love to see one of these NFL owners when somebody disrespects our flag to say, ‘get that son of a bitch off the field right now, out, he’s fired, he’s fired?’” Trump said. The crowd at the Von Braun Center applauded and began to chant, “USA! USA! USA!” Then the backlash came. Last Sunday, players knelt for the national anthem in defiance of Trump and declared their First Amendment rights would not be trampled upon by this president. Here’s the problem: All of this, whether intentional or not, is playing right into Trump’s hands. Trump was right when he said the NFL’s ratings were suffering. Some believe the low ratings are a product of the whole not-standingfor-the-anthem phenomenon, started by Colin Kaepernick. Others argue it isn’t, but the ratings certainly aren’t going up in this era of politicized football. The president has created a Trump vs. the NFL narrative that, based on the media coverage (outside of Alabama), is the most significant policy discussion of the day. It’s probably fair to say that most Americans, if given a choice, would take the side of the NFL and its players — not by a huge margin, but enough to where it is a majority. The reasons might vary — an allegiance to certain teams or players, the incorrect belief this is an infringement on First Amendment rights or they just don’t like anything Trump does. Politics isn’t just a popularity contest anymore. The Electoral College shows that, given a majority Americans did not vote for Trump. Within that minority that voted for and support Trump, fighting disrespect of the flag is something that polls pretty well. Take the crowd’s reaction at Trump’s speech — approving and boisterous applause and shouts. It’s a no-brainer: Keep winning over the people who brought you to the dance, and you’ll probably remain in a decent place politically. He does not need to win a majority of Americans. He needs to maximize the support within the narrow minority that supported him. People often forget about politics until a presidential election year. Voter turnout in offcycle elections pales in comparison. For better or for worse, people just don’t vote in a lot of elections. Turnout is often low. But the people who do turn out in these elections are the ones that care about the national anthem and respect for the United States flag. They’re the ones who are engaged in the process. That’s why this, in the end, will be a winner

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for the president. Critics of Trump and his antics say you win in politics by addition and not subtraction. Going after the NFL is an exercise in subtraction. They say the same about the president’s aggressive tack on immigration. They argue that will scare off the all-important Hispanic vote, which they also argue is a growing demographic capable of deciding future elections. The problem is they don’t vote. They don’t turn out for Democrats, hence the entire 2016 presidential election outcome. That’s where the Democrats have failed in recent years. Sure, those on the left will show their disdain by wearing a safety pin on their

LAST SUNDAY, PLAYERS KNELT FOR THE NATIONAL ANTHEM IN DEFIANCE OF TRUMP AND DECLARED THEIR FIRST AMENDMENT RIGHTS WOULD NOT BE TRAMPLED UPON BY THIS PRESIDENT. lapel, or by participating in some other hollow, meaningless gesture, like kneeling for the national anthem. But real change happens at the ballot box. The people upset the most by Trump’s statement on Friday night didn’t vote for him in the first place, if they voted at all. The dominant theme in 2017 politics is enthusiasm. It is getting out the vote. These symbolic stands may make headlines, and people will praise themselves for being courageous and not standing for the national anthem for the hundredth time. But is there anyone who thinks, “Gee, I really like what the long snapper for the Minnesota Vikings did there. I used to vote Republican, but I think I’ll go out and vote Democrat tomorrow?” There are very few of those votes to be had, one would imagine. What’s more likely is that the people who voted for Trump cheer him for calling out millionaire athletes and respecting the flag. There isn’t another election for over a year (the Alabama special election for U.S. Senate excluded). Even if he hasn’t been able to get one square inch of the wall built, he’s at least going after the people participating in something his supporters find abhorrent. You can say what you want about Trump and his style, but it is a miscalculation to think coming down on the side of respecting the American flag is not a winner politically.


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BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

Ground broken on Blue Bird Hardware BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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groundbreaking ceremony on Monday, Sept. 25, attracted Mayor Sandy Stimpson and other city leaders to the historic Blue Bird Hardware & Seed Store property at 2724 Old Shell Road in Mobile. The building will be restored as close to its 1950s appearance as possible while being updated and made functional for modern-day use, according to Jay O’Brien with J. L. O’Brien & Associates Inc., which is managing development of the property. McNair Historical Preservation has been involved with keeping the historical aspects of the building intact. One example is creating new signage that is an exact replica of original advertising for the hardware store, according to O’Brien. “We have multiple suites available for lease and are currently talking to restaurant, retail and office users about available space. Renovations should be complete sometime in early 2018,” O’Brien said. • According to Edmond, Oklahoma-based real estate developer The Broadway Group, plans are in place for a new 10,600-square-foot Dollar General retail store at 4225 Orange Beach Blvd. in Orange Beach. • LeMott Corp. has leased 2,300 square feet of office space at the Skyline Centre Office Park LLC located at 3737 Government Blvd. in Mobile. Jill Meeks, leasing executive with Stirling Properties, represented the tenant. John Delchamps with Merrill P. Thomas Co. worked for the landlord. Legendary Realty was the referring firm. • Some 17,500 square feet of industrial space was leased by Hyvinkää, Finland-headquartered Konecranes at 15444 Industrial Park Drive in Loxley. Founded in 1994, the international company specializes in the manufacture and service of cranes and lifting equipment. Sandy Wise with Coldwell Banker Reehl Properties represented the landlord. Adam Metcalfe with Metcalfe & Co. worked for the tenant.

• Tots2Teens Fun Salon is leasing some 1,300 square feet of shopping center space at Spanish Fort Town Center located at 26000 Bass Pro Drive, Suite 206. The business offers salon and spa services in a kid-friendly environment. The new-to-market retailer plans to open in spring 2018. Angie McArthur with Stirling Properties managed the transaction • Some 788 square feet of space located inside University Village Shopping Center, 5636 Old Shell Road, has been leased to a Thai-style ice cream parlor called Pour, Chop & Roll. The eatery will open by year-end according to Marl Cummings with Cummings & Associates Inc., who handled the transaction. • Mobile-based Briquettes Steakhouse has leased the 4,756-square-foot former Caliente restaurant space at the northwest corner of Schillinger Road and Airport Boulevard. This will be its third location in Mobile, with plans to open this fall. Buff Teague with JLL managed the transaction. 

Innovation PortAL gets federal funds

Innovation PortAL recently received an additional infusion of capital in the form of an award from the United States Department of Commerce, according to a news release. The Economic Development Administration recently announced a Regional Innovation Strategies grant award of $299,995, the fully requested amount, to the Mobile Area Chamber of Commerce Foundation program. The monies will help Innovation PortAL create, launch and administer a seed fund to support entrepreneurs in the Gulf Coast region. “This is a testament to the entrepreneurial talent in our region and illustrates the need to support and develop future innovators,” Mobile Area Chamber President and CEO Bill Sisson said. “Our continued work with local and regional partners helps us stand out in a very competitive process.” “Currently, there are limited seed funding offerings

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targeted to entrepreneurs in the Gulf Coast region. As a result, our high-potential entrepreneurs are either moving to other markets in search of capital or putting their efforts on hold. Thanks to the continued support of the EDA, this seed fund will offer our region’s entrepreneurs the critical funding required to launch and scale their ventures,” Hayley Van Antwerp, executive director of Innovation PortAL, said. Innovation PortAL was among a pool of 217 applicants and 42 organizations, including nonprofits, institutions of higher learning and entrepreneurship-focused organizations. Twenty-eight states received more than $17 million to create and expand cluster-focused proof-of-concept and commercialization programs with early-stage seed capital funds. Last September, Innovation PortAL received a $2.9 million Commerce Department Economic Development grant. It is being used to renovate the former Threaded Fasteners building at 358 St. Louis St., which will become the local incubator’s base of operations. More information about Innovation PortAL can be found on the Mobile Chamber’s website.

First robotic head, neck surgery performed

Brian P. Sullivan, M.D., a head and neck surgeon with Premier Medical Group, recently completed the first head and neck procedure at Springhill Medical Center utilizing the da Vinci Xi surgical system robot. The da Vinci Surgical System is a robotic device designed by Sunnyvale, California-based Intuitive Surgical (NASDAQ: ISRG). Approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2000, the robotic surgery system is designed to facilitate complex surgery using a minimally invasive approach and is controlled remotely by a surgeon from a console.  Locally, the robot assisted with a partial pharyngectomy procedure, a first for Mobile and for Springhill Medical. “With the surgical robot, I have better visualization of the lower throat so I can get behind the tongue and operate on tumors more effectively with the hi-def angled cameras,” Sullivan said. “The robotic system offers enhanced 3-D maneuverability with the robotic arms, which allow for much finer control lower in the throat. “This approach is better for the patient because there are no incisions on the neck or from outside of the throat, so the healing time is quicker with fewer complications. In some cases, this procedure can save the patient from having to undergo radiation treatments, as well,” he said. Sullivan has experience with the procedure from prior work performed at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine before coming to Mobile, but said it historically hasn’t been widely used outside of large tertiary referral centers. Based in Mobile, Premier Medical Group is one of the largest multi-specialty eye, ear, nose and throat groups both regionally and nationally. PMG has satellite offices throughout South Alabama and the Mississippi Gulf Coast.


CUISINE | THE DISH

Roots, greens and those kinds of things BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

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Collard me delicious

I enjoy collards from time to time. Usually they come in second place on my list of favorite greens. I went through a phase where I preferred them but it was usually when someone else was doing the cooking. I eventually found a way to make them myself. With collards, it is mandatory I chop them into smaller pieces. In a sauté pan they are great over a little bit of oil. They can even be done in a slow cooker or in a Gumbo Z’herbes. Lots of vitamin

WORD OF MOUTH

Grimaldi’s introduces new fall menu

The Shoppes at Bel Air just got a little tastier, with Grimaldi’s Pizzeria rolling out its new “Fall Favorites” menu. The New York pizza chain has a strong presence as one of the better dining spots in the mall and the new items should reinforce that. With football season underway, you may want to try the Buffalo chicken pizza. Made with Frank’s Red Hot Sauce, this pie sounds good on its own, but when I think of that coal-fired crust I imagine it to be a wonderful marriage of flavor. There’s also a new wedge salad, a caramel apple cheesecake and Italian sodas and flavored lemonade. If you have yet to visit Grimaldi’s, there is no better time.

A in these, so prepare yourself for better vision. Collards (and fat-soluble vitamin A) need a little fat to really get the optimal absorption. Please keep the sugar away or at least to a minimum.

What the kale?

Of all of these examples, kale is the one I am most likely going to eat raw. Loaded with vitamin C, a kale salad is a healthy choice, but the dressing needs to be oil-and-vinegar based. Don’t get me wrong. I will certainly cook this “superfood” and love homemade kale chips. Look for a spray bottle for your olive oil (cooking spray has a lot of unnecessary ingredients), usually with a pump. Finish with a little bit of the salt I mentioned a couple of issues ago.

Photo/Depositphotos.com

on’t think of this story as something that was written prematurely. I am well aware that greens are not a summer vegetable, but since our last conversation I picked up a huge bunch of turnip greens from Old Shell Market. It seemed a little early, but they were just too pretty to ignore. I made the entire mess of greens, fed on them for three days and am pleased to report they were outstanding. Greens season is here. It’s time to pick ’em and fix ’em. When I say greens I am referring to what we can call The Big Four: kale, collards, mustards and turnips. Properly prepared, there is a wealth of health benefits associated with each, but all seem to pack a fair amount of vitamin C. Greens are a great way to expel free radicals, align your digestive tract, build stronger bones and ward off the common cold. Greens even have cancer-fighting properties! Be careful, though. No matter which green, we all agree you can overcook the health right out of them. Greens should not be boiled. At the most you can simmer them for a bit, but steaming or sautéing is the best way to retain the healthy nutrients. With any of these greens you should remove the tasty leaves from their thick stems and veins. Most of the time I just pull them by hand but occasionally I use a sharp knife and cutting board, being a bit more precise. I fill the kitchen sink with cold water and scrub them over and over, sometimes draining the sandy grit and starting a second bath. Next step depends on what green I am preparing.

Col. Mustard

Loaded with vitamins E and K, mustard greens help to balance cholesterol, thicken hair and build strong bones. You’ll find certain cuisines that steam them with the stem intact. A little on the peppery side, mustard greens can sometimes remind you of other greens such as arugula. Wilt them and finish with a squeeze of lemon and serve them with fish. You’d be surprised at how many Chinese, Korean and Indian recipes there are for this underrated green.

After washing and picking the leaves, I shake the excess water from the bunch and pack them tightly into the pot. There’s no need to add any water. The excess is enough. Over medium heat I wait until steam begins to form, then I cover tightly with a lid, stirring every few minutes, reducing the heat to medium low. For those of you making your first attempt at cooking turnip greens, you will be floored by how much they cook down. A bunch so large it looks as if it could make a salad for 20 becomes dinner for two in a few short minutes. If your pot isn’t full when it’s raw, you won’t have Just fell off the turnip truck nearly enough when the cooking is done. Go ahead and call me boring, but my hands-down favorite You may be wondering about the roots. I love the roots but prefer green is the turnip. A tremendous source of calcium and potassi- them when they are small. White Lady turnips have roots that are tiny um, turnips always make me feel better. There is something to the and sweet and I prepare them like mashed potatoes. The purple tops healing power of pot liquor. I’ve experienced it. When the cold or need to be peeled before cooking and are great cubed in the greens. flu hits, I desperately need a coffee mug of that juice. No pot of turnip greens is complete until there is a skillet of cornTurnips are far more versatile than I make them out to be, but bread waiting for it. For me I need the white cornbread, not at all sweet, if I’m buying I pretty much make them the same way every time. with a little butter. Dunking a wedge of that into a bowl of greens is I start with the biggest pot I have and soften up some onions in a better than Oreos and milk. little oil with some sort of pork. Maybe I’ll use bacon, salt pork, Greens season is here. Stop wasting your time. Buy fresh, buy local ham or sausage. but don’t forget the pepper sauce.

Southern Napa welcomes Salvestrin

Salvestrin Wines are into four generations, spanning 84 years as a family-owned winery — practically Napa royalty. It has always been “Winery and Wine Club Only,” meaning you couldn’t buy it from retailers … until now. Southern Napa is holding a wine tasting with food pairings event featuring an exclusive look at Salvestrin Wines on Thursday, Sept. 28, at 6:30 p.m. Tickets may still be available but the tasting is limited to 24 guests. Attendees will taste six wines, including a sauvignon blanc, petite syrah, sangiovese, a red blend, a cabernet and a very special Three D Estate cabernet from the legendary Dr. Crane Vineyard ($175 retail!).

Cross your fingers that there’s still an opening. Of course the kitchen will be pouring out some great flavors, too. Price per person is $75. Call 251-375-2800 for availability.

Wharf Uncorked raises $20K for charity The fourth annual Wharf Uncorked Food and Wine Festival was another success for Orange Beach, welcoming nearly 1,000 guests and raising $20,357.57 for Make-AWish Alabama, an organization devoted to granting wishes to children with life-threatening medical conditions. At the grand tasting on Saturday some of Alabama’s finest chefs competed in a cooking competition. Chef Chris Kelly of Driftwood Steakhouse won for creativity

with his Gulf Coast boudin. Cosmo’s Chef Rob Benson’s seared scallops with greens and grits won for flavor as well as use of ingredients. Blue Water BBQ Co.’s Chef Neil Schappert won for presentation with his chicken and ribs. Voyager Chef Brody Olive won the People’s Choice Award as well as the Grand Tasting Overall Winner with his seared diver scallop, speck polenta gratin and onion agrodolce. Of course the competing chefs were looking to win an automatic qualifying position for the World Food Championships held at The Wharf in November. This year’s Golden Ticket went to Chef Rob Benson of Cosmo’s. Congratulations to all the winners and Make-A-Wish. Recycle!

S e p t e m b e r 2 8 , 2 0 1 7 - O c t o b e r 4 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 17


FLOUR GIRLS BAKERY ($)

O’DALYS HOLE IN THE WALL ($)

FIREHOUSE SUBS ($)

OLD SHELL GROWLERS ($)

809 Hillcrest Rd. • 634-2285

HOT SUBS, COLD SALADS & CATERING 6300 Grelot Rd. • 631-3730 $10/PERSON • $$ 10-25/PERSON • $$$ OVER 25/PERSON

COMPLETELY COMFORTABLE ALL SPORTS BAR & GRILL ($) 3408 Pleasant Valley Rd. • 345-9338

AL’S HOTDOGS ($)

CLASSIC HOTDOGS, GYROS & MILKSHAKES 4701 Airport Blvd. • 342-3243

ATLANTA BREAD COMPANY ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SALADS & MORE. 3680 Dauphin St. • 380-0444

BAKE MY DAY ($)

OLD-FASHIONED SOUTHERN BAKE SHOP 156 N. McGregor Ave. • 219-7261

BOB’S DINER ($)

GOOD OLD AMERICAN COOKING 263 St. Francis St. • 405-1497

BRICK & SPOON ($)

3662 Airport Blvd. Suite A • 525-9177

BUCK’S DINER ($)

CLASSIC AMERICAN DINER 58 N. Secion St. Fairhope • 928-8521

CAFE 219 ($)

SALADS, SANDWICHES & POTATO SALAD 219 Conti St. • 438-5234

CAMELLIA CAFÉ ($-$$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FARE 61 Section St. • Fairhope • 928-4321

CAMMIE’S OLD DUTCH ($) MOBILE’S CLASSIC ICE CREAM SPOT 2511 Old Shell Rd. • 471-1710

CARPE DIEM ($)

DELI FOODS, PASTRIES & SPECIALTY DRINKS 4072 Old Shell Rd. • 304-0448

CLARK’S KITCHEN ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHERN CUISINE & CATERING 5817 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0200

CHAT-A-WAY CAFE ($)

QUICHES & SANDWICHES 4366 Old Shell Rd. • 343-9889

CHICK-FIL-A ($)

FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES ($) BURGERS, MILKSHAKES & FRIES 4401 Old Shell Rd. • 447-2394 4663 Airport Blvd. • 300-8425 5319 Hwy 90 • 661-0071 1225 Satchel Page Dr.• 378-8768

FOOSACKLY’S ($)

FAMOUS CHICKEN FINGERS 29181 US Hwy 98 • Daphne • 375-1104 7843 Moffett Rd. • 607-6196 1109 Shelton Beach Rd. • 287-1423 310 S. University Blvd. • 343-0047 2250 Airport Blvd. • 479-2922 7641 Airport Blvd. • 607-7667 2558 Schillinger Rd. • 219-7761 3249 Dauphin St. • 479-2000

FOY SUPERFOODS ($) 119 Dauphin St.• 307-8997

GULF COAST EXPLOREUM CAFE ($) HOMEMADE SOUPS & SANDWICHES 65 Government St. • 208-6815

GUMBO SHACK ($-$$)

SEAFOOD & SANDWICHES 212 ½ Fairhope Ave •Fairhope • 928-4100

HOOTERS ($)

3869 Airport Blvd. • 345-9544 5470 Inn Rd. • 661-9117 28975 US 98 • Daphne • 625-3910

JAMAICAN VIBE ($)

MIND-BLOWING ISLAND FOOD 3700 Gov’t Blvd. Ste A • 602-1973

JERSEY MIKE’S ($)

AUTHENTIC SUB SANDWICHES 7449 Airport Blvd. • 375-1820

JIMMY JOHN’S ($)

SANDWICHES, CATERING & DELIVERY TOO 6920 Airport Blvd. • 414-5444 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-8694 62 B Royal St. • 432-0360

JOE CAIN CAFÉ ($)

PIZZAS, SANDWICHES, COCKTAILS 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

JONELLI’S ($)

1252 Govenment St.• 301-7556

107 St. Francis St. • 415-1700 3244 Dauphin St. • 476-0320 3215 Bel Air Mall • 476-8361 4707 Airport Blvd. • 461-9933 435 Schillinger Rd. • 639-1163 1682 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 621-3215 30500 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-3020

JUDY’S PLACE ($-$$)

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK ($)

PUB FOOD AND DRAFT BEERS 251 Dauphin St. • 287-6871

CHICKEN SALAD, SALAD & SOUP 2370 S. Hillcrest Rd. Unit R • 660-0501 5753 Old Shell Rd. • 408-3236 1802 US Hwy 98 Suite F• 625-1092

CHI-TOWN DAWGZ ($) CHICAGO STYLE EATERY 1222 Hillcrest Rd. • 461-6599

CONNECTION FROZEN YOGURT ($) 1880 Industrial Pkwy. • 675-2999

CREAM AND SUGAR ($)

HOME COOKING 4054 Government St. • 665-4557

LICKIN’ GOOD DONUTS ($) 3242 Dauphin St. • 471-2590

LODA BIER GARTEN ($) MAMA’S ($)

SLAP YOUR MAMA GOOD HOME COOKING 220 Dauphin St. • 432-6262

MARS HILL CAFE ($)

GREAT SANDWICHES, COFFEE & MORE 1087 Downtowner Blvd. • 643-1611

MARY’S SOUTHERN COOKING ($) 3011 Springhill Ave. • 476-2232

COFFEE, BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DESSERT 351 George St #B • 405-0003

MICHELI’S CAFE ($)

DAUPHIN ST. CAFE ($)

MCSHARRY’S ($-$$)

6358 Cottage Hill Rd. • 725-6917

562 Dauphin St.• 725-6429

GROWLER STATION AND BITES 1801 Old Shell Rd. • 345-4767

PANINI PETE’S ($)

ORIGINAL SANDWICH AND BAKE SHOP 42 ½ Section St. • Fairhope • 929-0122 102 Dauphin St. • 405-0031

PAT’S DOWNTOWN GRILL ($) BAR FOOD 271 Dauphin St • 438-9585

PDQ ($)

CHICKEN FINGERS, SALAD & SANDWICHES. 1165 University Blvd. • 202-0959

POLLMAN’S BAKERY ($)

BAKERY, SANDWICHES & MORE 750 S. Broad St. • 438-1511 4464 Old Shell Rd. • 342-8546 107 St. Francis St. Suite 102 • 438-2261

PUNTA CLARA KITCHEN ($)

FUDGE, PRALINES & MORE 17111 Scenic Hwy 98 • Fairhope • 928-8477

R BISTRO ($-$$)

334 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope • 928-2399

2906 Springhill Ave. • 479-4614

ROSIE’S GRILL ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHWEST FARE, 7 DAYS 1203 Hwy 98 Ste. 3D • Daphne • 626-2440

ROYAL KNIGHT ($)

LUNCH & DINNER 3004 Gov’t Blvd. • 287-1220

ROYAL STREET CAFE ($) HOMEMADE LUNCH & BREAKFAST 104 N. Royal St. • 434-0011

SALLY’S PIECE-A-CAKE ($) BAKERY 5638 Three Notch Rd.• 219-6379

SATORI COFFEEHOUSE ($)

COFFEE, SMOOTHIES, LUNCH & BEERS. 5460 Old Shell Rd. • 344-4575

SERDA’S COFFEEHOUSE ($)

COFFEE, LUNCHES, LIVE MUSIC & GELATO 3 Royal St. S. • 415-3000

DEW DROP INN ($)

CLASSIC BURGERS, HOTDOGS & SETTING 1808 Old Shell Rd. • 473-7872

DUNKIN DONUTS ($)

DONUTS, COFFEE & SANDWICHES 1976 Michigan Ave. • 442-4846 3876 Airport Blvd. • 219-7369 505 Schillinger Rd. S. • 442-4845 29160 US Hwy 98 • 621-2228

E WING HOUSE ($)

MONTEGO’S ($-$$)

FRESH CARIBBEAN-STYLE FOOD & CRAFT BEER 6601 Airport Blvd. • 634-3445 225 Dauphin St. • 375-1576

MOON PIE GENERAL STORE ($)

107 St Francis St #115 • RSA Bank Trust Building

MOSTLY MUFFINS ($) MUFFINS, COFFEE & WRAPS 105 Dauphin St. • 433-9855

NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE ($)

15 N Conception St. • 433-2299

OVEN-BAKED SANDWICHES & MORE 1335 Satchel Page Dr. Suite C. • 287-7356 7440 Airport Blvd. • 633-0096 30500 State Hwy 181 #132 • 625-6544

FATHOMS LOUNGE

NOURISH CAFE ($)

195 S University Blvd. Suite H • 662-1829

EUGENE’S MONKEY BAR ($) SMALL PLATES AND CREATIVE COCKTAILS 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

HEALTHY WHOLE FOODS & MORE 101 N Water St. (Moorer YMCA)• 458-8572

GOURMET GRILLED CHEESE 5955 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6134

WILD WING STATION ($)

4701 Airport Blvd. • 408-3379

SUNSET POINTE ($-$$)

AT FLU CREEK 831 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-7766

THE BLIND MULE ($)

INSIDE VIRGINIA’S HEALTH FOOD 3055 A Dauphin St • 479-3200

THYME BY THE BAY ($-$$)

33 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-5635

TIME TO EAT CAFE ($)

DOWN-HOME COUNTRY COOKIN 7351 Theodore Dawes Rd. • 654-0228 13665 N. Wintzell Ave. • 824-1119

TIN ROOF ($-$$)

SOUTHERN CASUAL FAMILY DINING 10800 US HWY 31 • Spanish Fort• 621-4995

TP CROCKMIERS ($)

AMERICAN RESTAURANT & BAR 250 Dauphin St. • 476-1890

THREE GEORGES CANDY SHOP ($) LIGHT LUNCH WITH SOUTHERN FLAIR. 226 Dauphin St. • 433-6725

18 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 8 , 2 0 1 7 - O c t o b e r 4 , 2 0 1 7

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE 271 Glenwood St. • 476-0516

SAGE RESTAURANT ($$)

THAI & SUSHI 5369 D Hwy 90 W • 661-5100

CHARM ($-$$)

THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR 960 Schillinger Rd. S • 660-4470

VON’S BISTRO ($-$$)

FUJI SAN ($)

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($$)

GOLDEN BOWL ($)

THE TRELLIS ROOM ($$$)

HIBACHI 1 ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC FOODS FROM HIMALAYAN REGION 3210 Dauphin St. • 287-0115 400 Eastern Shore Center • 459-2862

‘CUE

BACKYARD CAFE & BBQ ($) BAR-B-QUING WITH MY HONEY ($$) BRICK PIT ($)

COTTON STATE BBQ ($)

DOWNTOWN LUNCH 101 N. Conception St. • 545-4682

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT ($-$$)

MODERN GASTROPUB INSPIRED BY JAPANESE KITCHEN 455 Dauphin St • 433-0376 SEAFOOD, ASIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE 69 St. Michael St • 375-1113 CASUAL FINE DINING 104 N. Section St. • Fairhope • 929-2219 CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE Battle House Hotel, Royal St. • 338-5493

THE WASH HOUSE ($$)

17111 Scenic HWY 98 • Point Clear • 928-4838

3966 Airport Blvd.• 343-5530 LUNCH BUFFET 3674 Airport Blvd. • 341-6171

THAI FARE AND SUSHI 2000 Airport Blvd. • 478-9888 HIBACHI GRILL & ASIAN CUISINE 309 Bel Air Blvd • 470-8033 2370 Hillcrest Rd. Unit B • 380-6062

ICHIBAN SUSHI ($)

JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE 3959 Cottage Hill Rd • 666-6266

A LITTLE VINO

KAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($-$$)

WINE, BEER, GOURMET FOODS, & MORE. 720 Schillinger Rd. S. Unit 8 • 287-1851

LIQUID ($$)

DOMKE MARKET

QUALITY FOOD, EXCELLENT SERVICE 5045 Cottage Hill Rd. • 607-6454

FOOD PAK

AMAZING SUSHI & ASSORTMENT OF ROLLS. 661 Dauphin St. • 432-0109

FOOD, WINE & MORE 5150 Old Shell Rd. • 341-1497

RICE ASIAN GRILL & SUSHI BAR ($) 3964 Gov’t Blvd. • 378-8083

BBQ AND MORE Jubilee Sq.Ctr. Hwy 90, Daphne • 210-2151 McGowin Park Ctr. Satchel Paige Dr. • 471-1050 7721 Airport Blvd. • 380-8957

POUR BABY

DREAMLAND BBQ ($)

216 St Francis St. • 421-2022

273 S. McGregor Ave • 287-0445 6345 Airport Blvd. • 287-0555 940 Industrial Pkwy • 308-2158 6850 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 753-4367

RED OR WHITE

SAISHO ($$)

RIBS, SANDWICHES & GREAT SIDES 3314 Old Shell Rd. • 479-9898

MEAT BOSS ($)

5401 Cottage Hill Rd. • 591-4842

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE ($) BARBEQUE & MUSIC Bayfront Park Dr. • Daphne • 625-RIBS 701 Springhill Ave. • 410-7427 4672 Airport Blvd. • 300-8516 AWARD-WINNING BARBQUE 1111 Gov’t Blvd. • 433-7427

WINE BAR, CRAFT BEERS & BISTRO 6808 Airport Blvd. • 343-3555

FIREHOUSE WINE BAR & SHOP 323A De La Mare Ave, Fairhope • 990-0003 1104 Dauphin St.. • 478-9494

ROYAL STREET TAVERN

LIVE MUSIC, MARTINIS & DINNER MENU. 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

SOUTHERN NAPA

BISTRO PLATES, CRAFT BEERS & PANTRY 2304 Main St. • 375-2800

THE VINEYARD

UPSCALE WINE BAR 9 Du Rhu Dr. S 201 • 287-7135

ROCK N ROLL SUSHI ($$)

6455 Dauphin St. • 433-0376

STIX ($$)

610240 Eastern Shore Blvd. • 621-9088

TASTE OF THAI ($$)

9091 US-90 Irvington • 957-1414

TOKYO JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE ($$) UPSCALE SUSHI & HIBACHI 364 Azalea Rd. • 343-6622

WASABI SUSHI ($$)

JAPANESE CUISINE 3654 Airport Blvd. S. C • 725-6078

3758 Dauphin Island Pkwy. • 473-1401

FALAFEL? TRY SOME HUMMUS FROM THE DEPTHS

DROP DEAD GOURMET

HEALTHY, DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 3762 Airport Blvd. • 725-1177

A PREMIER CATERER & COOKING CLASSES 1880-A Airport Blvd. • 450-9051

4861 Bit & Spur Rd. • 340-6464

BAY GOURMET ($$)

BRIQUETTES STEAKHOUSE ($-$$)

CHUCK’S FISH ($$)

THE SUNFLOWER CAFE ($)

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

BENJAS ($)

YAK THE KATHMANDU KITCHEN ($-$$)

THE GALLEY ($)

SOUTHERN COOKING & THEN SOME 1716 Main St. Daphne • 222-4120

GUMBO, ANGUS BEEF & BAR 72. S. Royal St. • 432-SCAM (7226)

TRADITIONAL SUSHI & LUNCH. 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-9077

CUISINE OF INDIA ($$)

85 N. Bancroft St. Fairhope • 990.8883

DAILY SPECIALS MADE FROM SCRATCH 57 N. Claiborne St. • 694-6853

THE PIGEON HOLE ($)

ROYAL SCAM ($$)

BANZAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($$)

SAISHO ($-$$)

GRILLED STEAKS, CHICKEN & SEAFOOD 720A Schillinger Rd. S. S2. • 607-7200 901 Montlimar Dr • 408-3133

113 Dauphin St.• 436-0989

SUPREME EUROPEAN CUISINE 2579 Halls Mill Rd. • 479-0006

DELICIOUS, TRADITIONAL THAI CUISINE 28600 US 98 • Daphne • 626-5286 3821 Airport Blvd. • 344-9995

THE WINDMILL MARKET ($)

SMOKEY DEMBO SMOKE HOUSE ($)

SUGAR RUSH DONUT CO. ($)

OSMAN’S RESTAURANT ($$)

BANGKOK THAI ($-$$)

CHINA DOLL ($)

STEVIE’S KITCHEN ($)

SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS & MORE 41 West I-65 Service Rd. N Suite 150. • 287-2793

INVENTIVE & VERY FRESH CUISINE 6 N. Jackson St. • 433-0377

INSIDE THE MOBILE MARRIOTT 3101 Airport Blvd. • 476-6400

SAUCY Q BARBQUE ($)

CUPCAKE BOUTIQUE 6207 Cottage Hill Rd. Suite B • 665-3003

NOJA ($$-$$$)

1500 Gov’t St. • 287-1526

SIMPLY SWEET ($)

MOMMA GOLDBERG’S DELI ($)

GREAT DESSERTS & HOT LUNCH 23 Upham St. • 473-6115

WEDGIE’S ($)

ROSHELL’S CAFE ($)

D NU SPOT ($)

DELISH BAKERY AND EATERY ($)

COFFEE AND DONUTS 759 Nichols Avenue, Fairhope • 928-7223

A FAVORITE BARBECUE SPOT 5456 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0001

WRAPS & SALADS 3220 Dauphin St. • 479-2480

THE HARBERDASHER ($)

SANDWICHES & MOMMA’S LOVE 3696 Airport Blvd. • 344-9500 5602 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6556

WAREHOUSE BAKERY & DONUTS ($)

ROLY POLY ($)

MIKO’S ITALIAN ICE ($)

22159 Halls Mill Rd. . • 648-6522

2550 Dauphin Island Pkwy S. • 307-5328

BBQ, BURGERS, WINGS & SEAFOOD 19170 Hwy 43 Mt. Vernon. • 839-9927

SANDWICHES, SUBS & SOUPS 2056 Gov’t St. • 476-2777

D’ MICHAEL’S ($)

HOTDOGS SANDWICHES & COOL TREATS 3371 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 300–4015

UNCLE JIMMY’S DELICIOUS HOTDOGS ($)

HOME COOKIN’ LIKE MOMMA MADE. 2804 Springhill Ave. • 473-4739

OPEN FOR LUNCH, INSIDE GULFQUEST 155 S. Water St • 436-8901

PHILLY CHEESE STEAKS, GYROS & MORE 7101-A Theodore Dawes Rd. • 653-2979

GREAT SMOOTHIES, WRAPS & SANDWICHES. Du Rhu Dr. • 378-5648 570 Schillinger Road • 634-3454

REGINA’S KITCHEN ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC IRISH PUB 101 N. Bancroft St.• 990-5100

HOT LUNCH, DAILY MENU (INSIDE VIA) 1717 Dauphin St. • 470-5231

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE ($)

SEAFOOD AND SUSHI 551 Dauphin St.• 219-7051

CORNER 251 ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St • 460-3157

DAUPHIN’S ($$-$$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD WITH A VIEW 107 St. Francis St • 444-0200

DUMBWAITER ($$-$$$) 9 Du Rhu Dr. Suite 201 167 Dauphin St. • 445-3802

FIVE ($$)

GREAT FOOD AND COCKTAILS 609 Dauphin St. • 308-3105

KITCHEN ON GEORGE ($-$$)

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOOD 351A George & Savannah St. • 436-8890

LAUNCH ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St. • 432-8000

MAGHEE’S GRILL ON THE HILL ($-$$)

7 SPICE ($-$$)

ABBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE ($-$$) ISTANBUL GRILL ($)

AUTHENTIC TURKISH & MEDITERRANEAN 3702 Airport Blvd. • 461-6901

JERUSALEM CAFE ($-$$)

MOBILE’S OLDEST MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE 5773 Airport Blvd. • 304-1155

KAN ZAMAN ($-$$)

MEDITERRANEAN FOOD AND HOOKAH 326 Azalea Rd • 229-4206

MEDITERRANEAN SANDWICH COMPANY ($)

GREAT & QUICK. 3702 Airport Blvd. • 308-2131 274 Dauphin St. • 545-3161 2502 Schillinger Rd. Ste. 2 • 725-0126 6890 US-90 • DAPHNE • 621-2271

MINT HOOKAH BISTRO ($) GREAT MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 5951 Old Shell Rd. • 450-9191

OLLIE’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL ($-$$) MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT & HOOKAH 1248 Hillcrest St • 634-9820

TAZIKI’S ($-$$)

MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 1539 US HWY 98• 273-3337

FAR EASTERN FARE

GREAT LUNCH & DINNER 3607 Old Shell Rd. • 445-8700

ANG BAHAY KUBO ($$)

NOBLE SOUTH ($$)

BAMBOO STEAKHOUSE ($$)

LOCAL INGREDIENTS 203 Dauphin St. • 690-6824

4513 Old Shell Rd.• 473-0007 SUSHI BAR 650 Cody Rd. S • 300-8383

BAUDEAN’S ($$)

FRIED, GRILLED, STEAMED & ALWAYS FRESH 3300 River Rd. • 973-9070

THE BLUEGILL ($-$$)

A HISTORIC SEAFOOD DIVE W/ LIVE MUSIC 3775 Hwy. 98 • 625-1998

BONEFISH GRILL ($$)

ECLECTIC DINING & SPACE 6955 Airport Blvd. • 633-7196

BOUDREAUX’S CAJUN GRILL ($-$$) QUALITY CAJUN & NEW ORLEANS CUISINE 29249 US Highway 98 Daphne. • 621-1991

CRAVIN CAJUN/DIP SEAFOOD ($) PO-BOYS, SALADS & SEAFOOD 1870 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 287-1168

ED’S SEAFOOD SHED ($$)

FRIED SEAFOOD SERVED IN HEFTY PORTIONS 3382 Hwy. 98 • 625-1947

FELIX’S FISH CAMP ($$) UPSCALE DINING WITH A VIEW 1420 Hwy. 98 • 626-6710

FISHERMAN’S LEGACY ($) DELI, MARKET AND CATERING. 4380 Halls Mill Rd. • 665-2266

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($)

30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 206-8768 3654 Airport Blvd. • 338-9350

LUCY B. GOODE ($$)

GULF COAST CUISINE, REINVENTED 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

LULU’S ($$)

LIVE MUSIC & GREAT SEAFOOD 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

MUDBUGS AT THE LOOP ($) CAJUN KITCHEN & SEAFOOD MARKET 2005 Government St. • 478-9897


RALPH & KACOO’S ($-$$) THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1595 Battleship Pkwy. • 626-0045

R&R SEAFOOD ($-$$)

LAID-BACK EATERY & FISH MARKET 1477 Battleship Pkwy. • 621-8366

RIVER SHACK ($-$$)

SEAFOOD, BURGERS & STEAKS 6120 Marina Dr. • Dog River • 443-7318.

BUTCH CASSIDY’S ($)

FAMOUS BURGERS, SANDWICHES & WINGS 60 N. Florida St. • 450-0690

CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB ($) BURGERS & BEER 916 Charleston St. • 433-9374

HEROES SPORTS BAR & GRILLE ($)

THE GRAND MARINER ($-$$)

SANDWICHES & COLD BEER 273 Dauphin St. • 433-4376 Hillcrest & Old Shell Rd. • 341-9464

THE HARBOR ROOM ($-$$)

WINGS, SEAFOOD, BURGERS & BEER 7721 Airport Blvd. Suite E-180 • 639-6832

LOCAL SEAFOOD & PRODUCE 6036 Rock Point Rd. • 443-7540 UNIQUE SEAFOOD 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

THE SEAFOOD HOUSE ($-$$) 751 Azalea Rd. • 301-7964

TIN TOP RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR ($$) SEAFOOD, STEAKS, & EXTENSIVE WINE LIST 6232 Bon Secour Hwy County Rd. 10. • 949-5086

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) FRESH SEAFOOD FOR OVER 75 YEARS 605 Dauphin St. • 432-4605 6700 Airport Blvd. • 341-1111 1208 Shelton Beach Rd. • Saraland • 442-3335 805 S. Mobile St. • 929-2322

IS THE GAME ON?

ASHLAND MIDTOWN PUB ($-$$) PIZZAS, PASTAS, & CALZONES 245-A Old Shell Rd. • 479-3278

BAUMHOWER’S ($)

WINGS, BURGERS & PUB GRUB 6880 US-90 #14 • Daphne • 625-4695

BISHOP’S ($)

A SOUTHERN GRILL & BAR 3673 Airport Blvd. • 344-2131

BUFFALO WILD WINGS ($) BEST WINGS & SPORTING EVENTS 6341 Airport Blvd. • 378-5955

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS ($-$$) ISLAND WING CO ($)

EVERYTHING BAKED OR GRILLED 2617 Dauphin St. • 476-9464

MANCIS ($)

1715 Main St. • 375-0543

MCSHARRY’S IRISH PUB ($)

BRILLIANT REUBENS & FISH-N-CHIPS. 101 N. Brancroft St. Fairhope • 990-5100

MUG SHOTS ($$)

BAR & GRILL 29740 Urgent Care Dr. • Daphne • 662-9639 6255 Airport Blvd. • 447-2514

OLD 27 GRILL ($)

BURGERS, DOGS & 27 BEERS & WINES. 19992 Hwy.181 Old County Rd. Fairhope • 281-2663

LUCKY’S IRISH PUB ($) IRISH PUB FARE & MORE 3692 Airport Blvd • 414-3000

WEMOS ($)

WINGS, TENDERS, HOTDOGS & SANDWICHES 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-5877

MAMA MIA!

BUCK’S PIZZA ($$)

DELIVERY 350 Dauphin St. • 431-9444

CORTLANDT’S PIZZA PUB ($-$$) GREAT PIZZA. LUNCH & DINNER 4356 Old Shell Rd. • 342-0024

GAMBINO’S ITALIAN GRILL ($) ITALIAN, STEAKS & SEAFOOD 18 Laurel Ave. • Fairhope • 990-0995

ROMA CAFE ($-$$)

LOS ARCOS ($)

PASTA, SALAD AND SANDWICHES 7143 Airport Blvd. • 341-7217

QUAINT MEXICAN RESTAURANT 5556 Old Shell Rd. • 345-7484

GRIMALDI’S ($)

ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL ($$)

GUIDO’S ($$)

TAMARA’S BAR & GRILL ($)

Bel Air Mall • 476-2063 FRESH CUISINE NIGHTLY ON MENU 1709 Main St. • Daphne • 626-6082

HOUSE OF PIZZA ($)

3958 Snow Rd C. • Semmes • 645-3400

LA ROSSO ($$)

COMFORT FOOD 1716 Main St. Ste. C • Daphne • 281-2982

MACARONI GRILL ($$)

SMALL PLATES, PIZZAS, PASTAS & WINE 3250 Airport Blvd. • 450-4556

MARCOS ($)

5055 Cottage Hill Rd. • 308-4888 2394 Dawes Rr. • 639-3535 2004 US 98 • Daphne • 265-6550

MELLOW MUSHROOM ($)

PIES & AWESOME BEER SELECTION 2032 Airport Blvd. • 471-4700 5660 Old Shell Rd. • 380-1500 29698 Frederick Blvd.• Daphne • 621-3911

MIRKO ($$)

PASTA & MORE 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-6611

NAVCO PIZZA ($$)

PIZZA, SUBS & PASTA 1368 ½ Navco Rd.• 479-0066

PAPA’S PLACE ($$)

A TASTE OF ITALY. BYOB. 28691 U.S. Highway 98 • 626-1999

PINZONE’S ITALIAN VILLAGE ($$) AUTHENTIC ITALIAN DISHES 312 Fairhope Ave. • Fairhope • 990-5535

RAVENITE ($)

PIZZA, PASTA, SALAD & MORE 102 N. Section St. •Fairhope• 929-2525

PIZZERIA DELFINA ($) PIZZA & PASTA 107 Dauphin St. • 375-1644

3250 Airport Blvd. Springdale Mall• 450-4556

MEXICAN CUISINE 3977 Gov’t Blvd. • 660-4970

WINGS, PO-BOYS, BURGERS 210 Eastern Shore Center, Hwy. 98 • 929-0002

OLÉ MI AMIGO ($-$$)

TRATTORIA PIZZA & ITALIAN ($$)

HEARTY MEXICAN FARE 736 holcombe Ave.• 473-0413

ITALIAN FOOD & PIZZAS 11311 US HIghway 31 Spanish Fort• 375-0076

POOR MEXICAN ($)

VIA EMILIA ($$)

3050 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-7433

HOMEMADE PASTAS & PIZZAS MADE DAILY 5901 Old Shell Rd. • 342-3677

ROOSTER’S ($)

LATIN AMERICAN FOOD 211 Dauphin St. • 375-1076

OLÉ MI AMIGO! AZTECAS ($-$$)

TAQUERIA MEXICO ($-$$)

TASTE OF MEXICO 5452 Hwy 90 W • 661-5509

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FLAVOR 3733 Airport Blvd. • 414-4496

CAFÉ DEL RIO ($-$$)

NO GAMBLING CASINO FARE

MOUTH WATERING MEXICAN FOOD 1175 Battleship Pkwy • 625-2722

BEAU RIVAGE:

875 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 888-952-2582

CINCO DE MAYO ($)

BR PRIME ($$-$$$)

MEXICAN CUISINE 260 Azalea Rd. • 375-1095

DAUPHIN ST. TAQUERIA ($)

MARIA BONITA AGAVE BAR & GRILL ($-$$)

FINE DINING, SEAFOOD AND STEAKS

FLAVORS BUFFET ($-$$) ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET

IP CASINO:

850 Bayview Ave. Bilox • 888-946-2847

THIRTY-TWO ($$$) SEAFOOD, STEAKS, WINE

TIEN ($-$$)

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

HIGH TIDE CAFÉ ($)

CASUAL & RELAXING, EXTENSIVE MENU

ISLAND VIEW:

3300 W. Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 877-774-8439

BEACH BLVD STEAMER ($) SEAFOOD

CARTER GREEN STEAKHOUSE ($$-$$$) RICH TRADITIONS, STEAK, SEAFOOD

C&G GRILLE ($)

LARGE BREAKFAST, LUNCH OR DINNER MENU

PALACE CASINO:

158 Howard Ave. Biloxi • 800-725-2239

MIGNON’S ($$$)

PLACE BUFFET ($-$$)

EXOTIC CUISINE AND SUSHI

STACKED GRILL ($-$$)

ITALIAN COOKING

TREASURE BAY:

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, LATE NIGHT

THE DEN ($-$$)

EL MARIACHI ($)

STALLA ($$)

OUTSTANDING MEXICAN CUISINE 2066 Old Shell Rd. • 378-8621

MAGNOLIA HOUSE ($$-$$$)

BURGER, WINGS, PIZZA

COAST RESTAURANT ($-$$) JIA ($-$$)

FUEGO ($-$$)

280 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 288-436-2946

FINE DINING ESTABLISHMENT.

ENCHILADAS, TACOS, & AUTHENTIC FARE Ok Bicycle Shop • 661 Dauphin St. • 432-2453 763 Holcombe Ave • 473-0413

HARRAH’S GULF COAST:

TERRACE CAFE ($)

HARD ROCK CASINO:

STEAKS, SEAFOOD, FINE WINE INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

BURGERS AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

1980 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 800-747-2839 INTIMATE & CASUAL WITH DAILY SPECIALS

777 Beach Blvd.Biloxi • 877-877-6256

CQ ($$-$$$)

TASTE OF MEXICO 880 Schillinger Rd. S. • 633-6122 5805 US 90 • 653-9163

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$)

BLU ($)

LA COCINA ($)

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

HACIENDA SAN MIGUEL ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE 800 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-0783 830 W I65 Service Rd. S • 378-5837 4663 Airport Blvd. • 342-5553

SEAFOOD

HARD ROCK CAFÉ ($)

ELEGANT ATMOSPHERE & TANTALIZING ENTREES LOUNGE WITH COCKTAILS & TAPAS MENU

AMERICAN FARE & ROCKIN’ MEMORABILIA

WIND CREEK CASINO:

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE

FIRE ($$-$$$)

SOUTHERN FAVORITES BUFFET

GRILL ($)

SATISFACTION ($-$$)

303 Poarch Rd. Atmore • 866-946-3360 PRIME STEAKS, SEAFOOD & WINE CONTEMPORARY & OLD-FASHIONED FAVORITES

SEND LISTINGS TO LISTINGS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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CUISINE | THE BEER PROFESSOR

Brewing abounds in T-Town BY TOM WARD/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Photo | Provided

In addition to a wide selection of beers, some of which are available in bottles, Black Warrior Brewing also makes its own wine and cold-brew coffee.

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uscaloosa is, of course, best known for football, but in the past few years it has also developed into a significant craft brewing locale, currently home to three breweries. On a recent visit to T-Town, I decided to check them out. I found a number to great beers, and three very distinctive taprooms. Opened in 2012, Druid City Brewing Co. was Tuscaloosa’s first brewery. Best known for its Downtown North Porter, which won the top beer prize at the 2016 Alabama Craft Beer Festival, it now puts out six beers that can be found on tap at bars in and around the city. Its quirky little taproom, however, is worth a visit. Located in the back of a strip mall off 15th Street, the tiny taproom has a small bar that seats about eight people, and a handful of scattered tables. Outside there is much more seating in a makeshift patio within the ropedoff parking lot. I was there on a non-football weekend Friday night, and it was packed. There was a DJ outside and trivia going on, while a number of people were playing board games and enjoying the beer inside. There were only three beers on tap that night — the porter, the Lamplighter IPA and the Druid City Wheat — but if the beer is good, that is all you need. I ordered the Grapefruit Shandy, which was the wheat ale (5 percent alcohol by volume) with a generous splash of real grapefruit juice. It was refreshing and perfect for a steamy late-summer Alabama evening. Leaving Druid City, I headed to Black Warrior Brewing Co., located on University Avenue in the heart of Tuscaloosa’s entertainment district, about a mile from the Denny Chimes. Its taproom was much more like an upscale downtown pub, with a long, beautiful wooden bar, booths and some seating out front on University. The shiny tanks holding the brew are clearly visible, reminding everyone that it is indeed a working brewery. Inside I was confronted with a large menu of beers, so I asked my beertender, Forrest (who happened to be from Baldwin County), to give me some recommendations for a flight of four samples from the available 13 on tap. He steered me to the Broad Street Brown, The One and Only Mosaic, the Lock 17 IPA and the

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Blood Orange Double IPA. I was not disappointed. The brown ale was excellent, rich with malt flavors, almost like a light porter. It would be one to have if you were having more than one. The Mosaic was very interesting — a hoppy pale ale with some spice and fruit flavorings (Forrest’s favorite). The Lock 17 was a good, strong India pale ale with a deep color, while the Blood Orange IPA was superb — smooth orange taste at the beginning, followed by a powerful finish and, at 8.4 percent ABV, strong enough to knock down Big Al. In addition to its wide selection of beers, some of which are available in bottles, Black Warrior also makes its own wine. The taproom also features cold brew coffee on tap, which can be added to any beer — something I’ve never seen before. I had a taste of the cold brew mixed with the Broad Street Brown. It was tasty, but the coffee (which was strong) was too overpowering for me — it needed more beer in the mix. The newest of Tuscaloosa’s craft brewers is the Band of Brothers Brewing Co., located by the railroad tracks on 23rd Avenue. No typical T-Town tavern, it is situated inside a warehouse — which serves as the brewery, loading dock and taproom — and had a very different feel than either Black Warrior or Druid City. I stopped by early on a Saturday afternoon, when things were still quiet (save the forklifts), and had a great time talking beer, music and football with some of the regulars. There were five beers on tap and I took a sample of each before going with the White Widow IPA, which was strong and hoppy despite its light color. I had to leave, but was happy to find out three Band of Brothers brews are available in bottles in Mobile, so keep an eye out for them. I’ll definitely be back, though. If you don’t want to schlep all the way to Tuscaloosa for some Alabama craft beer, good news is (almost) here. Serda’s Brewing Co. on Government Street will host a “sneak peek” of the brewery, with food trucks and merchandise for sale, on Saturday, Sept. 30, from 1-6 p.m. Unfortunately no beer is available yet, but you can check out what we all hope will soon be a Mobile staple.


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TENSIXTYFIVE ARTIST FEATURE

Wet Willie is still smiling BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR

BAND: WET WILLIE STAGE: JAKE PEAVY FOUNDATION STAGE TIME: SUNDAY, OCT. 1, 4:45-5:45 P.M.

T Photo/Courtesy TenSixtyFive | Wet Willie

Photo/Facebook | Muscadine Bloodline

enSixtyFive is an epic celebration of music in the streets of downtown Mobile. Since the festival’s beginning, iconic local band Wet Willie has thrown a jam-filled set of funky Azalea City blues into the jambalaya and will return for the third installment. Guitarist/founding member Rick Hirsch has a deep appreciation for the festival and is taking a break from his Studio H2O to join in the festivities. Hirsch said he feels the demise of BayFest opened the door to a festival that uses the gateless philosophy to please both festival-goers and local businesses. “BayFest was extraordinarily difficult to participate in, as far as the audience is concerned,” Hirsch explained. “The whole town was cordoned off in a way. It was expensive and becoming more inaccessible for people who wanted to go. This TenSixtyFive thing happened and opened it all up.” For Hirsch, Wet Willie’s TenSixtyFive performances provide him the chance to revisit a specific “stage” in his career. The guitarist cites Wet Willie as his first “professional” job in the music world. Hirsch adds that the chemistry he shares with his fellow band members also brings him back to perform with Wet Willie. For Hirsch, taking the stage with Wet Willie is a family reunion filled with musical reflections on the past.

“Of course, the camaraderie that you develop with the people in that situation is deep,” Hirsch said. “You’re really more like brothers and sisters than just acquaintances, I guess you would say.” While Hirsch is excited about reuniting with his bandmates, Wet Willie’s fans are excited to get reacquainted with the band. With lineup changes and a departure from Capricorn Records, he says, the band’s evolution shifted from the funky blues of “Country Side of Life” to the disco sounds of “Weekend.” Hirsch says each stage of the band’s evolution has brought a new group of listeners into the fold. “With different people, I can tell by what they ask for what they really want to hear,” Hirsch said. “A lot of them swing back to that organic thing that we had going originally as a blues rock group. It’s funny in a way, because that stuff plugs into today’s music scene more than the latter, more slick stuff.” Wet Willie has yet to disappoint with its TenSixtyFive performances. The band brings grins to faces with “Keep on Smilin’” and has the crowd on their feet for their electrifying take on “Shout Bamalama.” With past history between lead singer Jimmy Hall and Blackberry Smoke, the two bands might surprise the crowd with a jam session. When asked if a collaboration was possible, Hirsch simply replied that “anything can happen.” “I’m sure that would be a really great thing, for a jam like that to happen. Aw, man! I can’t even imagine. It would be funktastic, as I like to say.”

Muscadine Bloodline gaining national notice BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR

BAND: MUSCADINE BLOODLINE DATE: FRIDAY, SEPT. 29, 6 P.M. STAGE: JAKE PEAVY FOUNDATION STAGE

N Photo/Rob Blackman | Blackberry Smoke

Photo/Neil Krug | Cage the Elephant

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appie Award winner Muscadine Bloodline will use its TenSixtyFive pulpit as a homecoming. A few years back, Charlie Muncaster and Gary Stanton were performing as solo country artists in whatever venue would have them. Eventually, the two crossed paths and formed Muscadine Bloodline. The duo’s combined talent and enthusiasm has served Muncaster and Stanton well. Since winning the Nappie Award for Best New Band in 2016, Muscadine Bloodline has relocated to Nashville and thrived. The duo has played numerous festivals across the United States, sold out numerous shows and shared the stage with such notables as Luke Combs and Blackberry Smoke. “We’ve seen this big transition from being a bar band and playing downtown Mobile for four hours for nobody or for free drinks, to last week in Virginia and D.C. playing headline shows,” Muncaster said. “There are venues that people are coming to see us, and it’s not just because they were just there in passing.” “We keep going, going and going,” Stanton added. “We’re having a good time and enjoying it. It’s weird, because things are kinda starting to work for itself. We feel that we’ve put in a

lot of sweat equity into this thing over the past few years. We’ve worked hard and grinded, and we’re starting to see the fruits of the labor.” Even though things are moving fast, Stanton says they still have a long way to go. When they moved to Nashville, neither invested much time in following the stereotypical Music City dream of meeting “the right person.” They recognized that progress in the country music game comes from putting in time on the road and in the studio. Muscadine Bloodline has been busy writing and recording new music for 2018. So far the band has recorded five tracks, one of which will become a single for radio play. If it doesn’t perform well, Muncaster and Stanton will continue to release singles until they find a hit. Ultimately, the pair say fans can expect a new release by next spring. Muncaster says he has high expectations for the new material. “The songs are better,” Muncaster said. “We’ve been in the room with some huge songwriters who have number ones and are really hot in Nashville. You’re co-writing with people who have done this for a long time, and their ideas are brilliant.” “We’re excited to see the turnout,” Stanton said. “We’ve played at home before, but every time you play at home, it’s fun to see the first fan base that you ever had come out and see it grow every time. It just really makes you feel good and makes everything worth it.”


Shooting arrows with Blackberry Smoke BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR

BAND: BLACKBERRY SMOKE DATE: FRIDAY, SEPT. 29, 9 P.M. STAGE: JAKE PEAVY FOUNDATION STAGE

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tlanta’s Blackberry Smoke will be filling the streets of downtown Mobile with a heaping serving of Southern rock that can be embraced by fans of soul, blues and country as well. Vocalist/guitarist Charlie Starr says Southern rock is an undefined genre steeped in a plethora of sounds, providing endless amounts of creative legroom. “I don’t have a definition for Southern rock,” Starr explained. “If you put on ‘Where We All Belong’ by Marshall Tucker, you’re like, ‘Yup! There we go!’ Then you put on a Wet Willie record, you go, ‘Well, that’s different, yet it’s similar.’ They’re still called Southern rock bands. It’s all over the map. I think that being called a Southern rock band is almost a license to be as free as you can possibly be with the music.” Blackberry Smoke will entertain TenSixtyFive with cuts from its latest effort, “Like an Arrow.” This album is the result of spontaneity. Starr says it started out like any other album — the tracks had been written, the demos recorded. When the band began rehearsing for the studio, Starr says the sessions were so good the band felt the need to go ahead and lay down the album while the magic was still present. “Everything went right, in that everything was feeling so great at that moment,” Starr said. “We had

time off and we were like, ‘Hell, let’s book the studio right now,’ where normally, we would’ve started right then talking about, ‘Who should we get to produce it?’ and ‘Where should we record it?’ I said, ‘Hey, the studio is free, and we’re free. Let’s go!’ Next thing you know, we were finished.” Starr says one of the biggest thrills of this album was working with the late Gregg Allman on the album’s warm, poignant closer, “Free on the Wing.” Starr says he was apprehensive about approaching Allman to perform on this song. Even though he’d had friendly interactions with Allman in the past, Starr says it would have been hard accepting a “no” from the Southern rock icon. After listening to the track, Allman agreed to contribute his talents. “He was a huge persona, but he was a very quiet, unassuming fellow,” Starr said. “He was such a sweet man. Now that I can look back, finding out after the fact how sick he was and the fact that he still came and did that for us was so moving to me. We couldn’t have been more honored and proud and appreciative.” Blackberry Smoke is no stranger to the Alabama Gulf Coast. Its collection of backwoods rock ‘n’ roll translates into a wild set filled with Southern-fried jams. The material on “Like an Arrow” could make for one of its most memorable local performances yet. From edgy rock numbers such as “Waiting for the Thunder” to the soulful sounds of “Sunrise in Texas,” Blackberry Smoke has something for everyone.

Beneath the layers of Cage the Elephant BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR

BAND: CAGE THE ELEPHANT DATE: SATURDAY, SEPT. 30, 8:30 P.M. VENUE: JAKE PEAVY FOUNDATION STAGE

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n 2008, Cage the Elephant used the progressive blues rock single “Ain’t No Rest for the Wicked” to catapult from Bowling Green, Kentucky, into the international rock scene. The light-speed wave of notoriety this single brought the band could have easily burned them out, but Cage the Elephant remained on scene and built an ever-growing catalog broadening the band’s talent and creativity. Cage the Elephant’s sound has changed greatly since “Ain’t No Rest for the Wicked,” first with its 2013 release “Melophobia” and again with 2015’s “Tell Me I’m Pretty.” The band began to develop a trademark modern rock sound laced with a ribbon of psychedelic ‘60s pop rock. Lead singer Matt Shultz says this change was part deliberate, part natural. After releasing two records molded and shaped by the music industry, Shultz says, the band decided to answer the question, “What if we could go back and make our first self-titled album the way we wanted to make it?” “The records that we were making weren’t fully who we were,” Shultz said. “We were under the forces at hand at that point. We’ve been able to push forward and bring our fans along the way. It’s about the songwriting. It’s about the spirit, the heart and the message of the music. Now, we’re in a place where we have complete creative control and are in control of our imagery. It’s more of a representation of who we are. It’s been a blessing.” Cage the Elephant’s latest release is the band’s latest exercise in innovation. “Unpeeled” is a live album unlike any other. It documents stripped-down, acoustic live performances of the band’s hits as well as unique covers, such as its beautiful take on Eric Goulden’s “Whole Wide World,” a track accented

by a full string section joining them on stage. The concept for this album began with an acoustic set at Neil Young’s Bridge School Benefit. “We’re very much a studio band,” Shultz explained. “We like to play the studio as an instrument as much as we like to play our instruments. As a way to fill some sonic space, we brought in this string section. Afterward, our managers came up and were like, ‘That’s the best thing you ever did! That was amazing!’ It felt good, and it went really well.” Sometime later, RCA asked the band to fulfill its contract with a greatest hits album. Cage the Elephant thought doing a typical greatest hits album signified the end of their career, which was far from over. At the time, Shultz says, the band was already putting tracks together for their next studio album. Instead, the group reminded themselves of the success of their Bridge School Benefit set and brought the concept to the label. “We were like, ‘Maybe they’ll be interested in allowing us to do this cool thing where we do these songs that everyone loves and that we love and a couple of covers, and strip it down and bring in a string section,’” Shultz said. “RCA was very gracious and allowed us to do it. So, instead of a greatest hits, we got to do something creative.” While he did not know when their next album will be released, Shultz says it will be shaped by the band’s experience and creative freedom. He did say the album will represent “the next phase” of Cage the Elephant, which he likened to David Bowie’s “Berlin” releases. Shultz says this album will reach into the band’s past and future, and that the band plans to employ “all the tools and paintbrushes that are available to us.” “There’s a couple of working titles that we’re working on,” Shultz said. “We’re seven songs deep. I don’t know when you can expect it. So, we’re gonna start getting together as a group and working through stuff in November.”

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Photo | Facebook

THE DELTA SAINTS WILL CAP OFF THE INAUGURAL UNITY FEST OCT. 21 IN FAIRHOPE.

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ffinity for All People is a company that uses colorful T-shirts with inspiring messages to create more positivity in the world. Now, Affinity for All People is taking another step in its mission. On Saturday, Oct. 21, the company will hold the first Unity Fest on the beachside stage at American Legion Post 199 in Fairhope. Organizers want Unity Fest to be a “celebra-

tion of unity and diversity through the power of music.” To strengthen the festival’s philosophy, Unity Fest will donate 10 percent of all profits to Fairhope Sisters Unite. Through a variety of events and community gatherings, Fairhope Sisters Unite hopes to “unite people of different races, genders, faiths and walks of life.” Unity Fest will feature an aurally diverse lineup of bands that include several local favorites. Stereo Dogs will rock out in a set

Bringing the beach to the plantation BAND: THE BLUEBERRY SESSIONS FEATURING CHARLIE MARS DATE: THURSDAY, OCT. 5, WITH DOORS AT 6 P.M. VENUE: WEEKS BAY PLANTATION, 12563 MARY ANN BEACH ROAD (FAIRHOPE), WWW.WEEKSBAYPLANTATION.COM TICKETS: $29, AVAILABLE THROUGH WEEKS BAY PLANTATION WEBSITE

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hose wanting to extend their musical experience for the TenSixtyFive weekend should look across Mobile Bay to Weeks Bay Plantation. In addition to growing delicious, organic blueberries, Weeks Bay Planta-

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tion serves as the Alabama Gulf Coast’s most scenic outdoor venue. Situated on the shores of an idyllic pond, the stage faces a natural incline that envelops the crowd with sound. When the sun goes down, stage lighting dances across the water as bands fill the area with music.

MUSIC

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

FEATURE

Affinity for All People launches Unity Fest

filled with classic rock and original songs. Disco Rednecks will bring their backwoods dance party to the festival. Chad Davidson Band will give the lineup a healthy dose of soul. Singer-songwriter Eric Erdman will serve up homegrown songs that have made him a favorite from Mobile to Muscle Shoals. Jamell Richardson will give the crowd a case of the blues. Infant Richard & the Delta Stones will be showcasing their revamped sound. New Breed Brass Band will be one of two Unity Fest headliners. This brassy collection of young New Orleans talent is co-managed by Trombone Shorty himself. New Breed Brass Band has clearly taken a few lessons from Trombone Shorty. When this band takes the stage, they merge funk, rock, jazz and hip-hop into one wild musical beast. The band’s time on the Unity Fest stage will bring the celebratory sounds of New Orleans to the shores of Mobile Bay. The Delta Saints will complete the lineup of the inaugural Unity Fest. This Nashville group has been delving into West Coast sounds on their full-length album “Monte Vista.” The album’s appropriate opener, “California,” represents a musical constant that flows throughout the album. The Delta Saints’ sound is a peppered with blues rock attitude and alt. rock overtones. “Monte Vista” is a powerful collection of songs that represent the band’s passion for its sound. Tickets are on sale now through Eventbrite. The festival has set general admission at $40. Unity Fest will also feature VIP access for $75.

In anticipation of fall weather, Weeks Bay Plantation is collaborating with Hix Snedeker Cos. and Skate Mountain Records for The Blueberry Sessions concert series, featuring notable headliners supported by groups from Skate Mountain Records’ roster. Mississippi singer-songwriter Charlie Mars will be the first headliner. In recent months, Mars has been taking his listeners to the shoreline with cuts from his most recent release, “Beach Town.” This acoustic-based album is filled with vivid musical snapshots that trip across the emotional spectrum. From the lighthearted “Dream Kitchen” to the album’s lazy title track, Mars’ Blueberry Sessions performance should provide a mellow evening on the plantation before the madness of TenSixtyFive.


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MUSIC BRIEFS

Ol’ Glory

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

Photo | jjgrey.com | JJ Grey & Mofro

Band: JJ Grey & Mofro plus Southern Avenue Date: Wednesday, Oct. 4, 7 p.m. Venue: The Steeple on St. Francis, 251 St. Francis St., www.thesteeplemobile.com Tickets: $28-$49.50, available through Ticketfly

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he unique setting and high-quality acoustics of The Steeple on St. Francis have made this downtown venue a favorite with local music lovers. The Steeple will soon polish its reputation with an evening of music that begins with Southern Avenue. This Memphis five-piece has been spreading the blues and soul of its self-titled debut on Stax Records. From oldschool blues to modern soul, each track serves as a different face of the Memphis music scene. Local favorites JJ Grey & Mofro recently released “Ol’ Glory,” with music reflecting Grey’s knack for mingling a variety of Southern genres. But “Ol’ Glory” earns its individuality through production tweaks. “The Island” is filled with haunting, soulful vocals that reverberate into slides on the dobro. “Hold on Tight” is a classic ‘70s street groove filled with funky guitar plucks and Grey’s vocal echoes. These new tracks combined with crowd pleasers from the band’s catalog should make for an interesting evening at The Steeple.

Brass after hours Band: Blackwater Brass Band Date: Saturday, Sept. 30, 10:30 p.m. Venue: Pinky’s Bar & Grill, 659 Dauphin St., 251-432-2453 Tickets: Free Over the past year, OK Bicycle Shop has experienced a tiny bit of growth in the form of Pinky’s Bar & Grill. This open-air, downtown watering hole maintains its reputation as “the smallest bar in Alabama” with pride. With its position near the Jake Peavy Foundation Stage, Pinky’s is looking to celebrate TenSixtyFive with post-festival entertainment sure to draw standing room only crowds. Blackwater Brass Band’s eclectic brass set will begin after festival headliners Cage the Elephant conclude. Since its debut at SouthSounds, this Mississippi-based brass band has earned new fans with regular visits to Mobile. Audiences cannot help but be drawn into the band’s energy. Its sets are filled with electrifying brass grooves that evolve into epic jams. Those looking to get their second wind after TenSixtyFive should look no further than Blackwater Brass Band’s set at Pinky’s.

Meanwhile, at The Mule Band: The Woolly Bushmen, The Shunnarahs, Lung, Cookies & Cake Date: Friday, Sept. 29, 9 p.m. Venue: The Blind Mule, 57 N. Claiborne St., www.theblindmule.net Tickets: $5 (21+) and $10 (18+), available at the door When it comes to post-TenSixtyFive music offerings, Mobile’s choices are practically endless. The Blind Mule, however, will feature an interesting lineup of bands throughout the weekend. Friday kicks off the venue’s festival weekend as Orlando’s The Woolly Bushmen make their triumphant return to the Azalea City. This group specializes in classic garage rock that is both fun and infectious. With raunchy vocals and old-school organ work, The Woolly Bushmen have definitely tapped into rock ‘n’ roll’s marrow and are more than willing to suck every drop. Mobile’s The Shunnarahs will be lending their support. This group has given the ‘60s garage surf rock sound a Gulf Coast edge. Lung will add its unique sound to the mix, featuring an electrified cello as a foundation for its ingenious underground rock. Pensacola’s female-fronted hip-hop outfit Cookies & Cake will employ fun beats and clever lyrics to set the mood.

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AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | September 28 - October 4

THUR. SEPT 28

McSharry’s— DJ Spiller, 10p The Merry Widow— Bluegill— Cary Laine Elements: after party, 9p Blues Tavern— John Hall Duo, Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — 8:30p Retrobution, 8p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Lefty Ryan Balthrop, 6p Collins, 6p Cockeyed Charlie’s— JJ Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Felix’s— Soulshine River Dan, 10p Flora Bama— Davis Nix, 2p// Moe’s BBQ (Semmes) — Zachery Diedrich, 5p/// Lee Yankie, The Dunaway Brothers 5:30p//// Mark Sherrill, James SanBar— David Jones Daniel, Chris Newbury, 6p//// Jo Jo Tacky Jacks (Gulf Pres, 10p//// Kyle Wilson, 10:15p Shores)— Destiny Brown, 6p Golden Nugget— DJ Rico, 9p Tacky Jacks (Orange Le Bouhon— Here Comes Beach) — Pierce Parker, 6p Treble, 7p Windmill Market— Light Listening Room— Shawn Travelers, 11:30a Williams, 8p Lulu’s— Lefty Collins, 5p SAT. SEPT 30 Manci’s— Ross Newell Big Beach Brewing— Strickly McSharry’s— Rock Bottom, Isbell, 6:30p 7:30p Blind Mule— Casual Burn, SanBar— Jim Andrews Future Hate, Hibachi Strangers, 9p Tacky Jacks (Orange Bluegill— Quintin Berry, 12p// Beach) — Jason Justice, 6p Journey 2 Mars, 6p Blues Tavern— Johnny No, 9p FRI. SPET 29 Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— All Sports Bar & Billiards— Matt Neese, 6p DJ Markie Mark, 10p Cockeyed Charlie’s— Jordan Big Beach Brewing— Bramblett Crackerjack Diamonds, 6:30p Felix’s— Matt Bush & Friends Blind Mule— Woolly Bushmen, Flora Bama— Jezebel’s Chilln’, The Shunnarahs, Lung, Cookies 1p// Jay Hawkins Duo, 2p/// and Cake, 9p Jack Robertson Show, 5:30p//// Bluegill— Lee Yankee, 12p// Sugarcane Jane, 6p//// Brian Hill Jeri, 6p Duo, 9p//// River Dan Band, 10p//// Blues Tavern— Fat Lincoln, 9p Bruce Smelley Duo, 10:15p//// Lee Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Yankie and the Hellz Yeah, 10:30p Delta Smoke, 6p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Cockeyed Charlie’s— DJ Brandon Green, 9:30p Chill, 10p Hard Rock (Live) — Anjealah Fairhope Brewing— Marlow Johnson, 8p Boys IP Casino— America, 8p Felix’s— DOTC Trio Le Bouhon— Rondale and Flora Bama— Jay Hawkins Dorothy Overstreet Duo, 1p// Lea Anne Creswell, 2p/// Listening Room— Honeyboy Dave McCormick, 5p//// Hung and Boots, 8p Jury, 6p//// Jezebel’s Chilln’, 6p//// Live Bait— Brandon Styles, 7p Mel Knapp, 9p//// Ty Taylor and McSharry’s— DJ Carter, 10p the Kinfolk, 10p//// Brian Hill Duo, The Merry Widow— Little 10:15p//// Red Clay Strays, 10:30p Raine Band and DJ Charles III, Golden Nugget— Radio Inc, 10:30p 9p Soul Kitchen— Milk & Cooks, Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Dino Brawl & Zew Mob, 11p Brandon Green, 9:30p Tacky Jacks (Orange IP Casino— Frankie Ballard, 8p Beach) — Soul Food Junkies, Listening Room— Ruby and 12p// Damien Lamb, 6p Rogues, 8p Live Bait— Brandon Styles, 7p SUN. OCT 1 Lulu’s—Grits N Pieces, 5p Bluegill— Quintin Berry, 12p// Manci’s— Emily Stuckey

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Yeah Probably, 6p Blues Tavern— John Hall Jam, 6p Fairhope Brewing— Ruby and Rogues Felix’s— Bobby Butchka Flora Bama— Smokey Otis Duo, 12p// Songs of Rusty, 1:30p/// Dave Chastang, 2p//// Perdido Brothers, 6p//// Mason Henderson, 8p//// Kevin Swanson and Adam Brown, 10:15p Listening Room— Malcom Holcombe, 7p Lulu’s— Grits N Pieces, 5p McSharry’s— Trad Irish Music, 6:30p The Merry Widow— Back to the 80’s, 3p Old 27 Grill— Barry Gibson, 11:30a

MON. OCT 2

Felix’s— David Chastang Flora Bama— Gove Scrivenor, 2p// Cathy Pace, 6p/// Mel Knapp, 8p//// Petty and Pace, 10:15p Listening Room— Pegi Young & The Survivors, 8p Lulu’s— Adam Holt, 5p

TUE. OCT 3

Bluegill— Tim Kinsey Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Matt Neese, 6p Butch Cassidy’s— Andy MacDonald Felix’s— Bryant Gilley Flora Bama— T-Bone Montgomery, 2p// Alabama Lightning, 6p/// Adam Brown, 8p//// Bruce Smelley Duo, 10:15p Lulu’s— Jimmy Lumpkin, 5p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Stephen Sylvester, 6p

WED. OCT 4

Beau Rivage— Louis Prima Jr. & The Witness, 7p Bluegill— Matt Neese Blues Tavern— Art, 8p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Felix’s— Matt Bush Duo Flora Bama— Neil Dover, 2p// Hartbreak Hill, 6p/// Davis Nix, 8p//// Johnny B Duo, 10:15p Old 27 Grill— Youth Open Mic, 6p The Steeple— JJ Grey & Mofro, 8p


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ART ARTIFICE

Ballet lawsuit fallout still echoes BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

W

hen lawsuits against individual board members and the development director of Mobile Ballet were dismissed by Mobile County Circuit Judge Jay York in an order signed Sept. 6, matters didn’t end there. A separate claim for injunctive relief against Mobile Ballet Inc. was allowed to stand, and a status conference on possible mediation is in the works for early October. The individuals named in the now-dismissed suits were Becky Tate, Sandra Parker, Jim Parker, Jill Reingold, Liz Kirby, Chris Burgess, Mary Byrd, Leslie Johnson, Julee Waldrop, Barbara Corte and Mobile Ballet Director Karen Kennedy. Lagniappe contacted defense counsel for comment on the ruling — a prepared 800-plus word statement by attorney Caine O’Rear — which opened with a reference to Lagniappe’s original article of Feb. 15, 2017. The statement read: “In that article, Lagniappe reported extensively on statements made by plaintiffs Beverly Davis and Monty Thull and their attorney, Ray Thompson, against the defendant directors and Ms. Kennedy. Those statements by Davis, Thull and Thompson which formed the basis of the lawsuit were hotly refuted by the individual director defendants and Ms. Kennedy as false, reckless and defamatory, and the plaintiffs’ claims have now been tossed out of court as the defendants predicted.” O’Rear’s statement noted the claim for “alleged injunctive relief” was not mentioned in the Feb. 15, 2017, Lagniappe piece. Defense attorneys O’Rear and Windy Bitzer will contest the last claim. The prepared statement spells out changes at

Mobile Ballet in the last year, including the hire of Katia Garza as guest artistic director for the 2017-2018 performance season. A 14-year veteran of the Orlando Ballet, her new production of “The Nutcracker” premieres with Mobile Ballet in December and her version of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” will be staged in March 2018. The upcoming season begins with the new production “Blaine Hoven — Full Circle” on Nov. 2, a production highlighting Mobile Ballet alumnus and American Ballet Theatre soloist Blaine Hoven along with a cast from both companies. A new Mobile Ballet ballet master has been hired with the addition of Cuban National Ballet School graduate Eduardo Pi Iglesias. The statement said 42 dancers for the 20172018 Mobile Ballet Company were hired from a “record number of dancers” who auditioned this summer. Plans for the 15th annual Nutcracker Charity Ball on Dec. 28 continue as well. This year’s selected charity is Boys & Girls Clubs of South Alabama. The released statement goes further in outlining ulterior motivations for the legal action against Mobile Ballet. It states that current board members believe the three former directors who filed suit using claims “dismissed by the court” are for motives “unrelated to the allegations of the complaint.” “The Ballet board members are aware of evidence that suggests the plaintiffs, together with others, have set out to damage Mobile Ballet in order to benefit a new competing ballet school. Pam Thompson, the wife of the lawyer represent-

ing the plaintiffs in this case (Ray Thompson), is a former employee of Mobile Ballet who is running the new competing school. Counsel for Mobile Ballet state that they will present evidence that persons associated with the new school have spread false rumors about Mobile Ballet and improperly criticized its directors and officers in an attempt to attract students away from Mobile Ballet and to the new school,” the statement reads. Ray Thompson directly refuted the characterization when asked. “That is blatantly false. Once Mr. [Winthrop] Corey was kicked out by the people currently running Mobile Ballet, many people left and took their children out and had no place to go. His last day was Dec. 12, 2016. In January of ’17, probably two dozen families approached my wife about teaching their children. She did not approach them,” Thompson told Lagniappe. He said the lawsuit arose “about the same time in an effort to try to recover control of Mobile Ballet.” Thompson said the new school — Classical Ballet of Mobile — arose from the dust-up but confirmed his wife’s involvement at the school. Defense counsel is expressly quoted in the statement: “It is truly unfortunate that the former director plaintiffs continue to pursue a case against a charitable cause such as Mobile Ballet when they are no longer associated with it and in which their only interest appears to be in attempting to disparage and harm it. The only explanation can be that they and others are doing so to benefit the new competing school, without regard to the truth or the lack of merit of their allegations.”

New director tops MAC news eruption

In addition to working with MAC on the 2017 Arty Awards, Teague also served on boards for the Mobile Azalea Trail, the Junior League of Mobile and the Young Women’s Civic Club of Mobile. What put Teague above the other 30 or so applicants for the slot? “It was clearly her experience at branding and knowledge of social media which made her a very, very, very strong candidate. The question we posed was if she had a clean sheet of paper, what would she do, and she’s got some fantastic ideas for how to put the arts council in the public eye again and to do some really creative things,” MAC Board President Jeff Marcus said. MAC just completed its biggest annual fundraising project, the Arts Throwdown held Sep. 15 at The Temple Downtown. Returning champ Devlin Wilson bested the field of contestants when his

painting of Middle Bay Lighthouse brought in a high bid of $800. Tabulations from more than 90 silent auction items are yet to be completed. MAC will also play a key role in TenSixtyFive, the downtown festival running Sept. 29 through Oct. 1, as the organizer of the Arts and Crafts Market in Cathedral Square, to be held 2-7 p.m. each day. Some 40 vendors are expected. MAC is also facilitating the Sept. 30 Creative Crossings competition wherein six local artists — James Currie, conz8000, Rando Dixon, Soynika Edwards, Kathleen Kirk Stoves and Kym Vanover Brown — will visually enhance crosswalks between Washington Avenue and Cathedral Square using temporary materials. Renderings will take place from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and judges will award prizes at 6 p.m. MAC said there’s a possibility some of the crosswalk designs could become permanent.

There’s a lot of good news at the Mobile Arts Council these days and at the top of the list is the top of the staff. The umbrella arts organization recently named Shellie Teague as its new executive director. The 32-year-old owner of Teague Branding Strategies fills a spot that has been vacant since previous executive director Bob Burnett stepped down in January 2015. She joins Program Director Lucy Gafford and Administrative Coordinator Angela Montgomery on the MAC staff. “I’m honored and humbled to serve the Mobile arts community in this new role. We’ve already got a lot of great plans being developed to increase community involvement in the arts. You’ll be seeing a lot more of MAC in Mobile, I can promise you that!” Teague said in a Sept. 18 press release.

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An ode to perseverance in WWII London

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FILMTHE REEL WORLD

BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

AREA

THEATERS CARMIKE CINEMA’S Wynnsong 16 785 Schillinger Rd. S. (251) 639-7373 CRESCENT THEATER 208 Dauphin Street (251) 438-2005 HOLLYWOOD STADIUM 18 1250 Satchel Paige Dr. (251) 473-9655

heir Finest” is an amusing but affecting drama about ongoing struggle in the face of adversity, through art and also through simple, dogged determination. As London is relentlessly bombed during World War II, the Ministry of Information Film Unit attempts to make a movie that will bolster morale. Its film succeeds, as does this film, in doing just that. Crowds will be pleased by “Their Finest.” It is a poignant, but not (too) cheesy, film. Movies about movies are a fun genre, and the wartime background gives this story an added element of interest. Gemma Arterton plays Catrin Cole, a smart young lady plucked from the typing pool to assist in adding a female perspective to a film script. Initially, they actually have her write little jokes and dialogue about husbands to entertain female viewers, and the degree to which her efforts are contained within the project are just the first of many great feminist moments. She’s the Rosie the Riveter of screenwriters. The concept of women rising to the occasion deepens when Mrs. Cole is sent

to interview two meek twin sisters said to have undertaken a heroic rescue at Dunkirk. Desperate for money to support her painter husband (Jack Huston), the fledgling screenwriter fudges the drama when necessary to get the project off the ground, and the sisters’ story begins its journey to the big screen. Richard E. Grant is, as always, wonderful as the government representative, ordering up the dramatic elements required, such as a handsome American thrown into the mix to try to entice the actual Americans to join the war effort. Bill Nighy supplies most of the film’s comedy and a good deal of its heart as well, as a vain, aging movie star, affronted when he is offered a role not as the romantic lead, but as a drunk uncle. “Their Finest” is adapted from the novel “The Finest Hour and a Half,” which is longer but also makes more sense as a title, and was directed by Lone Scherfig, who directed another marvelously intelligent, deeply literate period film, 2009’s “An Education” with Carey Mulligan and Peter Sarsgaard. This is a more sentimental, less nuanced story, but anchored by a very subtle and delicate

performance by Arterton, convincing as a woman still learning her own heart and her own strengths. And I echo my sentiments from last week as I encounter yet another performance by Sam Claflin, as the gruff head screenwriter grudgingly, then more amorously, working with a female writer. I find him wooden, and his last name is hard to spell. In this film he is once again upstaged by his female costar, which is appropriate to the story, but he could have been more affecting if he had risen to the occasion. Nevertheless, “Their Finest” is a rather delightful, dare I say inspiring story, and I found myself moved by the ultimate film within the film, too, dabbing away a tear or two just like those terribly beleaguered Londoners in the movie theater. It is also wholesome enough to watch with your parents, and I suggest you do so, for there is no use in attempting to resist the uplifting sentiment of the story, the ingenuity on display and the many worthwhile moments striving to go on living among the ruins of London. “Their Finest” is currently available to rent.

RAVE MOTION PICTURE JUBILEE SQUARE 12 6898 U.S. 90 Daphne, (251) 626- 6266 CARMIKE CINEMAS 23151 Wharf Ln. Orange Beach (251) 981-4444 COBB THEATRES PINNACLE 14 3780 Gulf Shores Pkwy Gulf Shores (251) 968-7444

Photos | Nicola Dove / Universal Pictures

FROM LEFT: Sam Claflin and Gemma Arterton in “Their Finest,” the story of a former secretary, newly appointed as a scriptwriter for propaganda films, who joins the cast and crew of a major production in WWII London. Tom Cruise stars in “American Made” as a pilot who works covertly for the CIA in the 1980s. NEW IN THEATERS AMERICAN MADE

EASTERN SHORE PREMIERE CINEMA 14 30500 Alabama 181 #500 Spanish Fort, Al (251) 626-0352 Information accurate at press time; please call theaters for showtimes.

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Tom Cruise stars in yet another movie, this one about a pilot transporting contraband for both the CIA and a cartel in the 1980s. A comedy adventure directed by Doug Liman (”Swingers,” “Mr. and Mrs. Smith”) should be pretty entertaining. All listed multiplex theaters.

FLATLINERS

Apparently they remade the 1990 film “Flatliners” with Ellen Page, Diego Luna, Nina Dobrev and my BBC boyfriend, James Norton. AMC Mobile 16, Eastern Shore Premiere Cinema

SPYDER

A spy thriller from India, in Telugu and Tamil. Regal Mobile Stadium 18

NOW PLAYING YEAR BY THE SEA Crescent Theater FRIEND REQUEST All listed multiplex theaters. KINGSMAN: THE GOLDEN CIRCLE All listed multiplex theaters. AMERICAN ASSASSIN All listed multiplex theaters. MOTHER! All listed multiplex theaters.   TRUE TO THE GAME Regal Mobile Stadium 18 HOME AGAIN All listed multiplex theaters. IT All listed multiplex theaters.

WIND RIVER Eastern Shore Premiere Cinema, Regal Mobile Stadium 18 LOGAN LUCKY All listed multiplex theaters. THE HITMAN’S BODYGUARD All listed multiplex theaters. ANNABELLE: CREATION All listed multiplex theaters. THE NUT JOB 2: NUTTY BY NATURE All listed multiplex theaters. KIDNAP All listed multiplex theaters. THE DARK TOWER All listed multiplex theaters. SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING All listed multiplex theaters. DESPICABLE ME 3 All listed multiplex theaters.


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CALENDAR OF EVENTS SEPTEMBER 28, 2017 - OCTOBER 4, 2017

GENERAL INTEREST Health & Wealth Fair

Senior citizens and their loved ones are invited to the 12th annual Health & Wealth Fair on Thursday, Sept. 28, at 9 a.m. at the James P. Nix Center in Fairhope. Call 251-928-2835.

Science on tap

The Mitchell Cancer Institute’s Rodney Rocconi, M.D., will present “Ovarian Cancer Screening: It’s Always the Last Place You Look,” Thursday, Sept. 28, 6 p.m. at Moe’s Original Bar B Que in downtown Mobile. Visit usahealthsystem.com.

Taste of Baldwin County

Join TimberCreek for a Taste of Baldwin County golf outing. Sample the best food from the best restaurants in Baldwin County while enjoying 18 holes of golf at TimberCreek. This event will be Thursday, Sept. 28 at 1 p.m. Call 251-621-9900.

“Plate and Gather”

Windmill Market in Fairhope presents “Plate and Gather,” the first in a pop-up dinner series featuring emerging chefs and exquisite food. Thursday, Sept. 28, at 6:30 p.m. Visit windmillmarket.org.

Family Movie Day

Surviving the Union Blockade.” Thursday, Sept. 28, 5:30 p.m. at Semmes Library, 9150 Moffett Road. A book signing and reception will follow the presentation. Call 251- 6456840.

Midtown Optimist Club

MMoA Night Market

Join Midtown Optimist Club every Wednesday at noon for lunch at Azalea City Golf Course. Call 251-348-3542.

Come take an early sneak-peek tour of Serda Brewing during the TenSixtyFive music festival on Saturday, Sept. 30, 1-6 p.m. Food, brewery and taproom tours. 600 Government St., Mobile.

Fairhope farmer’s market

The city of Fairhope hosts an outdoor farmer’s market Thursdays, 3-6 p.m., through Nov. 2. Behind the Fairhope Public Library downtown on Bancroft Street. Call 251-9291466.

Casino trip

Join Via! Health Fitness & Enrichment Center on the Party Bus to the Palace Casino, Saturday, Oct. 14. Cost is $20 per person with $15 Power Play given at casino. Bus departs the Via!, 1717 Dauphin St., at 10:30 a.m. and returns at 5:30 p.m. Call 251-478-3311 or email lprovost@viamobile.org.

Thriller Nights of Lights

The last Thursday of every month, End Time Harvest Ministry provides seniors with a free lunch at 1701 Donham Drive in Mobile. Call 251-604-2710.

TenSixtyFive

Spooky tours

Downtown Mobile comes alive with three days of free concerts on three stages, Sept. 29 through Oct. 1. Visit tensixtyfive.com and see related stories in this issue.

Gulf Coast Ducks presents a spine-tingling tour through The Fort, the Mobile River and downtown. While this experience is quite creepy, it’s a family attraction! Call 251-802-8687.

USA lecture series: Red tides

Bookmark contest

University of South Alabama’s Department of Marine Sciences and Dauphin Island Sea Lab host the 19th annual Wiese Distinguished Lecture Series Monday, Oct. 2. Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution’s Dr. Don Anderson will speak on “The expanding, global problem of red tides and harmful algal blooms.” USA Student Center Ballroom, 7 p.m.

Boardwalk Talks are held the first and third Wednesday of each month at 11:15 a.m. at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab, 101 Bienville Blvd. Call 251-861-2141.

Serda Brewing sneak peek

Thriller Nights of Lights will run Sept. 29 through Oct. 31 at Hank Aaron Stadium, every night, rain or shine, 7-10 p.m. The drive-thru light show is synchronized to a variety of fun music broadcasts through car radios. Visit www.ThrillerNightsofLights.com.

Free senior lunches

Dauphin Island Boardwalk Talks

To kick off Mental Illness Awareness week, NAMI Mobile will host a family movie day at the Crescent Theater in downtown Mobile, Saturday, Sept. 30, at 11 a.m. Visit Eventbrite.com.

The Daphne Public Library’s 2017 “Back-toSchool” Bookmark Contest, open to students in grades K-12, runs through Sept. 29. Call 251-621-2818.

TOPS

Take Off Pounds Sensibly meets every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. at Spanish Fort Presbyterian Church. Call 251-625-6888.

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Toastmasters

Toastmasters International meets regularly at six locations in Mobile and Baldwin counties. Visit www.toastmasters.org for more information.

FUNDRAISERS Vintage Affair Gala

The 24th annual Vintage Affair Gala is an upscale wine tasting and auction benefiting the American Cancer Society. Thursday, Sept. 28, 6 p.m. at Fort Whiting, 1630 S. Broad St., Mobile. Visit www.vintageaffairmobile.org.

Save a Stray

Save a Stray wine tasting will be held Friday, Sept. 29, at 6 p.m. at Cottage Hill Package Store in Mobile. For a $5 donation you’ll be able to sample a variety of wines and various finger foods, bid on wine baskets and meet the Save a Stray mascot. Visit saveastray.org.

“Paws for a Cause”

American Autism and Rehabilitation Center hosts the inaugural “Paws For a Cause” Sept. 30 at Daphne Utilities, 8301 Well Road in Daphne. A 1.6 mile dog walk begins at 8:30 a.m. and a 12-category canine talent competition begins at 9:30 a.m. Food, refreshments and music. Visit www. AmericanAutismCenter.com and/or call 251210-1632.

ARTS Book discussion

Semmes author Paula Webb will discuss the research and historical resources she used in writing her book “Mobile Under Siege:

Mobile Museum of Art hosts its Night Market on Thursday, Sept. 28, 5-8:30 p.m. featuring wares by artists and artisans. Support your local artists and join the party and shopping fun with great food, drink and live music. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive.

“Adrift in Macao”

The comic musical “Adrift in Macao” will have six performances at the Laidlaw Performing Arts Center, 5751 USA Drive South, Sept. 28-30. Showtimes are at 7:30 p.m. Call 251460-6305.

Last Friday Art Night

Dauphin Island Art Gallery is where it’s happening on the Island the last Friday of each month. Last Friday Art Night features local art and history, food, beverages, music and socializing. Dauphin Island Art Gallery is located at 918 Bienville Blvd. Call 251-8613300.

Creative Crossings

Live art contest along Dauphin Street during TenSixtyFive on Saturday, Sept. 30. Six local artists have been chosen to create masterpieces in the crosswalks between 11 a.m. and 5 p.m. Judging and prizes will be awarded at 6 p.m.

TenSixtyFive Arts & Crafts Market

Mobile Arts Council is organizing an art market featuring local artists in Cathedral Square on Saturday, Sept. 30, and Sunday, Oct. 1, 2-7 p.m. during the free outdoor concert series. Visit mobilearts.org.

Mobile Pops concerts

The Mobile Pops continues its 40th anniversary season Saturday, Sept. 30, at 7 p.m. at the Mobile County Bicentennial Pavilion in Medal of Honor Park and Sunday, Oct. 1, at 2 p.m. at the Spanish Fort Community Center. Visit www. themobilepops.com.


Baldwin Pops concert

The first concert of the 2017-2018 season will feature the premiere of conductor Jason Rinehart. Henry George Park in Fairhope, Sunday, Oct. 1, at 6 p.m.

Batik workshop

Join Joseph Booth to create your own fabric using the hot wax batik technique on Friday, Oct. 6, and Saturday, Oct. 7, at Mobile Museum of Art. Visit mobilemuseumofart.com.

Sculpture unveiling ceremony

The North American Iranian Friendship Society will unveil a bronze sculpture of the late legendary Iranian wrestler and national hero Jahan Pahlavan Takhti. 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct. 3, at 1 Academy Drive in Daphne. Wine and refreshments will be served. Call 251-626-3303 or email communications@ussa.edu.

MUSEUMS “Curious George: Let’s Get Curious!”

The insatiable curiosity of Curious George — the little monkey who has captured the imagination and hearts of millions of children and adults for 65 years — comes to life at Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center through Jan. 7. Visit exploreum.com.

“Dream Big: Engineering Our World”

Narrated by Academy Award winner Jeff Bridges, “Dream Big: Engineering Our World” is a first-of-its-kind film for IMAX and giant-screen theaters that will transform how we think about engineering. Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center through Jan. 7. Visit exploreum.com.

“Right on Course”

The United States Sports Academy’s American Sport Art Museum & Archives is open free to the public weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. One of the newest exhibits is “Right on Course.” Visit www.asama.org.

‘Windows to the Sea’

“Windows to the Sea” is the latest permanent exhibit at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab Estuarium. Visit disl.org.

“Shipwreck! Pirates and Treasure”

A new, highly interactive exhibit at GulfQuest features more than 500 authentic artifacts recovered from deep-ocean shipwrecks. Visit www.gulfquest.org.

Fairhope’s founding

Learn more about the 1894 founding of Fairhope at the Fairhope Museum of History, 24 N. Section St. The museum is open daily (except Sunday and Monday) from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 251-929-1471.

Little Discoveries

“Outside the Box,” aimed at children age 6 and under, explores how innovation and creativity can lead to a world of possibilities, starting with a simple cardboard box. Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Call 251-208-6893 or email jholland@exploreum.com.

Thursdays at MMoA

Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., the Mobile Museum of Art offers free admission to all visitors. No reservations are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive. Call 251-2085200.

SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES “Race for Hope”

City Hope Church hosts the “Race for Hope” 5K and 1-mile Fun Run on Saturday, Sept. 30, at 8 a.m. Daphne City Hall, 1705 Main St. Register online at Eventbrite.

“Bras across the CAUSEway”

Come run along the causeway on Saturday, Oct. 1, to benefit the Providence Hospital Breast Cancer Outreach Fund. The 5K and fun run begin and end at USS Alabama, 2703 Battleship Parkway. 5-8 p.m., visit brasacrossthecauseway2017.eventbrite.com.

Group rides

South Alabama and Mississippi Mountain Bike Association invites all levels of cyclists to join them every Tuesday and Thursday at 6 p.m. at USA Bike Trails and Sunday at 9 a.m. at Chickasabogue Park. Email carrie@ rideSAMBA.com.

Weekly 1K/5K

Every Thursday evening at 6 p.m., join Red Beard’s Outfitter and Cortlandt’s Pub in the Spring Hill Village Shopping Center for a 1K or 5K run and walk. No cost to participate.

Bingo

Join Via Health, Fitness, Enrichment Center (1717 Dauphin St.) for bingo every Tuesday and Thursday, 1:30-3:30 p.m. Call 251-4783311.

Bridge lessons

The Mobile Bridge Center offers free bridge lessons each Tuesday at 6 p.m. at 1510 University Blvd. Arrive a few minutes early to register. Call the Bridge Center at 251-6662147, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Fitness and athletics classes

New fitness classes offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School. Tai Chi, Candle Lit Yoga, Core Fusion, Small Group Personal Fitness Training, Basketball for ages 15 & Up, Basketball for ages 8-14 and sports conditioning for ages 8-17. Call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com.

Dance and art classes

New dance classes offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School. Belly Dance, Pre-ballet & tumbling for ages 6-12, Beginner Piano for ages 8 & Up. Call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com.

Pickleball for adults (indoors)

Offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School, Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon. Great sport for all ages combines tennis, pingpong and badminton on a court one-fourth the size of a tennis court. Call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com.

Ballroom dance

Azalea Ballroom Dance Club hosts dances the second and fourth Tuesday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Via Health, Fitness & Enrichment Center, 1717 Dauphin St. Call 251-623-9183 or visit azaleaballroomdanceclub.com.

Ballroom dance

The Moonlight Chassé Ballroom Dance Society hosts dances the first and third Monday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Hot Wheels Skating Rink in Daphne. Email cassief13@aol.com.

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THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE SUPER LOOPER BY MARK MACLACHLAN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Naval engagements 8 Setting a world record, e.g. 12 “The Hallucinogenic Toreador” artist 16 Evidence in an arson investigation 19 “No point arguing with me!” 20 Some rounds 21 “The only beauty that never fades,” per Audrey Hepburn 23 Fancy French shellfish dish 25 Beer parlor 26 “Then again …,” in a tweet 27 Collection of Hindu aphorisms 28 Palindromic bird 30 It’s got you covered 31 Tennis’s Novak Djokovic, by birth 32 Rex Tillerson’s alma mater, for short 34 Proteins responsible for mad-cow disease 35 Special ____ 37 It’s got you covered 39 Carved emblem 41 Keys for Keys? 44 German pronoun 46 South American plains 48 Tikkanen who won five Stanley Cups 49 All together, as a family 51 Classroom item 54 Schoolboy 55 More chichi 57 Get a bite? 58 Team finale? 60 Hot spot, both literally and figuratively 63 Roman philosopher who wrote, “All cruelty springs from weakness” 67 Buenos ____ 69 Central Park’s SummerStage, e.g. 73 At the limit, with “out” 74 Save from disaster 76 The same as 78 “Homer and ____ Exchange Cross Words” (2008 episode of “The Simpsons”) 79 Music genre for Weezer or the Shins 83 Catch like Spider-Man 85 Child’s seat, maybe 86 Tech overseer 91 Reason to stop reading 93 Stranded cellular stuff 94 ____ plane 95 Addis Ababa’s country: Abbr. 96 Claim deposits 97 “I rock!” 100 Group with Gladys Knight 102 Mahmoud Abbas’s grp. 103 Quarter deck? 105 Tiny conductor of heat or electricity 108 Email best not replied to

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16 Blessed 17 Frequent director of De Niro 18 Pigment in red blood cells 22 “Star Wars” droid 24 Letters on N.Y.C. trains 29 Together 33 Swiss folk hero with a crossbow 34 Dig for answers 36 After-dinner drink 38 Speed skater Karin who won eight Olympic medals 40 Scratch 41 Celestial object that emits radio waves 42 Drawn 43 Poisonous snakes 44 Anthropomorphic hedgehog of gamedom 45 “Don’t mind ____!” DOWN 47 Elbow-benders 1 Grain containers 50 ____-pah-pah 2 Theatricalize 51 Pair 3 National ____ Day (last 52 “Excuse me” Friday in April) 53 Kidney-related 4 Football formation 56 Dark time, in poesy 5 007, for one: Abbr. 59 Wrap-up 6 ____ monkey 61 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13 …, e.g.: 7 Cocky walk Abbr. 8 Copyright concern 62 Less mendacious 9 Symbol for a break 64 Like the Dalai Lama 10 ____, amas, amat 65 One of the Borgias 11 Taquito wrap 12 What may grow with interest 66 Evolves 68 The Philippines’ ____ Sea 13 Barley wine, e.g. 14 Burton of “Reading Rainbow” 70 Author Rankin 71 1428 ____ (horror film 15 “Totally understood” 112 Mulled-wine ingredient 113 Extra periods at TD Garden 114 Mythical beast with goatlike features 115 Jazzy Fitzgerald 116 Premise of the film “Freaky Friday” 118 Some positives and negatives 121 Welcoming diners at midnight, say 122 Singer India.____ 123 Adds water to 124 Director Anderson 125 Surveys 126 “Darn it!” 127 A good place to start

address): Abbr. 72 The N.B.A.’s Curry, informally 75 Singer James 77 Baja bear 80 Vermin 81 Straight: Prefix 82 Signer of many a permission form 84 Congress, with “the” 86 ____ wolf 87 Not level 88 Old outdoor dance sights 89 Place to try patatas bravas 90 Actress Lena 92 “Relax!” 95 Trusts and ____ (law school class) 98 Authority 99 Gertrude who swam the English Channel in 1926 101 Brand of note? 102 Teen driver’s acquisition 104 The New Yorker piece 106 Western tribe 107 “Turn! Turn! Turn!” band, with “the” 109 One-named philosopher 110 Paul ____, Microsoft co-founder 111 En ____ (as a group) 112 Boast 113 Bullfight chorus 117 Homophone for the atomic number of oxygen 119 Altar constellation 120 St. Pierre, par exemple

ANSWERS ON PAGE 35


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SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

Pall makes impact on lacrosse locally, worldwide

L

BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

acrosse is perhaps the oldest organized sport to be played in North America, with games dating back almost 1,000 years. Hundreds of Native American men from opposing tribes once gathered on open fields to pass a ball with sticks while using rocks or trees as goals. It was French missionaries who would give the sport its present name. They used their term for field hockey: “le jeu de la crosse.” While the sport has gained international attention over the centuries, it is just now making an impact along the Alabama Gulf Coast. One of the main reasons for this was the arrival of Zach Pall. “I was 8 years old at a roller hockey game,” Pall told Lagniappe. “One of the coaches recommended to my parents that I should try lacrosse. “I was hooked immediately. Once you get the stick in your hands, it is hard to put down.” While growing up on Long Island in the town of Setauket, he was part of the Elite Empire State Team in New York. After earning High School All-American honors, Pall would play at Quinnipiac University in Connecticut (2008-10) and at Hofstra University in New York (2010-12). During his senior year in college, his parents moved to Mobile. After living in Brooklyn for six months following graduation, he decided to make a life change and joined them in Alabama. He was pleased to see some local youngsters playing lacrosse, but he said the fathers were still learning about the game. “I took the opportunity to help that organization at the beginning,” Pall said. “I went on to help several recreational leagues.”

Company is born

It was at this point Pall got the idea to turn his passion for lacrosse into a career. In 2013, he formed Parallax Lacrosse to teach area players the finer points of the sport. “It was more structured and formal,” Pall said. “I could get the kids exactly what they needed.” Players range in age from 8 to 18. Practices have taken place from Perdido Key to Fairhope and from Daphne to Mobile. “We have a travel team that enters tournaments on weekends,” Pall said. “In November, we will play in Destin. In December, we will play at the Foley Sports Tourism Complex.” Pall said his players come to lacrosse from football, baseball and soccer. “We like all different types of athletes,” he said. “Lacrosse encompasses all sports into one. It is not as violent as football with head trauma, but it is more physical and fast-paced than baseball and soccer. It is very appealing to all sorts of athletes who are looking to branch out and try something different.” The training is paying off. Pall said two of his former players are now on teams at Birmingham-Southern College and Greensboro College in North Carolina. “Lacrosse is the original North American sport,” Pall said. “It is now the fastest growing sport in the U.S. We even have professional teams that play outdoors [Major League Lacrosse] and indoors [National Lacrosse League]. To learn more about Pall’s program in Mobile, visit www.Parallaxlacrosse19.com or call 251-654-6551.

Gold medalist

Despite spending most of his time as a coach, Pall has not lost his competitive spirit. He recently made an impact

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on the world scene as a member of the Israeli national indoor squad. “It was in 2014 that the process began,” said Pall, who was among several Jewish Americans on the roster. “The next year at the Indoor World Championships, we finished fourth and lost to the U.S. for the bronze medal.” The indoor game — or box format — started in Canada when teams were forced inside because of the bitter winters. The style has grown in popularity. This past year, Pall was invited back to the Israeli indoor team for the inaugural European Lacrosse Federation title. Fourteen teams competed for the crown in Finland. The title match featured Israel and the Czech Republic, with both sporting perfect 5-0 records. It was an evenly played match, as the teams were tied 5-5 at the half and 6-6 after three quarters. After gaining a slight 8-7 edge in the closing minutes, Israel managed to scoop up a rebound off a save with 20 seconds to play to secure the trophy. The gold medal was the first in a team sport in Israel’s 69-year history. They finished second at last year’s European Field Championships and fourth in the 2014 World Indoor Championships. “We were actually ranked No. 1 going into the tournament, but you can never go in expecting to win,” Pall said. “The team knew what their job was. We never looked past any opponent. “This was one of the greatest experiences that sports has given to me. There were a lot of Jewish guys wanting to represent Israel. It is a pretty amazing feeling.”

Next adventure

Pall hopes to experience a similar high soon, as he tries out out for Israel’s national outdoor team. He leaves this Thursday for the next round of tryouts. He won’t have to worry about jet lag as the games will be played in the U.S. “The tryouts are from October 1st to the 8th,” Pall said. “The first weekend we play in Syracuse, New York, and the second weekend we play in Maryland.” According to the Israel men’s national lacrosse team website, the scrimmages with some of the world’s top-ranked international, college and club teams are also to promote the 2018 FIL World Lacrosse Championships that will take place in Israel next July. Two of the opponents include Team USA and the Iroquois Nationals, which are ranked No. 2 and No. 3 in the world, respectively, as well as an ambitious schedule of NCAA powerhouses such as Towson and Syracuse. The Israelis are winless in their nine previous exhibitions against American college teams. “What I am doing here is what the Israeli officials want players like us to do,” Pall said. “They are giving the game of lacrosse to kids across the world. “There are guys from America like me who played lacrosse who are teaching kids in Israel. One of those first kids was on European championships. The goal is to have all Israeli players. Until then, we are the face of Israeli lacrosse.”


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STYLE HOROSCOPES EVERY SIGN HAS A LUCKY TENSIXTYFIVE SONG

LIBRA (9/23-10/22) — Relieved the Senate primary campaign is over, you’ll write sarcastic letters to Luther Strange and Roy Moore congratulating them for taking the high road. Your lucky TenSixtyFive song is “Porch Swing Angel” by Muscadine Bloodline. SCORPIO (10/23-11/21) — Offended by the lodging tax increase in Gulf Shores and Orange Beach, you vow to take your staycations elsewhere. Protip: Avoid the motels on Government Boulevard. Your lucky TenSixtyFive song is “Call Me” by St. Paul & the Broken Bones. SAGITTARIUS (11/22-12/21) ­­— Noting annual municipal budgets are currently being worked out, you try to carve out a small savings account for your pet’s artisanal snacks and embroidered sweaters. Your lucky TenSixtyFive song is “Ain’t Much Left Of Me” by Blackberry Smoke. CAPRICORN (12/22-1/19) — Now that fall has arrived, you begin to take your Halloween plans seriously. You’ll put some extra thought into what movie to watch and which pint of ice cream to consume Oct. 31. Your lucky TenSixtyFive song is “Take it All Back 2.0” by Judah and the Lion. AQUARIUS (1/20-2/18) — You’ll make an embarrassing mistake by arriving at a meeting of the Gulf Coast Herb Society in a cloud of smoke. Empathetically, they send you on your way with a complimentary basil plant. Your lucky TenSixtyFive song is “Immortal” by Elley Duhé. PISCES (2/19-3/20) — You offer a compromise in the argument about whether to sit or stand during concerts at the Saenger by suggesting attendees begin spooning each other in the aisles. Your lucky TenSixtyFive song is “Keep on Smilin’” by Wet Willie. ARIES (3/21- 4/19) — You offer a compromise in the argument about whether to sit or stand during the National Anthem by suggesting the crowd do “the wave.” Your lucky TenSixtyFive song is “Bury Me in Dixie” by Riley Green. TAURUS (4/20-5/20) — Upset over an Auburn coach’s role in a nationwide corruption scandal, you’ll attempt to poison the Nick Saban statue in Tuscaloosa. Your lucky TenSixtyFive song is “Cryin’ by Tonight” by Riverbend. GEMINI (5/21-6/21) — A little disappointed the world didn’t end Sept. 23 like David Meade suggested, you’ll turn yourself in for the bank robbery you committed Sept. 22. Your lucky TenSixtyFive song is “I’m Trying to Tell You” by Colin Lake. CANCER (6/22-7/22) — A normally emotional week will be softened by the fact that you recently professed your love for someone special — a pet cat. Your lucky TenSixtyFive song is “Trouble” by Cage the Elephant. LEO (7/23-8/22) — Hoping to capitalize on the recent investment in the Old Shell Road corridor, you’ll open the Old Shell Road Old Shells Emporium. Your lucky TenSixtyFive song is “Papa was a Rollin’ Stone” by Crowned Jewelz. VIRGO (8/23-9/22) — Feeling proud and generous after Nic Cage received a key to the city, you are inspired to award him a key fob to a 1997 Mitsubishi Eclipse. Your lucky TenSixtyFive song is “Home of the Lions” by Derek Norsworthy.

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STYLE GARDENING

Explore the world of cool-weather herbs BY NANCY ADAMS, MOBILE MASTER GARDENER | COASTALALABAMAGARDENING@GMAIL.COM

Q: Please share information about growing and using herbs, especially those that do well in cool weather on the Gulf Coast.

A:

Ask and you shall receive. Members of the Gulf Coast Herb Society shared their knowledge with us about growing herbs on the Gulf Coast. We gathered more information from “The Herb Bible” by Jennie Harding and “Southern Herb Growing” by Madalene Hill and Gwen Barclay.

History of herbs

Herbs have been useful to humankind for food, flavoring, fragrance, household activities and medicine for some 60,000 years. Around 460 B.C., the Greeks used opium as a narcotic, lungwort for lung infections and pomegranate to stop bleeding. The fragrance of some herbs actually has therapeutic effect. For example, rosemary, often used in food recipes, has been found to help with poor circulation and improve concentration. Some common weeds, such as dandelion and the common daisy, have often been used as healing herbs. It is important to consult a doctor or a registered herbal practitioner before using herbs for a recognized medical condition.

Growing herbs

Because of the Gulf Coast’s semitropical climate, many herbs and other plants grow here unlike in North Alabama. Parsley, for example, grows in spring and summer in North Alabama; here, however, parsley goes to seed in summer, so we plant it in fall for winter harvest. This is also true of dill and fennel. Other herbs that thrive in cooler months on the Gulf Coast from October through March — and

should be planted in fall — are chervil, cilantro, oregano, sage, sorrel and thyme. Bay laurel, chives and rosemary love our climate and are easily grown all year. Many herbs are native to arid climates and are therefore intolerant of our wet weather. They do, however, grow well in containers, which can have better drainage than our area’s typical soils. Most of our favorite herbs are also native to areas with naturally infertile soils, so they generally dislike fertilizer. Basil is an exception to the rule. As an annual, it is not cold tolerant and requires more water and fertilizer than some other herbs. To keep basil alive through summer and fall (mid-November), the branches should be cut back throughout the season to a couple of leaf nodes from where they branch out from the main stem. This practice will encourage new growth and a bushy habit for season-long harvesting. If you let the basil flower and go to seed closer to the end of the season, it is easy to save the seeds in a cool, dry place and start with new plants in the spring. Mints are divided broadly into two groups by fragrance: peppermint and spearmint. Peppermint has a menthol flavor and spearmint has primarily carvone, a flavor shared with caraway seeds. Mints are perennial and often invasive, so they are best planted in a container or alone where they have room to wander. Rosemary is a hardy perennial that grows through all the seasons and, with proper drainage, will last for years. Start new rosemary plants in spring from cuttings. Cilantro (Chinese parsley) actually comes from the same plant as coriander — the leaves are known as cilantro, while the seeds are known as coriander. It has a crisp, fruity flavor and is often used in curry, Mexican, Southeast Asian and Thai

food. While it may be tempting to buy cilantro plants when you see them for sale in the spring at local garden centers, resist the temptation and grow cilantro in the cooler months, as this is one herb in particular that struggles in our hot and humid summers. English lavender and French tarragon do not grow well on the Gulf Coast, although they can be grown as annuals.

Preserving herbs

Herbs can be preserved by freezing or drying. Detailed instructions can be found online. One convenient way is to put clean, dry herbs into an ice cube tray and fill the compartments with water. You can also mix different herbs in the trays. Freeze and pop the cubes into recipes as needed.

Cooking with herbs

Now that you know a little more about growing herbs, take a look at these recipes from the Gulf Coast Herb Society’s cookbook for a few ideas on how to use them in your kitchen. BASIL PESTO • 2 or more cloves garlic • 4 cups fresh basil leaves, hard-packed • ½ cup lightly toasted pine nuts • 3 tablespoons grated Parmesan cheese • ½ cup extra virgin olive oil • Salt and pepper to taste Place first four ingredients in a blender and blend about 10 seconds. With motor running, slowly pour in olive oil. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Place in airtight container and refrigerate. Makes about 1 cup. Serve over pasta, vegetables or as topping for soup. BASIL VEGGIE CHEESE SPREAD • 2 (8 oz.) packages cream cheese, softened • 2 tablespoons freshly grated Parmesan cheese • ¼ cup chopped fresh basil

• 1/3 cup chopped almonds • 1 envelope Lipton Veggie soup mix • ½ cup butter, softened • basil sprigs for garnish In mixer or food processor, beat cream cheese and butter until smooth. Stir in remaining ingredients until well blended. Line a loaf pan or small bowl with heavy-duty plastic wrap. Pack cheese mixture into pan and refrigerate 2 hours or until firm. Unmold onto serving platter. Garnish with fresh basil sprigs. Serve with bagel chips, cucumber slices or assorted crackers.

YOU ARE INVITED TO THESE UPCOMING GARDENING EVENTS What: Herb Day, presented by Gulf Coast Herb Society When: Saturday, Sept. 30, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Where: Mobile Botanical Gardens, 5151 Museum Drive, Mobile Topic: Stress-Free Gardening with Herbs, Felder Rushing Fee: $35 for nonmembers, $30 for members. Includes lunch and herb treats. What: Mobile Master Gardeners Monthly Meeting When: Thursday, Oct. 5, 10:30-11:45 a.m. Where: Jon Archer Center, 1070 Schillinger Road N., Mobile Topic: The Fungus Among Us: Mushrooms in Your Garden, Juan Mata, USA Biology Master Gardener Helpline: 1-877-252-4769, or send your gardening questions to coastalalabamagardening@gmail.com.

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LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com PUBLIC NOTICES STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE Notice is hereby given that a bill as described in the synopsis below will be introduced in the 2018 Regular Session of the Alabama Legislature and application for its passage and enactment will be made: A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT SYNOPSIS: Relating to Mobile County; to establish the regulatory authority for the Mobile County Health Department to regulate intermittent food service establishments that prepare food in association with a temporary exempt event that is a regional celebration, tradition, or cultural event designated as such by Mobile County, if the intermittent food service establishment does not prepare, sell, or distribute food on a regular basis in its regular line of business. Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, Oct. 5, 12, 2017

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL The Dauphin Island Property Owners Association is seeking proposals from parties interested in leasing the Isle Dauphine Clubhouse building located at 100 Orleans Drive, Suite B, Dauphin Island, Alabama 36528. The property is available for lease as a restaurant beginning May 1, 2018. The Isle Dauphine Clubhouse building is located at the Isle Dauphine Golf Club which is located on the Gulf of Mexico. The property to be leased is a building consisting of three (3) floors, all with a southern view of the beach and Gulf of Mexico, and a commercial kitchen on the second floor. Proposals should be submitted to the Dauphin Island Property Owners Association via mail at: Post Office Box 39, Dauphin Island, Alabama 36528 or via e-mail to board@dipoa.org. Proposals to be submitted by November 1, 2017. Please contact Office Manager Louise Carrubba at 251-861-2433 for a site visit. Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2017

NOTICE OF COMPLETION STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE NOTICE OF COMPLETION In accordance with Chapter I, Title 39, Code of Alabama, 1975, NOTICE IS HEREBY given that S & S Sprinkler Company, LLC, has completed the contract for Arthur R. Outlaw Convention Center Parking Deck - Fire Sprinkler Replacement, One South Water Street, Mobile, Alabama 36602, CN-066-17. All persons having any claim for labor, material or otherwise in connection with this project should immediately notify the Architectural Engineering Department, City of Mobile, P. 0. Box 1827, Mobile, Alabama 36633-1827. Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 21,28, 2017

FORECLOSURES MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Wayne Alan Marcus, unmarried, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for The Mortgage Outlet, Inc., on the 31st day of October, 2005, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 5873, Page 774; the undersigned LPP Mortgage LTD, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on October 26, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 22, Crestview, Fourth Addition, according to the map thereof recorded in Map Book 11, Page 98, of the Records in the Office of the Judge of Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  4363 East Birchwood Drive, Mobile, AL  36693 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a nonrefundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. LPP Mortgage LTD, Mortgagee/ Transferee Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C.

P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL 35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 340272 Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, October 5, 2017

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Lorenzo Bennett, Sr. and Angela Bennett, husband and wife, originally in favor of Southtrust Mortgage Corporation, on the 23rd day of October, 1997, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in RP 4519, Page 1322; Modified in Book LR7244 Page 1900; the undersigned Nationstar Mortgage LLC DBA Mr. Cooper, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on October 26, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 6, Block “C” Plat 1, Alpine Hills as recorded in Map Book 9, Page 213 in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  1063 Heidi St, Mobile, AL  36608 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Nationstar Mortgage LLC DBA Mr. Cooper, Mortgagee/Transferee Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 420622 Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, October 5, 2017

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Vixay Keoheuangsy, unmarried man, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Wachovia Mortgage, FSB, on the 16th day of June, 2008, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6396, Page 1872; the undersigned Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on October 19, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 45, Lovehaven Subdivision as recorded in Map Book 30, Page 87 of the Records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  3101 Beth Ct, Semmes, AL  36575 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVEDESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase

42 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 8 , 2 0 1 7 - O c t o b e r 4 , 2 0 1 7

price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Mortgagee/ Transferee Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL 35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 394485 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 28, 2017

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by William S. Wheatley and Tammy W. Wheatley, husband and wife, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Advance Mortgage & Investment Co. of North FL. Inc., on the 21st day of September, 2006, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6052, Page 1834; the undersigned Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on October 19, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 8 of Woodland Terrace Subdivision, according to the plat thereof recorded in Map Book 17, Page 108 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  8031 Woodland Terrace Drive North, Irvington, AL  36544 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVEDESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Mortgagee/ Transferee Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 403453 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 28, 2017

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by John David Williams and Crystal Williams, husband and wife, originally in favor of LendMark Financial Services, Inc., on the 8th day of September, 2006, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6053 Page 77; the undersigned Branch Banking and Trust Company, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on October 19, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Beginning at a point 399 feet due East from the Northwest corner of Lot 1 of the Coleman Tract, said tract being in Section 26, Township 7 South, Range 3 West, Mobile County, Alabama, continue South for a distance of 208.50 feet; thence run East for a distance of 92 feet; thence run North for a distance of 208.50 feet; thence run West for a distance of 92 feet to the point of beginning. Property street address for informational purposes:  8551 Julius St, Bayou La Batre, AL  36509 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time

and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Branch Banking and Trust Company, Mortgagee/Transferee Pam King SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 414838 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 28, 2017

NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE Default having been made in the terms of the vendor’s lien mortgage executed October 26, 2015, by Jeffrey Edward Adams, as mortgagor in favor of Perry Keidel, as mortgagee, as recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book LR7315 Page 1788, and said default continuing, the mortgagee, under power of sale contained in said mortgage will sell at auction for cash to the highest bidder on the steps of the Mobile County Courthouse in Mobile, Alabama, during legal hours of sale on the 12th day of October, 2017, the following described real estate embraces in said mortgage, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, towit: Lot 56 Lot 56 Quail Run, Unit One, according to plat thereof recorded in Map Book 26, Page 122 of the records in the office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Said sale is made for the purpose of foreclosing of said mortgage, paying the mortgage debt, the costs and expenses of foreclosure, including a reasonable attorney’s fee. Mortgagee reserves the right to bid on the subject property. Said property will be sold on an “as is, where is” basis subject to any easements, encumbrances and exceptions contained in said mortgage and those contained in the records of the Office of the Judge of Probate where the above described property is situated. Said property will be sold without warranty or recourse, expressed or implied as to title, use and/or enjoyment, and will be sold subject to the right of redemption of all parties entitled thereto. Said sale is also subject to unpaid taxes or assessments whether of record or not. Perry Keidel Holder of said Mortgage. James H. Sweet Crabtree & Sweet, P.C. Attorney for Holder of Mortgage P.O. Box 537 Daphne, AL 36526 251-626-3322 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 28, 2017

PROBATE NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING July 27, 2017 Case No. 2014-1128-2 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of DORIS JEAN LITTLE, Deceased On to-wit the 9th day of October, 2017 at 2:00 PM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the FINAL SETTLEMENT as filed by BOBBIE J WINSTON. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate. Attorney Name and Address: MICHAEL S. MCNAIR, 2151 GOVERNMENT STREET, MOBILE, AL 36606 Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2017

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING

CASE NO. 2017-1674 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Notice of the filing of petition for Summary Distribution in the estate of Dennis Marks, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that a Petition for Summary Distribution has been filed by Angela W. Marks on August 15, 2017, and that 30 days after the notice of publication hereof and pursuant to law the Court shall be requested to enter an order directing summary distribution of the estate of said decedent. Don Davis, Judge of Probate. Petitioner: Angela W. Marks 2671 Atoll Drive Mobile AL 36605 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 28, Oct. 5, 2017

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING August 10, 2017 Case No. 2013-0460-6 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of MARY JANE DYESS, Deceased On to-wit the 16th day of October, 2017 at 2:00 PM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the FINAL SETTLEMENT AND REPORT OF INSOLVENCY as filed by JEFFREY E. DYESS. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate. Attorney Name and Address: HENDRIK S. SNOW, 50 ST EMANUEL ST, MOBILE, ALABAMA 36602 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 28, Oct. 5, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: ANTHONY CHARLES SIMPSON, Deceased Case No. 2017-1364 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted

to the below named party on the 14th day of September, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. MARY LYNN WILSON as Executrix under the last will and testament of ANTHONY CHARLES SIMPSON, Deceased. Attorney of Record: T. JEFF STEIN Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, Oct. 5, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: EDWARD LOUIS SMITH, Deceased Case No. 2017-0671 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 21st day of September, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. STACY A. BROWN as Executrix under the last will and testament of EDWARD LOUIS SMITH, Deceased. Attorney of Record: PRO SE. Lagniappe HD September 28, October 5, 12, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: ELOUISE PURVIS, Deceased Case No. 2017-1471 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named parties on the 19th day of September, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. DENNIS HARVEY PURVIS and DEBRA LOVETT AKA DEBRA MOOREHEAD RAY as Co-Executors under the last will and testament of ELOUISE PURVIS, Deceased. Attorney of Record: RACHELE ALEXANDER REIS Lagniappe HD September 28, October 5, 12, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: JOSEPH L. JACKSON Case No. 2016-0869 Take notice that Ancillary Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 18th day of September, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. PAMELA S. JACKSON as Administratrix of the Ancillary Estate of JOSEPH L. JACKSON, deceased. Attorney of Record: HENDRIK S. SNOW, Esq. Lagniappe HD September 28, October 5, 12, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: WEBBER HAYWARD DOUGLAS, Deceased Case No. 2017-1758 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 18th day of September, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. DOROTHY M. DOUGLAS as Executrix under the last will and testament of WEBBER HAYWARD DOUGLAS, Deceased. Attorney of Record: HENDRIK S. SNOW Lagniappe HD September 28, October 5, 12, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: HENRIETTA F. KING, Deceased Case No. 2017-1309 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 21st day of September, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. MICHAEL T. KING as Executor under the last will and testament of HENRIETTA F. KING, Deceased. Attorney of Record: PRO SE Lagniappe HD September 28, October 5, 12, 2017

NOTICE OF SALE The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 27, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 225 First Ave., Saraland, AL 36571. 2005 Nissan Altima 1N4AL11D152C212145 Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 27, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 1600 Cedar Downs Dr., Mobile, AL 36605. 2005 Chevrolet Equinox 2CNDL13F956013905 Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 27, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 320 Martin Luther King Jr Dr., Prichard, AL 36610. 2007 Saturn VUE 5GZCZ33ZX7S871757 2001 Saturn SL1


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com 1G8ZH52881Z273646 2000 Honda Accord 1HGCG5658YA121519 2016 Kia Forte KNAFK4A65G5496759

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 27, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 1013 Shelton Beach Rd., Saraland, AL 36571. 1996 Chevrolet Caprice 1G1BL52P7TR103061

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on November 03, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 7471 Theodore Dawes Rd., Theodore, AL 36582. 2008 Honda Civic 2HGFA15528H310600

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 27, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2008 Chrysler Sebring 1C3LC46K18N186526 2002 Pontiac Grand AM 1G2NF52F62C130664

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 27, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2308 Gill Rd., Mobile, AL 36605. 1996 Chevrolet C1500 1GCEC19R7TE175809 2005 Honda Civic JHMES96625S002228

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on November 03, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 212 Bessemer Ave., Prichard, AL 36610. 1996 Chevrolet Impala 1G1BL52P5TR156681

Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, 2017

Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 27, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 1105 Betty Parker Court N., Semmes, AL 36575. 2006 Gulf Stream Coach 1NL1GTR2961068638 Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 27, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 8325 Winding River Dr., Foley, AL 36535. 1993 Lexus LS400 JT8UF11E1P0184020 Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, 2017

Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, 2017

Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 27, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 1527 Navco Rd., Mobile, AL 36605. 2008 Chrysler PT Cruiser 3A8FY48B58T111408 2001 Mercedes S430 WDBNG70J11A204206 Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 27, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 1628 Sigler Ave., Mobile, AL 36605. 2003 Jaguar S-Type SAJEA03V931M56377 Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, 2017

Lagniappe HD September 28, Oct 5, 2017

Lagniappe HD September 28, Oct 5, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on November 03, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  8404 Barrie Dr., Theodore, AL 36582. 1991 Toyota Halfton JT4RN01P4M0021590 Lagniappe HD September 28, Oct 5, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on November 03, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 683 Welworth St., Mobile, AL 36617. 1983 Oldsmobile 88 1G3AY37Y1DM745851 Lagniappe HD September 28, Oct 5, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on November 03, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2401 Octavia Dr. S., Mobile, AL 36605. 1996 Chevrolet Caprice

1G1BL52P2TR168531

Lagniappe HD September 28, Oct 5, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on November 03, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1959 Duval St., Mobile, AL 36606. 1988 Chevrolet Suburban 1GNER16K0JF177874 Lagniappe HD September 28, Oct 5, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on November 03, 2017 Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3609 W Charmaine Circle, Mobile, AL 36605. 1996 Ford Mustang 1FALP45X3TF227857 Lagniappe HD September 28, Oct 5, 2017

JHMCD563XVC006764 1999 Suzuki Grand Vitara JS3TD62V7X4107208 2007 Lincoln MKZ 3LNHM26T77R651975

Lagniappe HD September 28, Oct 5, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on November 03, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 751 Schillinger Rd. N., Mobile, AL 36608. 2005 Chrysler 300 2C3AA63H75H519513 2007 Mercury Marquis 2MEHM75V77X602943 2011 Chevrolet HHR 3GNBAAFW7BS506578 2006 Ford LGT Convt 1FTRF12246NA55699 Lagniappe HD September 28, Oct 5, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on November 03, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 4502 Kings Mill Rd., Eight Mile, AL 36613. 2006 Chrysler Pacifica 2A4GM68416R902260

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on November 03, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 18342 Couch Plant Rd., Summerdale, AL 36580. 2006 Kawasaki VN1600G6F JKBVNKG156A000165

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on November 03, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2001 Isuzu Rodeo 4S2CK58D614348086 1997 Honda Accord

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 27, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2024 Halls Mill Rd., Mobile, AL 36606. 2005 Pontiac Bonneville 1G2HZ54Y45U138554

Lagniappe HD September 28, Oct 5, 2017

Lagniappe HD September 28, Oct 5, 2017

Lagniappe HD September 28, October 5, 2017

STYLE BOOZIE

Hump day happiness BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

A

re we sure it was the first day of fall last week? I mean, it was so hot this past weekend you would have thought it was the dog days of summer. Fingers crossed the weather is a little cooler for TenSixtyFive. Actually, either way, I know we will still be partying! Bring on the jams and the sweat, Mobile is ready to get down! But until then, we need to go over all of last week’s shenanigans.

Hump day happies

Nothing makes a hump day better than a concert at the Saenger Theatre! This past Wednesday night, the Saenger was rocked by The Record Company and Trombone Shorty, which made hump day the best day of last week. As you may recall, back in May 2016, Lenny Kravitz visited BlackFlash Antiques on his way to Hangout Fest, and mentioned how great it was. Well, Trombone Shorty bandleader and trombone player Troy Andrews needed to see for himself. So once his crew was unloaded, Troy made the quick trip across the street from the Saenger to take a look around. He told owner Charlana that he wasn’t really into antiques but had heard Lenny loved the place so he wanted to check it out. Umm, hello! So cool, I told y’all there must be some secret celebrity website where they share the places to go! Now back to the show. The Record Company opened for Trombone Shorty and Boozie has heard nothing but good things! People raved that they were amazing. One spy said they seemed a little surprised at how many songs the crowd knew. Thank you, 92ZEW, for keeping us in the know! Nothing like some good rock to get the party started! Boozie is pretty sad she didn’t get to make the show this go-around. But I have been to a Trombone Shorty show and can tell you they are great and the spies said this show was no exception! Like always, the band had the crowd moving and grooving all night! One spy said her favorite part was when Andrews and a few guys from the band walked around in the audience, giving everyone a frontrow experience! Some people even pulled out their umbrellas and danced along as if they were marching in a second line. I bet you won’t miss them again. I know I won’t.

Key me

Before Trombone Shorty got to jamming on Wednesday, another celebrity was being celebrated. Nicolas Cage was given a key to the city by Mayor Sandy Stimpson. Hizzoner told Nic: “That key will get you into any door that you want to get in. I’m not sure that you need that, because you could probably get in anywhere in Mobile that you wanted to. On behalf of the citizens of Mobile, we appreciate what you do and what you represent.” Boozie couldn’t agree more, and I love being able to spot places around town in the movies! Hello The Garage in “Rage,” just to name one. Nic isn’t the only one that has been in town filming. Co-star Franka Potente, best known as the star of “Run Lola Run” and as Marie from the Jason Bourne movies, has been spotted around town. Apparently, she is so nice, and Boozie is guessing that’s true because she bought Nic a gift from Lush. What do you buy a guy that probably has it all? A messenger bag! Now he has something to carry all his treasure maps in! In other celeb news, acclaimed actor Gary Oldman dined at Sunset Pointe at Fly Creek Marina in Fairhope two nights in a row. How can you blame him with that view?!?! The stars always shine more brightly in the other LA.

Hanging out the passenger side

One of Boozie’s spies was just minding her own business last Thursday night, driving along Springhill Avenue at Florida Street, when she heard an awful ruckus coming from behind her car. As she looked back, a woman leaning out of the passenger window of a small car was screaming and hollering, then fell out of the window onto the street. Our spy figured she was going to have to pull over and try to help this poor soul, when the woman jumped up all dressed like she was about to go downtown for some serious booty dancing, and staggered on her high heels to another car that had stopped. The concrete flopper quickly jumped into the back seat of that car and they sped off into the night, possibly for some serious partying, or perhaps just to the nearest ER. Whichever was the case, the pavement diver was dressed for success. Well, kids, that’s all I’ve got this week. Just remember, whether rain or shine, dramatic or scandalous, or just some plain ol’ Trombone Shorty lovin’, I will be there. Ciao!

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Lagniappe: Sept 28 - Oct 4, 2017