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WEEKLY

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LAGNIAPPE

S E P T E M B E R 1 4 , 2 0 1 7 - S E P T E M B E R 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 | w w w. l a g n i a p p e m o b i l e . c o m ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com

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BAY BRIEFS

The Department of Justice concluded its investigation into a fatal police shooting in 2016.

COMMENTARY

A few legacy-building suggestions for Mayor Sandy Stimpson.

BUSINESS

Birmingham-based TekLinks is hosting an open house Sept. 28 at its new location in downtown Mobile, the The Buick Building at 451 St. Louis St.

CUISINE

ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com

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J. MARK BRYANT Sports Writer sports@lagniappemobile.com STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA RASMUSSEN Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com

While they don’t taste anything like beer, hard sodas are, technically, flavored beers — malted alcoholic beverages with added sugars and other flavors.

COVER

The Federal Emergency Management Agency recently unveiled significant changes to Baldwin County flood maps.

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BETH WILLIAMS Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com ALEEN MOMBERGER Advertising Sales Executive aleen@lagniappemobile.com RACHEL THOMAS Advertising Sales Executive rachel@lagniappemobile.com MELISSA EDGE Editorial Assistant events@lagniappemobile.com

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ARTS

The Mobile Symphony Orchestra opens its season Sept. 23-24 with “Firebird,” featuring the music of Stravinsky and Tchaikovsky.

MUSIC

Infant Richard and the Delta Stones are back with a new singer, new album and new tour.

ROSS PRITCHARD Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager jackie@lagniappemobile.com CONTRIBUTORS: Ron Sivak, Jeff Poor, Asia Frey, Brian Holbert, John Mullen, Tom Ward, Alice Marty ON THE COVER: UNDER WATER POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Editorial, advertising and production offices are located at 1100B Dauphin St. Mobile, AL 36604. Mailing address is P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Phone: 251.450.4466 Fax 251.450.4498. Email: ashleytoland@lagniappemobile.com or rholbert@lagniappemobile.com LAGNIAPPE is printed at Walton Press. All letters sent to Lagniappe are considered to be intended for publication. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and Alternative Weeklies Network All rights reserved. Something Extra Publishing, Inc. Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced without the expressed permission of the publishers. Individuals may take one copy of the paper free of charge from area businesses, racks or boxes. After that, papers are $3 per issue. Removal of more than one copy from these points constitutes theft. Violators are subject to prosecution.

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26 32 39 38 42 FILM

A short list of films to take your mind off an increasingly polarized political climate and raging natural disasters.

GARDENING

Pesticides and herbicides are major contributors to the loss of breeding habitat affecting monarch butterflies.

SPORTS

The United States Sports Academy signed an agreement with Stillman College to share its Master of Sports Science degree program.

STYLE

Alabama opens its arms to Irma evacuees and Green Day put on quite the show at The Wharf.

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GOING POSTAL

60 years of Boys & Girls Clubs SUBMITTED — Originally known as “Boys’ Club of Mobile” when it was established in 1957, Boys & Girls Clubs of South Alabama (BGCSA) has stretched from the Bayou to the Battleship serving youth everywhere in between for the past 60 years. In celebration as a continued leader in youth development across South Alabama, the nonprofit is driving an “Alumni Come Home” campaign aimed at inspiring alumni to share their success stories and invest time and resources back into current club kids. Celebrating the past 60 years, BGCSA hopes to utilize the success stories of its alumni as a reflection of the lasting impact Boys & Girls Clubs has on kids and teens, not only locally but nationally. Amazing stories of leadership, service, academic excellence, spirit and hope serve as insight to the past of yesterday’s youth and inspiration for tomorrow’s leaders. “For any nonprofit, 60 years of service is a true testament to many successes, but there is still so much to accomplish, with almost 29 percent of Mobile County’s youth living in poverty and 25 percent living in a food insecure home,” Tim Wills, BGCSA chief executive officer, said. “With this campaign, we hope to unite community-minded businesses and alumni in helping us to eradicate these negative statistics plaguing our youth.” As part of the campaign, BGCSA is partnering with local and national businesses to celebrate, support and bring awareness to the past, and also to the current happenings aimed at ensuring every young person living in our community has the platform to build a great future. “By businesses partnering with Boys & Girls Clubs of South Alabama for the ‘Alumni Come Home’ campaign, they are not only providing the necessary resources for specific youth development programs, but also highlighting the organization’s needed visibility within the community to connect past alumni like myself with current happenings,” local alumna Moshae Donald, Esq., said. If you are a BGCSA alumnus, please visit bgcsouthal.org/

2017 Youth of the Year Finalists from left to right; Daleeicia, Jace, Jadah, Kelsey (winner) and Jakobie . alumni to join our newly implemented Alumni & Friends community. Once there, you can view a list of all past and current clubs, share your stories and connect with club members. Furthermore, stay up-to-date on partnerships, announcements and potential service opportunities relating to the campaign via BGCSA’s social media platforms. Through several name changes and clubs opening and closing, Boys & Girls Clubs of South Alabama has pioneered, growing into what is now six year-round and four

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summer clubs providing structured, high-impact programs for youth ages 6 to 18 who reside in Mobile County. By providing access to positive and productive afterschool and summer programs facilitated through caring mentors, BGCSA helps reverse negative trends facing youth, including hopelessness, poor health, risky lifestyles, violence and high dropout rates. For more information or to participate, visit www.bgcsouthal.org.


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BAYBRIEF | PRICHARD

Contract questions

PRICHARD WATER BOARD DIRECTOR QUESTIONS CONTRACTOR AGREEMENT BY DALE LIESCH

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longtime member of the Prichard Water Works and Sewer board of directors has publicly questioned the hiring of a former consultant set to make $270,000 on a three-year contract. Russell Heidelburg, who has been a director since 2008, said the board acted irresponsibly in approving the contract for Nia Bradley. “I call it ignorant racketeering,” he said. “They didn’t do anything to cover their tracks. They are not acting with fiduciary responsibility.” The money for the contract, which is roughly $7,500 per month, was not in the budget when the board agreed to hire Bradley. Heidelburg also said her duties as laid out in the contract are vague at best. But Bradley said she will be helping to bring the board in compliance with the Alabama Department of Environmental Management. She previously worked for Severn Trent when the company managed the system for the board. She also does work for Daphne Utilities, she said. Bradley said she finds Heidelburg’s questioning of the contract “interesting,” as he, acting as board chairman at the time, hired her as a consultant. She argued that his problem with her contract stems from a larger power struggle between him and current board chairman Nathaniel Inge. In late 2015, the board changed its bylaws and elected new officers. Heidelburg was elected chairman. Attorneys for Inge said the move wasn’t legal because it was done in a special meeting that Inge, chairman at the time, did not call for. Inge’s attorneys said the bylaws state that only the board chairman can call a special meeting. Inge has since become chairman again. Bradley’s contract does have some interesting caveats, though. For instance, the contract states that Bradley can only be terminated for cause if

she is convicted of a crime related to fraud. Even if the board terminates the contract “for cause,” she is to be paid the remainder of the contract. In any other case, Bradley will be owed the money remaining on the contract in its entirety upon being released from the contract. Attorney Raymond Bell, who works with board attorney Jay Ross, questioned the “for cause” portion of the contract in a letter to directors. “It is advisable to expand this provision to provide any and all ‘for cause’ grounds,” Bell wrote. “ … It is unimaginable that the board would terminate the contractor for cause and also agree to pay the balance of the agreement.” Bradley said she had the “for cause” section of the contract added because she didn’t want to be terminated because of the ongoing power struggle between Heidelburg and Inge. Bradley, who began her 20 years of experience as a board employee, said she hates to be thrust into the middle of issues between Inge and Heidelburg and only wants to work for the citizens. “This is all for the citizens of Prichard,” she said. “My heart is here. This is not about the [power] struggle, this is only about getting the board in compliance and saving them money.” As for the length and the amount of the contract, both Bradley and Inge said it is pretty standard. “Actually it’s kind of low for what they’re asking and the money I’m going to save them,” Bradley said. Heidelburg also inferred Inge and Bradley were related. Inge and Bradley both denied this. In a report to the board during the Monday, Sept. 11, regular meeting, Bradley said she had ridden with system manager Bill Swopes to all of the system’s facilities. She said she would regularly report to the board at the meetings.

BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Budget talks continue

MOBILE CITY COUNCIL DEBATES BUDGET SPENDING, COUNTY RENT BY DALE LIESCH

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ouncilors asked about the prospect of adding bonuses for all city employees during discussions of Mayor Sandy Stimpson’s proposed 2018 fiscal year budget. During a pre-conference meeting Tuesday, Sept. 12, in the council conference room in Government Plaza, Councilman Levon Manzie said he has been told an agreement could be reached to offer firefighters longevity pay, and he was hopeful the city could extend bonuses to all other city employees as well. Councilman John Williams asked his colleagues to not forget about the city’s retirees during these discussions, as they haven’t been included in the most recent raises. He said to talk about bonuses for other employees and leave them out is “unfair.” “We’ve given everybody multiple raises and had nothing for them,” Williams said. “In many cases they’re the ones hurting the most.” In addition to the discussion of raises, Councilwoman Bess Rich brought up concerns over

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the city’s recent failure to pay rent to the county for use of Government Plaza. County Commissioner Connie Hudson has said the city owes the county more than $500,000 in back rent. The city admits it hasn’t paid rent since February, but says the decision was made in response to losses the city incurred collecting the county’s taxes in recent years.The city’s collection of county tax is tied into the rent agreement the governments signed in 1991. City attorney Ricardo Woods said the city is looking for a more favorable rent agreement since the county began telling taxpayers to use a state-sponsored online portal. Woods said the sides have agreed to come together to discuss a solution. Councilman Joel Daves called a 3 p.m. finance committee meeting for Monday, Sept. 18, to discuss the budget. The council, which delayed a vote on the budget again this week could make a final decision on it on as early as Tuesday, Sept. 19.


BAYBRIEF | UTILITIES

No easy fix

MAWSS GRAPPLES WITH FAILURE OF SPANISH FORT WATER PIPE PROJECT BY DALE LIESCH

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$3 million project to upgrade a water main across the Mobile-Tensaw Delta has hit an unexpected snag and work has been temporarily stopped, according to a Mobile Area Water and Sewer System spokeswoman. The project, which involves installing an 18-inch ductile iron pipe, was halted after the project’s casing pipe collapsed, MAWSS spokeswoman Barbara Shaw wrote in an email. “The permanent repairs called for 3,000 feet of 36-inch steel casing to be pulled through a directionally drilled bore nearly 90 feet under the river,” she wrote. “When contractors pulled the casing through, the casing pipe collapsed. This stopped work on the project until contractors could determine why the collapse occurred and how the problem will be corrected.” While work has been halted, Shaw said she believes it could begin again as early as next week, once the contractor figures out what caused the issue. Any additional cost should be incurred by the contractor, she said before the meeting of the MAWSS Board of Commissioners Sept. 11. “MAWSS expects the contractor to identify a path forward in the next few days,” Shaw wrote. The project became necessary in January when there was a failure in a segment of pipe carrying water across the causeway from Mobile to Spanish Fort. The failure caused a service disruption for roughly 30 customers, including several area restaurants. MAWSS replaced the

bad line with a temporary solution above and at the waterline, which is still in place. In April, the board approved a contract with Construction Labor Services for a total of $3,071,089.41 to replace one segment of ductile iron pipe at one boring, which is directional drilling underneath the water. The initial bid, which was opened in late February, was for more than $5 million and included more segments and a second boring. In order to move forward with the lower-cost option, the board had to approve a change order eliminating the second boring. In addition to the work on the single boring and segment, the contract includes work on installing emergency connection stub-outs for easier bypasses if there is another rupture, MAWSS Assistant Director Doug Cote said at the time. Following the recommendation of staff, the board voted to reject a number of bids to increase the line size due to a lack of funding. While a number of bids came in for the work, they ranged from $4.3 million to $23 million. Commissioners ultimately went with a cheaper option based on staff recommendations. In other business, the board discussed the possibility of a one-time bonus for retirees, which would cost $127,024 for all 225 retirees. Commissioners asked for more information on the proposal to possibly put it on the October agenda. The proposal must be approved by Oct. 31.

BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

There’s a way

CITY OF MOBILE TO OFFER WILLS TO LOW-INCOME FAMILIES BY DALE LIESCH

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he city of Mobile found a solution to a problem affecting 1,300 to 1,400 households, one that could potentially prevent neighborhoods from falling into decline. Facilitated by Legal Services Alabama’s Mobile office, the “Leaving a Legacy” program will help provide free wills to low-income residents of the city. The program will not only help those in need, but will benefit the city by helping prevent future blight problems affecting properties without heirs. Homes often, if not specifically added to a will, are left with no clear owner and become heir property, according to a statement from Mayor Sandy Stimpson’s office. “Heir property is one of the greatest contributing factors to blight in any medium to large-size city, Mobile included,” the statement reads. “These types of properties are often not transferred properly or are transferred to multiple heirs. This is particularly a problem when the heirs include multiple generations and are out of state, causing the home to become forgotten, abandoned and unmaintained.” Jamey Roberts, senior director of neighborhood development, said a simple windshield survey of homes in the city revealed that more than 1,300 fell under this distinction. Many of those homes have already or could fall into disrepair, leaving a long-term impact on entire neighborhoods. “We run into some problems with heir properties,” he said. “ … They can stall out a

new market and then it spirals down and affects neighboring properties. Just about every problem we have is because of heir property.” LSA will be hiring an attorney using Community Development Block Grants to oversee the program, Roberts said. That person will first hold seminars on the general importance of wills to help market the program, Roberts said, before meeting one-on-one with anyone who qualifies under the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development guidelines. The guidelines state that in order to qualify, a family of four must make $44,100 or less annually. The one-on-one meetings will help turn a sometimes arduous process of creating a will into a simple step-by-step project. “We want to leave a legacy, not a burden,” Stimpson said in the statement. “This program ensures the multi-generational loss of wealth is not passed down to future generations. It is one more piece to the puzzle to restoring our historic neighborhoods and leads us farther on the path to becoming to becoming the safest, most business and family-friendly city.” Roberts said the city hopes to help 100 residents complete wills within the first year of the program. Going forward, an applicant for housing rehabilitation assistance with the city will have to have created a will first, Roberts said. Roberts, who held a similar position with the city of Birmingham, said he helped create a will program there and it was very successful. He hopes that success can translate to Mobile.

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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE COUNTY

‘Step up’

COUNTY AGREES TO FUND LOCAL COURT POSITIONS, FOR NOW BY JASON JOHNSON

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efore they’d even sorted the final details of their own budget, Mobile County Commissioners agreed to set aside hundreds of thousands of dollars to help cover funding losses in the local judicial system that have been repeatedly and routinely incurred at the state level. All three commissioners voted Monday to approve a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with the Administrative Office Courts, which operates the state court system in Alabama including the 13th Circuit in Mobile County. The MOU sets the groundwork for a one-time reimbursement of $392,000, which the county will use to repay the state’s costs of funding “attendant” and “legal research assistant” positions in local courts that might have otherwise have been cut. Attorney Jay Ross said 13th Circuit Presiding Judge John R. Lockett requested the county’s help earlier this year. “The commission is under no obligation to fund these positions but wants to help the judicial system,” Ross said. “Mobile County has one of the busiest dockets in the state, and AOC reduced its funding by almost $400,000.” Ensuring Alabama’s legal system is properly funded locally is nothing new for the commission, which spent years in a lawsuit with District Attorney Ashley Rich over county’s obligation to fund local prosecutors, despite them technically being employees of the state. While commissioners unanimously approved Lockett’s request for funding assistance, all three put the state on notice that Mobile County’s generosity shouldn’t be counted on next year. “This is another one of those situations where a state function is just being underfunded, and we’re doing what we can to try to help with that, once again,” Commission

President Merceria Ludgood said. “We really need the state to step up and do what it needs to do in order to make sure we’re fully and properly funding these essential operations of government like the courts.” Commissioner Jerry Carl said it was made “very clear” Mobile County would not do the same the next year, while Commissioner Connie Hudson simply said, “We cannot take over the funding responsibilities of the state. We just can’t.”

Oil revenues may be “gobbled up”

As Mobile County begins to evaluate potential uses for a significant increase in funding from offshore oil revenues, there’s growing concern that natural disasters along the Gulf Coast might prompt that money to be redirected federally. Revenue generated by offshore oil leases is distributed according to the Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act (GOMESA). The 2006 law set boundaries for oil exploration in the Gulf and established a program to share federal revenues with coastal states and counties. In 2018, Mobile and Baldwin counties’ share of those revenues is projected to increase dramatically. Environmental Services Director Bill Melton previously estimated that, on the “lower end of the projected allocations,” Mobile County could see an additional $4 million by March 2018, though he noted revenue fluctuates with oil prices and demand. However, turbulence in Washington and in the waters of the Atlantic have created some political hurdles for that funding. In May, President Donald Trump’s 2018 budget proposal came with a recommendation to repeal GOMESA entirely. The White House suggested that ending GOMESA revenue sharing would save the federal government $272

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million a year, but the losses to Gulf states through 2027 could top $3.5 billion. Alabama alone would potentially forfeit up to $56 million each year. For Commissioner Jerry Carl, the idea of GOMESA funding being repurposed in Washington, D.C., did not sit well, especially considering how coastal Alabama fared in the multi-billion-dollar settlement with BP resulting from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. “The state took most of our BP money and gave it to other areas across Alabama that were not affected. This move will do the same thing on a national level,” he added. “GOMESA has to remain here on the Gulf.” U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne recently sponsored a successful amendment in the House that could add some protection, though. Byrne, who’s defended GOMESA revenue shares in the past, said he’s committed to making sure those dollars stay in the coastal communities that provide “a significant infrastructure and workforce for the oil and gas industry.” However, Melton recently said there are new concerns oil revenue could be redirected to fund federal disaster relief efforts, which could be staggering in the wake of hurricanes Harvey and Irma. “What’s on the federal mind right now is to use that money to help fund [the Federal Emergency Management Agency] because these disasters are beyond even the capability of the federal government, apparently,” Melton said. “Keep in mind that, when a disaster happens, our biggest role — other than saving lives — is recovery, and nothing is more expensive.” Still, Ludgood is pushing the county to evaluate potential projects and uses for its GOMESA funding, even with concerns that those dollars could be “gobbled up by Washington.” GOMESA funding has a limited number of acceptable uses, most of which have an environmental focus. Though no projects have been identified, the county has used similar funding in the past to preserve important coastal ecosystem water sources. “GOMESA provides critically important funding to Alabama and other Gulf states that bear the impact and potential risks involved with offshore oil and gas activity,” Hudson said. “It is the major source of funding in Mobile County to address conservation, wetland and ecosystem restoration and hurricane protection issues.” An overview of projected funding and its potential uses is scheduled during the Commission’s Oct. 9 meeting. For Ludgood, who said the recent flooding seen in Houston put GOMESA funding on her mind, her immediate priority is stormwater management. “Every time I see one of these cities underwater, it reminds me that we have significant stormwater issues in our community,” Ludgood said. “[That] must be a priority, and GOMESA is an important part of funding what needs to be done.”


BAYBRIEF | BALDWIN COUNTY

Turn for the worse

BUSINESSES SAY ORANGE BEACH U-TURN SYSTEM COSTS THEM MONEY BY JOHN MULLEN

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hris Ybarra is happy the state listened when he asked for a change in a roadway plan in front of his business, Cotton’s Restaurant in Orange Beach. The initial configuration in the U-turn project at his front entrance would have drastically hurt his bottom line, Ybarra said. “My projections were it would have cut my business probably somewhere between 50 to 75 percent,” he said. “It would have choked my business off.” But Ybarra is one of very few people happy about the new traffic patterns on Alabama 182 from Cotton Bayou Beach Access on the east to West Loop Road on the west. But his happiness was short-lived. “It’s had a negative impact on my business because of the construction, and they didn’t get completed until the 8th or 10th of May,” Ybarra said. “The summer was not as promising.” Up and down the beach road, business owners are saying the same thing. “It’s been a nightmare,” Café Beignet owner Al Joseph said. Joseph said his business depends on impulse buying. When cars pass by and see his sign, they might stop to try his beignets. “They’ve taken that away,” he said. “Now you can’t turn in. You have to go down there and make a U-turn, and by then you’ve seen two or three other places. It’s killed our inside business. We no longer have the west-to-east trade turning in. They have to go down to Publix,

almost to state Route 161.” Off-beach businesses report they are feeling the impact as well. Tacky Jack’s CFO Ken Kichler said business at the Orange Beach store isn’t growing at the same rate it did in 2016, and he believes part of the reason is the new road configuration. In July he was in west Orange Beach, which has a majority of condo rentals, and put Tacky Jack’s in his GPS. “It tells you to make a left turn on 161, but you can’t make that turn anymore,” Kichler said. “The next direction, it basically took you to the bottom of the bridge and you had to do a U-turn.” ALDOT spokesperson Cheyenne West said the state is working with GPS companies to get the glitches worked out. She also said the state received negative comments when the road first opened. She said those have faded as drivers learn to navigate the road. City Administrator Ken Grimes said in a three-year period there were more than 270 accidents on the same stretch of road, including five fatalities. He said more than 70 percent of those involved left-turn movements. “Is it more of an inconvenience?” Grimes asked. “And the answer is yes. But it does flow and you are safer.” More U-turns are coming. Phase II of the median project will start at West Loop Road and go west to the Romar Beach Access. Construction is scheduled to start in October.

Welcome mat

IRMA EVACUEES FILL BALDWIN HOTELS, VACATION RENTALS BY JOHN MULLEN

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uring normal business hours, you’re not likely to run across a pet in the lobby of the Holiday Inn Express and Suites in Daphne. “We don’t normally allow pets,” manager Steven Peacock said. This past weekend was anything but normal. Evacuees from Florida seeking safe shelter from Hurricane Irma started arriving on Friday. On Monday morning, Baldwin County EMA director Reggie Chitwood said every hotel in the county was full during the weekend. “All of our hotels have been full for several days and most of our campgrounds,” Chitwood said. “That started happening Friday. We have 44 dedicated campsites [at the Baldwin County Coliseum] with hookups for RVs, and we’ve got 20 of those filled.” And in Daphne, there were lots of puppies roaming around the Holiday Inn. “We have all kinds of neat dogs running around everywhere,” Peacock said. The welcome mat was out all over Baldwin County for those fleeing the storm. Beach condos and other vacation rentals were near capacity as well. On the beach, several companies and properties also waived rules on pets. Peacock said when guests had to be turned away from the Holiday Inn, he sent them to shelters. “We have a list of the shelters in the area we were giving people when we were sold out,” Peacock said. “The one in Robertsdale and the Gulf Coast Maritime Museum in Mobile.” The Baldwin County Coliseum in Roberts-

dale was the main facility, and Chitwood said 435 people were housed there. “Everybody’s comfortable, they have everything that they need and the outpouring from the community has been outstanding,” he said. “We couldn’t ask for any better operation.” The Red Cross is in charge of the Robertsdale shelter during most emergency events, Chitwood said. “Our memorandum of understanding is with the Red Cross to handle our shelter in an event like this, a non-wind event,” he said. “This is considered a non-wind event because we’re not actually under the hurricane activity. “We turn it over to the Red Cross and they do what they do and they’ve done an outstanding job with it. Myself, Sheriff Hoss Mack and the commission, we’re just supporting them.” In case of an overflow crowd, Chitwood said, the Red Cross had already made plans to use the Fairhope United Methodist Church. The coliseum can shelter 2,000 people comfortably, and up to 5,000 in emergency situations. “I don’t think we got to that point,” he said. Statewide, Alabama made all its state park campgrounds and parking lots at parks available to those fleeing the storm. And where there are lodges in state parks, pets were allowed, with the normal pet cleaning fee. “We will waive our cancellation policy and refund guest deposits for any of our patrons who have existing overnight reservations for the coming week, or next weekend [Sept. 15-17],” Greg Lein, Alabama State Parks System director, said.

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BAYBRIEF | COURTS

Case closed DOJ CONCLUDES INVESTIGATION INTO DEADLY POLICE SHOOTING BY JASON JOHNSON

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he United States Department of Justice announced Sept. 7 that it will not pursue federal criminal charges against former Mobile police officer Harold Hurst, who shot and killed 19-yearold Michael Moore during a 2016 traffic stop in Mobile. Officials from the DOJ’s Civil Rights Division, the U.S. Attorney’s Office in Mobile and the FBI notified Moore’s family of the determination, stating that “the evidence obtained through the course of a rigorous investigation is insufficient to prove [Hurst] willfully used excessive force.” According to the DOJ, the department devoted significant time and resources to investigating the events surrounding Moore’s death, which occurred on June 13, 2016, in Mobile near the University of South Alabama Medical Center. “A team of experienced career federal prosecutors from the Criminal Section of the Civil Rights Division and the U.S. Attorney’s Office reviewed evidence obtained by the FBI and state investigators to determine whether the officer violated any federal laws,” a DOJ statement reads. “They conducted a detailed and lengthy analysis of numerous materials, including police reports, law enforcement accounts, witness statements, affidavits of witnesses, dispatch logs, physical evidence reports, the autopsy report, photographs, videos of some portions of the incident and conducted additional witness interviews.” The DOJ’s assessment of what led up to the shooting were similar to accounts initially given by the Mobile Police Department: Moore made an erratic turn while driving a car that had been reported stolen, and, when pulled over, provided Hurst with a false driver’s license number.

As was the case in the local investigation, there were “conflicting eyewitness accounts” from residents and motorists traveling through the area about what happened once Moore exited the vehicle — “critical events” that weren’t captured on video because Hurst was not equipped with a body camera at the time. “Both passengers inside Moore’s vehicle acknowledged that they saw Moore with a firearm prior to the shooting. One passenger observed a firearm in Moore’s car seat before encountering the officer, and the other saw a firearm in Moore’s waistband once he stepped outside the vehicle,” the DOJ statement reads. “Some eyewitnesses describe Moore pulling up his pants or having his hands

MOORE EXITED THE VEHICLE WITH A CELL PHONE IN HIS RIGHT HAND, HE ASKED MOORE TO PUT THE CELL PHONE DOWN, AND WHEN MOORE BENT DOWN TO PUT THE PHONE ON THE GROUND, HE SAW A GUN IN MOORE’S WAISTBAND.” by his waist immediately prior to the shooting. Others describe Moore ‘snatching’ his hand downward or ‘flinching’ at the time of the shooting.” The DOJ’s account of interviews with Hurst are also consistent with statements he made to local investigators following the incident: Moore exited the vehicle with a cell phone in his right hand, he asked Moore to put the cell

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phone down, and when Moore bent down to put the phone on the ground, he saw a gun in Moore’s waistband. “The officer commanded Moore not to reach for the gun, but Moore did so, at which time the officer shot Moore causing Moore to fall to the ground,” the statement reads. “While on the ground, the officer again commanded Moore not to reach for the gun. However, Moore reached for the gun, and the officer shot him again.” The DOJ also acknowledged one of the more controversial pieces of evidence that came to light in the aftermath of Moore’s death — that the firearm was found under Moore’s right hip in the waistband of his shorts, but only after he’d been transported from the scene to the University of South Alabama Medical Center. “Under the applicable federal criminal civil rights laws, prosecutors must establish, beyond a reasonable doubt, that an officer ‘willfully’ deprived an individual of a constitutional right, meaning the officer acted with the deliberate and specific intent to do something the law forbids,” the DOJ statement reads. “This is the highest standard of intent imposed by the law. Neither accident, mistake, fear, negligence, nor bad judgment is sufficient to establish a willful federal criminal civil rights violation.” Using those measurements, investigators concluded the government couldn’t “disprove the officer’s claim that he believed that Moore was reaching for a firearm, that he feared for his life, and that he made the split-second decision to defend it.” The announcement from the DOJ on Thursday cleared Hurst from any possible criminal liability in Moore’s death. A Mobile County grand jury already elected not to pursue criminal charges against him at the state level last fall. However, Hurst still faces a federal civil lawsuit filed by Moore’s family in 2016. According to court records, a stay in that case was lifted Monday. Hurst, who worked as an MPD officer for more than four years at the time of Moore’s death, retired just last week after spending the past 14 months on paid administrative leave. Following the conclusion of the federal investigation, Mobile Mayor Sandy Stimpson issued a statement referring to Moore’s death as a “tragedy,” and vowing to continue efforts to improve police relations with communities in all areas of Mobile. “Since the shooting of Michael Moore, the city of Mobile has taken unprecedented steps to ensure transparency — incorporating lessons learned from other communities that have experienced similar tragedies,” Stimpson wrote. “Our prayers remain with all of the families affected by this incident. We continue to work as a city to strengthen the relationship between law enforcement and the citizens we serve.”


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COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

Some legacy-building ideas for Stimpson ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

A bay-front park

First and foremost, one thing this mayor and City Council should really take seriously is finding a way to give citizens of this burg an opportunity to get out on our famous bay without having to either inherit a house or be otherwise financially blessed. Yes, I’m talking about creating a bay-front park. While the vast majority of city frontage along Mobile Bay is privately owned and part of residences,

FIRST AND FOREMOST, ONE THING THIS MAYOR AND CITY COUNCIL SHOULD REALLY TAKE SERIOUSLY IS FINDING A WAY TO GIVE CITIZENS OF THIS BURG AN OPPORTUNITY TO GET OUT ON OUR FAMOUS BAY WITHOUT HAVING TO EITHER INHERIT A HOUSE OR BE OTHERWISE FINANCIALLY BLESSED.”

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The bridge

So, speaking of congestion, let’s hope this next four years ends with a new Interstate 10 bridge actively being constructed. No one can really argue any longer that we don’t need this bridge. It should have been started at least five years ago. While the multiple sources of funding and massive cost of the project are primarily what have kept it on the drawing board so far, the city needs to make more noise about getting it done. There will be a governor’s race next year, and that’s a great opportunity for Stimpson to bend a lot of ears, because it’s going to take support at the state and federal level to get this thing built. I’m not saying the mayor hasn’t been active, but maybe it’s time he loaded up all those gubernatorial candidates, members of ALDOT and federal transportation experts

into a car and tried to drive them through the Wallace Tunnel at 5 p.m. on a Friday. They’ll be begging to fund the bridge.

Litter

Sandy, if there’s one other thing you could do to really leave a long-standing mark on this city in your second term, somehow breaking the citizenry’s love affair with throwing trash into the streets would be it. The city has made some strides over the past four years, and I know litter is one of Stimpson’s biggest irritations, but it’s time to get really crazy. There are still just too many people who toss cans, cigarette butts, fast-food bags and dirty diapers out of their car windows. It’s like they’re in some kind of 60 mph Mardi Gras parade where people want to catch filthy diapers. We need a good anti-litter campaign and the cops should write tickets to people throwing anything out of their windows. On top of that, the city needs to find a way to take on the Press-Register’s hurling of thousands of plastic bags containing unwanted advertising circulars every week. It’s amazing such a high-profile and at one time very important corporate citizen continues to throw thousands of pounds of trash onto streets and sidewalks every week and the city has to stand by meekly while they do it. If by the end of the next four years it’s possible to drive on litter-free streets down to a new bay-front park where one can look north and see the new I-10 bridge well under construction, that would be a job well done.

THEGADFLY

the University of South Alabama Foundation has roughly 300 acres of land at Brookley that would make an amazing park. Most of that is the former USA Gulf Pines golf course — a truly gorgeous piece of real estate. The Foundation has repeatedly made clear it wants to develop this property, but it seems like such a huge waste to have it rolled over to create Days Inns, extended-stay condos or whatever they have in mind. For some reason we Mobilians have become complacent about not having access to both our river and our bay. More than a few people I’ve met over the years were actually surprised to know there IS a river downtown. But the river is heavily industrialized already and not really conducive to water sports or fishing, unless getting run over by a tugboat is your idea of a good time. The land at Brookley, though, would provide great access to the bay, where people could fish and swim, or paddleboard and kayak. Imagine how nice it would be to take a five-minute drive to a park where you could actually enjoy the water you might have read about in a history book. Ever since the Deepwater Horizon exploded and the always-about-to-be-released BP money became a constant discussion, it has seemed like a no-brainer for Mobile to somehow use that money to make the Foundation an offer it can’t refuse in order to create Mobile’s most important park. What would be more environmentally sound than preserving acres of oakcovered shoreline? If Mobile could accomplish this — along with adding a pier that’s one foot longer than Fairhope’s — it would be transformative. It would also greatly help

improve downtown living to have a terrific park just a few minutes away. Maybe even a trolley from the park to downtown as well? Once that land is gone, it’s gone. There won’t be another opportunity for the city of Mobile to reconnect with its namesake bay. And as traffic congestion makes it harder and harder to get over to Baldwin County to visit the beaches, many of us will just end up as pathetic landlubbers who might as well be living in a mall. (OK, maybe it’s not that bad, but you get the drift.) Of course creating such a park would be expensive and complex, but unlike Mobile’s history of build-it-and-they-willcome projects, a waterfront park is sure to be used for generations.

Cartoon/Laura Rasmussen

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ow that Mayor Sandy Stimpson has been reelected and is all snuggled in for another four years running America’s most potentially exciting city, it seems like a good time to pester hizzoner about a few things that might make his second four years even more memorable than the first. While Stimpson is certain to keep pushing his One Mobile theme, along with plans to make the city safer and more family- and business-friendly by 2020, there are still other things he should tackle that could leave a lasting legacy. I’ll admit up front some readers may find these ideas a little pie-in-the-sky, but if you’ll just settle down and drink four or five strong cocktails, it’ll all start to make sense.

PERHAPS FAIRHOPE’S DISPUTES CAN BEST BE SETTLED BY JUDGE STEVE HARVEY IN THE COURT OF FAMILY FEUD.


COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

A cone of uncertain, random, post-hurricane thoughts ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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urricane Irma has been on the minds of many a Mobilian over the past week or so. After absolutely decimating the Caribbean islands, she ultimately decided to visit the Sunshine State and make it not so “sunshiney.” Thankfully, Irma left us alone for the most part, only giving us a little bit of wind and strangely chugging our bay down her pie hole, or I guess I should say her “eye hole” (or whatever it is she did with it). Though it could have been much, much worse, there will still be lots of cleanup and rebuilding to do for our friends in Florida. And God help those poor island nations, where the devastation is vast and catastrophic. Irma continues to be downgraded as she steadily loses her steam and meanders to the west. Since she started petering out, my thoughts have been sort of the same way — becoming increasingly disorganized over time. So, to get my head as clear as the now bright, blue skies, I am going to clean it out on this page to make room for more orderly thoughts. Check back next week for a column that may have more coherence. Don’t hold me to it though, I said MAY. What a truly kind and wonderful city we have. After Harvey, countless area organizations and individuals collected money and supplies to deliver to Texas. During Irma, we placed the welcome mat down at the city limits and greeted evacuees and their pets with open arms. There was such an overwhelming outpouring of kindness to these people from our residents. With restaurants like Heroes and T.P. Crockmiers, as well as many other churches and civic groups, donating meals to the folks sheltering at The Grounds, to families who organized activities in Cathedral Square, our citizens stepped up to the plate. Many restaurants and businesses offered free or discounted items to these people, among many other small acts of kindness. It was so wonderful to see and it makes me proud to call this city home. Are we ready for the big one? This week marks the 38th anniversary of Frederic, one of, if not the most, devastating hurricanes to hit our area. After Harvey, my husband and I looked to the back of our own neighborhood, where Three Mile Creek runs. We wondered just how far it would rise into our ‘hood in Harvey-like conditions? With so much water flowing through the city, how would Mobile fare as a whole in a 100- or 1,000-year-flood event? With regular ol’ rainstorms sometimes flooding our streets, it’s not a pretty thought. And with powerful winds like Irma, when she was at her strongest, how would our structures hold up in a storm like that? Sure, modern edifices have been built to higher

standards and codes, but we still have a lot of historical buildings and houses in close proximity to Mobile Bay. What if the “big one” came right up her mouth? Yikes! I hope we don’t have to find out these answers firsthand anytime soon, but with folks suffering to our east and west at the hands of these two very different storms, it sure has me thinking about these very different and very frightening scenarios — and if there are any lessons to be learned on things we can do now to prevent such devastating outcomes. Speaking of disasters, have you seen this Senate race? Almost as frightening as a natural disaster, just a reminder the Republican runoff for the U.S. Senate seat vacated by Jeff Sessions is between a guy who has been removed from office TWICE and the dude who is currently holding the seat, but who sold his soul to a horny old devil to get it. With all of our attention focused on the hurricanes, I had rather blissfully forgotten about this for a tiny bit. Icky, icky, icky. These are not good choices, people. As such, it has led to some speculating that Democrat Doug Jones may actually have a shot at winning the general, no matter which one of the two evils wins out. Jones, a former U.S. attorney with a very impressive resume, including convicting two former Klansmen in the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, looks like a far better choice than Removable Roy or Sleazy Luther. Well, except Jones is clearly crazy, as he is a Democrat running for office … in Alabama. Did you hear me? That’s right, I said Democrat … in Alabama … running for office. He must be nuts! Sadly, in this polarized climate and in this state, in particular, if I were a betting gal, I would still put my money on one of the other two clowns. As disgraceful and embarrassing as they both are, people still put party over person. Thank God football is back Even though that dismal race is almost as depressing as national politics and natural disasters, we do thankfully have football to take our minds off of it. It is so nice to have all that political nastiness on our social media feeds replaced with friends playfully calling each other “Bammers” and “Barners” and criticizing Clemson for rushing the field or Oklahoma for planting flags. It has been absolutely refreshing to watch Auburn fans jumping off the Gus Bus and Saban acting like an ass to the media. And yes, even the Saints stinking it up on Monday Night Football is a sight for very sore eyes. It seems like all is right with the world again — at least for a few hours at a time on Saturday, Sunday and Monday nights. And you know what? I’ll take it.

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COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

Be on guard for anti-elite elitism BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM

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ack in the 1990s, there was a commercial for Pace Picante Sauce. It featured a group of good ol’ boy types sitting around a campfire, and for whatever reason, eating picante sauce. A jar of Pace’s picante sauce runs out. The replacement jar is less than satisfactory because it isn’t Pace and, as it turned out, was made in New York City. “New York City!” they exclaimed in disgust. The moral of that story was Pace, the brand made in San Antonio, was superior to the one made in New York City because New York City — what do they know about food for the common folk? There is something completely repulsive about some know-it-all guy from a big city like New York, Washington or Los Angeles telling us what is best for us. Last November’s election was a rejection of this (despite a New York City real estate developer being the beneficiary). No way — these self-appointed philosopher kings sipping on lattes in their artsy-fartsy metropolis hipster havens were not going to dictate to the rest of the country how we should run our lives, as ballots were cast for Donald Trump over Hillary Clinton. It was a natural and perhaps justifiable reaction to a lot of the force-fed political correctness. And it’s not exclusively a political phenomenon. Americans are told they must reject some historical symbols because they’re insensitive. Gender is no longer a physical attribute — it’s a state of mind. Being against illegal immigration is racist. For all of this, Newton’s third law of physics seems to apply: For every action, there is an equal and opposite reaction. It’s not that there’s just a rejection of these assertions from our fellow left-leaning mindless ne’er-do-wells populating our big cities. It’s a rejection of almost everything they do. The idea is that the elites on Wall Street, in Hollywood and in Washington don’t get it. Other than Pace Picante Sauce, there are other gimmicks that play off of this — such as the Farmers Only dating website and its slogan, “City folks just don’t get it.” But at what point does it become anti-elitism elitism? With all of this, we run the danger of rejecting everything just because it is born in places that dismiss flyover country’s way of life. Granted, the elites in our society have more

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influence in day-to-day life because they control Hollywood, Washington, Wall Street and Madison Avenue. Be on guard against making these judgments. It’s an easy trap to fall into. “Well, if they don’t like it in Washington, it must be good for America.” That might be true sometimes, but not always. That’s the mentality that has created the caustic situation in American politics and culture. One side thinks the stupid hicks in their little towns aren’t allowing the country to progress and another side thinks the city slickers and their moral depravity are what’s going to lead to the downfall of the America we grew up with. And in this case, two wrongs make a right. In other words, both feel justified based on how the other side reacts to them. If you find yourself on the dismissive side of the elite equation, maybe occasionally keep an open mind to what they have to say about any given topic and then be dismissive. The problem with MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” and Wall Street Journal editorial types is they tend to think they are more learned than all the plebes in the hinterlands. They find the foreign policy Trump campaigned on to be naïve and simplistic. In some ways, it was, given how Trump is running his foreign policy shop now. That’s something to keep in mind when they pontificate from their high-rise office buildings in Manhattan. Yeah, they’re scornful that many have views on foreign policy and vote based on that view. It doesn’t mean that they have bad information. When you completely shut out the elitist view from your consumption, it is to your detriment. That view might be wrong but it steers the direction our policymakers tend to go. When you shut it out or dismiss it as nonsense, you’re no better than they are — at least when it comes to running the country. Wanting to tell a southerner how to bake a pecan pie or someone from Kansas how to plant a wheat crop — the academic’s take on that probably isn’t going to be as strong. (Perhaps you just listen out of politeness if you’re ever faced with those circumstances?) Don’t fall into the trap of anti-elite elitism. It’s demagogued in our elections and a lot of that is the motivation behind the sewer-attack advertisements in our political campaigns, which for the most part are contrived by elites. You’ll be better informed if you don’t.


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BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

TekLinks joins IT corridor BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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irmingham-based TekLinks is hosting an open house Sept. 28 at its new location in downtown Mobile, inside the The Buick Building, 451 St. Louis St. ”We are hosting an event from 3-6 p.m. that is sponsored by Citrix and Microsoft, just to basically show our space and our commitment to Mobile,” said Jeff Mackin, TekLinks regional sales director. All Over Janitorial Services has leased the 4,371-squarefoot office building previously occupied by Rogers & Willard Builders at 3005 Mill St. in midtown. The property consists of 0.71 acres with several storage buildings, storage sheds and yard space. Joey Betbeze with Betbeze Realty Co. represented the tenant. David Dexter with NAI Mobile worked for the landlord. • Andy McGee, owner of a Daphne franchise of Memphis-based Lenny’s Subs, recently announced a new location will open this fall in Malbis. The property will encompass roughly 2,200 square feet and employ some 30 employees when fully staffed.  McGee was also named 2017 “Franchisee of the Year.” He has consistently ranked second in the company in catering sales volume and in the top 10 in store volume among more than 100 locations in 13 states throughout the Southeast and Midwest. • Goode Realty recently announced the opening of its second location in Orange Beach. It will be managed by broker Claudette Gable. “Demand for vacation homes and investment properties along the Gulf Coast remained strong in 2016 and continues to grow in 2017,” Gable said. • John Cantwell, M.D., recently announced the opening of Cantwell Family Psychiatry at 770 Middle St. in Fairhope. Cantwell has more than 30 years of experience, the last nine on the Eastern Shore. He is board certified in adult, child and adolescent psychiatry. Conditions treated at the office include, but are not limited to: anxiety disorders; attention deficit hyperactivity dis-

order, known as ADHD; bipolar disorder; behavioral problems in children and adolescents; common childhood and adolescent mental health conditions; depressive disorders; eating disorders; grief and loss; marriage, relationship and family problems; obsessive-compulsive disorder; psychotic disorders; substance use disorders and other addictions.

USAMC trauma team recognized

For a second consecutive year, the University of South Alabama Medical Center stroke team earned the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s “Get with the Guidelines — Stroke Gold Plus Target: Stroke Honor Roll Elite Plus” award. The medical center’s stroke team had to achieve specific results spanning a two-year period to earn the award. The award recognizes the hospital’s ability to ensure stroke patients receive appropriate treatment according to nationally recognized, research-based guidelines developed using the latest scientific evidence. This accolade is granted to programs that have successfully rendered the quality of care mandated through the use of specific guidelines. To qualify for the award, the hospital had to meet quality measures aimed at the reduction of time between a stroke patient’s arrival at the hospital and treatment. As a state-certified Level 1 trauma and burn center, USA Medical Center serves as the major referral center for southern Alabama, southeast Mississippi and portions of northwest Florida. In 2016 the hospital served patients from 53 counties. The medical center’s designated trauma team — which includes around-the-clock trauma surgeons, cardiovascular surgeons and neurosurgeons — treats an average of five critically injured patients per day, or more than 1,700 people per year. USA Medical Center is a part of USA Health.

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Wilkins Miller among best accountancies

Wilkins Miller, an accounting and advisory firm with offices in Mobile and Fairhope, has been named one of 2017’s “Best Accounting Firms to Work for” by Accounting Today for the third year in a row. The firm is one of only 100 from across the country to earn this recognition by the industry trade magazine. “We are honored to be recognized as one of the best accounting firms to work for in the country,” said Allen Carroll, Wilkins Miller managing partner. “This recognition is a direct result of our entire team being totally committed to making our firm a great place to work.” Wilkins Miller was selected from among hundreds of companies across the country, according to a news release. The annual survey and awards program, which is conducted in partnership with Best Companies Group, is designed to identify, recognize and honor the best employers in the accounting profession, benefiting its economy, workforce and businesses.  “We firmly believe that having an engaged and happy team is the cornerstone for our success,” said Michael Kintz, Wilkins Miller partner. “We continually strive to provide opportunities for our team to achieve their professional and personal goals.” Wilkins Miller is located at 41 West Interstate 65 Service Road North, Suite 400, in Mobile and 56 South Section St. in Fairhope. For more information, visit the company’s website.

Carpenter selected to Forbes list

S. Wesley Carpenter, vice president and resident director of the Fairhope Merrill Lynch Wealth Management office, was recently named to Forbes magazine’s inaugural “America’s Top Next Generation Wealth Advisors” list. Developed by Shook Research, the list acknowledges the industry’s future leaders born in 1980 or later, according to a news release. Carpenter graduated from The University of Alabama with a bachelor’s degree in finance and a minor in economics. He is a board member of the Eastern Shore Art Center and Alabama Planned Giving Council and active in the Eastern Shore Chamber of Commerce, Mobile Big Game Fishing Club, Mobile Touchdown Club and Red Elephant Club. According to Forbes, in addition to meeting the age criteria, selected candidates considered were considered likely to assume leadership positions in their respective regions. Advisers were interviewed by telephone and in person and measured qualitatively, examining service models, investing processes, experience levels and integrity. Each adviser also completed a lengthy survey covering such factors as compliance records, client retention, revenues produced and assets managed.


CUISINE | THE DISH

A salt for all seasons

BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

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ver get lost in the seasoning aisle of the grocery store? I get lost in my own spice cabinet. I have jars of seasonings I don’t even know how they got there. It can be a little intimidating for an untrained home chef to be inundated with plastic containers of cream of tartar, marjoram or turmeric, knowing fully well he or she has been through every recipe filling 10 different cookbooks and never once has been required to use any of these foreign substances. If you really want to get into that we can, but I’m pretty sure you could Google a use for each and every baffling spice. Take your time. But I thought today it would be a clever idea to explore the different varieties of the original seasoning and preservative: salt. I grew up pretty much thinking there was salt and that was it. The Morton’s logo is forever ingrained in my memory. Once or twice a year we would load up the ice cream maker and Khaki would grab a load of rock salt. It was the same brand but in a box instead of a cylinder. Maybe you felt like I did. So you grew up. Suddenly there was sea salt. Then there was kosher salt. Your point of view began to change and then, wow, all of a sudden there was a world of salt to explore! Himalayan pink salt, blue, grey, black and I am certain more colors of the rainbow are to appear soon enough. It’s not something most of us are used to. Our common table salt is heavily processed, which cleans and frees it of any “contaminants” such as other minerals. Unprocessed salts can take on many different colors defined by their surroundings. Of course, if those surrounding minerals could be potentially toxic you may appreciate the soulless processed salt.

WORD OF MOUTH

Windmill Market to host ‘Plate + Gather’

The pop-up dinner concept is still a hot trend across the United States and Fairhope’s Windmill Market is getting into the game with its latest “Plate + Gather” series. The inaugural event will be held Thursday, Sept. 28, at 6:30 p.m. with Chef Wade Price, souschef at Ox Kitchen. The Mobile native will bring a wealth of Asian influence to this dinner stemming from his time spent living in China from age 8, when he moved there with his family, the youngest of a team exploring the ancient form of kung fu known as gor chor. All grown up and back in the Port City, Price has honed his skills in the kitchens of our very own Von’s Bistro, NoJa and The Battle

So, is there a big difference in flavor? I can honestly throw out the word, “kinda.” Yes, you can taste a difference side by side. Could I taste a difference in two exact recipes where the only change has been the type of salt used? More than likely I could not, but that’s not really the point. The point is finding the proper use for each of these different varieties based on their saltiness, crystal shape and flavor. Most chefs will agree that plain table salt is garbage, opting to at least bump it up to kosher salt. You will immediately tell a difference. It is one of the most versatile NaCl things out there, with a much larger grain than most of us are used to. From salting meats to small amounts of pickling, this one can complete most jobs. Use it when needed at the start of a recipe or as a go-to finishing salt. This is your safe bet and every cupboard needs a box. Keep it dry. There’s usually no iodine in the mix. I keep a shaker of Alessi sea salt handy. This is a crystal salt from the Mediterranean and is easily attainable at most grocers. Almost all salt comes from the sea (or what used to be a sea), but this is a crystalline salt harvested through evaporation. I’ve always purchased the coarse grind to get a different texture than what is in grandma’s shaker. What are the celebs crazy about? Oh, it’s for sure Maldon. Not only is this the brand name of this flaky sea salt, it’s also the town in County Essex from whence it came. This may be the Brits’ most widely accepted contribution to the culinary world, at least in terms of ingredients. I have a jar of these flakes (said to be pyramid shaped) and will concur there is a difference. It’s so flaky it makes the perfect pinch to grind between your fingers over a tomato slice or anything that requires a flamboyant finish.

House Hotel. Diners can expect six courses of Modern Asian cuisine with cocktail pairings by Fairhope’s Kyle Kinder of Tongue & Groove. Price for the event is $125 per person, tax and gratuity included. Tickets are limited to just 100 attendees so order yours today via EventBrite or www.windmillmarket.org. See you there.

Tropical Smoothie unleashes new menu items

Tropical Smoothie in Legacy Village has long been a quick stop for me. Of course the smoothies get a lot of the buzz, but their sandwiches shine the most, in my opinion.

You can certainly find this one on Amazon or often at Target. Fleur de sel is another finishing salt that gets its name from the flowerlike crystals that form on the surface of seawater as it evaporates. It’s scraped from the salt marsh like cream from milk and must be handled delicately. With a higher moisture content (10 to 20 times higher than that of common salt), fleur de sel doesn’t dissolve as quickly on your tongue which, along with trace minerals, gives it a saltier flavor. Similar to this is sel gris, a French grey salt that comes from the bottom of the same salt pans. The grey color is due to its contact with the pans and the moisture content is typically a few percentages higher than fleur de sel. It can be used in cooking or in finishing, but use it sparingly in comparison to kosher or table salt. Your best bet to find these two is World Market or online, but again, use sparingly. They are pretty expensive. Himalayan pink salt was a big fad a couple of years ago. Some say it’s the

MOST CHEFS WILL AGREE THAT PLAIN TABLE SALT IS GARBAGE, OPTING TO AT LEAST BUMP IT UP TO KOSHER SALT. YOU WILL IMMEDIATELY TELL A DIFFERENCE.” purest. Here’s the history lesson. Let’s say hundreds of millions of years ago Mt. Everest wasn’t there. There were sea salt beds. Those beds were covered by lava, which formed mountains that were covered with snow. Today the hand-mined salt gets its hue from varying mineral content. Basically there are claims of health benefits one could experience from changing from table salt to Himalayan pink, but no scientific evidence has proven this true. It does look pretty cool and is a great conversation starter. I wouldn’t go throwing away that normal iodized salt just yet. Some things in life are best kept at 81 cents per pound. But sooner or later we should have expected our consumer lives to be overtaken by high-dollar salt. You can taste a difference. It isn’t life changing, though. Use those fancy salts for your fancy dishes, but keep the other handy for when it doesn’t count as much.

The latest news from Tropical Smoothie is a menu change that includes really good bowls, such as the Baja Chicken. Lose the bread and go crazy on the good stuff. There are also several new smoothie varieties that fall into the “better for you” category. With all sorts of great hippie-dippy ingredients such as fresh spinach, kale, basil, ginger and green apple, there is sure to be a combination you’ll love. Check them out at 9 Du Rhu Drive if you haven’t already.

Bailey’s sauce a local hit

It’s been around for a while, but Bailey’s Original Root Beer BBQ and Dippin’ Sauce recently made its way to my test kitchen lab. The squared-off bottle looks like a pint of snake oil, and the label boasts it “cures lame

grilling and fatigued meats.” This local sauce is the creation of Mike Bailey, a man you may know as half of the radio duo on the program “Sip and Chew with Mike and Stu.” It’s definitely a sweet sauce but not as sweet as you’d expect with a root beer base. Actually, I found this sauce has a moderate amount of heat. It’s great with chicken but really excels with ribs. I tried a bit as a dipping sauce with sausage and had excellent results. I even created a dip by mixing it with a bit of mayonnaise that toned down the cayenne enough that the kids loved it with chicken nuggets. Look for it on grocers’ shelves, or better yet call in to the radio program Sunday morning and get Mike to tell you all about it. You need this in your fridge. Recycle!

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FLOUR GIRLS BAKERY ($) 809 Hillcrest Rd. • 634-2285

GROWLER STATION AND BITES 1801 Old Shell Rd. • 345-4767

FIREHOUSE SUBS ($)

PANINI PETE’S ($)

HOT SUBS, COLD SALADS & CATERING 6300 Grelot Rd. • 631-3730 $10/PERSON • $$ 10-25/PERSON • $$$ OVER 25/PERSON

COMPLETELY COMFORTABLE ALL SPORTS BAR & GRILL ($) 3408 Pleasant Valley Rd. • 345-9338

AL’S HOTDOGS ($)

CLASSIC HOTDOGS, GYROS & MILKSHAKES 4701 Airport Blvd. • 342-3243

ATLANTA BREAD COMPANY ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SALADS & MORE. 3680 Dauphin St. • 380-0444

BAKE MY DAY ($)

OLD-FASHIONED SOUTHERN BAKE SHOP 156 N. McGregor Ave. • 219-7261

BOB’S DINER ($)

GOOD OLD AMERICAN COOKING 263 St. Francis St. • 405-1497

BRICK & SPOON ($)

3662 Airport Blvd. Suite A • 525-9177

BUCK’S DINER ($)

CLASSIC AMERICAN DINER 58 N. Secion St. Fairhope • 928-8521

CAFE 219 ($)

SALADS, SANDWICHES & POTATO SALAD 219 Conti St. • 438-5234

CAMELLIA CAFÉ ($-$$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FARE 61 Section St. • Fairhope • 928-4321

CAMMIE’S OLD DUTCH ($) MOBILE’S CLASSIC ICE CREAM SPOT 2511 Old Shell Rd. • 471-1710

CARPE DIEM ($)

DELI FOODS, PASTRIES & SPECIALTY DRINKS 4072 Old Shell Rd. • 304-0448

CLARK’S KITCHEN ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHERN CUISINE & CATERING 5817 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0200

CHAT-A-WAY CAFE ($)

QUICHES & SANDWICHES 4366 Old Shell Rd. • 343-9889

CHICK-FIL-A ($)

FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES ($) BURGERS, MILKSHAKES & FRIES 4401 Old Shell Rd. • 447-2394 4663 Airport Blvd. • 300-8425 5319 Hwy 90 • 661-0071 1225 Satchel Page Dr.• 378-8768

FOOSACKLY’S ($)

FAMOUS CHICKEN FINGERS 29181 US Hwy 98 • Daphne • 375-1104 7843 Moffett Rd. • 607-6196 1109 Shelton Beach Rd. • 287-1423 310 S. University Blvd. • 343-0047 2250 Airport Blvd. • 479-2922 7641 Airport Blvd. • 607-7667 2558 Schillinger Rd. • 219-7761 3249 Dauphin St. • 479-2000

FOY SUPERFOODS ($) 119 Dauphin St.• 307-8997

GULF COAST EXPLOREUM CAFE ($) HOMEMADE SOUPS & SANDWICHES 65 Government St. • 208-6815

JERSEY MIKE’S ($)

AUTHENTIC SUB SANDWICHES 7449 Airport Blvd. • 375-1820

JIMMY JOHN’S ($)

SANDWICHES, CATERING & DELIVERY TOO 6920 Airport Blvd. • 414-5444 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-8694 62 B Royal St. • 432-0360

JOE CAIN CAFÉ ($)

PIZZAS, SANDWICHES, COCKTAILS 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

JONELLI’S ($)

1252 Govenment St.• 301-7556

107 St. Francis St. • 415-1700 3244 Dauphin St. • 476-0320 3215 Bel Air Mall • 476-8361 4707 Airport Blvd. • 461-9933 435 Schillinger Rd. • 639-1163 1682 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 621-3215 30500 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-3020

JUDY’S PLACE ($-$$)

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK ($)

PUB FOOD AND DRAFT BEERS 251 Dauphin St. • 287-6871

CHICKEN SALAD, SALAD & SOUP 2370 S. Hillcrest Rd. Unit R • 660-0501 5753 Old Shell Rd. • 408-3236 1802 US Hwy 98 Suite F• 625-1092

CHI-TOWN DAWGZ ($) CHICAGO STYLE EATERY 1222 Hillcrest Rd. • 461-6599

CONNECTION FROZEN YOGURT ($) 1880 Industrial Pkwy. • 675-2999

CREAM AND SUGAR ($)

HOME COOKING 4054 Government St. • 665-4557

LICKIN’ GOOD DONUTS ($) 3242 Dauphin St. • 471-2590

LODA BIER GARTEN ($) MAMA’S ($)

SLAP YOUR MAMA GOOD HOME COOKING 220 Dauphin St. • 432-6262

MARS HILL CAFE ($)

GREAT SANDWICHES, COFFEE & MORE 1087 Downtowner Blvd. • 643-1611

MARY’S SOUTHERN COOKING ($) 3011 Springhill Ave. • 476-2232

COFFEE, BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DESSERT 351 George St #B • 405-0003

MICHELI’S CAFE ($)

DAUPHIN ST. CAFE ($)

MCSHARRY’S ($-$$)

HOT LUNCH, DAILY MENU (INSIDE VIA) 1717 Dauphin St. • 470-5231

D’ MICHAEL’S ($)

PHILLY CHEESE STEAKS, GYROS & MORE 7101-A Theodore Dawes Rd. • 653-2979

D NU SPOT ($)

22159 Halls Mill Rd. . • 648-6522

DELISH BAKERY AND EATERY ($) GREAT DESSERTS & HOT LUNCH 23 Upham St. • 473-6115

DEW DROP INN ($)

CLASSIC BURGERS, HOTDOGS & SETTING 1808 Old Shell Rd. • 473-7872

DUNKIN DONUTS ($)

DONUTS, COFFEE & SANDWICHES 1976 Michigan Ave. • 442-4846 3876 Airport Blvd. • 219-7369 505 Schillinger Rd. S. • 442-4845 29160 US Hwy 98 • 621-2228

E WING HOUSE ($)

6358 Cottage Hill Rd. • 725-6917 AUTHENTIC IRISH PUB 101 N. Bancroft St.• 990-5100

MIKO’S ITALIAN ICE ($)

HOTDOGS SANDWICHES & COOL TREATS 3371 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 300–4015

MOMMA GOLDBERG’S DELI ($) SANDWICHES & MOMMA’S LOVE 3696 Airport Blvd. • 344-9500 5602 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6556

INSIDE THE MOBILE MARRIOTT 3101 Airport Blvd. • 476-6400

SAISHO ($-$$)

CUISINE OF INDIA ($$)

VON’S BISTRO ($-$$)

FUJI SAN ($)

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($$)

GOLDEN BOWL ($)

THE TRELLIS ROOM ($$$)

HIBACHI 1 ($-$$)

CHICKEN FINGERS, SALAD & SANDWICHES. 1165 University Blvd. • 202-0959

1500 Gov’t St. • 287-1526

POLLMAN’S BAKERY ($)

85 N. Bancroft St. Fairhope • 990.8883

BAKERY, SANDWICHES & MORE 750 S. Broad St. • 438-1511 4464 Old Shell Rd. • 342-8546 107 St. Francis St. Suite 102 • 438-2261

PUNTA CLARA KITCHEN ($)

FUDGE, PRALINES & MORE 17111 Scenic Hwy 98 • Fairhope • 928-8477

R BISTRO ($-$$)

334 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope • 928-2399

REGINA’S KITCHEN ($-$$) ROLY POLY ($)

ROSHELL’S CAFE ($)

2906 Springhill Ave. • 479-4614

ROSIE’S GRILL ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHWEST FARE, 7 DAYS 1203 Hwy 98 Ste. 3D • Daphne • 626-2440

THE WINDMILL MARKET ($) YAK THE KATHMANDU KITCHEN ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC FOODS FROM HIMALAYAN REGION 3210 Dauphin St. • 287-0115 400 Eastern Shore Center • 459-2862

‘CUE

BACKYARD CAFE & BBQ ($) HOME COOKIN’ LIKE MOMMA MADE. 2804 Springhill Ave. • 473-4739

BAR-B-QUING WITH MY HONEY ($$) BBQ, BURGERS, WINGS & SEAFOOD 19170 Hwy 43 Mt. Vernon. • 839-9927

BRICK PIT ($)

A FAVORITE BARBECUE SPOT 5456 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0001

COTTON STATE BBQ ($)

DOWNTOWN LUNCH 101 N. Conception St. • 545-4682

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT ($-$$)

LUNCH & DINNER 3004 Gov’t Blvd. • 287-1220

BBQ AND MORE Jubilee Sq.Ctr. Hwy 90, Daphne • 210-2151 McGowin Park Ctr. Satchel Paige Dr. • 471-1050 7721 Airport Blvd. • 380-8957

ROYAL STREET CAFE ($)

DREAMLAND BBQ ($)

ROYAL KNIGHT ($)

HOMEMADE LUNCH & BREAKFAST 104 N. Royal St. • 434-0011

SALLY’S PIECE-A-CAKE ($) BAKERY 5638 Three Notch Rd.• 219-6379

SATORI COFFEEHOUSE ($)

COFFEE, SMOOTHIES, LUNCH & BEERS. 5460 Old Shell Rd. • 344-4575

SERDA’S COFFEEHOUSE ($)

COFFEE, LUNCHES, LIVE MUSIC & GELATO 3 Royal St. S. • 415-3000

SIMPLY SWEET ($)

CUPCAKE BOUTIQUE 6207 Cottage Hill Rd. Suite B • 665-3003

STEVIE’S KITCHEN ($)

SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS & MORE 41 West I-65 Service Rd. N Suite 150. • 287-2793

SUGAR RUSH DONUT CO. ($) 4701 Airport Blvd. • 408-3379

SUNSET POINTE ($-$$)

AT FLU CREEK 831 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-7766

RIBS, SANDWICHES & GREAT SIDES 3314 Old Shell Rd. • 479-9898

MEAT BOSS ($)

5401 Cottage Hill Rd. • 591-4842

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE ($) BARBEQUE & MUSIC Bayfront Park Dr. • Daphne • 625-RIBS 701 Springhill Ave. • 410-7427 4672 Airport Blvd. • 300-8516

SAUCY Q BARBQUE ($) AWARD-WINNING BARBQUE 1111 Gov’t Blvd. • 433-7427

SMOKEY DEMBO SMOKE HOUSE ($)

BAY GOURMET ($$)

A PREMIER CATERER & COOKING CLASSES 1880-A Airport Blvd. • 450-9051

BRIQUETTES STEAKHOUSE ($-$$)

THE HARBERDASHER ($)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St • 460-3157

SOUTHERN COOKING & THEN SOME 1716 Main St. Daphne • 222-4120

THE SUNFLOWER CAFE ($) INSIDE VIRGINIA’S HEALTH FOOD 3055 A Dauphin St • 479-3200

THYME BY THE BAY ($-$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE Battle House Hotel, Royal St. • 338-5493

THE WASH HOUSE ($$)

17111 Scenic HWY 98 • Point Clear • 928-4838

LUNCH BUFFET 3674 Airport Blvd. • 341-6171

THAI FARE AND SUSHI 2000 Airport Blvd. • 478-9888 HIBACHI GRILL & ASIAN CUISINE 309 Bel Air Blvd • 470-8033 2370 Hillcrest Rd. Unit B • 380-6062

ICHIBAN SUSHI ($)

JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE 3959 Cottage Hill Rd • 666-6266

A LITTLE VINO

KAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($-$$)

WINE, BEER, GOURMET FOODS, & MORE. 720 Schillinger Rd. S. Unit 8 • 287-1851

LIQUID ($$)

DOMKE MARKET

QUALITY FOOD, EXCELLENT SERVICE 5045 Cottage Hill Rd. • 607-6454

FOOD PAK

AMAZING SUSHI & ASSORTMENT OF ROLLS. 661 Dauphin St. • 432-0109

FOOD, WINE & MORE 5150 Old Shell Rd. • 341-1497

POUR BABY

WINE BAR, CRAFT BEERS & BISTRO 6808 Airport Blvd. • 343-3555

RICE ASIAN GRILL & SUSHI BAR ($) 3964 Gov’t Blvd. • 378-8083

ROCK N ROLL SUSHI ($$)

216 St Francis St. • 421-2022

273 S. McGregor Ave • 287-0445 6345 Airport Blvd. • 287-0555 940 Industrial Pkwy • 308-2158 6850 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 753-4367

RED OR WHITE

SAISHO ($$)

FIREHOUSE WINE BAR & SHOP 323A De La Mare Ave, Fairhope • 990-0003 1104 Dauphin St.. • 478-9494

ROYAL STREET TAVERN

LIVE MUSIC, MARTINIS & DINNER MENU. 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

SOUTHERN NAPA

BISTRO PLATES, CRAFT BEERS & PANTRY 2304 Main St. • 375-2800

THE VINEYARD

UPSCALE WINE BAR 9 Du Rhu Dr. S 201 • 287-7135

6455 Dauphin St. • 433-0376

STIX ($$)

610240 Eastern Shore Blvd. • 621-9088

TASTE OF THAI ($$)

9091 US-90 Irvington • 957-1414

TOKYO JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE ($$) UPSCALE SUSHI & HIBACHI 364 Azalea Rd. • 343-6622

WASABI SUSHI ($$)

JAPANESE CUISINE 3654 Airport Blvd. S. C • 725-6078

HEALTHY, DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 3762 Airport Blvd. • 725-1177

THE GALLEY ($)

THE PIGEON HOLE ($)

CASUAL FINE DINING 104 N. Section St. • Fairhope • 929-2219

3966 Airport Blvd.• 343-5530

DROP DEAD GOURMET

SEAFOOD AND SUSHI 551 Dauphin St.• 219-7051

113 Dauphin St.• 436-0989

SEAFOOD, ASIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE 69 St. Michael St • 375-1113

THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR 960 Schillinger Rd. S • 660-4470

FALAFEL? TRY SOME HUMMUS FROM THE DEPTHS

THE BLIND MULE ($)

OPEN FOR LUNCH, INSIDE GULFQUEST 155 S. Water St • 436-8901

MODERN GASTROPUB INSPIRED BY JAPANESE KITCHEN 455 Dauphin St • 433-0376

CHARM ($-$$)

3758 Dauphin Island Pkwy. • 473-1401

GRILLED STEAKS, CHICKEN & SEAFOOD 720A Schillinger Rd. S. S2. • 607-7200 901 Montlimar Dr • 408-3133

DAILY SPECIALS MADE FROM SCRATCH 57 N. Claiborne St. • 694-6853

SAGE RESTAURANT ($$)

THAI & SUSHI 5369 D Hwy 90 W • 661-5100

CHUCK’S FISH ($$)

CORNER 251 ($-$$)

DAUPHIN’S ($$-$$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD WITH A VIEW 107 St. Francis St • 444-0200

DUMBWAITER ($$-$$$) 9 Du Rhu Dr. Suite 201 167 Dauphin St. • 445-3802

FIVE ($$)

7 SPICE ($-$$)

ABBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE ($-$$) 4861 Bit & Spur Rd. • 340-6464

BAUDEAN’S ($$)

FRIED, GRILLED, STEAMED & ALWAYS FRESH 3300 River Rd. • 973-9070

THE BLUEGILL ($-$$)

ISTANBUL GRILL ($)

A HISTORIC SEAFOOD DIVE W/ LIVE MUSIC 3775 Hwy. 98 • 625-1998

JERUSALEM CAFE ($-$$)

ECLECTIC DINING & SPACE 6955 Airport Blvd. • 633-7196

KAN ZAMAN ($-$$)

QUALITY CAJUN & NEW ORLEANS CUISINE 29249 US Highway 98 Daphne. • 621-1991

AUTHENTIC TURKISH & MEDITERRANEAN 3702 Airport Blvd. • 461-6901 MOBILE’S OLDEST MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE 5773 Airport Blvd. • 304-1155 MEDITERRANEAN FOOD AND HOOKAH 326 Azalea Rd • 229-4206

MEDITERRANEAN SANDWICH COMPANY ($)

GREAT & QUICK. 3702 Airport Blvd. • 308-2131 274 Dauphin St. • 545-3161 2502 Schillinger Rd. Ste. 2 • 725-0126 6890 US-90 • DAPHNE • 621-2271

MINT HOOKAH BISTRO ($) GREAT MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 5951 Old Shell Rd. • 450-9191

BONEFISH GRILL ($$)

BOUDREAUX’S CAJUN GRILL ($-$$) CRAVIN CAJUN/DIP SEAFOOD ($) PO-BOYS, SALADS & SEAFOOD 1870 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 287-1168

ED’S SEAFOOD SHED ($$)

FRIED SEAFOOD SERVED IN HEFTY PORTIONS 3382 Hwy. 98 • 625-1947

FELIX’S FISH CAMP ($$) UPSCALE DINING WITH A VIEW 1420 Hwy. 98 • 626-6710

FISHERMAN’S LEGACY ($) DELI, MARKET AND CATERING. 4380 Halls Mill Rd. • 665-2266

MONTEGO’S ($-$$)

TIME TO EAT CAFE ($)

KITCHEN ON GEORGE ($-$$)

OLLIE’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL ($-$$)

LUCY B. GOODE ($$)

MOON PIE GENERAL STORE ($)

LAUNCH ($-$$)

TAZIKI’S ($-$$)

TIN ROOF ($-$$)

MAGHEE’S GRILL ON THE HILL ($-$$)

FAR EASTERN FARE

LULU’S ($$)

4513 Old Shell Rd.• 473-0007

MUDBUGS AT THE LOOP ($)

FRESH CARIBBEAN-STYLE FOOD & CRAFT BEER 6601 Airport Blvd. • 634-3445 225 Dauphin St. • 375-1576 107 St Francis St #115 • RSA Bank Trust Building

MOSTLY MUFFINS ($) MUFFINS, COFFEE & WRAPS 105 Dauphin St. • 433-9855

NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE ($)

FATHOMS LOUNGE

O’DALYS HOLE IN THE WALL ($)

SMALL PLATES AND CREATIVE COCKTAILS 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

WILD WING STATION ($)

CHINA DOLL ($)

PDQ ($)

BAR FOOD 271 Dauphin St • 438-9585

GOURMET GRILLED CHEESE 5955 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6134

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

33 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-5635

15 N Conception St. • 433-2299

EUGENE’S MONKEY BAR ($)

PAT’S DOWNTOWN GRILL ($)

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE 271 Glenwood St. • 476-0516

COFFEE AND DONUTS 759 Nichols Avenue, Fairhope • 928-7223

GREAT FOOD AND COCKTAILS 609 Dauphin St. • 308-3105

OVEN-BAKED SANDWICHES & MORE 1335 Satchel Page Dr. Suite C. • 287-7356 7440 Airport Blvd. • 633-0096 30500 State Hwy 181 #132 • 625-6544

195 S University Blvd. Suite H • 662-1829

BENJAS ($)

WEDGIE’S ($)

HOOTERS ($)

MIND-BLOWING ISLAND FOOD 3700 Gov’t Blvd. Ste A • 602-1973

TRADITIONAL SUSHI & LUNCH. 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-9077

GUMBO, ANGUS BEEF & BAR 72. S. Royal St. • 432-SCAM (7226)

WRAPS & SALADS 3220 Dauphin St. • 479-2480

JAMAICAN VIBE ($)

ROYAL SCAM ($$)

WAREHOUSE BAKERY & DONUTS ($)

GUMBO SHACK ($-$$)

3869 Airport Blvd. • 345-9544 5470 Inn Rd. • 661-9117 28975 US 98 • Daphne • 625-3910

2550 Dauphin Island Pkwy S. • 307-5328

2579 Halls Mill Rd. • 479-0006

ORIGINAL SANDWICH AND BAKE SHOP 42 ½ Section St. • Fairhope • 929-0122 102 Dauphin St. • 405-0031

SANDWICHES, SUBS & SOUPS 2056 Gov’t St. • 476-2777

SEAFOOD & SANDWICHES 212 ½ Fairhope Ave •Fairhope • 928-4100

UNCLE JIMMY’S DELICIOUS HOTDOGS ($)

562 Dauphin St.• 725-6429

OLD SHELL GROWLERS ($)

DOWN-HOME COUNTRY COOKIN 7351 Theodore Dawes Rd. • 654-0228 13665 N. Wintzell Ave. • 824-1119 SOUTHERN CASUAL FAMILY DINING 10800 US HWY 31 • Spanish Fort• 621-4995

TP CROCKMIERS ($)

AMERICAN RESTAURANT & BAR 250 Dauphin St. • 476-1890

THREE GEORGES CANDY SHOP ($) LIGHT LUNCH WITH SOUTHERN FLAIR. 226 Dauphin St. • 433-6725

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE ($)

GREAT SMOOTHIES, WRAPS & SANDWICHES. Du Rhu Dr. • 378-5648 570 Schillinger Road • 634-3454

18 | L AG N I A P P E | S e p t e m b e r 1 4 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 0 , 2 0 1 7

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOOD 351A George & Savannah St. • 436-8890 HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St. • 432-8000 GREAT LUNCH & DINNER 3607 Old Shell Rd. • 445-8700

NOBLE SOUTH ($$)

LOCAL INGREDIENTS 203 Dauphin St. • 690-6824

NOJA ($$-$$$)

INVENTIVE & VERY FRESH CUISINE 6 N. Jackson St. • 433-0377

OSMAN’S RESTAURANT ($$) SUPREME EUROPEAN CUISINE

MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT & HOOKAH 1248 Hillcrest St • 634-9820 MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 1539 US HWY 98• 273-3337

ANG BAHAY KUBO ($$)

BAMBOO STEAKHOUSE ($$) SUSHI BAR 650 Cody Rd. S • 300-8383

BANGKOK THAI ($-$$)

DELICIOUS, TRADITIONAL THAI CUISINE 28600 US 98 • Daphne • 626-5286 3821 Airport Blvd. • 344-9995

BANZAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($$)

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($)

30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 206-8768 3654 Airport Blvd. • 338-9350 GULF COAST CUISINE, REINVENTED 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858 LIVE MUSIC & GREAT SEAFOOD 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858 CAJUN KITCHEN & SEAFOOD MARKET 2005 Government St. • 478-9897

RALPH & KACOO’S ($-$$) THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1595 Battleship Pkwy. • 626-0045

R&R SEAFOOD ($-$$)

LAID-BACK EATERY & FISH MARKET 1477 Battleship Pkwy. • 621-8366


RIVER SHACK ($-$$)

916 Charleston St. • 433-9374

THE GRAND MARINER ($-$$)

SANDWICHES & COLD BEER 273 Dauphin St. • 433-4376 Hillcrest & Old Shell Rd. • 341-9464

SEAFOOD, BURGERS & STEAKS 6120 Marina Dr. • Dog River • 443-7318. LOCAL SEAFOOD & PRODUCE 6036 Rock Point Rd. • 443-7540

THE HARBOR ROOM ($-$$) UNIQUE SEAFOOD 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

THE SEAFOOD HOUSE ($-$$)

HEROES SPORTS BAR & GRILLE ($)

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS ($-$$) WINGS, SEAFOOD, BURGERS & BEER 7721 Airport Blvd. Suite E-180 • 639-6832

ISLAND WING CO ($)

751 Azalea Rd. • 301-7964

EVERYTHING BAKED OR GRILLED 2617 Dauphin St. • 476-9464

TIN TOP RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR ($$)

1715 Main St. • 375-0543

SEAFOOD, STEAKS, & EXTENSIVE WINE LIST 6232 Bon Secour Hwy County Rd. 10. • 949-5086

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$)

MANCIS ($)

MCSHARRY’S IRISH PUB ($)

BRILLIANT REUBENS & FISH-N-CHIPS. 101 N. Brancroft St. Fairhope • 990-5100

FRESH SEAFOOD FOR OVER 75 YEARS 605 Dauphin St. • 432-4605 6700 Airport Blvd. • 341-1111 1208 Shelton Beach Rd. • Saraland • 442-3335 805 S. Mobile St. • 929-2322

MUG SHOTS ($$)

IS THE GAME ON?

BURGERS, DOGS & 27 BEERS & WINES. 19992 Hwy.181 Old County Rd. Fairhope • 281-2663

ASHLAND MIDTOWN PUB ($-$$) PIZZAS, PASTAS, & CALZONES 245-A Old Shell Rd. • 479-3278

BAUMHOWER’S ($)

WINGS, BURGERS & PUB GRUB 6880 US-90 #14 • Daphne • 625-4695

BISHOP’S ($)

A SOUTHERN GRILL & BAR 3673 Airport Blvd. • 344-2131

BUFFALO WILD WINGS ($)

BAR & GRILL 29740 Urgent Care Dr. • Daphne • 662-9639 6255 Airport Blvd. • 447-2514

OLD 27 GRILL ($)

LUCKY’S IRISH PUB ($) IRISH PUB FARE & MORE 3692 Airport Blvd • 414-3000

WEMOS ($)

HOUSE OF PIZZA ($)

WINGS, PO-BOYS, BURGERS 210 Eastern Shore Center, Hwy. 98 • 929-0002

MARIA BONITA AGAVE BAR & GRILL ($-$$)

3958 Snow Rd C. • Semmes • 645-3400

LA ROSSO ($$)

COMFORT FOOD 1716 Main St. Ste. C • Daphne • 281-2982

MACARONI GRILL ($$)

SMALL PLATES, PIZZAS, PASTAS & WINE 3250 Airport Blvd. • 450-4556

MARCOS ($)

DELIVERY 350 Dauphin St. • 431-9444

GAMBINO’S ITALIAN GRILL ($)

GREAT PIZZA. LUNCH & DINNER 4356 Old Shell Rd. • 342-0024

ITALIAN, STEAKS & SEAFOOD 18 Laurel Ave. • Fairhope • 990-0995

GRIMALDI’S ($)

Bel Air Mall • 476-2063

ITALIAN FOOD & PIZZAS 11311 US HIghway 31 Spanish Fort• 375-0076

VIA EMILIA ($$)

PASTA & MORE 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-6611

NAVCO PIZZA ($$)

PIZZA, SUBS & PASTA 1368 ½ Navco Rd.• 479-0066

PAPA’S PLACE ($$)

PINZONE’S ITALIAN VILLAGE ($$) RAVENITE ($)

PIZZA, PASTA, SALAD & MORE 102 N. Section St. •Fairhope• 929-2525

PIZZERIA DELFINA ($) PIZZA & PASTA 107 Dauphin St. • 375-1644

ROMA CAFE ($-$$)

PASTA, SALAD AND SANDWICHES 7143 Airport Blvd. • 341-7217

ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL ($$)

HEARTY MEXICAN FARE 736 holcombe Ave.• 473-0413

OLÉ MI AMIGO!

ROOSTER’S ($)

CAFÉ DEL RIO ($-$$)

MIRKO ($$)

OLÉ MI AMIGO ($-$$) POOR MEXICAN ($)

MELLOW MUSHROOM ($)

PIES & AWESOME BEER SELECTION 2032 Airport Blvd. • 471-4700 5660 Old Shell Rd. • 380-1500 29698 Frederick Blvd.• Daphne • 621-3911

MEXICAN CUISINE 3977 Gov’t Blvd. • 660-4970

HOMEMADE PASTAS & PIZZAS MADE DAILY 5901 Old Shell Rd. • 342-3677

AZTECAS ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC ITALIAN DISHES 312 Fairhope Ave. • Fairhope • 990-5535

BUCK’S PIZZA ($$)

TRATTORIA PIZZA & ITALIAN ($$)

5055 Cottage Hill Rd. • 308-4888 2394 Dawes Rr. • 639-3535 2004 US 98 • Daphne • 265-6550

MAMA MIA!

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CUISINE | THE BEER PROFESSOR

Hard sodas catch fire BY TOM WARD/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Photo | Facebook

Henry’s Hard Sodas, made with cane sugar, include ginger ale, orange, grape (not pictured) and cherry cola.

I

’m always looking for new column ideas, and a number of people have recently urged me to write on the rise in popularity of hard sodas, which my son dubbed “reverse mocktails.” The concept didn’t sound too good to me — kind of like candy cigarettes — but, in the interest of science, I thought I’d give a couple of a try. Hard sodas are, technically, flavored beers — as they are malted alcoholic beverages with added sugars and other flavors — although they don’t taste anything like beer. While the boom in hard sodas is a relatively recent development, with a number of different brands putting out a host of different flavors, such beverages go back a number of years to the introduction of Mike’s Hard Lemonade (which, incidentally, I really like) and, for those of you who remember the early ’90s, Zima. Small Town Brewery of Wauconda, Illinois, puts out a number of hard sodas (which, incidentally, they define as beers), under the “Not Your Father’s” and “Not Your Mom’s” brands. The female versions include apple pie, iced tea and strawberry rhubarb flavors, while the male offerings are root beer, ginger ale, cream soda and Mountain Ale. Small Town’s “Not Your Father’s Root Beer” is actually the best-selling hard soda in the United States, but as I had not seen a Mountain Ale from another company, I thought I’d give it a try. I chose poorly. Ostensibly a hard Mountain Dew, it had the color of and, I assume, the taste of antifreeze. Anheuser-Busch puts out the “Best Damn” line of hard sodas, which includes a root beer, an apple ale, a sweet tea and a cream soda. As I love cream soda, I gave the Best Damn Cream

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Soda a try. It does taste just like cream soda, very sweet — too sweet for me, however. I couldn’t finish the bottle. Henry’s Hard Sodas, brewed by MillerCoors, puts out four flavors — ginger ale, orange, grape and cherry cola — plus two “hard sparking” options in lemon-lime and passion fruit, which are only 95 calories, about half as caloric as Henry’s regular offerings. I sampled the orange and the grape hard sodas from Henry’s and found both to be very tasty. I’m not sure I could tell the difference between Henry’s Hard and a grape or orange Fanta. Twisted Teas, owned by the Boston Beer Co. (of Samuel Adams fame), amazingly puts out 11 different styles of alcoholic teas, including mango, frosted cherry and watermelon lemonade. I tasted its original tea and found it OK, kind of a lightly sweetened sweet tea, nothing like our Lower Alabama cavity-inducing sweet tea. Not bad, but don’t know if I’d get one again. Finally, Louisiana’s Abita Brewing Co. does not put out a slate of hard sodas, but does produce a hard version of its (really excellent) non-alcoholic root beer. Like its non-alcoholic cousin, Bayou Bootlegger Root Beer is brewed with real Louisiana cane sugar, and you can taste the sweetness. As with Henry’s Hard Sodas, it’s hard to tell the difference between the Bayou Bootlegger and a regular root beer. After sampling a host of hard sodas, I’m certainly not ready to give up my IPAs for them, especially since many exceed 200 calories per bottle and about 30 carbs per serving (compared to about 150 calories and 12 carbs for most craft beer). But if you are looking for a sweet alternative to beer, hard sodas might be for you.


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COVER STORY

Baldwin County’s federal flood maps revamped BY JOHN MULLEN/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

W

hen the freak rainstorm of April 30 ferent areas,” he said. “Usually it’s a three- to five-year process. This has actually been a 10-year process. The through May 1 of 2014 hit Baldwin County, maps we are currently under are dated July of 2007.” about 30 to 35 houses along the Fish River And while storms like Harvey are few and far took on water. between, coastal Alabama still gets its fair share of “I think all but three of them were out of the flood tropical events. Being the rainiest part of the country zone,” Erik Cortinas, EMA coordinator for Fairhope, just adds to the flooding risk for residents in Baldwin said. “On Fish River, it was nine feet above base flood.” and Mobile counties. Now, with the release of new FEMA maps in July, most “Mobile, Alabama, is the rainiest place in the United of those properties are considered to be in a flood zone. States,” Cortinas said. It rains “on average 67 inches a “We have houses that have been removed from year and 59 rain days a year. As of right now I have read the floodplain that are not in a floodplain, per the new we’re at 56 inches for the year now with several months maps,” Cortinas said. “We have a bunch that were added to go.” to the floodplain that were previously not.” Cortinas said living in this rain-prone area is reason Communities all across Baldwin County are experiencenough to have insurance. ing the same scenarios as public meetings and outreaches “You do not have to live in a flood zone to purchase begin to show residents what changed in the first revision flood insurance,” he said. “I suggest to any and everyof flood hazard zone maps since 2007. Cortinas hopes body I talk to: buy flood insurance. You have no idea they will soon have more specific what’s going to happen.” information. Cortinas said number two and “The engineering consultant three on the rain list are Pensacola and the state said they would work and New Orleans. But, he pointed on putting together a spreadsheet out, most flood damage doesn’t for each community identifying come in the special flood hazard the parcels that left and what was BEING THE RAINIEST areas FEMA maps out. brought into the floodplain per the “FEMA will tell you the majornew map information,” he said. “It PART OF THE COUNTRY ity — anywhere from 60 percent would give us the ability to do some or more — of the flood losses they targeted outreach to talk specifically JUST ADDS TO THE insure or pay out are in areas that to people. Right now, it’s hard to are not designated flood zones,” do that because we don’t have any FLOODING RISK FOR Cortinas said. “They are low-lying means to know what came in.” areas with poor drainage. And if Those new to the flood zone will RESIDENTS IN BALDWIN you think about it, it makes sense. If have to consider whether they want you build in a flood zone, you have to buy flood insurance through the AND MOBILE COUNTIES. a required elevation that your floor Federal Emergency Management has to be at. So you are above the Agency’s National Flood Insurance flood line. Program. “It’s the folks that are along the Everybody should have flood creek beds and along the drainage ditches in these areas insurance, Cortinas believes, and he has the devastation that build on grade, slab on the ground. When the water of Hurricane Harvey’s deluge of Texas and Louisiana to rises they are the ones at the most risk.” bolster his position. Recent published reports indicate the number of “There are folks who are going to end up flooding and properties covered by flood insurance dropped from 5.5 losing everything they have and are not in a flood zone,” million in 2012 to 5 million in 2016. The National Flood Cortinas said. “They just experienced 50 inches of rain in Insurance Program reports that only 28 percent of propa five-day period and their homeowners insurance is alerties in high-risk areas have insurance. most certainly not going to cover that damage. It almost The program operates at a $1.4 billion deficit and always typically excludes flood.” is currently facing a $25 billion debt, federal officials Cortinas led an Aug. 29 open house in the Fairhope say. More residents and businesses joining the program City Council chambers to discuss the new FEMA flood would help the bottom line, and officials are afraid to hazard zone map and how it would affect residents here. raise the rates to help the bottom line for fear more “Every so many years FEMA updates their flood people will choose to drop coverage. maps to reflect current or more accurate hazards in dif-

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“I have people ask all the time ‘what if I don’t want to buy insurance?’” Cortinas said. “Whether or not you intend to buy flood insurance when you’re in a flood zone is entirely up to you.” But you still have to follow the guidelines for building according to the FEMA flood hazard zone map, he said. “The reasoning behind that from FEMA is if you allow noncompliance construction in a flood zone, that is potentially, in the event of a storm, debris that can damage other homes,” Cortinas said. “Anybody building in a flood zone has to meet the minimal requirements whether you choose to purchase insurance or not.” Cortinas says that while the flood maps reflect FEMA’s regulations for flood zone building, local governments are the enforcement arm. Fairhope and most other cities, Cortinas said, usually require even more than the minimum elevation from FEMA maps. “We have a one-foot freeboard requirement on all flood zones,” Cortinas said. “You have to build one foot higher than the base flood on the map. Most communities have at least of foot of freeboard. There are some coastal communities that have two- and three-foot freeboards depending on what their concerns are.” Cities all across Baldwin and Mobile counties are having community outreach meetings to discuss the preliminary new maps. A countywide meeting with FEMA and Office of Water Resources officials is scheduled for October at the Foley Civic Center. Fairhope, by law, doesn’t consider the maps preliminary. “Most communities use the maps the minute they are effective,” Cortinas said. “Our ordinances have a provision for best available data and, as of right now, this is the best available data we have.” Residents and businesses have 12 months to present a letter of map amendment or a letter of map revision to FEMA if they disagree with the zoning of their property. “You have the ability to put together the information and request to have it removed from the maps,” Cortinas said. Following is a look at how the new flood maps will affect Eastern Shore and South Baldwin cities.

FAIRHOPE

Residents on the bay got good news from the new FEMA maps. Inside the city and along dry creek beds, gullies and floodways, the news wasn’t so good. “A floodway is a riverine channel that carries high-velocity water,” Cortinas said. “They mapped a lot of our inland creeks, dry creek beds and gullies. They are considered floodways because in rain events they carry heavy velocity.” In previous flood maps, most of these floodways were never mapped and the possibility of flooding never determined. “Cowpen Creek and a lot of the unnamed creeks in town, a lot of them have never been mapped,” Cortinas said. “It is now mapped and we have several subdivisions now that are fully built all the way along Cowpen Creek.” Among the areas affected are Spring Lake subdivision and the back side of the River Oaks and Destrehan subdivisions, right through Fairfield Place. Also, Seacliff Drive, Quail Creek, Plantation Pines, Falls Creek and the Woodlands all are affected by dry creek beds or other floodways and saw changes in their flood hazard zone status. “Waterhole Branch was also mapped for the first time, so the Fairhope Airport’s got a nice big floodway that goes right down through the bottom part of the runway,” Cortinas said. On the bay, almost all of the bayfront property was taken out of the highvelocity zone. In those designated zones, the hazard is not just rising water, but wave action as well. A new high-velocity zone has been mapped in the area of Fly Creek and its outfall. Cortinas also said there were several properties in Montrose that in 2007


COVER STORY got a revision or amendment on their property’s rating. He said those may have to be reapplied for if the map changed. In 2018, Fairhope is going be part of FEMA’s Community Ratings System in 2018, which will allow residents to earn a 10 percent discount on premiums. “They are going to come in and rate how we do things,” Cortinas said. “Fairhope is actually tailor-made for that program. It’s based on a point system. You get great points for public set-asides or flood zone lands. The Single Tax Colony did wonders for us by setting aside all of this bayfront property.”

ORANGE BEACH

The resort town saw some improvements on the beachfront, but some inland waterfront lots saw a rise in base flood elevation levels. “If you go out to the beachfront, basically everything east of Turquoise is outside of the special flood hazard area,” EMA Coordinator Lannie Smith said. “Pretty much everything west of Turquoise, until you get to the city limit, it has gone from a base level of 12 to a base level of 15, with a few exceptions.” Smith said that was what the level city ordinance was already requiring in those areas. “The good thing about that is we’ve had a three-foot freeboard since 2002 so we’ve been building to 15, everything new on the beach,” Smith said. “I would be recommending to the city council that we continue to require freeboard.” One area, Burkhart Drive, which is bordered by Bayou St. John and Johnson’s Cove, saw the biggest change on the new map. “This new zone is catching a lot of these lots at the tip of Burkhart,” Smith said. “They’ll have to build to coastal standards. This is probably the most drastic change in the city. Toward Sportsman, that zone comes a good bit further north than it did.” Bear Point, at the far east end of Orange Beach’s inland city limits, is historically flood prone and even has a special pumping system for storm water drainage. But some properties were removed from the flood hazard zone. “Bear Point had some areas that were an AE zone with a base flood elevation of six,” Smith said. “Now it’s eight, nine and even a portion of North Bayshore Drive has gone up to 10. So, some people may be happy, some not may not.” Orange Beach participates in FEMA’s Community Rating System and is at the Class 7 level. This designation gives residents a 15 percent discount on flood insurance.

GULF SHORES

Areas along the south side of Fort Morgan Road cause most of the concern in Gulf Shores, where the city requires a three-foot freeboard for new construction. “After Ivan came through in 2005, it didn’t seem the FEMA requirements set for us south of Fort Morgan Road were adequate so we adopted a three-foot freeboard,” EMA Coordinator Brandan Franklin said. “That adds three feet to whatever FEMA requires. We put one foot on everything north of Fort Morgan Road.” The new maps bring the base flood elevation up to the city’s required level. “Basically, what FEMA’s doing south of Fort Morgan, they elevated their requirements three feet,” Franklin said. “So, the new maps basically put the base-level elevation requirements at what we were requiring. “I want to make a recommendation to the

council to decrease the three-foot freeboard south of Fort Morgan Road, and let’s just do a one-foot freeboard in all of the flood zone areas within the city of Gulf Shores and our permitting jurisdiction. It gives us an added layer of protection by adding that one foot.” Gulf Shores is already at Class 8 in the community ratings system because of the added requirements, which allows for a 10 percent premium savings. “We’re striving hard to go to a Class 7 category and that would give us 15 percent,” Franklin said. “By adding the one-foot freeboard this in no way guarantees we’ll go to a Class 7, but it gives us a better chance of getting there. For every foot above higher than FEMA’s required elevation, you will get some sort of discount.”

SPANISH FORT

Chester Patterson, EMA coordinator with Spanish Fort, said there were no significant changes with the new flood maps in his city. “Areas within flood-prone regions show to have slight changes, but nothing apparent to be of great concern,” Patterson said. He noted the new maps give a better indication of the flood zones in Spanish Fort than the 2007 maps. “Based on review, changes appear to reflect a better level of accuracy of the flood risks in Spanish Fort,” Patterson said. “The information will give the city a greater opportunity to evaluate properties at a higher level of detail within the flood-prone areas.” Spanish Fort doesn’t participate in the Community Rating System, but is studying joining the program in the near future, Patterson said.

FOLEY

In Foley, EMA Coordinator Chuck Lay said the latest map saw a dramatic increase in areas of concern. “I do not have an exact number. However, I estimate that our flood hazard area doubled,” Lay said. “We have a large increase in one major subdivision, Bay Forest, and a subdivision, Rivertrace, that is in a regulated flood hazard area for the first time.” Foley received its first velocity rating, which indicates rising waters with wave action from one and a half to three feet on top. It is located on one of the points of the Bay Forest subdivision. Lay said meetings with the public are planned to reveal the new maps to residents. “Those outreach meetings will kick off soon,” he said. “I have been keeping several of the HOA leaders up to date on the status of everything.” Foley participates in the Community Rating System and is at Class 8, which earns residents a 10 percent discount on premiums.

DAPHNE

In Daphne, EMA Coordinator Richard Merchant said there were no changes in building height requirements, but some parcels were removed from the troublesome and expensive high-velocity zone. “Daphne’s coastal elevations did not change, but 35 properties were removed from the VE Zone,” Merchant said. “There were 12 properties removed from the special flood hazard areas. I don’t foresee any adverse effects in Daphne from the map changes.” Daphne is not in the Community Rating System program, but Merchant said officials are in the process of enrolling.

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ART ARTIFICE

MSO melds dance, paint for season opener BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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or Mobile Symphony Orchestra Music Director Scott Speck, the excitement is rising like a maestro’s baton. “I had so much time this summer just to do things like study scores at my leisure, to exercise, to do a little bit of travel. I haven’t conducted since a week after our last Mobile Symphony concert so I’m dying to get back into it,” Speck said. Good thing, too, because energy will be abundant in MSO’s 2017-2018 season opener. The “Firebird” concert on Sept. 23 and 24 will feature a convergence of artistic mediums. “We’re going to explore a particular time when Russian visual art, music and dance became known to the wider world and that was when [Serge] Diaghilev’s Ballet Russes went to Paris,” Speck said. The Russian impresario brought his native culture to bear — pun intended — in 1907 by importing its dancers to the City of Lights, then the hub of Western artistic refinement. He melded their choreography with the leading painters and costumers of the day, names including Kandinsky, Picasso, Benois and Matisse and costumers such as Coco Chanel and Léon Bakst. The Mobile Museum of Art offered its services to MSO and located examples of the suggested artwork. Slides of the painters will be projected onto the orchestra shell as Speck guides the audience through their pertinence and provenance. The most energetic change for the evening will be on

Archaeology digs into local seashores

the 10-foot wide strip of sprung floor installed at the stage’s edge. That’s where Juilliard School dancers will perform works re-created specifically for their orchestral matches. One is Vaslav Nijinsky’s choreography for Claude Debussy’s “Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun,” a performance initially controversial for its nontraditional movements and sexual overtones. The steps followed at MSO will be Jerome Robbins’ later reimagined version, which portrays dancers at practice with the audience as their studio mirror. Another is Nijinsky’s “Sacrificial Dance” segment from composer Igor Stravinsky’s pagan-themed “The Rite of Spring.” Its groundbreaking dance and music was legendary for the near riot sparked at its 1913 premiere. “It’s choreographed for one virgin to dance herself to death. This dance has something like 52 jumps in the air she has to do. It’s mostly a vertical dance,” Speck said. In 1987, the Joffrey Ballet commissioned Millicent Hodson to recreate the original dance working from descriptions, notations and photographs. Speck has conducted at roughly 10 of the Joffrey’s “Rite of Spring” productions. “[MSO] approached various ballet companies but Rite of Spring’s ‘Sacrifical Dance’ is not something most companies do. Luckily I had a good relationship with Millicent Hodson. She told us she would be working at Juilliard this coming year and could teach it to the dancers and make it work,” Speck said. Stravinsky has the most works on the concert program

Mobilian turns cancer battle to comedy

Native Mobilian Steve Evans’ darkly humorous one-man

FOR MOBILE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA MUSIC DIRECTOR SCOTT SPECK, THE EXCITEMENT IS RISING LIKE A MAESTRO’S BATON. ” from the Jerome Robbins Trust will be on hand to aid with “Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun” Appropriately, the concert leads with Emmanuel Chabrier’s “Fete Polonaise” from his opera “Le roi maigré lui (The King in Spite of Himself),” which exemplified the linking of cultures across Europe. The French composer even described its collaborative creation as “a bouillabaisse … into which I throw the spices.” “We’ve never played ‘Fete Polonaise’ in all the years I’ve been in Mobile and I’ve always wanted to. I thought that would be a great opener for this concert since it’s a French production of a Slavic work,” Speck said. Performances are scheduled for Saturday, Sept. 23, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Sept. 24, at 2:30 p.m. Tickets range in price from $15 to $75. For more information, call 251-432-2010 or go to mobilesymphony.org.

act “Brother Luther Powell vs. Cancer,” from this summer’s Yippie Fest in Chicago, is now posted on YouTube. The festival is a successor of the Abbie Hoffman Died for Our Sins Theatre Festival, a three-day event that ran for 28 years and spread performances involving more than 50 theater groups, bands and performers across the Windy City. The show is both therapeutic and resourceful, as it is inspired by Evans’ real battle with small-cell cancer over the last year. Drawn from archetypal Southern preachers, the fictional Powell’s trademark seersucker suit — with requisite brightly colored tie and two-tone wingtips — is visibly roomier on the actor than in previous years. He runs through the accidental discovery of his condition following a vehicular mishap, and continues through chemotherapy, a cop giving him a lift to score liquid morphine, medicinal marijuana and other “benefits” to the deadly disease. The video runs a shade over 20 minutes.

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Guest trumpet for USA faculty recital

The University of South Alabama’s faculty recital series has brought our residential talent into sharp focus. For an upcoming show, the university has brought in some guest talent from the Peach State. On Sept. 18 at 7:30 p.m., Columbus State University trumpet professor Robert Murray will take the stage at Laidlaw Recital Hall on the USA campus. He’ll be joined by pianist Alina Sarkisyan-Bennett as they run through a program promised to be “highly interesting and entertaining.” Noted for his “golden tone” and “convincing performances,” Murray has served in international orchestras, the Dallas Brass and Broadway productions. He is currently principal trumpet of the North Charleston POPS! in Charleston, South Carolina. Tickets are $8, $5 for USA faculty/staff, students, youth under 18 and senior citizens; they are available at the door, cash or check only. For more information, call Peter Wood at 251-460-7821.

ARTSGALLERY

The fall lecture series at the University of South Alabama Archaeology Museum (6052 USA Drive S.) starts Sept. 14 at 6 p.m., when Della Scott-Ireton of the Florida Public Archaeology Network talks about the archaeology of Gulf Islands National Seashore. The National Park Service’s Gulf Islands National Seashore on Santa Rosa Island boasts unspoiled natural beauty that is valuable habitat for varied wildlife. Both land and water also hold some of Pensacola’s most intriguing archaeological sites. The presentation will tour some of these, including a Spanish colonial presidio and shipwrecks from several periods. Admission is free. For more information, call 251-460-6106 or email Candice Cravins at ccravins@southalabama.edu.

— three including the eponymous finale — and they illustrate his migration from Russian regular to revolutionary. “When Stravinsky started out he was a late Romantic, very much in the Tchaikovsky tradition. Then we’ll hear him in his Neoclassical mode and then for a few minutes we’ll hear him at his most brutal,” Speck said. Tchaikovsky, too will make an appearance with a work fittingly associated with ballet: “Sleeping Beauty.” “It ends the first portion of the concert, and I think the climaxes in that piece are every bit as exciting as the climaxes in his best symphonies,” Speck said. Everything for the concert has been redefined. Lighting has been recalibrated for visual projections and dance. Even seating has shifted as the 75-member orchestra makes room for the dancers. The Juilliard performers aren’t the only visitors the show has brought. Support personnel like costumers and makeup artists are common, and someone


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FEATURE

MUSIC

‘Same band, with a new feel’ BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

BAND: INFANT RICHARD & THE DELTA STONES, SERGIO & THE SATIN DOGS DATE: FRIDAY, SEPT. 15, 7 P.M. VENUE: CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB, 916 CHARLESTON ST., WWW.CALLAGHANSIRISHSOCIALCLUB.COM TICKETS: $10 AT THE DOOR

Photo | Michelle Stancil

T

Infant Richard and the Delta Stones are debuting new singer Morgan Fielder with a new album and ambitious southeastern tour.

he old saying that change is inevitable resonates throughout everyone’s lives, especially in the music world. Bands go through changes with their lineups and their sound. Sometimes just a small variation in a band can lead to something different on a variety of levels. In recent months, Nappie Award winners Infant Richard & the Delta Stones have gone through some changes that have sparked an evolution in the band’s sound. This group of eclectic Azalea City musicians has recruited singer-songwriter Morgan Fielder to serve as the band’s new vocalist. Her addition to the band has led the group to forget the past and focus on a future bursting with new material, with a new attitude. Members of Infant Richard discovered Fielder through YouTube. Taken by her vocal style and songwriting prowess, bassist Christian Heiden says the band offered her an audition, which she accepted. Throughout the audition, Fielder said, she instantly felt an artistic bond with her potential bandmates, who she found to be “beautiful souls” and “kind.” “They’re extremely talented and mesh really well,” Fielder said. “That was the automatic impression that I got. As soon as

I walked in to audition, I could tell it was a tightknit family. I automatically felt welcome.” While the addition of a new lead vocalist may seem like big news, the more impressive news is where Infant Richard has been going since Fielder joined the band. Guitarist Paul McDonald says the band has been starting over, scrapping all past original material, including the tracks on their new album “When the Smoke Clears.” Familiar tracks will be replaced by all new material the band has been composing nonstop since Fielder came on the scene. While this may seem an impossible task, Fielder arrived with an abundance of original songs from her personal repertoire. The group’s newly discovered artistic chemistry and Fielder’s passion for songwriting has made Infant Richard’s fresh start an easy process. “She [Fielder] writes constantly, every day and has new lyrics and new ideas for songs,” McDonald said. “She’s very persistent on us continuing to write songs and keep this process going. We’ve been taking the music that we write and pairing it with her lyrics. I think that’s the biggest reason that we’ve been able to write songs at a quicker, more efficient rate.” “I love the energy of these guys,” added Fielder. “It’s opened

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a lot of doors spiritually and artistically. It’s helping me be a better person. I’ve grown a lot since I’ve been with these people. It’s been good for me, and I think we’re meshing really well.” Musically, the group says they are not straying too far from their high-energy mix of “jazz, psychedelic rock with a little bit of funk.” However, this energized, aural context is being met with a deeper theme. The group hopes the end result will be a collection of songs that make their audiences ponder themselves and the world around them. With this in mind, Fielder brought along a few songs she wrote previously. Inspired by her personal experiences, Fielder says, these songs reflect “self-awareness, spiritual awakenings and the world around us.” The songs are about asking questions, she adds, questions she and the rest of the band hope the audience will ponder while dancing to their vibrant sound. “When we’re playing in front of an audience, we want to make them look inside themselves and look around and chew up the information that we’re spitting out and make a light bulb go off,” Fielder said. “It’s very deep but very fun.” “There are darker overtones,” adds Heiden. “There’s more hidden messages and more to decipher. It’s darker overtones with a psychedelic rock feel.” “We’re still gonna jam and be high-energy the whole time,” McDonald said. “We’re gonna be upbeat and have a good time.” With its concentration on psychedelic rock, the band cites “Mudpie” as one of their favorite songs. The group likes this song so much that Fielder says they are planning to write more in the same vein. Infant Richard has also gotten a case of the blues with their new song “Johnny & Annie.” While these songs and others can only be heard at the band’s live shows, the band’s online community has been treated to a stripped-down acoustic version of “Tattoo Kit.” In this version of the song, Fielder’s vocals trip light and sweet across the plucks and strums of the mellow, heartfelt ballad that is a throwback to the birth of rock. As far as an album featuring new material, McDonald says the band will be concentrating on going into the studio sometime in the near future. If they have their way, Infant Richard & the Delta Stones’ next release will be an EP or a demo that will hit sometime “within six months to a year,” with a full-length to follow. As far as new material for their next album, McDonald says the band has an abundance of songs with more on the way. The high demand for their live show has put any studio work on hold. Since Fielder has joined the group, the band has already introduced their new sound to Mobile, Birmingham, Athens, Atlanta and Augusta. Currently, the band has all dates filled through the end of the year, with more being added. With this in mind, McDonald encourages fans to witness the band’s new persona live. “Come out and watch it,” McDonald said. “It’s all new music. With the songs that we’ve played over the past three years, we’ve played some for that entire time and some just over the past year. Now, it’s all new music. It’s all new originals and all new covers. It’s the same band, with a new feel.”


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MUSIC BRIEFS

Shorty’s return

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

Band: Trombone Shorty, The Record Company Date: Wednesday, Sept. 20, with doors at 6 p.m. Venue: Saenger Theatre, 6 S. Joachim St., www.mobilesaenger.com Tickets: $31.50-$36.50, available at Saenger Box Office and Ticketmaster

Photo | Mathieu Bitton | Trombone Shorty

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his twofold lineup promises to bring the hottest modern jazz, funk and blues to The Jewel on Joachim. Los Angeles-based progressive blues trio The Record Company will open the evening. This group won thousands of fans with its single “Off the Ground,” and hasn’t disappointed its growing fanbase with its versatile blues rock. From the funky blues shuffle of “Rita Mae Young” to the Burnside-esque “On the Move,” The Record Company’s sound has more to do with growing the blues than simply keeping the genre alive. A packed house will be welcoming Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue back to Mobile. Over the years, Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews’ contemporary Big Easy brass sound has made him a favorite in the Azalea City and beyond. Shorty delivers an adrenalized hybrid of jazz, soul, funk and hip-hop to music-hungry audiences. With a set guaranteed to keep the crowd moving, Shorty’s high-energy live shows are equally impressive. The crowd can expect to hear live cuts from his latest release, “Parking Lot Symphony,” in which Shorty and his band give listeners a heavy dose of classic soul with a ribbon of funk flowing through the track list.

Hot fun, uncorked

Band: Sand Dollar Lifestyles “Summer Experience” Date: Saturday, Sept. 16, 2 p.m. Venue: Sand Dollar Lifestyles at The Wharf, 4700-B Main St., Suite 108 (Orange Beach), www.sanddollarlifestyles.com Tickets: Free

Labor Day Weekend marked the end of the summer vacation season on the Alabama Gulf Coast. But before summer 2017 is a fading memory, Sand Dollar Lifestyles wants to give the public one more taste of sun and fun with the conclusion of its “Summer Experience” events, coinciding with the Uncorked Food & Wine Festival. Monroe Meat Co. will provide food and Kamado Joe will demonstrate its grills. Kids can enjoy games, and everyone will enjoy the $7,500 in raffle prizes. Music will be a major highlight of this event. MidLife Crisis will perform a plethora of crowd favorites. The public will also get to sample LSD, featuring singer-songwriter Lisa Zanghi, Scott Koehn and Doug Habina. Terry Brock & Friends will headline. Brock has lent his vocals to bands such as Kansas and LeRoux. For his solo performances, he brings the sounds of his career to the stage with the help of Italian bassist Anna Portalupi and other friends.

R&B bash

Band: Tank, Sammie Date: Sunday, Sept. 17, with doors at 7 p.m. Venue: Soul Kitchen, 219 Dauphin St., www.soulkitchenmobile.com Tickets: $24.50-$59.50; $125 for meet-and-greets; available at venue, its website, Mellow Mushroom (West Mobile/midtown), or by calling 1-866-777-8932

Multiple Grammy-nominated singer-songwriter Tank is rolling into Mobile this weekend for an evening of rhythm and blues. This Atlantic recording artist is stopping in the Azalea City on his SAVAGE Tour, in support of his upcoming album “Savage,” set for release Sept. 29. For “Savage,” Tank welcomed guests such as Candace Boyd, Trey Songz, J. Valentine and Ludacris. Da Internz, Cardiak and Harmony Samuels served as the album’s production team. If the past serves as evidence for the future, Tank fans can expect more suave vocals that deliver this artist’s poignant lyrical poetry. Sammie will prep the crowd for Tank’s set. This R&B vocalist was barely into his teens when he got his start. Since then, he has grown from a teen pop sensation to one of the smoothest voices in R&B. Sammie’s syncopated flow and vocal control testify to his artistic maturity shaped by experience.

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AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | September 14 - September 20

THUR. SEPT 14

Blind Mule— Mobile Jazz Club, 9p Bluegill— Shea White Blues Tavern— John Hall Duo, 8:30p Cockeyed Charlie’s— JJ Fairhope Brewing— Pints for Prostates Felix’s— Grit’s N Pieces Flora Bama— Dave McCormick, 2p// Zachery Diedrich, 5p/// Dueling Pianos, 5:30p//// Mark Sherrill, James Daniel, Mel Knapp & Chris Newbury, 6p//// River Dan Band, 10p//// Wes Loper, 10:15p Lulu’s— Lefty Collins, 5p Manci’s— Lee Yankie McSharry’s— The Light Travelers, 7:30p The Merry Widow— Greyhounds, Infant Richard and the Delta Stones, 9p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Damien Lamb, 6p

Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Tyler Tisdale Duo, 6:30p Moe’s BBQ (Semmes) — The Dunaway Brothers Old 27 Grill— Carol Bachman, 6:30p SanBar— David Jones Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Soul Food Junkies, 6p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Jason Justice, 6p Windmill Market— Symone French, 11:30a

SAT. SEPT 16

Beau Rivage— Canelo Golovkin Supremacy viewing party, 8p Big Beach Brewing— Ben Loftin and Family, 6:30p Bluegill— Jamie Anderson, 12p// Jason Justice Band, 6p Blues Tavern— The Regulators w/East Bank Horns, 9p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Delta Smoke, 6p Cockeyed Charlie’s— FRI. SEPT 15 Jordan Bramblett All Sports Bar & Felix’s— Abro Trio Billiards— DJ Markie Mark, Flora Bama— Bruce Smelley 10p Duo, 1p// LeaAnne Creswell Beau Rivage— Jay Leno, 8p Trio, 2p/// Jack Robertson Show, Big Beach Brewing— The 5:30p//// Zachery Diedrich Rex, 6:30p & David Harris, 6p//// Mason Bluegill— Lee Yankie, 12p// Henderson Duo, 9p//// Jay Sherry Court Band, 6p Williams Band, 10p/// JoJo Pres, Blues Tavern— HalfWay, 9p 10:15p//// Anthony Orio, 10:30p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Hard Rock (Center Bar) Zydeco, 6p — Contraflow, 9:30p Callaghan’s— Infant Richard Hard Rock (Live) — Grand and the Delta Stones Funk Railroad, 8p Cockeyed Charlie’s— IP Casino— The Marshall Shifting Tracks, 10p Tucker Band, 8p Felix’s— Blind Dog Mike Listening Room— Lisa Mills Flora Bama— Wes Loper, Homecoming Shindig 1p// J. Hawkins Duo, 2p/// Lulu’s— Lee Yankie, 5p Destiny Brown, 5p//// Greg Manci’s— Konbit Haiti Kids Lyons, 5p//// Jack Robertson Ministry Fundraiser, 4p Show, 5:30p//// Brian Hill Duo, McSharry’s— DJ Lewis, 10p 6p//// River Dan, 6p//// Kevin The Merry Widow— Sun Swanson & Adam Brown, 9p//// Seeker w/The Ragcoats, 9p Mario Mena Band, 10p//// Kyle Moe’s BBQ (OBA) — Wilson Band, 10:15p//// Anthony Corey Reznor Orio, 10:30p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Golden Nugget— Bobby Shores)— Destiny Brown, 12p Bones Funny & Alone Comedy Tacky Jacks (Orange Tour Beach) — Jamie Adamson, Hard Rock (Center Bar) 11a// Pierce Parker, 6p — Contraflow, 9:30p The Wharf— Eric Church Listening Room— The Futher Confessions of Johnny No SUN. SEPT 17 Lulu’s— CoConut Radio, 5p Bluegill— Quintin Berry, 12p// Manci’s— Wes Loper Tip Tops, 6p McSharry’s— DJ Tiger, 10p Blues Tavern— John Hall, 6p The Merry Widow— Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Airpark and South Carlen, 10p Matt Neese, 6p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Callaghan’s— Andrew Category 4, 8p Duhon Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Adam Fairhope Brewing— FBC Tyler Brown and Friends, 6p Pro-Am

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Felix’s— Bobby Butchka Flora Bama— Smoky Otis Duo, 12p// Songs of Rusty, 1:30p/// Brandon White, 2p//// Perdido Brothers, 6p//// Mel Knapp, 8p//// Justin Headley Experiment, 10:15p Lulu’s— Greg Brown, 1p// Alvardo Show, 5p Manci’s— Eric Erdman, 6:30p McSharry’s— Trad. Irish Session, 6:30p Old 27 Grill— Barry Gibson, 11:30a Soul Kitchen— Tank, 8p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Lisa Christian, 2p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Gerry Gambino, 12p// Matt Slowick, 5p

MON. SEPT 18

Alchemy— Doug Stanhope, 8p Felix’s— Bryant Gilley Flora Bama— Founders and Friends, 2p// Cathy Pace, 6p/// Kevin Swanson, 8p//// Petty and Pace, 10:15p Lulu’s— Brent Burns, 5p

TUE. SEPT 19

Bluegill— Mobile Big Band Society Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Matt Neese, 6p Butch Cassidy’s— Jerry Powell Cockeyed Charlie’s— Jordan Bramblett Felix’s— Jamie Anderson Flora Bama— T. Bone Montgomery, 2p// Perdido Brothers, 6p/// Alabama Lightning, 8p//// Mario Mena Duo, 10:15p Lulu’s— Ronnie Presley, 5p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Bob Erickson, 6p

WED. SEPT 20

Blind Mule— Comedy Open Mic, 8p Bluegill— Matt Neese Blues Tavern— Art, 8p Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Callaghan’s— Phil and Foster Felix’s— Jimmy Lumpkin Duo Flora Bama— Neil Dover, 2p// Rhonda Hart and Jonathan Newton, 6p/// Dave McCormick, 8p//// Bruce Smelley Duo, 10:15p Lulu’s— Delta Reign Duo, 6p Old 27 Grill— Youth Open Mic, 6:30p Saenger— Trombone Shorty & Orlenas Avenue Shipp’s Harbour Grill— Brent Burns, 5p


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Soothing, escapist film fare for unnerving times

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FILMTHE REEL WORLD

BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

AREA

THEATERS CARMIKE CINEMA’S Wynnsong 16 785 Schillinger Rd. S. (251) 639-7373 CRESCENT THEATER 208 Dauphin Street (251) 438-2005 HOLLYWOOD STADIUM 18 1250 Satchel Paige Dr. (251) 473-9655 RAVE MOTION PICTURE JUBILEE SQUARE 12 6898 U.S. 90 Daphne, (251) 626- 6266

hese are trying times. From an active hurricane season to a whiplash-inducing political climate — remember when people used to say we couldn’t wait for the election year to be over? — it’s increasingly unlikely anyone will get any sleep, ever. Whether you’re distraught about the nation, or just reliving an argument you had with a family member about the nation, we need soothing, escapist film fare that hopefully doesn’t trigger comparison to any current events whatsoever. Considering the breadth and depth of current events, that’s a tricky spot to find. I, for one, am not looking to have my thoughts provoked any more at the moment. I need to watch dearly held favorite films and hope no one unearths a deleted scene to disrupt my Zen state of rewatchable reverie. If you rule out films that are about the apocalypse, a weather event or politics, the list gets much shorter, but it can’t be entirely brainless because you must remain engaged. This is my list of reliable mental babysitters. “Harvey” — James Stewart is the ultimate soothing presence no matter what, even if he is possibly imagining a 6-foot rabbit day drinking with him throughout town. The film grapples oh so pleasantly

with the question of whether Elwood P. Dowd’s best friend is a real giant rabbit or a benevolent hallucination, and is a sophisticated, delightful comedy with a tender, magical heart. “Lost in Translation” — The characters in this Sofia Coppola film are fish out of water, but their disorientation is soulful, wistful and extremely watchable. Bill Murray as a famous American movie star in Tokyo shilling for a whiskey brand launched his much-beloved second act in his real career, and I never get tired of this film. Scarlett Johansson may be a young lady adrift, but she’s still so sheltered that it looks like a rather enviable dilemma. This story makes existential crises glamorous and fun. “Gosford Park” — This is, unofficially, the superior prototype for the hugely entertaining television series “Downton Abbey,” with Julian Fellowes as screenwriter to director Robert Altman. The uneasy symbiosis between the upstairs and downstairs inhabitants of a vast English estate are richly retailed and vividly experienced in both the film and the subsequent PBS series, but “Gosford Park” has far more bite. Every character in “Gosford Park” is important and memorable. When you have Richard E. Grant in a rather tiny role

that is still entirely unforgettable, that is an embarrassment of riches. Pompous Michael Gambon butts heads with his fabulously imperious wife, Kristin Scott Thomas, and many other major and minor characters are meticulously intertwined. Bob Balaban provides comic relief as a clueless American movie producer, shouting down the phone most of the film. Clive Owen smolders as a possibly vengeful visiting footman, and there are surprisingly emotional secrets buried among the dozens of closet-dwelling skeletons. And a hateful, philandering coward gets his comeuppance, which just appeals to me for some reason. “Andy Goldsworthy: Rivers and Tides” — If you have never experienced this 2001 documentary, you have yet to experience a truly meditative journey that will provide much-needed solace and communion with nature through the deeply beautiful lens of the artwork of Andy Goldsworthy. The pace, I shall warn you, is extremely slow and quiet; this is a documentary about a British guy who builds incredible sculptures out of sticks and stones and leaves. It is extraordinary, and it is neither fast nor furious. Hunker down with this quiet and beautiful film and let its beauty and ingenuity cure, if only temporarily, what ails you.

CARMIKE CINEMAS 23151 Wharf Ln. Orange Beach (251) 981-4444 COBB THEATRES PINNACLE 14 3780 Gulf Shores Pkwy Gulf Shores (251) 968-7444 EASTERN SHORE PREMIERE CINEMA 14 30500 Alabama 181 #500 Spanish Fort, Al (251) 626-0352 Information accurate at press time; please call theaters for showtimes.

Photos | USA Films / Fox Searchlight Pictures

FROM LEFT: “Gosford Park” depicts the lives of upstairs guests and downstairs servants during a party at a country house in England in 1932, as they investigate a murder involving one of them. “Patti Cake$” tells the story of an unlikely rapper finding her voice as a one-of-a-kind hip-hop legend in the making. NEW IN THEATERS PATTI CAKE$

In a coming-of-age story straight out of Jersey, an unlikely rapper finds her voice as a one-of-a-kind hip-hop legend in the making. This is the first feature film from acclaimed commercial and music video director Geremy Jasper. Crescent Theater

MOTHER!

Mystery has surrounded this film from Darren Aronofsky, but the cast is stupendous. Jennifer Lawrence, Javier

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Bardem, Michelle Pfeiffer and Ed Harris star in this film in which a woman descends into madness and paranoia as her remote country mansion is invaded by a series of unwelcome guests — all of whom seem to have a mysterious connection to her husband. All listed multiplex theaters.

AMERICAN ASSASSIN

A CIA black ops recruit learns his trade under the tutelage of a Cold War veteran played by Michael Keaton. All listed multiplex theaters.

NOW PLAYING

THE NUT JOB 2: NUTTY BY NATURE TRUE TO THE GAME All listed multiplex theaters. Regal Mobile Stadium 18 KIDNAP HOME AGAIN All listed multiplex theaters. All listed multiplex theaters. THE DARK TOWER IT All listed multiplex theaters. All listed multiplex theaters. ATOMIC BLONDE WIND RIVER Regal Mobile Stadium 18 Crescent Theater, Eastern Shore THE EMOJI MOVIE Premiere Cinema, Regal Mobile All listed multiplex theaters. Stadium 18 DUNKIRK LEAP Eastern Shore Premiere Cinema, All listed multiplex theaters. Regal Mobile Stadium 18 LOGAN LUCKY SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING All listed multiplex theaters. All listed multiplex theaters. THE HITMAN’S BODYGUARD DESPICABLE ME 3 All listed multiplex theaters. All listed multiplex theaters. ANNABELLE: CREATION WONDER WOMAN All listed multiplex theaters. All listed multiplex theaters.


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CALENDAR OF EVENTS SEPTEMBER 14, 2017 - SEPTEMBER 20, 2017

GENERAL INTEREST Harbor improvement meeting The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ open house for the proposed improvement of the Mobile Harbor Federal Navigation Channel, Sept. 14, 5:30-7:30 p.m. at the Bayou La Batre Community and Senior Center, 12745 Padgett Switch Road in Irvington. For more information, visit sam. usace.army.mil. Fake news or not? Join editors and reporters from factchecking website PolitiFact to learn how they sort out fact from fiction on a daily basis. Thursday, Sept. 14, 6:30 p.m. at Ben May Main Library, 701 Government St. Call 251-208-7097. Fairhope farmer’s market The city of Fairhope hosts an outdoor farmer’s market Thursdays, 3-6 p.m., through Nov. 2 behind the Fairhope Public Library downtown on Bancroft Street. Call 251-929-1466. Kayak cleanup Join Mobile Baykeeper for a canoe and kayak cleanup Friday, Sept. 15, 9-11 a.m. at the One Mile Creek put-in spot on North Hamilton and Sumter streets. No canoe or kayak necessary. Call 251-4334229. Alabama Coastal Cleanup The 30th annual Alabama Coastal Cleanup is Saturday, Sept. 16, from 8 a.m. to noon. For more information or to

find cleanup areas near you visit www. AlabamaCoastalCleanup.com or call 251928-9792. Massacre Island Pirate Event Fort Gaines Historic Site and the 6th Alabama Cavalry Buccaneers will hold a two-day event, Sept. 16-17, in which the public can experience a day in the life of a pirate from the 1700s. Call 251-861-6992 or email fortgaines@outlook.com. Gulf Coast Gospel Fest The Gulf Coast Gospel Fest 2017, starring Grammy Award-winning artist Tasha Cobbs, will be held Saturday, Sept. 16, 6 p.m., at the Mobile Civic Center. It will be a musical night full of prayer, praise and worship. Visit mobilecivicctr.com. Bell Ringing Day Celebrate the signing of the U.S. Constitution on Tuesday, Sept. 19, at 2 p.m. This is a school project for Dodge Elementary PACE students to honor the official founding of the country. Bookmark contest The Daphne Public Library announces its 2017 “Back-to-School” Bookmark Contest, open to students in grades K-12, runs through Sept. 29. Call 251-621-2818. TOPS Take Off Pounds Sensibly meets every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. at Spanish Fort Presbyterian Church. Call 251-625-6888.

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Dauphin Island Boardwalk Talks Boardwalk Talks are held the first and third Wednesday of each month at 11:15 a.m. at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab, 101 Bienville Blvd. Call 251-861-2141. Midtown Optimist Club Join Midtown Optimist Club every Wednesday at noon for lunch at Azalea City Golf Course. Call 251-348-3542. Toastmasters Toastmasters International meets regularly at six locations in Mobile and Baldwin counties. Visit www.toastmasters. org for more information.

FUNDRAISERS ‘Girls Just Wanna to Have Fun’ Wind Creek Casino & Hotel – Atmore present the 11th annual “Girls Just Wanna Have Fun” fundraiser benefiting Ronald McDonald House Charities of Mobile. Thursday, Sept. 14, 5:30 p.m. at The Steeple in downtown Mobile. Visit rmhcmobile.org. ‘Pints for Prostates’ On Thursday, Sept. 14, at 5:30 p.m., Fairhope Brewing Co. (914 Nichols Ave.) will host “Pints for Prostates.” One dollar per pour will be donated to prostate cancer research, survivorship support and free testing. Visit pintsforprostates.org.

ARTS Craft and attic show On Sept. 16-17, the Abba Shrine Center, 7701 Hitt Road, will host a craft and attic

show featuring crafts, antiques, gifts, home décor, jewelry and more. Call 251895-3821. ‘A Beautiful Planet’ Mobile Baykeeper is partnering with the Exploreum to host an IMAX film screening of “A Beautiful Planet” to celebrate Mobile Baykeeper’s 20th anniversary on Tuesday, Sept. 19, at 6 p.m. Afterward, speaker Ruth Carmichael will lead a discussion and Q&A. Visit mobilebaykeeper.org.

MUSEUMS ‘Right on Course’ The United States Sports Academy’s American Sport Art Museum & Archives is open free to the public weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. One of the newest exhibits is “Right on Course.” Visit www.asama. org. ‘Windows to the Sea’ “Windows to the Sea” is the latest permanent exhibit at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab Estuarium. Visit disl.org. ‘Shipwreck! Pirates and Treasure’ A new, highly interactive exhibit at GulfQuest features more than 500 authentic artifacts recovered from deepocean shipwrecks. Visit www.gulfquest. org. Fairhope’s founding Learn more about the 1894 founding of Fairhope at the Fairhope Museum of History, 24 N. Section St. The museum is


open daily (except Sunday and Monday) from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 251-929-1471. Little Discoveries “Outside the Box,” aimed at children age 6 and under, explores how innovation and creativity can lead to a world of possibilities, starting with a simple cardboard box. Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Call 251-208-6893 or email jholland@ exploreum.com. Thursdays at MMoA Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., the Mobile Museum of Art offers free admission to all visitors. No reservations are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive. Call 251-208-5200.

SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES GO Run The 10th annual 5K and one-mile fun run/walk. Saturday, Sept. 16, at the USA Moulton Tower & Alumni Plaza. Registration opens at 6:30 a.m., 5K begins at 8 a.m., fun run at 9 a.m. Proceeds benefit gynecologic cancer research at the USA Mitchell Cancer Institute. South Alabama football The University of South Alabama Jaguars welcome the Alabama A&M Bulldogs Saturday, Sept. 16, 6 p.m. at Ladd-Peebles Stadium. Note: USA has implemented a policy allowing only clear, see-through bags at games. Visit usajaguars.com. Group rides South Alabama and Mississippi Mountain Bike Association invites all levels of cyclists to join them every Tuesday and Thursday at 6 p.m. at USA Bike Trails and Sunday at 9 a.m. at Chickasabogue Park. Email carrie@ rideSAMBA.com. Weekly 1K/5K Every Thursday evening at 6 p.m., join Red Beard’s Outfitter and Cortlandt’s Pub in the Spring Hill Village Shopping Center for a 1K or 5K run and walk. No cost to participate. Bingo Join Via Health, Fitness, Enrichment Center (171 Dauphin St.) for bingo every Tuesday and Thursday, 1:30-3:30 p.m.

Call 251-478-3311 Bridge lessons The Mobile Bridge Center offers free bridge lessons each Tuesday at 6 p.m. at 1510 University Blvd. Arrive a few minutes early to register. Call the Bridge Center at 251-666-2147, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fitness and athletics classes New fitness classes are in progress at Palmer Pillans Middle School. Curvy yoga, Tone It Up! (fusion workout), Zumba, basketball clinics (ages 8+) and sports conditioning (ages 8-17). To register or for more information, call 251-463-7980 or visit communityactivitiesprogram.com. Dance and art classes Classes offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School include belly dance, ballroom dance, ballet and tumbling (ages 6-8), beginning piano (ages 8+), watercolor painting, zombies and superheroes art, and pet portraits art. Call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com. Pickleball for adults (indoors) Offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School, Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon. Great sport for all ages combines tennis, pingpong and badminton on a court one-fourth the size of a tennis court. Call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com. Ballroom dance Azalea Ballroom Dance Club hosts dances the second and fourth Tuesday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Via Health, Fitness & Enrichment Center, 1717 Dauphin St. Call 251-623-9183 or visit azaleaballroomdanceclub.com. Ballroom dance The Moonlight Chassé Ballroom Dance Society hosts dances the first and third Monday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Hot Wheels Skating Rink in Daphne. Email cassief13@aol.com.

WORKSHOPS Education and career planning The city of Mobile Community Activities Program at LeFlore High School is offering free introductory classes for education and career planning for students in grades 8-12 and their parents, 6-7 p.m. on Tues., Sept. 19, or Thurs., Sept. 21. For more information and to reserve space, please call Melanie Johnson at 251-208-1610.

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THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE UNITED KINGDOM BY ANDREW ZHOU / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Mayhem 9 Bowfishing need 14 Happy event after a split? 19 Really happening 21 “Don Juan” girl 22 Prince of ____ 23 *Law enforcer with the Coast Guard 25 “____ we lucky?” 26 Nat ____ Wild (cable channel) 27 More decisive 28 Place for stars 30 Buffet heater 33 *It passes on some bits of information 37 What the last letter of 107Down stands for 38 Very puzzled 40 Record collection? 41 Constellation next to Corona Australis 42 ____ Jahan, leader who commissioned the Taj Mahal 43 ____ Jorge (part of the Azores) 44 Little sucker? 48 *Philosopher who wrote, “Out of the crooked timber of humanity, no straight thing was ever made” 53 “Works for me” 54 Company known for combining expertise? 55 Presidents Taft, Ford, Clinton and both Bushes 59 Remain 60 What the Tower of London was for over 850 years 63 Adhere (to) 64 Utter, as a sound 65 One put in bed? 66 *Celebrities working for the U.N., perhaps 71 Disposition 72 International fusion restaurant chain 73 Hall-of-Fame Bruin 74 Tater 75 Common Korean surname 76 Low-quality bank offerings whose acronym suggests stealthiness 79 A little teary 83 Peevish 85 *Certain photo poster 88 Island nation that was once part of the Spanish East Indies 89 TV’s NBA on ____ 91 Tribe that gave its name to a state 92 Grp. of people puttering around? 93 Tow truck 96 You might pass one in a race 98 Onetime Yankee nickname 99 *Business bigwigs

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103 Seep through 105 Like a bogey 106 Tie up quickly? 108 Cleveland athlete, familiarly 109 Educator Montessori 110 Sex appeal … or a hint to the answers to the six starred clues 117 Main force 118 Bring to a full amount 119 Bratty 120 Big instrument in electronic music, informally 121 Pillow covers 122 Washington newsmaker of 1980 DOWN 1 Start to call 2 U.N. workers’ grp. 3 Handle in the entertainment industry 4 Solar system model 5 Home-testing-kit target 6 Early seventh-century year 7 Very long spans 8 In a mischievous manner 9 Actress Woodard 10 Big seller of outdoor gear 11 Ocasek of the Cars 12 Call with a charge? 13 Geniality 14 Crystal jewelry company with a swan in its logo 15 Some patterned floors 16 Fox Islands dweller 17 ____ Elise Goldsberry,

37-Across winner for “Hamilton” 18 Poly- follower 20 TV producer Michaels 24 Cheese often served with olives 29 Hebrew name meaning 62-Down 30 Unadventurous 31 Crooner with the autobiography “It Wasn’t All Velvet” 32 U.S.S. Missouri’s resting site 34 Person who’s dreaded? 35 Publisher of the magazine America’s 1st Freedom, for short 36 Prefix with system 39 ____ Bo (workout system) 42 Golf’s Slammin’ Sammy 45 It helps keep things straight 46 First sign of spring 47 Wacky tobacky, in part 49 Lingo 50 One-third of a B-52 cocktail 51 “____ iacta est” (“The die is cast”) 52 First phase 53 Draft status? 56 Mastered, British-style 57 Conversation fillers 58 “____ me?” 61 Take responsibility for something 62 Safari sighting 65 Site of biblical destruction 66 Davis of “Thelma & Louise” 67 Heat center of old? 68 War on Poverty prez 69 Things displayed by mannequins

70 “The Lady of the Camellias” author, 1848 71 Dot on a screen 76 One suffering from numbness, maybe 77 Unit of petrol 78 Browning vessels 80 Do make-up work? 81 Plants with bell-shaped blooms 82 Pokémon card transaction 84 Penn State symbol 86 Old Pontiac 87 Western city bisected by I-80 89 B’way buy 90 Eleanor Roosevelt ____ Roosevelt 94 Soviet ____ 95 Diamond figures 96 Ten or twenty 97 Little bits 98 Big-bang creator 99 Rooster displays 100 Gynecologist’s concern 101 Many a late-night cable show 102 Bounds 104 Word with crime or bar 107 Acronym for an acting/ singing awards sweep 111 Plays performed in shozoku robes 112 Hoppy quaff, briefly 113 Closemouthed 114 Utmost 115 One in 100: Abbr. 116 O.R. figures

ANSWERS ON PAGE 40


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SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

USSA offers academic programs to Stillman students

goals: to identify athletes aged 13-18 who are at risk of sudden cardiac arrest (SCA), and to raise awareness about the signs of SCA and provide instruction on how to respond. Several heart screenings are planned in the next few months. These include Oct. 3 at St. Michael Catholic High School in Fairhope (12:30-4:30 p.m.), Alabama School of Math and Science in Mobile (1-4 p.m.) and Foley High School (1-4 p.m.). Amy Cockrell helped start the program after her son, Sam, suffered an SCA at age 16. The competitive triathlete collapsed while swimming in a pool. Aaron Morgan, M.D., a family medicine resident at the University of South Alabama, was present and quickly analyzed the situation. Cockrell is seeking volunteers for the three sessions. Help is needed for blood pressure checks, electrocardiogram monitoring and clerical work at the check-in desk. Interested parties may contact her at 251-510-7263 or amy@ heartforathletes.org. The service is offered free of charge to athletes from Mobile and Baldwin counties. A typical screening takes approximately 30 minutes. SCA is the leading cause of death in athletes aged 17-35. The goal of these screenings is to find athletes at risk for SCA by looking for the conditions most likely to cause the disorder. To learn more, visit http://heartforathletes.org.

BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

Wildlife events planned

Photo | Courtesy USSA

Stillman College President Cynthia Warrick, left, signs an articulation agreement with United States Sports Academy President and CEO T.J. Rosandich.

S

ince 1972, the United States Sports Academy has worked to help meet the educational needs of students preparing for a career in sports. Now, thanks to an agreement with Stillman College, USSA plans to share its knowledge with the historically black college in Tuscaloosa. Stillman President Cynthia Warrick, Ph.D., recently visited the USSA campus in Daphne to sign the deal with Academy President and CEO T.J. Rosandich, Ph.D. Qualified students from the bachelor’s degree program at Stillman will now be admitted into USSA’s Master of Sports Science degree program. This will offer the students majors in sports coaching, sports health and fitness, sports management, sports studies and recreation management. The master’s degree is a fully online program that allows students to enroll and start work at any time and do so at their own pace. “This agreement creates an opportunity for our students in physical education and related majors to get their graduate studies and experience from an excellent academic program,” Warrick said. “Physical education is one of our largest majors, so many of those students are looking to get certification as teachers or coaches, and they are interested in sports careers. This will be really important for our students.” USSA also offers a bachelor of sports science degree

that provides subject-specific courses typically taken during a student’s junior and senior years. The agreement allows USSA bachelor’s-level students to take their required general curriculum core coursework at Stillman. These courses typically are taken in the freshman and sophomore years. “The Academy is very pleased to be able to partner with such an historic institution and a fellow member of the Alabama Association of Independent Colleges and Universities,” Rosandich said. “This agreement benefits students and faculty from both institutions.” USSA will waive application fees for any Stillman student graduating with a physical education degree and will allow them to begin Academy coursework without official graduation status, provided all other admission requirements are met. Qualified members of the Stillman faculty may also be invited to become members of the USSA National Faculty, a group that teaches for the Academy’s post-secondary non-degree international sports education programs. For more information on the program, call USSA at 251-626-3303 or visit www.ussa.edu.

Volunteers needed for heart screenings

The nonprofit Heart for Athletes group has two primary

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• The Alabama Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries is conducting seminars to educate hunters about the Game Check harvesting system and new hunting regulations that take effect this year. One seminar is scheduled for Sept. 19, 6-8 p.m., at the Spanish Fort Community Center (7361 Spanish Fort Blvd.). Game Check results from last year’s hunting season, hunting and fishing regulation changes, and new public hunting opportunities for hunters will be explained during the seminar. A question-and-answer session will follow. Most of the seminars are being conducted by WFF Director Chuck Sykes. For more information, visit www.outdooralabama.com/game-check-seminarseries or call WFF at 334-242-3465. • National Hunting and Fishing Day, an annual celebration of hunters and anglers, will offer something new this year. Richard Childress, NASCAR legend and honorary chair for 2017, is asking hunters and anglers to participate in the new NHF Day Challenge by taking someone hunting, fishing or target shooting. By pledging to introduce someone to the outdoors between now and NHF Day on Saturday, Sept. 23, participants will be eligible to win a Richard Childress Racing VIP race weekend package or the Ultimate Outdoor Experience from Big Cedar Lodge and Johnny Morris’ Wonders of Wildlife National Museum and Aquarium. Alabama Conservation Commissioner Chris Blankenship says small-game species provide an ideal introduction for new hunters. Dove season began Sept. 9 in the South Zone, while squirrel and rabbit seasons open Sept. 16. Visit www.outdooralabama.com for complete details. To get involved in the challenge, visit NHFDay.org.

Taking the town by storm

Charlie McCants, owner of the local American Basketball Association team, has been busy this offseason. The squad, which lost in the Final Four playoffs to four-time defending champion Jacksonville by two points, has rebranded itself entering its fifth season as the Port City Tornados. Katelynn Craig has been appointed director of the dance team. A University of South Alabama student majoring in kinesiology, Craig is a choreographer and trainer who works with all ages to teach tumbling, stunts and dance routines. Tryouts for the Port City Tornados will be Sept. 16, 2:30-10 p.m., at the Gemini Studioz at 3240 Dauphin St. in Mobile. Male and female performers at least 18 years old are invited. For more details, call 251-861-1675 or visit www.portcitytornados.com.


STYLE GARDENING

Attract monarch butterflies to your garden BY ALICE MARTY, MOBILE MASTER GARDENER | COASTALALABAMAGARDENING@GMAIL.COM

Q: My daughter and I planted a butterfly garden this spring.

We have had quite a few visitors to our garden, but no monarchs have been attracted. We planted butterfly bushes, lantana, verbena and many other suggested butterfly plants, but so far no luck. Is there another plant they are more attracted to?

A:

Your plant selections are great nectar plants for all butterflies. Let me share a few key points about what is arguably our national butterfly, the monarch. Almost half of our population could recognize this orange and black butterfly, yet most could not name the most important plant in the monarch butterfly’s life. Quite simply, it is milkweed, a class of more than 100 varieties of leafy green plants so named for the milky sap that oozes from its stem when snapped. A quick look at the monarch life cycle explains why. Female monarchs lay their eggs on milkweed, a member of the Asclepias genus, the only plant monarch caterpillars eat. After hatching, the caterpillars (larvae) begin eating the milkweed. The monarch butterfly caterpillars then store toxins known as cardenolides, obtained from their milkweed diet, specifically to make themselves poisonous to birds. The adult butterfly retains those toxins. Read “The Case of the Barfing Blue Jay” on Science Friday (sciencefriday.com) to learn more. Survival to breed and further the species is the crucial element when you are a beautiful butterfly flitting about the garden. Being unpalatable is their only weapon. Few among the public at large are aware the monarch butterfly is in a survival struggle. Pesticides and herbicides creating loss of habitat for breeding are major contributors. In the past 20 years, the North American population of monarchs has de-

creased by 90 percent, down from a population of approximately 1 billion in 1996-97, to a population of approximately 33 million in 2013-14. Most researchers feel the loss of winter habitat due to illegal logging is the biggest threat to species survival. The monarch is the only butterfly known to make a two-way migration each year. They migrate every fall and overwinter in the Sierra Madre mountains of Mexico. Unlike other butterflies that can overwinter as larvae, pupae or even as adults in some species, monarchs cannot survive the cold winters of northern climates. The 2016 count shows gains that are credited to favorable weather and a long growing and breeding season. Native milkweed habitat replacement seems the best remedy, and many groups have heard the call. Asclepias plants are not always generally available at your local nursery or big box store. Ideal native varieties such as butterfly weed (Asclepias tuberosa) are even more scarce. While more prevalent, the non-native tropical milkweed (Asclepias curassavica) is not suggested by some scientists for home butterfly garden plants. Although monarchs love the nectar and lay eggs on it, researchers state the plant grows and blooms for too many months, allowing disease or parasites to attach that will harm the eggs and larvae or even the adult butterfly. Other sources fear the availability of tropical milkweed late in the year will entice the butterflies to stay too long in the Deep South and succumb to freezing weather. Further studies are needed before scientists can agree on these points. Before you start digging up your tropical milkweed, though, understand that many “Save the Monarch” groups suggest cutting back your tropical milkweed plants several times each year

can keep the growth fresh and lessen the chances it will become contaminated. Keeping it trimmed off in late fall will also urge monarchs to keep traveling to their winter home. More and more garden centers are making the effort to have native Asclepias plants available. Growing native plants is always your best option. Additional online resources include edis.ifas.ufl.edu and clemson.edu/extension. YOU ARE INVITED TO THESE UPCOMING GARDENING EVENTS What: Mobile Master Gardeners Lunch & Learn When: Monday, Sept. 18, noon to 1 p.m. Where: Jon Archer Center, 1070 Schillinger Road N., Mobile Topic: Pumpkins, Renee Reibling and Sonja Woodruff What: MBG’s Pollinator Celebration (fall-blooming pollinator plants for sale) When: Saturday, Sept. 23, 9-11:30 a.m. Where: Mobile Botanical Gardens, 5151 Museum Drive, Mobile Topic: Pollinators and the Plants That Attract Them Fee: Free for MBG members, $5 for non-members What: Mobile Master Gardeners Monthly Meeting When: Thursday, Oct. 5, 10:30-11:45 a.m. Where: Jon Archer Center, 1070 Schillinger Road N., Mobile Topic: “The Fungus Among Us: Mushrooms in Your Garden,” Juan Mata, USA Biology Master Gardener Helpline: 1-877-252-4769, or send your gardening questions to coastalalabamagardening@gmail.com

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STYLE HOROSCOPES AN IRMA-SIZED SIGH OF RELIEF

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ANSWERS FROM PAGE 36

VIRGO (8/23-9/22) — A participant in the Alabama Coastal Cleanup this weekend will retrieve the flip-flop you lost in 2011, but the sunglasses you misplaced in 2013 will never be found. You’ll welcome the end of hurricane season by booking a discounted vacation in a disaster zone. LIBRA (9/23-10/22) — The American Red Cross will put your financial contribution to use on a rebranding effort transitioning to a more nonpartisan “Gray Cross” color scheme. You’ll welcome the end of hurricane season by binge-drinking all the bottled water you hoarded. SCORPIO (10/23-11/21) — Disappointed that Mar-a-Lago weathered Hurricane Irma relatively unscathed, you’ll plan to pull off the flaming bag of dog poop prank the next time the Trumps are in town. You’ll welcome the end of hurricane season by battening up the hatches. SAGITTARIUS (11/22-12/21) ­­— Relieved your own property is excluded from FEMA’s flood maps, you’ll host the inaugural “High and Dry Fest,” where attendees smoke weed and sample antiperspirants. You’ll welcome the end of hurricane season by noting it is the beginning of Alabama’s tornado season. CAPRICORN (12/22-1/19) — When your effort to attract monarch butterflies to your yard instead attracts a swarm of moths, you’ll uproot all your flowers and replace them with pet rocks. You’ll welcome the end of hurricane season by complaining about how cold 60 F. feels. AQUARIUS (1/20-2/18) — After reading an article about the recent popularity of hard sodas, you’ll write a smash hit country ballad, “A Coda in my Soda.” You’ll welcome the end of hurricane season by giving WKRG Chief Meteorologist Alan Sealls a hug. PISCES (2/19-3/20) — You’ll be delighted to received 12 emails from Lagniappe in two days, later writing a letter to the editor suggesting they actually send more. You’ll welcome the end of hurricane season by vigorously stirring a cup of chocolate milk, creating a small vortex in your kitchen. ARIES (3/21- 4/19) — You’ll offer to serve as an unqualified and voluntary mediator for Fairhope’s municipal government, settling all disputes with a game of Twister. You’ll welcome the end of hurricane season by drinking a hurricane cocktail. TAURUS (4/20-5/20) — In a hat-tip to Attorney General Jeff Sessions, you’ll also destroy a child’s dreams when you buy them a hot fudge McFlurry instead of an M&M Blizzard. You’ll welcome the end of hurricane season by saying “roll tide” under your breath. GEMINI (5/21-6/21) — You’ll return to your secret lab in an effort to genetically modify love bugs to introduce non-sticking traits upon vehicular impact. You’ll welcome the end of hurricane season by naming your first daughter Katrina. CANCER (6/22-7-22) — Your cheerful and kind demeanor and focus on your tasks will be appreciated by someone who has been extremely lazy lately. You’ll welcome the end of hurricane season by flying double red flags … in bed. LEO (7/23-8/22) — Your excitement over the new iPhone will be tempered by the disappointment over your paycheck. You’ll welcome the end of hurricane season by igniting a wildfire in Oregon.


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LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com PUBLIC NOTICES NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on October 2, 2017 at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 620 Cumberland Road East (West side of Cumberland Road East, 136’+ North of Cumberland Road South) for a Side and Rear Setback Variances to allow a storage building 5’6” from the side property line and rear 6’5” from the rear property line in an R-1, Single-Family Residential District; the Zoning Ordinance requires a minimum of 8’ side and rear yard setbacks in an R-1, Single-Family Residential District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 11th day of September, 2017. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on October 2, 2017, at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 1558 & 1560 West Avenue (Northeast corner of West Avenue and Adler Avenue) for  a Use, Front and Rear Yard Setback Variances to allow a duplex within 13’ of the front property line and 6.1’ from the rear property line in an R-1 Single-Family Residential District, the Zoning Ordinance prohibits any structures exceeding 3’ in height within 25’ of the front property line and within 8’ of the rear property line and does not allow multiple family housing in an R-1, Single-Family Residential District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium on the ground level of the South Tower at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 11th day of September, 2017.   BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on October 2, 2017, at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 5706 U.S. Highway 90 West (West side of U.S. Highway 90 West, 55’± South of Plantation Road) for an Access and Parking Surface Variances to allow gravel access and parking for a business in a B-3, Community Business District; the Zoning Ordinance requires access and parking areas to be paved with asphalt, concrete, or an approved alternative paving surface in a B-3, Community Business District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium on the ground level of the South Tower at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 11th day of September, 2017.   BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on October 2, 2017, at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 161 Dunn Avenue (East side of Dunn Avenue, 340’± South of Emogene Street) for a Front and Side Yard Setback Variances to allow a structure within 7.8’ of the front property line and 2.1’ from the side property line in an R-1 Single-Family Residential District, the Zoning Ordinance prohibits any structures exceeding 3’ in height within 25’ of the front property line and within 8’ of the side property line in an   R-1, Single-Family Residential District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium on the ground level of the South Tower at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 11th day of September, 2017.  BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT MOBILE, ALABAMA PURSUANT TO THE ZONING ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF MOBILE, adopted the 16th day of May 1967, as amended, the City of Mobile’s Board of Zoning Adjustment will hold a Public Hearing on October 2, 2017, at 2:00 p.m. to consider a request at 20 Audubon Place (West side of Audubon Place, 560’± South of Dauphin Street) for a Side Yard Setback Variance to allow a structure within 6.3’ of the side property line in an R-1 Single-Family Residential District, the Zoning Ordinance prohibits any structures within 8’ of the side property line in an R-1, Single-Family Residential District. The meeting will be held in the Auditorium on the ground level of the South Tower at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama. This notice is to advise you of the public hearing so that you may attend the meeting and present your views to the Board concerning this request. Dated this 11th day of September, 2017. BOARD OF ZONING ADJUSTMENT Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Notice is hereby given that The Mobile City Planning Commission will hold a Public Hearing to consider an amendment to the Zoning Ordinance adopted May 16, 1967 As Amended, ORDINANCE 64-4.J-2017. AN ORDINANCE TO AMEND CHAPTER 64, MOBILE CITY CODE, AS AMENDED, TO MAKE ALLOWANCES FOR NEW TECHNOLOGIES. The amendments include, but are not limited to new and modified definitions, a more detailed permitting and review process, specifics on camouflage and aesthetics, reimbursement to the City for expenditures to third party engineers for review of submissions under this section, as well as other items to allow for new technologies. The Public Hearing will be held Thursday, October 5, 2017, at 2:00 pm. in the Auditorium of Government Plaza. Lagniappe HD Sept. 14, 2017

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL The Dauphin Island Property Owners Association is seeking proposals from parties interested in leasing the Isle Dauphine Clubhouse building located at 100 Orleans Drive, Suite B, Dauphin Island, Alabama 36528. The property is available for lease as a restaurant beginning May 1, 2018. The Isle Dauphine Clubhouse building is located at the Isle Dauphine Golf Club which is located on the Gulf of Mexico. The property to be leased is a building consisting of three (3) floors, all with a southern view of the beach and Gulf of Mexico, and a commercial kitchen on the second floor. Proposals should be submitted to the Dauphin Island Property Owners Association via mail at: Post Office Box 39, Dauphin Island, Alabama 36528 or via e-mail to board@dipoa.org. Proposals to be submitted by November 1, 2017. Please contact Office Manager Louise Carrubba at 251-861-2433 for a site visit. Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2017

NOTICE OF COMPLETION STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE NOTICE OF COMPLETION In accordance with Chapter I, Title 39, Code of Alabama, 1975, NOTICE IS HEREBY given that S & S Sprinkler Company, LLC, has completed the contract for Arthur R. Outlaw Convention Center Parking Deck - Fire Sprinkler Replacement, One South Water Street, Mobile, Alabama 36602, CN-066-17. All persons having any claim for labor, material or otherwise in connection with this project should immediately notify the Architectural Engineering Department, City of Mobile, P. 0. Box 1827, Mobile, Alabama 36633-1827. Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 21,28, 2017

ADVERTISEMENT OF COMPLETION In accordance with Chapter 1, Title 39, Code of Alabama, 1975, notice is hereby given that NATIONS ROOF CENTRAL, LLC, Contractor, has completed the Contract for Partial Reroofing of Central BOE Office at 201 N. Craft Highway, Chickasaw, Alabama 36611, for the State of Alabama and the Mobile County, City of Chickasaw Board of Education, Owners, and have made request for final settlement of said contract.  All persons having any claim for labor, materials, or otherwise in connection with this project should immediately notify the Lathan Associates Architects, P.C. 1550 Woods of Riverchase, Ste. 200 Hoover, AL  35244, 205-9889112. Nations Roof Central, LLC, Contractor 2914 Lawing Lane, Rowlett, TX 75088 Lagniappe HD August 24, 31, Sept. 7, 14, 2017

FORECLOSURES MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Vixay Keoheuangsy, unmarried man, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Wachovia Mortgage, FSB, on the 16th day of June, 2008, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate

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of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6396, Page 1872; the undersigned Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on October 19, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 45, Lovehaven Subdivision as recorded in Map Book 30, Page 87 of the Records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  3101 Beth Ct, Semmes, AL  36575 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Mortgagee/Transferee Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 394485  

Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 28, 2017

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE

Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by William S. Wheatley and Tammy W. Wheatley, husband and wife, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Advance Mortgage & Investment Co. of North FL. Inc., on the 21st day of September, 2006, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6052, Page 1834; the undersigned Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on October 19, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 8 of Woodland Terrace Subdivision, according to the plat thereof recorded in Map Book 17, Page 108 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes: 8031 Woodland Terrace Drive North, Irvington, AL  36544 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Mortgagee/Transferee Ginny

Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL 35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/ Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 403453 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 28, 2017

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by John David Williams and Crystal Williams, husband and wife, originally in favor of LendMark Financial Services, Inc., on the 8th day of September, 2006, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6053 Page 77; the undersigned Branch Banking and Trust Company, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on October 19, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Beginning at a point 399 feet due East from the Northwest corner of Lot 1 of the Coleman Tract, said tract being in Section 26, Township 7 South, Range 3 West, Mobile County, Alabama, continue South for a distance of 208.50 feet; thence run East for a distance of 92 feet; thence run North for a distance of 208.50 feet; thence run West for a distance of 92 feet to the point of beginning. Property street address for informational purposes:  8551 Julius St, Bayou La Batre, AL  36509 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Branch Banking and Trust Company, Mortgagee/Transferee Pam King SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 414838  

Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 28, 2017

NOTICE OF MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE

Default having been made in the terms of the vendor’s lien mortgage executed October 26, 2015, by Jeffrey Edward Adams, as mortgagor in favor of Perry Keidel, as mortgagee, as recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book LR7315 Page 1788, and said default continuing, the mortgagee, under power of sale contained in said mortgage will sell at auction for cash to the highest bidder on the steps of the Mobile County Courthouse in Mobile, Alabama, during legal hours of sale on the 12th day of October, 2017, the following described real estate embraces in said mortgage, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, towit: Lot 56 Lot 56 Quail Run, Unit One, according to plat thereof recorded in Map Book 26, Page 122 of the records in the office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Said sale is made for the purpose of foreclosing of said mortgage, paying the mortgage debt, the costs and expenses of foreclosure, including a reasonable attorney’s fee. Mortgagee reserves the right to bid on the subject property. Said property will be sold on an “as is, where is” basis subject to any easements, encumbrances and exceptions contained in said mortgage and those contained in the records of the Office of the Judge of Probate where the above described property is situated. Said property will be sold without warranty or recourse, expressed or implied as to title, use and/or enjoyment, and will be sold subject to the right of redemption of all parties entitled thereto. Said sale is also subject to unpaid taxes or assessments whether of record or not. Perry Keidel Holder of said Mortgage. James H. Sweet Crabtree & Sweet, P.C. Attorney for Holder of Mortgage P.O. Box 537 Daphne, AL 36526 251-626-3322 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 28, 2017

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made by the herein referenced Grantees in the terms of that certain Vendor’s Lien Deed executed on April 26, 2017, by Brent L. Chestang and Sabrina N. Johnson, a Grantees to Iras Development Company Inc. an Alabama corporation, as Grantor which said Vendor’s Lien Deed was recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book LR7509, Page 1246 and default continuing under said Vendor’s Lien Deed, by virtue of and pursuant to the power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, the following described real property will be sold at public outcry, for cash, to the highest bidder, in front of the North entrance of the Courthouse of said County, located at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama 36644, during the legal hours of sale, on October 12, 2017. Lot 120, as per plat of TIMBERLAND, UNIT VI as recorded in Map Book 124, Page 55, Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying said Vendor’s Lien debt and costs of foreclosure. Iras Development Company Inc. Holder of said Vendor’s Lien. WILLIAM B. JACKSON, II STOKES & CLINTON, P.C. Attorneys for Lienholder Post Office Box 991801 Mobile, Alabama 36691 (251) 460-2400 Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 21, 2017

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Rian K. Moore, an unmarried person, originally in favor of Magnolia Mortgage Company, LLC, on the 10th day of January, 2002, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 5104, Page 0428; the undersigned Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB, doing business as Christiana Trust, not in its individual capacity, but solely as trustee for BCAT 2015-13ATT, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on October 5, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 50, Bavarian Park Estates, 2nd Unit, according to the map thereof recorded in Map Book 13, Page 59 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  5048 Easy Street, Mobile, AL  36619 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Wilmington Savings Fund Society, FSB, doing business as Christiana Trust, not in its individual capacity, but solely as trustee for BCAT 2015-13ATT, Mortgagee/Transferee. Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www. sirote.com/foreclosures 369971 Lagniappe HD August 31, Sept. 7, 14, 2017

PROBATE NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING July 27, 2017 Case No. 2014-1128-2 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of DORIS JEAN LITTLE, Deceased On to-wit the 9th day of October, 2017 at 2:00 PM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the FINAL SETTLEMENT as filed by BOBBIE J WINSTON. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate. Attorney Name and Address: MICHAEL S. MCNAIR, 2151 GOVERNMENT STREET, MOBILE, AL 36606 Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 21, 28, 2017


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING CASE NO. 2017-1674 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Notice of the filing of petition for Summary Distribution in the estate of Dennis Marks, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that a Petition for Summary Distribution has been filed by Angela W. Marks on August 15, 2017, and that 30 days after the notice of publication hereof and pursuant to law the Court shall be requested to enter an order directing summary distribution of the estate of said decedent. Don Davis, Judge of Probate. Petitioner: Angela W. Marks 2671 Atoll Drive Mobile AL 36605 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 28, Oct. 5, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: BERNIE LEON NEWBERRY Case No. 2017-0285 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 18th day of August, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Cause Of Action of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Cause of Action Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. GINNY LYNN NEWBERRY as Administratrix of the estate of BERNIE LEON NEWBERRY, deceased. Attorney of Record: DEENA R. TYLER, Esq. Lagniappe HD August 31, Sept. 7, 14, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: DAVID H. PEACOCK Case No. 2017-1460 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 18th day of August, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. MARCELIUS BROWN as Administrator of the estate of DAVID H PEACOCK, deceased. Attorney of Record: HENDRIK S. SNOW, Esq. Lagniappe HD August 31, Sept. 7, 14, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: MARTHA CASSINELLI MEYER, A/K/A MARTHA MEYER-PATRICK Case No. 2017-1272 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 24th day of August , 2017 by the HONORABLE DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. ANTHONY DALE PATRICK as Administrator of the estate of MARTHA CASSINELLI MEYER A/K/A MARTHA MEYER-PATRICK, deceased. Attorney of Record: MICHAEL S. MCNAIR, Esq. Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 21, 2017

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING August 10, 2017 Case No. 2013-0460-6 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of MARY JANE DYESS, Deceased On to-wit the 16th day of October, 2017 at 2:00 PM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the FINAL SETTLEMENT AND REPORT OF INSOLVENCY as filed by JEFFREY E. DYESS. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate. Attorney Name and Address: HENDRIK S. SNOW, 50 ST EMANUEL ST, MOBILE, ALABAMA 36602 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 28, Oct. 5, 2017

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING July 31, 2017 Case No. 2009-0797-4 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of DOROTHY MACK WATSON, Deceased On to-wit the 2nd day of October, 2017 at 2:00 PM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the FINAL SETTLEMENT AND REPORT OF INSOLVENCY as filed by DEBRA K. MACK. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. Don Davis, Judge of Probate Attorney Name and Address: VANESSA ARNOLD SHOOTS, 56 ST. JOSEPH STREET, STE 1311, Mobile, AL 36602 Lagniappe HD August 24, 31, Sept. 7,14, 2017

NOTICE OF SALE The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 13, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  18342 Couch Plant Rd., Summerdale, AL 36580.

2002 Chevrolet Tahoe 1GNEC13Z42J160206 1998 Toyota Camry 4T1BG22K6WU258566

Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 13, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  120 Michael Donald Ave. Apt. B., Mobile, AL 36604. 2006 Chevrolet Impala 2G1WB55K769255716 Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 13, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  703 Saraland Blvd., Saraland, AL 36571. 2003 Ford Crown Vic 2FAFP71W83X174086 Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 13, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  1717 Bream Dr., Mobile, AL 36605. 2014 Chevrolet Cruze 1G1PE5SB7E7134927 Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 13, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  1400 Azalea Rd. Apt. 412, Mobile, AL 36693. 2006 Chrysler 300 2C3KA53GX6H294284 Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 13, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  7610 Marie Rd., Theodore, AL 36582. 2011 Toyota Corolla JTDBU4EEXB9138247 Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 13, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  8255 Old Gulfcrest Rd., Chunchula, AL 36521. 2005 Chevrolet Classic 1G1ND52FX5M238598 Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 13, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  7391 Zeigler Blvd., Mobile, AL 36608. 1996 Chevrolet Tahoe 3GNEC18R9TG131179 2004 Honda Accord 1HGCM56324A066843

STYLE BOOZIE

4M2CU81Z78KJ42305

Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed – at 10218 Hunters Trace N., Mobile, AL 36608. 2003 Chevrolet C1500 3GNEC16ZX3G187246 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed – at 19650 Shepard Lake Rd., Mount Vernon, AL 36560. 2012 Honda Accord 1HGCP2F34CA239962 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed – at 623 Neely Ave., Prichard, AL 36610. 2004 Honda Accord 1HGCM826X4A008481 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed – at 5750 Three Notch Rd., Mobile, AL 36619. 2007 Ford E250 1FTNE24W97DB19122 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1037 St Stephens Rd., Prichard, AL 36610. 2003 Mitsubishi Outlander JA4LX31G83U020171 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 461 5th Ave., Chickasaw, AL 36611. 2009 Mitusbishi Galant 4A3AB36F29E039777 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7368 Tung Ave N., Theodore, AL 36582. 2000 Mazda 626 1YVGF22FXY5125364 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 13, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 1998 Chevrolet ‹S›10 1GCCS19X4W8238358 2017 Toyota Camry 4T1BF1FK6HU698331 Lagniappe HD Sept. 7, 14, 2017

These abandoned vehicles will be sold on 10/12/2017 at 9am at 5781 Three Notch Rd Mobile Al. 36619 if not redeemed TOYO  4T1BE32KX2U093644 MITS    JA4MR41HXTJ009915 CHEV    1GCGG25U951103369 CHEV    2GCEC19T7Y1300327 FORD    1FAHP3E27CL231321 TOYT    4T1BD1FK2CU039550 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed – at 3360 Baptiste Dr N., Theodore, AL 36582. 2012 Nissan Altima 1N4AL2AP8CN434750 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 136 Cardinal Rd, Monroeville, AL 36460. 2002 Mazda 626 1YVGF22CX25288206 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed – at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2010 Chevrolet Malibu 1G1ZA5EB3AF253378 1999 Mitsubishi Monterosport JA4LS31H8XP027035 2008 Kia Spectra KNAFE121985547920 Lagniappe HD September 14, 21, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on October 20, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed – at 106 Martin Luther King Dr., Prichard, AL 36610. 2008 Mercury Mariner

Deadline for legal advertising in Lagniappe HD is every Monday at 3 p.m. Lagniappe HD is distributed each Thursday. Lagniappe HD offices are located at 1100B Dauphin St. Mobile, AL 36604. For more information or to place your ad call Jackie at 251-450-4466. Or email at legals@lagniappemobile. com

Mobile welcomes Irma escapees with open arms BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

W

hew, what a weekend! I know it’s crazy to even say this but I was ready for the week after my busy weekend. I mean LODA Artwalk on Friday night, a baby shower and a wedding shower on Saturday, then going out will take it out of you! Let’s be honest, the only fun part of a baby shower and wedding shower is the alcohol. And you know you are getting old when people start actually planning for babies. Meanwhile, I am staying out all night, cheers!

Arms wide open

Y’all, I can’t get over all the positive things I have heard here recently about Mobile! Obviously many people’s visits to the Port City last weekend weren’t planned, but I think those that took shelter from Irma in Mobile were glad they did. Like we do all the time, we welcomed guests with open arms. Boozie is happy to report Artwalk had a higher turnout than usual! Not to mention, downtown restaurants were packed with folks making the best of their rather unfortunate circumstances. Some places had such long waits that Boozie and crew decided to try our luck at Callaghan’s, which was crowded with people pre-gaming high school football games. Speaking of football, South Alabama gave evacuees tickets to Friday night’s game so that they had a free event to attend. South wasn’t the only one, The Fairhope Store offered free one-hour bike rentals, Alabama Gulf Coast Zoo provided free admission and many restaurants offered discounts. One family even took their toys to Cathedral Square to share with other children. I bet many of these folks may return now under more pleasant conditions! I’ve said it all along, Mobile is like a mini New Orleans, but better! It gives Boozie all the feels knowing that Mobile (and surrounding areas) have shown so much love!

Battle of the Cannon

One of the biggest high school rivals in Mobile was back this past weekend, “The Battle of Cannon” as it’s now called. On Friday night, McGill-Toolen Catholic and Murphy High schools met for their 86th annual game. As you know, the winner of the game paints the cannon at the Loop their team’s colors. For a few years in a row the cannon has seen a coat of orange paint and it remained that way again this year after McGill beat Murphy 21-14. Luckily this year there wasn’t any pepper

spray drama. Congrats Yellow Jackets and better luck next year, Panthers!

Meteorologists making waves

While Mobile already knew we had something great, it was time the rest of the country knew it. News 5 WKRG Chief Meteorologist Alan Sealls was featured on Reddit’s front page as “Best weatherman ever, very articulate and educational.” People went crazy over it, they said he reminded them “of a really good professor” (which he is), “amazing” and “impressive,” just to name a few comments. But Mobile already knew all this, Alan has been named Best Meteorologist in the Nappies several times! Alan hasn’t been the only Mobile meteorologist making headlines. Last week, I told y’all about the video that appeared to show a LOCAL 15 meteorologist passing gas on air and how he is now an internet celebrity. Well, this fame continued to grow when “The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon” picked this up. Jimmy showed the clip and made a joke that “it feels like a warm breeze is blowing in from the south.” While most have gotten a good laugh at his expense about what may or may not have been a toot, Boozie heard the meteorologist is ashamed about his unpredicted forecast. I would be too, but I think one selfdeprecating joke on-air would make you the most beloved weatherman of all time. Just own it and make light of it. We all toot!

Time of your life

Last Wednesday night, Green Day performed at The Wharf. My spy in attendance said it was a wild Wednesday night for her. She typically doesn’t stay out all night on a work night but said it was all worth it! The concert was relatively packed given it was a weekday in the fall, and apparently it was an awesome concert! In fact, she said it was one of the best concerts she’d been to. My spy said her seats weren’t in the “ pit,” for which she was glad because Billie sprayed the crowd with water from a pressure washer. Talk about a long ride back to Mobile in wet clothes! However, her favorite part was when it poured confetti as they played “Time of Your Life”. She said she had never seen so much confetti, but it truly was the time of her life. And I get it, because confetti is fun! Well, kids, that’s all I’ve got this week. Just remember, whether rain or shine, dramatic or scandalous, or just some plain ol’ weatherman lovin’, I will be there. Ciao!

S e p t e m b e r 1 4 , 2 0 1 7 - S e p t e m b e r 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 43


Lagniappe: Sept 14 - Sept 20, 2017  
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