Page 1


2 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7


WEEKLY

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

LAGNIAPPE

S E P T E M B E R 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S E P T E M B E R 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | w w w. l a g n i a p p e m o b i l e . c o m ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com

ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com

6 12 16

BAY BRIEFS

A bill sponsored by U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne seeks to clarify the tribal status of the Poarch Band of Creek Indians.

COMMENTARY

Heading into next week’s runoff, consider how “Big” Luther Strange sold his soul for a Senate seat.

BUSINESS

Mary B. Austin Elementary is the first in Alabama to be designated an “Entrepreneurial School” by the National Consortium for Entrepreneurship Education.

CUISINE

ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com

17

J. MARK BRYANT Sports Writer sports@lagniappemobile.com STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA RASMUSSEN Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com

Stupid fries, stupid okra, hot dogs and wings, but it’s a smart move to have lunch at Big White Wings in the heart of Prichard.

COVER

DACA recipients, including some “Dreamers” in Mobile, face uncertainty as Trump asks Congress to act.

22

BETH WILLIAMS Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com ALEEN MOMBERGER Advertising Sales Executive aleen@lagniappemobile.com RACHEL THOMAS Advertising Sales Executive rachel@lagniappemobile.com MELISSA EDGE Editorial Assistant events@lagniappemobile.com

24

ARTS

Lunch with Ramon Vargas Artiz, a Cuban artist whose work is currently on display at the Alabama Contemporary Art Center.

MUSIC

ROSS PRITCHARD Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager jackie@lagniappemobile.com CONTRIBUTORS: Ron Sivak, Jeff Poor, Asia Frey, Brian Holbert, John Mullen, Ken Robinson ON THE COVER: JORGE FUENTES BY DANIEL ANDERSON POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Editorial, advertising and production offices are located at 1100B Dauphin St. Mobile, AL 36604. Mailing address is P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Phone: 251.450.4466 Fax 251.450.4498. Email: ashleytoland@lagniappemobile.com or rholbert@lagniappemobile.com LAGNIAPPE is printed at Walton Press. All letters sent to Lagniappe are considered to be intended for publication. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and Alternative Weeklies Network All rights reserved. Something Extra Publishing, Inc. Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced without the expressed permission of the publishers. Individuals may take one copy of the paper free of charge from area businesses, racks or boxes. After that, papers are $3 per issue. Removal of more than one copy from these points constitutes theft. Violators are subject to prosecution.

For Lagniappe home delivery visit

www.lagniappemobile.com/lagniappehd

26 32 36 38 43

Jason Isbell returns to Mobile to promote his new album “The Nashville Sound,” which NPR calls a “gorgeous record” invoking parenthood, politics, fear of obsolescence and his place in the world.

FILM

Rachel Weisz’s nuanced and intelligent performance in “My Cousin Rachel” keeps an otherwise inessential film afloat.

MEDIA

The Alabama Media Group is suing Alexander Shunnarah to recover more than $200,000 in advertising money.

SPORTS

The NCAA notified Spring Hill College that the Badgers have been granted an additional year within the provisional period.

STYLE

A sinner and a saint, Boozie went to church and the Flora-Bama last week.

S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 3


GOING POSTAL

Let’s get ahead of ourselves for once

A waterfront reality

Editor: First, your column, “Some legacy-building ideas for Stimpson” (Lagniappe, Sept. 14-20), was great. I always enjoy your insights. Secondly, you touched on something that may be worthy of consideration in a future article. Under the heading of “The Bridge,” you said, “No one can really argue any longer that we don’t need this bridge. It should have been started at least five years ago.” Agreed. Maybe 10 years ago. So here is my observation: What projects do we need to consider NOW in order to have them on track in five years? I was born and raised in Mobile, and I moved back to stay four years ago. I have lived in Chicago, Des Moines and St. Louis. I can confidently say that among Mobile’s biggest problems is our lack of efficient, four- to sixlane roads. What about a western bypass connecting Interstate 65, the University of Mobile, the University of South Alabama, the airport, and Interstate 10? Four-lane Sage Avenue. Six-lane Cottage Hill Road. And don’t even get me started on Old Shell Road. The simple addition of right-turn lanes at Cottage Hill and Azalea and a dozen or so other locations would be a quantum improvement. When a migration of hurricane refugees back to Florida or an accident that shuts down I-65 for several hours can cause traffic in Mobile to come to a virtual standstill, we need a vision NOW that will alleviate this problem for the foreseeable future. If we are going to be everything else our mayor has told us we are to become, we need a big vision for traffic and transportation. Perhaps a 20-year plan? David B. Carpenter Mobile

Editor: Thank you, Rob, for suggesting to the mayor that we should find a way to purchase or lease the University of South Alabama Foundation’s Brookley property for a public waterfront park (“Some legacybuilding ideas for Stimpson,” Lagniappe, Sept. 14-20). This would be THE most beneficial asset to our area for improving the quality of life for all its citizens. Imagine being able to drive 10-15 minutes from almost anywhere in Mobile and be sitting on beautiful white sand under a palm tree or scrub oak watching kids swim and play in Mobile Bay — maybe even jump in yourself. The bottom is sandy and the water clear (when not raining). Forget your troubles for a little while close by. The park could be paid for over time. It would be a job stimulator for kids and provide a huge economic stimulus for all surrounding neighborhoods

4 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7

Go a step further Editor: Countless low-income residents and lawful heirs lose untold revenues because of their lack of resources to clear title to rightfully owned properties, often which they have lived in for many years. Wills would help the city gain control of and lawfully deal with property of scrambled ownership. But

— real estate values would increase substantially as people renovated their property and moved to be close to the park, which in turn would increase property taxes for the city and county. Mayor Stimpson said recently that tourism income was a crucial part of revenue. We don’t want to compete with Foley’s OWA. We want and need a large, beautiful waterfront park that is simple and provides for swimming, sailing, kayaking, sand castles, soccer fields, disk golf, shuffleboard, etc. There should be no go-carts, ferris wheels, jet skis and the like. The park would also instill a love for the environment and reduce litter. You have to be able to enjoy nature to love it. Let’s make Mobile reach her potential. We deserve it. All the local politicians and USA Foundation officials should put their heads together and make this happen — you absolutely can make this a win/ win situation. Do it for all of us and for those who come in the future. Clarence Carrio Mobile what would it do for the owners and their heirs? A program to help them clear their titles would be more difficult and expensive than boilerplate wills, but perhaps pro bono assistance from the Alabama State Bar could be tapped. Homeowners make good citizens, often better than the industrial developers who would probably take their places once their properties were demolished. Jo Ann Flirt Mobile


S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 5


BAYBRIEF | COURTS

Weighted words

an exception” so it could contest them now. Reached by Lagniappe, PCI declined to comment, but in 2015 a tribal spokesperson told the Montgomery Advertiser the 11th Circuit’s decision reaffirmed that “the [U.S.] holds the lands where the Tribe’s gaming faciliPOARCH BAND OF CREEK INDIANS CONTINUE EFFORTS TO CLARIFY TRIBAL STATUS ties are located in trust for the benefit of the Tribe and that those lands ‘are properly considered Indian lands’” in spite of the Carcieri ruling. BY JASON JOHNSON Yet, based on its political spending, PCI has continued to lobby for a “Carcieri fix” in Congress, which appears to have led to a substantial increase in he interpretation of a single word appears to be has on land taken into trust for other tribes, it has contin- its donations to candidates in federal elections in recent years. According to the Center for Responsive Politics, PCI spent just $20,000 a persistent concern for the Poarch Band of Creek ued to call into question dozens of land acquisitions from Indians (PCI), which has made a significant effort the past 80 years, including lands taken into trust for PCI lobbying at the federal level in 2007, but in 2008 — the year SCOTUS agreed to hear the Carcieri case — that number jumped to $305,000. In the past two in recent years to clarify its status as a federally in the 1980s and 1990s. years, PCI’s lobbying expenditures have topped $400,000, and as of June recognized Indian tribe and secure the privileges that Several states have cited the Carcieri ruling in legal 2017 it has put $217,000 toward its federal legislative agenda. come with that designation. challenges against tribes, some of which have been sucIn 2015, PCI lobbied for the passage of H.R. 249, which would have clariWhile it may seem like a silly question to ask more cessful. In Alabama, however, two federal claims have than 30 years after PCI was formally recognized, a 2009 gone so far as to challenge whether PCI’s recognition as a fied the issues raised by the Carcieri ruling for all Indian tribes recognized ruling by the Supreme Court of the United States (SCO- tribe in 1984 was valid, and in both cases the 11th Circuit after 1934. Of the bill’s 39 cosponsors, U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne was the only one from Alabama. TUS) has left dozens of Indian tribes across the country Court of Appeals returned rulings favorable to the tribe. Byrne, whose district includes Escambia County, has since introduced in a legal gray area and looking to a divided Congress The most notable case was an attempt by the state of multiple bills that would “reaffirm” that 460 acres in Alabama and Florida are for relief. Alabama to enforce gambling laws on trust land housing “taken into trust” for PCI and are “subject to valid existing rights” under the The issue goes back to the Indian Reorganization Act PCI casinos. In its analysis, the 11th Circuit noted that IRA. In the 2015-2016 election cycle, Byrne also reported at least $10,400 in of 1934 (IRA), which established a process for the U.S. Carcieri started as a challenge under the Administrative Secretary of the Interior to take land into trust for recogProcedures Act (APA) to review a decision of the Depart- direct contributions from PCI. Byrne said he doesn’t think Carcieri invalidated PCI’s recognition as a nized Indian tribes. ment of the Interior, while Alabama had never raised a federal tribe or affected properties that he said “have always been considered Eighty-three years later, more than 8 million acres similar claim about PCI trust land. trust lands,” but he did say the 2009 ruling had “raised a question.” of “Indian land” have been taken into the trust, includ“We find persuasive the opinion of the Ninth Circuit, “Trust land is land especially set up for the tribe as tribal lands itself, and ing roughly 460 acres owned by PCI, which became which recently held that California could not raise a colAlabama’s only federally recognized Indian tribe in 1984. lateral attack — that is, make a challenge outside an APA everybody thought it was pretty clear as to what was and wasn’t tribal land until Carcieri,” Byrne told Lagniappe. “There was an effort to pass a law in When Rhode Island Gov. Donald L. Carcieri sued claim — to the Secretary’s authority to take lands into Congress that would have clarified that, but for whatever reason, it had more Interior Secretary Ken L. Salazar over a 31-acre parcel trust for an Indian tribe,” Judge Jill Pryor wrote. enemies as a comprehensive bill than as separate tribal bills.” the Narragansett Indian tribe intended to develop, a series Because there is a six-year statute of limitations for Byrne’s most recent effort to clarify Carcieri expressly states that it applies of appeals put it before the Supreme Court. The decision challenging the actions of federal agencies under the in Carcieri v. Salazar hinged on one word: “now.” APA, Pryor said, even if Alabama filed an APA challenge to all pending and future challenges to the acquisition of PCI’s trust lands — meaning were it to pass, it would nullify a lawsuit that’s been pending In a 6-3 vote, the court ruled the term “now under over the acceptance of PCI’s trust lands, it should have before the Alabama Supreme Court for three years. federal jurisdiction” in the IRA “unambiguously” referred done so by 1991, 1999 and 2002, respectively. That case is challenging PCI’s right to evoke sovereign immunity to to tribes under federal jurisdiction when it was enacted in While there are exceptions for bringing later chalprevent being sued in state and federal court. In a legal context, sovereign 1934 — meaning the Secretary of the Interior lacked the lenges, Pryor said those are intended for parties unable immunity simply means PCI is treated as a sovereign state or country. Thus, authority to take land into trust for the Narragansett tribe, to bring a timely administrative challenge. Because Alait can’t be sued in state or federal court, which lack jurisdiction over the tribe, which was recognized after 1934. bama did not challenge the land acquisitions when they even if it’s being sued for something that occurred off tribal lands. While there is still debate on what impact the ruling were approved years ago, the court refused to “carve out

T

6 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7


BAYBRIEF | COURTS

Men overboard DEFENDANT PLEADS NOT GUILTY IN OFFSHORE STABBING INCIDENT

A

BY GABRIEL TYNES

ccording to court records, Christopher Shane Dreiling, a 42-year-old from Oxford, Alabama, pleaded not guilty in federal court Sept. 13 to an offshore stabbing incident last month that left two of his fellow fishermen bobbing and bleeding in the Gulf of Mexico before they were rescued by the U.S. Coast Guard. In a criminal complaint filed Aug. 21, a special agent with the Coast Guard Investigative Service claimed Dreiling was serving as a deckhand on the boat Billy B out of Bon Secour on Aug. 20, alongside captain Noah Gibson and crew Anthony (AJ) Love. The boat was approximately 45 miles southeast of Orange Beach, when, “with no provocation and no previous indication of hostility,” he allegedly stabbed Gibson with a knife in the chin and lip. When Gibson turned to jump off the boat in an attempt to flee, Dreiling allegedly stabbed the captain in the back and pushed him into the water. Meanwhile, hearing the commotion, Love turned around and took a defensive position. According to the complaint, “Love was stabbed several times while turning to run away from Dreiling. Dreiling continued to chase Love through the wheelhouse and around the vessel, stabbing Love. On several occasions, Love

turned to fend off Dreiling, receiving additional stabs to his arms and the front of his torso. During the attack, Love was eventually able to jump off the vessel and into the water.” Allegedly the Billy B was not underway at the time of the attacks, but once both victims were in the water, Dreiling attempted to take control of the boat. “In dire straits, Gibson pleaded with Dreiling to throw a life raft and emergency beacon in the water, which Dreiling did. The contact with the water activated the emergency beacon, notifying the USCG that people were in the water. Gibson then pleaded with Dreiling to contact the USCG by VHF radio. Dreiling contacted the USCG, indicating there were people in the water and that he stabbed the individuals.” The complaint says the Coast Guard vessel Kingfisher was able to respond “immediately,” and upon arrival took control of the Billy B, detained Dreiling, and evacuated Gibson and Love via helicopter to Baptist Hospital in Pensacola. Dreiling was arrested and booked into the Baldwin County Corrections Center, and remains there today without bond. On Aug. 31, he was formally charged with two counts of assault with the attempt to commit murder within the United States maritime jurisdiction. A trial has been tentatively set for November.

BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Moving forward MOBILE HOUSING BOARD FRUSTRATED BY DELAYS FROM ROGER WILLIAMS DEVELOPER

BY DALE LIESCH

W

hile the site has been vacant and boarded up for almost a year, the Mobile Housing Board of Commissioners voted on a contract that would start the demolition process for Roger Williams Homes. Now the developer, Hunt Cos., and general contractor, Moss, have a five-month window in which to demolish the former housing complex, which is the first step in a multimillion-dollar revitalization of the entire northside neighborhood. The budget for the demolition is set at $2.5 million and Gulf States Contracting was the firm selected to do the work, Hunt Cos.’ Stan Waterhouse said. At issue for many commissioners is the delay from the time the contract was initially brought to the board to when it was finalized by Hunt. About three months ago, Hunt told the board a demolition contract would be ready for them to vote on in about a week; that was not the case. “I’m concerned about delays,” Chairwoman Kimberly Pettway said. “Did we ask you to do something more quickly than you planned to?” Waterhouse blamed the delays on a “series of issues” that created the “perfect storm.” “We thought we’d be down the road in development by now,” Waterhouse said. “I apologize on my end for the timeliness of it. I don’t expect problems to continue.” When asked for more specifics on the delays by Commissioner Reid Cummings, Robert Kelly, also with Hunt Cos., said they’ve been working on the contract for three months. There have been

three drafts, he said. “The first one would be simple and straightforward,” he said. “We decided instead to go with a design-build contract with the demolition to be phase one. We submitted it and the board asked us to pull out references to the redevelopment of the site. We made it a stand-alone contract.” Cummings said the ordeal doesn’t provide evidence of competency on the part of the $30 billion company that should have a department full of attorneys who regularly work out contract details Pettway told Waterhouse to let the board know if it was causing problems for the developer. She said commissioners were “antsy” over the project and wanted to get it started. “We have to know we are a priority for you,” Pettway said. “Are we? Can we just see that going forward?” Waterhouse assured Pettway that MHB and the redevelopment of Roger Williams was a priority for the developer. “This one sits at the top of the heap,” he said. “We spend a lot of time and energy talking about this project.” In other business, the board approved the authority’s annual housing choice voucher program plan, which would be sent to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. MHB has reduced its voucher waiting list to 1,600 from about 6,000, but commissioners wanted to know what it would take to reduce the number even more. S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 7


BAYBRIEF | EDUCATION

Behind closed doors STUDENT SUES USA OVER ‘SEXUAL ASSAULT’ INVESTIGATIONS BY JASON JOHNSON

Photo | U.S. District Court, Southern District of Alabama

Doe claims on the day of his conduct hearing, which was held in USA’s student center, banners were hung by student groups that spoke to some of the core issues of his case.

A

s federal officials look to revise guidance for handling allegations of sexual misconduct on college campuses, the University of South Alabama is facing a lawsuit filed by a student who says his rights were violated when USA found him responsible for two reported sexual assaults. The lawsuit alleges the processes USA used to investigate the allegations against the male student relied heavily on “hearsay” testimony, biased administrators and a closed-door hearing led by a panel of improperly trained students and faculty members. While this appears to be the first case of its kind in Alabama, it follows a trend of lawsuits filed around the country by college students — predominantly men — who claim their respective college’s policies for sexual misconduct investigations under Title IX are fundamentally unfair. Title IX was enacted to prohibit sex-based discrimination, but its application has expanded over the years as courts and the United States Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights (OCR) have classified sexual misconduct as a form of sex discrimination. In 2011, as high-profile incidents pushed the issue of college sexual assault to the forefront of the nation’s conscience, President Barack Obama’s administration issued new guidance to universities for handling Title IX complaints of misconduct. That guidance came in the form of a “Dear Colleague Letter” from the OCR, which, among other things, pushed schools to adopt a “preponderance of the evidence” standard when determining the culpability of students accused of misconduct, which is lower than the “clear and convincing” evidence standard used in criminal cases. Since then, there have been more than 180 lawsuits filed by students who claim their due-process rights were violated by the college they were enrolled in. Many of the plaintiffs were expelled, suspended or placed on academic probation as a result of the allegations against them. According to the Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), the 2011 guidance, while voluntary, was issued as DOE began increasing Title IX investigations across the board. With federal funding contingent on Title IX compliance, FIRE Vice President of Policy Research Samantha Harris said most colleges took the DOE guidance as a directive, not a suggestion. “The number of schools under Title IX investigations jumped from just 50 in 2014 to more than 200 as of June,” Harris told Lagniappe. “It wasn’t just the ‘Dear Colleague Letter,’ it was the climate. Universities were very fearful of triggering a Title IX investigation and possibly losing fed-

eral funding, so — formally or informally — many decided to take steps that made it easier to find students responsible for sexual misconduct, whether or not they were.” Earlier this month, U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos announced plans to review and possibly revise the DOE’s 2011 guidance, claiming, despite “good intentions,” the Obama-era guidance had “failed” students accused of wrongdoing and victims of sexual assault alike. However, groups dedicated to survivors of sexual assault quickly criticized DeVos’ plan to roll back those 2011 changes, with many calling her announcement this month “a step backward” from the recent progress made in addressing collegiate sexual assault. Now, with a federal policy review as the backdrop, the lawsuit against USA has become all the more relevant in a highly contentious national discussion.

John Doe v. USA

The plaintiff, a male student identified only as “John Doe,” claims USA’s investigation of two sexual assaults he was accused of in 2016 violated his right to due process, breached his contract with the university and discriminated against him on the basis of his gender. Like many universities, USA has a stand-alone policy guiding the procedures used to investigate and resolve reports of sexual assault. In the policy, USA vows to “promptly and thoroughly investigate and resolve all complaints of sexual misconduct” — an “umbrella term” for accusations including “sex discrimination, sexual harassment, sexual violence, domestic violence, dating violence, stalking and retaliation.” Doe’s disciplinary hearings stemmed from accusations made by three female students who claim Doe committed sexual assault by having intercourse with them while they were under the influence of alcohol and without the ability to consent. “If a person is incapacitated by alcohol or drugs such that the person cannot understand the fact, nature or extent of the sexual situation, there is no consent, even if the person self-administered the alcohol or drugs,” USA’s policy reads. The first allegation against Doe stemmed from an encounter in September 2016 he described as a “mutual sexual threesome” between himself and two females identified in the lawsuit only as Jane Roe 1 and Jane Roe 2. He claims he had had similar, consensual encounters at least twice before with both complainants. Weeks later, though, both women reported the final incident to USA’s Title IX coordinator as a sexual assault based on their in-

8 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7

ability to give consent at the time. Doe’s initial complaint, which can be read at lagniappemobile.com, only includes Doe’s recollection of the events from that evening as well as his account of another sexual encounter that caused a third female student to file a separate complaint of sexual misconduct against him. It also discusses a previous allegation one of his accusers made against another male student that was unsubstantiated, despite an investigation by campus police and a subsequent Title IX investigation and hearing by USA. While the details of those incidents were crucially important in Doe’s Title IX investigations, the lawsuit he filed against USA is more focused on the processes USA used to determine that he bore responsibility in both reported sexual assaults last year. The outcomes and records of USA’s conduct investigations and hearings aren’t accessible to the public pursuant to the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act, which protects the privacy of student educational records. In his lawsuit, though, Doe claims he was suspended for two semesters and placed on academic probation for the rest of his time at USA. He also agreed to a mutual “no contact” order with his accusers and was required to complete several hours of community service. Since then, he claims to have been placed on leave from the ROTC program and says his scholarship for ROTC has been suspended. Unlike some at colleges, though, a “responsible” finding for a reported sexual assault is not noted on a student’s academic transcript, according to USA. Attorney Matt Green represented Doe throughout the university’s proceedings and in the resulting lawsuit has argued that a student accused of sexual misconduct at USA “faces a system that is biased at every step toward finding the student ‘responsible.’” Green also claims “one of the prime objectives of the disciplinary process is that the alleged victim be believed.” The 2011 guidance from the Obama administration stressed the importance of taking allegations of sexual assault seriously, and USA has maintained its system is fair to all students. According to USA’s policy, after a report of sexual assault is filed, an investigating officer looks into the allegations. If it’s determined misconduct occurred, the accused student can accept the findings of the investigation or have the matter adjudicated in a closed hearing before a University Disciplinary Committee. A UDC is typically composed of faculty members and “students who serve in [Student Government Association] leadership positions,” and if the committee finds the accused “responsible,” it can also recommend sanctions. In cases involving sexual misconduct, USA’s policy states “the UDC will be composed of two to four faculty/staff and two to five students.” UDC members also receive training on what type of activity does and does not constitute sexual assault — training a USA spokesperson said is “based upon source materials from national organizations ..​. ” The lawsuit suggests USA’s policies are “biased” against students accused of sexual misconduct, but USA Director of Communications Bob Lowry said UDC panels have reviewed 10 cases of sexual misconduct in the past three years and the accused student has only been found responsible in three cases. Because the university cannot speak about specific cases, it’s unclear if those three “responsible” findings include both of Doe’s cases or just one. USA has also claimed in recent court filings that Doe’s complaint fails to show any policy changed after the 2011 “Dear Colleague Letter” was “applied to him detrimentally or that is relevant” to his case. “[The lawsuit] cites cases in which colleges failed to follow their own procedures, but those are distinguishable because here the University followed its policies,” one response from USA reads. “But even if one or more of the University’s policies were not followed to a ‘t,’ Doe cannot attribute such a failure to the Dear Colleague Letter.” According to Lowry, those changes did have some effect on USA’s investigation and adjudication of alleged sexual misconduct, though he said the most notable change was “the equal opportunity for both parties to appeal [a] UDC decision.” Lowry added, “Other provisions of the [​ 2011 guidance] were already an integral part of university student-on-student sexual misconduct investigations.” Yet students accused of sexual misconduct haven’t been the only critics of USA’s handling of sexual misconduct allegations. In 2015, a female student aired her criticism in the Vanguard student newspaper and in other local media. That student, age 20 at the time, claimed local law enforcement dismissed two separate reports of sexual misconduct — one alleging rape and another alleged groping incident — and conduct hearings before a UDC yielded the same result. So far, Doe’s lawsuit against USA had yet to progress very far, though a number of lawsuits filed against other universities have successfully overturned internal disciplinary decisions. As it proceeds through court, though, colleges all over the country will be waiting to see what new guidance might come down from DeVos’ department. “We know this much to be true: one rape is one too many. One assault is one too many. One aggressive act of harassment is one too many. One person denied due process is one too many,” DeVos stated in a speech earlier this month. “This conversation may be uncomfortable, but we must have it. It is our moral obligation to get this right.”


BAYBRIEF | BALDWIN COUNTY

Go your own way

DAPHNE CITY COUNCIL DISCUSSES STUDY ON INDEPENDENT SYSTEM BY JOHN MULLEN

A

s the firm conducting a feasibility study for Daphne to form its own school system kicks off its work, one of the improvements city leaders hope to see is smaller class sizes. City Council members met with representatives of the K-12 Criterion Group on Sept. 12 to understand what educational options the city wants to include if a new system is formed. “Just getting a general idea of what kind of system,” Councilman Robin LeJeune said. “We said we definitely wanted to see an improvement and we would see that with class size and things like that.” Smaller class sizes would be an inherent part of a split, LeJeune said. Based on the number of students currently attending classes in Daphne, he said the total number of students in the city could drop by 500. “My understanding [is] that there are close to 600 kids that live in the city limits that go to Spanish Fort and Fairhope that would come back into the city school system,” LeJeune said. “There are actually about 1,100 kids that live in the county outside of Daphne that actually go to Daphne schools. “Based on the Baldwin school system numbers that they gave us, we’re looking at a reduction of about 500 kids in a 4,000- to 4,100kid school area. That’s a pretty big reduction right there just as far as class sizes go if you kept everything the same.” The meeting earlier this month was for K-12

Criterion Group to find out the level of services the city intends to provide and what it will cost. This is the first of two parts of the study if the city decides to move forward. “They gave a brief introduction and they had some questions to kind of get a more narrow focus on what we want to accomplish in the first half,” LeJeune said. “The first half they’re working on is going to be financial — what the cost of certain things will be and delving into that.” The company’s visit included meeting with local education officials, county officials and taking a look around town. “They were just getting the groundwork to start the process,” LeJeune said. LeJeune said the council expects to hear back from K-12 Criterion Group in late October or early November. The first half of the study will cost the city about $38,500 and a total of $68,500 if leaders decide to continue the study. The Gulf Shores City Council also voted to spend $15,000 for a preliminary study by the Public Affairs Research Council of Alabama “to assist in calculating the revenue and expense part of the equation.” The Island Task Force for Education donated $12,000 toward that cost from collections at community meetings about forming an independent system. Mayor Robert Craft said the PARCA report is being studied by city officials and the goal is to have it ready to present to the public at the Sept. 25 council meeting.

BAYBRIEF | EASTERN SHORE

Case study

FAIRHOPE’S COVERED BRIDGE SUBDIVISION AFFECTED BY NEW FEMA FLOOD MAPS BY JOHN MULLEN

D

r. Harvey Joanning doesn’t understand why his home was deemed to be in a flood plain. His home in the Covered Bridge subdivision is one of the areas added to the Federal Emergency Management Agency flood hazard zone on the new maps released in July. “One of the things that Dr. Joanning has, he shot an elevation certification at his house that shows the flood zone going right through his property,” Fairhope EMA Coordinator Eric Cortinas said. “The map says the base flood for that area is 47 feet above mean sea level. His house is 84 feet above mean sea level.” Joanning and his neighbors, including former Fairhope Mayor Tim Kant, are questioning the designation and plan a formal request to FEMA for relief. “That is a prime candidate for a letter of map revision because what they basically did was kept the previous data,” Cortinas said. “Evidently, they didn’t shoot lidar at your house so they wouldn’t have seen the elevation. “Former Mayor Kant came to see me. He’s in the same situation. He’s got the gully at the end of his lot, so his lot touches the flood zone. He had to get an elevation certificate for his insurance, but he’s 45 feet above base flood.” Residents have 12 months from the time the maps are released to file either a letter of map amendment or a letter of map revision. “If you disagree with any of the determinations made on the map, you have the opportunity

to request a map amendment,” Cortinas said. “If you show data to FEMA showing that flood zone determination is inaccurate, they will amend the maps based on that.” Joanning said he and his neighbors will talk about a joint filing with FEMA to object to being in the flood hazard zone. “Could I get together with all of my neighbors, who have the exact situation that I have going on, and use one letter of revision?” he asked. “Every one of my neighbors is going to go nuts as soon as I come tell them.” Joanning said being ruled inside the zone will adversely affect his property. “That’s why I want to get out of the flood zone,” he said. “It will increase the value of my property significantly if I can get out of the flood zone.” Cortinas said the increase in flood zones in Fairhope came about because creeks, dry creek beds and gullies in the town were mapped for the first time. And since the last maps were released in 2007, several subdivisions have sprung up along the banks of these waterways. “This was all built and developed before there was a flood zone,” Cortinas said. “They are now in a flood zone. If they have a federally backed mortgage, they’re going to get a call from their mortgage company and you have to purchase flood insurance. Since they were built before the mapping was done, they will be able to get flood insurance at the grandfathered rate.” S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 9


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

On thin ice

COUNCIL DEBATES HOLIDAY SPENDING, BUDGET VOTE DELAYED BY DALE LIESCH

P

subsequent years. During a discussion of the performance contract vote, John Williams added an amendment to include the $40,000 event payment with the $120,000 performance contract, but the vote failed 6-1 with only Williams voting in favor. Several councilors expressed concern over earmarking the money before the city came up with a replacement event of its own. Councilman C.J. Small said he had confidence the administration would plan an event everyone in the city could enjoy, unlike the skating rink. Councilman Levon Manzie said he was “hesitant” to support the $40,000 payment to the BID because it’s unknown at this point what the city has planned. “We’ve been told there will be a robust celebration in Mobile,” he said. “We don’t know how much that will cost. I look forward to hearing back from the administration on what we will do and how much it will cost.” Manzie added that he’s hesitant to agree to a one-time payment because if the event is successful, it could require them to shell out the same amount next year. Councilman Fred Richardson discussed the possibility of bringing back the city’s Christmas parade, which was nixed by the Stimpson administration. Richardson said the city should’ve left the parade “well enough alone.” “We cut the Christmas parade and tried this, that and another thing and couldn’t match the Christmas parade,” Richardson said. “We ought to go back to the Christmas parade because it brings joy to the hearts of all the citizens in Mobile.” Councilwoman Bess Rich initially had doubts the city could organize and pull off a Christmas parade with such short notice.

10 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7

Photo | Lagniappe

lans for a big holiday-themed event might be slowly melting away following the Mobile City Council meeting Tuesday. Councilors learned Mayor Sandy Stimpson’s administration won’t be bringing back the portable ice skating rink known as Riverside Ice this year and don’t have any specific plans to replace it. City spokesman George Talbot said the administration wanted to move the event from its previous location at Cooper Riverside Park to the newly opened Mardi Gras Park, but apparently ran into logistical problems. “We’re looking at bringing it back in 2018 at a more central location,” Talbot said. He confirmed that other seasonal downtown events such as the Christmas tree and menorah lightings would go on as scheduled, as well as the Downtown Mobile Alliance’s Elfapalooza. Learning that the skating rink would not be happening this year, DMA Executive Director Elizabeth Stevens said downtown retailers had asked her about reviving the North Pole Stroll event. Stevens and the Business Incentive District board approached the city for $40,000 that had been budgeted by the city as part of a previous performance contract, but not yet allocated, to help with the event. This money would be in addition to a $120,000 performance contract BID had negotiated with administration officials and was set to receive in 2018, pending a vote of the council on Tuesday. The money for the holiday event was not scheduled for a vote. Of the $40,000, Stevens said $25,000 would be used to put on the North Pole Stroll this year and the other $15,000 would be used for decorations that could be reused in

Mayor Sandy Stimpson announced Riverside Ice will not return in 2017. “With any parade, you’re talking about next year,” she said. She later conceded it might be possible. She also asked for the council to vote again next week on the $40,000 payment for the holiday event. The council did approve, by a 6-1 vote, the $120,000 performance contract for the BID, with the caveat that a councilor will be given the opportunity to serve on the BID’s board, similar to an agreement the county has with the BID. Williams voted against the measure. The council again delayed a vote on Stimpson’s proposed fiscal year 2018 budgets, as questions regarding longevity pay for firefighters, GulfQuest funding and county rent payments remain unanswered. In other business, Stimpson announced an event from 2-5 p.m. Saturday at Figures Park to celebrate the city’s collaboration with New Orleans Pelicans forward DeMarcus Cousins on a tournament-style basketball court at the park. The event, known as “Boogie’s Block Party,” is free to the public and will celebrate the groundbreaking of the new court. The council delayed a vote on the replacement of traffic signal controllers along Airport Boulevard from Sage Avenue to the Pinebrook Shopping Center. The new controllers will synchronize the lights and lead to better traffic flow.


BAYBRIEF | ENVIRONMENT

Better faster deeper wider CORPS OF ENGINEERS DISCUSSES SHIPPING CHANNEL EXPANSION BY JASON JOHNSON

A

fter three years, the Army Corps of Engineers is roughly halfway through a $7.8 million study of economic and environmentally feasible ways to expand the federal shipping channel in Mobile Bay. An open house was held last week in South Mobile County to provide updates on preliminary findings that will eventually be documented in a general re-evaluation report (GRR) federal officials will use to select the best expansion option for the 36-mile channel. While any proposal will ultimately require congressional approval, project manager David Newell said the Corps is currently evaluating an expansion model that would deepen the length of the channel by five feet to a 50-foot depth while widening a five-mile stretch in the lower part of Mobile by 100 feet to create a passing lane for ships. “This combination of widening and deepening was chosen because of the potential economic benefits estimated for these proposed modifications and because there is a reasonable likelihood the 50-foot depth and 100-foot widener will be the tentatively selected plan,” Newell said. “[That’s] the plan the Corps initially recommends for implementation. It is ‘tentative’ because it is subject to internal and external reviews.” If approved, an expansion like the one Newell mentioned would be similar to what was initially proposed by the Alabama State Port Authority in 2014, which would have created a five-mile passing lane without increasing the current 45-foot depth of the channel. However, at ASPA’s request, the Corps was asked to evaluate the cost of further expansions and what impact they may have from an economic and environmental standpoint.

This week, ASPA spokeswoman Judith Adams told Lagniappe a channel expansion would ensure Mobile remains competitive with other United States seaports, adding it’s “very important to Alabama’s economy to remain relevant in international trade.” “We must ensure our continued competitiveness as a port and a maritime economy that’s up against other major ports that are already deepening and widening,” she said. “Industries throughout Alabama rely on us because we offer cost-competitive logistics, and that helps them compete globally.” While the cost of the project is unknown, it could easily be in the tens of millions of dollars. For perspective, the project considered in 2014, which would not have deepened the channel at all, came with an estimated cost of $15 million. The cost of all construction in federal ports is split between the federal government and a non-federal partner, which in this case is the Corps. Historically, that has meant the state only paid 25 percent of project costs, but if the port were to expand to a depth of 50 feet or more the ratio shifts to a 50-50 split. According to Adams, ASPA will also have to pay a portion of future maintenance costs equal to 10 percent of the total project cost. That means if the project were hypothetically priced at $50 million, it would ultimately cost ASPA $30 million. However, at whatever price, federal law dictates any expenditure must provide “a return on investment” for every dollar the government spends. While the financial benefits of an expanded port can be quantified in many ways, the Corps recently released a chart showing the “net benefits” generated by every foot

of depth potentially added to the shipping channel. Based on that chart, an additional five feet of depth could have a net benefit of more than $50 million. However, those dollars wouldn’t be directly collected by the federal government, but would instead be passed on to consumers from “origin-to-destination transportation cost savings” that would result from larger cargo ships carrying more goods in fewer number of trips. With last week’s open house in the coastal fishing community of Bayou La Batre, questions were raised about whether saltwater intrusion from increased dredging might impact aquatic life in the bay and the industries that harvest it. While Newell said there is some “concern” over saltwater intrusion, the extent of any potential impact is still unknown at this point in the study. Previously, the Corps has established a baseline of existing resources including “wetlands, sea grasses, oysters, fish and bay bottom communities” — data Newell says will be used going forward to estimate the impact an expansion could potentially have on those communities. “Results from the water-quality modeling being conducted to predict changes in salinity — along with other water-quality parameters — are being used to compare differences between the existing conditions in the bay and future conditions that would result from deepening and/or widening the channel,” he added. While there have been some criticisms about public access to the details of the GRR, a Corps spokesperson said events such as last week’s open house and a previous meeting held in Daphne are intended to give the public an opportunity to ask questions and provide input. As it has for years, the discussion of dredging activity in the federal channel also brought up concerns about erosion on Dauphin Island and whether dredged material could be placed in a location more beneficial to the restoration of the barrier island. As part of the GRR, Newell said a team has been modeling and analyzing the existing sediment transport processes from the area where dredge material is currently disposed near the old Sand Island Lighthouse. He said the GRR is also evaluating how a channel expansion could impact “on the ebb tidal shoal and adjacent coastal areas, including Dauphin Island.” However, when it comes to the contention that routine maintenance dredging has contributed significantly to erosion seen on Dauphin Island, Newell said The Corps’ position hasn’t changed. “The Corps’ position is that channel dredging has not had a measurable impact to Dauphin Island erosion up to the currently maintained channel dimensions,” Newell said. “This view is supported by the 2008 and 2010 investigations, [which] represent the most comprehensive investigation to date, using the latest technology and tools available.”

S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 11


COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

Strange sold his soul in this race ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

IF THERE’S ONE THING LUTHER AND THE SENATE LEADERSHIP FUND HAVE MADE CLEAR, IT’S THAT THEY TRULY BELIEVE THE PEOPLE OF THIS STATE ARE IDIOTS. ”

12 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7

Republicans. Worse yet for them, their antics have opened the political door for Democrats to at least have a sliver of hope they can send a senator to D.C. Doug Jones may serve as a palatable candidate for many Alabamians who generally vote Republican but find the idea of Moore or Strange unacceptable. Imagine the heads rolling if that scenario plays out. While Roy Moore is a deeply flawed candidate in his own right, a Luther Strange victory next Tuesday would more than anything signal that Washington is indeed as bad as most of us think. The fix has been in ever since Luther went to see Bentley, and Strange and McConnell fell in love. There has been little that is organic or even Alabamian about this contest. Everything has been tainted by the powers in Washington trying to pick Alabama’s senator for us. Given the polls and the general attitude expressed about Strange, it looks like the D.C. swamp is going to be losing the services of the Big Frog before he even really got his webbed feet wet. I can just imagine a single tear rolling down McConnell’s cheek next Tuesday night as he talks about what a truly great swamp creature Luther could have been. Hopefully Alabamians will reject the type of cynical intervention Strange has received and welcomed in this race. Roy Moore may turn out to be nothing more than a backbencher if he ultimately wins, but Strange does not deserve to be rewarded for his unethical behavior and obvious disdain for the citizens of Alabama. If he wanted to be worthy of the job, he should have stayed in Montgomery and prosecuted Bentley instead of selling his soul.

THEGADFLY

Right now it’s hard to imagine anything Strange wouldn’t do if he knew it would keep him in the Senate seat he so clearly believes he deserves. Hold on, let me correct myself. There is one thing he wouldn’t do, and that’s explain the actions that led to the Luv Guv appointing him to fill Sessions’ seat in the first place. During this whole campaign, Strange has remained a moving target when it came to any situation that might lead to him being put on the spot about “the job interview,” as I like to call it. As for his efforts in Montgomery, Luther was the biggest frog in the pond. Or at least the second biggest after Robert Bentley. As Strange praises himself for going after Montgomery corruption, he must be hoping nobody remembers he was so tangled up in the system there that he had to recuse himself from the prosecution of disgraced Speaker of the House Mike Hubbard. So he was on the sidelines for the biggest ethics prosecution of the past decade. In the other biggie — the case against Bentley — Big Luther deftly manipulated the situation to put himself in position to be appointed senator once Sessions left to become U.S. Attorney General. He told the state House of Representatives to back off on impeaching Bentley because his staff was working on “something.” Then Luther went to see the Guv about that empty Senate chair, and — voila! — he was headed for D.C. It’s pretty hard to see what Strange did to “drain” the Montgomery swamp. He appears to have mostly just made it made it swampier. All of the amphibian behavior displayed by Strange is probably why — despite millions poured into the state by the Senate Leadership Fund on his behalf — he trails Moore badly in just about every poll that has been conducted on the race. Well, there are a couple of polls that have Strange within striking distance of Moore. Of course they were

conducted by the very Senate Leadership Fund that has done everything short of having Moore assassinated in order to help Big Luther win. Yes, Luther Strange and Mitch McConnell think we are idiots. The last credible poll, released Sept. 11 by Emerson College, has Big Luther down Big Time — 14 points. Of course polls are polls and subject to being wrong, but the trend seems to be that Moore has a decent chance of pounding Big Luther. Still, for the life of me, I can’t exactly understand what it is about Luther Strange that Mitch McConnell and President Trump believe the horrible, failed Washington system can’t do without. Trump is on his way down to stump for Big Luther even as the Senate Leadership Fund blasts Moore hourly for being crooked and a “Trump hater.” The simpleton logic, of course, is that by picking Trump up and cradling him like a sweet little baby, the robotic Alabama voters will completely forget Strange’s unethical behavior regarding his handling of the Luv Guv. Doubtful. Even though Trump enjoys more popularity in the Yellowhammer State than he might in other parts of the country, he’s far from being able to wave his hand and make Big Luther senator for life. At this stage of the game, Luther losing has more meaning than simply not having a greasy, anything-for-a-buck guy like Strange to do McConnell’s bidding. It’s really become more about McConnell, the SLF and establishment Washington winding up with egg on their collective mugs. If Luther loses they will have wasted millions and millions in trying to beat other

Cartoon/Laura Rasmussen

W

ith the Republican runoff for the United States Senate less than a week away, it is evident Luther Strange is becoming exponentially more desperate each day. The current placeholder for Jeff Sessions’ old seat is running behind former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore in all the polls, so the Republican Senate Leadership Fund is trucking money down to poor ol’ Bama so Big Luther can further flood the airwaves before the polls open Sept. 26. Suddenly Luther is fighting for term limits and crowing about how he drained the Montgomery swamp, and making sweet political love to Donald Trump. If there’s one thing Luther and the Senate Leadership Fund have made clear, it’s that they truly believe the people of this state are idiots. First of all, would anyone possibly believe Strange really wants term limits? He’s wound up so tightly with Mitch McConnell and other multi-term U.S. Senate leaders that someone’s going to start chafing pretty soon. Strange simply comes off as the insider Washington lobbyist he is. His new affection for term limits is nothing more than pandering.

PRESIDENT TRUMP MAKES A LAST-MINUTE PITCH FOR “BIG” LUTHER STRANGE AS AN ALLY IN THE SENATE


COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

Change needed on America’s college campuses ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

E

very parent wants their child to grow up, do well in school and eventually leave the nest to go off to college (hopefully on full academic and/or athletic scholarships). After buying a house with a picket fence, getting a dog and birthing 2.5 children, this hope is the natural extension of the American Dream. But some of the activities on college campuses these days are becoming every parent’s worst nightmare.

Hazing deaths

Hazing deaths, usually alcohol- and/or drugrelated, in Greek fraternities are nothing new. They unfortunately happened when I was in college, and they are still happening today. With two recent high-profile cases, one at Penn State and one at LSU, garnering national media attention, we have to ask ourselves once again, what can we do to finally stop these senseless deaths? Universities and national fraternity chapters have tried to address this in various ways. They bring in doctors to tell these kids what alcohol poisoning looks like in an attempt to terrify them from drinking 15 shots in a row. They have tried banning alcohol altogether or threatening to close the fraternity down if word of any behavior like this is reported. I truly believe they are trying. But yet, it keeps happening. You want your children to spread their wings and fly and hang out with friends and form lifelong bonds, but obviously you don’t want them to die. Nor do you want them to see any of their buddies die. These rituals take lives and ruin the ones of those left behind. Part of me says, these kids need to be more responsible and they should be taught to know better than to engage in this kind of reckless behavior. That sounds all fine and good. But they’re kids, and they are trying to fit in with a bunch of new people and look cool, and there is more peer pressure than ever. Even a “good kid” who has been taught all the right lessons can make poor choices in these situations. No parent should have to bury a child for any reason. But these hazing deaths seem even more senseless. Greek life is here to stay and there are many great things about it. But this sad story is bound to keep repeating itself no matter how many warnings these kids get. Because none of them think it is ever going to happen to them. I say, if you are going to have fraternities, you should make them employ a full-time, live-in nurse or paramedic, who can not only treat their colds and STDs, but also save them from drowning in their own vomit. Seriously. Just replace the house mother with a medical professional. I am not one for “coddling” kids on college campuses, but Greek life is an extra expense paid for by parents. If my kids decide they want to go that route and we decide to scratch out checks for them to do so, I would feel much better knowing my money was going to pay for someone who could save their lives than, say, forking over dough to an interior designer who is putting a new $5,000 Chesterfield couch in the frat house library and painting the walls one of Farrow & Ball’s “key colours” of the year. One expense seems far more insane than the other to me. But maybe that’s just me.

Sex on campus

In a very admirable attempt to end sexual assault on college campuses, the Obama admin-

istration sent out a letter in April 2011 to the nation’s university administrators essentially requiring them to adopt new procedures on how they handle reports of on-campus sexual assaults. If the universities didn’t comply, they would be at risk of losing federal funds, so of course they adopted them. These procedures are heavily weighted in favor of the accuser and only require a “preponderance of evidence” to find the accused guilty. While I am sure in many cases these guidelines have helped young women get justice they deserve, critics have rightly argued this takes away due process, and there have been many reports of innocent young men’s lives being ruined by a misuse of these new guidelines. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos recently said they would be revisiting these policies. Hopefully they will rework these guidelines to protect the rights of all involved. But before they even get to these “campus courts,” the definition of sexual assault has changed greatly over the years at American universities. A relatively new campaign has been going around some college campuses featuring a red Solo cup reading, “My cup is not my consent.” One university’s website describes consent like this: “Consent should be freely given, enthusiastic and affirmatively communicated through verbal and/or non-verbal language. Consent cannot be assumed or obtained through coercion, manipulation, force, or while under the influence of any drug(s) including alcohol.” Most of that sentence I think we can all agree with. It is the very last clause that creates a lot of gray area. Obviously we all know what sexual assault is and obviously we all know that no one should ever take advantage of someone who is incapacitated. That is a classic definition of sexual assault. But after that this definition gets a little murky and a little dangerous. And the one that has caused a lot of misuse of the aforementioned Obama-era guidelines. There seems to be an attitude that even if a girl gives a guy all of the “affirmative verbal and/or non-verbal language” and has sex with him willingly, but has had a few drinks (that she may have even poured for herself), if she decides the next day or even next week she regrets this action, because she had a few drinks, this can now be a sexual assault instead of just something she regrets. I am sorry, but this is absolutely ridiculous. When did we stop teaching our daughters that they have to take responsibility for their own actions as well? Again, I am obviously not talking about girls who are passed out drunk and taken advantage of and truly assaulted. But saying anytime a girl has had a few drinks she can charge someone with sexual assault because she couldn’t really give consent is a very slippery slope to go down. I have a daughter and I, of course, never want her to be taken advantage of in any way. I also want her to be responsible for her own actions and make good choices. But I also have a son. And I don’t want him to ever be wrongly accused of something like this either. And I’ll have to say, I think I am more terrified for him than I am for her right now. A reasonable balance can be found here. We can protect our daughters, as they should be, without decimating the rights of our sons. S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 13


COMMENTARY | THE GRIOT’S CORNER

Lessons from catastrophe about community BY KEN ROBINSON/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

I

n one part of his bestselling book “Tribe,” author, journalist and filmmaker Sebastian Junger tells the story of the German bombardment of England during World War II. However, he relates the story from an unusual perspective. Junger recounts how on the eve of the German air onslaught that was intended to break the will of the English people and bomb them into submission, English leaders feared the worst — from their own people. Junger states: “No one knew how a civilian population would react to that kind of trauma, but the Churchill government assumed the worst. So poor was their opinion of the populace — particularly the working-class people of East London — that emergency planners were reluctant to even build public bomb shelters because they worried people would move into them and simply never move out.” He goes on to say that the English authorities felt that as a result of the German aerial bombardment campaign, “ ... economic production would plummet and the shelters themselves, it was feared, would become a breeding ground for political dissent and even Communism.” They were proven very wrong. The London Blitz, or aerial bombardment campaign, started on Sept. 7, 1940, and did not ease until May 1941. By the thousands of tons, German bombers unleashed bombs directly over populated neighborhoods — at one point for 57 straight days — taking the lives of hundreds of civilians at a time in the process. In the midst of this aerial onslaught meant to breed mass hysteria and psychological capitulation, Junger

observes, something profound took place day after day. “Many Londoners,” he notes, “trudged to work in the morning, trudged across town to shelters or tube stations in the evening, and then trudged back to work again when it got light. Conduct was so good in the shelters that volunteers never even had to summon the police to maintain order. If anything, the crowd policed themselves according to unwritten rules that made life bearable for complete strangers jammed shoulder to shoulder on floors that were at times awash in urine. … On and on the horror went. … Not only did these experiences fail to produce mass hysteria, they didn’t even trigger much individual psychosis.” Catastrophe, in other words, had not led to chaos, but to true community. It happened on the opposite side as well. The Allied bombardment of the German civilian populace, which eventually led to the death or wounding of around a million people, failed to break the will of the German people. It stiffened it! The cities with the highest morale were the ones hardest hit. Industrial production increased during the war. Junger recounts, “The more the Allies bombed, the more defiant the German population became.” Calamity strengthened the bonds of community. Throughout this profound treatise, Junger points out how it is often catastrophe and calamity that bring out the best in humanity and create that most elusive of pursuits: equality. Because we are at our core social beings, calamitous or catastrophic events often bring out the most basic and primal aspects of our nature: communal bonds,

14 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7

togetherness, belonging and a sense of shared purpose. If modern life, with its varied distracting and fracturing influences and tendencies, serve to fray and sever the ties that should bind us one to another, nothing helps repair or strengthen these — even if momentarily — like shared suffering, suffering that cuts across racial and socioeconomic lines, reducing all to one commonality: human beings. As I walked around downtown Mobile two weekends ago and had the chance to meet and talk with evacuees from Hurricane Irma, such thoughts ran through my mind. I talked with people of different races, ages and socioeconomic backgrounds who expressed a sense of sincere gratitude for the hospitality they were shown wherever they went in Mobile. Many genuinely worried about what would become of their homes, but were able to quickly utter a strong sense of hope and belief that, whatever happened, they would be OK. They were able to parlay the encouragement, comfort and relief they received from total strangers here into a belief that, whatever the future held for them, they would not face it alone. Support and help, if needed, would come. In “Tribe,” Junger declares, “The earliest and most basic definition of community — of tribe — would be the group of people that you would both help feed and help defend.” Walking around the streets of Mobile, those evacuees sensed, as I’m sure those in other cities did as well, that they were part of a larger community, a larger tribe that, despite race, creed or economic status, would move heaven and earth to help care for them in their time of need. This heartfelt and incredible truth, however, leads us to a distressing question: Why does it take catastrophe and calamity to bring out true community? Why are we so often plagued with disunity rather than community? I would submit the source of the problem is often found in those we choose to lead us. A nation, a state or a municipality will no doubt always have different views on how to address and solve societal ills, but differences shouldn’t be equated with disloyalty to the group as a whole or met with disdain. Yet we often elect and follow leaders that fan the flames of destructive difference and lead us to believe those that disagree with our side need to be vanquished and silenced, rather than understood and negotiated with. Instead of urging constructive difference that leads to dialogue and strengthens the bond of community, many leaders prefer the destructive difference that disintegrates community and erodes the humanity and dignity we all share. Contempt replaces community and feelings of sectional superiority and collective discord stifle growth and progress. In the past few weeks nature has reaffirmed its destructive capability, but in doing so it has helped remind us of our productive and positive capabilities as a nation, as a community. For our sakes, may we heed its lessons.


COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

‘Better safe than sorry’ isn’t good enough BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM

I

n case you hadn’t heard, a hurricane hit the state of Florida last week. Hurricane Irma first made landfall in the Florida Keys, then made a second landfall in southwestern Florida on Marco Island. Early estimates on the damage inflicted by the storm range from $50 billion to $70 billion. Forecasters expected the situation to be much worse. If some pre-landfall prognostications — which had Irma making landfall 100 miles east in Miami-Dade County — had been correct, the damage figures would have been much higher. However, based on those early prognostications, millions were told to evacuate from southeastern Florida’s three most populous counties: Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach. As the storm got closer to Florida, evacuation areas were expanded. And near the end, the entire state was under some type of Hurricane Irma advisory except for the state’s three westernmost counties: Escambia, Santa Rosa and Okaloosa. As one would expect, such an enormous displacement resulted in a lot of gridlock in Florida and points beyond. The Florida Turnpike and interstates 10, 75 and 95 were bumper-to-bumper for dozens of miles in various locations. The price of gasoline shot up 20-30 cents per gallon (partially due to the effects of Hurricane Harvey weeks earlier). Hotel rooms were booked solid.  Yes, a lot of residents and visitors to the Sunshine State were inconvenienced by Hurricane Irma. Now, if it were up to Frances Coleman, the former opinion page editor of the PressRegister and now a freelance columnist for AL.com, those of us in Florida are expected to suck it up. “Sooner or later, and probably sooner, someone’s going to have to say this to some of the people of Florida, so I will take one for the team: Quit your bitching,” Coleman wrote as a lede sentence for her screed about those unhappy with the circumstances. Taking such a courageous stance might feel good at a childish level: You chose to live in Florida, so deal with the consequences. But that’s not the way the world works. People aren’t going to shrug off this disruption in their lives. They’re going to remember all the bad stuff from the evacuation — traffic, gas shortages, time away from home and work, playing catch-up for the next few weeks to get back to where they were before Irma’s approach. Yes, for those people impacted who live on barrier islands, perhaps it is fair to say you should have known what to expect when you decided to live there. What about those living farther inland? What about the people that didn’t sustain damage except for a power outage? What about the people that didn’t even lose power, but were encouraged by officals to

evacuate anyway? Florida Gov. Rick Scott was quick to call for the evacuation of southeastern Florida. He based his decision-making on the best available data, which was provided by government agencies. The data predicted a landfall near Miami.  He did what any reasonable elected leader would do: Tell people to get out of Miami and other points in Florida. That data turned out to be inaccurate. People left, but most came back to find their homes mostly intact. The question to ask is how this outcome will impact future human behavior. What happens the next time a Category 5 hurricane threatens the Florida peninsula? Will people be as willing to leave? Or will they say, “They said the same thing about Irma and nothing serious happened to us, so we’re going to stay put,” and potentially be in danger? The easy response is “better safe than sorry,” but that’s not good enough. After dropping $1,000-plus to avoid what they were told would be a catastrophe, a lot of people won’t leave next time. And that is why our federal government needs to do a better job with tropical weather modeling. Predicting the weather isn’t easy, especially when a jog two or three miles in the eastern Atlantic can change a storm’s trajectory by hundreds of miles as it approaches North America. But we know it is possible for our government to do a better job than it has. There are two computer models meteorologists like to watch during these storms. One is the European model (EURO) run by the European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasting, and the other is the Global Forecast System (GFS) model run by NOAA. With Hurricane Irma, the EURO model was far more accurate than the GFS model. That begs the question: How is that the Europeans — who haven’t had a hurricane come in striking range of their continent since Hurricane Debbie in 1961 — are more accurate than the U.S., where tropical weather is an annual occurrence? The inaccuracy, albeit by only a hundred miles on a giant map, is where the government could fail to perform one of its primary duties, which is to keep people safe.  By not being able to provide the most accurate data possible, people make decisions with the idea that it is better to be safe than sorry. But then the next time or the time after that, it will more resemble the boy who cried wolf. Precautionary measures are fine. In a post-Katrina era, our elected leaders seem to be fearful of facing a backlash similar to that faced by President George W. Bush in 2005. With the cloud of politics hanging over our policymakers, they could be prone to taking unnecessary proactive measures. Those come at a cost, and we’ll have to see how responsive people are the next time our leaders declare a mass evacuation.

S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 15


BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

Mary B. Austin receives national award BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

L

ast Monday, Mary B. Austin Elementary was awarded a national designation as one of “America’s Entrepreneurial Schools” by the National Consortium for Entrepreneurship Education. This is the first time a school in Alabama has received the designation. Elementary, middle and high schools that incorporate entrepreneurship education and activities at every grade level during a school year are eligible for the recognition. “At Mary B. Austin, we strive to expose our students to a wide variety of experiences that cultivate learners who are innovators, problem solvers and collaborators,” Mary B. Austin Elementary Principal Dr. Amanda Jones said. “I am proud of the work my staff and students have accomplished to earn distinction as an ‘America’s Entrepreneurial School.’ Our students are being exposed to life skills that prepare them to become outside-the-box thinkers, ready to take on future careers that in many cases have yet to be invented.” Part of the Mobile County Public School System and located near Spring Hill College, the elementary school serves roughly 500 students in grades K-5. It has also been recognized in years past as a National Blue Ribbon School. Todd Greer, dean of the University of Mobile’s School of Business and chief catalyst and CEO of Exchange 202, supported Mary B. Austin in achieving the designation. “As the speed of business continues to increase exponentially, it is important for our students to understand and cultivate entrepreneurial thinking skills as early as possible,” Greer said. “Their recognition as one of ‘America’s Entrepreneurial Schools’ by the National Consortium for Entrepreneurship Education provides further validation that we are cultivating the right opportunities for our students here in Mobile.” To earn the award for the 2016-2017 school year, Mary B. Austin Elementary students participated in project-based learning programs at each grade level emphasizing entrepre-

neurial skills. First-graders studied sound and created mock instruments from around the world to “sell.” They also learned the principles of supply and demand through their study of world continents and were able to visit two local music businesses. Second-graders held a “Fairy Tale Market Day” as their public product. They also visited The Exchange 202, The Fuse factory and Mobile’s iTeam to learn about innovation, pitching a business and working in teams. Third-graders learned about advertising and created their own commercials for a national park, which they collaboratively researched in project-based learning groups through an integration of various standards. Fourth-graders learned about past and present innovations and researched notable inventors from around the world. Students created various communication lab products to build upon this experience. Fifth-graders researched ways to protect and conserve ecosystems. They worked in project-based learning teams to create products that would benefit the environment. Fifthgraders extended their project over two quarters and hosted a “Shark Tank” style competition to pitch products. Schools achieving the “America’s Entrepreneurial Schools” designation receive national recognition around their programming, a banner presentation by the National Consortium for Entrepreneurship Education and support during the year from regional coordinators to implement programming.

Continental Motors moving to Brookley

Continental Motors Group Ltd. (CMG), an AVIC International Holding Corp. company, recently announced it has signed a letter of intent with Stonemont Financial Group and Clayco Inc. to develop its new headquarters at the Mobile Aeroplex in Mobile.

16 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7

Atlanta-based Stonemont Financial Group and Chicago-headquartered Clayco Inc. will serve as partners to finance, design and build the $25 million manufacturing and corporate office facility. “We look forward to partnering with Continental Motors Group on the design and construction of their new manufacturing facility,” Anthony Johnson, Clayco executive vice president, said. The new building will be designed for lean manufacturing, engineering and office systems. The proposed facility will be approximately 250,000 square feet, with the majority dedicated to engine and parts manufacturing. “Continental has joined forces with the state of Alabama, the city and county of Mobile, the Mobile Airport Authority, Stonemont Financial Group and Clayco to build a world-class facility that will continue to support our growth as a leader in the general aviation industry,” CMG President and CEO Rhett Ross said. Continental Motors and supporting partners will break ground in late 2017 and the majority of the construction work will finish in fall 2018, allowing the company to begin transitioning to its new facility in late 2018.

Virginia College expands welding facilities

Virginia College in Mobile recently announced the opening of a new facility for its welding technician diploma program at its campus, 3725 Airport Blvd., Suite 165. The additional 6,000-square-foot space will include labs, classrooms and 30 new welding booths. The expansion will accommodate an additional 35 students for acceptance into the high-demand welding technician program, nearly doubling the number of students the campus currently allows each year. The program is set to launch at the new facility on Wednesday, Sept. 27. “Prior to this facility build-out, our welding technician program was operating out of just one 10,000-square-foot building, greatly limiting the number of students we were able to enroll,” campus president Eric Barrios said. “By utilizing this space, we can increase our program’s capabilities and better serve those students who have been waiting to join the program.” Students receive hands-on training and learn about the various processes, equipment and materials used in welding from experienced instructors. Six months is spent studying structural welding and the final three months focus on pipe welding. In addition to the courses in welding, students receive instruction in safety, blueprint reading, computer applications, machine shop practices and computer-aided drafting. Virginia College is a subsidiary of Birmingham-based Education Corporation of America. Other holdings include Golf Academy of America, Ecotech Institute, Brightwood Career Institute, Brightwood College and the fully online New England College of Business, which is regionally accredited by the New England Association of Schools and Colleges. To date, Education Corporation of America has 70 locations with a collective enrollment of 30,000 students nationwide. More information about Virginia College can be found on its website.


CUISINE THE REVIEW

Big White Wings’ stupid goodness BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

Photo | Daniel Anderson / Lagniappe

T

here I was, wandering around the guitar store speaking to a person who found out I was a food writer. As usual, it’s a little awkward when people learn this. I guess I don’t look or act like I should be in this position because most people appear a little surprised when they figure it out. “I need a job like that. I love to eat,” the individual says, casually patting his or her belly. It isn’t the lifestyle you think it is, but it’s pretty fun. This conversation ends up with them telling me their favorite places, what our disagreements are and, of course, what restaurant I’ve “got to try out” because it’s the best place I have never visited. I always listen attentively and smile at our petty differences, but occasionally I pick up a gem or two. This was one of those days. My newfound friend recommended Big White Wings in the heart of Prichard. This was the second time I’d been referred to this place in as many weeks, so I figured I better go see what the fuss was. It was a lazy Thursday and I called up my old pal John McCook. As his name suggests, he is an excellent cook — and an even better guitar player. Our friendship is creeping up on the 20-year mark and it’s a shame we’ve yet to go on a review together. This place seemed like it would be right up his alley. The thing you will repeatedly hear about Big White Wings is that you must try something called Stupid Fries. Apparently it’s fries with stuff on them. That’s enough to get me excited, so we screamed into the parking lot of the small, unassuming building just a block or two off Interstate 165 on Wilson Avenue. On the window we see the words “Steak & Shrimps” in red lettering, but we knew we weren’t there for the steak. We checked out the menu and placed an order that seemed a little large, but we were not expecting the volume that made its way to our table. People in line behind us snickered at our inexperience. Here is the breakdown. The Big White Dog ($2.20) was a tad on the ridiculous side. We asked for a knife in order to share this monster and were granted a serrated kitchen blade. Chili, cheese, sweet slaw, red onion and jalapeños made this thing a meal all by itself. Did I say ridiculous? I meant ridiculously good.

BIG WHITE WINGS 405 WILSON AVE. PRICHARD 36610 251-301-7880

Stupid fries, stupid okra, hot dogs and wings, but it’s a smart move to have lunch at Big White Wings in the heart of Prichard.

You can’t avoid the wings in a wing joint. We tried them pass up. We were steered toward the chicken and bacon version two different ways: lemon pepper hot and Buffalo ($9.90 and weren’t disappointed. As a matter of fact, I felt this overper dozen). As interesting as the hot lemon pepper sounded, shadowed the Stupid Fries by a long shot. It doesn’t even sound it tasted even better, but maybe not as good as the standard good but the okra is very crispy and sturdy enough for the Buffalo. These are world-class wings the way wings are supchunks of chicken, bacon and cheese sauce that won my heart. posed to be. I’ll be back to try some of their What a long shot, but this was one of crazier flavors such as hot Italian or Italian the craziest (should I say stupidest?) meals ranch just for giggles. I’ve had in a while. Aside from powering I think what McCook grooved on the down the hot dog, we had to take home most was the order of fried green tomaeverything else with minimal damage. It toes ($1.50). Thick-cut with a flour batter, was happily the unhealthiest meal I’d had in THIS IS THE SOUL FOOD they were definitely not the way I would a month or more, but Big White’s could be have fried them, usually opting for thinly WE’VE BEEN MISSING. THIS the ultimate cheat day for dieters. sliced in cornmeal. They went against all I You should also try the lemonade, but IS INSANE FOOD TRUCK want in fried green tomatoes and they were stay away from the large. We, of course, got fantastic. Firm and tender at the same time, the large. Each of us was treated to a quart FARE IN A BRICK AND the flavor negated any preconceived notion of bright yellow deliciousness that was of the best method of frying. sweeter than the tea at any given catfish MORTAR. I’M CERTAIN IT So you want to know about Stupid joint in the Mississippi Pine Belt. I thought WILL END UP ON A TELEFries ($9.90 large order). Of the many the sugar was going to take me down. options, we chose cheeseburger over the This place is definitely an exercise in VISION SHOW ONE DAY. others. Ground beef, cheese and pickles excess, but the people are as sweet as the were topped with a red and white sauce lemonade. It’s really up to you to show that could have been, but was probably restraint, but a small amount of money can too thin to be, ketchup and mayonnaise. feed one person for several meals. This is Yes, we were stupid for ordering the large, it took up an entire the soul food we’ve been missing. This is insane food truck fare plastic foam clamshell container. You know, the big one usually in a brick and mortar. I’m certain it will end up on a television reserved for an entire meal. Man, were they good. We barely show one day. If not, then we have a best-kept secret in our made a dent. But wait, there’s more! neighboring city. I had to order this because I knew it would either be fantasSpread the word. I’m going to call McCook and see if he tic or a train wreck, but Stupid Okra ($9.90) was too wild to still has any leftovers.

S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 17


FLOUR GIRLS BAKERY ($) 809 Hillcrest Rd. • 634-2285

GROWLER STATION AND BITES 1801 Old Shell Rd. • 345-4767

FIREHOUSE SUBS ($)

PANINI PETE’S ($)

HOT SUBS, COLD SALADS & CATERING 6300 Grelot Rd. • 631-3730 $10/PERSON • $$ 10-25/PERSON • $$$ OVER 25/PERSON

COMPLETELY COMFORTABLE ALL SPORTS BAR & GRILL ($) 3408 Pleasant Valley Rd. • 345-9338

AL’S HOTDOGS ($)

CLASSIC HOTDOGS, GYROS & MILKSHAKES 4701 Airport Blvd. • 342-3243

ATLANTA BREAD COMPANY ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SALADS & MORE. 3680 Dauphin St. • 380-0444

BAKE MY DAY ($)

OLD-FASHIONED SOUTHERN BAKE SHOP 156 N. McGregor Ave. • 219-7261

BOB’S DINER ($)

GOOD OLD AMERICAN COOKING 263 St. Francis St. • 405-1497

BRICK & SPOON ($)

3662 Airport Blvd. Suite A • 525-9177

BUCK’S DINER ($)

CLASSIC AMERICAN DINER 58 N. Secion St. Fairhope • 928-8521

CAFE 219 ($)

SALADS, SANDWICHES & POTATO SALAD 219 Conti St. • 438-5234

CAMELLIA CAFÉ ($-$$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FARE 61 Section St. • Fairhope • 928-4321

CAMMIE’S OLD DUTCH ($) MOBILE’S CLASSIC ICE CREAM SPOT 2511 Old Shell Rd. • 471-1710

CARPE DIEM ($)

DELI FOODS, PASTRIES & SPECIALTY DRINKS 4072 Old Shell Rd. • 304-0448

CLARK’S KITCHEN ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHERN CUISINE & CATERING 5817 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0200

CHAT-A-WAY CAFE ($)

QUICHES & SANDWICHES 4366 Old Shell Rd. • 343-9889

CHICK-FIL-A ($)

FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES ($) BURGERS, MILKSHAKES & FRIES 4401 Old Shell Rd. • 447-2394 4663 Airport Blvd. • 300-8425 5319 Hwy 90 • 661-0071 1225 Satchel Page Dr.• 378-8768

FOOSACKLY’S ($)

FAMOUS CHICKEN FINGERS 29181 US Hwy 98 • Daphne • 375-1104 7843 Moffett Rd. • 607-6196 1109 Shelton Beach Rd. • 287-1423 310 S. University Blvd. • 343-0047 2250 Airport Blvd. • 479-2922 7641 Airport Blvd. • 607-7667 2558 Schillinger Rd. • 219-7761 3249 Dauphin St. • 479-2000

FOY SUPERFOODS ($) 119 Dauphin St.• 307-8997

GULF COAST EXPLOREUM CAFE ($) HOMEMADE SOUPS & SANDWICHES 65 Government St. • 208-6815

GUMBO SHACK ($-$$)

SEAFOOD & SANDWICHES 212 ½ Fairhope Ave •Fairhope • 928-4100

HOOTERS ($)

3869 Airport Blvd. • 345-9544 5470 Inn Rd. • 661-9117 28975 US 98 • Daphne • 625-3910

JAMAICAN VIBE ($)

MIND-BLOWING ISLAND FOOD 3700 Gov’t Blvd. Ste A • 602-1973

JERSEY MIKE’S ($)

AUTHENTIC SUB SANDWICHES 7449 Airport Blvd. • 375-1820

JIMMY JOHN’S ($)

SANDWICHES, CATERING & DELIVERY TOO 6920 Airport Blvd. • 414-5444 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-8694 62 B Royal St. • 432-0360

JOE CAIN CAFÉ ($)

PIZZAS, SANDWICHES, COCKTAILS 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

JONELLI’S ($)

1252 Govenment St.• 301-7556

107 St. Francis St. • 415-1700 3244 Dauphin St. • 476-0320 3215 Bel Air Mall • 476-8361 4707 Airport Blvd. • 461-9933 435 Schillinger Rd. • 639-1163 1682 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 621-3215 30500 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-3020

JUDY’S PLACE ($-$$)

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK ($)

PUB FOOD AND DRAFT BEERS 251 Dauphin St. • 287-6871

CHICKEN SALAD, SALAD & SOUP 2370 S. Hillcrest Rd. Unit R • 660-0501 5753 Old Shell Rd. • 408-3236 1802 US Hwy 98 Suite F• 625-1092

CHI-TOWN DAWGZ ($) CHICAGO STYLE EATERY 1222 Hillcrest Rd. • 461-6599

CONNECTION FROZEN YOGURT ($) 1880 Industrial Pkwy. • 675-2999

CREAM AND SUGAR ($)

HOME COOKING 4054 Government St. • 665-4557

LICKIN’ GOOD DONUTS ($) 3242 Dauphin St. • 471-2590

LODA BIER GARTEN ($) MAMA’S ($)

SLAP YOUR MAMA GOOD HOME COOKING 220 Dauphin St. • 432-6262

MARS HILL CAFE ($)

GREAT SANDWICHES, COFFEE & MORE 1087 Downtowner Blvd. • 643-1611

MARY’S SOUTHERN COOKING ($) 3011 Springhill Ave. • 476-2232

COFFEE, BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DESSERT 351 George St #B • 405-0003

MICHELI’S CAFE ($)

DAUPHIN ST. CAFE ($)

MCSHARRY’S ($-$$)

HOT LUNCH, DAILY MENU (INSIDE VIA) 1717 Dauphin St. • 470-5231

D’ MICHAEL’S ($)

PHILLY CHEESE STEAKS, GYROS & MORE 7101-A Theodore Dawes Rd. • 653-2979

D NU SPOT ($)

22159 Halls Mill Rd. . • 648-6522

DELISH BAKERY AND EATERY ($) GREAT DESSERTS & HOT LUNCH 23 Upham St. • 473-6115

DEW DROP INN ($)

CLASSIC BURGERS, HOTDOGS & SETTING 1808 Old Shell Rd. • 473-7872

DUNKIN DONUTS ($)

DONUTS, COFFEE & SANDWICHES 1976 Michigan Ave. • 442-4846 3876 Airport Blvd. • 219-7369 505 Schillinger Rd. S. • 442-4845 29160 US Hwy 98 • 621-2228

E WING HOUSE ($)

6358 Cottage Hill Rd. • 725-6917 AUTHENTIC IRISH PUB 101 N. Bancroft St.• 990-5100

MIKO’S ITALIAN ICE ($)

HOTDOGS SANDWICHES & COOL TREATS 3371 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 300–4015

MOMMA GOLDBERG’S DELI ($) SANDWICHES & MOMMA’S LOVE 3696 Airport Blvd. • 344-9500 5602 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6556

MONTEGO’S ($-$$)

FRESH CARIBBEAN-STYLE FOOD & CRAFT BEER 6601 Airport Blvd. • 634-3445 225 Dauphin St. • 375-1576

MOON PIE GENERAL STORE ($)

107 St Francis St #115 • RSA Bank Trust Building

MOSTLY MUFFINS ($) MUFFINS, COFFEE & WRAPS 105 Dauphin St. • 433-9855

NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE ($)

15 N Conception St. • 433-2299

OVEN-BAKED SANDWICHES & MORE 1335 Satchel Page Dr. Suite C. • 287-7356 7440 Airport Blvd. • 633-0096 30500 State Hwy 181 #132 • 625-6544

FATHOMS LOUNGE

O’DALYS HOLE IN THE WALL ($)

195 S University Blvd. Suite H • 662-1829

EUGENE’S MONKEY BAR ($) SMALL PLATES AND CREATIVE COCKTAILS 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

562 Dauphin St.• 725-6429

OLD SHELL GROWLERS ($)

UNCLE JIMMY’S DELICIOUS HOTDOGS ($)

2550 Dauphin Island Pkwy S. • 307-5328

2579 Halls Mill Rd. • 479-0006

ROYAL SCAM ($$)

TRADITIONAL SUSHI & LUNCH. 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-9077

BENJAS ($)

ORIGINAL SANDWICH AND BAKE SHOP 42 ½ Section St. • Fairhope • 929-0122 102 Dauphin St. • 405-0031

WAREHOUSE BAKERY & DONUTS ($)

GUMBO, ANGUS BEEF & BAR 72. S. Royal St. • 432-SCAM (7226)

PAT’S DOWNTOWN GRILL ($)

WEDGIE’S ($)

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE 271 Glenwood St. • 476-0516

INSIDE THE MOBILE MARRIOTT 3101 Airport Blvd. • 476-6400

CHINA DOLL ($)

PDQ ($)

WILD WING STATION ($)

SAISHO ($-$$)

CUISINE OF INDIA ($$)

VON’S BISTRO ($-$$)

FUJI SAN ($)

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($$)

GOLDEN BOWL ($)

THE TRELLIS ROOM ($$$)

HIBACHI 1 ($-$$)

BAR FOOD 271 Dauphin St • 438-9585

COFFEE AND DONUTS 759 Nichols Avenue, Fairhope • 928-7223 GOURMET GRILLED CHEESE 5955 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6134

CHICKEN FINGERS, SALAD & SANDWICHES. 1165 University Blvd. • 202-0959

1500 Gov’t St. • 287-1526

POLLMAN’S BAKERY ($)

85 N. Bancroft St. Fairhope • 990.8883

BAKERY, SANDWICHES & MORE 750 S. Broad St. • 438-1511 4464 Old Shell Rd. • 342-8546 107 St. Francis St. Suite 102 • 438-2261

PUNTA CLARA KITCHEN ($)

FUDGE, PRALINES & MORE 17111 Scenic Hwy 98 • Fairhope • 928-8477

R BISTRO ($-$$)

334 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope • 928-2399

REGINA’S KITCHEN ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SUBS & SOUPS 2056 Gov’t St. • 476-2777

ROLY POLY ($)

WRAPS & SALADS 3220 Dauphin St. • 479-2480

ROSHELL’S CAFE ($)

2906 Springhill Ave. • 479-4614

ROSIE’S GRILL ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHWEST FARE, 7 DAYS 1203 Hwy 98 Ste. 3D • Daphne • 626-2440

THE WINDMILL MARKET ($) YAK THE KATHMANDU KITCHEN ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC FOODS FROM HIMALAYAN REGION 3210 Dauphin St. • 287-0115 400 Eastern Shore Center • 459-2862

‘CUE

BACKYARD CAFE & BBQ ($) HOME COOKIN’ LIKE MOMMA MADE. 2804 Springhill Ave. • 473-4739

BAR-B-QUING WITH MY HONEY ($$) BBQ, BURGERS, WINGS & SEAFOOD 19170 Hwy 43 Mt. Vernon. • 839-9927

BRICK PIT ($)

A FAVORITE BARBECUE SPOT 5456 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0001

COTTON STATE BBQ ($)

DOWNTOWN LUNCH 101 N. Conception St. • 545-4682

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT ($-$$)

LUNCH & DINNER 3004 Gov’t Blvd. • 287-1220

BBQ AND MORE Jubilee Sq.Ctr. Hwy 90, Daphne • 210-2151 McGowin Park Ctr. Satchel Paige Dr. • 471-1050 7721 Airport Blvd. • 380-8957

ROYAL STREET CAFE ($)

DREAMLAND BBQ ($)

ROYAL KNIGHT ($)

HOMEMADE LUNCH & BREAKFAST 104 N. Royal St. • 434-0011

SALLY’S PIECE-A-CAKE ($) BAKERY 5638 Three Notch Rd.• 219-6379

SATORI COFFEEHOUSE ($)

COFFEE, SMOOTHIES, LUNCH & BEERS. 5460 Old Shell Rd. • 344-4575

SERDA’S COFFEEHOUSE ($)

COFFEE, LUNCHES, LIVE MUSIC & GELATO 3 Royal St. S. • 415-3000

SIMPLY SWEET ($)

CUPCAKE BOUTIQUE 6207 Cottage Hill Rd. Suite B • 665-3003

STEVIE’S KITCHEN ($)

SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS & MORE 41 West I-65 Service Rd. N Suite 150. • 287-2793

SUGAR RUSH DONUT CO. ($) 4701 Airport Blvd. • 408-3379

SUNSET POINTE ($-$$)

AT FLU CREEK 831 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-7766

RIBS, SANDWICHES & GREAT SIDES 3314 Old Shell Rd. • 479-9898

MEAT BOSS ($)

5401 Cottage Hill Rd. • 591-4842

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE ($) BARBEQUE & MUSIC Bayfront Park Dr. • Daphne • 625-RIBS 701 Springhill Ave. • 410-7427 4672 Airport Blvd. • 300-8516

SAUCY Q BARBQUE ($) AWARD-WINNING BARBQUE 1111 Gov’t Blvd. • 433-7427

SMOKEY DEMBO SMOKE HOUSE ($)

BAY GOURMET ($$)

A PREMIER CATERER & COOKING CLASSES 1880-A Airport Blvd. • 450-9051

BRIQUETTES STEAKHOUSE ($-$$)

THE HARBERDASHER ($)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St • 460-3157

SOUTHERN COOKING & THEN SOME 1716 Main St. Daphne • 222-4120

THE SUNFLOWER CAFE ($) INSIDE VIRGINIA’S HEALTH FOOD 3055 A Dauphin St • 479-3200

THYME BY THE BAY ($-$$)

CASUAL FINE DINING 104 N. Section St. • Fairhope • 929-2219 CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE Battle House Hotel, Royal St. • 338-5493

THE WASH HOUSE ($$)

17111 Scenic HWY 98 • Point Clear • 928-4838

3966 Airport Blvd.• 343-5530 LUNCH BUFFET 3674 Airport Blvd. • 341-6171

THAI FARE AND SUSHI 2000 Airport Blvd. • 478-9888 HIBACHI GRILL & ASIAN CUISINE 309 Bel Air Blvd • 470-8033 2370 Hillcrest Rd. Unit B • 380-6062

ICHIBAN SUSHI ($)

JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE 3959 Cottage Hill Rd • 666-6266

A LITTLE VINO

KAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($-$$)

WINE, BEER, GOURMET FOODS, & MORE. 720 Schillinger Rd. S. Unit 8 • 287-1851

LIQUID ($$)

DOMKE MARKET

QUALITY FOOD, EXCELLENT SERVICE 5045 Cottage Hill Rd. • 607-6454

FOOD PAK

AMAZING SUSHI & ASSORTMENT OF ROLLS. 661 Dauphin St. • 432-0109

FOOD, WINE & MORE 5150 Old Shell Rd. • 341-1497

POUR BABY

WINE BAR, CRAFT BEERS & BISTRO 6808 Airport Blvd. • 343-3555

RICE ASIAN GRILL & SUSHI BAR ($) 3964 Gov’t Blvd. • 378-8083

ROCK N ROLL SUSHI ($$)

216 St Francis St. • 421-2022

273 S. McGregor Ave • 287-0445 6345 Airport Blvd. • 287-0555 940 Industrial Pkwy • 308-2158 6850 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 753-4367

RED OR WHITE

SAISHO ($$)

FIREHOUSE WINE BAR & SHOP 323A De La Mare Ave, Fairhope • 990-0003 1104 Dauphin St.. • 478-9494

ROYAL STREET TAVERN

LIVE MUSIC, MARTINIS & DINNER MENU. 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

SOUTHERN NAPA

BISTRO PLATES, CRAFT BEERS & PANTRY 2304 Main St. • 375-2800

THE VINEYARD

UPSCALE WINE BAR 9 Du Rhu Dr. S 201 • 287-7135

6455 Dauphin St. • 433-0376

STIX ($$)

610240 Eastern Shore Blvd. • 621-9088

TASTE OF THAI ($$)

9091 US-90 Irvington • 957-1414

TOKYO JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE ($$) UPSCALE SUSHI & HIBACHI 364 Azalea Rd. • 343-6622

WASABI SUSHI ($$)

JAPANESE CUISINE 3654 Airport Blvd. S. C • 725-6078

HEALTHY, DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 3762 Airport Blvd. • 725-1177

THE GALLEY ($)

THE PIGEON HOLE ($)

SEAFOOD, ASIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE 69 St. Michael St • 375-1113

THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR 960 Schillinger Rd. S • 660-4470

DROP DEAD GOURMET

SEAFOOD AND SUSHI 551 Dauphin St.• 219-7051

113 Dauphin St.• 436-0989

MODERN GASTROPUB INSPIRED BY JAPANESE KITCHEN 455 Dauphin St • 433-0376

CHARM ($-$$)

FALAFEL? TRY SOME HUMMUS FROM THE DEPTHS

THE BLIND MULE ($)

OPEN FOR LUNCH, INSIDE GULFQUEST 155 S. Water St • 436-8901

SAGE RESTAURANT ($$)

THAI & SUSHI 5369 D Hwy 90 W • 661-5100

3758 Dauphin Island Pkwy. • 473-1401

GRILLED STEAKS, CHICKEN & SEAFOOD 720A Schillinger Rd. S. S2. • 607-7200 901 Montlimar Dr • 408-3133

DAILY SPECIALS MADE FROM SCRATCH 57 N. Claiborne St. • 694-6853

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

CHUCK’S FISH ($$)

CORNER 251 ($-$$)

DAUPHIN’S ($$-$$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD WITH A VIEW 107 St. Francis St • 444-0200

DUMBWAITER ($$-$$$) 9 Du Rhu Dr. Suite 201 167 Dauphin St. • 445-3802

FIVE ($$)

7 SPICE ($-$$)

ABBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE ($-$$) 4861 Bit & Spur Rd. • 340-6464

BAUDEAN’S ($$)

FRIED, GRILLED, STEAMED & ALWAYS FRESH 3300 River Rd. • 973-9070

THE BLUEGILL ($-$$)

ISTANBUL GRILL ($)

A HISTORIC SEAFOOD DIVE W/ LIVE MUSIC 3775 Hwy. 98 • 625-1998

JERUSALEM CAFE ($-$$)

ECLECTIC DINING & SPACE 6955 Airport Blvd. • 633-7196

KAN ZAMAN ($-$$)

QUALITY CAJUN & NEW ORLEANS CUISINE 29249 US Highway 98 Daphne. • 621-1991

AUTHENTIC TURKISH & MEDITERRANEAN 3702 Airport Blvd. • 461-6901 MOBILE’S OLDEST MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE 5773 Airport Blvd. • 304-1155 MEDITERRANEAN FOOD AND HOOKAH 326 Azalea Rd • 229-4206

MEDITERRANEAN SANDWICH COMPANY ($)

GREAT & QUICK. 3702 Airport Blvd. • 308-2131 274 Dauphin St. • 545-3161 2502 Schillinger Rd. Ste. 2 • 725-0126 6890 US-90 • DAPHNE • 621-2271

MINT HOOKAH BISTRO ($) GREAT MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 5951 Old Shell Rd. • 450-9191

BONEFISH GRILL ($$)

BOUDREAUX’S CAJUN GRILL ($-$$) CRAVIN CAJUN/DIP SEAFOOD ($) PO-BOYS, SALADS & SEAFOOD 1870 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 287-1168

ED’S SEAFOOD SHED ($$)

FRIED SEAFOOD SERVED IN HEFTY PORTIONS 3382 Hwy. 98 • 625-1947

FELIX’S FISH CAMP ($$) UPSCALE DINING WITH A VIEW 1420 Hwy. 98 • 626-6710

FISHERMAN’S LEGACY ($) DELI, MARKET AND CATERING. 4380 Halls Mill Rd. • 665-2266

33 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-5635

GREAT FOOD AND COCKTAILS 609 Dauphin St. • 308-3105

TIME TO EAT CAFE ($)

KITCHEN ON GEORGE ($-$$)

OLLIE’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL ($-$$)

LAUNCH ($-$$)

TAZIKI’S ($-$$)

LUCY B. GOODE ($$)

MAGHEE’S GRILL ON THE HILL ($-$$)

FAR EASTERN FARE

LULU’S ($$)

4513 Old Shell Rd.• 473-0007

MUDBUGS AT THE LOOP ($)

DOWN-HOME COUNTRY COOKIN 7351 Theodore Dawes Rd. • 654-0228 13665 N. Wintzell Ave. • 824-1119

TIN ROOF ($-$$)

SOUTHERN CASUAL FAMILY DINING 10800 US HWY 31 • Spanish Fort• 621-4995

TP CROCKMIERS ($)

AMERICAN RESTAURANT & BAR 250 Dauphin St. • 476-1890

THREE GEORGES CANDY SHOP ($) LIGHT LUNCH WITH SOUTHERN FLAIR. 226 Dauphin St. • 433-6725

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE ($)

GREAT SMOOTHIES, WRAPS & SANDWICHES. Du Rhu Dr. • 378-5648 570 Schillinger Road • 634-3454

18 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOOD 351A George & Savannah St. • 436-8890 HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St. • 432-8000 GREAT LUNCH & DINNER 3607 Old Shell Rd. • 445-8700

NOBLE SOUTH ($$)

LOCAL INGREDIENTS 203 Dauphin St. • 690-6824

NOJA ($$-$$$)

INVENTIVE & VERY FRESH CUISINE 6 N. Jackson St. • 433-0377

OSMAN’S RESTAURANT ($$) SUPREME EUROPEAN CUISINE

MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT & HOOKAH 1248 Hillcrest St • 634-9820 MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 1539 US HWY 98• 273-3337

ANG BAHAY KUBO ($$)

BAMBOO STEAKHOUSE ($$) SUSHI BAR 650 Cody Rd. S • 300-8383

BANGKOK THAI ($-$$)

DELICIOUS, TRADITIONAL THAI CUISINE 28600 US 98 • Daphne • 626-5286 3821 Airport Blvd. • 344-9995

BANZAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($$)

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($)

30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 206-8768 3654 Airport Blvd. • 338-9350 GULF COAST CUISINE, REINVENTED 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858 LIVE MUSIC & GREAT SEAFOOD 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858 CAJUN KITCHEN & SEAFOOD MARKET 2005 Government St. • 478-9897

RALPH & KACOO’S ($-$$) THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1595 Battleship Pkwy. • 626-0045

R&R SEAFOOD ($-$$)

LAID-BACK EATERY & FISH MARKET 1477 Battleship Pkwy. • 621-8366


RIVER SHACK ($-$$)

916 Charleston St. • 433-9374

THE GRAND MARINER ($-$$)

SANDWICHES & COLD BEER 273 Dauphin St. • 433-4376 Hillcrest & Old Shell Rd. • 341-9464

SEAFOOD, BURGERS & STEAKS 6120 Marina Dr. • Dog River • 443-7318. LOCAL SEAFOOD & PRODUCE 6036 Rock Point Rd. • 443-7540

THE HARBOR ROOM ($-$$) UNIQUE SEAFOOD 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

THE SEAFOOD HOUSE ($-$$)

HEROES SPORTS BAR & GRILLE ($)

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS ($-$$) WINGS, SEAFOOD, BURGERS & BEER 7721 Airport Blvd. Suite E-180 • 639-6832

ISLAND WING CO ($)

751 Azalea Rd. • 301-7964

EVERYTHING BAKED OR GRILLED 2617 Dauphin St. • 476-9464

TIN TOP RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR ($$)

1715 Main St. • 375-0543

SEAFOOD, STEAKS, & EXTENSIVE WINE LIST 6232 Bon Secour Hwy County Rd. 10. • 949-5086

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$)

MANCIS ($)

MCSHARRY’S IRISH PUB ($)

BRILLIANT REUBENS & FISH-N-CHIPS. 101 N. Brancroft St. Fairhope • 990-5100

FRESH SEAFOOD FOR OVER 75 YEARS 605 Dauphin St. • 432-4605 6700 Airport Blvd. • 341-1111 1208 Shelton Beach Rd. • Saraland • 442-3335 805 S. Mobile St. • 929-2322

MUG SHOTS ($$)

IS THE GAME ON?

BURGERS, DOGS & 27 BEERS & WINES. 19992 Hwy.181 Old County Rd. Fairhope • 281-2663

BAR & GRILL 29740 Urgent Care Dr. • Daphne • 662-9639 6255 Airport Blvd. • 447-2514

OLD 27 GRILL ($)

GUIDO’S ($$)

3250 Airport Blvd. Springdale Mall• 450-4556

5556 Old Shell Rd. • 345-7484

TAMARA’S BAR & GRILL ($)

HOUSE OF PIZZA ($)

WINGS, PO-BOYS, BURGERS 210 Eastern Shore Center, Hwy. 98 • 929-0002

MARIA BONITA AGAVE BAR & GRILL ($-$$)

FRESH CUISINE NIGHTLY ON MENU 1709 Main St. • Daphne • 626-6082 3958 Snow Rd C. • Semmes • 645-3400

LA ROSSO ($$)

COMFORT FOOD 1716 Main St. Ste. C • Daphne • 281-2982

MACARONI GRILL ($$)

SMALL PLATES, PIZZAS, PASTAS & WINE 3250 Airport Blvd. • 450-4556

MARCOS ($)

MIRKO ($$)

PASTA & MORE 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-6611

BAUMHOWER’S ($)

WEMOS ($)

PAPA’S PLACE ($$)

BISHOP’S ($)

A SOUTHERN GRILL & BAR 3673 Airport Blvd. • 344-2131

BUFFALO WILD WINGS ($)

WINGS, TENDERS, HOTDOGS & SANDWICHES 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-5877

MAMA MIA!

BUCK’S PIZZA ($$)

DELIVERY 350 Dauphin St. • 431-9444

BEST WINGS & SPORTING EVENTS 6341 Airport Blvd. • 378-5955

CORTLANDT’S PIZZA PUB ($-$$)

BUTCH CASSIDY’S ($)

GAMBINO’S ITALIAN GRILL ($)

FAMOUS BURGERS, SANDWICHES & WINGS 60 N. Florida St. • 450-0690

CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB ($) BURGERS & BEER

GREAT PIZZA. LUNCH & DINNER 4356 Old Shell Rd. • 342-0024

ITALIAN, STEAKS & SEAFOOD 18 Laurel Ave. • Fairhope • 990-0995

GRIMALDI’S ($)

Bel Air Mall • 476-2063

PIZZA, SUBS & PASTA 1368 ½ Navco Rd.• 479-0066 A TASTE OF ITALY. BYOB. 28691 U.S. Highway 98 • 626-1999

PINZONE’S ITALIAN VILLAGE ($$) AUTHENTIC ITALIAN DISHES 312 Fairhope Ave. • Fairhope • 990-5535

RAVENITE ($)

PIZZA, PASTA, SALAD & MORE 102 N. Section St. •Fairhope• 929-2525

PIZZERIA DELFINA ($) PIZZA & PASTA 107 Dauphin St. • 375-1644

ROMA CAFE ($-$$)

PASTA, SALAD AND SANDWICHES 7143 Airport Blvd. • 341-7217

ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL ($$)

HEARTY MEXICAN FARE 736 holcombe Ave.• 473-0413

POOR MEXICAN ($)

OLÉ MI AMIGO!

ROOSTER’S ($)

TASTE OF MEXICO 5452 Hwy 90 W • 661-5509

TAQUERIA MEXICO ($-$$)

CAFÉ DEL RIO ($-$$)

PIES & AWESOME BEER SELECTION 2032 Airport Blvd. • 471-4700 5660 Old Shell Rd. • 380-1500 29698 Frederick Blvd.• Daphne • 621-3911

OLÉ MI AMIGO ($-$$)

HOMEMADE PASTAS & PIZZAS MADE DAILY 5901 Old Shell Rd. • 342-3677

MELLOW MUSHROOM ($)

NAVCO PIZZA ($$)

WINGS, BURGERS & PUB GRUB 6880 US-90 #14 • Daphne • 625-4695

VIA EMILIA ($$)

AZTECAS ($-$$)

LUCKY’S IRISH PUB ($) IRISH PUB FARE & MORE 3692 Airport Blvd • 414-3000

ITALIAN FOOD & PIZZAS 11311 US HIghway 31 Spanish Fort• 375-0076

5055 Cottage Hill Rd. • 308-4888 2394 Dawes Rr. • 639-3535 2004 US 98 • Daphne • 265-6550

ASHLAND MIDTOWN PUB ($-$$) PIZZAS, PASTAS, & CALZONES 245-A Old Shell Rd. • 479-3278

TRATTORIA PIZZA & ITALIAN ($$)

MEXICAN CUISINE 3977 Gov’t Blvd. • 660-4970

LATIN AMERICAN FOOD 211 Dauphin St. • 375-1076 AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FLAVOR 3733 Airport Blvd. • 414-4496

MOUTH WATERING MEXICAN FOOD 1175 Battleship Pkwy • 625-2722

NO GAMBLING CASINO FARE

CINCO DE MAYO ($)

ENCHILADAS, TACOS, & AUTHENTIC FARE Ok Bicycle Shop • 661 Dauphin St. • 432-2453 763 Holcombe Ave • 473-0413

LOS ARCOS ($)

QUAINT MEXICAN RESTAURANT

CASUAL & RELAXING, EXTENSIVE MENU

ISLAND VIEW:

3300 W. Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 877-774-8439

BEACH BLVD STEAMER ($) SEAFOOD

CARTER GREEN STEAKHOUSE ($$-$$$) RICH TRADITIONS, STEAK, SEAFOOD

LARGE BREAKFAST, LUNCH OR DINNER MENU

158 Howard Ave. Biloxi • 800-725-2239 STEAKS, SEAFOOD, FINE WINE

PLACE BUFFET ($-$$)

STALLA ($$)

STACKED GRILL ($-$$)

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

BURGERS AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

TREASURE BAY:

1980 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 800-747-2839

777 Beach Blvd.Biloxi • 877-877-6256

THE DEN ($-$$)

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$)

CQ ($$-$$$)

HARD ROCK CAFÉ ($)

BLU ($)

SEAFOOD

AMERICAN FARE & ROCKIN’ MEMORABILIA

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE 800 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-0783 830 W I65 Service Rd. S • 378-5837 4663 Airport Blvd. • 342-5553

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

HIGH TIDE CAFÉ ($)

JIA ($-$$)

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, LATE NIGHT

TASTE OF MEXICO 880 Schillinger Rd. S. • 633-6122 5805 US 90 • 653-9163

SEAFOOD, STEAKS, WINE

TIEN ($-$$)

MIGNON’S ($$$)

BURGER, WINGS, PIZZA

HARD ROCK CASINO:

HACIENDA SAN MIGUEL ($-$$)

THIRTY-TWO ($$$)

COAST RESTAURANT ($-$$)

ITALIAN COOKING

OUTSTANDING MEXICAN CUISINE 2066 Old Shell Rd. • 378-8621

850 Bayview Ave. Bilox • 888-946-2847

BR PRIME ($$-$$$)

TERRACE CAFE ($)

FUEGO ($-$$)

IP CASINO:

PALACE CASINO:

EXOTIC CUISINE AND SUSHI

EL MARIACHI ($)

ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET

C&G GRILLE ($)

FINE DINING ESTABLISHMENT.

DAUPHIN ST. TAQUERIA ($)

FINE DINING, SEAFOOD AND STEAKS

FLAVORS BUFFET ($-$$)

BEAU RIVAGE:

875 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 888-952-2582

MEXICAN CUISINE 260 Azalea Rd. • 375-1095

LA COCINA ($)

3050 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-7433

MAGNOLIA HOUSE ($$-$$$)

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

INTIMATE & CASUAL WITH DAILY SPECIALS ELEGANT ATMOSPHERE & TANTALIZING ENTREES LOUNGE WITH COCKTAILS & TAPAS MENU

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE

WIND CREEK CASINO:

SOUTHERN FAVORITES BUFFET

FIRE ($$-$$$)

SATISFACTION ($-$$)

HARRAH’S GULF COAST:

280 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 288-436-2946

303 Poarch Rd. Atmore • 866-946-3360 PRIME STEAKS, SEAFOOD & WINE

GRILL ($)

CONTEMPORARY & OLD-FASHIONED FAVORITES

SEND LISTINGS TO LISTINGS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 19


CUISINE | WORD OF MOUTH

New slow-cooker cookbook in time for fall BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

C

ool weather isn’t here yet, but we got a glimpse of it when a cold front saved us from certain doom during the recent hurricanes. Plus, this week marks the first day of fall. Ready or not, slow cooker season is upon us. Make sure you’re prepared by grabbing a copy of the newly published “Stock the Crock” cookbook (Oxmoor House, $21.99) by Phyllis Good, creator of the bestselling “Fix-It and Forget-It” series. Good has compiled 100 delicious recipes as well as 200 easy-to-follow variations to suit your dietary need, be it gluten-free, paleo, vegan, etc. Complete with advice on choosing the right slow cooker (you’d be surprised), tips on using them to poach or bake, as well as other hacks such as a scent diffuser, steam bath or humidifier, this collection of pages is a bit more than just a cookbook. But with sections highlighting pasta mains and vegetarian, poultry, beef and pork, sides and sweet treats, Good is covering all the bases. There is even a “Make Your Own Basics” chapter I find very useful. “The bar for the recipes in this cookbook was high,” Good says. “I looked for the recipes that no slow-cooker user should be without — the ones that guarantee make-it-again results. I’ve also included all the know-how that I’ve learned through the years about slow cookers and how to get them to do their best work.” Standouts for me include Warm Clam Dip, Chicken Tikka Masala, Veggie Lasagna and Pumpkin Spice Créme Brulée (use ramekins in the water bath). Whether you’re making dinner, sides or just filling

the room with the scent of citrus and cloves, this book is a really good guide and is also available in e-book format.

Pinot on a pedestal

I was fortunate enough to be a part of the recent pinot noir tasting panel with speaker Jimmy Kawalek of Ancien Wines. We enjoyed five different wines, each from different subregions of Napa Valley and Willamette. It was amazing to taste the difference in these grapes from their proprietary AVAs (American Viticultural Areas) side by side. Although Oregon is known for pinot noir, I couldn’t help leaving with a bottle from Red Dog Vineyard from atop the cool western side of Sonoma Mountain. I’ll be back for more of the Ancien stuff, but while there I had to nab an R. Stuart and Co. Love Oregon pinot noir rosé to close out my summer. I love it even over Kawalek’s Big Fire. Thanks to Jim and Carrie Cox for an informative evening. Pay attention to Southern Napa for more events like this one.

Breakfast in the buff

Back in my day, “naked taco” meant something completely different, but Taco Bell is augmenting its breakfast offerings with the new Naked Egg Taco. The shell of the taco is a fried egg, filled with customizable breakfast ingredients. Base price is $1.99, but if you’re too modest for naked they will dress it in a Gordita flatbread. Recycle!

20 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7

Photo | Oxmoor House

100 delicious slow-cooker recipes with 200 easy-to-follow variations are detailed in Phyllis Good’s “Stock the Crock” cookbook.


S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 21


COVER STORY

DACA recipients face uncertainty as Trump asks Congress to act DALE LIESCH/REPORTER

W

hen most kids his age were fast asleep dent Barack Obama signed an executive order DACA. before the following days’ school asThe program gave them limited Social Security numsignments, Jorge Fuentes was working bers, work permits and driver’s licenses in a renewable for no pay. At 16 years old, Fuentes said two-year cycle. The program also meant they would not he helped his mother clean the Outback be deported. Steakhouse on Montlimar Drive. As an undocumented Since its signing, DACA has become a political lightteenager, it was the only work he could find in Mobile. ning rod and has rallied both supporters and detractors. Sleeping only when he could, Fuentes’ workday One of its more prominent opponents is President Donstarted at midnight and ran to just before he had to wake ald Trump, who announced through Attorney General his younger siblings for school. The Davidson High Jeff Sessions a little more than a week ago that he would School student would then get himself ready for class. be rescinding the policy after a six-month waiting period. “I would go back home, shower, wake up my little “The DACA program was implemented in 2012 and brother and sister and go to school,” he said. essentially provided a legal status for recipients for a The now 20-year-old college student admits it was a renewable two-year term, work authorization and other juggling act. benefits, including participation in the Social Security “It was tough,” he said following a rally in support program, to 800,000 mostly adult illegal aliens,” Sesof the Deferred Action for Childsions said in a press conference. hood Arrivals, or DACA, on the “This policy was implemented campus of the University of South unilaterally to great controversy Alabama last week. “At that time I and legal concern after Congress was also trying to balance soccer — rejected legislative proposals to my dream was to become a soccer extend similar benefits on numerplayer. So, there was school and I occasions to this same group THE PRESIDENT MADE ous tried to finish all of my schoolwork of illegal aliens. In other words, the at school, train, go home, eat and executive branch, through DACA, IT CLEAR HE WANTED then go to sleep.” deliberately sought to achieve what The hectic lifestyle did have TO DO SOMETHING FOR the legislative branch specifically some advantages, Fuentes rememrefused to authorize on multiple bered with a laugh, such as no occasions.” ‘DREAMERS.’ I SUSobligation to do household chores. Sessions added that DACA was “My siblings had to do all the PECT SOMETHING WILL to blame, in part, for a surge of unchores, so I was pretty happy about documented children coming across COME OUT OF IT. that,” he said. “After I ate I just the border. went to sleep.” The Trump administration’s After graduating from Davidaction means that no new DACA son, Fuentes attended a community applications will be processed and college in Mississippi on a partial a deadline for renewals has been soccer scholarship. He is currently one credit away from set for Oct. 5. When he applied and became part of the earning an associate degree in biology, but is currently DACA program, Fuentes said he never thought he’d face working full time in Mobile to earn money to attend a the fear of deportation again. larger school in Texas. Fuentes said paying for college “They promised us we’d be safe,” he said. “I was is hard because federal loans aren’t available to undocuconfident the whole time.” mented immigrants. Fuentes said he was shocked when he heard Sessions’ “Next semester, in January, I’ll be going back to announcement. school,” he said. “I took a semester off to work to save “I didn’t know what to believe at that time,” he said. … we don’t get any benefits so I have to save up.” Sessions’ announcement called others to action, such as USA Latin American Student Association President DACA Erick Romero, who helped plan a rally in support of Fuentes is one of more than 800,000 undocumented DACA on campus. immigrants who came to the United States as children “The idea for a rally came from [The University of and were given greater opportunities when then-PresiAlabama at Birmingham] because they had a rally last

22 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7

Tuesday, I think,” he said. “We just wanted to keep the momentum going. So, we decided to get everything planned within a week.” Romero, who was born in Maryland to parents who emigrated separately from Honduras, said he was “sick to my stomach” when he heard the announcement. “I didn’t know what to say,” Romero said. “I mean, it didn’t affect me personally but I know people in DACA. What are they going to do? “It was just a sad moment,” he added. “I was at a loss for words.” The administration has opened a six-month window for Congress to act on immigration reform. “Congress should carefully and thoughtfully pursue the types of reforms that are right for the American people,” Sessions said. “Our nation is comprised of good and decent people who want their government’s leaders to fulfill their promises and advance an immigration policy that serves the national interest. … The compassionate thing is to end the lawlessness, enforce our laws and, if Congress chooses to make changes to those laws, to do so through the process set forth by our founders in a way that advances the interest of the nation.” Sessions’ language in the announcement makes clear the Trump administration’s attempts to argue the initial Obama action was unconstitutional and an overreach by the executive branch of government. Mat Staver, chairman of the right-leaning Liberty Counsel, agrees. Staver said immigration laws should be addressed through Congress. He added that Obama’s action was unconstitutional and didn’t follow the rule of law. Staver said the administration would have faced legal challenges if Obama’s action continued unchanged. “What Trump did was give a six-month window and put pressure on Congress to get some work done,” Staver said. “The president made it clear he wanted to do something for ‘Dreamers.’ I suspect something will come out of it.” On the other hand, Naomi Tsu, an attorney with the left-leaning Southern Poverty Law Center, said Trump’s action is unconstitutional because it interferes with DACA recipients’ liberty and property, which is protected by the constitution. Questions of whether the administration acted reasonably could also be raised, Tsu said. “They said they don’t have the authority to run the program, but are continuing to accept applications,” she said. “It’s not reasonable to say we can’t do this and then keep doing it.” There have already been five or six legal challenges to Trump’s actions nationwide featuring more than 20 litigants, Tsu said. On a constitutional basis, Staver said those various challenges would fail in court. The fix will most likely be a bipartisan effort, Staver said. Tsu agreed, but cautioned that a “clean bill” would have the best chance to pass. There might be efforts to tack border security or funding for the wall to any DACA bill that could signal its demise. There are currently four bills in congress that deal with protecting “Dreamers,” Tsu said. Mobile immigration attorney Matthew W. Peterson is less confident Congress can act in the six-month time period. Failure to do so could lead to deportations. Peterson added DACA recipients were coaxed “out of the shadows” and gave information to the government in exchange for DACA clearance. That same information could now be used against them if nothing is done. Peterson questions the timing of the announcement as well. He said he’s curious why Trump didn’t simply ask Congress to act before imposing a deadline. “I don’t understand why you would take temporary security away now,” he said. “I hope the administration would have different priorities.”

Congressional reaction

U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne wants to see legislative text on any possible solutions, according to a spokesman. In a statement, Byrne said DACA currently has no legal basis to exist. He added that any solution to the country’s “broken immigration system” must start with increased security on the border. Two of the three candidates remaining in the special-election race to fill the Senate seat vacated by Sessions weighed in on the controversial program. In a statement released by his campaign, Sen. Luther Strange, who is in a Sept. 26


COVER STORY

Photo | Lagniappe

About 100 people turned out in support of DACA at the University of South Alabama last week. tration’s position to end DACA in six months. “President Trump rightly affirmed that the United States is a nation ruled by law, and that Congress, not the president, is responsible for writing our country’s laws,” Strange said. “I applaud President Trump and Jeff Sessions for stopping the overreach of President Obama and allowing Congress to lead.” The campaign for Strange’s opponent in the runoff, former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore, did not respond to a request for comment on DACA. Democratic challenger Doug Jones said in a statement from his campaign he fully supports the DACA program, but added Congress should have acted on it initially. “In that regard, let me be clear it is time for [former Gov.] Robert Bentley’s appointed Sen. Luther Strange to step up and do the right thing without someone pulling his strings,” Jones said. “He should get to work with fellow Republicans and reach across the aisle to craft a bipartisan solution that recognizes the value and contributions that these ‘Dreamers’ have made to this great and compassionate country” The special Senate general election is Tuesday, Dec. 12.

Impact

The revocation of DACA could have a significant economic impact not only all over the country, but in the local area as well, according to numbers provided by the SPLC. Alabama stands to lose $182 million in economic impact if the administration’s action moves forward without congressional action. Alabama Coalition for Immigrant Justice organizer Frank Barragan said undocumented

immigrants, especially the roughly 5,000 DACA recipients statewide, pay taxes, he said. DACA recipients are given a limited Social Security number and pay income taxes, but they are not eligible for typical benefits given to citizens. In addition to paying income tax, they shop at local stores and eat at local restaurants, Barragan said. “This has always been a pain in my rear end,” he said. “They’ve been paying taxes since they’ve been here.” Local businesses, particularly nurseries in areas such as Semmes, Wilmer and Loxley, benefit from work Hispanic immigrants do on a daily basis, Barragan said. In addition, many dreamers are working through school, he said. “Dreamers” cannot have criminal records, he said. Like many lawmakers, Barragan is confident Congress will act before the deadline. “I think there’s an opportunity where DACA recipients are going to be OK,” he said. “I think we’re going to have to give up a lot. Is that OK? No, but we have to start somewhere. I do think it’ll be something that will work out.” Fuentes said he currently feels angry and a little bit scared, but mostly hopeful about the future. He said he dreams of becoming a U.S. citizen one day, although he understands the task is somewhat arduous. As for the prospect of going back to Mexico, Fuentes said the only thing he knows about his native country is the language. He came to Mobile as a small child. The Port City is his home. “All I know is I could speak some,” he said. “I really don’t know it other than that. It’s just different. “ I’m used to everything here,” he added. “I

S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 23


ART ARTIFICE

My lunch with Ramon BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

I

turned a corner in downtown Mobile and found Cuba on a side street, leaning against a wall and drawing from a hand-rolled cigarette in the breezy late summer sunshine. The occasion was lunch, with art the main course. Ramon Vargas Artiz was 630 miles from his island home and living for three weeks in a second-story walk-up while his work was being installed at Alabama Contemporary Art Center. He is one of a dozen artists in ACAC’s “Back to Havana” exhibition, in place through June 2018. My friend introduced me to his Latin American houseguest as we ducked from the bright afternoon into the stairwell. While I paused on the climb to allow for my diseased lungs, Artiz’s broken English relayed memories of his asthmatic mother and her breathlessness when lifting him. The apartment interior was sensory overload. The floor was littered with Artiz’s brilliant engravings while the air was redolent with the aromas of the lunch he had cooked. Exotic aromas and hunger pangs pulled me to the kitchen, where a trio of pans simmered on the stovetop. At my friend’s urging, a small, silver espresso pot was placed atop a glowing burner. Once a translator arrived, our stilted conversation sped along. It was also aided by the Café Bustelo, a thick espresso which might as well be called “an uppercut in a cup” for the powerful thump it carries. Artiz grew up in rural Cuba and discovered art early. He studied at Havana’s Elementary School of Arts and San Alejandro School of Arts, after which his mastery

Judge narrows ballet lawsuit

made him professor of drawing and printmaking at Taller Experimental de Grafica in Havana, and former director of engraving and drawing, Academia de Artes Plásticas Eduardo Abela. He has had exhibitions and served in residence in Norway, New York City, Connecticut and Matanzas, Cuba. While on this recent trip, he detoured to Tuscaloosa to teach students for a week. Wiry and tanned, Artiz’s active brown eyes gleamed

RAMON VARGAS ARTIZ WAS 630 MILES FROM HIS ISLAND HOME AND LIVING FOR THREE WEEKS IN A SECOND-STORY WALK-UP WHILE HIS WORK WAS BEING INSTALLED AT ALABAMA CONTEMPORARY ART CENTER.” below a mass of dark curls and above a close-cropped saltand-pepper goatee. At one point, he crossed to his portfolio and slowly splayed pieces across the floor. The subject matter was wildly imaginative, chimerical beings amidst realms of vaguely pagan imagery. Lounging ladies were surrounded by floating faces reminiscent

Plaintiffs attorney Ray Thompson said a status conference is scheduled for Oct. 6 to determine whether the court sends the case to mandatory mediation.

MOJO homecoming

The Mystic Order of the Jazz Obsessed (MOJO) follows their wildly successful August show by returning to their customary digs at historic Gulf City Lodge (601 State St.) to celebrate 16 years of jazz support. The birthday shindig kicks off Monday, Sept. 25, at 6:30 p.m. There is no customary educational component for the evening, but live entertainment will be provided by bandleader and drummer Jimmy Roebuck along with saxophonist Shane Philen, trumpeter Larry Carter, pianist Gino Rosaria and bassist Tom Latenser. Entrance is $15, $12 for students and military, and $10 for MOJO members. A light jambalaya dinner is included and a cash bar will be available.

24 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7

For more information, call 251-459-2298, email mobilejazz@bellsouth.net or go to mojojazz.org.

Autumn burlesque

Since November 2015, Camellia Bay Burlesque has put a modern twist on a ribald American tradition dating back to the late 19th century. The troupe has thrown salutes to late entertainers Prince and David Bowie and the Star Wars and American Horror Story franchises for delighted Mobile audiences. They return to the stage on Friday, Sept. 22, at Alchemy Tavern (7 S. Joachim St.). The show will feature special guest Shelbelle Shamrock from Dallas. Doors open at 9 p.m. Show begins at 10 p.m. Tickets cost $15 at the door, $12 in advance. Online sales are available at camelliabayburlesque.com. The show is sponsored by The Gift Shop. For more information, check out Camellia Bay’s Facebook page.

ARTSGALLERY

In a Sept. 6 court order, Mobile County Circuit Judge Jay York upheld motions to dismiss lawsuits against specific Mobile Ballet employees and board members while allowing the action against the entirety of Mobile Ballet to go forward. Of plaintiffs Rhea Mostellar, Beverly Davis and Monty Thull, Judge York said Mostellar had no grounds for action since she was a former rather than current board member. All claims by Mostellar are void. York also said by virtue of Davis and Thull’s respective term expiration and resignation, their claims against specific board members had no standing. That includes board members Becky Tate, Sandra Parker, Jim Parker, Jill Reingold, Liz Kirby, Chris Burgess, Mary Byrd, Leslie Johnson, Julee Waldrop, Barbara Corte and Mobile Ballet Director Karen Kennedy. The remaining count against Mobile Ballet Inc. for injunctive relief stands.

of Carnival masks. Men astride giant roosters and elephants passed Boschinspired creatures. The work was painstaking, colorful and precise. “What’s with the snakes with the men’s faces? What do they represent?” I asked. “My religion,” Artiz answered, touching and showing a colorful bracelet on his left arm. “Balance. Equal in all things,” the translator said after Ramon’s Spanish explanation. It was likely a reference to Ifá, a belief with West African origins related to the Santeria practiced by a majority of Cubans. My stomach growled loudly, eliciting laughter and a call to the table. Ramon’s pork chops topped with an apple-tinged sauce (“secret family recipe”), lightly whipped potatoes and salata with tomatoes, cabbage and cucumbers was succulent and perfect. We mentioned Hurricane Irma, which was due to strafe Cuba the next day. Ramon explained how American hype around storms differed from his native country. He said so many Cuban buildings are constructed of concrete and infrastructure so meager there’s less to damage. Ramon touched on the lack of technological access in Cuba. Along with it, there’s a dearth of wealth and access to funds. “Politicians think about money and business but not so much about art,” Ramon said. Ramon has a young child and wants to bring his family to the states, but is scrambling for funding to bridge legal and political barriers. He came across as nearly apologetic for his eagerness to monetize his work. Necessity was explanation enough. A silent auction at ACAC two weeks previous was beneficial. Ramon said he sold more pieces there than in a while. It’s a lofty compliment considering the impressive breadth of talent in the exhibit and the other highly creative artists vying for those same dollars. The Bustelo rush subsided behind our post-lunch languor. A deadline looming, I politely thanked all for the meal, the company and the indulgence. So quickly that I didn’t realize what was happening, Ramon thrust a small monochrome print toward me. “He wants you to have this to remember the afternoon,” the translator relayed as Ramon added his signature. I checked my urge to decline with a lengthy explanation about ethical apprehension and just deferred to graciousness. It was only a talisman of the comfort found in Havana on Lawrence Street.


S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 25


The Isbell sound

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

BAND: JASON ISBELL & THE 400 UNIT, FRANK TURNER & THE SLEEPING SOULS DATE: WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 27, WITH DOORS AT 7 P.M. VENUE: SAENGER THEATRE, 6 S. JOACHIM ST., WWW.MOBILESAENGER.COM TICKETS: $31-$47, AVAILABLE THROUGH TICKETMASTER

T

For Isbell, songwriting is a natural movement that can take his music into numerous unplanned directions. Even so, he will be the first to tell you he’s been having fun playing “louder and faster” songs. “I learned a few years ago that the way I work best is just writing the best songs that I can and try to record them in a way that sounds natural,” Isbell said. “For this record, I just happened to have more rockers than I’ve had in the past. It’s good, and it makes it easier to write out a live set.” “The Nashville Sound” is also the first album to feature his backing band, The 400 Unit, since 2011’s “Here We Rest.” Isbell says including this group of musicians completed the album’s sound. Without The 400 Unit, he felt the tracks wouldn’t come fully to life. Isbell says The 400 Unit’s musical proficiency played a major role in laying down the album tracks over a mere two weeks. “It’s the fact that the guys in the band are really good players,” Isbell said. “It doesn’t take them a long time to learn how to play a song. After a couple of passes, everybody pretty much has it down.” Isbell says his Mobile crowd will experience the live interpretation of most of the album. Azalea City fans might get the chance to hear “Anxiety.” Isbell wrote this one with his wife, Amanda Shires, and it details their individual perceptions of anxiety. Isbell’s setlist might also include “White Man’s

26 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7

Photo | jasonisbell.com

en years ago, Grammy Awardwinning singer-songwriter Jason Isbell traded a spot in the DriveBy Truckers’ lineup for a solo career. In those early days, Isbell brought his original material to a small crowd at Callaghan’s. The first show had such an impact on Isbell that he has made Mobile a regular stop on his tour itinerary. Isbell admits his local fans are the main reason he returns to the Azalea City time after time. In return, a legion of Mobilians flock to his stage to hear their favorite tunes as well as his latest compositions. “They’ve [Mobilians] always treated us well,” Isbell said. “They’re good audiences and like to have a good time. They seemed to have always appreciated the music that we’re playing, even earlier than other towns.” For this visit, Isbell will be entertaining the crowd with material from his latest album, “The Nashville Sound.” The album lives up to its name, with a tracklist that serves as a musical interpretation of Nashville’s versatile contemporary music scene. While his Southern roots and alt. country style are evident throughout the record, Isbell has given this album a definite rock edge his fans didn’t heard on his earlier releases. However, he says this inclusion of rock was not intentional.

According to NPR, Jason Isbell’s “The Nashville Sound” is a “gorgeous record” invoking parenthood, politics, fear of obsolescence, and his place in the world. World.” This socially conscious track details Isbell’s realization that being born white in America is like “winning the lottery” when it comes to opportunities. No matter what tracks he includes from “The Nashville Sound,” Isbell is confident his local fans will be pleased. “They’ve [audiences] been singing along with these like the old songs,” Isbell said. “That’s a really great thing. It makes me happy and not worry about how things are going and have a good time. I think if I’m having fun, then the audience will too.”


MUSIC

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

FEATURE

Songs from the shed

BAND: USA’S INDEPENDENT MUSIC COLLECTIVE PRESENTS THE WILD PONIES DATE: FRIDAY, SEPT. 22, 7:30 P.M. VENUE: SATORI COFFEE HOUSE, 5460 OLD SHELL ROAD, WWW.SATORI-COFFEE.COM TICKETS: $5 DONATION AT THE DOOR (FREE WITH USA STUDENT ID) chirp of the crickets, the musical ambiance of the recording environment brings a bit of magic to the album’s tracks. “The shed is one of our favorite places to play and be, and there’s an amazing energy there,” Williams said. “Music sounds really good there. There’s a tin roof at the top and has this cool, natural reverb that sounds glorious. We just set up a bunch of mics in a circle.” Another great aspect of this album is the musical connection between the past and present it demonstrates. While many songs are heavily steeped in old-timey mountain attitude, The Wild Ponies brought modern overtones to several tracks. Their cover of the Hazel Dickens classic “Pretty Bird” brings this mountain song into the modern world with a refreshing injection of soul. “Will They Still Know Me” is a venture into the modern Americana realm. “What we wanted to do is draw a line and create an arc between the traditional and the current,” Williams said. “It’s a different record than what we’ve previously done.” One way the past and present are connected is through the talent recruited for this album. Williams says they first tapped two Galax locals. In his mind, Galax natives Snake Smith, Kyle Dean and Kilby Spencer are celebrities. As they planned this album, the Williamses wanted to make sure this trio of

Photo | Neilson Hubbard

E

ven though Americana duo The Wild Ponies claim Nashville, Doug and Telisha Williams know their hearts are in Galax, Virginia. The Williamses grew up just down the road from this Blue Ridge mountain town, but their regular visits to Doug’s grandfather over the years led this couple to embrace the sights and sounds of Galax. According to Doug, Galax is a music-rich town that has been an endless source of traditional mountain music. In fact, he says, some argue that Galax is the birthplace of “hillbilly music.” “When you come out of the hospital, they look at you, and they’re like, ‘You’re a fiddle player. Here you go,’ he joked. “Almost everybody plays, but it’s not a place where people play professionally. The best players in the world live there. They do it purely for the joy.” With help from their friends in both Galax and Nashville, the Williamses captured the soundtrack of Galax on an album that shares the town’s name. The beautifully raw and poignant nature of this album transports the listener to a shed on Williams’ grandfather’s farm where the album was recorded. The pristine quality of “Galax” is the next best thing to being at the actual recording session. From the casual banter between artists to the

Doug and Telisha Williams are Wild Ponies, whose 2017 album “Galax” nods to the band’s history while still pushing forward. musicians were included. From Nashville, The Wild Ponies imported session musician Fat Kaplin and Mobile native Will Kimbrough. “We wanted to put [Kaplin and Kimbrough] in the same room as Snake and Kyle Dean and see what happens,” Williams explained. “I wasn’t going to get Snake and Kyle to go to Nashville.” The Wild Ponies’ concert at Satori promises to be just as versatile as the tracks on “Galax.” Multi-instrumentalists Katie Marie and Greg Horn will be joining the Williamses. For the first half, the group will deliver an acoustic set filled with cuts from “Galax.” For the second set, Marie and Horn will take the drums and lap-steel, respectively, and Williams will grab his Telecaster. The group will spend the rest of the night rocking for their Azalea City crowd.

S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 27


MUSIC BRIEFS

What’s bred in the bone

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

Band: Lilly Hiatt Date: Sunday, Sept. 24, 7 p.m. Venue: Callaghan’s Irish Social Club, 916 Charleston St., www.callaghansirishsocialclub.com Tickets: $15 (limited number) available at Callaghan’s or by calling 251-433-9374

Photo | Facebook | Lilly Hiatt

C

arrying on the family business isn’t unusual in the world of music. It’s even sweeter when the progeny’s output is on a par with that of their predecessor — in this case, father. Singer-songwriter Lilly Hiatt, daughter of John Hiatt, adds to her family’s musical legacy with an infectious mix of alt. country and alt. rock, inspired by the same eclectic muse that drove the first rock ‘n’ rollers. Hiatt will be taking her OGD crowd on a tour of her reality through cuts from her third album, “Trinity Lane.” Hiatt tapped Michael Trent (Shovels & Rope) to serve as producer, and together the duo captured Hiatt’s personal life testimony and transformed it into a sonic portrait. This album’s title track transports listeners to Hiatt’s time on Nashville’s Trinity Lane. This ballad of self-motivation chugs through measures with its driving rock beat and Hiatt’s beautiful rounds of countrified vocals. “The Night David Bowie Died” defines Hiatt’s versatile sound. Verses of alt. country are sandwiched between choruses forged in alt. rock’s fire. Hiatt uses this audio creation to explain how the rock icon’s death brought her heartbreaking memories of the past.

Southern-fried credentials Band: Allman Goldflies Band Date: Friday, Sept. 22, 9 p.m. Venue: The Blues Tavern, 2818 Government Blvd., www.bluestavern.com Tickets: Free In recent months, the Allman Goldflies Band traveled to Mobile to pay tribute to the late guitar legend Luther Wamble. The positive reception to their short set left locals wanting more, and the band wanting to give it. The band’s return to the Azalea City will give fans a chance to hear a full show of Southern rock and blues from the past and present of the band’s namesakes. Gary Allman contributes to his family’s musical legacy with vocals filled with Southern-fried soul and recollections of his “journey through the United States criminal justice system, his pain, loss and, finally, his redemption.” Bassist David Goldflies brings a rich musical history to the stage. Before Ram Jam made it famous, Goldflies laid down the original bass lines with guitarist Bill Bartlett for the rock hit “Black Betty.” Goldflies also served as bassist for The Allman Brothers Band from 1979 into the early ‘80s.

Rock ‘n’ roll special Band: Gino & the Goons, Cyster Sister, Splatter Date: Friday, Sept. 22, 10:30 p.m. Venue: The Blind Mule, 57 N. Claiborne St. Tickets: $5 (21+)/$10, available at the door The Blind Mule is bringing the underground rock of St. Petersburg’s Gino & the Goons to its intimate confines. This band’s minimalistic approach to their sound and lineup produces a huge, raging rock sound influenced by punk’s early days, allowing the band to whip their audience into a vehement dance party for their entire set. In 2015, Slovenly Records released the band’s 7-inch vinyl EP “Check This Out.” The two-track punk explosion includes the band’s excellent rendition of the Johnny Thunders classic “Let’s Go.” Two seemingly elusive bands will be joining these ambassadors of the St. Pete underground. Mobile’s Cyster Sister will be lending its support. This all-female group has spent the past year bringing its “harpy-power violence” punk style to the Azalea City music scene. Splatter will complete the evening’s lineup, a group Blind Mule bills as “mom and son sonic destruction.”

28 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7


S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 29


AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | September 21 - September 27

THUR. SEPT 21

Big Beach Brewing— Travis Posey, 6p Bluegill— Al and Cathy Blues Tavern— Last Call Rodeo, 8:30p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— David Chastang, 6p Cockeyed Charlie’s— JJ Fairhope Brewing— Bluegrass Jam Felix’s— Tropic Flyer Flora Bama— J. Hawkins Duo, 2p// Mason Henderson, 5p/// Dueling Pianos, 5:30p//// Mark Sherrill, James Daniel, Chris Newbury, 6p//// Mario Mena Band, 10p//// Justin Headley Experiment, 10:15p Listening Room— Dan Navarro, 8p Lulu’s— Adam Holt, 5p Manci’s— Light Travelers McSharry’s— Rondale and the Kit Katz, 7p Old 27 Grill— Songwriters Night, 6:30p Saenger— Peppa Pig’s Surprise SanBar— Jim Andrews, 7p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Matt Slowick, 6p

FRI. SEPT 22

Alchemy— Camellia Bay with Shelbelle Shamrock, 10p All Sports Bar & Billiards— DJ Markie Mark, 10p Beau Rivage— Peter Cetera, 8p Big Beach Brewing— Lisa Christian, 6:30p Blind Mule— Gino and the Goons, Splatter, 9p Bluegill— Tim Kinsey, 12p// Bust, 6p Blues Tavern— Allman Goldflies Band, 9p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Delta Smoke, 6p Cockeyed Charlie’s— DJ Chill, 10p Fairhope Brewing— Infant Richard and the Delta Stones Felix’s— Grit’s N Pieces Flora Bama— Dave Chastang, 1p// Jay Hawkins Duo, 2p/// Mel Knapp, 5p/// Jack Robertson Show, 5:30p//// Alabama Lightning, 6p//// Big Muddy, 6p//// Kevin Swanson and Jon Puzan, 9p//// JoJo Pres, 10p//// Brian Hill Duo, 10:15p//// Foxy Iguanas, 10:30p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Phil Vaught, 9:30p IP Casino— The Clairvoyants, 8p Listening Room— Eric Erdman, 8p Lulu’s— Jeri, 5p Main Street Cigar Lounge— Blue Bicycle, 8p Manci’s— Fat Man Squeeze McSharry’s— DJ Shadow,

30 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7

10p The Merry Widow— Dada and Sound & Shape, 7p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Retrobution, 8p Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Justin Wall, 6p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Joshua Stephen Ward, 6:30p Moe’s BBQ (OBA) — Charlie Wilson Moe’s BBQ (Semmes) — The Dunaway Brothers Old 27 Grill— Roger Wood, 6:30p The Old Mill – Identity Crisis, 9p SanBar— Scott Koehn and Lisa Zanghi, 7p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Mason Henderson, 6p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Charlie Hudgins, 6p Windmill Market— Eric Erdman, 11:30a

SAT. SEPT 23

Big Beach Brewing— Moonshine Wagon, 6:30p Blind Mule— Fat Lip, 9p Bluegill— Tim Kinsey, 12p// David Chastang Duo, 6p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Matt Neese Duo, 6p Cockeyed Charlie’s— DJ Chill, 10p Felix’s— Delta Reign Flora Bama— Jezebel’s Chilln’, 1p// Lea Anne Creswell Duo, 2p/// Jack Robertson Show, 5:30p//// Al and Cathy, 6p//// Reed Lightfoot, 9p//// Yeah Probably, 10p//// Fuzzy Iconic Duo, 10:15p//// Oliver’s Twist, 10:30p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Phil Vaught, 9:30p Listening Room— Melissa Summersell, Shelley King and Robert Cline Jr., 8p Lulu’s— Webb Dalton, 5p McSharry’s— DJ Chi, 10p Pirates Cove— Tangerine Station, 5p Saenger— Mobile Symphony Orchestra: Firebird SanBar— David Jones, 7p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Three Bean Soup, 6p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Charlie Hudgins, 11a// Gringofife, 6p

SUN. SEPT 24

Big Beach Brewing— Rock Bottom, 3p Bluegill— Jamie Adamson, 12p// Jamell Richardson, 6p Blues Tavern— John Hall Jam, 6p Callaghan’s— Lilly Hiatt, 7p Felix’s— Lee Yankee

Flora Bama— Smoky Otis Duo, 12p// Songs of Rusty, 1:30p/// Al and Cathy, 2p//// Perdido Brothers, 6p//// Reed Lightfoot, 8p//// Brandon White, 10:15p Frog Pond— Grayson Capps, Corky Hughes, Molly Thomas, Harrison McInnis, 3p Lulu’s— Greg Brown, 1p// Cadillac Attack, 5p McSharry’s— Trad Irish Music, 6:30p Old 27 Grill— Lisa Zanghi, 11:30a Saenger— Mobile Symphony Orchestra: Firebird Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Lisa Christian, 2p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Gringofife, 11a// Jamie Adamson, 6p

MON. SEPT 25

Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— BDM, 6p Felix’s— Lefty Collins Flora Bama— Founders and Friends, 2p// Cathy Pace, 6p/// Kevin Swanson, 8p//// Petty and Pace, 10:15p Lulu’s— Brent Burns, 5p

TUE. SEPT 26

Bluegill— Shelby Brown Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Butch Cassidy’s— Pete Young Cockeyed Charlie’s— Jordan Bramblett Felix’s— Rodger Fleshman Flora Bama— T. Bone Montgomery, 2p// Jon Puzan, 5:30p/// Perdido Brothers, 6p//// Yeah Probably, 10p//// Justin Headley Expirement, 10:15p Lulu’s— Jimmy Lumpkin, 5p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Jimmy Lee Hannaford, 6p Soul Kitchen— Band of Horses, Why are You Ok, 8p

WED. SEPT 27

Blind Mule— Comedy Open Mic, 8p Bluegill— Matt Neese Blues Tavern— Art, 8p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Callaghan’s— Phil and Foster Crooked Martini— Magic Mike Male Revue, 8:30p Felix’s— Bobby Butchka Flora Bama— Neil Dover, 2p// Rhonda Hart and Jonathan Newton, 6p/// Davis Nix, 8p//// Kyle Wilson, 10:15p Lulu’s— Sugarcane Jane, 5p Old 27 Grill— Elise Taylor, 6:30p Shipp’s Harbour Grill— Brent Burns, 5p


S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 31


FILMTHE REEL WORLD Weisz’s nuance saves otherwise inessential ‘My Cousin Rachel’

R

BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

AREA

THEATERS CARMIKE CINEMA’S Wynnsong 16 785 Schillinger Rd. S. (251) 639-7373 CRESCENT THEATER 208 Dauphin Street (251) 438-2005 HOLLYWOOD STADIUM 18 1250 Satchel Paige Dr. (251) 473-9655 RAVE MOTION PICTURE JUBILEE SQUARE 12 6898 U.S. 90 Daphne, (251) 626- 6266

achel Weisz stars as a dangerously appealing widow in a spotty adaptation of Daphne du Maurier’s “My Cousin Rachel.” The unreliable narrator, Philip, tells us in his reliably drowsy narration that he will never know the truth about his cousin, and neither will we. The “my” of the title is very important, because it is through Philip’s inexperienced and selfish eyes we view the events of this watchable, but inessential, period film. Sam Claflin (“The Hunger Games”) plays Philip, an orphan raised by his beloved older cousin, Ambrose. Just when Philip is about to turn 25, come of age and ascend to his inheritance of Ambrose’s estate, the older man falls ill and travels to Italy for a cure in the sunshine. Soon he is writing giddily of his vast improvement in the loving arms of their distant cousin, Rachel, who he impulsively weds. Back home, Philip and the family lawyer (Iain Glen from “Game of Thrones”) are shocked by the reports they are getting from Ambrose, and suspicions mount when he suddenly feels much worse and suggests Rachel is a monster who watches his every move.

Finally he pleads for Philip to come to Italy and rescue him, but Philip arrives too late and finds his beloved cousin dead and buried. A sinister Italian guy explains that Ambrose died of a brain tumor, but Philip is unconvinced, to say the least. He also blames the mysterious Rachel and vows, aloud, to avenge Ambrose’s death via revenge against Rachel. The Italian guy seems unimpressed, and this is a completely accurate appraisal. For soon Rachel writes and announces her intention to visit the estate and, while Philip pouts that this will be his chance to take matters into his manly hands, he is completely undone by Rachel within a matter of minutes. The degree to which he changes his tune is honestly preposterous, and strains credulity. Plot twists are one thing, but some element of reason should be maintained or the story becomes meaningless. Weisz’s portrayal is wonderfully nuanced and intelligent, and her ambiguous character and motives (and fabulous costumes) are enough to float this gothic mystery even when the plot holes are gaping. I don’t know if Claflin was doing a great job playing a petulant idiot, or if he himself is just a dopey actor. I do

think a bit more range on his part would have enhanced the story. We’re not sure how we feel about Rachel, but there’s no question Philip is a fool. While we are left scratching our heads as to whether Rachel is trying to kill Philip, it’s more disappointing that she doesn’t succeed. Weisz makes us care about her past and current actions, but Claflin keeps us from caring too much about the result. It seems so obvious that she is, for example, poisoning him, but Weisz still manages to string us all along until we really don’t know. All we know is he kind of deserves it, just for pure naiveté and nonstop sulkiness. Suffice to say, this doesn’t approach an adaptation like Hitchcock’s “Rebecca” in terms of a du Maurier adaptation, although it does have some of the signature techniques, such as the doubling of characters, which, again, could have been explored more skillfully. It’s also not as good as “My Cousin Vinny,” but what is? The title character makes this a decent Gothic period film, but a male character who even approached her could have made this film so much better. “My Cousin Rachel” is currently available to rent.

CARMIKE CINEMAS 23151 Wharf Ln. Orange Beach (251) 981-4444 COBB THEATRES PINNACLE 14 3780 Gulf Shores Pkwy Gulf Shores (251) 968-7444

Photos | Fox Searchlight / Real Women Make Waves

FROM LEFT: In “My Cousin Rachel,” a young Englishman plots revenge against his late cousin’s mysterious, beautiful wife, believing her responsible for his death. “Year by the Sea” is the story of an empty nester who retreats to Cape Cod to embark upon a quest to set herself free. NEW IN THEATERS YEAR BY THE SEA

EASTERN SHORE PREMIERE CINEMA 14 30500 Alabama 181 #500 Spanish Fort, Al (251) 626-0352 Information accurate at press time; please call theaters for showtimes.

After 30 years as a wife and mother, Joan (Karen Allen!! Yay!) retreats to Cape Cod rather than follow her husband to Kansas. Intent on rediscovering herself, but plagued with guilt, she questions her decision until she stumbles upon a spirited mentor. Crescent Theater

FRIEND REQUEST

This horror film boasts the awful tagline “Evil is

32 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7

trending.” I mean, that’s accurate, but still. I’m just going to assume this is about accidentally sending a friend request to an ex while lurking on Facebook, and wait to watch it on TBS. All listed multiplex theaters.

KINGSMAN: THE GOLDEN CIRCLE

This sequel finds a U.S. Kingsman allied organization that boasts Channing Tatum among its secret weapons. All listed multiplex theaters.

NOW PLAYING AMERICAN ASSASSIN All listed multiplex theaters. MOTHER! All listed multiplex theaters.   TRUE TO THE GAME Regal Mobile Stadium 18 HOME AGAIN All listed multiplex theaters. IT All listed multiplex theaters. WIND RIVER “Wind River” Eastern Shore Premiere Cinema, Regal Mobile Stadium 18 LEAP All listed multiplex theaters. LOGAN LUCKY All listed multiplex theaters. THE HITMAN’S BODYGUARD

All listed multiplex theaters. ANNABELLE: CREATION All listed multiplex theaters. THE NUT JOB 2: NUTTY BY NATURE All listed multiplex theaters. KIDNAP All listed multiplex theaters. THE DARK TOWER All listed multiplex theaters. ATOMIC BLONDE Regal Mobile Stadium 18 THE EMOJI MOVIE All listed multiplex theaters. SPIDER MAN All listed multiplex theaters. DESPICABLE ME 3 All listed multiplex theaters. WONDER WOMAN All listed multiplex theaters.


S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 33


CALENDAR OF EVENTS SEPTEMBER 21, 2017 - SEPTEMBER 27, 2017

GENERAL INTEREST Women’s conference Focus Women’s Conference aims to educate, encourage and empower women through various workshops and panel discussions. The conference will be Friday, Sept. 22, at the Mobile Convention Center. Visit www. focuswomensconference.com. Travel auction The Great Escape Travel Auction is a live and silent auction featuringtg affordable trips to bucket-list destinations. The event is Friday, Sept. 22, 6-9 p.m. at Central Presbyterian Church, 1260 Dauphin St., Mobile. Proceeds benefit neighborhood missions at the church. Visit www. cpcmidtown.com. Garden Brothers Circus Celebrating 100 years of entertaining families, Garden Brothers Circus will be at the Mobile Civic Center on Friday, Sept. 22, at 4:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Visit gardenbroscircus.com. Jubilee Festival of Arts The Eastern Shore Chamber of Commerce hosts the 29th annual Jubilee Festival of Arts. Saturday and Sunday, Sept. 23-24 on Main Street in Olde Towne Daphne. Dozens of artists, cooking competitions, craft demonstrations, popup performances and local musicians. Admission is free. Alabama Gulf Coast Recovery Council Tasked with dispersing the BP oil spill settlement, the AGCRC will hold a public meeting to provide an opportunity for individuals to offer input on any of the projects currently suggested. Wednesday, Sept. 27, 3:30-5:30 p.m. in the Mobile Government Plaza Auditorium. Visit restorealabama.org. Lecture series Dauphin Way Methodist (1507 Dauphin St.) presents the Stephen and Ruth Dill Lecture Series on Sunday, Sept. 24, 10:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. and Monday, Sept. 25, at 9 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. Featuring Dr. Wayne Flynt, scholar of Southern history, politics, religion and culture. Call 251-4711511 or visit www.dauphinwayumc.org.

Free fitness workshop A free health and fitness workshop with a certified instructor will be held on Sept. 23, 10 a.m. to noon at Wingate by Wyndham Mobile, 516 Springhill Plaza Court. Visit www.dietspotlight.com/ workshop/. Special Needs Expo Eastern Shore Parents and Mobile Bay Parents are hosting a Special Needs Expo Saturday, Sept. 23, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. at the Life Center at St. Paul’s Church in Daphne. Admission is free. Call 251-9292099. Lunch and learn Mitchell Cancer Institute hosts monthly “lunch and learn” events. The subject Tuesday, Sept. 26, at noon will be “GYN Oncology Care Month.” Lunch will be held in the multipurpose room on the second floor of MCI. Call 251-445-9647. Bookmark contest The Daphne Public Library announces its 2017 “Back-to-School” Bookmark Contest, open to students in grades K-12, running through Sept. 29. Call 251-6212818. TOPS Take Off Pounds Sensibly meets every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. at Spanish Fort Presbyterian Church. Call 251-625-6888. Dauphin Island Boardwalk Talks Boardwalk Talks are held the first and third Wednesday of each month at 11:15 a.m. at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab, 101 Bienville Blvd. Call 251-861-2141. Midtown Optimist Club Join Midtown Optimist Club every Wednesday at noon for lunch at Azalea City Golf Course. Call 251-348-3542. Toastmasters Toastmasters International meets regularly at six locations in Mobile and Baldwin counties. Visit www.toastmasters. org for more information.

FUNDRAISERS “All in for Heart”

Fairhope farmer’s market The city of Fairhope hosts an outdoor farmer’s market Thursdays, 3-6 p.m., through Nov. 2 behind the Fairhope Public Library downtown on Bancroft Street. Call 251-929-1466.

ARTS Live at the Museum Strange Her will perform original music Thursday, Sept. 21, at 7 p.m. at Mobile Museum of Art, 4850 Museum Drive. $10 admission, wine and beer by donation. Call 251-208-5200. “Live at Five” “Live at Five” presents Grayson Capps on Friday, Sept. 22, at the Halstead Amphitheater on Coastal Alabama Community College in Fairhope. Free admission. Donations accepted at the door to benefit future concerts. “Adrift in Mancao” The comic musical “Adrift in Macao” opens Friday, Sept. 22. The play will have six performances at the Laidlaw Performing Arts Center, 5751 USA Drive South, Sept. 22-24 and Sept. 28-30. Showtimes are 7:30 p.m., except for Sunday, Sept. 24, which will be at 2 p.m. Call 251-460-6305.

Mobile Pops Concert The city of Semmes presents the Mobile Pops in concert at MGM Auditorium Monday, Sept. 25, at 7 p.m. Food and fun for the entire family. Call 251-649-8811. Book launch Professor Emerita Sue Brannan Walker will celebrate the launch of her new book of poetry, “Let Us Imagine Her Name,” on Wednesday, Sept. 27, at 7 p.m. at the USA Faculty Club. Reception to follow.

Educators’ Night Out Join us at the Mobile Museum of Art for a special evening designed for educators on Thursday, Sept. 21, 5-7 p.m. Network with other area educators over wine and snacks while learning how the Museum School can enrich your curricula. The event is free. Call 251-208-5200.

Photo | Courtesy of Children’s of Alabama

The inaugural “All in for Heart” is Thursday, Sept. 21 at 6:30 p.m. to benefit the Pediatric Congenital Heart Center at Children’s of Alabama. Featuring a night of faux casino games at The Pillars, 1757 Government St., Mobile. Visit give. childernsal.org/allinforheart.

34 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7

that will transform how we think about engineering. “Dream Big” opens Saturday, Sept. 23, and runs until Jan. 7. “Right on Course” The United States Sports Academy’s American Sport Art Museum & Archives is open free to the public weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. One of the newest exhibits is “Right on Course.” Visit www.asama. org. ‘Windows to the Sea’ “Windows to the Sea” is the latest permanent exhibit at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab Estuarium. Visit disl.org. “Shipwreck! Pirates and Treasure” A new, highly interactive exhibit at GulfQuest features more than 500 authentic artifacts recovered from deepocean shipwrecks. Visit www.gulfquest. org. Fairhope’s founding Learn more about the 1894 founding of Fairhope at the Fairhope Museum of History, 24 N. Section St. The museum is open daily (except Sunday and Monday) from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 251-929-1471.

Little Discoveries “Outside the Box,” aimed at children age 6 and under, explores how innovation and creativity can lead to a world of possibilities, starting with a simple cardboard box. Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Call 251-208-6893 or email jholland@ Book signing Emily Blejwas, author of “Once You Know exploreum.com. This,” a middle-grade novel targeting readers age 9-14, will be signing copies Thursdays at MMoA of her book at the Barnes & Noble Teen Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., Book Fest in Spanish Fort, Saturday, Sept. the Mobile Museum of Art offers free 23. Call 251-621-3545. admission to all visitors. No reservations

MUSEUMS

“Boogie’s Block Party” New Orleans Pelicans star DeMarcus Cousins and Mobile Mayor Sandy Stimpson are hosting “Boogie’s Block Party” Saturday, Sept. 23, 2-5 p.m., to celebrate the new premier basketball court in Figures Park (658 Donald St.). Gentleman’s Ride The Distinguished Gentleman’s Ride is Sunday, Sept. 24. Participants will be riding vintage-style motorcycles, in period-correct dress, from Mobile to the Fairhope Pier while joining the fight against prostate cancer and suicide. Visit gentlemansride.com.

“Knowing You Can Make a Difference” Legendary athlete Bo Jackson will be the featured guest at the 8th annual “Knowing You Can Make a Difference” fundraiser in Daphne benefiting the Baldwin County Drug Court Foundation. Thursday, Sept. 21, at 5:30 p.m., Daphne Civic Center, 2603 U.S. Highway 98. Visit www. baldwindrugcourt.com.

“Curious George: Let’s Get Curious!” The insatiable curiosity of Curious George — the little monkey who has captured the imagination and hearts of millions of children and adults for 65 years — comes to life Sept. 23 at Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center. “Dream Big: Engineering Our World” Narrated by Academy Award winner Jeff Bridges, “Dream Big: Engineering Our World” is a first-of-its-kind film for IMAX and giant-screen theaters

are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive. Call 251-208-5200.

SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES Spanish Fort Fire-Rescue 5K This 2nd annual Fire Prevention 5k and 1-mile fun run will start at Meaher State Park on a certified course along the causeway. Saturday, Sept. 23, 8 a.m. Register online at eventbrite.com or call 251-410-6181. South Alabama football The University of South Alabama Jaguars welcome the University of Idaho Vandals Saturday, Sept. 23, 1 p.m. at Ladd-Peebles Stadium. Note: USA has implemented a policy allowing only clear, see-through bags at games. Visit usajaguars.com. Group rides South Alabama and Mississippi Mountain Bike Association invites all levels of cyclists to join them every Tuesday and Thursday at 6 p.m. at USA Bike Trails and Sunday at 9 a.m. at Chickasabogue Park. Email carrie@rideSAMBA.com. Weekly 1K/5K Every Thursday evening at 6 p.m., join Red Beard’s Outfitter and Cortlandt’s Pub in the Spring Hill Village Shopping Center for a 1K or 5K run and walk. No cost to participate.


Bingo Join Via Health, Fitness, Enrichment Center (171 Dauphin St.) for bingo every Tuesday and Thursday, 1:30-3:30 p.m. Call 251-478-3311. Bridge lessons The Mobile Bridge Center offers free bridge lessons each Tuesday at 6 p.m. at 1510 University Blvd. Arrive a few minutes early to register. Call the Bridge Center at 251-666-2147, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fitness and athletics classes New fitness classes are in progress at Palmer Pillans Middle School. Curvy yoga, Tone It Up! (fusion workout), Zumba, basketball clinics (ages 8+) and sports conditioning (ages 8-17). To register or for more information, call 251-463-7980 or visit communityactivitiesprogram.com. Dance and art classes Classes offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School include belly dance, ballroom dance, ballet and tumbling (ages 6-8), beginning piano (ages 8+), watercolor painting, zombies and superheroes art, and pet portraits art. Call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com. Pickleball for adults (indoors) Offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School, Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon. Great sport for all ages combines tennis, pingpong and badminton on a court one-fourth the size of a tennis court. Call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com. Ballroom dance Azalea Ballroom Dance Club hosts dances the second and fourth Tuesday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Via Health, Fitness & Enrichment Center, 1717 Dauphin St. Call 251-623-9183 or visit azaleaballroomdanceclub.com. Ballroom dance The Moonlight ChassĂŠ Ballroom Dance Society hosts dances the first and third Monday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Hot Wheels Skating Rink in Daphne. Email cassief13@aol.com.

WORKSHOPS Education and career planning The city of Mobile Community Activities Program at LeFlore High School is offering free introductory classes for education and career planning for students in grades 8-12 and their parents, 6-7 p.m. on Thurs., Sept. 21. For more information and to reserve space, call Melanie Johnson at 251-208-1610. Couples and money Learn about savings programs, different kinds of investments and risks, and common strategies. Monday, Sept. 25, at 6 p.m. at Lifelines/Consumer Credit Counseling, 705 Oak Circle Drive E. (Mobile). Space is limited; call 251-6020011 to register.

PUBLIC MEETINGS Byrne Town Hall Meetings Congressman Bradley Byrne will host two town hall meetings on Thursday, Sept. 21. The first will be at 10:30 a.m. at Silverhill Town Hall, 15965 East Silverhill Ave., in Silverhill. The second will be at 2 p.m. at Elberta Town Hall, 13052 Main St., in Elberta.

Baldwin County Commission: First and third Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., 322 Courthouse Square, Bay Minette. Work sessions are the second and fourth Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. rotating between Bay Minette, the Foley Satellite Courthouse, the Fairhope Satellite Courthouse and the Baldwin County Central Annex Building in Robertsdale. www.baldwincountyal.gov Baldwin County Planning Commission: First Thursday at 6 p.m., 22251 Palmer St., Robertsdale, www.baldwincountyal. gov. Bayou La Batre City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 13785 S. Wintzell Ave., www.cityofbayoulabatre. com. Chickasaw City Council: Second and fourth Tuesday at 7 p.m., 224 N. Craft Highway, 251-452-6450. Citronelle City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6:30 p.m., 19135 Main St., 251-866-7973. Creola City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6 p.m., 190 Dead Lake Road, #A, 251-675-8142. Daphne City Council: First and third Monday at 6:30 p.m., 1705 Main St. Work sessions are the second Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m., www.daphneal.com. Dauphin Island Town Council: First and third Tuesdays at 7 p.m., 1011 Bienville Blvd., www.townofdauphinisland.org. Elberta Town Council: Third Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m. in the town hall. Workshop meeting on the second Tuesday. townofelberta.com. Fairhope City Council: Second and fourth Monday at 6 p.m., 161 N. Section St. Work sessions are held before each council meeting at 4:30 p.m., www. cofairhope.com. Fairhope Planning Commission: First Monday at 5 p.m., 161 N. Section St. For more information visit www.cofairhope. com. Foley City Council: First and third Monday at 5:30 p.m., 407 E. Laurel Ave. Work sessions begin at 4 p.m., www. cityoffoley.org. Gulf Shores City Council: Second and fourth Mondays at 4 p.m., 1905 W. First St., www.gulfshoresal.gov. Mobile City Council: Tuesdays at Government Plaza, 205 Government St. Pre-council meeting begins at 9 a.m.; council meeting begins at 10:30 a.m., www.cityofmobile.org. Mobile Planning Commission: First and third Thursdays at 2 p.m., 205 Government St., www.urban.cityofmobile. org. Orange Beach City Council: First and third Tuesdays at 5 p.m., 4099 Orange Beach Blvd., www.cityoforangebeach. com. Prichard City Council: Every Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 216 E. Prichard Ave., www. thecityofprichard.org.

S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 35


MEDIA MEDIA FRENZY

AL Media Group sues Shunnarah

O

BY ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM ne of the state’s most high-profile personal injury attorneys was slapped with a lawsuit last Thursday by the Alabama Media Group in an attempt to recoup close to $300,000 the media chain claims it is owed for unpaid advertising bills. AMG, the parent company of al.com, filed suit in Mobile County Circuit Court Sept. 14 in an attempt to have Birmingham-based plaintiff’s attorney Alexander Shunnarah pay $276,072 for advertising run on the al.com website. Shunnarah is known throughout the region for billboard advertising so dense in concentration that it is not uncommon to see two signs carrying his smiling visage located almost across the street from each other. But besides his dominant billboard coverage across Alabama and other parts of the Southeast, Shunnarah is also a heavy buyer of broadcast and digital advertising. Shunnarah and other personal injury attorneys have become a mainstay of local advertising as they promise big bucks for people who have been hurt in an accident. Rumors of AMG filing suit against Shunnarah have been rampant for weeks as word leaked of claims that the law firm owes a substantial amount of money. According to court filings, AMG is asking for $276,072, as well as another $55,000 in attorneys’ fees and an additional 6 percent interest on the balance owed. The filing shows the balance had exceeded $345,000, but Shunnarah made a payment of just over $69,000. “Plaintiff and Defendant(s) entered into a written contract and/or promissory note. Plaintiff is in compliance with the terms of this contract, but Defendant(s), have failed and/or refused to comply with the terms of this contract and therefore are in breach of said contract,” the court

documents read. Shunnarah’s contract with AMG was quite extensive, according to copies of the contract included with the suit. In October of last year, for example, Shunnarah’s firm signed a commitment to place $720,000 in advertising over the coming year. The ad campaign contained a 30-day penalty-free cancellation clause that was handwritten on the contract. Also included was a 2014 contract in which Shunnarah’s firm agreed to pay at least $14,900 per month for advertising, up to $183,960 for the year. Attorney Joshua Friedman, who is representing AMG in the matter, said his clients would have no comment on the suit. A call seeking comment from Shunnarah was not returned prior to deadline.

Weather ups and downs

WKRG Chief Meteorologist Alan Sealls recently garnered some national accolades when the social news aggregator Reddit carried a post declaring him “Best weatherman ever, very articulate and educational.” This became the top trending post on the site, giving Sealls a new level of national notoriety. The station also presented Sealls a trophy declaring him “Best Weatherman Ever,” thus settling the debate. On the flip side of local meteorology fame, WPMI Chief Meteorologist Chris Dunn found himself the butt of national jokes after apparently breaking wind on air early this month. The video of Dunn’s “slip” became a YouTube sensation, was posted to numerous national websites and even landed on “The Tonight Show With Jimmy Fallon.” I guess there are many ways to make it big in the weather game.

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE SIZE MATTERS BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 “Watch yourself out there” 7 Comic Sweeney 12 ____ All-Star Race (annual event since 1985) 18 Getaway for meditation 19 Rub oil on 21 Fruit dessert 22 Spin-class activity? 24 City with one of the SUNY schools 25 That craft 26 TV host Gibbons 27 What Siri runs on 29 SC Johnson product with a lightning bolt in its logo 30 Wireless-data-and-messaging company 32 Number of appearances in a grain holder? 38 ____ Tomé (African capital) 39 Stuck at a ski lodge, say 41 Wallops 42 Like long chances 44 River near the start of an alphabetical list 45 Primordial universe matter 47 What people sing when they don’t know the words 49 Au courant, once 50 Storms that don’t offend? 53 Actress Christina 55 God, to Hebrews 57 Staple of Hawaiian cuisine 58 Mammals with webbed feet 60 Business with a guest book 62 French 101 verb 63 Appropriate rhyme for “cache” 65 Robust 66 RC, for one 67 Left college athletics, maybe 69 Lesley of CBS News 71 Nonsense 73 Second hand: Abbr. 74 Loads 76 2016 Disney hit 78 George who founded Industrial Light & Magic 79 “____-hoo!” 80 Position on a steamship 82 Schedule inits. 83 Europe’s largest lake 84 Region of ancient Egypt 86 Makes a quick map of an Egyptian peninsula? 89 Very, in Veracruz 90 Sequel to a sequel to a sequel to a sequel 92 Action at a bris 93 Popular website that explains the news 94 Lille women: Abbr. 95 Not debut 97 Mint

99 War su ____ (boneless chicken dish) 100 Opening performers that are all mimes? 104 Orchestra tuner 107 Brand with a rabbit symbol 108 “____ little confused” 109 It has a lock, stock and barrel 111 Take in 113 Citroën competitor 116 Rod-and-reel event in old Vietnam? 121 North and South Korea, e.g. 122 Nurse’s outfit 123 Indian appetizer 124 Prince Edward’s earldom 125 Belief 126 High as a kite

13 Black church inits. 14 Spot on a fern frond 15 TBS late-night show 16 Room with a slanted roof 17 All systems go 20 Cry to kick off the weekend 21 “Down goes Frazier!” sportscaster 23 Relating to the abdominal cavity 28 Surg. locales 31 Nonstandard verb from Popeye 33 Pastoral poet 34 “____ & Stitch” 35 Common opening bid in bridge 36 Argument 37 Fruit with greenish-yellow rinds DOWN 40 TV’s “Tales From the ____” 1 Big party 42 Suddenly start, as in fright 2 Photorealist painter Richard 43 Strands, as a base runner 3 Order to a pool hustler to 44 German lament suck up some broth? 46 Workplaces with a need 4 “So vast is ____, so narrow for speed human wit”: Alexander Pope 48 Government group on 5 Do not offspring? 6 Run the show 50 Felon, to a cop 7 Rapper with the music51 Drink holders streaming service Tidal 52 Greyhound stop: Abbr. 8 Take out, as wine bottles 54 Plotting (with) 9 “Haha” 56 Alicia of “Urban Legend,” 1998 10 Due east on an old clock dial 59 Ex-isle of exile 11 Common female middle 61 Denies name 63 Play alone 12 Smoking or ____ 64 Jerry Lewis, notably

66 “Oh, fudge” 68 Snare-drum sound 70 Rebel in “Henry IV, Part 1” 72 Jai ____ 75 Green-lit 77 Green 80 Tornado warning 81 Raised, as a flag 83 Laissez-faire 85 Pre-practice tests? 87 Lush’s favorite radio station? 88 Drowse 91 Santa makes millions of them every Christmas 94 French month 96 Ingredient in an Aunt Agatha 98 Blinking light 99 Attacks 100 Cast about 101 Chemistry Nobelist Joliot-Curie 102 Understudy’s study 103 Ticket 105 Ignorance, so they say 106 Nerve-racking 110 Think tank, e.g.: Abbr. 112 “Heavens!” 114 It may be pulled after a wrong turn 115 Old law 117 Do something 118 Heat 119 Heater 120 H.R. offering for employees

ANSWERS ON PAGE 40

F U T U R E S H O C K 36 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7


S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 37


SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

Spring Hill College retains provisional NCAA status

BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

SHC has faced other setbacks in its move from being a member of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. In what was scheduled to be a three-year process, the NCAA asked the Badgers to repeat candidacy year two to give new campus personnel with direct compliance responsibilities adequate time get up to speed with NCAA requirements. Then, in 2016, the membership committee ruled SHC had successfully completed the second phase and recommended advancement to provisional membership. This phase was completed during the previous school year. During the 2017-18 academic year, the 16 SHC varsity athletic programs making the transition will continue to play full slates of Division II conference and nonconference regular season competition, but remain ineligible for NCAA or conference post-season competition. “I am very happy for our student-athletes and athletic staff who have worked diligently over the last four years of our membership transition,” SHC Director of Athletics Jim Hall said. “We are thrilled to be given the opportunity to finish what we started and continue the positive momentum our transition to the NCAA has generated.” According to a news release from the school, SHC will undergo a Compliance Blueprint Review conducted by the NCAA this fall and submit an annual membership report to the Division II Membership Committee prior to June 1, 2018. At that point, the membership committee will review the annual report along with the results of the compliance review, then vote on whether to advance SHC to active membership status for the 2018-19 academic year. Active status signals the completion of SHC’s membership transition process and would allow the school to begin participating in conference and NCAA post-season competition. Spring Hill currently plays some sports in the Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference and others in the Gulf South Conference.

College briefs

Photo | Courtesy of Spring Hill College

The National Collegiate Athletic Association recently offered Spring Hill College an additional year to achieve provisional status.

T

o the surprise of many local sports fans, the National Collegiate Athletic Association has notified Spring Hill College President Christopher Puto, Ph.D., that the Badgers have been granted an additional year within the provisional period during the 2017-18 academic year. On July 14, the Division II Membership Committee notified SHC it would not recommend to the NCAA Division II Management Council that the Badgers be allowed to advance to full membership. This came despite the group saying it was impressed by the Jesuit school’s compliance program and enhancements to its athletics department. The sole reason cited by the membership committee was Spring Hill’s current accreditation status with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). According to an earlier report by the college, SHC is currently in a 12-month probation period by the SACS Commission on Colleges because of financial instability. By this coming December, SACS will decide whether to reaffirm or not reaffirm the school’s accreditation. While Spring Hill currently does have its accreditation, SACS

had yet to reaffirm it for the next 10 years. In July, SHC and Emmanuel College in Georgia were removed from the membership process. The NCAA at that time said, “Both schools previously had been required to repeat one year of the three-year process, which is the maximum permitted by Division II legislation. If a school cannot complete the membership requirements within the established timeline, it is removed from the process and must wait one year to reapply.” With the latest reprieve from the NCAA, Spring Hill will now continue its status as a provisional member of Division II for another year as the college works to complete its membership transition. “Gaining full Division II membership — our ultimate goal — will be the culmination of years of outstanding work by coaches, administration and campus-wide colleagues on behalf of our student-athletes,” Puto said. “Because of their diligent work, our student-athletes and the SHC community as a whole are now positioned for an exceptional intercollegiate athletic experience for decades to come.”

38 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7

• Guilherme Altoe, goalkeeper for the University of Mobile men’s soccer team, was named the Southern States Athletic Conference’s Player of the Week. The junior earned his first shutout with three saves against second-ranked University of Rio Grande. So far this year, the Brazilian has seven saves with one goal allowed. • The men’s soccer team for Spring Hill shocked eighth-ranked University of Tampa with a 6-1 home rout. The win snapped a four-game losing skid by the Badgers all-time against the Florida squad. • University of South Alabama junior Hannah Godfrey was voted the Sun Belt Conference’s Soccer Defensive Player of the Week. She is the first Jaguar to win the weekly honor this season, and claims the award for the second time in her career. • For the third consecutive week, UM’s Annie Kate Hudson was named SSAC Setter of the Week. She tallied 170 assists on the weekend, including 53 against Dillard and 56 against Reinhardt. Both of those totals rank in the top 10 for a single match in UM history. • After her dominant performance at the UM tournament, sophomore outside hitter Mirella Gatterdam was named SSAC Attacker of the Week. She led the Rams in kills in three of the four matches this weekend en route to racking up 64 in total. She now has 205 kills on the season, which ranks her third in the NAIA. Earlier, the reigning SSAC Freshman of the Year was named to the Life University Tournament all-star team after picking up 51 kills. • Junior South Alabama women’s cross country runner Laura Labuschaigne opened up the fall season with a win as she crossed the line with a time of 17:40.0 in the 5K race to pace the Jaguar women and lead the club to the team title at the Azalea City Classic, held at The Grounds. • South Alabama men’s golfer Jason Mendel was named a Golf Coaches Association of America Cleveland Golf/Srixon All-America Scholar. The rising senior from Norcross, Georgia, was one of 260 NCAA Division I student-athletes recognized this year. Last year, Mendel paced the Jaguars with 11 rounds at or below par while posting a career best 74.26-stroke average.


S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 39


STYLE HOROSCOPES DOOMSDAY PROPHESIES IN TRUMP’S AMERICA

ANSWERS FROM PAGE 36 40 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7

VIRGO (8/23-9/22) — Depressed you couldn’t take part in last weekend’s Juggalo March in Washington, D.C., you’ll make plans to boost your spirits at Anthrocon 2018. You’ll ride out the North Korean apocalypse in the Bankhead Tunnel. LIBRA (9/23-10/22) — The voodoo magic you’ve employed to steer tropical weather clear of coastal Alabama will return to haunt you in October, when your favorite potted plant refuses to absorb water and dies of thirst. You’ll ride out the North Korean apocalypse in the Big Creek Lake dam. SCORPIO (10/23-11/21) — Instead of casting a vote for the lesser of two evils in the U.S. Senate Republican primary runoff Tuesday, you’ll pray for peace and hand out coloring books to drivers stuck in I-10’s traffic. You’ll ride out the North Korean apocalypse at a fishing camp in the delta. SAGITTARIUS (11/22-12/21) ­­— You’ll throw your hat in the ring to become Alabama’s next State Superintendent of schools. Disappointingly, you’ll discover it’s yet another thing you can’t do with an art degree. You’ll ride out the North Korean apocalypse at Lambert’s Café. CAPRICORN (12/22-1/19) — You’ll go overboard at Lickin’ Good Donuts and be hospitalized with the world’s first case of bacon maple coma. You’ll come around with the help of smelling salts and a box of kolache. You’ll ride out the North Korean apocalypse in the basement of Fort Conde. AQUARIUS (1/20-2/18) — After watching “It,” you’ll start your own Loser’s Club to defeat the monster haunting Mobile. Eventually, you’ll determine it’s actually just a giant tangle of discarded hair weaves. You’ll ride out the North Korean apocalypse on a liveaboard at Pirate’s Cove. PISCES (2/19-3/20) — You’ll find a masterpiece at Daphne’s Jubilee Festival of Art. Rejected by the Louvre, “Whole flounder dipped in pastel latex paint and pressed on canvas” will look majestic in your mudroom. You’ll ride out the North Korean apocalypse in an Apple Store. ARIES (3/21- 4/19) — You’ll be disqualified from Spanish Fort’s Fire Prevention 5K Saturday after the cigarette break you take in the third kilometer ignites a wildfire on the causeway. You’ll ride out the North Korean apocalypse in the Crescent Theater. TAURUS (4/20-5/20) — As an alternative to the canceled Riverside Ice, you’ll suggest the city rent out a cold room in Americold Logistics’ refrigeration facility at Brookley Aeroplex, where people can simply chill. You’ll ride out the North Korean apocalypse over a few drinks at Papa Buddha’s. GEMINI (5/21-6/21) — In an interesting coincidence, you’ll note both the Band of Horses and the Wild Ponies are performing in Mobile next week. Tuning into 93 BLX on the way home, you’ll be delighted to hear Gucci Mane. You’ll ride out the North Korean apocalypse in a sycamore tree. CANCER (6/22-7/22) — You’ll set a personal couponing record when you combine a flash sale with a coupon with an employee discount, and actually get paid $6 to purchase a brand-name skin serum. You’ll ride out the North Korean apocalypse at the Eastern Shore Centre. LEO (7/23-8/22) — You’ll create an independent school system in Baldwin County where the core curriculum consists of Tupac’s book, “The Rose That Grew From Concrete,” and Nas’ 1994 album “Illmatic.” You’ll ride out the North Korean apocalypse in a van down by the river.


S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 41


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com PUBLIC NOTICES STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE Notice is hereby given that a bill as described in the synopsis below will be introduced in the 2018 Regular Session of the Alabama Legislature and application for its passage and enactment will be made: A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT SYNOPSIS: Relating to Mobile County; to establish the regulatory authority for the Mobile County Health Department to regulate intermittent food service establishments that prepare food in association with a temporary exempt event that is a regional celebration, tradition, or cultural event designated as such by Mobile County, if the intermittent food service establishment does not prepare, sell, or distribute food on a regular basis in its regular line of business. Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, Oct. 5, 12, 2017

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on October 2, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 620 Cumberland Road East (West side of Cumberland Road East, 136’+ North of Cumberland Road South) for a Side and Rear Setback Variances to allow a storage building 5’6” from the side property line and rear 6’5” from the rear property line in an R-1, Single-Family Residential District; the Zoning Ordinance requires a minimum of 8’ side and rear yard setbacks in an R-1, Single-Family Residential District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 11th day of September, 2017. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on October 2, 2017, at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 1558 & 1560 West Avenue (Northeast corner of West Avenue and Adler Avenue) for  a Use, Front and Rear Yard Setback Variances to allow a duplex within 13’ of the front property line and 6.1’ from the rear property line in an R-1 Single-Family Residential District, the Zoning Ordinance prohibits any structures exceeding 3’ in height within 25’ of the front property line and within 8’ of the rear property line and does not allow multiple family housing in an R-1, Single-Family Residential District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium on the ground level of the South Tower at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 11th day of September, 2017.   BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on October 2, 2017, at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 161 Dunn Avenue (East side of Dunn Avenue, 340’± South of Emogene Street) for a Front and Side Yard Setback Variances to allow a structure within 7.8’ of the front property line and 2.1’ from the side property line in an R-1 Single-Family Residential District, the Zoning Ordinance prohibits any structures exceeding 3’ in height within 25’ of the front property line and within 8’ of the side property line in an   R-1, Single-Family Residential District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium on the ground level of the South Tower at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 11th day of September, 2017.  BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on October 2, 2017, at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 5706 U.S. Highway 90 West (West side of U.S. Highway 90 West, 55’± South of Plantation Road) for an Access and Parking Surface Variances to allow gravel access and parking for a business in a B-3, Community Business District; the Zoning Ordinance requires access and parking areas to be paved with asphalt, concrete, or an approved alternative paving surface in a B-3, Community Business District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium on the ground level of the South Tower at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 11th day of September, 2017.   BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on October 2, 2017, at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 20 Audubon Place (West side of Audubon Place, 560’± South of Dauphin Street) for a Side Yard Setback Variance to allow a structure within 6.3’ of the side property line in an R-1 Single-Family Residential District, the Zoning Ordinance prohibits any structures within 8’ of the side property line in an R-1, Single-Family Residential District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium on the ground level of the South Tower at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 11th day of September, 2017. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL The Dauphin Island Property Owners Association is seeking proposals from parties interested in leasing the Isle Dauphine Clubhouse building located at 100 Orleans Drive, Suite B, Dauphin Island, Alabama 36528. The property is available for lease as a restaurant beginning May 1, 2018. The Isle Dauphine Clubhouse building is located at the Isle Dauphine Golf Club which is located on the Gulf of Mexico. The property to be leased is a building consisting of three (3) floors, all with a southern view of the beach and Gulf of Mexico, and a commercial kitchen on the second floor. Proposals should be submitted to the Dauphin Island Property Owners Association via mail at: Post Office Box 39, Dauphin Island, Alabama 36528 or via e-mail to board@dipoa.org. Proposals to be submitted by November 1, 2017. Please contact Office Manager Louise Carrubba at 251-861-2433 for a site visit. Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2017

NOTICE OF COMPLETION STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE NOTICE OF COMPLETION In accordance with Chapter I, Title 39, Code of Alabama, 1975, NOTICE IS HEREBY given that S & S Sprinkler Company, LLC, has completed the contract for Arthur R. Outlaw Convention Center Parking Deck - Fire Sprinkler Replacement, One South Water Street, Mobile, Alabama 36602, CN-066-17. All persons having any claim for labor, material or otherwise in connection with this project should immediately notify the Architectural Engineering Department, City of Mobile, P. 0. Box 1827, Mobile, Alabama 36633-1827. Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 21,28, 2017

FORECLOSURES MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Wayne Alan Marcus, unmarried, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for The Mortgage Outlet, Inc., on the 31st day of October, 2005, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 5873, Page 774; the undersigned LPP Mortgage LTD, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest

42 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7

bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on October 26, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 22, Crestview, Fourth Addition, according to the map thereof recorded in Map Book 11, Page 98, of the Records in the Office of the Judge of Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  4363 East Birchwood Drive, Mobile, AL  36693 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a nonrefundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. LPP Mortgage LTD, Mortgagee/ Transferee Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 340272 September 21, 28, October 5, 2017

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Lorenzo Bennett, Sr. and Angela Bennett, husband and wife, originally in favor of Southtrust Mortgage Corporation, on the 23rd day of October, 1997, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in RP 4519, Page 1322; Modified in Book LR7244 Page 1900; the undersigned Nationstar Mortgage LLC DBA Mr. Cooper, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on October 26, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 6, Block “C” Plat 1, Alpine Hills as recorded in Map Book 9, Page 213 in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  1063 Heidi St, Mobile, AL  36608 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVEDESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Nationstar Mortgage LLC DBA Mr. Cooper, Mortgagee/Transferee Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 420622 September 21, 28, October 5, 2017

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Vixay Keoheuangsy, unmarried man, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Wachovia Mortgage, FSB, on the 16th day of June, 2008, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6396, Page 1872; the undersigned Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on October 19, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 45, Lovehaven Subdivision as recorded in Map Book 30, Page 87 of the Records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  3101 Beth Ct, Semmes, AL  36575 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVEDESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Mortgagee/ Transferee Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 394485 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 28, 2017

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by William S. Wheatley and Tammy W. Wheatley, husband and wife, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Advance Mortgage & Investment Co. of North FL. Inc., on the 21st day of September, 2006, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6052, Page 1834; the undersigned Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on October 19, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 8 of Woodland Terrace Subdivision, according to the plat thereof recorded in Map Book 17, Page 108 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes: 8031 Woodland Terrace Drive North, Irvington, AL  36544 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVEDESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand

Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Mortgagee/Transferee Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/ Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 403453 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 28, 2017

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by John David Williams and Crystal Williams, husband and wife, originally in favor of LendMark Financial Services, Inc., on the 8th day of September, 2006, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6053 Page 77; the undersigned Branch Banking and Trust Company, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on October 19, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Beginning at a point 399 feet due East from the Northwest corner of Lot 1 of the Coleman Tract, said tract being in Section 26, Township 7 South, Range 3 West, Mobile County, Alabama, continue South for a distance of 208.50 feet; thence run East for a distance of 92 feet; thence run North for a distance of 208.50 feet; thence run West for a distance of 92 feet to the point of beginning. Property street address for informational purposes:  8551 Julius St, Bayou La Batre, AL  36509 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Branch Banking and Trust Company, Mortgagee/Transferee Pam King SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 414838 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 28, 2017

NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE Default having been made in the terms of the vendor’s lien mortgage executed October 26, 2015, by Jeffrey Edward Adams, as mortgagor in favor of Perry Keidel, as mortgagee, as recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book LR7315 Page 1788, and said default continuing, the mortgagee, under power of sale contained in said mortgage will sell at auction for cash to the highest bidder on the steps of the Mobile County Courthouse in Mobile, Alabama, during legal hours of sale on the 12th day of October, 2017, the following described real estate embraces in said mortgage, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, towit: Lot 56 Lot 56 Quail Run, Unit One, according to plat thereof recorded in Map Book 26, Page 122 of the records in the office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Said sale is made for the purpose of foreclosing of said mortgage, paying the mortgage debt, the costs and expenses of foreclosure, including a


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com reasonable attorney’s fee. Mortgagee reserves the right to bid on the subject property. Said property will be sold on an “as is, where is” basis subject to any easements, encumbrances and exceptions contained in said mortgage and those contained in the records of the Office of the Judge of Probate where the above described property is situated. Said property will be sold without warranty or recourse, expressed or implied as to title, use and/or enjoyment, and will be sold subject to the right of redemption of all parties entitled thereto. Said sale is also subject to unpaid taxes or assessments whether of record or not. Perry Keidel Holder of said Mortgage. James H. Sweet Crabtree & Sweet, P.C. Attorney for Holder of Mortgage P.O. Box 537 Daphne, AL 36526 251-626-3322 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 28, 2017

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made by the herein referenced Grantees in the terms of that certain Vendor’s Lien Deed executed on April 26, 2017, by Brent L. Chestang and Sabrina N. Johnson, a Grantees to Iras Development Company Inc. an Alabama corporation, as Grantor which said Vendor’s Lien Deed was recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book LR7509, Page 1246 and default continuing under said Vendor’s Lien Deed, by virtue of and pursuant to the power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, the following described real property will be sold at public outcry, for cash, to the highest bidder, in front of the North entrance of the Courthouse of said County, located at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama 36644, during the legal hours of sale, on October 12, 2017. Lot 120, as per plat of TIMBERLAND, UNIT VI as recorded in Map Book 124, Page 55, Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying said Vendor’s Lien debt and costs of foreclosure. Iras Development Company Inc. Holder of said Vendor’s Lien. WILLIAM B. JACKSON, II STOKES & CLINTON, P.C. Attorneys for Lienholder Post Office Box 991801 Mobile, Alabama 36691 (251) 460-2400 Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 21, 2017

PROBATE NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING July 27, 2017 Case No. 2014-1128-2 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of DORIS JEAN LITTLE, Deceased On to-wit the 9th day of October, 2017 at 2:00 PM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the FINAL SETTLEMENT as filed by BOBBIE J WINSTON. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate. Attorney Name and Address: MICHAEL S. MCNAIR, 2151 GOVERNMENT STREET, MOBILE, AL 36606 Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2017

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING CASE NO. 2017-1674 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Notice of the filing of petition for Summary Distribution in the estate of Dennis Marks, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that a Petition for Summary Distribution has been filed by Angela W. Marks on August 15, 2017, and that 30 days after the notice of publication hereof and pursuant to law the Court shall be requested to enter an order directing summary distribution of the estate of said decedent. Don Davis, Judge of Probate. Petitioner: Angela W. Marks 2671 Atoll Drive Mobile AL 36605 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 28, Oct. 5, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: MARTHA CASSINELLI MEYER, A/K/A MARTHA MEYER-PATRICK Case No. 2017-1272 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 24th day of August , 2017 by the HONORABLE DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. ANTHONY DALE PATRICK as Administrator of the estate of MARTHA CASSINELLI MEYER A/K/A MARTHA MEYER-PATRICK, deceased. Attorney of Record: MICHAEL S. MCNAIR, Esq. Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 21, 2017

proceed to consider the FINAL SETTLEMENT AND REPORT OF INSOLVENCY as filed by JEFFREY E. DYESS. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate. Attorney Name and Address: HENDRIK S. SNOW, 50 ST EMANUEL ST, MOBILE, ALABAMA 36602 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 28, Oct. 5, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: ANTHONY CHARLES SIMPSON, Deceased Case No. 2017-1364 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 14th day of September, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. MARY LYNN WILSON as Executrix under the last will and testament of ANTHONY CHARLES SIMPSON, Deceased. Attorney of Record: T. JEFF STEIN Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, Oct. 5, 2017

NOTICE OF SALE These abandoned vehicles will be sold on 10/12/2017 at 9am at 5781 Three Notch Rd Mobile Al. 36619 if not redeemed TOYO  4T1BE32KX2U093644 MITS    JA4MR41HXTJ009915 CHEV    1GCGG25U951103369 CHEV    2GCEC19T7Y1300327 FORD    1FAHP3E27CL231321 TOYT    4T1BD1FK2CU039550 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed – at 3360 Baptiste Dr N., Theodore, AL 36582. 2012 Nissan Altima 1N4AL2AP8CN434750 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 136 Cardinal Rd, Monroeville, AL 36460. 2002 Mazda 626 1YVGF22CX25288206 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed – at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2010 Chevrolet Malibu 1G1ZA5EB3AF253378 1999 Mitsubishi Monterosport JA4LS31H8XP027035 2008 Kia Spectra KNAFE121985547920 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed – at 106 Martin Luther King Dr., Prichard, AL 36610. 2008 Mercury Mariner 4M2CU81Z78KJ42305 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed – at 10218 Hunters Trace N., Mobile, AL 36608. 2003 Chevrolet C1500 3GNEC16ZX3G187246 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed – at 19650 Shepard Lake Rd., Mount Vernon, AL 36560. 2012 Honda Accord 1HGCP2F34CA239962 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed – at 623 Neely Ave., Prichard, AL 36610. 2004 Honda Accord 1HGCM826X4A008481

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING

Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

August 10, 2017 Case No. 2013-0460-6 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of MARY JANE DYESS, Deceased On to-wit the 16th day of October, 2017 at 2:00 PM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed – at 5750 Three Notch Rd., Mobile, AL 36619. 2007 Ford E250 1FTNE24W97DB19122 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1037 St Stephens Rd., Prichard, AL 36610. 2003 Mitsubishi Outlander JA4LX31G83U020171 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 461 5th Ave., Chickasaw, AL 36611. 2009 Mitusbishi Galant 4A3AB36F29E039777 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

STYLE BOOZIE

Church and Flora-Bama kind of weekend BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

A

nother weekend is in the books! This past weekend was just as busy as the one before, and let’s just say it has taken it out of me. These weekends keep Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017 kicking my butt, but I know it’s not because I’m getting old, it’s just ... The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October umm ... the weather. 27, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 225 First Ave., Luckily, fall should be here soon Saraland, AL 36571. 2005 Nissan Altima and all will be well, right? Hopefully no 1N4AL11D152C212145 more 100 F. weekends and hurricanes! I Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, 2017 need highs in the 60s and a light jacket. The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October Until then, I’ll just keep dreaming and collecting gossip! 27, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 1600 Cedar The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7368 Tung Ave N., Theodore, AL 36582. 2000 Mazda 626 1YVGF22FXY5125364

Downs Dr., Mobile, AL 36605. 2005 Chevrolet Equinox 2CNDL13F956013905

Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 27, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 320 Martin Luther King Jr Dr., Prichard, AL 36610. 2007 Saturn VUE 5GZCZ33ZX7S871757 2001 Saturn SL1 1G8ZH52881Z273646 2000 Honda Accord 1HGCG5658YA121519 2016 Kia Forte KNAFK4A65G5496759 Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 27, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2008 Chrysler Sebring 1C3LC46K18N186526 2002 Pontiac Grand AM 1G2NF52F62C130664 Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 27, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 1105 Betty Parker Court N., Semmes, AL 36575. 2006 Gulf Stream Coach 1NL1GTR2961068638 Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 27, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 8325 Winding River Dr., Foley, AL 36535. 1993 Lexus LS400 JT8UF11E1P0184020 Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 27, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 1013 Shelton Beach Rd., Saraland, AL 36571. 1996 Chevrolet Caprice 1G1BL52P7TR103061 Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 27, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2308 Gill Rd., Mobile, AL 36605. 1996 Chevrolet C1500 1GCEC19R7TE175809 2005 Honda Civic JHMES96625S002228 Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 27, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 1527 Navco Rd., Mobile, AL 36605. 2008 Chrysler PT Cruiser 3A8FY48B58T111408 2001 Mercedes S430 WDBNG70J11A204206 Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 27, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 1628 Sigler Ave., Mobile, AL 36605. 2003 Jaguar S-Type SAJEA03V931M56377 Lagniappe HD September 21, 28, 2017

Better go to Church

Eric Church played this past Saturday night at The Wharf in Orange Beach, and there is still so much buzz about the sold-out show. Needless to say, it closed out the summer concerts at The Wharf with a bang! Ashley McBryde opened, and Boozie is going to go ahead and say it: If you haven’t heard of her, look her up now because she is bad*ss! I mean, hello, Eric Church picked her to open for him on this tour. Not to mention the fact one of her songs goes to show you can meet your future spouse at a bar. My kind of style! Then Brothers Osborne played, and they didn’t disappoint either! John Osborne had a three-minute guitar solo. For some it was awesome, but Boozie’s spy thought it should have been saved for Guitar Hero. Like his openers, Eric Church was amazing. I know my spies say every concert at The Wharf was the best show ever, but I think it’s safe to say this one was the best! My spy said it was great, and this was her second concert in three days, so she knows. The heat had everyone drinking. Eric even chugged a miniature at one point! And he commented that it was “hot as hell,” which was no joke, everyone was sweating. One guy’s shirt was so drenched it looked like he’d jumped in a pool. Gross, but can’t blame him. Drinking wasn’t the only fun being had. At one point a naked blow-up doll resembling Eric started to appear. The doll had short hair, a guitar and a drink in his hand. I guess, “All I need is a drink in my hand” was taken seriously, and that’s why the doll was missing clothes? Anyways, as the doll made its way toward the front, it caught Eric’s eye. He tried not to laugh and keep singing, but by the time the doll was at the front of the crowd he was laughing. He brought the doll onstage and kept singing, but turned to check on it a few times. Finally, he decided to address it, saying something along the lines of he’s been a lot of places but this was weird. “You Alabama people are weird.” What Boozie wants to know is how in the world did that doll make it

into the amphitheater? Just when you thought the concert couldn’t get any better, Eric invited Brothers Osborne and Ashley McBryde to the stage to join him for a song. Before starting, Eric and Ashley each took a swig of straight whiskey, yikes. Then they all sang “Proud Mary.” For those of you who don’t know, that’s the same song as “Rolling on the River.” Don’t feel bad if you didn’t know, I had to look up “Proud Mary.” Anyways they killed it, Tina would be proud! The concert wrapped up around 1 a.m. and for those who were able, it was off to Flora-Bama!

Flora-Bama lovin’

Boozie’s weekend was busy too. I had a wedding and while nothing crazy happened at the beautiful reception, the Flora-Bama provided plenty of entertainment! The wedding was early, so we were kinda early to the Bama but that didn’t matter, it was still hopping! First order of business was a bushwacker! While walking to the closest bar, a girl suddenly trips and falls. It was a little early to be that drunk but no one was judging. Then, while in line at one of the outside bars, Boozie spots a roach! I quietly say “roach” to not scare the girl it’s running toward, and a guy hears me and stomps it dead. He must be used to being the bug killer because he didn’t think twice, and meanwhile I was about to run! The night is going well, it’s cooled off a little, bands are playing when suddenly I get an extra cooldown. A girl has thrown her drink and who does the liquid land on? ME! I turn around with a death glare. She claimed it was an accident and she was trying to throw her drink away. I give her the benefit of the doubt (I was standing next to the trash can) and decide it’s time to move on. We head inside to the AC but things were getting steamy in there! As soon as we walk into the room with the pool tables, we see a couple making out. This isn’t just a little kissing, the guy is holding her while her legs are wrapped around him, and they are going to town making out. Boozie is in shock, and I wasn’t the only one; most other people in the bar had the same “what the heck?” expression on their faces. It was a sight to see. After a few more drinks and one cop chasing someone down, I decided it was time to head across the street to Waffle House. I hope things never change at Flora-Bama because that place never disappoints! Well, kids, that’s all I’ve got this week. Just remember, whether rain or shine, dramatic or scandalous, or just some plain ol’ Eric Church blow-up doll lovin’, I will be there. Ciao!

S e p t e m b e r 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 43


Lagniappe: Sept 21 - Sept 27, 2017