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WEEKLY

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LAGNIAPPE

AUGUST 24, 2017 - AUGUST 30, 2017 | www.lagniappemobile.com ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com

ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com

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BAY BRIEFS

Creola residents are complaining about “brown water” while officials are pointing fingers.

COMMENTARY

Presenting the 2017 Mobile Municipal Campaign Awards.

BUSINESS

Infirmary Health, which is preparing to open an emergency clinic in Malbis, recently purchased 17.8 acres nearby.

CUISINE

ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com

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J. MARK BRYANT Sports Writer sports@lagniappemobile.com STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA RASMUSSEN Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com

With daily lunch specials, take-home family dinners and more than 100 menu items made fresh daily, Taziki’s Mediterranean-inspired cuisine is highly recommended.

COVER

Coverage, commentary and analysis of the Mobile Municipal Election held Aug. 22.

BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com

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BETH WILLIAMS Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com ALEEN MOMBERGER Advertising Sales Executive aleen@lagniappemobile.com RACHEL THOMAS Advertising Sales Executive rachel@lagniappemobile.com MELISSA EDGE Editorial Assistant events@lagniappemobile.com

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ARTS

Roughly a third of the Mobile Arts Council’s board of directors has resigned this summer.

MUSIC

The Iguanas will headline the Nature Conservancy’s “Rhythm for the Rivers” benefit concert in Pascagoula Aug. 26.

ROSS PRITCHARD Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager jackie@lagniappemobile.com CONTRIBUTORS: Ron Sivak, Jeff Poor, Asia Frey, Brian Holbert, Ken Robinson, John Mullen ON THE COVER: ELECTION 2017 BY DAN ANDERSON

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There are many wonderful elements to Terrence Malick’s “Song to Song,” and it’s not impossible to enjoy.

SPORTS

Bishop State Community College has beefed up its athletics program and welcomed alum James Hattenstein as its new baseball coach. CALENDAR OF EVENTS The 20th annual Dauphin Street Beer Festival is Saturday, Aug. 26.

STYLE

Boozie gets ready for football season!

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GOING POSTAL

Be more inclusive, not less

Repeal and replace

Public versus private

Editor: Taking down the memorial to Robert E. Lee in Charlottesville, Virginia, resulted in at least one death and 12 injuries. So, in effect, the attempt to remove this remembrance of past conflict in our country has added greater misery and emotional strain 150 years after the end of the Civil War. Rather ironically, removing memorials to those who fought for morally incorrect causes is creating more racial disharmony, not less. Instead of taking down statues to leaders who represent causes now distasteful in the 21st century, why don’t we include historical leaders we find worthy role models instead? Perhaps Charlottesville might erect a statue to the African-American Union soldiers who risked their lives to sustain freedom. Perhaps Virginia should dedicate a capitol memorial to Booker T. Washington, born in Virginia in a one-room slave cabin. Similarly, why can’t the city of Pensacola invite Judaism, Buddhism, Hinduism, Jainism, Islam, Wicca, Gnosis, Zen/Tao, Sufism, Sikhism, Shamanism, Metaphysical/New Thought and other religions to erect monuments of their faith traditions in the park in question rather than remove the Christian cross that upsets a few people? I assume the angry advocates wanting the cross removed perceive exclusion of their worldview, although there is a sizable minority today who incite community disharmony in an attempt to mislead life. We simply must be mature enough to include less-traditional worldviews with respect rather than disdain. Exclusion leads to violence, such as what happened in Charlottesville. Respectfully including, but not necessarily endorsing, alternative perspectives creates a more harmonious society. Let’s think inclusion.

Editor: I’m a little skeptical about the educational value of statues, as most of the history I’ve learned has come in non-statue form. However, our Confederate statues are currently providing us a teachable moment. An anonymous internet group recently issued a threat to remove one such statue in Mobile. In the news coverage, I saw a young black man describe what the symbolism of the statue meant to him. “The history of my people, it’s a history of terror.” We need to listen carefully to that young man, because he understands where the Civil War mythology departs from reality. Confederate nostalgia buries the history that black Southerners bear on their shoulders. We need to teach our history better, and understand how these monuments were often placed well after the war as a declaration of white supremacy. For example, New Orleans’ recently removed “Battle of Liberty Place” was not a Civil War memorial at all, but a celebration of an 1874 white paramilitary insurgency against the integrated police force. High school students should read the Confederate States’ declarations of secession. The documents make clear that the South was fighting to defend the institution of slavery, for all time. We should teach how 200,000 black Americans, many only recently emancipated, fought for their freedom in the U.S. Army and Navy. Our Confederate monuments cast a distorting shadow over the memory of black patriots who fought against tyranny. In the interest of defending history, it’s time to replace our Confederate myths with real heroes.

Editor: White supremacists incited deadly violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, last week in defense of a Confederate monument. We must show the country that Mobile gives no safe harbor to such hatred. We must remove the monument downtown of Adm. Raphael Semmes. Confederate symbols on public land in effect endorse a movement founded on white supremacy. If our city government continues to pay homage to the Confederacy, people of color — who make up the majority of Mobile’s population — will continue to feel unsafe in their own community and can never be sure they will be treated fairly. And we will never solve our city’s problems if an entire group of citizens is alienated or feels targeted for discrimination. Confederate symbols belong in museums and on private property. In museums, we can learn their full history. Citizens will always have the right to fly the Confederate flag. They can still erect monuments on their own property. That will not change. But it is past time to move our monument to an appropriate place. Sandy Stimpson, the city council, the media and the rest of our community should research how to remove the monument and whether we can afford the $25,000 fine associated with doing so. Then we should act.

Ronald Francis David Hunt, Theodore

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Andrew Bartran Mize, Mississippi

Jack Helean, Mobile


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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE COUNTY

A murky issue

REPORTS OF ‘BROWN WATER’ PERSIST IN CREOLA BY JASON JOHNSON

Residents of Creola have documented dirty water.

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n a closed Facebook group where posts usually revolve around local businesses, small-town politics and lost pets, several posts have recently focused on the discoloration of the drinking water being pumped into homes in the Creola area. For several months now, some residents have complained about the “brown water” coming out of their faucets, yet city officials in Creola and the area’s privately owned water system seem to be pointing fingers at one another — leaving residents frustrated and concerned. “When does this stop? [I’m] calling board of health and keeping a sample,” one resident posted over the weekend. “[My] husband is headed to get yet another case of water!” For Mayor Bill Criswell, it’s a familiar complaint, but one he says the city has no control over, as residents in Creola get their water from Le Moyne Water System Inc. “It’s an independent, privately owned company and, good or bad, they have about 85 percent of the residential meters in our area,” Criswell said. “We don’t have a dog in the hunt because this is a contract between each individual resident and the water system.” Unlike the Mobile Area Water and Sewer System, the board governing Le Moyne is not appointed by city officials. Instead, customers select members who serve on the five-member board. This week, Board Chairman Frank Seltzer said he believes some of the discoloration has been the result of the Creola Volunteer Fire Department (VFD) flushing hydrants in an effort to improve the city’s Insurance Services Office rating. When setting premiums, some insurance companies account for ISO ratings, which are based on a number factors including the fire suppression systems available in an affected area. Fire departments occasionally test such systems to improve or maintain ratings. “That’s going to stir up the sediment in the lines, and you’re going to get brown water,” he added. “I guess one of the main things is we haven’t had a good line of communication as to when they’re going to do this. If we had, we could have notified the residents ahead of time.” As a longtime member of the water board, Seltzer said he’s seen the same issue pop up every four to five years when Creola VFD flushes hydrants to prepare for ISO inspections. He also said the recent problems should be resolved soon, now that Creola has completed its work related to the ISO rating inspection. However, Fire Chief Jeff Reeves said his department would not be to blame for any

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Photo | Facebook

recent discoloration of the water. Speaking with Lagniappe, he said any flushing of the system’s hydrants would have been completed by June in preparation for an ISO inspection on July 5. Yet photographs from residents in Creola suggest there have been issues with “brown water” as recently as Aug. 20. One woman, who’s had problems on multiple occasions, wrote “This is getting totally out of hand” in a post showing a stream of discolored water on Sunday. “We tested the hydrants we needed to test back in June, and that was it,” Reeves said. “Le Moyne keeps saying it’s because of us, but we had a house fire the third week of July where we flowed water for about two hours, and we didn’t get any brown water.” Reeves said the flushing in June and the house fire in July are the only times he recalls Creola VFD putting any substantial strain on the Le Moyne Water System — a system that was initially designed for distributing potable water, not fire suppression. Reeves also said the discoloration in water systems is typically caused by “natural minerals and material” settling at the bottom of water lines. While flushing larger lines — like those connected to a fire hydrant — can agitate such materials, many water systems routinely flush lines to prevent that type of buildup. Reached by phone, an employee of the Bayou La Batre Utilities Board confirmed routine flushings are a common practice for the water system. Seltzer said Le Moyne does the same when leaks occur that could cause sediment to get into a waterline, but deferred questions about routine flushing to the managers of the water system. As for the lack of communication, Criswell said Creola must notify Le Moyne at least 24 hours before it draws water from the system, adding that local officials have also met with members of the board as recently as last week. “They’ve got some issues, and I think they need to go outside of their board and get some additional help, which is what I recommended to them,” he said. “We also agreed to a close patrol by the police department to make sure no one is straining the system by using it illegally.” However, given the geographic location of some of the reports from Le Moyne customers, Seltzer still believes Creola’s ISO activity is “what most of [the problem] came from.” While he said he understood the concern some have expressed, Seltzer stressed the discolored water is “safe to drink” despite its unpleasant appearance. “Now, I wouldn’t drink it,” he admitted. “And, I’m sure nobody else would either.”


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Brick walls RESIDENTS FIGHT THROUGH RED TAPE ON ‘UNSIGHTLY’ MOTEL BY DALE LIESCH

The Crest Motel has drawn complaints from neighbors.

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motel on Government Boulevard has drawn the ire of nearby residents over issues they say have been largely ignored by officials. Residents have responded to what they see as “blight” and other issues at the Crest Motel by creating a petition online asking the city to fix the problems. The petition has roughly 3,000 signatures. Glen Perry, president of the Crestview Community Action Group, said the motel has been an “ongoing issue for many years.” “It keeps degrading and degrading,” he said. Perry said the motel is an eyesore and home to a number of sex offenders. According to the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency website, the address has at least four sex offenders currently. “Government Boulevard is a corridor to Mobile,” Perry said. “The area used to look nice. If you take the scenic route now it’s not very scenic.” In a letter Perry plans to present to the mayor and City Council following the election, he wrote that something has to be done. “We, the undersigned residents of the Skyline Community Area are speaking out to protect our families and our communities from the motel that has added serious blight and invited a criminal element to the area,” he wrote. “This continues to grow worse with each passing day and now is the time we beg for action.” Perry has given credit to Councilman John Williams, the area’s representative, for trying to clean up the area. He said even the councilman has “hit brick walls.” Williams said his office is committed to doing all he can to clear up the issues. “People say ‘I don’t want that in my neighborhood,’” Williams said. “It’s unsightly,

Photo | Lagniappe

at best. It is a residence for those who’ve had serious run-ins with law enforcement.” Williams pledged that it would be a goal if he’s re-elected to clear up the issues there. The letter supports Williams’ efforts to clean up the area. “Our councilman, John Williams, has been a tremendous help in Crestview, Skyland and his district, albeit even his hands are tied on certain matters,” Perry wrote. “Various high-profile departments have been alerted to our continuing requests for help but have not offered any viable solutions. Hopefully, this extensive petition will show that we are a very concerned community.” One obstacle Perry referred to was the Mobile County Health Department. The department normally inspects hotels and motels, but the Crest is considered an apartment complex, which is outside MCHD’s purview, according to a statement from Dr. Stephanie Woods-Crawford, who oversees the Bureau of Environmental Health and Preparedness. Donna Feeney, a member of the Southern Skyline Community Action Group, said it has been a struggle to get blight cleaned up in the area. “We’ve been dealing with this for years,” Feeney said. “It has been very difficult … to get anybody to help. Something just really needs to be done.” Recently, however, Feeney said city departments have begun listening, specifically urban development. Lagniappe made two phone calls to the Crest Motel seeking comment for this story. The first call ended with a busy signal and the second call ended with a disconnection notice.

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BAYBRIEF | EDUCATION

Backtracking

“private training session” that wouldn’t be subject to public notice under the Alabama Open Meetings Act. In a 2016 interview with Lagniappe, Don Yancey, deputy director of the Retirement Systems of Alabama, referred to the pre-meeting as a “working JUDGE OVERTURNS HEALTH INSURANCE HIKES FOR ALABAMA TEACHERS session,” which he said would not be uncommon for the board to hold before voting on a complicated matter such as a premium increase. BY JASON JOHNSON “It was not a board meeting. It was not called as a meeting, not announced as a meeting and there was no deliberation between the board members,” he fter more than a year of legal battles, a judge Based on the base rates, those refunds could be up said at the time. “There’s lot of things we present that are very complicated, in Montgomery ordered the reversal of a 2016 to $800 for policyholders with family coverage and up and we’ve always tried to educate the board in advance.” increase in Alabama teachers’ health insurance to $650 for those with single coverage. The ruling also However the meeting is described, Hardwick’s ruling found it to have been premiums after finding the governing body that invalidates the higher rates going forward. conducted illegally, which AEA past president and lawsuit plaintiff Sheila made the decision did so in violation of the Alabama While the PEEHIP board has already announced plans Remington described as an attempt by the board to “ram through a premium Open Meetings Act. to appeal the ruling, Hardwick’s decision was a subincrease without public discussion or debate.” As Lagniappe previously reported, teachers in Mobile stantial victory for the Alabama Education Association, However, there is at least some concern with how PEEHIP’s budget and across the state felt an increase in premiums last Oc- which filed suit over the increases last May. After the could be impacted by refunding last year’s premium increases, which RSA tober after a rate hike approved by the board of the Public decision, current and former leaders issued a statement attorneys and Yancey have both argued were passed to help shore up a $140 Education Employees’ Health Insurance Plan (PEEHIP) calling Monday “a great day for the AEA and for all million deficit and keep the program solvent. took effect with the new fiscal year. public education employees.” Yancey previously told Lagniappe that if PEEHIP were to refund those The premium change meant a $15 increase in the “For many of our members, the PEEHIP board’s acmonies, he could say with “reasonable certainty” that the program “would cost of an individual plan, a $30 increase in the cost of a tions completely took away a legislative pay raise that not be able to continue operating.” However, AEA has downplayed those family plan and the doubling of a monthly surcharge paid was so richly deserved. For everyone else, it took a large concerns, pointing out the increases were never a part of PEEHIP’s budget. by members whose spouses are covered through other portion of it,” AEA Executive Director Brenda Pike, In a press release after Hardwick’s ruling was issued, AEA said the chief insurance carriers. Ph.D., said. “We hope the PEEHIP board members will accountant for RSA told legislators the organization “wasn’t counting” that Over the past 10 months, those increases have added take this opportunity to reflect on their action and will money while speaking about PEEHIP’s funding in the 2017 state budget up for teachers and support staff in Alabama’s public take appropriate steps to ensure that the increases will not deliberations. schools. More than anything, PEEHIP policyholders were go into effect, in accordance with the judge’s order.” “The fact that PEEHIP has functioned just fine without these funds should vocally upset about the timing of those increases, which As stated, Hardwick’s ruling did not find PEEHIP’s inform the board members that their action wasn’t the dire necessity their took effect just as teachers were beginning to feel the board at fault for passing a premium increase, but instead staff told them it was during the illegal closed meeting,” AEA Associate effects of a 4 percent pay raise approved by the Alabama agreed with AEA that board members violated Alabama Executive Director Theron Stokes said. “As we have from the beginning, and Legislature in 2016. law by the manner in which those increases were apas Judge Hardwick noted in his order, AEA stands ready to work with the With Montgomery County Circuit Judge Johnny Hard- proved last spring. PEEHIP staff and to give guidance and perspective to the PEEHIP board in wick’s decision, PEEHIP members will soon see refunds While the board approved the increases during an crafting a solution to any funding shortfall that does not unduly burden our of the money generated by those increased premiums, advertised meeting on April 27, 2016, the contentious members.” which the court had previously ordered PEEHIP to keep agenda item was discussed separately during an earlier PEEHIP, on the other hand, has said it “respectfully disagrees” with in a separate account until the lawsuit was resolved. meeting that same day — a meeting the public and AEA Hardwick’s ruling, and by Monday evening had confirmed plans to appeal the While it’s unclear exactly how or when refunds will be representatives were prevented from attending. decision to the Alabama Supreme Court. administered, Hardwick was clear in his ruling it would In previous court documents, lawyers for the PEEHIP Additionally, attorneys for the program said they plan to seek a stay in the case, be distributed “back to the PEEHIP members.” board argued the earlier meeting that day was merely a which could effectively freeze Hardwick’s’ decision until the appeal is resolved.

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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Dollars for doughnuts DUNKIN’ DONUTS FRANCHISEE, NEIGHBOR DISCUSS PAYMENT PRE REZONING BY DALE LIESCH

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uring last week’s Mobile Planning Commission meeting, a Dunkin’ Donuts franchisee accused a nearby homeowner of asking for money to support a West Mobile development. However, the homeowner said talk of money changing hands started with the developer. During a hearing to rezone property near the intersection of Azalea and Cottage Hill roads to allow for the doughnut shop, Damon Dunn, a Dunkin’ Donuts franchisee, responded to criticism of the project by sharing with the board copies of an email he received from homeowner Gary Beasley. The email, which Dunn shared with Lagniappe, read in part “... after discussing pros [and] cons with my wife, we are willing to listen to your offer before we make our decision.” Dunn said he in no way intends to “harm” Beasley with the release of the email, but he wanted to counter Beasley’s strong criticism of the project. “He showed up and strongly opposed the project and I felt his previous actions, including his efforts to develop the subject property himself, were germane to the planning commission,” Dunn said. Dunn said the offer to which Beasley referred goes back to a meeting in June where the two sides discussed possible compensation to make Beasley a consultant on the project and whip up the community’s support. Beasley, Dunn said, asked the franchisee for $150,000 — the same amount he was allegedly offered for a proposed Walgreens before that deal fell through. In an interview with Lagniappe, Beasley said he was offered $150,000 for his home and property during negotiations for the Walgreens deal.

He also said it was Dunn who first approached him about exchanging money, not the other way around. Beasley said he told Dunn he “couldn’t be bought.” On the other hand, Dunn points out that Beasley offered him his email address, something he said proves Beasley was reaching out proactively. Dunn said he did offer Beasley $12,000 to “consult” on the project. He said Beasley never returned an email after the offer was made. “That wouldn’t cover the depreciation on my house with a Dunkin’ Donuts next to it,” Beasley said. As for paying community members to lobby support for a project, Dunn said it’s not common and he felt “uncomfortable” about it. “When you go into a situation where there is organized opposition, then you have to find a way to get in front of neighbors and share your message,” he said. “Initially, you can meet at [homeowners association] meetings, but it’s much more effective to build a team that can help you walk door to door and build support.” In essence, Dunn said he considered paying Beasley to make a certain number of contacts per day. Beasley said his steadfast opposition to the doughnut shop is based upon noise and traffic concerns. He said he doesn’t want to hear sounds coming from a drive-thru speaker box at 5 a.m. “I don’t want Dunkin’ Donuts,” he said. “I don’t like Dunkin’ Donuts.” The Planning Commission approved the rezoning and it will now go before the Mobile City Council for a final decision. Planning Commission attorney Doug Anderson said the email had no influence on the commissioners.

Long time coming

OFFICIALS BREAK GROUND ON NEW MOBILE VETERANS CLINIC

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BY DALE LIESCH

ust how old is the current veterans clinic at the University of South Alabama Medical Center campus on Springhill Avenue? Well, it’s been at that location long enough for 62-year-old U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne, R-Fairhope, to be born there. Byrne aged himself while speaking with other officials at a groundbreaking for the new Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) clinic at a site near 4444 Demetropolis Road on Thursday, Aug. 17. For Byrne, the new building is a long time coming. Work began on it before he was even elected to the office he currently holds. “This office has been working on this building for 10 years,” Byrne said. “I’ve only been in office four years.” Roughly 70 percent of the work his office does now is on behalf of veterans in the area and he wouldn’t have it any other way, he said. The new hospital is a small token of gratitude, he added. “I’m proud to serve veterans because they served us,” Byrne said. “This clinic is a small down payment on what we’re going to do for them.” Others in attendance spoke specifically of the workload at the current Mobile clinic and how it was taxing to veterans and employees alike. Dr. M. Christopher Saslo, interim director of the Gulf Coast Veterans Health Care System, said during

fiscal year 2016 the Mobile clinic saw 11,390 unique veterans. Through June of this year, he said, the clinic has already seen 11,000. “I appreciate the job the staff does,” he said. “The new facility will be a great place to work and serve our nation’s heroes.” In choosing this site for the proposed 65,000-square-foot facility, the VA dismissed an option to repurpose an old Infirmary Health facility on Knollwood Drive. At the time the VA and USA had discussed a possible increase in rent at the clinic’s current facility. A local realtor, John Toomey III, proposed the abandoned hospital location. Mayor Sandy Stimpson said the groundbreaking was an exciting day for Mobile because everyone has been impacted by a veteran in some way. Dr. Janet L. Henderson, chief medical officer at Veterans Integrated Service Network, said the clinic should be online by spring 2019 and be equipped to serve the more than 10,000 veterans in the Mobile area. “This facility will add more choice,” she said. “An exciting future awaits us.” The new clinic will include the following practice areas: primary care, audiology and speech pathology, education, eye clinics, mental health, patient advocacy, radiology, veterans’ service organizations and women’s health.

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BAYBRIEF | BALDWIN COUNTY

Ready or not SOUTH BALDWIN COUNTY HOUSING BOOM CONTINUES BY JOHN MULLEN

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n 2016 the city of Foley issued 20 permits per month for single-family housing new construction and is on pace to top that in 2017. Through July 31 the city has issued 155 permits, about 22 per month. The total for all of 2016 was 242. It’s a trend in South Baldwin County, as Gulf Shores and Orange Beach are also topping 2016 numbers. Orange Beach Building Official Lannie Smith said overall permits and inspections for 2017 are matching the previous year, but permits for homes are ahead of 2016. “We’re seeing more in the single-family area than we did last year,” Smith said. “We’ve got a couple of new subdivisions that are contributing to that but the rest of them are vacant lots in existing older subdivisions.”

In Gulf Shores, the year 2016 saw 247 permits issued for single-family housing, or about 20 per month. Through July 31, 147 were issued, for an average of 21 per month in 2017. Gulf Shores leads the way in planned subdivisions, with 764 lots OK’d for construction in six subdivisions, including Adventura, a 404-lot development off County Road 6 which recently got the go-ahead for the first phase of 100 homes. A new 96-unit apartment complex, Marbella, has also been approved, but construction hasn’t begun yet. “The trend is north of the intracoastal canal for most of the new single-family homes,” Building Official Brandan Franklin said. “County Road 8 subdivisions are being built out, including the ones that have been sitting for years.”

Foley isn’t far behind Gulf Shores, with 681 lots planned in 10 subdivisions, six within the city limits and four in Foley’s Extra Territorial Jurisdiction. Subdivisions there are reviewed by both Foley’s and Baldwin County’s planning commissions. Also in Foley, three apartment complexes totaling 564 units have received site plan approval from the planning commission, but have not yet obtained building permits. Two of those, Baldwin Trace and Sevilla Place, are on County Road 20 and The Reserve is planned for County Road 12. “I see the growth as a steady increase based on market demand,” Foley Planner Miriam Boutwell said. “We are seeing a diverse demographic of homebuyers, from young families to retirees. People want to enjoy our natural resources, way of life and job market.” Orange Beach has at least 345 lots approved for building in four subdivisions. Two of those are townhouse developments — Spyglass on Canal Road in East Orange Beach and Gulf Stream on Canal Road near Blalock’s Seafood. No apartments have been approved or built in Orange Beach this year. “I know that the ones that are being built now and getting the most activity would be the single-family component of Cypress Village and also the expansion of Terry Cove subdivision, Harbor Cove,” Smith said. “Spyglass has all the infrastructure in but hasn’t started building yet. I believe they are getting the buildings engineered.” Orange Beach has issued 81 building permits for single-family development through July 31 of 2017, one more than the 80 issued in all of 2016.

BAYBRIEF | MOBILE COUNTY

Checkered past PRICHARD HIRES FORMER MPD CAPTAIN DESPITE FRAUD CONVICTION BY JASON JOHNSON

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fter a 20-year career, Capt. DeWayne Hill’s retirement from the Mobile Police Department was marred by a scandal that ultimately led to a criminal conviction for fraudulently using a credit card tied to a program teaching underprivileged youth about police work. The circumstances of Hill’s retirement — as well as his subsequent arrest — were well documented in the local media at the time, but they did not prevent him from landing a supervisory position with the Prichard Police Department earlier this month. Prichard spokeswoman Melanie Baldwin recently told Lagniappe Hill had been employed as a major at the department for a little over two weeks, though it’s currently unclear whether he was hired through the Mobile County Personnel Board or appointed by Mayor Jimmy Gardner. Last week, the members of the Prichard City Council voted to approve a full-time contract for Police Chief Walter Knight, who began acting in an interim capacity following the resignation of former Chief Bernard Parish after Gardner was sworn into office earlier this year. The city had initially planned a “special event” after the Aug. 18 meeting, and speaking with Lagniappe just two hours before, Baldwin confirmed Hill would be introduced to the public during that event, which would also feature

“other officers being promoted as well.” Shortly after the call, however, Baldwin called back to say the event had been postponed, and while Knight’s contract remained on the agenda, the “special event” afterward was going to be rescheduled. At the time, she said the event had “not been listed correctly.” Seven minutes later, Baldwin sent an email — just an hour before the event was scheduled to start — announcing its postponement to the rest of the local media. While Knight attended the regular council meeting, Gardner did not, and through correspondence with Baldwin, both have denied requests to be interviewed about Hill’s employment with the department and his previous issues before retiring from MPD. “They’re not doing any of that because they’re not in town,” Baldwin said of Gardner and Night’s schedule. “Major Hill is here but won’t be able to do anything like that within the next week.” On Monday, Baldwin said the city expects Hill to be introduced to the public at the Aug. 24 council meeting, at which time he will have been employed for at least three weeks. Yet officials have still not publicly addressed Hill’s history with the MPD or his 2014 fraud conviction. In November 2012, while serving as the commander of MPD’s Third Precinct, Hill was allowed to retire after

BAY BRIEF — CRIME

Day care worker charged after deceased child found in Mobile By Jason Johnson Just hours after the body of a 5-year-old child was discovered in a driveway on Demetropolis Road, police arrested an employee of a Mobile day care center when she came to speak to investigators of her own volition. According to the Mobile County Metro Jail, 46-year-old Valarie Rena Patterson was arrested and charged with “corpse abuse” early Tuesday morning — a charge District Attorney Ashley Rich has confirmed to be related to the child’s body found Monday afternoon in Mobile. At a press conference Tuesday, Mobile Police Chief Lawrence Battiste identified Patterson as an employee of Community Church Ministries, which operates a day care center on Hillcrest Road. Patterson’s role at the day care center is unclear. A search of a database kept by the Alabama Department of Human Resources revealed the facility has claimed the religious exemption from state licensing permitted under Alabama law.

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an internal affairs investigation concluded he’d used a debit card linked to an account where the MPD kept fundraising proceeds and private donations for its Police Explorers program. Months later, a grand jury charged Hill with multiple counts of fraudulent misuse of a credit card after District Attorney Ashley Rich’s office launched its own investigation into Hill’s conduct. All but one of those was dropped when Hill entered a guilty plea in October 2014. According to court records, he was later sentenced to a year of probation and ordered to pay a $300 fine. Prior to that incident, though, Hill was reportedly the focus of a separate internal affairs investigation after he allegedly used his captain’s position to have

THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF HILL’S RETIREMENT — AS WELL AS HIS SUBSEQUENT ARREST — WERE WELL DOCUMENTED IN THE LOCAL MEDIA AT THE TIME, BUT THEY DID NOT PREVENT HIM FROM LANDING A SUPERVISORY POSITION WITH THE PRICHARD POLICE DEPARTMENT EARLIER THIS MONTH.” police target a group of local football referees after a verbal altercation during the 2012 matchup between LeFlore High School and Faith Academy. An official with the Metro-Mobile Football Officials Association told Lagniappe at the time that referees were confronted by police after that game while congregating at a traditional meeting place in the Springdale Mall parking lot between Lowe’s and Belk. One of the responding officers allegedly said Hill had called via cellphone and ordered police to break up the officials’ party following the verbal altercation, which was sparked by a disputed call during the game. Hill’s son was a sophomore and an active player on LeFlore’s roster when the incident occurred.

Also on Tuesday, Battiste identified the victim as 5-year-old Kamden Johnson, though police are awaiting the results of an autopsy from the Alabama Department of Forensic Sciences before releasing any information about the cause and manner of Johnson’s death. Battiste said Patterson came to speak with MPD officers “of her own accord” in the late hours of Aug. 21. He described her as “somewhat” cooperative with investigators. In addition to “corpse abuse” — a Class C felony — Battiste said Patterson could face additional charges once the autopsy report from Johnson’s death has been completed by ADFS. Patterson lists an address on South Gulf Terra Drive, and police were said to have been investigating a residence there Tuesday morning. A bond hearing for Patterson was expected sometime Tuesday or Wednesday, according to police in Mobile. While investigators have kept most of the early details under wraps, Battiste assured local parents that the evidence seen so far doesn’t suggest any kind of random act caused Johnson’s death. He said Patterson’s arrest on Tuesday should indicate that as well. “On my desk, I have a picture of my sons when they were in elementary school, and when I looked at that, the first thing I thought of was Kamden,” he said. “It’s extremely traumatic for an organization to go through something like this.” Lagniappe will have more information on this developing story once it is released by authorities.


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COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

Shield your eyes! The end is near! ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

IT WAS NICE TO HAVE A DISTRACTION FROM ALL THE THINGS WE DEAL WITH THESE DAYS THAT REALLY ARE FAR MORE ‘APOCALYPTIC.’ FOR A FEW MINUTES WE COULD ALL STOP WORRYING ABOUT NUCLEAR THREATS FROM NORTH KOREA, PEOPLE GETTING KILLED OVER STATUES, TERRORIST ATTACKS AND THE EVENTUAL REAPPEARANCE OF THE MCRIB.”

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in 80 percent totality land the experience wasn’t quite as mystical. It was just a little more like 5:30 p.m. than 1:30 p.m. Mostly it just made me wish it was happy hour. For some reason the whole event reminded me of the movie “Apocalypto,” where the Mayan chiefs are lopping off the heads of prisoners and bouncing them down from the tops of their pyramids during an eclipse. Not that I saw anyone decapitated, but just the strange behavior among modern people who theoretically have a least a reasonable understanding of the science behind an eclipse offered a sliver of insight into just how nuts people must have gotten when this kind of thing happened 500 years ago. Plus I almost went bouncing down the stairs, which would have been life imitating art. It was nice to have a distraction from all the things we deal with these days that really are far more “apocalyptic.” For a few minutes we could all stop worrying about nuclear threats from North Korea, people getting killed over statues, terrorist attacks and the eventual reappearance of the McRib. For just a few minutes we could all revert back to our prehistoric roots and be awed by the giant fire eye in the sky closing for a few minutes. I’d love to say we came through this heavenly event a stronger, happier, more unified people, but that’s asking way too much from an eclipse. I’ll just settle for not having fallen down a flight of stairs wearing goofy paper glasses and my dog still being able to see.

THEGADFLY

made. I grew up before bicycle helmets and seat belts, when Evel Knievel was every young boy’s hero, and inflicting permanent damage upon yourself was just part of life. Back then we stared at the sun for hours just because we could — and we liked it! We also walked to and from school uphill both ways. So it’s hard to watch this kind of namby-pamby reaction to the moon flying between the Earth and the sun. Frankly, I thought the eclipse would have been a perfect opportunity to set up some speakers, bring the students outside and have a science teacher explain exactly what was happening. But maybe the temptation to stare directly into the sun with the naked eye would have just been too much for some students. Although, as I drove by the Alabama School of Math and Science Monday it looked like they were using it as a teaching moment. I guess those kids are smart enough to keep their eclipse glasses on. But if they change the name of the school to Alabama School of Math and Science for the Blind, we’ll know things went terribly wrong. The stories of people burning their eyes out looking at the sun appear to be somewhat apocryphal. Searching the almighty internet, I found just one article about some guy in the ‘60s who looked at an eclipse with his naked eye and still sees a sunspot. Seems like there would have been more reports of eclipse-related blindness if it were a pertinent issue. The freaking out about eclipse blindness hit some pretty interesting high points. There were warnings that looking at a photo of the sun taken with your cellphone could damage your eyes. (WHAT?!!!) And lots of warnings about ruining cellphone cameras by taking a picture of the sun. But my favorite eclipse warnings

were about getting the pets indoors so THEY wouldn’t stare at the sun. Now my dog, Georgia, has as much interest in astronomy as any mutt I know, but I’ve never caught her staring at the sun. Still, just to be on the safe side I locked up her telescope and made her wear a welding mask all day. Just kidding! She doesn’t have thumbs, there’s no way she could twist the knobs to focus a telescope! But the welding mask part is true. I’m not trying to downplay all eclipserelated dangers, though. Some were very real. For instance, I nearly fell down a very long flight of stairs while wearing my eclipse glasses and looking up at the sun. I was so mesmerized by the eclipse that I forgot it wasn’t a great idea to try to walk down the stairs while staring at it. People were also driving a little crazy as they kept trying to look at the eclipse at red lights or even while still cruising along at 50 mph. I bet MPD dealt with more than a couple of eclipse-related wrecks. Some of the memes created to honor the eclipse may have been my favorite part of the day. The widely circulated pic of the two packs of Eclipse gum stuck to a pair of glasses was clever. The video of the sun with male genitalia moving in to create an “eclipse” was also a winner among the more childish people I know. (I refused to laugh at it.) Those people I know who were in the “path of totality” — meaning in areas where the sun was completely blotted out by the moon for a few minutes — all said the eclipse was an amazing sight. Here

Cartoon/Laura Rasmussen

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uring the eclipse Monday I couldn’t help thinking how little the human species has progressed over the past few thousand years when nature throws a curveball our way. We humans still love to freak out over anything out of the ordinary. Naturally we were inundated with warnings about not staring into the blazing hot sun, and children were cordoned off inside school buildings and warned not to even look out the window. Some local schools did initially prepare for students to go outside with their eyes properly protected in order to observe this “oncein-a-lifetime” event, but administrators chickened out at the last minute to avoid the “liability” of some kids potentially taking off their eclipse glasses, staring into the sun and going blind. I get it. We live in an age when we’re supposed to be constantly prepared for anything that might happen and blame is viciously applied when preparations aren’t

THE SAVVY VIEWER WILL NOTE A TOTAL SOLAR ECLIPSE OCCURS IN MOBILE ABOUT ONCE EVERY 24 HOURS.


COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

And the Campie goes to … ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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The Campie for Most Positive Campaign goes to … Mayor Sandy Stimpson. His campaign focused on the issues, the improvements and accomplishments his administration made over the last four years, and they tried to reach out to ALL Mobilians, a move which garnered him criticism from his rival, who labeled that outreach as disingenuous. If Mayor Stimpson wins it will certainly be in part because people were drawn to his positivity and turned off by his opponent’s negativity. But more so because, quite simply, Stimpson got a lot of stuff done in his first four years in office and people are excited about the city under his leadership. If Jones is able to take his old job back, Stimpson can hold his head up high knowing he ran a very honorable campaign. Unlike some people, cough, cough. Move on to next Campie. The Campie for Most Divisive Campaign goes to … former Mayor Sam Jones, who ran a campaign based not on the issues, but identity politics. From his announcement to the final days, his campaign and supporters said things like “we are the 52 percent” and “we are going to take our city back.” Such a divisive message from the word go! What about the other 48 percent, Mayor Jones? Shouldn’t a candidate for mayor be focused on 100 percent of his constituents and moving us forward together as a city? We are “all in” this together. Though Jones threw around the phrase “all in” a lot, the actions of his campaign did not reflect those two words. Jones’ surrogates also criticized black Mobilians who voted for Stimpson last time as being “weak minded” and “played” because Stimpson had “fish fries” and “blues singers” at campaign rallies. Jones himself said during his campaign announcement speech, “Now, I’m not going to tell you not to eat no not dog. … Everybody sees you eating a hot dog, but don’t nobody see you when you vote!” How insulting to these voters! If their enthusiasm for you is so little that they can be swayed by a wiener on a bun or plate of fish, perhaps the problem is not with your opponent, Mayor Jones, but the man you see when you look in the mirror. If you do win this election, I certainly hope you will govern far differently than you campaigned, sir, and be a leader for all of Mobile. The Campie for Campaign Most Against Food being served at his rival’s campaign

Photo via Fred Richardson/Facebook

s I sit at my desk writing this column on Tuesday morning, Mobilians are headed to the polls to cast their vote for Mobile’s next mayor and in many districts their city councilpersons as well. This column must be sent to the printer before the results are in, but since most of the campaigning and vote lobbying is done, I feel I can safely present the 2017 Mobile Municipal Election Campaign Awards, or the Campies, as I like to call them. The Campies recognize the biggest triumphs and missteps of the election season. The mayor’s race has provided most of the fireworks, while the council races have been pretty tame. But from the boring to the bombastic, we still need to give credit where credit is due. So, without further adieu, can someone hand me the envelope please? (Price Waterhouse has not confirmed these results.)

Squeaky was a bright spot in an otherwise dismal campaign season. rallies goes to … the Sam Jones campaign for the aforementioned reasons. I’ve just never seen such an obsession with food being served at rallies (and the belief that said food’s ability has the power to change votes) as I did during this campaign. Though it did make me hungry quite often this summer as it was repeatedly brought up. The Campie for Biggest “October Surprise” goes to … the Stimpson campaign. Who says you can’t have an October surprise in midAugust? One of the only “negative attacks” the Stimpson campaign launched against Jones was information about an IRS penalty for misusing a tax-free bond that could have cost the city $45 million. Though the Stimpson administration was able to negotiate it down to a far lower, undisclosed amount, the taxpayers were still on the hook for the penalty. Stimpson said upon finding this out on his first day in office, he decided not to publicly disclose it because he wanted to move on and not “air a bunch of dirty laundry.” But once Jones started taking credit for the city’s current financial position, Stimpson decided to throw that soiled laundry out on the field. Though the story did get some attention, as it should have, I don’t think it was quite the “Access Hollywood” moment the Stimpson campaign thought it would be. It is pretty complex stuff and I just don’t think voters were able to wrap their heads around or get fired up about the intricacies of tax law and how it should be applied to tax-free bonds. I get it. Just typing that sentence made me sleepy. The Campie for Cutest Surrogate goes to … District One City Councilman Fred Richardson’s cat. If Councilman Richardson is able to “squeak” out an outright win or even if he is just headed to a runoff, I believe he needs to thank his orange kitty, Squeaky. Fred often shared photos of Squeaky dressed in campaign T-shirts or Mardi Gras costumes, and they were like most cat pics on the internet, absolutely adorable. (And I’m a dog person.) I don’t know why, but I just love that cat. The Squeakster provided much-needed levity to an otherwise depressing, divisive campaign season. Squeaky for Mayor in 2021!

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COMMENTARY | THE GRIOT’S CORNER

When moral authority is missing in a leader BY KEN ROBINSON/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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oral authority. It’s that intangible quality that, if missing in a leader, has tangible effects. The higher the position, the more discernible and consequential they can be. In the political realm, our leaders need not be, nor should they be expected to be, saints. However, they should possess a functional moral compass that enables them to aptly discern what is right and what is wrong, particularly on very serious and pressing issues. “Because power corrupts,” noted John Adams, “society’s demands for moral authority and character increase as the importance of the position increases.” A deficiency in this area can cause a serious crisis in people’s confidence that a leader will carry out his or her responsibilities faithfully and for the good of all. When a leader’s moral authority, their moral compass begins to point in the wrong direction, a breakdown or disconnection begins to occur between themselves and the people they’ve sworn to serve. Because moral authority is so intertwined with legitimacy, when a leader sows seeds of doubt concerning their moral authority, concerning their ability to understand what is and is not “right conduct, right belief and right action,” it can erode belief in their positional authority. The question soon becomes: Is he or she really capable and fit to hold their office? It has nothing to do with ideology or political affiliation, and everything to do with basic moral fitness for public office. In our home state of Alabama, we’ve seen

this play out. Once the confidence and trust in a leader’s moral authority is seriously questioned, once it becomes obvious that their moral compass is off, their ability to lead is undermined and challenged. For the office of president of the United States, moral authority is indispensable. Regardless of party, it’s a given that during a presidency crises will arise that will cause Americans to look to the president for leadership, guidance and direction … to look to the occupier of the office for consolation and hope … to look to the leader of the free world for a path through the tough times, a path illuminated by notions that lie at the very core of who we are and what we believe as Americans — a way forward based on ideals that have given inspiration and hope, not just for generations of Americans but for peoples the world over. That’s not what we got last week. From the highest office in the land we got moral ambiguity and a failure of leadership. We glimpsed a leader whose moral authority is suspect. Whose moral compass is faulty. After the president’s deeply troubling comments last Tuesday at a Trump Tower press conference in which he bequeathed moral equivalency to the protesters standing against the white supremacists and neo-Nazis gathered in Charlottesville, Virginia — an equivocation that confounded and bewildered many — one group did indeed find comfort and solace in his words. Former Grand Wizard of the Ku Klux Klan David

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Duke tweeted, “Thank you President Trump for your honesty and courage to tell the truth about #Charlottesville …” White supremacist leader Richard Spencer chimed in, stating, “Trump’s statement was fair and down to earth.” Just the day before, Duke issued a stern rebuke to Trump, telling him, “I would recommend you take a good look in the mirror and remember it was white Americans who put you in the presidency.” Duke sickeningly linked his cause and that of his white supremacist and racist allies with that of all white Americans that voted for Trump — implying that he and his hate-filled colleagues and their ideology were a legitimate component of Trump’s base. To them, Trump’s more positive and less condemning words at the press conference were proof that he recognized them as being so. If white supremacists and racists such as Spencer and Duke were heartened and encouraged by Trump’s words, many other Americans, particularly those in his own party, were dismayed. Former Republican National Committee Chairman Michael Steele observed, “We have someone who has elevated the hate machines in this country to the level of the presidency, and has created a false equivalency between these groups and other movements.” South Carolina Republican Sen. Tim Scott commented, “I’m not going to defend the indefensible. … His comments on Monday were strong. His comments on Tuesday started erasing the comments that were strong. What we want to see from our president is clarity and moral authority. And that moral authority is compromised when Tuesday happens. There’s no question about that.” John Cornyn, the second highest ranking Republican in the U.S. Senate, remarked, “I think the president had an opportunity to send a message that would unite America behind our common resolve, to heal those wounds and unite our country, and unfortunately I don’t think he did that.” Sen. Ben Sasse of Nebraska wrote on Facebook, “It feels like violence is coming. … What will happen next? I doubt Donald Trump will be able to calm and comfort the nation in that moment.” One worried Kentucky state senator opined of the president’s comments, “[They were] more than a gaffe. … I’m concerned he seems to firmly believe in what he’s saying about it.” Time will tell. This is not about political correctness but fundamental notions of right and wrong, equality and respect for others that’s deeply a part of the American creed. America is not special because of its whiteness, or its blackness, or any other color, for that matter — but because of its ideals. We don’t need anyone to take us back to anything. But we do need cleareyed leaders to propel and lead us forward — sound in values, character and intellect.


COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

The evolution of Roy Moore BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM

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y first personal encounter with Roy Moore came in summer 2005. He was already famous (or infamous depending on your perspective) for refusing to remove a monument of the Ten Commandments from the Alabama Judicial Building in Montgomery. After a state judicial ethics panel removed Moore from office over the Ten Commandments controversy, Moore took the helm of the Foundation for Moral Law, a Montgomerybased nonprofit. It was while he was working at the foundation that Moore granted me — at the time the editor of The Vanguard, the University of South Alabama’s college newspaper — an interview. The word on the street was that Moore wanted to make a run for governor. Alabama already had a Republican governor in Bob Riley. However, at the time Riley looked vulnerable given the outright failure of a $1.2 billion tax referendum he heavily promoted. The substance of the interview turned out to be uneventful. Christianity was good, and government waste was bad. Regardless of the question, his answers seemed to always gravitate toward a dig at Bill Pryor, the Alabama attorney general who had ousted Moore from the bench a year and a half earlier. It was his demeanor and mannerisms that struck me that day. It was as if Moore were delivering a fire-and-brimstone sermon insisting I repent for my sins or face eternal damnation in hell. His approach, to me, seemed like the biggest problem Judge Moore would have in advancing his political career. Preaching the gospel from the pulpit might get some people to find Jesus. It was less clear whether preaching from a political pulpit would get voters to pull a lever for Roy Moore. Who was going to vote for a politician whose campaign signage might as well have mimicked the old homemade billboard on Interstate 65 between Montgomery and Birmingham: “Vote for Roy Moore, or the devil will get you!” My instinct in 2005 turned out to be true. Moore never was able to advance to the second round of voting in his two attempts at governor. The first time Moore ran, Riley demolished him in the 2006 GOP primary, 66 percent to 33 percent. Four years later, he finished fourth behind Bradley Byrne, eventual governor Robert Bentley and a well-funded Tim James, earning only 19 percent of the GOP vote. Whatever Moore was selling, folks weren’t buying — at least not in a high-profile race at the top of a ballot. He would win another Alabama Supreme Court chief justice term in 2012, only to be expelled again in 2016 for instructing lowercourt judges not to issue marriage licenses to same-sex couples despite a ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court saying such refusals were unconstitutional. In this U.S. Senate special election Republican primary, things turned out to be much different. Ever since Moore announced his

candidacy, he has been the lead dog in the contest for the seat previously held by Attorney General Jeff Sessions. In last week’s primary, Moore was the top vote-getter in a crowded field, which included two high-profile Republican officeholders, U.S. Sen. Luther Strange and U.S. Rep. Mo Brooks. Moore and Strange will face off in a runoff Sept. 26. The first round of polling seems to indicate the runoff could be a big win for Moore, who leads Strange in a JMC Analytics poll of likely registered voters, taken Aug. 17 and Aug. 19, by 19 points. That’s a big deficit for Big Luther. The polling is that much more striking considering Strange has the deep pockets of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s Senate Leadership Fund backing him, his technical incumbency and the fact that he has previously won two statewide elections for Alabama Attorney General. What changed? How is it that he is now in the driver’s seat for a spot in the U.S. Senate when, before this election, many largely dismissed Moore as a fringe novelty candidate who was dining off the 2003 Ten Commandments controversy? Moore changed. He’s still the religious zealot we all know from past campaigns. He has not backed away from his stance on gay marriage. In fact, he touted his book “Abuse of Power,” which criticizes the U.S. Supreme Court’s gay marriage decision, at least twice on the campaign trail. While Moore has not deviated from his values, he has softened his approach. He is no longer a finger-wagging proselytizer. Somewhere along the way, he recognized that would not get him as many votes. Instead, the finger-wagging has focused on his opponents and other political figures. He has also realized the beauty of showcasing political gimmickry. Moore arrived at his polling location on horseback in a cowboy hat and boots. As hokey as that may seem, in the eyes of many Alabama voters it was appealing. Roy Moore has changed, and it seems to be working. Last week’s GOP primary gave us some clarity about the political climate in Alabama. We know money will at least get you in striking range. Ten million dollars later, Luther Strange lives to fight another day. We have also learned what so-called conservative movement leaders such as Laura Ingraham, Mark Levin, Ann Coulter and Sean Hannity have to say does not move the needle in Alabama. Mo Brooks was hoping their endorsements would give him a boost, but he had a worse showing than even the polls suggested. The one element that is clutch in statewide elections is that iconic Alabama quality. When people think of Alabama, what comes to mind? Paul “Bear” Bryant, George Wallace, Hank Williams, etc., etc. Other than Jeff Sessions, Roy Moore is becoming one of this generation’s best-known political icons of the state. That is invaluable in a high-stakes political campaign.

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BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

Infirmary Health buys 17.8 acres in Malbis BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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obile-based Infirmary Health recently purchased 17.8 acres of land, with more than 800 feet fronting the property, for $3.85 million. The site is located on Highway 90 in the Malbis community of Daphne, near the intersection with Highway 181. The undeveloped property — which was officially annexed into the city of Daphne and remains a historical district — was rezoned to a neighborhood business district to accommodate future development plans. The seller in the transaction was represented by Sharon Wright and Tracy Womack with White-Spunner Realty. BT Roberts of Roberts Brothers CPM Inc. worked for the buyer. Thomas Hospital, an affiliate of Infirmary Health located in Fairhope, is currently constructing a freestanding emergency department in Malbis that is scheduled to open in October 2017 located near the newly acquired property. • Christian Counseling Professionals is leasing 1,200 square feet of office space located at 4087 Cottage Hill Road in Mobile. The new location is to open this month. Angie McArthur, broker associate with Stirling Properties, handled the transaction. • The Mobile Area Chamber recently announced Safran USA will be moving into the Mobile Aeroplex at Brookley. This is the 19th company to locate in the area since Airbus began production in Mobile, per a news release. To house the facility, the Mobile Airport Authority will build out one of the existing bays at the Mobile Aeroplex to 24,500 square feet. In addition, the company is investing approximately $1 million in equipment and expects to hire 20 local workers for the site, which is slated to open in November. • Hometown Lenders LLC is leasing 1,605 square feet of office space in Mobile Office Park, 3929 Airport Blvd. Jack Conger, leasing executive with Stirling Properties, managed

nization of the Year award for its support of Alabama’s sports tourism market with the opening of the city’s new sports complex, which has 16 outdoor fields and a 90,000-square-foot indoor events center. Nine other state tourism industry awards were also presented at the conference. For more information, visit the Alabama Governor’s Conference on Tourism Facebook page.

Frankel holds new endowed chair at MCI the transaction. • Last week the Associated Builders & Contractors of Alabama’s Mid Gulf Chapter hosted Congressman Bradley Byrne for a job site tour of the St. Louis Street historical renovation project led by Ryan Ott with Rogers & Willard. The theme of the visit was the need for revitalization, historical tax credits and skilled craft workers for the construction industry. “The construction industry is a $12 billion economic engine in Alabama, and we as an industry certainly have needs from a state and federal level,” Jay Reed, president of Associated Builders & Contractors of Alabama, said.

Baldwin County recognized as tourism leader

Two individuals, one theme park and a city in Baldwin County were recognized recently at the Alabama Governor’s Conference on Tourism held recently in Birmingham. Altogether 13 awards were handed out in recognition of accomplishments across the state. J. Gary Ellis, of Gulf Shores, was inducted into the Alabama Tourism Hall of Fame. Ellis founded Compass Media Inc., an award-winning media and marketing company, in 1988. Ellis is also co-founder and board member of the Gulf United Metro Business Organization. Pedro Mandoki, of Gulf Shores, received the Alabama Tourism Lifetime Achievement Award. He is just the third individual in the state to earn the accolade. Mandoki founded Mandoki Hospitality more than 30 years ago to promote and manage Gulf Shores Plantation. The OWA theme park in Foley was named the 2018 Attraction of the Year. The 520-acre family tourist destination opened last month and features rides, midway games, restaurants, shopping and a hotel development. The city of Foley was presented with the Tourism Orga-

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Dr. Arthur E. Frankel has been named the inaugural holder of the Arlene and Mayer Mitchell Endowed Chair in Medical Oncology. Frankel, who joined USA Mitchell Cancer Institute in July as chief of medical oncology, was recognized at a recent ceremony. An endowed chair is the highest academic award bestowed upon a faculty member by a university. “Having someone like Dr. Frankel in the Mobile community is transforming for cancer care,” MCI Director Dr. Michael A. Finan said. Prior to coming to MCI, Frankel served at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, where he oversaw Phase 1 clinical trials. He also served as executive director of the Cancer Research Institute at Scott & White Hospital at the Texas A&M School of Medicine. In a career spanning more than 30 years, Frankel also worked at Wake Forest University, the Florida Hospital Cancer and Leukemia Research Center and Duke University. Frankel is co-inventor on 12 issued patents and has authored or co-authored more than 200 publications in peer-reviewed journals. His research interests include melanoma, for which he is nationally recognized. Frankel said he plans to create a fellowship program at MCI. “We will try to entice students to join us in the fight against cancer,” he said.

SHC hires new alumni relations VP

Christopher P. Puto, Ph.D., president of Spring Hill College, recently announced in a news release that Mary McDonald has been named as the new vice president for development and alumni relations, officially assuming the position last month. McDonald brings 19 years’ experience with public and private institutions, most recently serving in a similar role at University of Maryland in College Park. She has extensive experience soliciting, closing and stewarding gifts and has played an integral role in six comprehensive campaigns throughout her career. “Selected through a national search, Mary will bring philanthropy to every area of the campus through work with the college’s leadership and its stakeholders,” Puto said. “I look forward to her fresh perspective and implementation of best practices at Spring Hill College.” In 2010, U.S. News and World Report ranked SHC 14th among the top small private colleges in the Southern region offering both bachelor’s and master’s degrees.


CUISINE THE REVIEW

Feast on Mediterranean specialties at Taziki’s

BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

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Photo | Daniel Anderson / Lagniappe

’ve really just been waiting for an excuse to review Taziki’s Mediterranean Café. Located at Legacy Village in the former Zoe’s (which is now at Pinebrook Shopping Center on Airport Boulevard), I wondered if this place would be more of the same. Certainly there are similarities between the two. Not that it’s a bad thing, but I’d prefer a little variety rather than just a turnkey building and a different brand of rice. I finally got my excuse when the private schools went back in session. Rob’s kids were both dreading and looking forward to their new year moving up the ranks, but it was Beth’s daughter, Vivi, who was really ready for big-girl school. What to do? Celebrate. How do we celebrate? With food, of course! The whole gang managed to coordinate a time and spot at Taziki’s. In good company, Taziki’s sits footsteps away from flavors galore, with Dumbwaiter on the Hill, Mirko Pasta, Tropical Smoothie, Atlanta Bread Co. and Williams-Sonoma nearby. We were happy to find some familiar items and a few more fresh ideas. For starters, we needed to try the Spicy Pimento Cheese ($4.99). The former tenants had a great take on pimento cheese. For me, this one is even better, with a hint of Tabasco and really sharp cheddar. You have a choice of soft or baked pita chips. We had to have the baked for the sturdiness. Crispy and brittle, the crunchy pita made this happy dish even better. It may have been a little spicy for Beth, but it was just right for most everyone else. With six of us in tow we needed to double up on appetizers. Taziki Dip ($4.99) was a lot like taziki sauce with a lemony mix of cucumber and dill in a yogurt base. Soft pita was the way to go for this one for the exact opposite reasons the crunchy pita was right for the cheese. The soft was a little better at soaking up the runny dip. Ursula was up first with Grilled Chicken Roll-Ups ($7.99). Think of these as Mediterranean taquitos with tomato (she held the tomato) and feta with chicken in a rolled-up flour tortilla, browned on a griddle and served with a side of chips and fresh salsa. I was offered a bite. Not bad at all. Your kids will love this. Ulysses was rambling on and on about whether or not he’d enjoy a Grilled Lamb Gyro ($9.99). He must have enjoyed it because I didn’t get a single bite. This is your standard. It’s the yardstick for this kind of food. Served with chips and choice of additional side, he, like his sister, chose roasted new potatoes. Good choice. Beth had been here before and had already made up her mind. She didn’t stutter when she ordered the Grilled Salmon Feast ($12.99). Served with a fantastic Greek salad, Beth also chose the new potatoes as her side. At least my bite of the salmon was cooked perfectly, and neither she nor I had any complaints. I ordered similarly to Beth with the Grilled Shrimp Feast ($11.99), getting the same salad but I opted for the basmati rice over the potatoes. I was the only brave soul, and though I love

TAZIKI’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFÉ 9 DU RHU DRIVE, SUITE 300 MOBILE 36608 251-378-2678

With daily lunch specials, take-home family dinners and more than 100 menu items made fresh daily, Taziki’s Mediterranean-inspired cuisine is highly recommended. the potatoes I felt the rice went better with the salmon and shrimp. Either was fine, though. The other “feast” options were chicken, beef, lamb, tilapia or herb-roasted pork loin, the latter of which ensuring I’ll be coming back. Rob doesn’t realize this but I believe he had the winning dish of the evening. His Beef Tender Sandwich ($8.99) was the surprise of the trip on a Kaiser bun with grilled onions, horseradish and melted Swiss cheese. My small bite was enough to let me know the sandwich is a strong competitor. Furthermore, he somehow was granted a side of grilled vegetables, an option I don’t remember being offered. Once it was all said and done, we can say we had a very decent back-to-school meal without breaking the bank. Princess Vivi only grazed a little here and there, without much interest in dining. Must have been an exciting day for a 4-year-old to lose her appetite. Here’s why you’ll visit Taziki’s. There are daily lunch specials usually in the form of a sandwich, pasta or fish taco, all in

the under $9 category. There are also take-home dinners for four people to be picked up after 2 p.m., but you must call to order two hours in advance. These guys boast more than 100 menu items made fresh daily. I didn’t bother counting but I’m inclined to blindly believe it. I’m very interested in trying the homemade Greek Lemon Chicken Soup when the weather turns. Another great thing about Taziki’s is that they do serve wine and beer. A bottle of wine there is very affordable, though I wouldn’t plan on stopping in to get ripped during happy hour. It’s not that atmosphere at all. But the markup on the wine is very small. When you compare Taziki’s to Zoë’s Kitchen (and it’s very hard not to do so), on the surface you will say they are very similar. Both serve stellar pimento cheese, similar proteins, the rice, etc., but really they are much more different than most will acknowledge, and can cleverly coexist only a couple of miles apart. I say give it a try. Both are very good, but today I am having Taziki’s.

A u g u s t 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 - A u g u s t 3 0 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 17


FLOUR GIRLS BAKERY ($) 809 Hillcrest Rd. • 634-2285

GROWLER STATION AND BITES 1801 Old Shell Rd. • 345-4767

FIREHOUSE SUBS ($)

PANINI PETE’S ($)

HOT SUBS, COLD SALADS & CATERING 6300 Grelot Rd. • 631-3730 $10/PERSON • $$ 10-25/PERSON • $$$ OVER 25/PERSON

COMPLETELY COMFORTABLE ALL SPORTS BAR & GRILL ($) 3408 Pleasant Valley Rd. • 345-9338

AL’S HOTDOGS ($)

CLASSIC HOTDOGS, GYROS & MILKSHAKES 4701 Airport Blvd. • 342-3243

ATLANTA BREAD COMPANY ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SALADS & MORE. 3680 Dauphin St. • 380-0444

BAKE MY DAY ($)

OLD-FASHIONED SOUTHERN BAKE SHOP 156 N. McGregor Ave. • 219-7261

BOB’S DINER ($)

GOOD OLD AMERICAN COOKING 263 St. Francis St. • 405-1497

BRICK & SPOON ($)

3662 Airport Blvd. Suite A • 525-9177

BUCK’S DINER ($)

CLASSIC AMERICAN DINER 58 N. Secion St. Fairhope • 928-8521

CAFE 219 ($)

SALADS, SANDWICHES & POTATO SALAD 219 Conti St. • 438-5234

CAMELLIA CAFÉ ($-$$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FARE 61 Section St. • Fairhope • 928-4321

CAMMIE’S OLD DUTCH ($) MOBILE’S CLASSIC ICE CREAM SPOT 2511 Old Shell Rd. • 471-1710

CARPE DIEM ($)

DELI FOODS, PASTRIES & SPECIALTY DRINKS 4072 Old Shell Rd. • 304-0448

CLARK’S KITCHEN ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHERN CUISINE & CATERING 5817 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0200

CHAT-A-WAY CAFE ($)

QUICHES & SANDWICHES 4366 Old Shell Rd. • 343-9889

CHICK-FIL-A ($)

FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES ($) BURGERS, MILKSHAKES & FRIES 4401 Old Shell Rd. • 447-2394 4663 Airport Blvd. • 300-8425 5319 Hwy 90 • 661-0071 1225 Satchel Page Dr.• 378-8768

FOOSACKLY’S ($)

FAMOUS CHICKEN FINGERS 29181 US Hwy 98 • Daphne • 375-1104 7843 Moffett Rd. • 607-6196 1109 Shelton Beach Rd. • 287-1423 310 S. University Blvd. • 343-0047 2250 Airport Blvd. • 479-2922 7641 Airport Blvd. • 607-7667 2558 Schillinger Rd. • 219-7761 3249 Dauphin St. • 479-2000

FOY SUPERFOODS ($) 119 Dauphin St.• 307-8997

GULF COAST EXPLOREUM CAFE ($) HOMEMADE SOUPS & SANDWICHES 65 Government St. • 208-6815

GUMBO SHACK ($-$$)

SEAFOOD & SANDWICHES 212 ½ Fairhope Ave •Fairhope • 928-4100

HOOTERS ($)

3869 Airport Blvd. • 345-9544 5470 Inn Rd. • 661-9117 28975 US 98 • Daphne • 625-3910

JAMAICAN VIBE ($)

MIND-BLOWING ISLAND FOOD 3700 Gov’t Blvd. Ste A • 602-1973

JERSEY MIKE’S ($)

AUTHENTIC SUB SANDWICHES 7449 Airport Blvd. • 375-1820

JIMMY JOHN’S ($)

SANDWICHES, CATERING & DELIVERY TOO 6920 Airport Blvd. • 414-5444 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-8694 62 B Royal St. • 432-0360

JOE CAIN CAFÉ ($)

PIZZAS, SANDWICHES, COCKTAILS 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

JONELLI’S ($)

1252 Govenment St.• 301-7556

107 St. Francis St. • 415-1700 3244 Dauphin St. • 476-0320 3215 Bel Air Mall • 476-8361 4707 Airport Blvd. • 461-9933 435 Schillinger Rd. • 639-1163 1682 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 621-3215 30500 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-3020

JUDY’S PLACE ($-$$)

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK ($)

PUB FOOD AND DRAFT BEERS 251 Dauphin St. • 287-6871

CHICKEN SALAD, SALAD & SOUP 2370 S. Hillcrest Rd. Unit R • 660-0501 5753 Old Shell Rd. • 408-3236 1802 US Hwy 98 Suite F• 625-1092

CHI-TOWN DAWGZ ($) CHICAGO STYLE EATERY 1222 Hillcrest Rd. • 461-6599

CONNECTION FROZEN YOGURT ($) 1880 Industrial Pkwy. • 675-2999

CREAM AND SUGAR ($)

HOME COOKING 4054 Government St. • 665-4557

LICKIN’ GOOD DONUTS ($) 3242 Dauphin St. • 471-2590

LODA BIER GARTEN ($) MAMA’S ($)

SLAP YOUR MAMA GOOD HOME COOKING 220 Dauphin St. • 432-6262

MARS HILL CAFE ($)

GREAT SANDWICHES, COFFEE & MORE 1087 Downtowner Blvd. • 643-1611

MARY’S SOUTHERN COOKING ($) 3011 Springhill Ave. • 476-2232

COFFEE, BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DESSERT 351 George St #B • 405-0003

MICHELI’S CAFE ($)

DAUPHIN ST. CAFE ($)

MCSHARRY’S ($-$$)

HOT LUNCH, DAILY MENU (INSIDE VIA) 1717 Dauphin St. • 470-5231

D’ MICHAEL’S ($)

PHILLY CHEESE STEAKS, GYROS & MORE 7101-A Theodore Dawes Rd. • 653-2979

D NU SPOT ($)

22159 Halls Mill Rd. . • 648-6522

DELISH BAKERY AND EATERY ($) GREAT DESSERTS & HOT LUNCH 23 Upham St. • 473-6115

DEW DROP INN ($)

CLASSIC BURGERS, HOTDOGS & SETTING 1808 Old Shell Rd. • 473-7872

DUNKIN DONUTS ($)

DONUTS, COFFEE & SANDWICHES 1976 Michigan Ave. • 442-4846 3876 Airport Blvd. • 219-7369 505 Schillinger Rd. S. • 442-4845 29160 US Hwy 98 • 621-2228

E WING HOUSE ($)

6358 Cottage Hill Rd. • 725-6917 AUTHENTIC IRISH PUB 101 N. Bancroft St.• 990-5100

MIKO’S ITALIAN ICE ($)

HOTDOGS SANDWICHES & COOL TREATS 3371 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 300–4015

MOMMA GOLDBERG’S DELI ($) SANDWICHES & MOMMA’S LOVE 3696 Airport Blvd. • 344-9500 5602 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6556

BENJAS ($)

ORIGINAL SANDWICH AND BAKE SHOP 42 ½ Section St. • Fairhope • 929-0122 102 Dauphin St. • 405-0031

WAREHOUSE BAKERY & DONUTS ($)

GUMBO, ANGUS BEEF & BAR 72. S. Royal St. • 432-SCAM (7226)

PAT’S DOWNTOWN GRILL ($)

WEDGIE’S ($)

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE 271 Glenwood St. • 476-0516

WILD WING STATION ($)

INSIDE THE MOBILE MARRIOTT 3101 Airport Blvd. • 476-6400

CHINA DOLL ($)

PDQ ($)

SAISHO ($-$$)

CUISINE OF INDIA ($$)

VON’S BISTRO ($-$$)

FUJI SAN ($)

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($$)

GOLDEN BOWL ($)

THE TRELLIS ROOM ($$$)

HIBACHI 1 ($-$$)

BAR FOOD 271 Dauphin St • 438-9585

COFFEE AND DONUTS 759 Nichols Avenue, Fairhope • 928-7223 GOURMET GRILLED CHEESE 5955 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6134

CHICKEN FINGERS, SALAD & SANDWICHES. 1165 University Blvd. • 202-0959

1500 Gov’t St. • 287-1526

POLLMAN’S BAKERY ($)

85 N. Bancroft St. Fairhope • 990.8883

BAKERY, SANDWICHES & MORE 750 S. Broad St. • 438-1511 4464 Old Shell Rd. • 342-8546 107 St. Francis St. Suite 102 • 438-2261

PUNTA CLARA KITCHEN ($)

FUDGE, PRALINES & MORE 17111 Scenic Hwy 98 • Fairhope • 928-8477

R BISTRO ($-$$)

334 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope • 928-2399

REGINA’S KITCHEN ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SUBS & SOUPS 2056 Gov’t St. • 476-2777

ROLY POLY ($)

WRAPS & SALADS 3220 Dauphin St. • 479-2480

ROSHELL’S CAFE ($)

2906 Springhill Ave. • 479-4614

ROSIE’S GRILL ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHWEST FARE, 7 DAYS 1203 Hwy 98 Ste. 3D • Daphne • 626-2440

THE WINDMILL MARKET ($) YAK THE KATHMANDU KITCHEN ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC FOODS FROM HIMALAYAN REGION 3210 Dauphin St. • 287-0115 400 Eastern Shore Center • 459-2862

‘CUE

BACKYARD CAFE & BBQ ($) HOME COOKIN’ LIKE MOMMA MADE. 2804 Springhill Ave. • 473-4739

BAR-B-QUING WITH MY HONEY ($$) BBQ, BURGERS, WINGS & SEAFOOD 19170 Hwy 43 Mt. Vernon. • 839-9927

BRICK PIT ($)

A FAVORITE BARBECUE SPOT 5456 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0001

COTTON STATE BBQ ($)

DOWNTOWN LUNCH 101 N. Conception St. • 545-4682

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT ($-$$)

LUNCH & DINNER 3004 Gov’t Blvd. • 287-1220

BBQ AND MORE Jubilee Sq.Ctr. Hwy 90, Daphne • 210-2151 McGowin Park Ctr. Satchel Paige Dr. • 471-1050 7721 Airport Blvd. • 380-8957

ROYAL STREET CAFE ($)

DREAMLAND BBQ ($)

ROYAL KNIGHT ($)

HOMEMADE LUNCH & BREAKFAST 104 N. Royal St. • 434-0011

SALLY’S PIECE-A-CAKE ($) BAKERY 5638 Three Notch Rd.• 219-6379

SATORI COFFEEHOUSE ($)

COFFEE, SMOOTHIES, LUNCH & BEERS. 5460 Old Shell Rd. • 344-4575

SERDA’S COFFEEHOUSE ($)

COFFEE, LUNCHES, LIVE MUSIC & GELATO 3 Royal St. S. • 415-3000

SIMPLY SWEET ($)

CUPCAKE BOUTIQUE 6207 Cottage Hill Rd. Suite B • 665-3003

STEVIE’S KITCHEN ($)

SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS & MORE 41 West I-65 Service Rd. N Suite 150. • 287-2793

SUGAR RUSH DONUT CO. ($) 4701 Airport Blvd. • 408-3379

SUNSET POINTE ($-$$)

AT FLU CREEK 831 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-7766

RIBS, SANDWICHES & GREAT SIDES 3314 Old Shell Rd. • 479-9898

MEAT BOSS ($)

5401 Cottage Hill Rd. • 591-4842

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE ($) BARBEQUE & MUSIC Bayfront Park Dr. • Daphne • 625-RIBS 701 Springhill Ave. • 410-7427 4672 Airport Blvd. • 300-8516

SAUCY Q BARBQUE ($) AWARD-WINNING BARBQUE 1111 Gov’t Blvd. • 433-7427

SMOKEY DEMBO SMOKE HOUSE ($)

BAY GOURMET ($$)

A PREMIER CATERER & COOKING CLASSES 1880-A Airport Blvd. • 450-9051

BRIQUETTES STEAKHOUSE ($-$$)

THE HARBERDASHER ($)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St • 460-3157

SOUTHERN COOKING & THEN SOME 1716 Main St. Daphne • 222-4120

THE SUNFLOWER CAFE ($) INSIDE VIRGINIA’S HEALTH FOOD 3055 A Dauphin St • 479-3200

THYME BY THE BAY ($-$$)

CASUAL FINE DINING 104 N. Section St. • Fairhope • 929-2219 CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE Battle House Hotel, Royal St. • 338-5493

THE WASH HOUSE ($$)

17111 Scenic HWY 98 • Point Clear • 928-4838

3966 Airport Blvd.• 343-5530 LUNCH BUFFET 3674 Airport Blvd. • 341-6171

THAI FARE AND SUSHI 2000 Airport Blvd. • 478-9888 HIBACHI GRILL & ASIAN CUISINE 309 Bel Air Blvd • 470-8033 2370 Hillcrest Rd. Unit B • 380-6062

ICHIBAN SUSHI ($)

JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE 3959 Cottage Hill Rd • 666-6266

A LITTLE VINO

KAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($-$$)

WINE, BEER, GOURMET FOODS, & MORE. 720 Schillinger Rd. S. Unit 8 • 287-1851

LIQUID ($$)

DOMKE MARKET

QUALITY FOOD, EXCELLENT SERVICE 5045 Cottage Hill Rd. • 607-6454

FOOD PAK

AMAZING SUSHI & ASSORTMENT OF ROLLS. 661 Dauphin St. • 432-0109

FOOD, WINE & MORE 5150 Old Shell Rd. • 341-1497

POUR BABY

WINE BAR, CRAFT BEERS & BISTRO 6808 Airport Blvd. • 343-3555

RICE ASIAN GRILL & SUSHI BAR ($) 3964 Gov’t Blvd. • 378-8083

ROCK N ROLL SUSHI ($$)

216 St Francis St. • 421-2022

273 S. McGregor Ave • 287-0445 6345 Airport Blvd. • 287-0555 940 Industrial Pkwy • 308-2158 6850 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 753-4367

RED OR WHITE

SAISHO ($$)

FIREHOUSE WINE BAR & SHOP 323A De La Mare Ave, Fairhope • 990-0003 1104 Dauphin St.. • 478-9494

ROYAL STREET TAVERN

LIVE MUSIC, MARTINIS & DINNER MENU. 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

SOUTHERN NAPA

BISTRO PLATES, CRAFT BEERS & PANTRY 2304 Main St. • 375-2800

THE VINEYARD

UPSCALE WINE BAR 9 Du Rhu Dr. S 201 • 287-7135

6455 Dauphin St. • 433-0376

STIX ($$)

610240 Eastern Shore Blvd. • 621-9088

TASTE OF THAI ($$)

9091 US-90 Irvington • 957-1414

TOKYO JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE ($$) UPSCALE SUSHI & HIBACHI 364 Azalea Rd. • 343-6622

WASABI SUSHI ($$)

JAPANESE CUISINE 3654 Airport Blvd. S. C • 725-6078

HEALTHY, DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 3762 Airport Blvd. • 725-1177

THE GALLEY ($)

THE PIGEON HOLE ($)

SEAFOOD, ASIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE 69 St. Michael St • 375-1113

THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR 960 Schillinger Rd. S • 660-4470

DROP DEAD GOURMET

SEAFOOD AND SUSHI 551 Dauphin St.• 219-7051

113 Dauphin St.• 436-0989

MODERN GASTROPUB INSPIRED BY JAPANESE KITCHEN 455 Dauphin St • 433-0376

CHARM ($-$$)

FALAFEL? TRY SOME HUMMUS FROM THE DEPTHS

THE BLIND MULE ($)

OPEN FOR LUNCH, INSIDE GULFQUEST 155 S. Water St • 436-8901

SAGE RESTAURANT ($$)

THAI & SUSHI 5369 D Hwy 90 W • 661-5100

3758 Dauphin Island Pkwy. • 473-1401

GRILLED STEAKS, CHICKEN & SEAFOOD 720A Schillinger Rd. S. S2. • 607-7200 901 Montlimar Dr • 408-3133

DAILY SPECIALS MADE FROM SCRATCH 57 N. Claiborne St. • 694-6853

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

CHUCK’S FISH ($$)

CORNER 251 ($-$$)

DAUPHIN’S ($$-$$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD WITH A VIEW 107 St. Francis St • 444-0200

DUMBWAITER ($$-$$$) 9 Du Rhu Dr. Suite 201 167 Dauphin St. • 445-3802

FIVE ($$)

7 SPICE ($-$$)

ABBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE ($-$$) 4861 Bit & Spur Rd. • 340-6464

BAUDEAN’S ($$)

FRIED, GRILLED, STEAMED & ALWAYS FRESH 3300 River Rd. • 973-9070

THE BLUEGILL ($-$$)

ISTANBUL GRILL ($)

A HISTORIC SEAFOOD DIVE W/ LIVE MUSIC 3775 Hwy. 98 • 625-1998

JERUSALEM CAFE ($-$$)

ECLECTIC DINING & SPACE 6955 Airport Blvd. • 633-7196

KAN ZAMAN ($-$$)

QUALITY CAJUN & NEW ORLEANS CUISINE 29249 US Highway 98 Daphne. • 621-1991

AUTHENTIC TURKISH & MEDITERRANEAN 3702 Airport Blvd. • 461-6901 MOBILE’S OLDEST MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE 5773 Airport Blvd. • 304-1155 MEDITERRANEAN FOOD AND HOOKAH 326 Azalea Rd • 229-4206

MEDITERRANEAN SANDWICH COMPANY ($)

GREAT & QUICK. 3702 Airport Blvd. • 308-2131 274 Dauphin St. • 545-3161 2502 Schillinger Rd. Ste. 2 • 725-0126 6890 US-90 • DAPHNE • 621-2271

MINT HOOKAH BISTRO ($) GREAT MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 5951 Old Shell Rd. • 450-9191

BONEFISH GRILL ($$)

BOUDREAUX’S CAJUN GRILL ($-$$) CRAVIN CAJUN/DIP SEAFOOD ($) PO-BOYS, SALADS & SEAFOOD 1870 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 287-1168

ED’S SEAFOOD SHED ($$)

FRIED SEAFOOD SERVED IN HEFTY PORTIONS 3382 Hwy. 98 • 625-1947

FELIX’S FISH CAMP ($$) UPSCALE DINING WITH A VIEW 1420 Hwy. 98 • 626-6710

FISHERMAN’S LEGACY ($) DELI, MARKET AND CATERING. 4380 Halls Mill Rd. • 665-2266

MONTEGO’S ($-$$)

TIME TO EAT CAFE ($)

KITCHEN ON GEORGE ($-$$)

OLLIE’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL ($-$$)

LUCY B. GOODE ($$)

MOON PIE GENERAL STORE ($)

LAUNCH ($-$$)

TAZIKI’S ($-$$)

TIN ROOF ($-$$)

MAGHEE’S GRILL ON THE HILL ($-$$)

FAR EASTERN FARE

LULU’S ($$)

4513 Old Shell Rd.• 473-0007

MUDBUGS AT THE LOOP ($)

FRESH CARIBBEAN-STYLE FOOD & CRAFT BEER 6601 Airport Blvd. • 634-3445 225 Dauphin St. • 375-1576 107 St Francis St #115 • RSA Bank Trust Building

MOSTLY MUFFINS ($) MUFFINS, COFFEE & WRAPS 105 Dauphin St. • 433-9855

NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE ($)

FATHOMS LOUNGE

O’DALYS HOLE IN THE WALL ($)

SMALL PLATES AND CREATIVE COCKTAILS 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

ROYAL SCAM ($$)

TRADITIONAL SUSHI & LUNCH. 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-9077

33 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-5635

15 N Conception St. • 433-2299

EUGENE’S MONKEY BAR ($)

2550 Dauphin Island Pkwy S. • 307-5328

2579 Halls Mill Rd. • 479-0006

GREAT FOOD AND COCKTAILS 609 Dauphin St. • 308-3105

OVEN-BAKED SANDWICHES & MORE 1335 Satchel Page Dr. Suite C. • 287-7356 7440 Airport Blvd. • 633-0096 30500 State Hwy 181 #132 • 625-6544

195 S University Blvd. Suite H • 662-1829

UNCLE JIMMY’S DELICIOUS HOTDOGS ($)

562 Dauphin St.• 725-6429

OLD SHELL GROWLERS ($)

18 | L AG N I A P P E | A u g u s t 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 - A u g u s t 3 0 , 2 0 1 7

DOWN-HOME COUNTRY COOKIN 7351 Theodore Dawes Rd. • 654-0228 13665 N. Wintzell Ave. • 824-1119 SOUTHERN CASUAL FAMILY DINING 10800 US HWY 31 • Spanish Fort• 621-4995

TP CROCKMIERS ($)

AMERICAN RESTAURANT & BAR 250 Dauphin St. • 476-1890

THREE GEORGES CANDY SHOP ($) LIGHT LUNCH WITH SOUTHERN FLAIR. 226 Dauphin St. • 433-6725

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE ($)

GREAT SMOOTHIES, WRAPS & SANDWICHES. Du Rhu Dr. • 378-5648 570 Schillinger Road • 634-3454

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOOD 351A George & Savannah St. • 436-8890 HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St. • 432-8000 GREAT LUNCH & DINNER 3607 Old Shell Rd. • 445-8700

NOBLE SOUTH ($$)

LOCAL INGREDIENTS 203 Dauphin St. • 690-6824

NOJA ($$-$$$)

INVENTIVE & VERY FRESH CUISINE 6 N. Jackson St. • 433-0377

OSMAN’S RESTAURANT ($$) SUPREME EUROPEAN CUISINE

MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT & HOOKAH 1248 Hillcrest St • 634-9820 MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 1539 US HWY 98• 273-3337

ANG BAHAY KUBO ($$)

BAMBOO STEAKHOUSE ($$) SUSHI BAR 650 Cody Rd. S • 300-8383

BANGKOK THAI ($-$$)

DELICIOUS, TRADITIONAL THAI CUISINE 28600 US 98 • Daphne • 626-5286 3821 Airport Blvd. • 344-9995

BANZAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($$)

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($)

30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 206-8768 3654 Airport Blvd. • 338-9350 GULF COAST CUISINE, REINVENTED 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858 LIVE MUSIC & GREAT SEAFOOD 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858 CAJUN KITCHEN & SEAFOOD MARKET 2005 Government St. • 478-9897

RALPH & KACOO’S ($-$$) THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1595 Battleship Pkwy. • 626-0045

R&R SEAFOOD ($-$$)

LAID-BACK EATERY & FISH MARKET 1477 Battleship Pkwy. • 621-8366


RIVER SHACK ($-$$)

916 Charleston St. • 433-9374

THE GRAND MARINER ($-$$)

SANDWICHES & COLD BEER 273 Dauphin St. • 433-4376 Hillcrest & Old Shell Rd. • 341-9464

SEAFOOD, BURGERS & STEAKS 6120 Marina Dr. • Dog River • 443-7318. LOCAL SEAFOOD & PRODUCE 6036 Rock Point Rd. • 443-7540

THE HARBOR ROOM ($-$$) UNIQUE SEAFOOD 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

THE SEAFOOD HOUSE ($-$$)

HEROES SPORTS BAR & GRILLE ($)

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS ($-$$) WINGS, SEAFOOD, BURGERS & BEER 7721 Airport Blvd. Suite E-180 • 639-6832

ISLAND WING CO ($)

751 Azalea Rd. • 301-7964

EVERYTHING BAKED OR GRILLED 2617 Dauphin St. • 476-9464

TIN TOP RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR ($$)

1715 Main St. • 375-0543

SEAFOOD, STEAKS, & EXTENSIVE WINE LIST 6232 Bon Secour Hwy County Rd. 10. • 949-5086

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$)

MANCIS ($)

MCSHARRY’S IRISH PUB ($)

BRILLIANT REUBENS & FISH-N-CHIPS. 101 N. Brancroft St. Fairhope • 990-5100

FRESH SEAFOOD FOR OVER 75 YEARS 605 Dauphin St. • 432-4605 6700 Airport Blvd. • 341-1111 1208 Shelton Beach Rd. • Saraland • 442-3335 805 S. Mobile St. • 929-2322

MUG SHOTS ($$)

IS THE GAME ON?

BURGERS, DOGS & 27 BEERS & WINES. 19992 Hwy.181 Old County Rd. Fairhope • 281-2663

ASHLAND MIDTOWN PUB ($-$$) PIZZAS, PASTAS, & CALZONES 245-A Old Shell Rd. • 479-3278

BAUMHOWER’S ($)

WINGS, BURGERS & PUB GRUB 6880 US-90 #14 • Daphne • 625-4695

BISHOP’S ($)

A SOUTHERN GRILL & BAR 3673 Airport Blvd. • 344-2131

BUFFALO WILD WINGS ($)

BAR & GRILL 29740 Urgent Care Dr. • Daphne • 662-9639 6255 Airport Blvd. • 447-2514

OLD 27 GRILL ($)

LUCKY’S IRISH PUB ($) IRISH PUB FARE & MORE 3692 Airport Blvd • 414-3000

WEMOS ($)

HOUSE OF PIZZA ($)

WINGS, PO-BOYS, BURGERS 210 Eastern Shore Center, Hwy. 98 • 929-0002

MARIA BONITA AGAVE BAR & GRILL ($-$$)

3958 Snow Rd C. • Semmes • 645-3400

LA ROSSO ($$)

COMFORT FOOD 1716 Main St. Ste. C • Daphne • 281-2982

MACARONI GRILL ($$)

SMALL PLATES, PIZZAS, PASTAS & WINE 3250 Airport Blvd. • 450-4556

MARCOS ($)

DELIVERY 350 Dauphin St. • 431-9444

GAMBINO’S ITALIAN GRILL ($)

GREAT PIZZA. LUNCH & DINNER 4356 Old Shell Rd. • 342-0024

ITALIAN, STEAKS & SEAFOOD 18 Laurel Ave. • Fairhope • 990-0995

GRIMALDI’S ($)

Bel Air Mall • 476-2063

ITALIAN FOOD & PIZZAS 11311 US HIghway 31 Spanish Fort• 375-0076

VIA EMILIA ($$)

PASTA & MORE 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-6611

NAVCO PIZZA ($$)

PIZZA, SUBS & PASTA 1368 ½ Navco Rd.• 479-0066

PAPA’S PLACE ($$)

PINZONE’S ITALIAN VILLAGE ($$) RAVENITE ($)

PIZZA, PASTA, SALAD & MORE 102 N. Section St. •Fairhope• 929-2525

PIZZERIA DELFINA ($) PIZZA & PASTA 107 Dauphin St. • 375-1644

ROMA CAFE ($-$$)

PASTA, SALAD AND SANDWICHES 7143 Airport Blvd. • 341-7217

ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL ($$)

HEARTY MEXICAN FARE 736 holcombe Ave.• 473-0413

OLÉ MI AMIGO!

ROOSTER’S ($)

CAFÉ DEL RIO ($-$$)

MIRKO ($$)

OLÉ MI AMIGO ($-$$) POOR MEXICAN ($)

MELLOW MUSHROOM ($)

PIES & AWESOME BEER SELECTION 2032 Airport Blvd. • 471-4700 5660 Old Shell Rd. • 380-1500 29698 Frederick Blvd.• Daphne • 621-3911

MEXICAN CUISINE 3977 Gov’t Blvd. • 660-4970

HOMEMADE PASTAS & PIZZAS MADE DAILY 5901 Old Shell Rd. • 342-3677

AZTECAS ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC ITALIAN DISHES 312 Fairhope Ave. • Fairhope • 990-5535

BUCK’S PIZZA ($$)

TRATTORIA PIZZA & ITALIAN ($$)

5055 Cottage Hill Rd. • 308-4888 2394 Dawes Rr. • 639-3535 2004 US 98 • Daphne • 265-6550

MAMA MIA!

BUTCH CASSIDY’S ($)

BURGERS & BEER

5556 Old Shell Rd. • 345-7484

TAMARA’S BAR & GRILL ($)

A TASTE OF ITALY. BYOB. 28691 U.S. Highway 98 • 626-1999

CORTLANDT’S PIZZA PUB ($-$$)

CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB ($)

3250 Airport Blvd. Springdale Mall• 450-4556

FRESH CUISINE NIGHTLY ON MENU 1709 Main St. • Daphne • 626-6082

WINGS, TENDERS, HOTDOGS & SANDWICHES 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-5877

BEST WINGS & SPORTING EVENTS 6341 Airport Blvd. • 378-5955

FAMOUS BURGERS, SANDWICHES & WINGS 60 N. Florida St. • 450-0690

GUIDO’S ($$)

TASTE OF MEXICO 5452 Hwy 90 W • 661-5509 MOUTH WATERING MEXICAN FOOD 1175 Battleship Pkwy • 625-2722

CINCO DE MAYO ($) MEXICAN CUISINE 260 Azalea Rd. • 375-1095

DAUPHIN ST. TAQUERIA ($)

ENCHILADAS, TACOS, & AUTHENTIC FARE Ok Bicycle Shop • 661 Dauphin St. • 432-2453

EL MARIACHI ($)

763 Holcombe Ave • 473-0413

FUEGO ($-$$)

OUTSTANDING MEXICAN CUISINE 2066 Old Shell Rd. • 378-8621

HACIENDA SAN MIGUEL ($-$$) TASTE OF MEXICO 880 Schillinger Rd. S. • 633-6122 5805 US 90 • 653-9163

LA COCINA ($)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE 800 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-0783 830 W I65 Service Rd. S • 378-5837 4663 Airport Blvd. • 342-5553

LOS ARCOS ($)

QUAINT MEXICAN RESTAURANT

3050 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-7433 LATIN AMERICAN FOOD 211 Dauphin St. • 375-1076

TAQUERIA MEXICO ($-$$) AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FLAVOR 3733 Airport Blvd. • 414-4496

NO GAMBLING CASINO FARE

MAGNOLIA HOUSE ($$-$$$) FINE DINING, SEAFOOD AND STEAKS

FLAVORS BUFFET ($-$$) ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET

IP CASINO:

850 Bayview Ave. Bilox • 888-946-2847

THIRTY-TWO ($$$) SEAFOOD, STEAKS, WINE

TIEN ($-$$)

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

HIGH TIDE CAFÉ ($)

CASUAL & RELAXING, EXTENSIVE MENU

ISLAND VIEW:

3300 W. Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 877-774-8439

BEACH BLVD STEAMER ($) SEAFOOD

CARTER GREEN STEAKHOUSE ($$-$$$) RICH TRADITIONS, STEAK, SEAFOOD

BEAU RIVAGE:

C&G GRILLE ($)

BR PRIME ($$-$$$)

PALACE CASINO:

COAST RESTAURANT ($-$$)

MIGNON’S ($$$)

875 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 888-952-2582 FINE DINING ESTABLISHMENT. BURGER, WINGS, PIZZA

LARGE BREAKFAST, LUNCH OR DINNER MENU

158 Howard Ave. Biloxi • 800-725-2239 STEAKS, SEAFOOD, FINE WINE

JIA ($-$$)

PLACE BUFFET ($-$$)

STALLA ($$)

STACKED GRILL ($-$$)

EXOTIC CUISINE AND SUSHI ITALIAN COOKING

TERRACE CAFE ($)

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, LATE NIGHT

HARD ROCK CASINO:

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

BURGERS AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

TREASURE BAY:

1980 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 800-747-2839

777 Beach Blvd.Biloxi • 877-877-6256

THE DEN ($-$$)

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$)

CQ ($$-$$$)

HARD ROCK CAFÉ ($)

BLU ($)

SEAFOOD

AMERICAN FARE & ROCKIN’ MEMORABILIA

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

INTIMATE & CASUAL WITH DAILY SPECIALS ELEGANT ATMOSPHERE & TANTALIZING ENTREES LOUNGE WITH COCKTAILS & TAPAS MENU

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE

WIND CREEK CASINO:

SOUTHERN FAVORITES BUFFET

FIRE ($$-$$$)

SATISFACTION ($-$$)

HARRAH’S GULF COAST:

280 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 288-436-2946

303 Poarch Rd. Atmore • 866-946-3360 PRIME STEAKS, SEAFOOD & WINE

GRILL ($)

CONTEMPORARY & OLD-FASHIONED FAVORITES

SEND LISTINGS TO LISTINGS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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CUISINE | WORD OF MOUTH

Alabama Chef Challenge coming to Fort Whiting BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

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Photo | feedingthegulfcoast.org | Alabama Chef Challenge

eeding the Gulf Coast’s 19th annual Alabama Chef Challenge is set to dazzle taste buds Thursday, Aug. 31, 6-9 p.m. at Fort Whiting, 1630 S. Broad St. This is the annual fundraiser to increase awareness for those struggling with hunger along the central Gulf Coast. Every year this event marks the beginning of September as Hunger Action Month, with Feeding the Gulf Coast leading the charge. Guests will enjoy tastings from local chefs and restaurants, ultimately voting on their favorite dishes. The overall winner will qualify for a spot in the World Food Championships in Orange Beach, so vote responsibly! Also enjoy live music by Roman Street, a silent auction and complimentary beer and wine. Guests must be 21 or over. All proceeds will be used to help those in need within Feeding the Gulf Coast’s nine-county service area. To purchase tickets, contact Kim Getto at 251-653-1617, ext. 130.

Balance closes, FOY endures

Since Balance closed its Airport Boulevard location a couple of months ago (social media says “temporarily”), we’ve been waiting patiently for another paleo-style restaurant in midtown. For the time being we will have to rely on its sister restaurant, FOY (Fountain of Youth) Superfoods at 119 Dauphin St. on Bienville Square. These guys are still cranking out the healthy stuff, from 7:30 a.m. until 5 p.m. Monday through Friday and 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. Be sure and ask for the Grack!

which is crashing a Waffle House so Graham can eat his waffle like a pizza, saving the edge for the trash bin because he “doesn’t like the crust.” Where does he come up with this stuff? National Potato Day was last week. I missed it. I guess the only thing to do is to go with the scattered, smothered, covered, chunked, topped and diced. You know, because I’m old school.

Five Guys shuts Spring Hill location

New restaurants for Beer Fest

In other sad news, Five Guys has not survived the Hill. Five Guys burgers and fries closed its Old Shell Road/McGregor location just in time for school to start. Other locations, such as McGowin Park, can provide your fix should the craving get to you, but let’s hope rumors of other closings are not true.

National Waffle Day Aug. 24

I’m not giving you much notice, but Thursday, Aug. 24, is National Waffle Day. The boys and I plan on celebrating the way we usually do,

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Get your Uber and Lyft apps handy and get ready to get wild at the Dauphin Island Beer Festival on Saturday, Aug. 26. I always like to remind those drinking locally to be sure and eat locally. You won’t enjoy it if you don’t eat, trust me. From Royal Scam to Dauphin Street Taqueria, you’ll have ample opportunity. This year we have new offerings such as Rooster’s Tacos, Eugene’s Monkey Bar, Hole in the Wall, Kazoola and The Haberdasher. Tastiest Beer Fest ever! Recycle!


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COVER STORY

Stimpson re-elected in a landslide, City Council follows BY LAGNIAPPE STAFF

T

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Photo | Daniel Anderson

he rematch between Mayor Sandy Stimpson “The council made a real effort to work together in a and the man he defeated four years ago turned harmonious way,” Daves said. “We were able to move out not to be much of a contest after all, as the the city forward.” incumbent cruised to a landslide victory and The council’s longest-serving member — with 20 another four years at the Port City’s helm. years in office — overcame three opponents to win Stimpson turned out the votes to score a dramatic decisively, and Tuesday night expressed the enthusiasm win over former Mayor Sam Jones, who ran something that has made him a voter favorite. of a shadow campaign that was short on money and “I don’t care who you are, if you live in District 1, if featured few public appearances. Jones also garnered you ring, I will spring,” Fred Richardson said. “I dare criticism for running what many complained was a you to call me, because I will be there for you.” campaign based on “identity politics,” with his base of Going into the race and even throughout the day, supporters arguing race should be the central reason to Stimpson’s inner circle expressed nervousness about the put the former mayor back in office. election, but in the end those fears proved unfounded Unofficial totals Tuesday night as voters turned out in force to showed Stimpson gathered nearly keep his agenda alive. Stimpson 28,000 votes with 97 percent of has repeatedly run on a platform of the precincts reporting, to Jones’ making Mobile the safest and most roughly 20,000, giving the mayor business- and family-friendly city 58 percent of the overall total and a in America by 2020. WE WANT TO TELL ALL MO17-point win. The victory bettered Hallmarks of his first term in Stimpson’s showing four years ago office have included building a BILIANS, EVEN THOSE WHO when he won by seven points. $20 million surplus fund, launchAs Stimpson went, so, too, did ing capital improvement projects DID NOT VOTE FOR ME, I the City Council that has been to tackle infrastructure that had CAN PROMISE YOU THAT in place over the past four years. been neglected for years, business All seven members of the council recruitment and bringing the CarniWE’RE GOING TO WORK will be returned to office. Five had val Fantasy back to the city’s cruise opponents but none was seriously ship terminal. In the end Stimpson JUST AS HARD FOR YOU AS challenged, with every incumbent came close to matching his 2013 THE PEOPLE IN THIS ROOM. total of almost 31,000 votes, but taking more than 65 percent of the vote. District 2 Councilman Levon Jones fell far short of the 26,699 he Manzie and District 7 Councilgot four years ago. Voting overall woman Gina Gregory were unopwas close to 10,000 short of its posed. final total four years ago, although 3 percent of the total Stimpson and the council had some rough patches was still out at press time. in the first two years of his administration, but the rela“How humbling and exciting is this?” Stimpson tionship seems to have improved. Both branches of city asked the crowd at his victory party at The Steeple in government received a strong stamp of approval from the downtown entertainment district. Mobile’s voters Tuesday night. He then thanked his family and brought them onDistrict 5 Councilman Joel Daves said he believed stage, adding, “I’m blessed to be mayor, but I’m more the success he and his colleagues had in winning reblessed to have them as family.” election had a lot to do with being able to work together Stimpson went on to thank his city department over the past four years. He said it paid dividends for heads, also pulling them onstage to share credit for the the council to be able to come to consensus on many win. issues throughout the term. “If it was not for the job they do we would have not

Mayor Sandy Stimpson thanked his family and staff after sailing to victory over former Mayor Sam Jones.

have won this election,” he said. “These guys work hard for you every day.” Stimpson also addressed some of the racial division that had been part of the contest, saying he would continue working on his theme of “One Mobile.” “We want to tell all Mobilians, even those who did not vote for me, I can promise you that we’re going to work just as hard for you as the people in this room. We’re going to earn your vote and work to earn your trust because we can and we will unite this city, and the opportunities that are before us, none of us can even imagine,” Stimpson said. “There are so many tonight that are not as excited as we are, but let me say this there is hope for every single Mobilian, no matter where you come from or what you look like — and the best is yet to come.”

Election day

The day started with good weather and a lot of activity at polling places across the city. A steady stream of voters moved toward the doors of the Michael Figures Community Center in Toulminville Tuesday afternoon, as large speakers blasted music from across the street. Mobilians in various


COVER STORY campaign T-shirts danced on the sidewalk while handing out fliers for the candidate of their choice. James Jackson, a volunteer for the Timothy Hollis campaign for District 1, said turnout had been steady all day, as of about 5 p.m. He was encouraged to see it, since Toulminville has one of the largest blocs of registered voters in the city. “Toulminville has the largest number of registered voters in Mobile,” he said, before making a reference to national presidential elections. “It’s like the Ohio and Florida of Mobile. If you win Toulminville, you’ll win the election.” He said he was disappointed, though, that there hadn’t been many young voters, since Hollis himself is only 29 years old. Toulminville wasn’t the only polling location that had a presidential election feel. A person working the polls at Westminster Presbyterian Church said turnout had been similar to the last presidential race, between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump. Lagniappe wasn’t allowed inside the polling location at Westminster to ask about turnout. Campaign workers for Mayor Sandy Stimpson, Councilman Joel Daves and District 5 challenger Ariana McArthur all said turnout had been steady all day.   A worker at Via! on Dauphin Street went one election further and compared the turnout to the Barack Obama and Mitt Romney contest of 2012. The machines at Via! had registered just over 1,400 votes by 5 p.m. The worker, who did not supply his name, said the polling location was on track to

Mayor Sandy Stimpson — 27,912 Sam Jones — 19,803 Anthony Thompson — 167 Donavette Ely — 113 District 1 Fred Richardson — 4,632 Cory Penn — 1,737 Timothy Hollis — 439 Perry Berens — 171 District 3 C.J. Small — 4,238

equal or surpass the total number of voters in the 2013 mayoral race. A Sam Jones campaigner standing outside St. John’s Episcopal Church said turnout had been “steady in and out all day.”

Financials

When it came to money, the race was never close. Stimpson held a decisive advantage Jones was never able to challenge. In June, when Jones officially announced his candidacy after months of rumors, Stimpson held a reported $292,403 in his campaign account. With Jones’ announcement, Stimpson nearly doubled his war chest that month, earning $242,393 in itemized cash contributions. Between July and the final report, filed Aug. 21, the incumbent collected an additional $347,792. Meanwhile, between June 1 and Aug. 18, Stimpson spent a total of $766,237.94 on advertising, polling and consulting, fundraising and administrative expenses. Jones, on the other hand, entered the race with just $715.61 in the bank. He subsequently raised $69,680 as of Aug. 18, but the relative lack of funding, coupled with the fact Jones didn’t enter the race until nearly July, left the challenger with few options. His campaign relied heavily on social media and attempts to register young voters. But even in cyberspace, where he clearly had hoped to spark his voters, Jones couldn’t get much momentum. The two Facebook pages dedicated to his campaign drew fewer than 5,000 likes, while Stimpson’s two Facebook pages had more than 39,000.

Leola Chaney — 986 District 4 John Williams — 5,138 Robert Martin — 2,151 District 5 Joel Daves — 3,979 Arianna McArthur — 973 District 6 Bess Rich — 6,196 Deryl Pendleton — 1,407

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ART ARTIFICE

MAC board weathers rash of departures BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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spate of midsummer resignations from the Mobile Arts Council board of directors cut meeting attendance by roughly a third and has set tongues wagging throughout the close-knit arts community. The timbre of the scuttlebutt varies. “I think a lot of people have put a lot of hard work into it and I really wish that things were not the way it is right now,” former board member Lakeshia Dotson said. “Well, the issue that brought it about was insignificant. The fact that somebody calls you a liar is a different story,” said Mary Cousar, emeritus board member. MAC Board President Jeff Marcus said he feels they have removed “obstacles” and finds the response encouraging. “It’s amazing. Now that the word’s out the Arts Council is no longer as stodgy, people are literally emailing the board members asking if they can help, if there are positions on the board for them, et cetera,” Marcus said. The round of departures began after the board’s regular July 10 meeting. Marcus claimed that while he was out of town a faction consisting of Cousar, Immediate Past President Bunky Ralph and Board Vice President Marianne Terry ran an acrimonious board meeting in his stead. Marcus said he received 18 text messages and two voicemails from other board members as it occurred. “I don’t want to disparage anyone, but all the arguing and discord was a no-win for anybody. The fingerpointing and calling names shouldn’t happen in a board meeting,” Marcus said. Upon his return, Marcus called a special meeting of the

Triumphant recital by USA alum

executive committee that convened two days later. When Cousar, Ralph and Terry denied the characterizations of their actions, Marcus openly doubted their veracity. Cousar was first to tender resignation, via email. “As an emeritus, it’s kind of hard to resign. I just said I was no longer going to participate in anything with the board and to please remove my name from the letterhead,” Cousar said. Cousar said she has been a part of the MAC board since 2005. As executive director of the Sybil H. Smith Charitable Trust, she has “way too many things in my life that I need to do and want to do and if somebody doesn’t appreciate my contribution, I can go find somebody else to help.” Ralph and Terry quickly resigned as well. Within days, board member Justine Herlihy — she said she was in the first year of a three-year term — followed suit. In the following weeks, Dotson and board member Leslie Holberg stepped down. Marcus said the last two cited time commitments as impediments. Dotson told Artifice that wasn’t the case with her, though she declined to provide an official reason. Devin Ford replaced Marianne Terry as vice president. Chappell Brady is still secretary and Debbie Stevens is treasurer. Marcus said the remaining board members are Russ Adams, Ben Jernigan, John Mims, Luke Peavy, Richard Shields, Maggie Smith, Sally Trufant and Melody Ziedan. He also said the board voted to accept two new members but those additions have yet to be notified.

A SPATE OF MIDSUMMER RESIGNATIONS FROM THE MOBILE ARTS COUNCIL BOARD OF DIRECTORS CUT MEETING ATTENDANCE BY ROUGHLY A THIRD AND HAS SET TONGUES WAGGING THROUGHOUT THE CLOSE-KNIT ARTS COMMUNITY. THE TIMBRE OF THE SCUTTLEBUTT VARIES.” He pointed to a recent allocation of grant money through four community recipients as indicative of their future course. Even so, regrets remain. “I know Mary Cousar and Bunky [Ralph] have put their all into the organization. They’ve worked extremely hard for the organization, so it’s just an unfortunate situation,” Dotson said. “My driving force was to help an organization that continues to be very important to our community. They will weather this. I don’t think it’s devastating,” Ralph said. Marcus agreed on both MAC’s essential role and its endurance. “We’re not going to miss a lick because I’m not going to let us miss a lick,” Marcus said.

he’ll perform works of Brahms, Ibert, Ives and Mozart, among others. Tickets for this special event will be sold at the door only; no reserve tickets or advance seating available. Admission is $15, $10 for USA faculty and staff, USA students, youth under 18 and senior citizens. Cash or check only. For more information, call 251-460-7116, 251-460-6136 or go to southalabama.edu/music.

Musical orphans storm JJP stage

The Joe Jefferson Players thought their 70th season deserved a spectacular start. So they turned to a Broadway warhorse that enjoyed an initial six-year run and set a record for the Neil Simon Theatre. On Aug. 25, “Annie” opens at JJP (11 S. Carlen St.), boasting a cast of 50 and a production filled with the memorable tunes — “Tomorrow” and “It’s A Hard Knock Life” — that pulled in Tony Awards for Best Musical, Best Book and Best

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Original Score. Inspired by Harold Gray’s popular early 20th century cartoon, the plot centers the auburn-haired 11-year-old titular character and her rascally orphanage pals as they search for love and comfort in a Depression-wracked world. When little Annie and her scruffy dog, Sandy, stumble across benevolent billionaire Oliver Warbucks, schemes and crossplots sprout to sink hooks into the philanthropist’s wealth and heart. JJP will feature their popular Blue Carpet Opening Night soiree, starting at 6:30 p.m. A “meet and greet” with cast follows the performance. The play runs Aug. 25 through Sept. 10. Friday and Saturday curtain is at 7:30 p.m., Sunday matinees are at 2 p.m. Tickets cost $20, $15 for military/seniors and $10 for students. For more information, visit the Joe Jefferson Playhouse Facebook page, call 251-471-1534, email info@joejeffersonplayers.com or go to joejeffersonplayers.com.

ARTSGALLERY

Heard of Mobile native Nick Brownlee? You will before long if the description of Mobile Opera’s Scott Wright is accurate. “Nick went to Theodore High School and did all the usual guy things like football, went to South and in college found out he could sing. He sang with the chorus of Mobile Opera and was hooked,” Wright wrote. The 2012 University of South Alabama grad has won numerous prizes, including the 2015 Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions. He made debuts with Atlanta Opera, Santa Fe Opera, Los Angeles Opera, the Metropolitan Opera — and made his European debut at the Teatro de Sao Carlos as Escamillo in Bizet’s “Carmen.” “The kid is on a rocket ride and it couldn’t happen to a nicer guy,” Wright finished. Now is your chance to see the Azalea City’s most meteoric young export. Brownlee will have a recital at USA’s Laidlaw Performing Arts Center on Friday, Aug. 25, 7:30 p.m., where

MAC continues its search for an executive director, a position unfilled since Bob Burnett left in January 2015 after more than a dozen years at the helm. A nine-year MAC veteran in various capacities, Ralph recently volunteered to serve as interim director for five months. She stepped down in early July after 90 days in that role. Marcus said fundraising will be a chief task of a new executive director. Ralph pointed to Cousar and Terry as instrumental sponsor and fund raisers in recent years. Marcus feels MAC can cope with their loss. A generational rift was cited by exiting board members. “Members of the board view it as generational but I think the Arts Council needed to be, I’ll use the word ‘cooler.’ Our brand needs to be on everything artistic in the community. We should have our name on TenSixtyFive, on everything,” Marcus said.


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BAND: “RHYTHM FOR THE RIVERS” FUNDRAISER DATE: SATURDAY, AUG. 26, NOON VENUE: GRAND MAGNOLIA BALLROOM, 3604 MAGNOLIA ST. (PASCAGOULA), WWW.GRANDMAGNOLIA.COM TICKETS: $25, AVAILABLE THROUGH WWW.NATURE.ORG

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or those wanting to avoid the masses at Mobile’s downtown beer fest, the Nature Conservancy will be holding its “Rhythm for the Rivers” event just up the road in Pascagoula. Proceeds of this event will go to “support conservation of Mississippi’s critical natural waterways.” This philanthropic organization has gathered sounds from along the Gulf Coast, including Molly Thomas & the Rare Birds, Cary Hudson, Matt Hoggatt and Lynn Drury. The Iguanas from New Orleans will headline the event. Since the early ‘90s, these New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival regulars have released some of the most exotic sounds to come out of the Big Easy. The group mingles Mexican cumbia and Colombian sounds with rock ’n’ roll. Bassist René Coman provided Lagniappe with the secrets to both the band’s longevity and its unique style. Stephen Centanni: The Iguanas have been doing their thing for 20 years now. How does it feel to see this thing last as long as it has? René Coman: It feels great! When you have the kind of background that we have together, there’s a level of telepathy that you can’t get in anything else

Photo | Facebook

in life. Even if you run into adversity, it’s even more apparent because you can see the organism of the four guys move around whatever the obstacle it. It’s intriguing as an audience member, and it’s intriguing as a participant. It feels really good. One of the most fun things that you can do in life is to have a group of people who you know so intimately and have such confidence in to be able to operate with. Centanni: I always love coming across New Orleans bands that don’t fit the musical stereotype for the city. There seems to be a lot coming out of there right now, and it was kind of that way when you guys were gaining popularity. What was it like bringing your sound to the New Orleans scene back in the early ‘90s? Coman: Yes, for sure, we were playing Mexican and Colombian music and using the kind of very regular band approach. A lot bands in New Orleans don’t have a name or maybe even a leader. It’s all different guys all the time. Right from the jump, the idea of The Iguanas was that we would be a solid unit. If somebody couldn’t make the job, then we wouldn’t take the job. We had an approach that was outside the box in New Orleans. That was at a time that you had a few established bands that had been playing for a while, like The Radiators.

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MUSIC

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

FEATURE

The Iguanas headline ‘Rhythm for the Rivers’

There weren’t as many clubs. Frenchman Street was in its pre-infancy. It was definitely a fun time to see the band catch on and grow like it did and have people recognize us. It was a fantastic thing. Centanni: You were the first band to be signed to Jimmy Buffett’s Margaritaville label. How did you and Jimmy cross paths? Coman: Jimmy was good friends with Clint Davis, who is the originator of the Jazz Festival. They’ve known each other since the very early days of Jimmy playing around town. He called up Clint and said, “Hey, I’m starting this label. Is there anybody that I should check out down there?” [Clint] mentioned us. He told him, “Go see The Iguanas. They play every Sunday night at the Maple Leaf.” We’re playing our regular Sunday night gig, and Jimmy comes in and talks to us on the break. He wanted to have lunch the next day. He laid it all out at once. He said he was interested in possibly signing us, and he offered us an opening spot on a winter tour that he was doing. So, we did that and did some recording with him down in Key West. He knew we were cool on stage, but he wanted to see us in the studio. That all went good, and it just went from there. We opened for him on a few summer tours and put out three records on his label. It was well-timed. The music business is interesting. You go through different phases of it. Different people are operating it, and different trends are going on. The real goal is longevity. It’s like you’re going through the jungle, and at the end of the pendulous swing of one vine, you have to reach out and find another vine. That was a fun one. It was fun to do all those dates. We had that full ‘90s boom of CDs coming out and a lot of money in the record biz. It was an opportunity to get swept up into that part of the business, which is good, because that part of the business kinda doesn’t exist anymore. It was nice to have done it while it was there. Centanni: It’s definitely a different game now. With that said, what’s it like for The Iguanas these days? Coman: Well, let’s see. There were a lot more people involved, and I would say a higher degree of stress in that there’s a lot more things proposed and decisions that had to be made. There were more people on the road like managers negotiating your way through. If you wanted take out a bus, you had to work out how you’re gonna make it work. Personally, I’d say it was more amped up or nuts. So, it definitely feels like a calmer time now, which I’m perfectly fine with. Centanni: Your last release was 2014’s “Juarez.” Your band has always been consistent with the Latin influences, but there seems to be more of a garage rock edge to this one. How did that element creep into your sound? Coman: I think it was just a function of who we did it with and where we did it and how it was done. Those first records on Margaritaville were very meticulously pored over and done in a way that, really, the recording budgets don’t allow nowadays. Those were cool to make, and those records sound great. Again, it’s that thing of moving through different phases of the business and your career and what you’ve done before. You find yourself in circumstances that kind of allow for one aspect to flower. So, you can fight that and say, “Well, I wanna do something that I did before.” Even though the circumstances are totally different, you can just go, “Okay, this is cool, and we’ll do something cool in this context.” Hopefully it resonates with people. I’m happy with the record, and other people have said that. Yeah, I think it’s the level of cohesion and confidence that a band gets if they don’t fall apart. Discussions don’t have to happen. It all happens on the instinctual level. Centanni: The Iguanas have always stayed busy with albums, and it’s about time for a new one. Are you guys working on anything? Coman: Yeah! We haven’t gone back into the studio. We’re still trying to keep our eyes out for the next situation and place to record, and circumstances to record under, and writing and adding stuff to our repertoire. That way, when the opportunity arises, our powder is dry and ready to fire.


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MUSIC BRIEFS

Summertime

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

Band: Mario Mena Band Date: Saturday, Aug. 26, 9 p.m. Venue: The Brickyard, 266 Dauphin St., 251-219-6488 Tickets: Call for more info. For the past two decades, the Dauphin Street Beer Festival has urged locals to “think globally” and “drink locally.” The festival’s 20th anniversary this weekend is sure to fill LoDa with thousands of thirsty individuals wanting to explore new brews and sample their favorites. For some beer hounds, this year’s festival will be an early night. For others, this festival dedicated to all things malty and hoppy will serve as the launching point for an evening of revelry. The Mario Mena Band will be onstage at The Brickyard for those who want to jam into the wee hours. Mena has spent many years entertaining listeners with his version of crowd favorites. Now this local guitarist is giving his audiences a taste of his original sounds with tracks from his debut EP “Summertime.” This collection represents a musical style that skirts across the genre spectrum with great skill — and great results. Each song is an experimental sonic cocktail of Southern rock, pop country and grooving soul. Living up to the album’s title, each song resonates a bright warmth that is accented by great arrangements, lyrical dexterity and Mena’s six-string talent. Mena’s original songs should be great way to finish Beer Fest 2017.

Chattanooga blend

Band: Strung Like a Horse Date: Friday, Aug. 25, with doors at 9 p.m. Venue: The Merry Widow, 51 S. Conception St., www.themerrywidow.net Tickets: $10 available at venue and its website

Tennessee has given birth to some of America’s greatest music. Country, rock, blues and Americana have emanated from cities such as Nashville and Memphis. Strung Like a Horse is showing the world Chattanooga shouldn’t be overlooked as an important facet of Tennessee’s music scene. This group has used its eclectic folk-rock sounds to establish a nationwide fanbase. While its recordings embody the group’s acoustic electric energy, Strung Like a Horse’s raucous live show takes the band’s sound into another dimension. The tracks of its latest album, “Free,” defy genre. Freight-train rhythms and a tinge of bluegrass highlight the album’s title track before the vocals drop. Just this small addition into the aural mix shifts the song’s persona into the world of gypsy jazz. The rest of the album follows this template. Other tracks exhibit classic country overtones met with volleys of folk punk goodness. This group’s adrenalized sound and performance should have locals anticipating the return of Strung Like a Horse.

Mix-up, mash-up

Band: Rock Fight! Date: Friday, Aug. 25, 8 p.m. Venue: The Blind Mule, 57 N. Claiborne St., www.theblindmule.net Tickets: $3 at the door ($5 under 21)

Rock Fight! is returning to The Blind Mule for another evening of mixed-up and mashed-up local talent. This event is a chance for local musicians to network not only socially but musically. Days before Rock Fight!, a cavalcade of local musicians submitted their names. Then, names were drawn at random and matched with other musicians. The end result is a lineup of bands built upon both spontaneity and chance. These impromptu bands then set about composing fresh music to perform before a panel of judges. Based on last year’s Rock Fight!, the audience never knows what they will hear. The drummer from a metal band may spend his or her set performing funk and soul. A pop vocalist may have to showcase their talents in a hip-hop context. Each band’s combined efforts may result in music that is wonderfully brilliant or terribly awful. The winning band will receive a Rock Fight! trophy and a cash prize.

Diamond Reo 75 at The Steeple On Thursday, Oct. 12, The Steeple will host a benefit for N.E.S.T. of Mobile, an organization providing support for local at-risk families and children. While the charitable aspect is at the forefront, N.E.S.T. is making the evening more memorable with a performance by Diamond REO 75, featuring local keyboardist William Oppenheimer. The roots of this band can be traced to Yale University in 1974. As with many college bands, each member’s destiny took them on respective life paths in different parts of the country. Three years ago, the creative bond between Diamond Reo 75’s members was rekindled at a rehearsal in La Honda, California. Not long after, the band released its EP “Back on the Truck.” This four-song collection uses a nod to classic West Coast rock to provide a nostalgic flashback to the glory days of the jam scene. Diamond Reo 75’s performance at The Steeple will mark the seventh time the band has played together since it reunited. The crowd can expect cuts from “Back on the Truck” as well as Grateful Dead and The Band covers. Tickets cost $50 and will be available from Sept. 8 through Ticketfly.

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AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | August 24 - August 30

THUR. AUG 24

Bluegill— Lee Yankie Cockeyed Charlie’s— JJ Felix’s— Bust Flora Bama— Donnie Mathis, 2p// Zachary Diedrich, 5p/// Dueling Pianos, 5:30p//// Mark Sherrill, James Daniel, Chris Newbury, 6p//// Yeah, Probably, 10p//// Sam Glass Trio, 10:15p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Delta Downpour, 8p Listening Room— Eric Erdman Lulu’s— Lefty Collins, 5p SanBar— Gino Rosaria and Carlos Vizoso Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Jason Justice, 6p Veets— David Chatel, 8p Wind Creek Casino— Trigger Proof, 8p

— The Dunaway Brothers SanBar— Malcolm Bond Soul Kitchen— Bass Redemption ft. Taboo, Nola, DJ Krave, Panda Panax, 10p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Damien Lamb, 6p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Pierce Parker, 6p Veets— The Family Jewels, 9p Wind Creek Casino— Trigger Proof, 9p

SAT. AUG 26

Bluegill— Brandon Bailey, 12p// Lucky Doggs, 6p Callaghan’s— Cotton Bird Cockeyed Charlie’s— DJ Chill, 10p Dority’s Bar and Grill— The Foxy Iguanas, 6p Felix’s— Delta Reign Flora Bama— Jay Williams Band, 10a// J. FRI. AUG 25 Hawkins Trio, 1p/// Sam Alchemy— The Bodhi Glass Duo, 1p//// Lea Anne Trio/ Sergio & the Satin Creswell Trio, 2p//// Destiny Dogs, 10p Brown, 4p//// Brittany Bell All Sports Bar & Duo, 5p//// Red Clay Strays, Billiards— DJ Markie 5:30p//// Hung jury, 6p//// Mark, 10p Sugarcane Jane, 6p//// Chris Bluegill— Jamie Anderson, Bryant Duo, 9p//// Oliver’s 12p// Bust, 6p Twist, 10p//// Brandon White Callaghan’s— Blackwater Duo, 10:15p//// Brian Hill Brass Band, 10:30p Cockeyed Charlie’s— Garage— Chief Slac, 9p Ben and Friends, 10p Grand Magnolia Dority’s Bar and Ballroom— he Iguanas, Grill— Rock Bottom, 6p Cary Hudson, Lynn Drury, Felix’s— Blind Dog Mike Matt Hoggatt, Molly Thomas Flora Bama— J. Hawkins and the Rare Birds, 12- 8p Duo, 1p// LeaAnne Creswell Hangout— Ja’Rhythm, 7p// Duo, 2p/// Greg Lyons, G-Rivers, 11p 4p//// Jack Robertson Show, Listening Room— 5:30p//// Big Muddy, 6p//// Anne E Dechant with Frye Dave McCormick, 6p//// Gaillard Mason Henderson, 6p//// Lulu’s— Alvarado Road Tony Brook Duo, 6p//// Lee Show, 5p Yankie and the Hellz Yeah, Pirates Cove— Big 10p//// The Magic Johnsons, Muddy, 5p 10:15p//// Mario Mena Band, SanBar— Christina 10:30p Christian Hangout— Yeah, Porbably, Soul Kitchen— 7p// Ellux Furor, 11p Wrongway: A Sublime Hard Rock (Center Tribute, 10:30p Bar) — Joel Cooper Rock Tacky Jacks (Gulf Show, 9:30p Shores)— Lefty Collins, 6p Listening Room— The Tacky Jacks (Orange Echo Beach) — Soul Food Junkies, Lulu’s— Jeri, 5p 12p// Damien Lamb, 6p Main Street Cigar Veets— The Family Jewels, Lounge— The Memorys, 8p 9p The Merry Widow— Wind Creek Casino— Strung Like a Horse, 9p Trigger Proof, 9p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — The Spotswood Brothers, 8p SUN. AUG 27 Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Alchemy— Phil and Lefty Collins, 6p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Foster, 3p Bluegill— Lee Yankie, Glass Joe, 6:30p 12p// Modern Eldorados, 6p Moe’s BBQ (Semmes) 30 | L AG N I A P P E | A u g u s t 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 - A u g u s t 3 0 , 2 0 1 7

Callaghan’s— Lee Yankie Cortland’s Pizza Pub— Sergio Rangel Dority’s Bar and Grill— Ben Leninger and Friends, 6p Felix’s— Brandon Bailey Flora Bama— Foxy Iguanas, 12p// Songs of Rusty, 1:30p/// Big Muddy, 2p//// Brittany Grimes, 2p//// Dave McCormick, 5p//// Tony Brook Band, 5:30p//// Perdido Brothers, 6p//// Jo Jo Pres, 10p//// Alabama Lightning, 10:15p Listening Room— Songwriter Festival ft. Abe Partridge, Shawn Williams, Frankie Boots, Phil Proctor, Laurie Anne Armour, Camm Lewis, Mike Turner, Marcy Chatelain and Drew Nix Lulu’s— Greg Brown, 1p// Cadillac Attack, 5p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Lisa Christian, 2p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Jessie Howell, 11a// Gerry Gambino, 6p Veets— Al and Cathy, 8p

MON. AUG 28

Dority’s Bar and Grill— Lee Yankie, 6p Felix’s— Stephen Sylvester Flora Bama— Gove Scrivenor, 2p// Cathy Pace, 6p/// Logan Spicer, 8p//// Petty and Pace, 10:15p Lulu’s— Brent Burns, 5p

TUE. AUG 29

Alchemy— Black Irish Texas, 8p Bluegill— Shea White Butch Cassidy’s— David Jernigan, Dr. Tom Thomas & Karl Butts Cockeyed Charlie’s— Jordan Bramblett Cortland’s Pizza Pub— Matt Neese Dority’s Bar and Grill— Emily Stuckey, 6p Felix’s— Lefty Collins Flora Bama— T. Bone Montgomery, 2p// Perdido Brothers, 6p/// Tony Ray Thompson, 8p//// Jay Williams Duo, 10:15p Lulu’s— Jimmy Lumpkin, 5p

WED. AUG 30

Bluegill— Matt Neese Callaghan’s— Phil and Foster Felix’s— Matt Bush Flora Bama— Neil Dover, 2p Lulu’s— Sugarcane Jane, 5p Veets— Mark Willis & Friends, 8p


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Eye candy and cameos rescue ‘Song to Song’

S

FILMTHE REEL WORLD

BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

AREA

THEATERS CARMIKE CINEMA’S Wynnsong 16 785 Schillinger Rd. S. (251) 639-7373 CRESCENT THEATER 208 Dauphin Street (251) 438-2005 HOLLYWOOD STADIUM 18 1250 Satchel Paige Dr. (251) 473-9655

ong to Song” finds auteur filmmaker Terrence Malick in his hometown of Austin, Texas, where he explores two unstable romantic relationships through their various iterations. It also finds him squarely in the land of inadvertent self-parody, where style trumps substance and virtually all the dialogue is a dreamy, nonsensical voiceover. I think I could have given him the benefit of the doubt if not for that voiceover. There are many wonderful elements to this film, and it’s not impossible to enjoy, but I have reservations. The cast includes Ryan Gosling and Michael Fassbender, as a songwriter and a producer, respectively, who play good friends working together until professional and, more importantly, romantic entanglements take over. That entanglement is in the person of Rooney Mara, subverting the concept of the Manic Pixie Dream Girl by being totally expressionless. I have admired Mara’s work in films in the past, but I found her pale, drawn face scowling at her smitten admirers while she drones the nonsensical script

in a dispassionate voiceover singularly unappealing. Was I simply jealous because she couldn’t even muster a smile in the face of two of the most appealing male leads you’re likely to encounter on screen? Possibly. I think it can be argued, however, despite my personal prejudices in favor of her castmates, that it isn’t very compelling to explore the artistic impulses of an alleged musician who is never shown singing, writing music or playing an instrument. She attends many outdoor concerts, and one of the best parts of the film is the many real-life musicians who appear, including Iggy Pop and Patti Smith, both of whom contribute short but memorable sequences. Malick’s 2011 film “The Tree of Life” was also an almost unintelligible dreamscape, but that was in service to a story composed of many childhood memories, and was gloriously, beautifully effective. To continue to repeat these impressionistic techniques, however lovely they may be, has resulted in a very long perfume commercial with “Song to Song.” And while sex is a big part of the story, I found Mara’s Faye, the object

of affection and obsession, mostly inert, while the two dueling men have much more interesting chemistry as friends and foes. Again, I think this may because they actually have dialogue with each other, while Faye mostly speaks her thoughts in voiceover. “Song to Song” seems, and I believe I said this when I reviewed Malick’s last movie “Knight of Cups,” embarrassingly similar to a perfume commercial. The films are also embarrassingly similar to each other. In fact, if you haven’t seen “Knight of Cups,” which is a sensual exploration of, well, sensuality, I believe — if I’m recalling accurately — you would probably appreciate “Song to Song” more. The film really is visually beautiful, and if you’re interested in Austin, which is a perfectly appropriate thing in which to be interested, this film isn’t without watchability points. I have mentioned the appeal of the leads to a point that I have most likely embarrassed myself, and Patti Smith is in it, so it’s not all bad. But it’s not all that good, either. “Song to Song” is currently available to rent.

RAVE MOTION PICTURE JUBILEE SQUARE 12 6898 U.S. 90 Daphne, (251) 626- 6266 CARMIKE CINEMAS 23151 Wharf Ln. Orange Beach (251) 981-4444 COBB THEATRES PINNACLE 14 3780 Gulf Shores Pkwy Gulf Shores (251) 968-7444 EASTERN SHORE PREMIERE CINEMA 14 30500 Alabama 181 #500 Spanish Fort, Al (251) 626-0352 Information accurate at press time; please call theaters for showtimes.

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Photos | Broad Green Pictures / iFeatures Ltd.

FROM LEFT: Ryan Gosling and Rooney Mara in “Song to Song,” a story of two intersecting love triangles, obsession and betrayal set against the music scene in Austin, Texas. In “Lady Macbeth,” a young bride who has been sold into marriage discovers an unstoppable desire within herself as she enters into an affair with a worker on her estate.

NEW IN THEATERS LADY MACBETH

In rural England, 1865, a woman who is trapped in a loveless marriage to a much older man begins a passionate affair with a man her age. Crescent Theater

LEAP

Paris, 1884. An orphaned girl arrives in Paris from Brittany. Félicie Milliner is 11 and has no money but one big, passionate dream: to become a dancer. With nothing left to lose, Félicie takes a big risk: she “borrows” a spoiled brat’s identity and enters the Opera Ballet School. All listed multiplex theaters.

ALL SAINTS

A pastor (John Corbett) hosts refugees from Burma in his tiny church. AMC Mobile 16, AMC Jubilee Square 12

NOW PLAYING

THE EMOJI MOVIE All listed multiplex theaters. LOGAN LUCKY VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A All listed multiplex theaters. THOUSAND PLANETS THE HITMAN’S BODYGUARD All listed multiplex theaters. All listed multiplex theaters. DUNKIRK AN INCONVENIENT SEQUEL All listed multiplex theaters. Crescent Theater GIRLS TRIP THE GLASS CASTLE AMC Jubilee Square 12, AMC Mobile 16, All listed multiplex theaters. Cobb Pinnacle 14 WISH UPON ANNABELLE: CREATION All listed multiplex theaters. All listed multiplex theaters. WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE THE NUT JOB 2: NUTTY BY APES NATURE All listed multiplex theaters. All listed multiplex theaters. SPIDER MAN: HOMECOMING DETROIT All listed multiplex theaters. All listed multiplex theaters. DESPICABLE ME 3 KIDNAP All listed multiplex theaters. All listed multiplex theaters. THE DARK TOWER BABY DRIVER All listed multiplex theaters. All listed multiplex theaters. ATOMIC BLONDE CARS 3 All listed multiplex theaters. All listed multiplex theaters. FIDAA WONDER WOMAN Regal Mobile Stadium 18. All listed multiplex theaters.


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CALENDAR OF EVENTS AUGUST 24, 2017 - AUGUST 30, 2017

GENERAL INTEREST

Dauphin Street Beer Festival

Business Expo The Mobile area’s largest businessto-business trade show features more than 200 companies showcasing the latest products and services. Hosted by Mobile Area Chamber of Commerce. Thursday, Aug. 24, noon to 5 p.m., Mobile Convention Center. Visit events. mobilechamber.com Science on tap The Mitchell Cancer Institute’s Dr. Joel Andrews will present “Shooting for a Cure: Lasers as Tools in Cancer Research,” Thursday, Aug. 24, 6 p.m. at Moe’s Original Bar B Que in downtown Mobile. Visit usahealthsystem.com. Grief and loss conference On Thursday, Aug. 24, at 8:30 a.m., join grief specialist Harold Ivan Smith for “A Kaleidoscope of Grief Support” at Cottage Hill Baptist, 4255 Cottage Hill Road. Call 251-740-6866. Cuts for kids During August, Remington College will provide free back-to-school haircuts for students 17 and under at 4368 Downtowner Loop S., Monday through Friday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call 251342-4848 for appointments. Walk-ins welcome. Fairhope farmer’s market The city of Fairhope hosts an outdoor farmer’s market Thursdays, 3-6 p.m., through Nov. 2 behind the Fairhope Public Library downtown on Bancroft Street. Call 251-929-1466. Free family movie night Join Dauphin Island on the West End Beach for a free movie at dusk on Friday. This week’s film is “E.T. the ExtraTerrestrial.”

Miles for Medicine The University of South Alabama Lion’s Club and Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy are hosting a 5K/Fun Run on Aug. 26 at 7:30 a.m. at the USA Intramural Fields. Proceeds will benefit the University Lion’s Club sight programs and Ozanam Charitable Pharmacy. Register at https://bit.ly/Kick2017.

Photo | Facebook

Grab your friends, grab your mug and get ready to taste a bevy of brews! Dauphin Street Beer Festival is back Saturday, Aug. 26, starting at 6 p.m. Call 251-2081550. Tickets are available at beerfest. brownpapertickets.com. TOPS Take Off Pounds Sensibly meets every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. at Spanish Fort Presbyterian Church. Call 251-625-6888. Dauphin Island Boardwalk Talks Boardwalk Talks are held the first and third Wednesday of each month at 11:15 a.m. at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab, 101 Bienville Blvd. Call 251-861-2141. Midtown Optimist Club Join Midtown Optimist Club every Wednesday at noon for lunch at Azalea City Golf Course. Call 251-348-3542. Toastmasters Toastmasters International meets regularly at six locations in Mobile and Baldwin counties. Visit www.toastmasters. org for more information.

Caregiver series Join Spring Hill Presbyterian Church (10 Westminster Way) for an informational session on caregiving Sunday, Aug. 27, at 4 p.m. “Your Final To-Do List” covering wills, living wills, probate and other related topics. Visit www.shpc.us.

FUNDRAISERS

Bookmark contest The Daphne Public Library announces its 2017 “Back-to-School” Bookmark Contest. The contest is open to students in grades K-12 and runs Aug. 28 through Sept. 29. Call 251-621-2818.

Making Strides Hundreds of local breast cancer survivors, caregivers, volunteers and corporate and community members will kick off the 10th annual American Cancer Society’s Making Strides Against Breast

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Cancer season Thursday, Aug. 24, at 5:30 p.m. at The Steeple. Call 251-751-6676.

Downtown Get Down Join Hargrove on Thursday, Aug. 24, at 5:30 p.m. at the corner of Dauphin and Royal for a street party benefiting the American Heart Association.

Doggie Paddle On Saturday, Aug. 26, at 10 a.m., locations along the Gulf Coast will host fun doggie paddles to benefit local animal shelters: n Spanish Fort at 5 Rivers and in Gulf Shores at 4159 County Road 6. Visit wildnativetours.com/specialevents.

ARTS Last Friday Art Night Dauphin Island Art Gallery is where it’s happening on the Island on the last Friday of each month. Last Friday Art Night features local art and history, food, beverages, music and socializing. Dauphin Island Art Gallery is located at 918 Bienville Blvd. Call 251-861-3300. Summer Sunday Soiree Join the Mobile Opera on Sunday, Aug. 27, at 5:30 p.m. for an evening of exquisite dining and exceptional music at Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse, benefiting Mobile Opera. Call 251-432-6772 MOJO Jazz Jambalaya Enjoy an evening of live jazz celebrating the music of Ray Charles on Monday, Aug. 28, at 6:30 p.m. at Ben May Main Library, 701 Government St. Visit mojojazz.org. Meet the author Miriam C. Davis, author of “True Crime in New Orleans,” will be at West Regional Branch, Mobile Public Library, 5555 Grelot Road, on Tuesday, Aug. 29, at 6:30 p.m. Call 251-208-7097.

MUSEUMS “Right on Course” The United States Sports Academy’s American Sport Art Museum & Archives is open free to the public weekdays from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. One of the newest pieces on display is “Right on Course.” Visit www.asama.org.


“Windows to the Sea” “Windows to the Sea” is the newest permanent exhibit at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab Estuarium. Visit disl.org. “Shipwreck! Pirates and Treasure” A new, highly interactive exhibit at GulfQuest features more than 500 authentic artifacts recovered from deep-ocean shipwrecks. Visit www.gulfquest.org. “Drugs: Costs and Consequences” The Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration team up to present a powerful interactive exhibit of the effects of drugs on individuals and society. Through August. Visit exploreum.com. Fairhope’s founding

Registration required, cost is $50. Call 251602-0909. Circuit board workshop On Tuesday, Aug. 29, at 3:45 p.m. the Daphne Library will offer an afterschool circuit board workshop for students in sixth grade and up. Call 251-621-2818, ext. 211. Free of charge.

SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES Mobile BayBears The Mobile BayBears are back in action. The team is on the road, but will return to Hank Aaron Stadium to play Biloxi Aug. 31. Call 251-479-BEAR. Group rides South Alabama and Mississippi Mountain Bike Association invites all levels of cyclists to join them every Tuesday and Thursday at 6 p.m. at USA Bike Trails and Sunday at 9 a.m. at Chickasabogue Park. Email carrie@ rideSAMBA.com. Weekly 1K/5K Every Thursday evening at 6 p.m., join Red Beard’s Outfitter and Cortlandt’s Pub in the Spring Hill Village Shopping Center for a 1K or 5K run and walk. No cost to participate. Bridge lessons The Mobile Bridge Center offers free bridge lessons each Tuesday at 6 p.m. at 1510 University Blvd. Arrive a few minutes early to register. Call the Bridge Center at 251-666-2147, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Photo | cofairhope.com

Learn more about the 1894 founding of Fairhope at the Fairhope Museum of History, 24 N. Section St. The museum is open daily (except Sunday and Monday) from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 251-929-1471. Little Discoveries “Outside the Box,” aimed at children age 6 and under, explores how innovation and creativity can lead to a world of possibilities, starting with a simple cardboard box. Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Call 251-208-6893 or email jholland@exploreum.com. Thursdays at MMoA

Fitness and athletics classes New fitness classes are in progress at Palmer Pillans Middle School. Curvy yoga, Tone It Up! (fusion workout), Zumba, basketball clinics (ages 8+) and sports conditioning (ages 8-17). To register or for more information, call 251-463-7980 or visit communityactivitiesprogram.com. Dance and art classes Summer classes offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School include belly dance, ballroom dance, ballet and tumbling (ages 6-8), beginning piano (ages 8+), watercolor painting, zombies and superheroes art, and pet portraits art. Call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com. Pickleball for adults (indoors) Offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School, Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon. Great sport for all ages combines tennis, pingpong and badminton on a court one-fourth the size of a tennis court. Call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com. Ballroom dance Azalea Ballroom Dance Club hosts dances the second and fourth Tuesday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Via Health, Fitness & Enrichment Center, 1717 Dauphin St. Call 251-623-9183 or visit azaleaballroomdanceclub.com.

Photo | mobilemuseumofart.com

Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., the Mobile Museum of Art offers free admission to all visitors. No reservations are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive. Call 251-208-5200.

WORKSHOPS “Helping Children Cope with Divorce” An educational program focusing on how effective parenting can lessen the negative impact on children of divorce and parental separation. Saturday, Aug. 26, at 8 a.m.

Ballroom dance The Moonlight Chassé Ballroom Dance Society hosts dances the first and third Monday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Hot Wheels Skating Rink in Daphne. Email cassief13@aol.com.

PUBLIC MEETINGS Public Services Committee to meet Mobile City Council Vice President Fred Richardson announced the council’s Public Services Committee will meet Tuesday, Aug. 29, at 2 p.m. in the Council Conference Room on the 9th floor of the South Tower, Government Plaza. A u g u s t 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 - A u g u s t 3 0 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 35


THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE THE MAGIC SHOW BY ERIC BERLIN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Bit of a Bollywood soundtrack 5 Hawaiian giveaway 8 Home of van Gogh’s “The Starry Night,” informally 12 Walgreens competitor 19 Greek warrior of myth 20 Person from Calgary or Edmonton 22 Source of material for a baseball bat 23 Magic trick performed at 78-Down 25 Company accountant’s responsibility 26 Concern for wheat farmers 27 Nickname for an Oxford university 29 Puzzle-loving group 30 Sugar found in beer 34 Mouselike rodents 36 Sometimes-stinky pair 39 Adds to 43 Agcy. that cares what airs 46 Mauna ____ 47 Magic trick performed at 119-Across and 104-Down 49 Burden for Jack and Jill 50 Female org. since the 1850s 52 Lee of Marvel Comics 53 Pals around (with) 54 Coca-Cola brand 55 ____ duck (Chinese entree) 57 “Carmina Burana” composer Carl 59 Grant-making org. 60 Like most doors 61 Followed closely, as a set of rules 63 Zest source 65 Feudal vassal 67 Magic trick performed at 123- and 124-Across 71 Word repeated before “everywhere” 72 Online “Very funny!” 73 Basic gymnastics flips 76 Comic Aziz of “Master of None” 79 “Is that true about me?” 81 Movies with big budgets and no audience 83 At the proper moment 84 Simple percussion instrument 85 Greenish-blue hues 87 Musical based on Fellini’s “81/2” 89 Ready to take part 90 Escape maker 91 Magic trick performed at 55-Across 94 Blue, on some maps: Abbr. 95 Onetime White House

16 Baseball’s Hank 17 Physicist Bohr 18 Crème ____ crème 21 They can be inflated or shattered 24 Lesley of “60 Minutes” 28 Manipulative type 31 Lane in Metropolis 32 12:50 33 Schindler of “Schindler’s List” 35 Officers below capts. 36 Relief carving 37 Shout of pain 38 Talkative birds 40 “Yuk!” 41 Relative of pop? 42 Place from which to withdraw deposits 43 Long tooth DOWN 44 Give as an example 1 Go gaga 45 Wearing, with “in” 2 Not quite closed 48 Prefix with structure 3 Bunch of friends 49 Décor of many dens 4 Truisms 51 Onetime honor for cable 5 ____-di-dah TV shows 6 QB Manning 54 Mozart title character 7 Arabic for “son of” 56 Part of P.E.I. 8 Advertising icon who wears a 58 Some dental work single earring 60 Titter 9 Missouri River native 62 South American monkey 10 Hurt badly 64 Old war zone, briefly 11 Latin years 66 Tangled up 12 Output of N.W.A or DMX 68 Ill-defined situation 13 “This ____ test” 69 Offspring 14 Herbs related to mints 70 Front 15 English lengths 74 Director of 1957’s “12 nickname 96 Apt anagram of IS A CHARM 97 Eight-line poems 99 Hullabaloo 100 Four-string instrument 102 Kind of jar 105 Crisp fabric 109 Tequila source 113 “Whenever you want” 115 Magic trick performed at 15-, 16- and 17-Down 119 Skinny sort 120 Hydrogen has one 121 Architect Saarinen 122 Swiss and others 123 First name in jazz 124 Bad: Prefix 125 Prohibitionists

Angry Men” 75 Looks like 76 Name on some boxes of film 77 Neophyte, informally 78 Provide part of a coverage policy for 80 ____-pedi 82 “Mirabile ____!” (“Wonderful to state!”) 85 Reproves 86 Dweller in a virtual “City” 88 Great Lakes city 91 Greek X 92 J.Crew competitor 93 New York archbishop Timothy 96 Furs from rabbits 98 Got a move on, with “it” 99 “I would ____ surprised” 101 Stand-up comic Williams 102 Like the Spanish nouns “gato” (cat) and “perro” (dog): Abbr. 103 Literary collection: Abbr. 104 Vaccine holder 106 Run away 107 Tumbled 108 Stuntman Knievel 110 The New World: Abbr. 111 Be inconsistent 112 Book of Mormon book 114 Fannie or Ginnie follower 116 Suffix with dull 117 Small dog 118 Entrances

ANSWERS ON PAGE 40

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SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

Bishop State beefs up athletics BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

A

s Bishop State Community College prepares to enter its 90th year of providing educational opportunities to local students, the Wildcats’ athletic program is looking to the future with the addition of new sports. Trenton Eager is starting his second season as Bishop State’s athletic director and women’s basketball coach. He recently sat down with Lagniappe to discuss the plans for his school, which has four campuses across Mobile. “We are adding golf for the fall of the 2017-18 academic year,” Eager said. “Ronald Davis, who has been a computer information system instructor here for 25-plus years, will serve as the coach. He is very familiar with the local golf scene.” Davis will be in charge of starting the program from scratch. Scholarships are established for eight players on each squad. Davis currently has scholarships left for four women and two men. “We are still recruiting the local area,” Eager said. “We want this to be a great addition to the Bishop State athletic family.” Community college officials are also planning to add competitive cheerleading to the mix. Julie King, who has been at Bishop State for at least a decade, will coach the team. “There is a lot of interest in competitive cheerleading,” Eager said. The University of Mobile recently formed a squad, and promptly won its conference title. “Mobile is big in cheerleading, volleyball, soccer and tennis,” he continued. Eager said Bishop State wants to keep adding similar sports. “We have a great swimming facility here at Bishop, but when we looked into forming a team we learned the closest community college that we could compete with was four hours away,” he said. “It just did not work out logistically.” However, sports such as volleyball and track are still on the drawing board.

“We are weighing the outcomes,” said Eager, who came to Mobile after coaching at Alabama Southern Community College in Monroeville. “Athletics are a big part of enrollment and student success. It really adds to student life on campus. “People gravitate to sports. We are a community college, so we also want to attract members of the community.”

Benefit of athletics

Eager said you only have to look at the University of South Alabama’s vision to add football a few years ago. The decision has generated a lot of interest for both USA and its sports program. “Their football team has really been something,” said Eager, who earned his bachelor’s degree at Jacksonville State and a master’s from West Florida. “It has helped the school in so many ways. While we are not adding football, it shows the impact sports can have.” Eager again pointed out how being a community college assists in recruitment. “We first go after the local kids from Mobile County,” he said. “Then we fill in with others who can help the program. “Let them represent Mobile for two years and then go on to senior college. They can come to Bishop State, get a quality education and a quality athletic career.” Bishop State — which was founded in 1927 as the Mobile branch of Alabama State University — has previously fielded basketball teams for men and women, fast-pitch softball and baseball. The last sport mentioned will have a change next year with the recent hiring of James Hattenstein as the new coach. An alumnus of Bishop State, he played for the Wildcats from 1990 to 1991. He went on to finish his college career at USA. After school, Hattenstine played professionally with the Mobile BaySharks and Grand Forks (North Dakota) Varmints. For the last 20 years, he has been a member of

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coaching staffs at Bishop State, University of Mobile, Mary G. Montgomery, Daphne, LeFlore and Citronelle. Hattenstein, who holds two master’s degrees, was the head coach at LeFlore and Citronelle. “We are very excited to have Coach Hattenstein taking over the baseball team,” Eager said. “Being a former Bishop State player, he is familiar with the Mobile area.” Bishop State has veterans in charge of its other programs. J.D. Shelwood is starting his 25th year in charge of the men’s basketball team, after having coached at LeFlore for 26 years. Angelo Archible has been leading the women’s softball team more than 20 years. “We also have a lot of volunteers who help,” Eager said. “There are quality people who have bought into our mission.”

Expanding facilities

Bishop State constructed a new baseball and softball complex at its Southwest Campus a few years. While improvements continue there, additional work is planned. “We are renovating our gym and the locker rooms at our Main Campus,” said Eager, who played in several minor league basketball programs in the United States as well as in Argentina, Finland and Uruguay before starting to coach. “We want to take our athletic facilities to the next level. Kids look at that when they are being recruited.” Of course, all of this growth requires funding. Eager said there are plans for this as well. “We are in a good place for our budgets to give us the best on-field experience possible,” he said. “We are considering the cost of scholarships, equipment and salary for coaches. “We have a five-year period where we are looking to expand. I must give credit to Bishop State’s president, Dr. Reginald Sykes. He is all-in for athletics. He was right in the mix to implement golf.” While the plan to add a swim team did not come through, that does not mean growth has stopped. “We look at the feasibility of all sports that we might add,” Eager said. “Volleyball is a potential. We need to see how far we must travel to compete. We are looking at possibly adding it next.” Eager said he wants all Bishop State students to be proud of being Wildcat supporters. “As we expand athletics, it expands the college,” Eager said. “Our programs add to enrollment and to the retention of students. I envision the Bishop State athletic program is going to grow as Mobile grows. We are Mobile’s community college, and we want to give our city and county something to be proud of.” To learn more about the athletic program, visit www.bishop.edu. Eager can be reached at 251-405-7034 or via email at teager@bishop.edu.


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STYLE HOROSCOPES THE COMPLETE BEER FEST EXPERIENCE

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VIRGO (8/24-9/22) — You’ll enjoy the 20th annual Dauphin Street Beer Festival in spite of your friend who complains about the absence of gluten-free varieties. To shut them up, you’ll shove a soft pretzel with cheese sauce in their mouth. SCORPIO (10/23-11/21) — You’ll serve as a designated driver during the Dauphin Street Beer Festival, but that doesn’t keep you from overindulging in The Merry Widow’s free hot boiled peanuts. You’ll be so satisfied, you’ll change your name to Charles M. Schulz. SAGITTARIUS (11/22-12/22) — You’ll don your lederhosen and skip arm in arm with your fair maiden while singing “John Jangle Weissbier Doppelbock,” to the delight of absolutely no one. Thankfully, the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service will deport you to Austria. CAPRICORN (12/23-1/19) — A lifelong “Champagne of Beers” aficionado, you’ll bemoan the lack of Miller High Life along the Beer Fest route. When you’re offered an ultra-hoppy IPA at Hayley’s, you’ll return home to drink your preferred toilet wine. AQUARIUS (1/20-2/18) — You’ll opt out of the Dauphin Street Beer Festival fun and opt in for a case of Bud heavy and reruns of “Family Feud” on the Game Show Network. You’ll get drunk and start your own “Family Feud” game when you call your sister. PISCES (2/19-3/20) — With good intentions, you’ll try to dialog with a gentleman sharing his opinions on India Pale Ales — a decision that will cost close to an hour of your time. By the end of the evening, you’ll be no closer to liking a liquid that tastes like old shoes. ARIES (3/21-4/19) — You’ll be arrested after confusing the date of the Dauphin Street Beer Festival — accidentally stealing beer from more than 30 businesses. While the pretzel necklace will lend some credence to your story, officers will remind you that ignorance of the law is no excuse. TAURUS (4/20-5/20) — The Dauphin Street Beer Festival will simply serve as a convenient pregame for the MayweatherMcGregor fight. The Mayweather-McGregor fight will simply serve as a convenient pregame for the upcoming college football season. GEMINI (5/21-6/21) — About 11 beers in, you’ll hijack a pedicab and lead the Mobile Police Department on a low-speed chase downtown. You’ll be forced off the road by an officer on a Segway, claiming the entire time that it wasn’t you, it was O.J. CANCER (6/22-7/22) — You’ll skip the Dauphin Street Beer Festival in order to plan the inaugural Royal Street Deer Festival. It’ll be like Pamplona’s running of the bulls, except it involves camouflage, hunting rifles and some very unfortunate animals. LEO (7/23-8/23) — After several turns on the mechanical livestock at Saddle Up Saloon, you’ll spew a banana nut-flavored brew all over fellow patrons. You’ll be banned for life after the smell of overripe bananas and barley close the establishment for the rest of the night.


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LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com FORECLOSURES MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE

Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by John Albert Rockwell, Jr. and Jeannie R. Rockwell, husband and wife, originally in favor of Union Planters Bank, National Association, on the 19th day of May, 1999, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in RP 4714, Page 0030; the undersigned Nationstar Mortgage, LLC, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on October 26, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 20, Scanlan Way, Second Unit according to the plat thereof recorded in Map Book 23, Page 85, in the Office of the Judge of Probate Court Records, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  5351 Scanlanway Dr. W, Satsuma, AL  36572 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Nationstar Mortgage, LLC, Mortgagee/Transferee Elizabeth Loefgren SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 408105 Lagniappe HD August 24, 31, Sept. 7, 2017

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE

Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Patrick Gustafson, a married man, originally in favor of PNC Mortgage, a division of PNC Bank, National Association, on the 24th day of February, 2012, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6869 Page 1261; along with that certain Order recorded in Bk: LR7516, Pg: 1872; the undersigned PNC Bank, National Association, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on September 14, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: All that certain parcel of situated in the County of Mobile and State of Alabama. From the Southeast corner of Lot 30, Pines Addition to Alpine Hills as per plat recorded in Map Book 16, page 28, Probate Court records, Mobile County, Alabama; thence run North 18 degrees 19 minutes East along the East line of Lot 30, a distance of 21.00 feet to the Point of Beginning of the property herein described; thence continue North 18 degrees 29 minutes East along the East line of lot 30, a distance of 74.23 feet to the Northeast corner of lot 30; thence Westwardly along the North line of Lot 30 a distance of 161.22 feet to the East line of Lucerne Drive; thence Southwardly along said East line 90.00 feet to the Southwest corner of Lot 30, thence North 81 degrees 05 minutes East 138.32 feet to the Point of Beginning.  Being the same property as conveyed from Steven Hults, and wife, Joanne Hults to Patrick Gustafson, as described in Book 6290 Page 1009, dated 11/13/2007, recorded 11/16/2007 in Mobile County records. Property street address for informational purposes:  1106 Lucerne Dr, Mobile, AL  36608-4117 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds

by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. PNC Bank, National Association, Mortgagee/Transferee   Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/ foreclosures 393803 Lagniappe HD August 10, 17, 24, 2017

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE

Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Curtis Wilson Jr. and Virginia L. Wilson, husband and wife, originally in favor of AmSouth Bank, on the 24th day of September, 2003, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 5465 Page 0113; the undersigned PNC Bank, National Association, successor by merger to RBC Bank (USA), formerly known as RBC Centura Bank, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on September 28, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 29, Heron Lakes, Phase One, Resubdivision of and Addition to Lot 29, as recorded in Map Book 101, Page 122 in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  Grand Heron Court, Lot 29, Mobile, AL  36693 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. PNC Bank, National Association, successor by merger to RBC Bank (USA), formerly known as RBC Centura Bank, Mortgagee/Transferee Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/ Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 401598

Map Book 4, Page 166, as recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Parcel No: 228 Velma Street, Prichard, Alabama. Parcel F: Lots 99, 108 and 109 of Neese Subdivision of Old Cotton Mill Village, per Map Book 4, Page 166, as recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Parcel No: 02-29-02-440-015-240; 621 Vernon Street, Prichard, Alabama. Parcel G: Lot 80 and Lot 82 thru 90 (inclusive) of Neese Subdivision of Old Cotton Mill Village, per Map Book 4, Page 166, as recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Parcel No: 02-29-02-44-0-015-241, 730 Maudine Avenue, Prichard, Alabama. Parcel H: Lots 39 thru 47(inclusive); Lots 55 thru 61 (inclusive) the West 110 feet of Lots 53; and the West 40 feet of Lot 51, all of Neese Subdivision of Old Cotton Mill Village, per Map Book 4, Page 166, as recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Parcel No: 02-29-02-44-0-016-160.022; 705 Neese Avenue, Prichard, Alabama. Parcel I: Lots 35 thru 38 (inclusive) of Neese Subdivision of Old Cotton Mill Village, per Map Book 4, Page 166, as recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Parcel No: 02-29-02-440-016-162; 312 Velma Street, Prichard, Alabama. Parcel J: Lots 91 thru 98 (inclusive) of Neese Subdivision of Old Cotton Mill Village, per Map Book 4, Page 166, as recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Parcel No: 02-29-02-44-0-015-239; 718 Vernon Street, Prichard, Alabama. Parcel K: Lots 62 thru 65 (inclusive) and Lots 67 thru 78 (inclusive) of Neese Subdivision of Old Cotton Mill Village, per Map Book 4, Page 166, as recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Parcel No: 02-29-02-44-0-016-161; 311 Velma Street, Prichard, Alabama. Parcel L: Lot 52 of Neese Subdivision of Old Cotton Mill Village, per Map Book 4, Page 166, as recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Parcel No: 02-29-02-44-0-016-160.002, Neeses Avenue, Prichard, Alabama. Parcel M: Lot 106 of Neese Subdivision of Old Cotton Mill Village, per Map Book 4, Page 166, as recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Parcel No: 02-29-02-44-0-015-240.002. Vernon Street, Prichard, Alabama. Said sale will be made for the purpose of paying said indebtedness and the expenses incident to this sale, including a reasonable attorney’s fee. SW Partners, LLC Holder of Said Mortgage ATTORNEYS FOR MORTGAGEE: Ferrell S. Anders ANDERS, BOYETT & BRADY, P.C. One Maison, Suite 203 3800 Airport Boulevard Mobile, Alabama  36608 (251)344-0880 82363 Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 31, 2017

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made by the herein referenced Grantees in the terms of that certain Vendor’s Lien Deed executed on January 25, 2017, by Gary A. Larison and Tara M. Larison, a Grantees to Iras Development Company Inc. Employee’s Profit Sharing Plan an Alabama corporation, as Grantor which said Vendor’s Lien Deed was recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book LR7472, Page 781, and default continuing under said Vendor’s Lien Deed, by virtue of and pursuant to the power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, the following described real property will be sold at public outcry, for cash, to the highest bidder, in front of the North entrance of the Courthouse of said County, located at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama 36644, during the legal hours of sale, on September 21, 2017. Lot 8, as per plat of GLENWOOD ESTATES, as recorded in Map Book 46, Page 117, Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying said Vendor’s Lien debt and costs of foreclosure. Iras Development Company, Inc. Employee’s Profit Sharing Plan Holder of said Vendor’s Lien. WILLIAM B. JACKSON, II STOKES & CLINTON, P.C. Attorneys for Lienholder Post Office Box 991801 Mobile, Alabama 36691 (251) 460-2400 Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 31, 2017

Lagniappe HD August 24, 31, Sept. 7, 2017

FORECLOSURE NOTICE

Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness described in and secured by that certain Mortgage executed by Calvin Gill Construction Services, LLC to SW Partners, LLC, dated September 29, 2016 and recorded in Land Record 7435, Page 1092, and further modified by Mortgage Modification Agreement dated January 11, 2017 and recorded in Land Record 7468, Page 1811, of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama; and notice is hereby given that the undersigned, as holder of said Mortgage, will under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said Mortgage, sell at public outcry for cash to the highest bidder during the legal hours of sale on Tuesday, September 12, 2017, at the Government Street entrance of Government Plaza located at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama, the following described real property situated in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, described in said Mortgage hereinabove referred to, viz: Parcel A: Lots 110 thru 120 (inclusive) of Neese Subdivision of Old Cotton Mill Village, per Map Book 4, Page 166, as recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Parcel No: 02-29-02-44-0-016-055, 623 Maudine Avenue, Prichard, Alabama. Parcel B: Lots 7 thru 7 (inclusive) of Neese Subdivision of Old Cotton Mill Village, per Map Book 4, Page 166, as recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, Parcel No: 02-29-02-44-0-016-026, 506 Neese Avenue, Prichard, Alabama. Parcel C: Lots 8 thru 11 (inclusive) and that part of Lots 12 and 13 lying North of Carpenter Street in Neese Subdivision of Old Cotton Mill Village, per Map Book 4, Page 166, as recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, Parcel No: 0229-02-44-0-015-016; 604 Vernon Street, Prichard, Alabama. Parcel D: Lots 100 thru 105 (inclusive) of Neese Subdivision of Old Cotton Mill Village, per Map Book 4, Page 166, as recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Parcel No: 02-29-02-44-0-016-054; 620 Maudine Avenue, Prichard, Alabama. Parcel E: Lots 15 thru 32 (inclusive) and that part of Lots 13-14 lying South of Carpenter Street in Neese Subdivision of Old Cotton Mill Village, per

42 | L AG N I A P P E | A u g u s t 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 - A u g u s t 3 0 , 2 0 1 7

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made by the herein referenced Grantees in the terms of that certain Vendor’s Lien Deed executed on February 19, 2014, by Mary L. White, a Grantees to Iras Development Company Inc. an Alabama corporation, as Grantor which said Vendor’s Lien Deed was recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book LR7122, Page 55, and said Vendor’s Lien Deed having been last assigned to McAleer Properties II, L.P., which assignment was recorded in the office of the Judge of Probate Mobile County Alabama in Real Property Book LR7169, Page 862 and default continuing under said Vendor’s Lien Deed, by virtue of and pursuant to the power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, the following described real property will be sold at public outcry, for cash, to the highest bidder, in front of the North entrance of the Courthouse of said County, located at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama 36644, during the legal hours of sale, on September 21, 2017. Lot 74, as per plat of TIMBERLAND, UNIT III as recorded in Map Book 92, Page 16, Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying said Vendor’s Lien debt and costs of foreclosure. McAleer Properties II, L.P. Holder of said Vendor’s Lien WILLIAM B. JACKSON, II STOKES & CLINTON, P.C. Attorneys for Lienholder Post Office Box 991801 Mobile, Alabama 36691 (251) 460-2400

Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 31, 2017

PUBLIC NOTICE

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers hosts Mobile Harbor improvement open house The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile District, will host an open house to update all interested parties on the ongoing study to evaluate impacts of widening and/or deepening the Mobile Harbor Federal Navigation Channel. The open

house will be held at the Bayou La Batre Community Center, 12745 Padgett Switch Rd, 36544 Irvington, Ala., Sept. 14 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. Any person with an interest in the proposed harbor improvements and the status of the ongoing study is welcome to attend. This event is an opportunity to give members of the public an update on the proposed project’s status and recent milestones, and to receive the public’s comments and concerns related to potential impacts associated with the project. Members of the project team will be on hand with graphical displays to explain the various ongoing studies they are conducting and to answer questions related to the proposed project.The open house is one opportunity to share comments that will become part of the preparation of a Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement for the proposed project. In addition to the open house, members of the public may submit comments by email to MobileHarborGRR@usace.army.mil or by mail to U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Mobile District, 109 Saint Joseph Street, Mobile, AL 36602. For more information, on the proposed Mobile Harbor Federal Navigation Channel project, visit http://www.sam.usace.army.mil/. Lagniappe HD August 24, 31, Sept. 7, 2017

PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT MEETING TIGER Grant Project / Proposed Broad Street Improvements Broad Street/Beauregard Street from Water Street to I-10 and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard from Three Mile Creek to Beauregard Street Mobile County, Alabama City of Mobile Project No. 2015-202-22 Informal, Walk-in Information Session Format from 4:00 pm until 6:00 pm August 31, 2017 James Seals Community Center 540 Texas Street Mobile, Alabama 36603 Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 2017

ADVERTISEMENT OF COMPLETION In accordance with Chapter 1, Title 39, Code of Alabama, 1975, notice is hereby given that NATIONS ROOF CENTRAL, LLC, Contractor, has completed the Contract for Partial Reroofing of Central BOE Office at 201 N. Craft Highway, Chickasaw, Alabama 36611, for the State of Alabama and the Mobile County, City of Chickasaw Board of Education, Owners, and have made request for final settlement of said contract.  All persons having any claim for labor, materials, or otherwise in connection with this project should immediately notify the Lathan Associates Architects, P.C. 1550 Woods of Riverchase, Ste. 200 Hoover, AL  35244, 205-9889112. Nations Roof Central, LLC, Contractor 2914 Lawing Lane, Rowlett, TX 75088 Lagniappe HD August 24, 31, Sept. 7, 14, 2017

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Sealed proposals will be received by Bishop State Community College, at the Yvonne Kennedy Business Technology Center, President’s Board Room (Room 340) on the Main Campus at 351 North Broad Street, Mobile AL, 36603; 2:00pm TUESDAY, September 12th , 2017, at which time and place they will be publicly opened and read for: SECURITY CAMERA PROJECT BISHOP STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE Mobile, Alabama The Work of the project includes, but is not limited to, selective demolition, new construction, coordination and supervision of the entire project, and all related work, as indicated in the Bid and Contract Documents. A cashier’s check or bid bond payable to BISHOP STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE in an amount not less than five (5) percent of the amount of the bid, but in no event more than $10,000, must accompany the bidder’s proposal. Performance and statutory Labor and material Payment Bonds, insurance in compliance with requirements, and verification of E-Verify enrollment will be required at the signing of the Contract. The Issuing Office for the Bidding Documents is Goodwyn, Mills & Cawood, Inc., 11 North Water Street, Suite 15250, Mobile, AL 36602, Attn:  Ashley Morris (251) 460-4006 Ashley.Morris@gmcnetwork.com.  Prospective Bidders may examine the Bidding Documents at the Issuing Office on Mondays through Fridays between the hours of 8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. and may obtain copies of the Bidding Documents from the Issuing Office as described below. General Contractors may procure plans and specifications from the Architect upon payment of a deposit of Twenty dollars ($20.00) for a one time administrative fee for digital/ file sharing access or One hundred dollars ($100.00) (printed) per set. Contractors are encouraged to use the digital plans.  Refunds will be issued for printed sets only issued by the Architect to each general contract bidder on the first two (2) sets issued submitting a bonafide bid, upon return of documents in good and reusable condition within ten (10) days of bid date.  Additional sets for General Contractors, and sets for subs and vendors, may be obtained with the same deposit, which will be refunded as above, less cost of printing, reproduction, handling and distribution, which is estimated to be the same as the deposit amount.  Checks shall be made payable to “Goodwyn, Mills & Cawood, Inc.”  Bid documents will be mailed only upon receipt of deposit.  No bid documents will distributed later than 24 hours prior to the scheduled opening of bids.  Partial sets of Bidding Documents will not be available from the Issuing Office. Neither Owner nor Architect will be responsible for full or partial sets of Bidding Documents, including Addenda if any, obtained from sources other than the Issuing Office. For the list of plan holders on this project visit http://www. gmcnetwork.com/bids/ . All bidders bidding in amounts exceeding that established by the State Licensing Board for General Contractors must be licensed under the Provision of Title 34, Chapter 8, Code of Alabama, 1975, as amended, and must show such evidence of license before bidding or bid will not be received or considered by Architect or Owner.  The bidder shall show such evidence by clearly displaying his or her current license

number on the outside of the sealed envelope in which the proposal is delivered; Bidder must also include his or her current license number on the Proposal Form. No bid may be withdrawn after the scheduled closing time for receipt of bids for a period of sixty (60) days. A PRE-BID CONFERENCE will be held at the same location where bids will be received, at 10:00AM TUESDAY, AUGUST 29TH, 2017 for the purpose of reviewing the project and answering Bidder’s questions.  Attendance at the Pre-Bid Conference is strongly recommended for all General Contractor Bidders and Subcontractors intending to submit a Proposal. This project is being bid, under the provisions of Alabama Act 2000-684, which require the General Contractor, in part, to take advantage of the Owner’s tax exempt status, obtain necessary certificates and other documentation required from the Alabama Department of Revenue, make payment for all materials, and to administer the sales and use tax savings portion of the project, as a part of their Bid. Additional qualifications and requirements for General Contractor Bidders and separate Subcontractors are indicated in the Bid and Contract Documents. The Owner reserves the right to reject any or all proposals and to waive technical errors if, in their judgment, the best interests of the Owner will thereby be promoted. BISHOP STATE COMMUNITY COLLEGE Mobile, Alabama Dr. Reginald Sykes, President GOODWYN, MILLS & CAWOOD, INC. MEMBERS, AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS 11 North Water Street, Suite 15250 Mobile, AL  36602 Phone:(251) 460-4006 Fax:(251) 460-4423 Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 31, 2017

PROBATE NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: JANE C. DEUPREE Case No. 2017-1396 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 3rd day of August, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. ROBERTA CHRISTINE DEUPREE as Executrix of the estate of JANE C. DEUPREE, deceased. Attorney of Record: NANCY J. BUSEY Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 31, 2017

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING August 10, 2017 Case No. 2017-1082 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of HARLAND FREDERICK RENTSCHLER, Deceased On to-wit the 18th day of September, 2017 at 9:30 AM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the Petition to Probate Last Will and Testament of Harland Frederick Rentschler as filed by CYRINA LYNN RENTSCHLER. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest, specifically DUANE RENTSCHLER, who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate. Attorney Name and Address: MICHAEL S. MCNAIR, 2151 GOVERNMENT STREET, MOBILE, AL 36606 Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 31, Sept. 7, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: JOSEPH E. VELLA, Deceased Case No. 2017-1268 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 11th day of August, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. J. MICHAEL DRUHAN JR as Executor under the last will and testament of JOSEPH E. VELLA, Deceased. Attorney of Record: DEENA R TYLER Lagniappe HD August 24, 31, Sept. 7, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: DOROTHY C. WILLIAMS, Deceased Case No. 2017-1139 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 16th day of August, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. BOOKER T. WILLIAMS as Executor under the last will and testament of DOROTHY C. WILLIAMS, Deceased. Attorney of Record: PRO SE Lagniappe HD August 24, 31, Sept. 7, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: CLAUDE D. BOONE, Deceased Case No. 2017-1352 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 16th day of August, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com will be barred. SARA P. BOONE as Executrix under the last will and testament of CLAUDE D. BOONE, Deceased. Attorney of Record: MOLLY SULLIVAN, ESQ. 1809 Old Shell Road Mobile, AL 36607 Lagniappe HD August 24, 31, Sept. 7, 2017

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING July 31, 2017 Case No. 2009-0797-4 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of DOROTHY MACK WATSON, Deceased On to-wit the 2nd day of October, 2017 at 2:00 PM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the FINAL SETTLEMENT AND REPORT OF INSOLVENCY as filed by DEBRA K. MACK. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. Don Davis, Judge of Probate Attorney Name and Address: VANESSA ARNOLD SHOOTS, 56 ST. JOSEPH STREET, STE 1311, Mobile, AL 36602 Lagniappe HD August 24, 31, Sept. 7, 2017

NOTICE OF SALE These abandoned vehicles will be sold on 09/21/2017 at 5781 Three Notch Rd Mobile Al. 36619 @9 am   NISS    1N4AL2AP0CN566921 TOTO   5TFAZ5CN1HX029945 TOYO   JT3GN86R8V0034560 Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 22, 2017 Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  4763 Lott Rd., Eight Mile, AL 36613. 2003 Lexus RX300 JTJGF10U330156878 1993 Honda Civic JHMEG8656PS049378 2005 Toyota Camry 4T1BE32K85U577753 2009 Toyota Camry 4T1BE46K59U868068 Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 22, 2017 Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  1528 Homestead Dr. W., Semmes, AL 36575. 2004 Cadillac Deville 1G6KD54Y54U221654 Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 22, 2017 Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  451 Harding Blvd., Mobile, AL 36608. 2002 Harley Davidson XL1200 1HD1CGP142K161606 Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 22, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  6425 Spanish Fort Blvd., Spanish Fort, AL 36577. 2011 GMC Acadia 1GKKRPEDXBJ157376 2004 Chevrolet Trailblazer 1GNDS13S942198450 1998 GMC Yukon 1GKEK13R3WJ736177 2010 Ford Fusion 3FAHP0HAXAR331154 1999 Dodge Ram Truck 3B7HC12Y0XG139201 2017 Nissan Altima 1N4AL3AP7HC193840 2001 Ford Explorer 1FMYU60E11UA44021 2006 Chevrolet HHR 3GNDA13D16S594531 Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 22, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  1037 St Stephens Rd., Prichard, AL 36610. 2006 Chrysler PT Cruiser 3A4FY48B66T271957 Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 22, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  351 Azalea Rd. Apt. D7, Mobile, AL 36609. 2007 Dodge Charger 2B3KA53H17H878712 Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 22, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  7951 Tanner Williams Rd. Suite A, Mobile, AL 36608. 2013 Ford Fusion Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 22, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  19546 Keller Rd. Lot 19, Foley, AL 36535. 1998 Pontiac Sunfire 3G2JB5241WS850981 Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 22, 2017 Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  755 Chin St., Mobile, AL 36610. 2003 Chevrolet Tahoe 1GNEC13ZX3J121797 Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 22, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  7960 Two Mile Rd.,. Irvington,

AL 36544. 2016 Nissan Altima 1N4BL3AP1GC219867

Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 22, 2017 Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  1408 Montlimar Dr., Mobile, AL 36609. 2017 Volkswagen Jetta 3VW2B7AJ5HM221666 Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 22, 2017 Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  9221 Hwy. 45, Chunchula, AL 36521. 2005 Suzuki GSX600 JS1GN79A252101695 Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 22, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  5891 Sunshine Lane, Mobile, AL 36619. 2005 Ford Escape 1FMYU94165KB11738 Lagniappe HD August 17, 24, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 29, 2017 Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  604 Farnell Lane, Mobile, AL 36606. 2012 Chevrolet Malibu 1G1ZD5EUXCF181753 Lagniappe HD Aug. 24, 31, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 29, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  9540 Broughton Place, Stockton, AL 36579. 2001 Ford Explorer 1FMZU63K13ZA20801 Lagniappe HD Aug. 24, 31, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 29, 2017 Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  605 East Orange Ave., Foley, AL 36535. 2001 Pontiac Sunfire 1G2JB124117109813 Lagniappe HD Aug. 24, 31, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 29, 2017 Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  2909 Raines Ct., Mobile, AL 36605. 1988 Chevrolet  GMT-400 1GCEK19R0WE102403 Lagniappe HD Aug. 24, 31, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 29, 2017 Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  4600 Calhoun Rd., Mobile, AL 36619. 2003 Chevrolet Silverado 1GCEC19T03Z123247 1999 Dodge Dakota 1B7FL22P7XS232424 Lagniappe HD Aug. 24, 31, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 29, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  3151 Moffett  Rd., Mobile, AL 36607. 2010 Dodge Caliber 1B3CB4HA1AD662788 Lagniappe HD Aug. 24, 31, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 29, 2017 Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 106 Martin Luther King Dr., Prichard, AL 36610. 2006 Chevrolet Avalanche 3GNEC12Z16G238322 Lagniappe HD Aug. 24, 31, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 29, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 1997 Chevrolet Tahoe 1GNEK13R2VJ429178 2005 GMC Envoy 1GKDS13S552231233 2007 Dodge Nitro 1D8GU58K17W613162 2004 Mitsubishi Lancer JA3AJ86E24U041925 1998 Ford Escort 1FAFP13PXWW168146 2000 Ford Explorer 1FMZU73E9YUA83102

STYLE BOOZIE

Exit summer, enter football! BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

S

ummer is officially over. All the schools have started back, which means it’s time for stay-at-home moms to kick back and relax. A group of ladies wearing workout clothes was spotted this past Friday enjoying a glass of wine at lunch — must be nice. I could get into that life, just minus the kids. But of course I’d have to have a friend or two to hang out with and drink lunch wine with after our workout class. I’m sure they would all be on board, especially if wine is involved. So now we need someone to fund us! Until then, I will just keep living it up on the weekends and having my wine during happy hour.

once again that the talk had started. Luckily for us we didn’t get out of line when we were told to because we would have missed out on food. In the last event of the evening, the fashion show, various boutiques and online stores showed off their fall fashion trends for the upcoming football season! There were some really great looks, but Boozie’s favorite fashion was off the runway — it was two friends, one an Alabama fan, the other an Auburn fan, wearing everything from their teams, from earrings to shoes!

Ready, down set, hut!

Talk about a perfect flashback Friday: Matchbox Twenty at The Wharf this past weekend was the perfect reminder that you are getting old, but they are still great! I mean, they’re celebrating their 20th anniversary, but Boozie must admit these last 20 years have been good to Rob Thomas! I hope to age like him. But anyways I had a spy at the concert who said it was absolutely incredible. My spy said even though Rob had a cold it didn’t stop them from performing one of their best shows. Her favorite part was when they asked everyone to pull out their cellphones and light them up. She said Rob was right, it does “look really f*ckin’ cool.”

Forget this winter-is-coming stuff, football season is coming! To prepare for the upcoming season, Boozie headed to the Reese’s Senior Bowl Girls of Fall event. Held at the convention center, it was a series of talks about different things. The first talk for Boozie was on rules of the game by former Alabama QB and head referee of the SEC David Smith. I’m not going to lie, I learned a lot. Like who knew that each referee watches certain players? I always thought it was crazy when a ref all the way down the field would blow his whistle, but it turns out it’s because he was watching that player. David did make a joke that even though they have eyes on them they may miss something! The next talk was more of a demo given by Von of Von’s Bistro. She gave us a little back history of her life and where she gained her cooking skills. She said since she is Asian, her husband is Southern and she owned a seafood processing plant, she decided to open a restaurant that does it all. Since this was the tailgating food demo, we got to sample Von’s creation: a chicken Alfredo dip! While in line for a sample, a friend asked if I was still eating healthy, because the ingredients on the table weren’t exactly healthy. Later, Von joked that it wasn’t a Weight Watchers recipe since it contained heavy cream, cream cheese and more cheese. I thought to myself, it isn’t a game day without cream cheese and more cheese! But the best part of Von’s chicken Alfredo dip is that it’s quick, easy and can be made ahead of time. You can even trade out the chicken for shrimp, crawfish or whatever you like. I’m thinking I will serve mine with some fried bowtie pasta. Talk about healthy! Our next talk was about special teams, but first Boozie needed food! Moe’s BBQ was passing out ribs and Maker’s Mark shots. The rib was perfect and the shot wasn’t bad either! Of course they ran out of both ribs and shots early. Then we decided to grab a few more bites of food, but while in line we kept being told to go to our next event. Boozie and her friend ignored the guy, we were hungry. Once we got our plates fixed we were told

I’m not crazy …

New friends, old places

Boozie’s other Orange Beach spy was busy Saturday night making new friends. As he said, it’s not every day you make friends with a professional golfer. Anyways, my spy said it was another typical night at the Flora-Bama until he ran into pro golfer Smylie Kaufman! The golfer was down at the beach with some friends from Birmingham, just hanging out. My spy said he was a really cool guy and fun to be around. Boozie is told they shared a few golf tips over a few bushwackers! Sometimes you just never know who you’ll run into at Flora-Bama!

Total eclipse

Boozie might get some backlash for this, but the eclipse wasn’t what I expected. Twenty percent is still a lot of sun up in the sky, wayyyy more than I thought. If we’re being honest, I’m also glad it’s over. I’m not sure how many more social media posts I can take that say “Total eclipse of the heart.” Like, come on, people — get creative! But I will say the coolest part was probably the shadows the trees made and how everybody across the country got together to view the eclipse. Mother nature really does bring us together! Well, kids, that’s all I’ve got this week. Just remember, whether rain or shine, dramatic or scandalous, or just some plain ol’ football lovin’, I will be there. Ciao!

Lagniappe HD Aug. 24, 31, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 29, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 1419 E I-65 Service Rd. S., Mobile, AL 36606. 2004 Jaguar S-Type SAJEA01U94HM95358 2002 Jaguar X Type SAJEA51D42XC57825 Lagniappe HD Aug. 24, 31, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on September 29, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 1015 N. Craft Hwy., Prichard, AL 36610. 2003 Chevrolet Trailblazer 1GNDT13S332220437 2006 Chevrolet Impala 2G1WT58K569295589 2006 Dodge Charger 2B3KA53H16H354068 Lagniappe HD Aug. 24, 31, 2017

F U T U R E S H O C K A u g u s t 2 4 , 2 0 1 7 - A u g u s t 3 0 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 43


Lagniappe: August 24 - August 30, 2017