Page 1


2 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7


WEEKLY

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

LAGNIAPPE

J U LY 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J U LY 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | w w w . l a g n i a p p e m o b i l e . c o m ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com

ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com

6 16 22

BAY BRIEFS

Incumbents are raking in campaign contributions prior to the Aug. 22 municipal elections.

COMMENTARY

Looking back at 15 years of Nappies.

BUSINESS

A developer wants to open a 1950s-style diner on Old Shell Road near Lavretta Park.

CUISINE

ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com

26

J. MARK BRYANT Sports Writer sports@lagniappemobile.com STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA RASMUSSEN Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com BETH WILLIAMS Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com ALEEN MOMBERGER Advertising Sales Executive aleen@lagniappemobile.com RACHEL THOMAS Advertising Sales Executive rachel@lagniappemobile.com MELISSA EDGE Editorial Assistant events@lagniappemobile.com

COVER

More than 1.5 million votes were cast in the 2017 Nappie Awards, indicating the best in Mobile Bay area shopping, services, arts, cuisine, music and more! A full list of winners, select profiles and commentary are inside!

46

CONTRIBUTORS: Lee Hedgepeth, Ron Sivak, Jeff Poor, Asia Frey, Brian Holbert, Tom Murphy, John Mullen, Judy Weaver ON THE COVER: 2017 NAPPIE AWARDS BY DANIEL ANDERSON POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Editorial, advertising and production offices are located at 1100B Dauphin St. Mobile, AL 36604. Mailing address is P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Phone: 251.450.4466 Fax 251.450.4498. Email: ashleytoland@lagniappemobile.com or rholbert@lagniappemobile.com LAGNIAPPE is printed at Walton Press. All letters sent to Lagniappe are considered to be intended for publication. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and Alternative Weeklies Network All rights reserved. Something Extra Publishing, Inc. Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced without the expressed permission of the publishers. Individuals may take one copy of the paper free of charge from area businesses, racks or boxes. After that, papers are $3 per issue. Removal of more than one copy from these points constitutes theft. Violators are subject to prosecution.

For Lagniappe home delivery visit

www.lagniappemobile.com/lagniappehd

32

ARTS

The 2017 recipients of arts Nappies include faces familiar and new.

MUSIC

The Nappies 2017 music winners reflect the area’s diverse interests.

ROSS PRITCHARD Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager jackie@lagniappemobile.com

Who has the best appetizer, seafood, Mexican or wedding cakes? Our readers voted and these are your favorite places to munch.

48 56 63 70 72 FILM

The dull documentary “I Am Heath Ledger” is a story of enabling and a tale told through omission.

SPORTS

The U.S. Tennis Association will conduct its Southern Sectionals tournament at the Mobile Tennis Center over eight days July 21-31.

GARDEN

More than 900 fern varieties are recognized in the United States. One Mobile Master Gardener tends more than 100.

STYLE

J u lladies y 2 0 at , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | Boozie spotted some leaping lords and the Dauphin Street Vault.

3


GOING POSTAL Bridge alternatives never pursued

Thanks for all the good work you guys do!

Rob: What is most frustrating to me regarding the traffic problem on Interstate 10 is the “magic bullet bridge.” After reading your column (Damn the Torpedoes, “Like a bridge to the future,” July 13-19), I decided to look around and see if I could find some statistics that would highlight some alternative ideas. I found a report titled “Independent Analysis of I-10 Bridge Project and of Alternatives” prepared for Keep Mobile Moving by Street Smarts in 2007. While the costs are out of date, the concept is not. Nothing has been done on the magic bullet bridge and the alternatives have been ignored, even though they would cost less and are likely to be more successful. Read the study (tinyurl.com/yd2nn8qx) where it talks about bridge grades, mileage and truckers’ time. This study is well thought out. I am astounded that it received no follow-through. Think about it: If these alternatives had been addressed as feasible in 2008, they would have been implemented by now. Today everyone is waiting for the magic bullet. The biggest bottleneck today is the curve and the tunnel. Anyone who must drive through the tunnel when it’s crowded knows how quickly speeds increase on the other side when drivers see daylight again. It’s partly due to trucks slowing down, but also tourists who don’t drive through a tunnel regularly. I would bet a very high bridge would bring out the same reaction in drivers, the main reason why I think a high bridge would not be successful.

Tink Wilkinson, Mobile

NEWS Mobile City Council approves community recycling contracts By Jason Johnson After being delayed for weeks over potential legal concerns, the Mobile City Council unanimously agreed Tuesday to put $1.2 million into a pair of contracts that will provide expanded recycling services over the next two years. The city will enter into a $125,000 agreement with the Emerald Coast Utilities Authority and a $900,000 deal with Amwaste LLC to allow recyclable materials to be picked up from multiple locations throughout Mobile and delivered to the recently constructed Materials Recycling Facility (MRF) in Escambia County. Mayor Sandy Stimpson praised the council’s support of a “cleaner, greener community,” adding that with the approval of the contracts, Mobile would join five other community recycling programs that will feed into the MRF. The recycled product will later be used by regional industries. “Nationally, more than 34 percent of municipal solid waste is diverted from landfills through recycling efforts, and Mobile’s diversion rate is at a dismal 6 percent,” Stimpson’s office said in a statement. “To increase the

4 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

rate of recycling, the city is transitioning to a single-stream method to create a more accessible, less burdensome experience for citizens, because they will no longer be required to sort their recyclables.” The approval of those contracts was delayed, in part, over concerns among members of the city’s Solid Waste Authority board, which was sued by the manager of the city’s Chastang landfill in 2015 over breach-of-contract complaints when yard debris began being diverted to another landfill location. Concerned that shipping recyclables to Escambia County might prompt a similar legal challenge, there was some hesitation at first, though Councilwoman Bess Rich said those had been sufficiently addressed prior to the July 18 vote. “There was some uneasiness about removing some of that waste stream, but getting clarification and an understanding that Solid Waste Authority is backing this proposal makes my support of this more comfortable,” Rich said. “I’m all about recycling and I’m looking forward to working with the administration in the placement of the transport containers to make sure they’re in appropriate locations and also screened appropriately as well.” Currently, there are recycling drop-off locations at the West Administrative Complex in Langan Park and behind Mobile Police Department headquarters off Pinehill Drive. More locations will be offered in the future. Incident in Lavretta Park At Tuesday’s pre-council meeting, Councilman Fred Richardson echoed a District One resident’s complaint about officers not

employed with the MPD allegedly removing peaceful protesters from Lavretta Park. Though Richardson offered few details, he said the group was holding “placards” and “demonstrating” during a recent event related to Michael Moore — the 19-year-old who was shot and killed by an MPD officer in June 2016. “What was alleged is that they were demonstrating and then were confronted by officers — armed officers other than our own police officers, who escorted them out of the park,” Richardson said. “It had to do with Michael Moore, that’s what they told me.” Richardson said he raised the issue to Public Safety Director James Barber, who said whoever intervened and escorted the protesters out of the park “certainly wasn’t an MPD officer.” He also told the council he would look into the matter to the extent he is able. Richardson said he believed those involved were either police officers from the city of Prichard, Mobile County Constables or a combination of both. It’s not uncommon for active officers to be hired as private security for events, and Barber said he would look into whether any local agencies had officers working a side job around the time of the event. After assuring Richardson once again that the MPD wasn’t involved in the incident reported to him, Barber said anyone who feels their right to peaceful protest had been infringed upon should contact the MPD. “I will look into it to the extent I can, but if it wasn’t reported to us, there’d be no record of it,” he added. “Do keep in mind that we’ll protect any individual’s right to peaceful protest, even if it’s against us. We do it all the time.”


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 5


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Checks and balances CAMPAIGN CASH FLOWING TO MUNICIPAL INCUMBENTS BY DALE LIESCH

W

ith about a month remaining before Mobilians head to the polls to decide mayoral and City Council races, campaign coffers are filling up and new candidates are emerging. The race for mayor will be closely watched with incumbent Sandy Stimpson and former Mayor Sam Jones highlighting the skirmish. The race has garnered some big donations and spending, but has been somewhat lopsided so far. According to a statement from his campaign, Stimpson raised more than $240,000 in his June disclosure and has more than $459,000 on hand. “I’m humbled to receive the support of more than 1,300 contributors who believe in the vision of One Mobile,” Stimpson noted. “I am particularly grateful for the grassroots support that represents every neighborhood across the city.” As of the June report, Stimpson had collected donations from 1,260 individuals, with nearly 60 percent giving less than $250. But in that month alone Stimpson received donations of more than $2,500 from seven individuals, including $15,000 from former Major League Baseball pitcher and Mobile native Jake Peavy. This election cycle, Stimpson also received donations of $2,500 or more from businesses including Holcomb and Associates Marketing, McCrary Management, Palmer’s Toyota Superstore, Pinebrook Properties LLC, Bullard Management Corp., Mercedes-Benz of Mobile, MIS Offshore LLC, Greene & Phillips Attorneys at Law, Beard Equipment Co. and Iberia Bank. Notable political action committee (PAC) donations to

6 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

the incumbent include CANPAC, WESTPAC, EDPAC and the Alabama Builders Political Action Committee out of Montgomery, as well as Mobile Auto-PAC. Stimpson’s campaign has spent more than $429,800 since January. Jones has lagged behind in fundraising, but his support has increased since the former mayor officially announced he would seek the office last month. According to his June report, Jones brought in contributions of $7,250 and spent

AS OF THE JUNE REPORT, STIMPSON HAD COLLECTED DONATIONS FROM 1,260 INDIVIDUALS, WITH NEARLY 60 PERCENT GIVING LESS THAN $250.” $1,630. His largest donation to date and the only one so far to exceed $2,500 came from former Mobile Housing Board Chairman Clarence M. Ball Jr. in the amount of $5,000. Jones did not return a call seeking comment for this story. Anthony Thompson has filed paperwork to run for mayor, according to city and probate records. He also did not return a call seeking comment. Two of the three candidates for the City Council Dis-

trict 1 seat have filed campaign finance reports with the probate court. Challenger Timothy Hollis lags behind two-decade incumbent Fred Richardson in contributions so far. From a beginning balance of $2,601 in February, Richardson has raised more than $21,745, according to subsequent reports. Hollis has raised less than $500 in cash contributions. There were no records available for District 1 Challenger Cory Penn. This means he either didn’t raise or spend enough to meet the threshold of $1,000 to require monthly reports. In District 3, incumbent C.J. Small raised $4,000 in cash contributions in May to add to a beginning balance of $2,826. The incumbent spent more than $12,999 in May. District 3 Challenger Leola Chaney filed a report in April showing she raised $950 in cash contributions and spent only $196. She raised $300 in June. Incumbent John Williams is facing a similar situation in District 4, with a fundraising advantage over challenger Robert Martin. In two reports since January, Williams has raised a total of $15,325 in cash contributions. Martin has yet to file because he said he has only raised about $940 of his own money for the campaign. Incumbent District 5 Councilman Joel Daves has a staggering advantage over recently announced challenger Arianna McArthur, for whom reports are not yet available. Daves has raised just $800 since his January report but has a war chest exceeding $74,000. McArthur did not return a call seeking comment for this story. In District 6, incumbent Bess Rich has raised $2,100 in cash contributions since her January disclosure. Her challenger, Deryl Pendleton, has received $1,175. Pendleton said he’s hoping for more contributions as the election draws near. “I don’t really know where to set my expectations,” he said. “I’ve never run for political office before.” Pendleton, a financial services advisor, said he is seeking the office because he wants “to serve the people” and see what he can do for the city. There are no official challengers for Councilman Levon Manzie of District 2 or Council President Gina Gregory in District 7. The lack of an opponent has not stopped Gregory from raising money for a campaign. Gregory began the year with a balance of more than $71,000, according to her January disclosure. Since then she has raised an additional $20,000. In an email message, Gregory wrote that she doesn’t have an opponent and “hopefully won’t.” “But qualifying doesn’t end until Tuesday [July 18] at 5 p.m. and I’m ready if anyone decides to run against me,” she said.


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 7


BAYBRIEF | GULF COAST

Fishing for trouble

EXTENDED SNAPPER SEASON PROMPTS LAWSUIT BY JASON JOHNSON

A

prediction by United States Rep. Bradley Byrne, R-Alabama, that extending the recreational red snapper season would likely prompt a legal challenge from environmentalists has proven true, as two advocacy groups have taken legal action in Washington, D.C. On Monday, the environmental groups Ocean Conservancy and the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) filed a lawsuit aimed at preventing extensions to the federal snapper season like the one approved in June in a longsought compromise between the Gulf states and the U.S. Department of Commerce. Federal officials extended the recreational snapper season to allow fishing in federal waters on weekends through Sept. 4 in exchange for reduced fishing in state waters. The agreement followed the setting of a historically low three-day season, prompting outrage from fishermen and public officials on the Gulf Coast. However, the increased access to the Gulf’s

YOU WOULDN’T TELL A PERSON WHO’S ALMOST OUT OF BANKRUPTCY TO GO ON A SPENDING SPREE … snapper fisheries appears to have concerned some in the environmental community who contend the once-depleted stock of the popular sport fish needs more time to rebound despite improvements in its population in recent years. According to Chris Dorsett, vice president of conservation policy and programs at Ocean Conservancy, the fishery is only “halfway through” a rebuilding plan intended to replenish a population that, at one point, was down to just three percent of its normal levels. On Monday, Dorsett compared the federal government’s decision to extend the 2017 season to a patient who “stops taking antibiotics” in the middle of a prescription. “Ocean Conservancy made the very difficult decision to sue because, ultimately, this is not just about rebuilding red snapper,” Dorsett said. “[This is] about protecting America’s fisheries, which are the backbone of so many coastal communities and the heart of deep cultural traditions rooted in a love for fishing and our ocean.” It is worth noting that representatives of Ocean Conservancy, Earthjustice and the EDF all said their lawsuit isn’t aiming to cancel or shorten the current season. Instead, it seeks to prevent similar action in the future. Based on early statements, one of the opponents’ main points of contention with extending the season is that it would prolong efforts to rebuild the snapper population in the Gulf. A notice in the Federal Register announcing the extension of the season in June stated that despite the snapper stock being ahead of its rebuilding target, the extended 2017 season

8 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

“may delay the ultimate rebuilding of the stock by as many as six years.” “Nevertheless, [the National Marine Fisheries Service] calculates the stock will continue to grow, although at a substantially more modest pace if this approach is adopted for one year,” the notice reads. Despite those concerns, the notice concludes that because of the growth in the stock and the “increasing harm to the coastal economies of Gulf States,” Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross determined “a more modest rebuilding pace for the stock is a risk worth taking.” Dorsett, a marines biologist, disagrees. “The red snapper fishery is currently on 31-year building time frame, which we’re about halfway through, and six additional years would be significant increase,” he said. “The additional 39 days has a significant impact.” Andrea A. Treece, a staff attorney for Earthjustice’s Oceans Program, is representing Ocean Conservancy in the lawsuit. In a press conference on Monday, she criticized the decision to expand the 2017 season, saying it was bad for the long-term health of the fishery and could ultimately hurt the fishermen it was intended to protect. “The [department’s] decision to extend the federal recreational season violates the most basic, common-sense requirements of federal law to prevent overfishing and to ensure long-term, healthy fisheries,” Treece said. “You wouldn’t tell a person who’s almost out of bankruptcy to go on a spending spree. It’s equally irresponsible — and illegal — for the department to ignore the very conservation measures that are bringing red snapper back.” Additionally, Treece said the agreement that led to the expansion of the 2017 season in June circumvented public and undercut “years of efforts” to manage the snapper stock by the “Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, the Commerce Department, conservation groups and stakeholders across the gamut.” Treece also expressed concern a similar approach might be used in other U.S. fisheries. “If the government decides it’s easier to cut political deals than to do the hard work of implementing essential conservation measures and honoring the sacrifices stakeholders have been making for years, then fisheries around the nation are going to suffer,” she said. Acting Commissioner of the Alabama Department of Conservation of Natural Resources Chris Blankenship was instrumental in negotiating the state’s interests in the agreement with the Department of Commerce. While Blankenship is aware of the planned lawsuit, he told Lagniappe Monday he couldn’t comment until he had more time to evaluate it. Likewise, a representative from Bryne’s office, which had an equal hand in negotiating the season extension, said the congressman was “concerned” about the news and “would be following closely” as it develops. Despite initial pushback from anglers and local politicians, Dorsett said Ocean Conservancy’s objective isn’t about halting the current expanded season, but instead “is about catalyzing change” in the way snapper are managed in the Gulf Coast.


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 9


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE COUNTY

Lump sum AGENCIES WEIGHING BONUSES FOR RETIREES BY JASON JOHNSON

L

ast week the Mobile County Commission agreed to spend $412,000 to extend a one-time bonus to its retirees, but so far it’s unclear whether other civic employers — including the area’s largest — will follow suit. The authorization for the one-time payments came from a law state legislators passed earlier this year. Act 2017-267 applies to employees who retired from a Retirement Systems of Alabama (RSA) agency and paid into the Employees’ Retirement System (ERS). Per Act 2017-267, if approved by their former employer eligible retirees would receive $2 for every month of their civic service or $300, whichever is greater. The same law also extends a one-time payment of $300 to beneficiaries of deceased retirees. According to William F. Kelley, director of ERS benefits, one-time payments have been periodically approved by the Legislature over the past few years as permanent cost-of-living adjustments became less sustainable due to their recurring cost to local agencies. “The Legislature has not granted a cost-of-living increase in quite some time because it is expensive. It adds immediate liability to our retirement system, which makes us look more underfunded than we are,” Kelley said. “If all of the state [and education] retirees got even a 2 percent cost of living increase, the immediate liability for RSA would be more than $1 billion.” In contrast, the one-time payouts legislators approved in recent years do not create any unfunded liability and for retirees. They have the same financial impact as a one-time bonus for an active city or county employee. The more than 900 contributing agencies which pay

10 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

into RSA can either pay the cost of those bonuses in one lump sum or through a temporary increase in the monthly contribution they make to the ERS on behalf of their retirees. For the Mobile County Commission, which has roughly 807 retirees including some veterans of the Mobile County Sheriff’s Office, the options in 2017 were to tack on an additional .75 percent to its ERS contribution rate from October 2018 through September 2019 or pay $418,214 in an upfront payment. When the issue was brought before the commission,

AGENCIES WHICH PAY INTO RSA CAN EITHER PAY THE COST OF THOSE BONUSES IN ONE LUMP SUM OR THROUGH A TEMPORARY INCREASE IN THE MONTHLY CONTRIBUTION THEY MAKE ON BEHALF OF THEIR RETIREES.” Commissioner Jerry Carl asked if the state was contributing money to it. After Carl was told the state would not, commissioners agreed to to pay the lump sum in a unanimous vote July 10. However, because the authorizing legislation makes each agency’s participation optional, the payouts don’t have to be given at all, which Kelley said many agencies have opted to do.

That’s what the city of Mobile did in 2014 despite pressure from advocacy groups such as the Alabama Retired State Employees Association (ARSEA), which pushed this year’s bill as well. “Some of our leaders think we had the votes on the [Mobile] City Council [in 2014], but we just couldn’t get Mayor [Sandy] Stimpson to include it on the agenda,” ARSEA Executive Director Liane Kelly told Lagniappe this week. “That’s something we’re working on this year. We certainly hope it can at least come before the mayor and the council.” Kelly said ARSEA is planning to send representatives to address the City Council within the next two weeks, which is a common practice as agencies around the state consider whether to fund the one-time payment for their respective retirees. In Mobile, the matter is also slightly more complicated because the city maintains a separate, non-RSA pension plan for retired public safety employees. That means even if the one-time bonuses from Act 2017-267 were approved, it wouldn’t have an effect on the largest groups of city retirees under the Mobile Pension Board. In June, all RSA agencies received a letter outlining their options under Act 2017-267 and so far the County Commission is the only local agency to take any action. On Tuesday, Mobile City Councilwoman Bess Rich confirmed the city had received a breakdown of its options from RSA, though because of the city’s rules, putting it on the agenda for consideration will be left up Stimpson. According to Rich, money to make payments to retirees would have to be budgeted and only the mayor’s office can propose a budget amendment. The Mobile County Communications District has also discussed it, but tabled a decision to get more information. However, as a younger agency, MCCD only listed four retirees in 2014, and its total payout this year, if approved by the board, would only cost the agency $2,700. In the city of Mobile, it’s unclear how officials may proceed. On Tuesday, a representative from Stimpson’s office only commented to say, “The administration has not come to a decision.” Officials have until October to respond to RSA, but in the meantime eligible county retirees can expect a one-time payment in December. For those facing increased living expenses and rising healthcare costs, Kelly said, the bonus can go a long way. “For years, retirees have continued to face increases just in their cost of living, and these bonuses are fairly small — the average is around $600,” Kelly said. “This is the best way for a city, county or public board to show retirees, who were public servants, that they do care about their employees’ quality of life once they retiree. I think it sends a great message.”


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 11


BAYBRIEF | FAIRHOPE

What the tech

DISPUTED INVOICE RAISES MORE QUESTIONS OF EMPLOYEE TRACKING BY MAYOR BY LEE HEDGEPETH

I

n a continuation of tense relations between Fairhope’s City Council and mayor, a disputed invoice from a technology company has again raised questions about Mayor Karin Wilson’s apparent effort to monitor city employee phones and computers. The invoice from Elias Technology, which has since been revised at the direction of the city, originally included line items charging Fairhope taxpayers for, among other things, phone and hard drive “examination” of devices used by former city employees. The content of the invoice was first publicly alluded to by City Council President Jack Burrell in a radio interview regarding the recent resignation of other city employees, in particular City Treasurer Deborah Smith, to whom both the original and revised bills were sent from the tech company. “Unofficially,” Burrell said on WABF 1480 AM, “we heard [the resignations] had to do with the tracking software placed on people’s computers and some of the other things the IT department was being asked to do by the mayor.” The original Elias invoice, first reported by The Courier but independently obtained by Lagniappe, explicitly outlines work including the examination of former city employees’ devices. “Phone w/mayor,” one item on the invoice reads. “Pickup cell phone for examination/phone examination of Motorola i686 that was assigned to Jennifer Fidler (tagged “JENNIFER ID357 IMEI 001700955280890”). Motorola device picked up from Jeff Montgomery’s office — Hard drive from Jennifer Fidler’s Computer picked up. Hard drive from Sherry Sullivan’s Computer picked up. Physical extraction of Motorola i686 attempted using Oxygen multiple times with failures.” After the tale of two invoices came to light, the mayor’s

12 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

office responded by chastising Burrell for allegedly leaking the documents. “Confidential information regarding security measures being implemented by Mayor Karen [sic] Wilson for the city of Fairhope have been leaked to the media and publicly discussed on the radio and published by Fairhope City Councilman Jack Burrell,” the statement began. “Such leaks are not in the best interests of the city of Fairhope, and the information released was made public without going through the public records request process.” Lagniappe did not obtain the Elias invoices from Burrell. In any case, Wilson’s statement goes on to explain her view of the invoice and its eventual revision. “Elias Technology submitted an invoice to the city for work performed. When it was brought to the mayor’s attention that some of the work listed on the invoice was outside of the scope of work accepted by Elias, the mayor said we could not be charged for work outside the scope, and company submitted a second invoice without the unauthorized work. The work that was done outside the scope was not nefarious and will be implemented as part of our procedure for all departing employees.” “There is nothing wrong with that,” Wilson said. “Elias simply corrected an invoice that had been submitted that showed work that the city was not going to pay for. Even though some have tried to say that this involves an investigation of me, that is not true. They are trying to make a mountain out of a molehill for political purposes, but at the same time, they are releasing confidential information about the security of the city of Fairhope.” The mayor’s statement also included a relatively short comment from the tech company, which said “though it is normal for us as a company to image and preserve terminat-

ed employees’ phones and computers and have contractually done so for government agencies and private corporations, [we] requested those hours be backed out of the invoice. … The second invoice was sent to the Treasurer to show that the balance had been adjusted in the city’s favor and reflects the changes to the layout that were requested.” The CEO of Elias Technology, K. Gus Dimitrelos, however, gave a much more nuanced view of what occurred, saying Wilson was “playing the role of investigator” and had “conscripted” the company into “the city’s unfortunate political battles.” “Any implication by Fairhope Mayor Karin Wilson that she was unaware of services being performed by Elias Technologies, or that those services were not requested by her, are false,” he said. “Elias Technologies performs data extraction, but does not play the role of investigator. In this case, the mayor, playing the role of investigator, provided some names of persons she believed to have been in contact with employees and email accounts through which she believed city information was being mishandled. No evidence of mishandled information was ever identified.” Dimitrelos also said the explicit detail of the invoice — not its scope — were really what concerned the mayor. “Mayor Wilson expressed the detailed invoice services performed was problematic,” he said. “Wishing to foster a good working relationship within all offices of the city government, we refunded the hours spent on those tasks to the city of Fairhope’s account as a courtesy — even though they were performed at the mayor’s request and are within the scope of providing general cyber security support and assistance as requested. A new invoice was emailed to the treasurer to reflect the account balance change in the city’s favor.” That new invoice lacks the detail of the first and reduces the assessed cost of much of the work listed to $0. In the future, Dimitrelos said, the mayor asked that details of IT work not be listed on invoices. “During a meeting at City Hall on May 16, the mayor requested that future invoices sent to the city not contain details of the time worked. We routinely accept client requests to tailor the invoice format to their common practices, which may include adding or removing content from the invoice; however, changes to the invoice format does not change our practice of maintaining detailed records of hours worked,” he said. “Elias Technologies is a nonpartisan contractor working amid a heated political climate in the city of Fairhope. We contracted with the city of Fairhope — not any one person, office or position. We look forward to achieving contracted goals and to then conclude our business with the city of Fairhope to avoid being conscripted into any more of the city’s unfortunate political battles.” The next Fairhope City Council meeting will be held at 6:30 p.m. on July 24.


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 13


BAYBRIEF | ORANGE BEACH

Building up

LATEST CONDO APPROVAL WILL ADD 120 UNITS IN ORANGE BEACH

P

BY JOHN MULLEN

lanning Commissioner Ralph Moore listened to some complicated discussions during a busy planning meeting in Orange Beach and decided maybe it was time for a little levity. “I’ve just got one silly little question,” Moore said to John Brett of Brett Robinson developers. “When did y’all decide you were going to name every building ‘Phoenix’?” After the laughter subsided, Brett being among those amused, said he hears that question a lot. “I’ve been asked that question more than you can imagine,” Brett said. “A long time ago we talked about renaming to totally different names but this is more for a branding deal. You can go to different parts of the Southeast or walk through an airport, someone’s heard of the Phoenix.” About 18 of the 20 Brett Robinson beachfront and back-bay projects built since 1984 carry the Phoenix name. Brett said the company has built and sold nearly 3,000 condo units during that time. Another one is underway and yet another is now on the drawing board, both in Orange Beach. Phoenix Orange Beach II received a 9-0 favorable recommendation from the planning commission on July 10 and will now be presented in a public hearing before the Orange Beach City Council, likely at the Aug. 15 meeting. The council has the final say on whether or not the project moves forward. It will be located on the Gulf between Tidewater Condominiums and the recently renovated DoubleTree by Hilton Island House Hotel. This $70 million project will add 120 units

to the more than 17,000 vacation condos, hotel rooms and beach houses in southern Baldwin County. Orange Beach alone has 8,466 of the 14,567 condos, with Gulf Shores having 4,519 and Fort Morgan 1,582. There are a total of 2,473 hotel rooms in Gulf Shores and Orange Beach and none in Fort Morgan. Prices for the units in Phoenix Orange Beach II are $785,000 for four bedrooms, $610,000 for three bedrooms and $530,000 for two bedrooms. “We have deposits on nearly half of them,” Brett said. “We’re still working with the city like we do on every other building, but the response has been overwhelming.” This is the third new project started by Brett Robinson since ground was broken on Phoenix Gulf Shores in 2014. The 80-unit complex opened on July 6 and was the first building start for the iconic developer since the massive Phoenix West II was begun in 2007. Currently underway west of the Hampton Inn is Phoenix Orange Beach I, which will add 114 units to the vacation inventory. There are three other beachfront condominiums approved by the cities, two more in Orange Beach and one in Gulf Shores. Those are the 78-unit Abaco in Gulf Shores and the 166-unit Transcendence and 160-unit Caribe on the Beach in Orange Beach. All three are being actively marketed. Additionally, Gulf Shores Planning Director Andy Bauer said, there is a 96-room Comfort Inn and Suites under construction on the north side of East Beach Boulevard. And in the beach district there are six “beach cottage” developments, which will add 58 vacation rental houses.

On track

COUNTY COMMISSION, CSX TO PARTNER ON DORMANT MEGA SITE

B

BY JOHN MULLEN

14 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

aldwin County has a new partner in continuing efforts to recruit businesses to the shovel-ready Mega Site industrial park on Interstate 65 near Bay Minette. Company officials from CSX Corp. have been working with Lee Lawson of the Baldwin County Economic Development Alliance and the Baldwin County Commission to achieve the CSX Select Site designation. “This is a process we went through to understand how we can better work with them and to elevate our site into a more rarified air,” Lawson said. “About 10 years ago now, CSX did a network-wide analysis for large-scale advance manufacturing sites along their railroads and there are only about five sites identified.” The goal of the Select Site designation is to help land new businesses at the Mega Site to add jobs in the county, as well as potential rail customers, Rashard Howard of CSX told the commission. “This is something that’s important and near and dear to us because we understand making these CSX Select Site announcements draws a lot of attention to the site with hopes of landing an optimal customer,” Howard said. The 3,009-acre Baldwin site was first designated in July 2011. It is considered shovel ready because all utilities are already in place, it is adjacent to a major interstate highway and it has mainline CSX rail service. The site is owned by the county. “With CSX, we’ve been working on this a long time, this commission has, along with Economic Development,” Commissioner Skip Gruber said.

“It’s great to have partners like CSX supporting the Mega Site. It’s going to help us in the future when people looking at the site want to make this their home.” In other business: • The county also signed BRATS transportation contracts for fiscal year 2017-18 with AltaPointe Health Systems, ARC Baldwin County and the Baldwin County Council on Aging, and two with Coastal Alabama Community College for courier and transportation services. • Awarded a $145,000 bid to Sun Coast Builders Inc. for the purchase and installation of a 60-by-125-foot storage building in Robertsdale for the Baldwin County Sheriff’s Office. Money for the building will come from federal Asset Forfeiture Program funds. • Agreed to pay $47,869 to Black Box Network Services to provide call monitoring management for the commission. The 2017 budget provided for about $27,000 of the cost and the other $20,000 will be provided by the circuit clerk, according to county documents. • Received a staff recommendation to accept a quote from Kemko for $27,892 to construct a 40-by-40-foot storage building at the county landfill in Loxley. It will be used for the Litter Patrols project. • Staff recommended the commission accept a quote from All Pro Sound for $45,991 to upgrade the audio/video system in commission chambers and $14,457 to CDW-G for cameras and racks. Money for this project will come from the cable franchise fees reserve.


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 15


COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

A brief history of the past ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

BayFest would be a major initiative if he’s re-elected. • The Gulf Coast Classic. For 34 years, Alabama State University was paid $40,000 to play one of its home games at LaddPeebles Stadium against another traditionally African-American college. In 2008 Jones decided to make the game a “true classic,” ultimately getting $275,000 worth of taxpayer money to fund a series that lasted one year. The teams never got paid what Jones promised and the following year the deal fell apart, killing the Gulf Coast Classic. • Carnival. Under Jones, Carnival Cruise Lines pulled out of Mobile, leaving the city holding the bag for roughly $3 million a year in annual debt service on a cruise ship terminal that sat empty for four years. Stimpson was able to get a commitment from Carnival to return after a little more than a year in office. • Investigation of campaign funds. In the last election an investigation by this newspaper was able to prove Jones was using political donations to pay a tenant’s power bill at a building he owns and buying personal items for campaign employees. Jones and some campaign employees were forced to pay back $9,300 in misspent political funds. • Fiscal mismanagement. When Jones took office the city of Mobile had just below $168 million in debt. By the time he left eight years later the debt had skyrocketed to just a hair below $300 million. His last year in office the city ran $29 million in the red, even though he’s continued claiming it didn’t. There’s much more, but you get the gist. Really, when you look over what happened during his eight years and contemplate a return to Jones-style management, the only question this unborn soul can ask is, “Sam Why?”

THEGADFLY

16 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

dent nonprofit organization. HUD pointed out that from 2009-2013, MHB failed to rehab 1,192 family units and allowed more than 800 units to remain vacant for as long as 16 years. • The Police Explorers Scandal. The Police Explorers, a program designed to introduce young people to police work, became a runaway slush fund for snow-skiing trips attended by police, city employees and their families. Jones and MPD ignored the misuse of funds and worked hard to keep this newspaper and the public from seeing who went on those trips. Jones repeatedly sent city attorneys to court try to keep Lagniappe from getting some 6,000 pages of documents pertaining to the trips. • Hank Aaron Stadium. The Mobile BayBears didn’t pay rent at The Hank for more than three years, running up a nearly $820,000 bill. The mayor kept this information secret from the City Council, and when it finally came to light, Jones’ brilliant plan allowed the team to make roughly $500,000 in repairs to the stadium over six years instead of paying the back rent, costing the city hundreds of thousands. • BayFest. Under Jones the city’s threeday music festival was allowed to run itself into the ground financially even as the city continued pouring more money into it. Without a $3.38 million infusion of BP money the festival would have died a few years sooner. During the last three years of Jones’ administration, the festival lost roughly $400,000, $400,000 and $1.1 million, respectively. • BayFest organizers pulled off another slightly losing year in 2014 then abruptly canceled the 2015 show just a few weeks before it was to go on, claiming they were out of money. Still, Jones has said restarting

Cartoon/Laura Rasmussen

F

our years ago a rap group known as 3UnbornSoulz captured the city’s attention with their monster political hit “Sam Who? Sam Jones!” just as the mayoral campaign between Jones and Sandy Stimpson was heating up. Perhaps unintentionally the 3UnbornSoulz were asking a question a lot of Mobilians hadn’t really given much consideration. Sure, Jones had served for years on the County Commission, but “Silent Sam” never made much noise there. He swept into office on the recommendations of then-still-popular outgoing Mayor Mike Dow and the then-still-important Press-Register. Both assured the electorate Jones was the man. Sam Who indeed! I noticed some issues right away when I interviewed him about a strange fundraiser that took place on his behalf in Pennsylvania. Jones was evasive and when I called people on the donors list, some said they had no idea what fundraiser I was talking about. So my antennae went up. Over the years things kind of devolved. The Press-Register editorial board was still portraying him as the affable Teddy Bear they called Sam “Love” Jones, but those of us covering the mayor’s office noticed it was harder and harder to get a straight answer about anything — especially if you asked a tough question. But nobody bothered to run against him, so Jones skated back into office. Over the second four years, though, things deteriorated. There were City Council members who claimed they weren’t allowed to see financial data. There were secret deals and embarrassing personnel issues at MPD. It seemed like there was constant turmoil, especially when it came to finances. The mayor always needed more money and played hardball when it came to getting it. When it came time for re-election, Jones showed his true stripes in a couple of nasty debates during which he expressed derision for people who lived in parts of the city different from his own neighborhood. Mr. Jones has been practically invisible for the past four years — except for his involvement in a rancorous effort to get a paying gig on the Mobile Area Water and Sewer System Board. Since then he’s been quiet as a church mouse. His campaign, like last time, seems primarily focused on stirring racial acrimony and offering constituents the false promise that because he shares their ethnicity he will do something superior for them. The only problem with that tack is he didn’t do it before. Lots of people remember that. Mass hypnosis appears to be the magical part of this bizarre political campaign. Sam thinks by simply telling people things were better when he ran the show they’ll believe it, especially young people who never voted before. To read his campaign’s Facebook posts, Jones was an astoundingly honest, forthcoming, creative and intellectual mayor who was defeated by some white men who paid blues players to hand out fish sticks. But that’s not reality. Jones was hardly an honest, scandal-free and transparent mayor, and the people he mostly seemed to take care of were friends, relatives and political cronies. Maybe for those who have forgotten, or were too young to have paid attention, a short primer of Sam Jones’ greatest hits is in order. He wants to say his administration was scandal-free and successful, but let the record speak for itself. Consider these things: • The Mobile Housing Board. Chaired by Jones’ biggest political supporter and current boss, Clarence Ball, this board not only let much of its housing stock deteriorate into Third World condition on Jones’ watch, the fiscal mismanagement and sweetheart deals have led to federal investigations. HUD’s Office of Inspector General nailed MHB with a $1.2 million conflict of interest payback of funds paid to an employee’s siblings. The report also hammered MHB for improper usage of a supposedly indepen-

THE GADFLY HOPES TO WIN THE “FLYEST FLY” IN THE NAPPIE AWARDS NEXT YEAR, THE ONLY CATEGORY WE DON’T HAVE YET.


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 17


COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

We’ve come a long way, baby ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

E

ach year as we are celebrating the winners of the Nappie Awards, Lagniappe is also celebrating a birthday. This year we turn 15. We’re not babies anymore, and thankfully we have our braces off and our acne under control (mostly). We’ve certainly grown up a lot, but like any 15-year-old we still have a lot to learn. When I look back over the very first Nappie Awards issue, I am amazed we made it to the second one. The font sizes were ginormous because we didn’t have enough advertising to fill the pages. We had zero news coverage — only opinion columns, food reviews, and arts and entertainment coverage. Not to say the content we had wasn’t good, it was. It was just limited. And the topics we opined on were a little lighter. For example, Nappie Award-winning radio host Sean Sullivan, who wrote a column for us back then, was contemplating the evolution of men’s shorts. And it seems we were a little racier with our headlines back then, too. My column was topped with “Not quite a parliament of whores, but close.” This was back when I was covering City Council and they were considering suspending the business license of Jam’s Lounge, a bar on Dauphin Street, alleged to be offering tricks with their liquid treats. Not in the bar, thankfully. They had a bus that would take you to a different location for said tricks. I had forgotten about that. Bow chicka bow wow! Oh, how things have changed — for downtown, the city as a whole and the paper. When Rob and I first started Lagniappe, I don’t think we knew exactly what it would look like 15 years later. We were just trying to get it off the ground, which was not easy and took far longer than we thought it would. Though we always had goals for it, many things have changed the paper rather organically, as we grew along with the city. After we were able to stay around long enough and our budget got slightly bigger than a shoestring, we were able to add more hard news content and investigative reporting, not to mention our talented graphic artists and photographers who have made the papers look much, much better than those sad first ones. And once the Press-Register decided to go to a thrice weekly from a daily and operate under a more statewide, “digital first” approach, we knew we had to fill some gaps there, too. That’s what prompted us to become a weekly instead of a bi-weekly, which was a huge change for us. And a scary one, but it was the right decision, even in a time when everyone was screaming print was all but dead. Over the years, we’ve added more columnists and tried to expand our coverage to points north and across the bay as much as we can. In that first Nappie Awards paper, we had an ad announcing we had just placed the first

18 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

batch of our “hideous pink boxes.” We had 12 of those and three “regal purple ones.” Now we have six times as many boxes and more than 1,300 distribution spots. Some of those poor, hideous pink ones are still around. Bless their hearts. And we couldn’t have done any of this without the support of our advertisers, some of which have been with us from the very beginning. Sometimes I think people forget newspapers are largely supported by advertising. They see them as institutions that should always just be there no matter what. But that is not reality. They are businesses that have to be supported like any other. Lagniappe’s investigation into Herman Thomas, the 911 Board, indigent defense spending, the Mobile Housing Board and coverage of the mayor’s race ... the Luv Guv’s saga ... the BayFest, TenSixtyFive, SouthSounds and Hangout festivals … and 15 years of Nappie Awards (just to name a few) have all been brought to you by the local grocery, shoe, clothing and jewelry stores who support us as well as real estate offices, restaurants, doctors, dentists, banks, lawyers and even naughty shops and gentleman’s clubs. The very different people and different kind of businesses who are the unique threads that make up the fabric that is our community. Without them, we could not have brought you, our readers, any of this. All forms of media have to battle for their piece of the same pie in any given market. Obviously, as times have changed, more and more players are trying to get into that battle. And many of them are from Silicon Valley, such as Facebook, Google, Instagram and Pandora, to name just a few. Their appeal is obvious, but just remember: If you want local media, you have to support it, whether it’s us, our local magazines or local radio stations. So once again, we thank all of those who have helped get us to 15. And we are excited to see what the next 15 will bring. We do know we have some “exciting changes” ahead as we make our way to “sweet 16.” This fall, we will be moving back downtown, to the place where this newspaper was born. (That sounds kind of like a country song.) Along with a partner, we have purchased a building on Government Street and are in the process of renovating it. We look forward to gazing out at the summer traffic jams on Government Street until the bridge is built (some time by the year 3000) and being back in the heart of the city. From our new HQ, we are committed to bringing you the same award-winning journalism we always have, with hopes to continue expanding our coverage to more and more areas throughout the city. And we will have some cool new options for our advertisers as well. As we blow out our candles and make a wish, we thank you for letting us Keep Mobile Funky for the last 15 years and hopefully for many more.


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 19


COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

What happened to the Southern Poverty Law Center? BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM

F

or nearly 50 years, the Southern Poverty Law Center has been a fixture of the Montgomery cityscape. The current iteration of the SPLC’s headquarters is two blocks from the Alabama State Capitol, where Martin Luther King Jr. gave a speech at the conclusion of the 1965 civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery. Ironically, it is also blocks away from the First White House of the Confederacy, where Jefferson Davis lived at the beginning of the Civil War. Another famous landmark in its vicinity is the Dexter Avenue Baptist Church, where King organized the Montgomery Bus Boycott after the arrest of Rosa Parks. The headquarters of the SPLC sticks out like a sore thumb among these buildings. The building, which more closely resembles an Austal USA littoral combat ship than anything else in downtown Montgomery, sits at the corner of Washington Avenue and Hull Street. Initially, the SPLC had noble goals. Founded in 1971, it served as a law firm that fought against racial discrimination and poverty. By the end of that decade, it had successfully implemented a system of combating the Ku Klux Klan by targeting the organization’s chapters with civil litigation and forcing them into bankruptcy. However, by the mid-1980s, the SPLC took on a different role. Instead of focusing solely on racism and racist organizations, it broadened its mission to take on all forms of so-called rightwing extremism. This adjustment proved very lucrative for the SPLC, with its founder, Morris Dees, still at the helm. In a 1994 exposé by The Montgomery Advertiser, it was described as a “money machine” by its critics. At the time, the organization had hoarded nearly $52 million in reserves. Those same critics accused the organization of exaggerating claims of “hate” to secure this fundraising. Since then, the SPLC has continued to make waves. One of its more notable endeavors was teaming up with the American Civil Liberties Union in Glassroth v. Moore in 2002 to force then Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore to remove a monument displaying the Ten Commandments from the rotunda of the Alabama Judicial Building. Moore refused and he was removed from office, along with that monument. Now with an operating budget of $45 million and an endowment in excess of $300 million, the SPLC is still at it, willing to label any organization that does not adhere to a strict interpretation of its left-leaning values as a “hate group.” This is not without consequence. Some news organizations regard the SPLC as the definitive authority on hate groups. In recent years, its definition of what constitutes a hate group has dramatically expanded to include groups that oppose same-sex marriage, a belief held by many religious organizations. Last week, Attorney General Jeff Sessions

20 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

gave a speech to what ABC News defined as “an alleged hate group” based on the SPLC’s designation. Sessions’ speech was to a group called the Alliance Defending Freedom, a group that lists “religious freedom, sanctity of life, and marriage and family” as its core issues and defines its mission “as funding cases, training attorneys and successfully advocating for freedom” in the name of those causes. Where ABC News took particular issue with Sessions’ address to this group is that the Department of Justice was not releasing his remarks to the media. So as you might imagine, ABC News’ website posted a story headlined “Jeff Sessions addresses ‘anti-LGBT hate group,’ but DOJ won’t release his remarks.” For them, this was probably was a twofer. Not only do they get to work in an angle of questionable behavior committed by one of President Donald Trump’s Cabinet members, but also in the name of “anti-LGBT hate,” which the SPLC and ABC News apparently define as opposing same-sex marriage. The ABC News report, bylined by Pete Madden and Erin Galloway, justified naming the ADF a “hate group” with a link to the Southern Poverty Law Center’s website. The ADF, along with 916 other organizations, are deemed by the SPLC to be “hate groups.” The SPLC pinpoints these groups on its website’s “hate map.” Twenty-seven of these groups are in Alabama, ranging from chapters of the KKK to the Nation of Islam. OK, it is arguably valid to classify white and black separatist groups as “hate groups. But 52 of those 917 organizations fall under the SPLC’s newest definition of hate group, which it deems to be “anti-LGBT” groups. In addition to the ADF, included among those are nonthreatening organizations such as Gainesville, Florida’s, American College of Pediatricians and politically active groups such as the Family Research Council in Washington, D.C. When did a policy disagreement about the government’s endorsement of same-sex marriage become “hatred” that rises to a level of racism? Apparently when it became lucrative. In a fundraising pitch from May, the SPLC offered a list of anti-LGBT incidents (some of which it tied to Trump’s election victory). One conclusion that could be drawn is that the SPLC regards LGBT issues as a fundraising cash cow. And, by extension, deeming groups that oppose same-sex marriage on religious grounds as hate groups is fundamental to that effort. When a group like the Southern Poverty Law Center, with arguably undeserved credibility on defining what is and what isn’t a hate group, starts broadening its definition of hate, it marginalizes its own abilities to combat hate. The definition of “hate” becomes watered down and people stop taking the claims of hate seriously. Suddenly, being branded as a “hate group,” even if it is warranted, loses its effectiveness. 


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 21


BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

Mid-century diner targets Lavretta Park location BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

A

ccording to John Vallas with Vallas Realty, a proposal is in place for the 1420-square-foot former Rester’s Auto Shop site — on the corner of Old Shell Road and Border Drive and adjacent to Lavretta Park — to be converted into a 1950s-era throwback style eatery. Blueprints indicate the existing structures will more than double in size, with proposed additions encompassing some 1,650 square feet. An open deck area in the back will have a covered canopy, and separate 830-square-foot office space will be built toward the rear of the site. Plans also indicate the build-out of a large, crushedstone parking lot area between Border Drive and Parkway Drive, adjacent to a similarly sized lot owned by the city and currently used by park visitors. Nine new walk-up parking lanes will also directly front the Border Drive side of the property. An expanded sidewalk fronting the Old Shell Road main entrance is also planned. Two new streetlights and a handicap-accessible drop-off/loading zone are also seen in the works. Timelines for groundbreaking, construction and additional capital investment involved in developing the location were unknown as of press time. Palm Beach Tans is leasing 1,600 square feet of retail space in Tillman’s Corner Plaza, located at 4419 Rangeline Road in Mobile. Plans are in place to open in fall 2017, marking its fifth Mobile location. Angie McArthur with Stirling Properties handled the transaction. Freedom Carrington Hall purchased an 8,000-squarefoot religious facility for $270,000, located at 5901 Overlook Road. An adjacent two-acre parcel remains available

22 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

for purchase according to NAI Mobile, which represented the sellers in the transaction. Don Wilkins of Coldwell Banker represented the buyers. Cameron Weavil, vice president of the Weavil Co., reported that a local investor paid nearly $2.9 million to acquire a 12,000-square-foot shopping center at 2050 S. McKenzie St. in Foley. The site currently has five tenants, including Papa Murphy’s Pizza, T-Mobile and UPS. One 1,500-square-foot retail lot is still available for lease, according to Weavil. The Thrasher Company LLC certified public accountants has leased 1,151 square feet of office space at 713 Belrose in Daphne. Jeff Barnes with Stirling Properties managed the transaction. MetalTech Service Center Inc., a Houston-based company, signed a three-year lease for Building G in Halls Mill Road Industrial Park at 5237 Halls Mill Road. The tenant will occupy 16,766 square feet on two acres, according to J.T. Jenkins and Pete Riehm of NAI Mobile, who handled the transaction.  Direct Furniture has leased 19,324 square feet of warehouse space at 1751 Industrial Drive in Foley. Jeff Barnes with Stirling Properties Broker handled the transaction. The local retailer will use the space as a distribution center. TMIG LLC has leased 1,653 square feet of office space in Mobile Office Park, located at 3929 Airport Blvd. in Mobile. Jack Conger and Jill Meeks with Stirling Properties handled the transaction. Anytime Fitness has leased 3,800 square feet of space at Eastern Shore Plaza, 10200 Eastern Shore Blvd. in Spanish Fort, with plans to open in spring 2018. Angie

McArthur with Stirling Properties represented the property owner. Richard Parnell with Franchise Real Estate LLC worked for the tenant. Per Terry McKinney with Delaney Land & Realty, 3.6 acres of property were picked up for nearly $1.5 million by investors who also own Springhill Hospital in Mobile. The property, located on the West I-65 Service Road N., is near the hospital. McKinney worked for the sellers and Jonathan Rudolph of Rudolph Development represented the buyers. Altaworx LLC, offering business technology services, has signed a lease for a new 4,403-square-foot Class A office space to be located at 455 Magnolia Ave. in Fairhope. Construction of the office building will commence this summer, with delivery by late spring or early summer 2018. Mike Reid with White-Spunner Realty Inc. represented the tenant. Jeff Barnes with Stirling Properties represented the property owner. In an additional update, Will Sledge of Mission Capital, a New York-based real estate advisory firm, represented the seller and obtained Steven McMahon of Inge and Associates Real Estate Inc. locally to assist with last week’s $18.5 million reported sale of the 540,000-square-foot Eastern Shore Centre in Malbis.

Captain D’s expanding

Nashville-based fast casual seafood chain Captain D’s recently announced the signing of a franchise development agreement that will expand its presence in lower Alabama. Four new sites are in the works, to be allocated between Mobile and Pensacola markets over the next several years, according to a news release. Driving Captain D’s growth in Alabama are new franchise owners Sam and Gus Abusaleem of GSA Food Group, who will be in charge of opening the new locations locally. The Abusaleems have been working in the industry since the early 1990s, having previously owned and operated local convenience stores in their community as well as several restaurant franchises, including Popeye’s and Marco’s Pizza. After developing their initial locations, the partners plan to continue expanding within their territory with the expressed goal of opening more eateries throughout the surrounding region. “The significant brand-building accomplishments we’ve achieved over the last six years have solidified Captain D’s as a leader in the fast casual segment and showcased our potential for success,” Michael Arrowsmith, chief development officer of Captain D’s, said. “Our commitment to supporting our franchisees has not only driven interest from new candidates, but also fueled growth from within, with existing franchisees continuing to develop more restaurants.” Founded in 1969, Captain D’s currently has 521 restaurants in 21 states. It is also the top seafood franchise in the country, as ranked by average unit volume, according to a news release. The company is currently seeking single- and multiunit operators to join in brand expansion. For more information about franchise opportunities, visit the company’s website.


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 23


FIREHOUSE SUBS ($)

HOT SUBS, COLD SALADS & CATERING 6300 Grelot Rd. • 631-3730

FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES ($) $10/PERSON • $$ 10-25/PERSON • $$$ OVER 25/PERSON

COMPLETELY COMFORTABLE ALL SPORTS BAR & GRILL ($) 3408 Pleasant Valley Rd. • 345-9338

AL’S HOTDOGS ($)

CLASSIC HOTDOGS, GYROS & MILKSHAKES 4701 Airport Blvd. • 342-3243

ATLANTA BREAD COMPANY ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SALADS & MORE. 3680 Dauphin St. • 380-0444

BAKE MY DAY ($)

OLD-FASHIONED SOUTHERN BAKE SHOP 156 N. McGregor Ave. • 219-7261

BOB’S DINER ($)

GOOD OLD AMERICAN COOKING 263 St. Francis St. • 405-1497

BUCK’S DINER ($)

CLASSIC AMERICAN DINER 58 N. Secion St. Fairhope • 928-8521

CAFE 219 ($)

SALADS, SANDWICHES & POTATO SALAD 219 Conti St. • 438-5234

CAMELLIA CAFÉ ($-$$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FARE 61 Section St. • Fairhope • 928-4321

CAMMIE’S OLD DUTCH ($) MOBILE’S CLASSIC ICE CREAM SPOT 2511 Old Shell Rd. • 471-1710

CARPE DIEM ($)

DELI FOODS, PASTRIES & SPECIALTY DRINKS 4072 Old Shell Rd. • 304-0448

CLARK’S KITCHEN ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHERN CUISINE & CATERING 5817 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0200

CHAT-A-WAY CAFE ($)

QUICHES & SANDWICHES 4366 Old Shell Rd. • 343-9889

CHICK-FIL-A ($)

BURGERS, MILKSHAKES & FRIES 4401 Old Shell Rd. • 447-2394 4663 Airport Blvd. • 300-8425 5319 Hwy 90 • 661-0071 1225 Satchel Page Dr.• 378-8768

FOOSACKLY’S ($)

FAMOUS CHICKEN FINGERS 29181 US Hwy 98 • Daphne • 375-1104 7843 Moffett Rd. • 607-6196 1109 Shelton Beach Rd. • 287-1423 310 S. University Blvd. • 343-0047 2250 Airport Blvd. • 479-2922 7641 Airport Blvd. • 607-7667 2558 Schillinger Rd. • 219-7761 3249 Dauphin St. • 479-2000

FOY SUPERFOODS ($) 119 Dauphin St.• 307-8997

GULF COAST EXPLOREUM CAFE ($) HOMEMADE SOUPS & SANDWICHES 65 Government St. • 208-6815

1880 Industrial Pkwy. • 675-2999

CREAM AND SUGAR ($)

3869 Airport Blvd. • 345-9544 5470 Inn Rd. • 661-9117 28975 US 98 • Daphne • 625-3910

JAMAICAN VIBE ($)

MIND-BLOWING ISLAND FOOD 3700 Gov’t Blvd. Ste A • 602-1973

JERSEY MIKE’S ($)

AUTHENTIC SUB SANDWICHES 7449 Airport Blvd. • 375-1820

JIMMY JOHN’S ($)

SANDWICHES, CATERING & DELIVERY TOO 6920 Airport Blvd. • 414-5444 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-8694 62 B Royal St. • 432-0360

JOE CAIN CAFÉ ($)

PIZZAS, SANDWICHES, COCKTAILS 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

JONELLI’S ($)

1252 Govenment St.• 301-7556 HOME COOKING 4054 Government St. • 665-4557

LICKIN’ GOOD DONUTS ($) 3242 Dauphin St. • 471-2590

LODA BIER GARTEN ($) MAMA’S ($)

SLAP YOUR MAMA GOOD HOME COOKING 220 Dauphin St. • 432-6262

MARS HILL CAFE ($)

GREAT SANDWICHES, COFFEE & MORE 1087 Downtowner Blvd. • 643-1611

MARY’S SOUTHERN COOKING ($) 3011 Springhill Ave. • 476-2232

COFFEE, BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DESSERT 351 George St #B • 405-0003

MICHELI’S CAFE ($)

DAUPHIN ST. CAFE ($)

MCSHARRY’S ($-$$)

HOT LUNCH, DAILY MENU (INSIDE VIA) 1717 Dauphin St. • 470-5231

D’ MICHAEL’S ($)

PHILLY CHEESE STEAKS, GYROS & MORE 7101-A Theodore Dawes Rd. • 653-2979

D NU SPOT ($)

22159 Halls Mill Rd. . • 648-6522

DELISH BAKERY AND EATERY ($) GREAT DESSERTS & HOT LUNCH 23 Upham St. • 473-6115

DEW DROP INN ($)

CLASSIC BURGERS, HOTDOGS & SETTING 1808 Old Shell Rd. • 473-7872

DUNKIN DONUTS ($)

DONUTS, COFFEE & SANDWICHES 1976 Michigan Ave. • 442-4846 3876 Airport Blvd. • 219-7369 505 Schillinger Rd. S. • 442-4845 29160 US Hwy 98 • 621-2228

E WING HOUSE ($)

6358 Cottage Hill Rd. • 725-6917 AUTHENTIC IRISH PUB 101 N. Bancroft St.• 990-5100

MIKO’S ITALIAN ICE ($)

HOTDOGS SANDWICHES & COOL TREATS 3371 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 300–4015

MOMMA GOLDBERG’S DELI ($) SANDWICHES & MOMMA’S LOVE 3696 Airport Blvd. • 344-9500 5602 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6556

MONTEGO’S ($-$$)

FRESH CARIBBEAN-STYLE FOOD & CRAFT BEER 6601 Airport Blvd. • 634-3445 225 Dauphin St. • 375-1576

MOON PIE GENERAL STORE ($)

107 St Francis St #115 • RSA Bank Trust Building

MOSTLY MUFFINS ($) MUFFINS, COFFEE & WRAPS 105 Dauphin St. • 433-9855

NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE ($)

15 N Conception St. • 433-2299

OVEN-BAKED SANDWICHES & MORE 1335 Satchel Page Dr. Suite C. • 287-7356 7440 Airport Blvd. • 633-0096 30500 State Hwy 181 #132 • 625-6544

FATHOMS LOUNGE

O’DALYS HOLE IN THE WALL ($)

195 S University Blvd. Suite H • 662-1829

EUGENE’S MONKEY BAR ($) SMALL PLATES AND CREATIVE COCKTAILS 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

FLOUR GIRLS BAKERY ($) 809 Hillcrest Rd. • 634-2285

PDQ ($)

CHICKEN FINGERS, SALAD & SANDWICHES. 1165 University Blvd. • 202-0959

POLLMAN’S BAKERY ($)

BAKERY, SANDWICHES & MORE 750 S. Broad St. • 438-1511 4464 Old Shell Rd. • 342-8546 107 St. Francis St. Suite 102 • 438-2261

PUNTA CLARA KITCHEN ($)

FUDGE, PRALINES & MORE 17111 Scenic Hwy 98 • Fairhope • 928-8477

R BISTRO ($-$$)

334 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope • 928-2399

562 Dauphin St.• 725-6429

OLD SHELL GROWLERS ($) GROWLER STATION AND BITES 1801 Old Shell Rd. • 345-4767

24 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

WAREHOUSE BAKERY & DONUTS ($)

72. S. Royal St. • 432-SCAM (7226)

WEDGIE’S ($)

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE 271 Glenwood St. • 476-0516

WILD WING STATION ($)

INSIDE THE MOBILE MARRIOTT 3101 Airport Blvd. • 476-6400

COFFEE AND DONUTS 759 Nichols Avenue, Fairhope • 928-7223 GOURMET GRILLED CHEESE 5955 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6134 1500 Gov’t St. • 287-1526

THE WINDMILL MARKET ($)

85 N. Bancroft St. Fairhope • 990.8883

YAK THE KATHMANDU KITCHEN ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC FOODS FROM HIMALAYAN REGION 3210 Dauphin St. • 287-0115 400 Eastern Shore Center • 459-2862

‘CUE

BACKYARD CAFE & BBQ ($) HOME COOKIN’ LIKE MOMMA MADE. 2804 Springhill Ave. • 473-4739

REGINA’S KITCHEN ($-$$)

BAR-B-QUING WITH MY HONEY ($$)

ROLY POLY ($)

BRICK PIT ($)

ROSHELL’S CAFE ($)

COTTON STATE BBQ ($)

HOOTERS ($)

PUB FOOD AND DRAFT BEERS 251 Dauphin St. • 287-6871

CONNECTION FROZEN YOGURT ($)

BAR FOOD 271 Dauphin St • 438-9585

WRAPS & SALADS 3220 Dauphin St. • 479-2480

SEAFOOD & SANDWICHES 212 ½ Fairhope Ave •Fairhope • 928-4100

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK ($)

CHICAGO STYLE EATERY 1222 Hillcrest Rd. • 461-6599

PAT’S DOWNTOWN GRILL ($)

GUMBO SHACK ($-$$)

JUDY’S PLACE ($-$$)

CHI-TOWN DAWGZ ($)

ORIGINAL SANDWICH AND BAKE SHOP 42 ½ Section St. • Fairhope • 929-0122 102 Dauphin St. • 405-0031

SANDWICHES, SUBS & SOUPS 2056 Gov’t St. • 476-2777

107 St. Francis St. • 415-1700 3244 Dauphin St. • 476-0320 3215 Bel Air Mall • 476-8361 4707 Airport Blvd. • 461-9933 435 Schillinger Rd. • 639-1163 1682 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 621-3215 30500 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-3020 CHICKEN SALAD, SALAD & SOUP 2370 S. Hillcrest Rd. Unit R • 660-0501 5753 Old Shell Rd. • 408-3236 1802 US Hwy 98 Suite F• 625-1092

PANINI PETE’S ($)

2906 Springhill Ave. • 479-4614

ROSIE’S GRILL ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHWEST FARE, 7 DAYS 1203 Hwy 98 Ste. 3D • Daphne • 626-2440

ROYAL KNIGHT ($)

LUNCH & DINNER 3004 Gov’t Blvd. • 287-1220

ROYAL STREET CAFE ($) HOMEMADE LUNCH & BREAKFAST 104 N. Royal St. • 434-0011

SALLY’S PIECE-A-CAKE ($) BAKERY 5638 Three Notch Rd.• 219-6379

BBQ, BURGERS, WINGS & SEAFOOD 19170 Hwy 43 Mt. Vernon. • 839-9927 A FAVORITE BARBECUE SPOT 5456 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0001 DOWNTOWN LUNCH 101 N. Conception St. • 545-4682

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT ($-$$) BBQ AND MORE Jubilee Sq.Ctr. Hwy 90, Daphne • 210-2151 McGowin Park Ctr. Satchel Paige Dr. • 471-1050 7721 Airport Blvd. • 380-8957

DREAMLAND BBQ ($)

RIBS, SANDWICHES & GREAT SIDES 3314 Old Shell Rd. • 479-9898

MEAT BOSS ($)

5401 Cottage Hill Rd. • 591-4842

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE ($)

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$) SAGE RESTAURANT ($$) SAISHO ($-$$)

MODERN GASTROPUB INSPIRED BY JAPANESE KITCHEN 455 Dauphin St • 433-0376

VON’S BISTRO ($-$$)

SEAFOOD, ASIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE 69 St. Michael St • 375-1113

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($$)

CASUAL FINE DINING 104 N. Section St. • Fairhope • 929-2219

THE TRELLIS ROOM ($$$)

A LITTLE VINO DOMKE MARKET

WINE, BEER, GOURMET FOODS, & MORE. 720 Schillinger Rd. S. Unit 8 • 287-1851

FOOD PAK

FOOD, WINE & MORE 5150 Old Shell Rd. • 341-1497

POUR BABY

WINE BAR, CRAFT BEERS & BISTRO 6808 Airport Blvd. • 343-3555

FIREHOUSE WINE BAR & SHOP 216 St Francis St. • 421-2022

RED OR WHITE

STEVIE’S KITCHEN ($)

DROP DEAD GOURMET

HEALTHY, DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 3762 Airport Blvd. • 725-1177

SUNSET POINTE ($-$$)

AT FLU CREEK 831 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-7766

THE BLIND MULE ($)

DAILY SPECIALS MADE FROM SCRATCH 57 N. Claiborne St. • 694-6853

THE GALLEY ($)

OPEN FOR LUNCH, INSIDE GULFQUEST 155 S. Water St • 436-8901

THE HARBERDASHER ($) 113 Dauphin St.• 436-0989

A PREMIER CATERER & COOKING CLASSES 1880-A Airport Blvd. • 450-9051

BRIQUETTES STEAKHOUSE ($-$$) GRILLED STEAKS, CHICKEN & SEAFOOD 720A Schillinger Rd. S. S2. • 607-7200 901 Montlimar Dr • 408-3133

CHUCK’S FISH ($$)

SEAFOOD AND SUSHI 551 Dauphin St.• 219-7051

CORNER 251 ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St • 460-3157

DAUPHIN’S ($$-$$$)

THE PIGEON HOLE ($)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD WITH A VIEW 107 St. Francis St • 444-0200

THE SUNFLOWER CAFE ($)

9 Du Rhu Dr. Suite 201 167 Dauphin St. • 445-3802

THYME BY THE BAY ($-$$)

GREAT FOOD AND COCKTAILS 609 Dauphin St. • 308-3105

SOUTHERN COOKING & THEN SOME 1716 Main St. Daphne • 222-4120 INSIDE VIRGINIA’S HEALTH FOOD 3055 A Dauphin St • 479-3200

33 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-5635

TIME TO EAT CAFE ($)

DOWN-HOME COUNTRY COOKIN 7351 Theodore Dawes Rd. • 654-0228 13665 N. Wintzell Ave. • 824-1119

DUMBWAITER ($$-$$$) FIVE ($$)

TP CROCKMIERS ($)

THREE GEORGES CANDY SHOP ($)

LOCAL INGREDIENTS 203 Dauphin St. • 690-6824

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE ($)

INVENTIVE & VERY FRESH CUISINE 6 N. Jackson St. • 433-0377

GREAT SMOOTHIES, WRAPS & SANDWICHES. Du Rhu Dr. • 378-5648 570 Schillinger Road • 634-3454

UNCLE JIMMY’S DELICIOUS HOTDOGS ($)

2550 Dauphin Island Pkwy S. • 307-5328

UPSCALE WINE BAR 9 Du Rhu Dr. S 201 • 287-7135

7 SPICE ($-$$)

ABBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE ($-$$) 4861 Bit & Spur Rd. • 340-6464

ISTANBUL GRILL ($)

AUTHENTIC TURKISH & MEDITERRANEAN 3702 Airport Blvd. • 461-6901

JERUSALEM CAFE ($-$$)

MOBILE’S OLDEST MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE 5773 Airport Blvd. • 304-1155

KAN ZAMAN ($-$$)

MEDITERRANEAN FOOD AND HOOKAH 326 Azalea Rd • 229-4206

MEDITERRANEAN SANDWICH COMPANY ($)

GREAT & QUICK. 3702 Airport Blvd. • 308-2131 274 Dauphin St. • 545-3161 2502 Schillinger Rd. Ste. 2 • 725-0126 6890 US-90 • DAPHNE • 621-2271

MINT HOOKAH BISTRO ($) GREAT MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 5951 Old Shell Rd. • 450-9191

LAUNCH ($-$$)

GREAT LUNCH & DINNER 3607 Old Shell Rd. • 445-8700

LIGHT LUNCH WITH SOUTHERN FLAIR. 226 Dauphin St. • 433-6725

THE VINEYARD

TAZIKI’S ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St. • 432-8000

AMERICAN RESTAURANT & BAR 250 Dauphin St. • 476-1890

BISTRO PLATES, CRAFT BEERS & PANTRY 2304 Main St. • 375-2800

KITCHEN ON GEORGE ($-$$)

TIN ROOF ($-$$)

SOUTHERN CASUAL FAMILY DINING 10800 US HWY 31 • Spanish Fort• 621-4995

SOUTHERN NAPA

OLLIE’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL ($-$$)

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOOD 351A George & Savannah St. • 436-8890

MAGHEE’S GRILL ON THE HILL ($-$$) NOBLE SOUTH ($$) NOJA ($$-$$$)

OSMAN’S RESTAURANT ($$) SUPREME EUROPEAN CUISINE 2579 Halls Mill Rd. • 479-0006

ROYAL SCAM ($$)

GUMBO, ANGUS BEEF & BAR

FUJI SAN ($)

THAI FARE AND SUSHI 2000 Airport Blvd. • 478-9888

GOLDEN BOWL ($)

HIBACHI GRILL & ASIAN CUISINE 309 Bel Air Blvd • 470-8033 2370 Hillcrest Rd. Unit B • 380-6062 JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE 3959 Cottage Hill Rd • 666-6266

KAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($-$$) QUALITY FOOD, EXCELLENT SERVICE 5045 Cottage Hill Rd. • 607-6454

LIQUID ($$)

AMAZING SUSHI & ASSORTMENT OF ROLLS. 661 Dauphin St. • 432-0109

RICE ASIAN GRILL & SUSHI BAR ($) 3964 Gov’t Blvd. • 378-8083

ROCK N ROLL SUSHI ($$)

273 S. McGregor Ave • 287-0445 6345 Airport Blvd. • 287-0555 940 Industrial Pkwy • 308-2158 6850 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 753-4367

STIX ($$)

LIVE MUSIC, MARTINIS & DINNER MENU. 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

FALAFEL? TRY SOME HUMMUS

4701 Airport Blvd. • 408-3379

LUNCH BUFFET 3674 Airport Blvd. • 341-6171

ROYAL STREET TAVERN

3758 Dauphin Island Pkwy. • 473-1401

SUGAR RUSH DONUT CO. ($)

CUISINE OF INDIA ($$)

SAISHO ($$)

SMOKEY DEMBO SMOKE HOUSE ($)

BAY GOURMET ($$)

3966 Airport Blvd.• 343-5530

323A De La Mare Ave, Fairhope • 990-0003 1104 Dauphin St.. • 478-9494

SIMPLY SWEET ($)

SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS & MORE 41 West I-65 Service Rd. N Suite 150. • 287-2793

CHINA DOLL ($)

ICHIBAN SUSHI ($)

17111 Scenic HWY 98 • Point Clear • 928-4838

SAUCY Q BARBQUE ($)

CUPCAKE BOUTIQUE 6207 Cottage Hill Rd. Suite B • 665-3003

THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR 960 Schillinger Rd. S • 660-4470

THE WASH HOUSE ($$)

SERDA’S COFFEEHOUSE ($)

AWARD-WINNING BARBQUE 1111 Gov’t Blvd. • 433-7427

CHARM ($-$$)

HIBACHI 1 ($-$$)

COFFEE, SMOOTHIES, LUNCH & BEERS. 5460 Old Shell Rd. • 344-4575 COFFEE, LUNCHES, LIVE MUSIC & GELATO 3 Royal St. S. • 415-3000

THAI & SUSHI 5369 D Hwy 90 W • 661-5100

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE Battle House Hotel, Royal St. • 338-5493

BARBEQUE & MUSIC Bayfront Park Dr. • Daphne • 625-RIBS 701 Springhill Ave. • 410-7427 4672 Airport Blvd. • 300-8516

SATORI COFFEEHOUSE ($)

BENJAS ($)

MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT & HOOKAH 1248 Hillcrest St • 634-9820 MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 1539 US HWY 98• 273-3337

FAR EASTERN FARE ANG BAHAY KUBO ($$)

6455 Dauphin St. • 433-0376 610240 Eastern Shore Blvd. • 621-9088

TASTE OF THAI ($$)

9091 US-90 Irvington • 957-1414

TOKYO JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE ($$) UPSCALE SUSHI & HIBACHI 364 Azalea Rd. • 343-6622

WASABI SUSHI ($$)

JAPANESE CUISINE 3654 Airport Blvd. S. C • 725-6078

FROM THE DEPTHS BAUDEAN’S ($$)

FRIED, GRILLED, STEAMED & ALWAYS FRESH 3300 River Rd. • 973-9070

THE BLUEGILL ($-$$)

A HISTORIC SEAFOOD DIVE W/ LIVE MUSIC 3775 Hwy. 98 • 625-1998

BONEFISH GRILL ($$)

ECLECTIC DINING & SPACE 6955 Airport Blvd. • 633-7196

BOUDREAUX’S CAJUN GRILL ($-$$) QUALITY CAJUN & NEW ORLEANS CUISINE 29249 US Highway 98 Daphne. • 621-1991

CRAVIN CAJUN/DIP SEAFOOD ($) PO-BOYS, SALADS & SEAFOOD 1870 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 287-1168

ED’S SEAFOOD SHED ($$)

FRIED SEAFOOD SERVED IN HEFTY PORTIONS 3382 Hwy. 98 • 625-1947

FELIX’S FISH CAMP ($$) UPSCALE DINING WITH A VIEW 1420 Hwy. 98 • 626-6710

FISHERMAN’S LEGACY ($) DELI, MARKET AND CATERING. 4380 Halls Mill Rd. • 665-2266

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($)

30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 206-8768 3654 Airport Blvd. • 338-9350

LUCY B. GOODE ($$)

GULF COAST CUISINE, REINVENTED 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

LULU’S ($$)

4513 Old Shell Rd.• 473-0007

LIVE MUSIC & GREAT SEAFOOD 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

BAMBOO STEAKHOUSE ($$)

MUDBUGS AT THE LOOP ($)

BANGKOK THAI ($-$$)

RALPH & KACOO’S ($-$$)

SUSHI BAR 650 Cody Rd. S • 300-8383

DELICIOUS, TRADITIONAL THAI CUISINE 28600 US 98 • Daphne • 626-5286 3821 Airport Blvd. • 344-9995

BANZAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($$) TRADITIONAL SUSHI & LUNCH. 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-9077

CAJUN KITCHEN & SEAFOOD MARKET 2005 Government St. • 478-9897 THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1595 Battleship Pkwy. • 626-0045

R&R SEAFOOD ($-$$)

LAID-BACK EATERY & FISH MARKET 1477 Battleship Pkwy. • 621-8366


RIVER SHACK ($-$$)

916 Charleston St. • 433-9374

THE GRAND MARINER ($-$$)

SANDWICHES & COLD BEER 273 Dauphin St. • 433-4376 Hillcrest & Old Shell Rd. • 341-9464

SEAFOOD, BURGERS & STEAKS 6120 Marina Dr. • Dog River • 443-7318. LOCAL SEAFOOD & PRODUCE 6036 Rock Point Rd. • 443-7540

THE HARBOR ROOM ($-$$) UNIQUE SEAFOOD 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

THE SEAFOOD HOUSE ($-$$)

HEROES SPORTS BAR & GRILLE ($)

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS ($-$$) WINGS, SEAFOOD, BURGERS & BEER 7721 Airport Blvd. Suite E-180 • 639-6832

ISLAND WING CO ($)

751 Azalea Rd. • 301-7964

EVERYTHING BAKED OR GRILLED 2617 Dauphin St. • 476-9464

TIN TOP RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR ($$)

1715 Main St. • 375-0543

SEAFOOD, STEAKS, & EXTENSIVE WINE LIST 6232 Bon Secour Hwy County Rd. 10. • 949-5086

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$)

MANCIS ($)

MCSHARRY’S IRISH PUB ($)

BRILLIANT REUBENS & FISH-N-CHIPS. 101 N. Brancroft St. Fairhope • 990-5100

FRESH SEAFOOD FOR OVER 75 YEARS 605 Dauphin St. • 432-4605 6700 Airport Blvd. • 341-1111 1208 Shelton Beach Rd. • Saraland • 442-3335 805 S. Mobile St. • 929-2322

MUG SHOTS ($$)

IS THE GAME ON?

BURGERS, DOGS & 27 BEERS & WINES. 19992 Hwy.181 Old County Rd. Fairhope • 281-2663

BAR & GRILL 29740 Urgent Care Dr. • Daphne • 662-9639 6255 Airport Blvd. • 447-2514

OLD 27 GRILL ($)

GUIDO’S ($$)

3250 Airport Blvd. Springdale Mall• 450-4556

5556 Old Shell Rd. • 345-7484

TAMARA’S BAR & GRILL ($)

HOUSE OF PIZZA ($)

WINGS, PO-BOYS, BURGERS 210 Eastern Shore Center, Hwy. 98 • 929-0002

MARIA BONITA AGAVE BAR & GRILL ($-$$)

FRESH CUISINE NIGHTLY ON MENU 1709 Main St. • Daphne • 626-6082 3958 Snow Rd C. • Semmes • 645-3400

LA ROSSO ($$)

COMFORT FOOD 1716 Main St. Ste. C • Daphne • 281-2982

MACARONI GRILL ($$)

SMALL PLATES, PIZZAS, PASTAS & WINE 3250 Airport Blvd. • 450-4556

MARCOS ($)

MIRKO ($$)

PASTA & MORE 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-6611

BAUMHOWER’S ($)

WEMOS ($)

PAPA’S PLACE ($$)

BISHOP’S ($)

A SOUTHERN GRILL & BAR 3673 Airport Blvd. • 344-2131

BUFFALO WILD WINGS ($)

WINGS, TENDERS, HOTDOGS & SANDWICHES 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-5877

A TASTE OF ITALY. BYOB. 28691 U.S. Highway 98 • 626-1999

MAMA MIA!

AUTHENTIC ITALIAN DISHES 312 Fairhope Ave. • Fairhope • 990-5535

BUCK’S PIZZA ($$)

DELIVERY 350 Dauphin St. • 431-9444

BEST WINGS & SPORTING EVENTS 6341 Airport Blvd. • 378-5955

CORTLAND’S PIZZA PUB ($-$$)

BUTCH CASSIDY’S ($)

GAMBINO’S ITALIAN GRILL ($)

FAMOUS BURGERS, SANDWICHES & WINGS 60 N. Florida St. • 450-0690

CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB ($) BURGERS & BEER

PIZZA, SUBS & PASTA 1368 ½ Navco Rd.• 479-0066

GREAT PIZZA. LUNCH & DINNER 4356 Old Shell Rd. • 342-0024

ITALIAN, STEAKS & SEAFOOD 18 Laurel Ave. • Fairhope • 990-0995

GRIMALDI’S ($)

Bel Air Mall • 476-2063

PINZONE’S ITALIAN VILLAGE ($$) RAVENITE ($)

PIZZA, PASTA, SALAD & MORE 102 N. Section St. •Fairhope• 929-2525

PIZZERIA DELFINA ($) PIZZA & PASTA 107 Dauphin St. • 375-1644

ROMA CAFE ($-$$)

PASTA, SALAD AND SANDWICHES 7143 Airport Blvd. • 341-7217

ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL ($$)

HEARTY MEXICAN FARE 736 holcombe Ave.• 473-0413

POOR MEXICAN ($)

OLÉ MI AMIGO!

ROOSTER’S ($)

TASTE OF MEXICO 5452 Hwy 90 W • 661-5509

TAQUERIA MEXICO ($-$$)

CAFÉ DEL RIO ($-$$)

PIES & AWESOME BEER SELECTION 2032 Airport Blvd. • 471-4700 5660 Old Shell Rd. • 380-1500 29698 Frederick Blvd.• Daphne • 621-3911

OLÉ MI AMIGO ($-$$)

HOMEMADE PASTAS & PIZZAS MADE DAILY 5901 Old Shell Rd. • 342-3677

MELLOW MUSHROOM ($)

NAVCO PIZZA ($$)

WINGS, BURGERS & PUB GRUB 6880 US-90 #14 • Daphne • 625-4695

VIA EMILIA ($$)

AZTECAS ($-$$)

LUCKY’S IRISH PUB ($) IRISH PUB FARE & MORE 3692 Airport Blvd • 414-3000

ITALIAN FOOD & PIZZAS 11311 US HIghway 31 Spanish Fort• 375-0076

5055 Cottage Hill Rd. • 308-4888 2394 Dawes Rr. • 639-3535 2004 US 98 • Daphne • 265-6550

ASHLAND MIDTOWN PUB ($-$$) PIZZAS, PASTAS, & CALZONES 245-A Old Shell Rd. • 479-3278

TRATTORIA PIZZA & ITALIAN ($$)

MEXICAN CUISINE 3977 Gov’t Blvd. • 660-4970

MOUTH WATERING MEXICAN FOOD 1175 Battleship Pkwy • 625-2722

CINCO DE MAYO ($) MEXICAN CUISINE 260 Azalea Rd. • 375-1095

DAUPHIN ST. TAQUERIA ($)

ENCHILADAS, TACOS, & AUTHENTIC FARE Ok Bicycle Shop • 661 Dauphin St. • 432-2453

EL MARIACHI ($)

763 Holcombe Ave • 473-0413

FUEGO ($-$$)

OUTSTANDING MEXICAN CUISINE 2066 Old Shell Rd. • 378-8621

HACIENDA SAN MIGUEL ($-$$) TASTE OF MEXICO 880 Schillinger Rd. S. • 633-6122 5805 US 90 • 653-9163

LA COCINA ($)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE 800 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-0783 830 W I65 Service Rd. S • 378-5837 4663 Airport Blvd. • 342-5553

LOS ARCOS ($)

QUAINT MEXICAN RESTAURANT

3050 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-7433 LATIN AMERICAN FOOD 211 Dauphin St. • 375-1076 AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FLAVOR 3733 Airport Blvd. • 414-4496

NO GAMBLING CASINO FARE

MAGNOLIA HOUSE ($$-$$$) FINE DINING, SEAFOOD AND STEAKS

FLAVORS BUFFET ($-$$) ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET

IP CASINO:

850 Bayview Ave. Bilox • 888-946-2847

THIRTY-TWO ($$$) SEAFOOD, STEAKS, WINE

TIEN ($-$$)

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

HIGH TIDE CAFÉ ($)

CASUAL & RELAXING, EXTENSIVE MENU

ISLAND VIEW:

3300 W. Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 877-774-8439

BEACH BLVD STEAMER ($) SEAFOOD

CARTER GREEN STEAKHOUSE ($$-$$$) RICH TRADITIONS, STEAK, SEAFOOD

BEAU RIVAGE:

C&G GRILLE ($)

BR PRIME ($$-$$$)

PALACE CASINO:

COAST RESTAURANT ($-$$)

MIGNON’S ($$$)

875 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 888-952-2582 FINE DINING ESTABLISHMENT. BURGER, WINGS, PIZZA

LARGE BREAKFAST, LUNCH OR DINNER MENU

158 Howard Ave. Biloxi • 800-725-2239 STEAKS, SEAFOOD, FINE WINE

JIA ($-$$)

PLACE BUFFET ($-$$)

STALLA ($$)

STACKED GRILL ($-$$)

EXOTIC CUISINE AND SUSHI ITALIAN COOKING

TERRACE CAFE ($)

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, LATE NIGHT

HARD ROCK CASINO:

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

BURGERS AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

TREASURE BAY:

1980 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 800-747-2839

777 Beach Blvd.Biloxi • 877-877-6256

THE DEN ($-$$)

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$)

CQ ($$-$$$)

HARD ROCK CAFÉ ($)

BLU ($)

SEAFOOD

AMERICAN FARE & ROCKIN’ MEMORABILIA

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

INTIMATE & CASUAL WITH DAILY SPECIALS ELEGANT ATMOSPHERE & TANTALIZING ENTREES LOUNGE WITH COCKTAILS & TAPAS MENU

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE

WIND CREEK CASINO:

SOUTHERN FAVORITES BUFFET

FIRE ($$-$$$)

SATISFACTION ($-$$)

HARRAH’S GULF COAST:

280 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 288-436-2946

303 Poarch Rd. Atmore • 866-946-3360 PRIME STEAKS, SEAFOOD & WINE

GRILL ($)

CONTEMPORARY & OLD-FASHIONED FAVORITES

SEND LISTINGS TO LISTINGS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 25


CUISINE THE DISH

The tastiest Nappies of 2017 BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

26 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

Photos | Yelp / Facebook

Y

ou have spoken. The 2017 Nappie Awards are in the can and you, dear reader, spread the love more this year than ever. Very few nominees found themselves winning multiple awards, something I believe may be due to a voting system that levels the playing field a bit. Those that did win more than one award were heavily contested. Butch Cassidy’s took home the awards for Best Locally Owned Restaurant and for Best Server in Megan Baker. The Noble South nabbed a couple, with Best Chef Chris Rainosek also cranking out the Best Entrée with his shrimp and grits. Kitchen on George grabbed a pair for its Most Innovative Menu as well as Best Farm to Table Restaurant. Moe’s Original BBQ won for both Best Chain Restaurant and Best Barbecue Restaurant. Speaking of barbecue, those awards gave virtually all of our heavy hitters some recognition. Best Barbecue Sauce went to Meat Boss while your choice for Best Ribs was oldschoolers Dreamland. Farther west, Dick Russell’s Bar-B-Q got the nod for Best Biscuits. The Best Overall Restaurant is Felix’s Fish Camp Grill on the causeway. Best New Restaurants are Dumbwaiter on the Hill (fine dining) and Roosters (casual dining). Across the bay you liked Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill for Best Eastern Shore Restaurant and LuLu’s for Best Beach Restaurant. Ruth’s Chris was voted as having the Best Service Overall. Best Outdoor Dining is tough when competing against Sunset Pointe at Fly Creek Marina. Panini Pete’s may have the Nappie for Best Eastern Shore Lunch Spot sealed for a while. No doubt the incredible view at Dauphin’s helped it win the award for Best Atmosphere. Best Restaurant Wine List deservedly goes to Red or White, while Best Wine/Gourmet Shop is Domke Market. For Best Beer Selection — Retail you can praise Old Shell Growlers for its wonderful beer selection. A little more down to earth is the Best Home Cookin’/ Soul Food category. That’s an important one, and this year it went to Judy’s Place. Have you ever tried to get in there for lunch? Cross your fingers. If it’s the area’s Best Brunch you crave, the Grand Hotel in Point Clear is your spot. Internationally, we have some great categories. Via Emilia is your pick for Best Italian Restaurant. That tiny kitchen puts out a lot of food. For Best Mexican Restaurant, your pick is La Cocina and its new digs. Best Ethnic Restaurant went to Mediterranean Sandwich Co. The best news about that is Vlad seems to be opening a new location every time we turn around!

Chris Rainosek at The Noble South won the Nappie Award for Best Chef, while Lagniappe readers decided Cream & Sugar Cafe serves the area’s Best Gumbo. Best Caterer goes to Naman’s. Even the coffeehouses were well represented. For Mobile, Of all the annual food events this town supports, you voted you chose Carpe Diem as Best Coffeehouse; Alan Tolson and Greek Fest as the Best Annual Food Event or Cook-off. I was crew are still making it happen. You picked Serda’s as the Best sad I didn’t get to see the bouzouki player this year. Think of Eastern Shore Coffeehouse. Along with his original Mobile lohow much better next year’s will be now that Ann Street has cation John Serda will soon have a brewery downtown, no doubt gotten some much-needed attention. heavily contesting any beer categories we may have in the next When you’re in the midst of indulging, O’Daly’s Hole in the Nappie Awards. Wall is your place for (I predicted it) Best Drunk Food. I still When it comes to specific foods, no restaurant ran away with haven’t tried one of their goofy pizzas, but I will. When you an armload of awards. For starters, let’s have a look at Best Apwake up with a hangover, your cure is petizer. That was awarded to Heroes for its Foosackly’s for Best Hangover Food, joincrawfish and spinach dip. David Rasp better ing the ranks of those with multiple wins not take that one off the menu anytime soon, this year. but Chick-fil-A beat Heroes for Best Sweet Once you’ve wrapped it all up and are Tea. While we also love Heroes’ wings, for almost ready for the check, your Best DesBest Wings you chose Buffalo Wild Wings, a BUTCH CASSIDY’S sert favorites are clear. Delish’s Desserts tough-to-beat chain that puts out an excellent took the award for Best Desserts. Sally’s product. For Best Chicken Fingers you can’t TOOK HOME THE Piece of Cake took the, um, cake for Best fake the foo — Foosackly’s holds the title. Bakery and Pollman’s got the nod for Best You aren’t surprised Callaghan’s won Best AWARDS FOR BEST Wedding Cakes. Not to be too confusing, Burger. The whole neighborhood did well. LOCALLY OWNED but Flour Girls took the Nappie for Best Best Gumbo went to the Oakleigh Garden District’s Cream and Sugar, which serves it RESTAURANT AND FOR Cupcake. As for Best Local Grocery Store, you over grits. Ashland Midtown Pub has your BEST SERVER IN know Greer’s has “got it.” Best Grocery Best Po’boy while Mellow Mushroom serves Chain went to Publix, while its neighbor your Best Pizza. In the Best Take and Bake MEGAN BAKER. down the street, Whole Foods, won for category, Papa Murphy’s is currently king. Best Gourmet Grocery. The Best Place to For Best Sushi, Rock-n-Roll Sushi rocked the get Local Produce/Foods in Mobile was vote. Briquettes Steakhouse took Best Steak Old Shell Market (where you will find me and Half Shell Oyster House shucked out on Mondays), while Allegri won for Best Place to Get Local your Best Seafood. Produce/Foods in Baldwin County. Your Best Raw Oysters are from Wintzell’s Oyster House. Last but not least, and I am almost tired of saying it, but Always be on the lookout for the locals; the ones from Dauphin Cammie’s Old Dutch beat out all of the other contenders for Island are spectacular. In the Best Seafood Market category, Best Ice Cream/Frozen Yogurt/Gelato. At some point the city Mudbugs at the Loop was your place for tails to pinch and heads will erect a bronze statue, I am sure. to suck. Congratulations to our winners. Seeing such a variety speaks Your Best Lunch Spot in Mobile is Chicken Salad Chick. to the strength of our culinary scene and our readers’ broad dinBest Eastern Shore Lunch Spot is Panini Pete’s. Best Food Truck goes to Von’s. (Her restaurant is great, too.) The award for ing preferences. Here’s to many more options next year!


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 27


CUISINE | WORD OF MOUTH

Fairhope Brewing’s annual ‘Mardi Gras in July’ BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR

Bay Bites gains momentum

Cooper Riverside Park will be bursting at the seams Wednesday, July 26, for the annual Bay Bites Food Truck Festival. From 5-8 p.m., enjoy offerings from your favorite meals on wheels as well as craft beer from Atlanta’s Sweetwater Brewing Co., live music from Roadside Glorious and good, clean fun with lawn games, a dunking booth and vendors in this beautiful setting. Tickets are $15 in advance and $20 at the door, available through Mobile Baykeeper and the “Bay Bites” Facebook page. Participating food trucks so far are Bleus Burger, Crabby T’s, Crepe Crusader, Frios Gourmet Pops, Grillbillies BBQ Co. (what a name!), The Kraken Catering Co., Mother Shuckers, Puglies Mexican and Von’s. (I had some Puglies the other day — get their barbacoa. I can’t wait to try the others.) This event is hosted by Baykeeper’s Young Advisory Council and continues to grow every year.

Callaghan’s gets statewide award

For the sixth year in a row, the readers of Alabama Magazine voted as you did for the Nappie Awards, crowning Callaghan’s for having the “best burger” in the Best of Bama Awards. I’d not had one in weeks so ordered one at the Phil and Foster CD release party to be sure. I think they got it right. Congratulations, JT and crew! Don’t change a thing.

Photo | Yelp

Gumbo Academy time

Y

Fries aren’t an option, but Callaghan’s won local and statewide awards for Best Burger this year.

ou’ve heard of Christmas in July, but Mardi Gras? It’s time for the fourth annual “Mardi Gras in July” this Saturday, July 22, at Fairhope Brewing Co. It’s an annual celebration of our favorite time of year … at a different time of year! Enjoy cooling off in the oppressive summer heat with Mardi Gras brews such as King Cake Stout, Bubba Likes Moon Pie and Hurricane Wheat, along with a few surprises.

A mere $5 gets you in the door plus a commemorative glass. Great live music begins at 2 p.m. with Bay City Brass Band, Fat Man Squeeze at 4:30 p.m. and Lauren Murphy and the Psychedelics at 7 p.m. Don’t worry about bringing a covered dish. Food will be available for purchase from Fairhope’s Bean and Bistro as well as the Bleus Burger food truck. Laissez les bon temps rouler!

28 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

You must act fast! It’s time once again for the class you’ll love to eat at Bettie Champion’s Gumbo Academy. Made possible with a grant from the Alabama Arts Council, this two-part class includes a lecture portion and a hands-on cooking class, after which students take home their own gallon of gumbo. Identical lectures will be held Monday, July 24, and Tuesday, July 25, beginning at 5:30 p.m. at Government Street United Methodist Church located at the corner of Broad. You’ll get an hour of history, preparation instruction and informational handouts including the tested recipe. The cooking part of the class will be done in pairs at dates to be determined. Cost is $75 per student; all you need to bring is a gallon-sized stockpot. For more information call Bettie at 251-458-1570 or email championbettie@ hotmail.com. Recycle!


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 29


CUISINE | THE BEER PROFESSOR

Readers name their favorite tipples BY TOM WARD/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

I

30 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

Causeway are easily found at almost every bar and restaurant in our area, if you’re looking for something more exotic than your regular beer fare, LoDa Bier Garten is again the readers’ choice for Bar with Best Tap Beer Selection, and I heartily agree, as it is my favorite place to try new and different beers I can’t find anywhere else. With more than 100 beers regularly on tap — and 100 more available in bottles and cans — it’s a fantastic place to explore new beer styles, especially on Sunday afternoon when drafts are half price. For the Best Beer Selection — Retail, our readers chose Old Shell Growlers, another great place to find a wide range of craft beers from around the area and around the world. Old Shell Growlers offers both on- and off-site sales, so you can enjoy a pint from one of the 30 or so beers on tap while perusing the dozens of beers for sale. The thing that really makes Old Shell Growlers such a haven for beer enthusiasts is that it makes it easy to try lots of different beers without breaking the bank. First, it offers a great variety of single-sale bottles and cans, so you don’t have to get a six- or a 12-pack of something you aren’t quite sure about. Second, you can get a taste of any one of the beers on tap before filling up your 32- or 64-ounce growler to take home. If your tastes go to something other than beer, some of the other drink winners include Tacky Jack’s Bushwacker and the Pineapple Jalapeño Margarita at Five Bar, which I think I’m going to have to try. Finally, for those of you who had a little too much the night before and need a little hair o’ the dog, Ashland Midtown Pub’s Bloody Mary was again chosen as the best by Lagniappe readers. Congratulations to all the winners!

Photo | Facebook

t’s Nappie time and the votes are in for the best drinks in Mobile! Not surprisingly, local favorite Fairhope Brewing Co. won as Lagniappe readers’ Favorite Craft Beer for the second year in a row with its Take the Causeway IPA, beating out a number of other excellent beers — including its own Judge Roy Bean Stout. Take the Causeway is not only great general local navigation advice, but also a very nice, strong (8.2 percent APV) IPA with good flavor and not too much bitterness. In the Favorite Import Beer category, the Belgian pilsner Stella Artois won the Nappie for the second time in two years, having been beaten by Corona last year. I have to agree with Lagniappe readers on this one, as Stella is a smooth, traditional European pilsner, light in color and sweet in aroma and taste. First brewed in 1926, it has become much more widely distributed in the past decade or so and is now fairly ubiquitous throughout the United States. Pennsylvania’s Yuengling lager took home the award for Favorite Domestic Beer, a new Nappie category this year. The nation’s oldest brewery, Yuengling was founded during Andrew Jackson’s administration in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, by David Yuengling, a German immigrant. The brewery has been in continuous operation and under the control of the same family ever since, not even closing during Prohibition, when it produced a series of “near beers” to stay afloat. The Yuengling lager popular today dates only from 1987 but, according to the brewery, is based on a historical family recipe. Very different from most American lagers, it looks more like an ale, with an amber color and very little head. It’s a bit bitter but its flavor isn’t very distinctive, especially for those who have become used to craft beers. While Yuengling, Stella and even Fairhope’s Take the

OLD SHELL GROWLERS, NAPPIE AWARD WINNER FOR BEST BEER SELECTION — RETAIL, HAS DOZENS OF BEERS BY THE BOTTLE AND MORE THAN 30 ON TAP.


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 31


Oops, you guys did it again. We received the most votes we ever have in the Nappies in our 15-year history. We love to see all of the excitement, but, honestly, we hate to see the disappointment too. There were many categories where less than 100 votes determined the top three. Some categories received more than 20,000 votes total! (That’s just crazy! The first year we got less than a thousand votes… in the whole contest.) And it’s hard to tell someone they didn’t win when they received more than 5,000 votes, but it happened more than once. And even in the less popular categories, finalists received hundreds of votes each. So even if you didn’t win, know you are loved and better luck next year! Nappie revenge winning is oh so sweet! But this issue is about the winners, all 287 of them. Yes, 287. We often hear complaints that there are now too many categories. Trust us, we complain about it too, as we are the ones who have to tabulate the votes, make certificates and sit at the Saenger for two-and-a-half hours handing out awards. But when businesses call up and ask why we don’t have a category for them and make the case that their business and their employees are contributing to our great city just as much as any of our other Nappie categories, it’s hard for us to argue with that. And we enjoy letting our readers recognize businesses who may not get that kind of recognition very often. So, the categories will most likely continue to grow. Just eat a sandwich before the awards show. There are plenty of excellent Nappie-award winning places to choose from. Congratulations to all of our deserving winners this year. And thank you Lagniappe readers for choosing them and for Keeping Mobile Funky!

TOP VOTE GETTERS IN EACH CATEGORY

NIGHTLIFE

CITY LIFE

EATS AND DRINKS

BEST BARTENDER

BEST MOBILIAN EVER

BEST LOCALLY-OWNED RESTAURANT

BEST BARTENDERESS

BEST LOCAL COMPANY TO WORK

BEST CHAIN RESTAURANT

BEST ALL AROUND BAR

BEST MOBILIAN RIGHT NOW

FOR

SHOPPING/SERVICES BEST SALON BEST STYLIST

BEST METEOROLOGIST

BEST LOCAL BAND

FAVORITE RADIO STATION

BEST LOCAL MUSIC FESTIVAL

BEST ANCHOR

BEST CLUB TO SEE LIVE MUSIC

KIDS

BEST PRIVATE SCHOOL BEST PEDIATRICIAN BEST ORTHODONTIST

ARTS

POLITICOS

HARDEST WORKING CITY OFFICIAL -

BEST ACTOR

MOBILE

BEST LOCAL THEATRE GROUP

WHO WILL BE NEXT GOVERNOR?

BEST PLAY OR LIVE PERFORMANCE

HARDEST WORKING COUNTY

OF THE YEAR

OFFICIAL - MOBILE

NAPPIES BY THE NUMBERS TOTAL NUMBER OF VOTES 1,593,808 TOTAL NUMBER OF REGISTERED VOTERS 63,695 TOP VOTING AGE GROUP 33-42

32 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

MEDIA

MUSIC

BEST YOGA STUDIO

BEST OVERALL RESTAURANT

TOP FIVE VOTING ZIP CODES 36695 36608 36609 36526 36606 NUMBER OF U.S. STATES FROM WHICH PEOPLE VOTED 50

MOST FARAWAY PLACES FROM WHICH PEOPLE VOTED Bloemfontein, South Africa (51 votes) Taipei, Taiwan (42 votes) Auckland, New Zealand (5 votes)


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 33


Haberdasher regains ‘fancy drink’ title in new location 2017 Nappie Winner | Best Fancy Drink Bar / Best New Bar — The Haberdasher

Photo | Dan Anderson

BY JASON JOHNSON/REPORTER hile it was closed for a long-anticipated relocation, The Haberdasher was out of contention for the Nappie Awards, but 2017 was a year of redemption for the downtown cocktail spot as it reopened as Best New Bar and reclaimed its designation as Mobile’s Best Fancy Drink Bar. The Haberdasher returned last June at 113 Dauphin St., after closing its original location a few blocks west in 2015. According to beverage director Roy Clark, the move was a blessing. “It’s beyond what we ever could have imagined, honestly, and it’s only gotten better as more restaurants and bars have come downtown,” Clark said. “We’re surrounded by hotels now, so we’re constantly seeing out-of-towners, and Mardi Gras is a lot better for us in this location.” Several things separate The Hab-

W

NIGHTLIFE

BEST ALL AROUND BAR O’Daly’s BEST BARTENDER Adam Yunker, Royal Street Tavern BEST BARTENDERESS Rachael Norris, Hayley’s HOTTEST BARTENDER Hunter Vanderlinde, Boo Radley’s/ Brickyard HOTTEST BARTENDERESS Jana Padgett Young, Brickyard

erdasher from other bars, but one of the first customers notice is its aesthetic. Soft lighting and wooden-barrel table tops highlight an aged look the barroom gets from the exposed rock and brick that frame it. While finding that look under the original blue stucco walls was “a happy accident,” Clark said it helped create an ambiance that’s classy but not stuffy. “We wanted to make a space that felt comfortable for everyone,” he said. “We don’t want to be perceived as a stuffy, moody cocktail lounge. We’re a local bar, and we want people to have fun and be relaxed, but at the same time, in a nice setting.” While its appearance may help bring in customers, the libations are the focus of the “Hab Lab.” From the tried and true Old Fashioned, to the sweet gin and cucum-

BEST WEMO BAR Pour Baby

BEST E-SHO HAPPY HOUR Sunset Pointe

BEST MIMO BAR Red or White

BEST SPORTS BAR Heroes

BEST LODA BAR OK Bike Shop

BEST COLLEGE BAR O’ Daly’s

BEST SOMO BAR The River Shack

BEST WATERFRONT BAR Bluegill

BEST BEACH BAR Flora-Bama

BAR WHERE YOU ARE MOST LIKELY TO GET LUCKY Boo Radley’s

BEST WINE BAR Red or White

BEST NEW BAR Haberdasher

BEST FANCY DRINK BAR Haberdasher

BEST DIVE BAR Garage

BEST AFTER-HOURS BAR Alchemy Tavern

BEST E-SHO BAR McSharry’s

BEST HAPPY HOUR BAR Garage

34 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

BEST PLACE TO SHAKE YOUR BOOTY B-Bob’s BEST GAY BAR B-Bob’s FAVORITE CRAFT BEER Fairhope Brewing Take the Causeway IPA

ber Jerk Store, the quality and variety of cocktails at The Haberdasher are notable. “If you look at our current menu, I think almost every one of our bartenders has at least one drink on there,” Clark said. “We like to play around with esoteric ingredients that aren’t necessarily common in cocktails around here, and we always want to keep moving. You don’t want to have the same menu forever, so we like to try new and exciting things.” Serving the number and diversity of customers the bar can host requires a lot of prep work, a long and reliable supply chain and an astute and well-trained staff. Every day, fresh citrus, cucumber and other juices are made on location, along with simple syrups and others preparations as needed. “We invest a lot of time and effort into staff training on everything from

FAVORITE IMPORT BEER Stella Artois FAVORITE DOMESTIC BEER Yuengling BAR WITH BEST TAP BEER SELECTION LoDa Bier Garten FAVORITE CASINO Hard Rock BEST BAR BATHROOM Pour Baby

technique and the history of classic cocktails, to knowledge of spirits,” he said. “We take the staff to distilleries and breweries because it’s nice to know where your product comes from and see how things are made.” Clark said seeing The Haberdasher recognized by Lagniappe readers “means a ton” to the staff and the owners, especially because they never really campaigned for votes. “The fact that people are paying attention and are excited, that’s why we do this … for everybody else,” he added. “We want to give Mobile and every individual guest a great experience.”

BEST SPECIALTY COCKTAIL Pineapple Jalapeno Margarita at Five Bar BEST BAR TRIVIA Buffalo Wild Wings BEST GENTLEMAN’S CLUB The Candy Store

SHOPPING AND SERVICES

BEST BARBER Hillcrest Barbers BEST MAKEUP ARTIST Lauren Kelly, Makeup by Lauren BEST HOOHA WAXER Crystal Quattrone, Primp BEST PLACE TO GET A MANI Lily’s Nails BEST PLACE TO GET A PEDI Vivian’s Nails BEST ESTHETICIAN Ashley Maynard, The Spa at the Battle House

BEST MARGARITA Taqueria Mexico

BEST OVERALL STYLIST Julia Liller - Salon West 5400

BEST BLOODY MARY Ashland Midtown Pub

BEST SALON Inspire Salon & Gallery

THE PERFECT MARTINI Ruth’s Chris

BEST COLORIST Phrankey Lowery - Studio PH

BEST DAY SPA Lyons Elite Day Spa BEST MASSAGE THERAPIST Massage Envy

BEST BUSHWACKER Tacky Jack’s

SCISSOR WIZARD Ryan Amacker - Salon West 5400

BEST TANNING SALON LA Bikini


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 35


Former councilman was there at the beginning 2017 Nappie Winner | Quintessential Mobilian — Reggie Copeland Sr.

Photo | Dan Anderson

BY DALE LIESCH/REPORTER

R

eggie Copeland Sr., the Nappie winner for Quintessential Mobilian, has witnessed both the death and rebirth of Brookley Aeroplex and had a hand in shaping the form of government now in control of the city. Moving with his family to Mobile from Tuscaloosa in 1942, Copeland remembers the excitement firsthand. “It was the place to be,” he said. “It was hopping.” His father relocated to take a job at Brookley Air Force Base during its heyday. The former city councilman said a brother joined him as well. When the base shut down in 1969, it was devastating, he said. “Jobs weren’t very plentiful,” Copeland said. “Many people I knew had to move to California [and] Florida.” The closure affected other aspects of community life. The United Fund,

MOBILE’S BEST DOCTOR Dr. Richard Oyler MOBILE’S BEST SPECIALIST Rihner, Gupta, Grosz, Cardiology P.C. BEST HOOHA DOCTOR Dr. Quin A. Bixler BEST BOOB DOC Dr. Christopher Park BEST FACELIFT DOC Dr. Michael Lyons BEST DERMATOLOGIST Dr. Ryan Ramagosa BEST WEIGHT LOSS DOC Dr. William T. Urquhart BEST “DOC IN THE BOX” CLINIC Greater Mobile Urgent Care BEST BACK CRACKER (CHIROPRACTOR) Dr. Chris Corsentino

now known as United Way, had trouble securing charitable donations. Despite the economic strain, Copeland never wanted to leave Mobile, even with offers to move to such locales as New Orleans. “Mobile is a very special place for me,” he said. “I had opportunities to go to other places, but I stayed in Mobile. I liked the city and I like what it had to offer.” Copeland had his first brush with politics in the early 1970s with a run for the Alabama Legislature. He lost by 800 votes but caught the political bug. “It was quite an experience,” Copeland said. The failed legislative run helped him be better prepared when the city launched its first elections after it shifted from an at-large commission government to a city council with district representatives. In August

BEST DENTIST Grelot Dental BEST ORAL SURGEON Dr. Chris Mullenix BEST GYM ProHealth BEST CROSSFIT BOX CrossFit Saraland BEST PERSONAL TRAINER Emily Powell, ProHealth BEST VETERINARIAN Dr. Mary Katherine Cross, Old Shell Road Animal Hospital BEST PET GROOMER Lola Bell’s BEST FLORIST All A Bloom BEST WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHER Elizabeth Gelineau, Fleeting Moments

36 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

1985, Copeland ran against eight other contenders and won the District 5 seat. He represented the district for 28 years, running unopposed after 1993. “If someone is doing a good job, you leave them alone,” Copeland said. “It was a good thing [running unopposed] because I hated asking my friends for money.” In those 28 years, Copeland had a big influence on the city. During that time, he became known as the sports and recreation liason of the city council, one fostered by his background as a college basketball referee. The highlights of his council career, as he tells it, include being involved with discussions that eventually led to the formation of Magnolia Grove Golf Course, as well as working to improve what is now known as the Copeland-Cox Tennis Center, named partially in his honor. During his tenure

BEST YOGA STUDIO Above and Beyond Hot Yoga

BEST REALTOR Kevin Loper, Roberts Brothers

BEST YOGA INSTRUCTOR Sprite Wood, Sterling Hot Yoga

BEST INSURANCE AGENT OR AGENCY

BEST MECHANIC/AUTO SHOP Mark McGugin BEST CARWASH/DETAIL Bebo’s BEST LAWYER IF YOUR SPOUSE IS A HO (DIVORCE) Josh Boone BEST LAWYER TO KEEP YOU OUT OF PRISON (CRIMINAL) Jeff Deen BEST LAWYER TO SUE THE PANTS OFF SOMEONE (TRIAL) Long & Long BEST REAL ESTATE FIRM Roberts Brothers

Jonah Dismukes, Worthy Insurance Agency

BEST MORTGAGE BROKER/FIRM Craig Anderton, Bank of England BEST INVESTMENT BANKER/ FINANCIAL PLANNER Coldsmith, Ryder and Associates, a private wealth advisory practice of Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc.

BEST NEW CAR DEALER Joe Bullard BEST USED CAR DEALER Keith Kingan BEST CPA BJ Gilbert, Karen Simmons, PC BEST LANDSCAPER Bay Landscaping

on the council the center expanded to 60 courts. “It’s outstanding,” Copeland said. “It’s good economic development for the city.” In addition to those accomplishments, Copeland said he was also involved in discussions to give St. Louis Street rare two-way access downtown. He called it a “jewel.” Copeland decided not to run for re-election in 2013 and has since semi-retired. After his first wife, Betty, passed away, he married Jean Johnson. Copeland has five adult children: Reggie Jr., Riley, Randy, Rush and Gayle. He and Jean have 23 grandchildren between them and two great-grandchildren.

BEST CONTRACTOR/ HOMEBUILDER Batten Builders

BEST CLOTHING CONSIGNMENT STORE Hertha’s

BEST INTERIOR DESIGNER Randi Wilson

BEST DEPARTMENT STORE Steinmart

BEST HARDWARE STORE Blankenship’s Universal Hardware BEST PEST CONTROL Aegis Pest Control BEST PET STORE B&B Pet Stop BEST ANTIQUE STORE Antiques at The Loop BEST MEN’S CLOTHING STORE G Harvell

BEST FORMAL WEAR Francia’s BEST ACCESSORIES/ AFFORDABLE JEWELRY Francesca’s BEST FINE JEWELRY Friedman’s BEST DRY CLEANERS Waite’s

BEST LINGERIE/NAUGHTY SHOP Gift Spot

BEST HOME CLEANING SERVICE Maids a la Mode

BEST WOMEN’S BOUTIQUE Kenzlee Grace

BEST STATIONERY STORE JO Acree


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 37


Mobile magnet school prepares students for life 2017 Nappie Winner | Best Public School — Phillips Preparatory Middle School

Photo | Lagniappe

BY GABRIEL TYNES/ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR

T

he Nappie Award-winning Best Public School offers an accelerated college preparatory curriculum to more than 800 students in grades 6-8 and was recognized in 1996 and 2011 as a National Blue Ribbon School of Excellence. The Mobile County Public School System touts Phillips Preparatory Middle School as a college preparatory school emphasizing communication skills, accelerated math and foreign languages. Principal Brenda Hartzog, who has been at the school for 17 years, says students commute from all over Mobile County to attend accelerated classes in a process that promotes thinking globally and applying classroom skills to life experiences. “The students who come to us, they come to us by choice,” Hartzog said. “Our motto is ‘Excellence by Choice.’”

BEST OUTDOORS STORE McCoy Outdoors BEST LOCAL PHARMACY Saraland Pharmacy BEST SHOE STORE Shoe Station BEST GIFT SHOP Marcie-N-Me BEST HOME FURNISHINGS STORE J&J BEST FURNITURE CONSIGNMENT SHOP High Cotton BEST VAPE SHOP Parlor Vapes BEST BANK OR CREDIT UNION Regions BEST TATTOO ARTIST/SHOP CW Neese

Hartzog noted the school is currently pursuing designation as an International Baccalaureate Middle School, a status it hopes to achieve by the end of the year. “We have foreign languages — we offer French and Spanish — and we also have, which is part of the IB theme, different design classes. For example, one may be STEM based, another may be stage production or fashion, another one may be technolgy like hands-on robotics. So we have that and of course all of our students take Algebra I. Our students are able to receive two high school credits, one in foreign language and one in Algebra I.” Hartzog also noted Phillips has a welcoming atmosphere with an experienced teaching staff. “We have 45 teachers and historically a very high retention rate,” Hartzog said.

BEST HOME SECURITY COMPANY ADT BEST BODY PIERCER Aaron Victory The Bell Rose

KIDS BEST KIDS’ CLOTHING STORE NEW Little Monkey Toes BEST KIDS’ CONSIGNMENT STORE Carousel Kids BEST KIDS’ ROOM FURNISHINGS Polka Tot Designs BEST SUMMER CAMP St. Luke’s Summer Camps

38 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

BEST DAYCARE Christ United Methodist Church Kidz Crossing BEST PRESCHOOL St. Paul’s EEC BEST MOTHER’S DAY OUT Westminster MDO MOST KID-FRIENDLY RESTAURANT Chick-fil-a BEST BIRTHDAY PARTY PLACE Pump It Up BEST PARK/PLAYGROUND Medal of Honor Park MOST KID-FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD Rosswood BEST KID-FRIENDLY LOCAL ATTRACTION Gulf Coast Exploreum

“Our teachers are often with us for years but this year, unfortunately, we had some retirements, so we are welcoming nine new teachers coming aboard who are being trained now.” Hartzog gave additional credit to the level of engagement from parents and families, who often send more than one of their children to the school. “Former students return and tell us how well prepared they were, not just for high school but for college and beyond. Those who have gone through our program, many credit what they learned here at Phillips for helping them be as successful as they are.” Hartzog said because of the school’s magnet draw, students are often separated when they leave for high school, so Phillips hosts a “senior reunion” every year. Teachers and administrators also solicit advice from students, parents and

BEST DANCE STUDIO Sheffield School of the Dance BEST PEDIATRIC DENTIST Dr. Joel Welford and Dr. Marion McMurphy BEST ORTHODONTIST Hicks & McMurphy BEST PEDIATRICIAN Dr. Matthew Cepeda BEST KID PHOTOGRAPHER Samantha Vickers BEST PUBLIC SCHOOL Phillips Preparatory School BEST PRIVATE SCHOOL St. Paul’s Episcopal School COOLEST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER Lisa Large, Collier Elementary COOLEST MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHER Peter Stoyka, Corpus Christi Catholic

other schools on how to improve. “We were selected No. 42 in the nation a few years ago through the National Association of Educators program and about that same time, we received our second Blue Ribbon. … We’re going for a third one! We come in pretty high in the state with test scores.” Ultimately, Hartzog said, “It’s a great place to be. … I think we do a very good job serving this community and we do it because we love what we do and we will continue to educate the students and prepare them not just for high school and not just for college, but for their entire life.”

COOLEST HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER Joe Arensberg, McGill-Toolen Catholic High School

CITY LIFE

BEST MOBILIAN EVER Jimmy Buffett BEST MOBILIAN RIGHT NOW Mayor Sandy Stimpson QUINTESSENTIAL MOBILIAN Reggie Copeland, Sr. MOST ELIGIBLE BACHELOR Charles Matranga

COOLEST NEIGHBORHOOD – EASTERN SHORE Fruit and Nut District BEST ANNUAL EVENT Bellingrath Magic Christmas in Lights BEST ANNUAL FUNDRAISING EVENT Junior League Christmas Jubilee BEST PLACE TO HOLD A RECEPTION/SPECIAL EVENT The Steeple BEST HOTEL Battle House Hotel

MOST ELIGIBLE BACHELORETTE Sarah- John Smith

BEST HIGH SCHOOL MARCH ING BAND McGill Toolen Catholic High School

COOLEST NEIGHBORHOOD – MOBILE Florence Place

BEST MARDI GRAS PARADING SOCIETY Mystics of Time


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 39


Best stage vocalist won’t stop ‘til she gets enough 2017 Nappie Winner | Best Theatrical Singer — Terri Jackson

Photo | Dan Anderson

BY DALE LIESCH/REPORTER

L

ong before New Orleans jazz musician Ellis Marsalis Jr. referred to her talent as “a treat,” Terri Jackson, the Nappie winner for Best Theatrical Singer, was performing Michael Jackson hits as a second grader in Mobile. Jackson said she became aware of her own talent and love for singing while listening to Jackson’s “Off the Wall” album. “I sang along to it,” she said. “I noticed I didn’t really sound like a kid. I sounded like an adult.” Her fondness for all kinds of music expanded early on into a yearning to perform. As a fifth-grader she wrote, starred in and directed her own play, which her teacher let the class perform, she said. “I guess the teacher wanted some time off,” Jackson joked. “I think she was glad to be out of the classroom.”

BEST MARDI GRAS MARCHING SOCIETY Wild Mauvillians BEST MARDI GRAS BALL Polka Dots BEST GOLF COURSE Spring Hill College MOBILE’S BUMPIEST STREET Ann Street COOLEST CHURCH OR HOUSE OF WORSHIP Grace Lutheran BEST CLERGYMAN/PASTOR/ SPIRITUAL LEADER Fr. Mark Neske, Holy Family Catholic BEST PLACE TO TAKE OUT-OFTOWNERS (ATTRACTION) Gulf Coast Ducks BEST PLACE TO TAKE OUT-OFTOWNERS (RESTAURANT) Dauphin’s

Jackson learned a lot about musicals in the 1980s, when she learned of auditions for “Annie” on Broadway. Obviously she didn’t audition since she was in Mobile and not New York, but she was inspired by the fact that many of the actors auditioning for roles in the musical were her age. “It sparked something,” she said. “I saw a kid … on stage on Broadway.” After graduating from Davidson High School, Jackson attended Dillard University in New Orleans, where she took a music appreciation course and the instructor asked her to sing with the school’s jazz band one year at the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival. After graduating from the historically black liberal arts college with a degree in mass communication, Jackson was struck by the pervasive culture of New Orleans,

BEST COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY University of South Alabama BEST JUNIOR COLLEGE/ TRADE/TECHNICAL SCHOOL Coastal Alabama Community College COOLEST APARTMENT COMPLEX – MOBILE Old Shell Lofts COOLEST APARTMENT COMPLEX – EASTERN SHORE Bay Breeze Apartments BEST MOVIE THEATER Crescent Theater BEST LOCAL COMPANY TO WORK FOR FTZC BEST BEACH RESORT/CONDO Caribe

40 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

MUSIC

BEST LOCAL BAND The Mulligan Brothers BEST NEW LOCAL BAND The Marlow Boys BEST COUNTRY BAND/ PERFORMER Bruce Smelley BEST METAL/PUNK/ UNDERGROUND BAND Black Titan BEST CLUB TO SEE LIVE MUSIC Soul Kitchen BEST OUTDOOR BAR TO SEE LIVE MUSIC Bluegill BEST VENUE TO SEE LIVE MUSIC (NON-BAR) Saenger Theatre

and made it her home for 11 years. “The arts scene was the main reason I stayed,” she said. “In New Orleans, you’re totally immersed in different cultures. They’re a gumbo.” It was different from Mobile, she said, where arts and cultural events at that time were more sporadic and scattershot. But Jackson returned to Mobile in 2001, shortly after her daughter was born, to be close to family. While she appreciates listening to all kinds of music because a “good song is a good song,” Jackson said her favorite tunes to sing come from jazz. “I like the improvisational aspects of it,” she said. Jackson performs with the Joe Jefferson Playhouse, the Chickasaw Civic Theatre and the Mobile Theatre Guild. Her most recent

performance was as Justice Charlier in the JJP performance of “Rock of Ages.” Her favorite performance was a two-part role in a Mobile Theatre Guild production of “The Colored Museum.” She got to play a talking wig named Janine, which argues with another wig, and Ms. Pat, a flight attendant who took unsuspecting passengers to America during the slave trade. Of Mobile’s live theater scene, Jackson said the talent would surprise people. “There’s a lot of local talent,” she said. “A lot of them were on the list of [Nappie] nominees.”

BEST BLUES BAND/ARTIST Lisa Mills

BEST AREA BASSIST Gabriel Willis

DESIGN ARTIST Colby Jackson

BEST SOLO MUSICIAN Eric Erdman

BEST PIANO PLAYER/ KEYBOARDIST Chris Spies

BEST MIXED MEDIA ARTIST Julia Greer Fobes

BEST JAZZ MUSICIAN Roman Street BEST RAP/HIP HOP ARTIST Mr. 88 BEST MUSIC/RECORD STORE Mobile Records BEST LOCAL RECORDING STUDIO Studio H20 BEST GUITAR PLAYER Phil Proctor BEST AREA SINGER/VOICE Ryan Balthrop BEST AREA DRUMMER Chico McCollum

BEST DRAG QUEEN PERFORMER Amber Douglas

BEST ART GALLERY Cathedral Square Gallery

BEST DJ (MIXIN’, MASHIN’UP KIND) DJ Mbezzle

BEST MUSEUM Mobile Museum of Art

BEST AREA MUSIC FESTIVAL 1065 Music Festival

ARTS

BEST LOCAL PAINTER Devlin Wilson BEST LOCAL SCULPTOR Bruce Larsen BEST LOCAL GRAPHIC

BEST THEATRE GROUP Chickasaw Civic Theatre BEST PLAY OR PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR Sordid Lives, Mobile Theatre Guild BEST LOCAL ACTOR Chandler Smith BEST THEATRICAL SINGER Terri Jackson


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 41


News, weather, traffic and a lot more

2017 Nappie Winner | Best Morning Show / DJ Mobile Mornings with Sean Sullivan, Dalton Orwig and Kelly Jones, FM Talk 106.5

Photo | Dan Anderson

BY JASON JOHNSON/REPORTER

O

n a good day, Sean Sullivan can be found at the FM Talk 106.5 studio as early as 4:15 a.m. starting the prep work for “Mobile Mornings” — the back-to-back recipient of the Best Morning Show/DJ Nappie for radio programming that’s locally made and locally focused. Sullivan has long held a seat behind the midmorning microphone, but recently brought in two new hosts after longtime radio man Wayne Gardner retired after four decades in the business. While replacing Gardner was “a huge task,” it just so happened another veteran journalist was also looking for the right fit to keep her broadcast career in Mobile. “I sheepishly went to Kelly [Jones] and asked. It was like asking the prettiest girl in high school to the prom,” Sullivan said. “I went in thinking,

BEST ARTS EVENT LoDa Artwalk

EATS & DRINKS BEST OVERALL RESTAURANT Felix’s BEST LOCALLY OWNED RESTAURANT Butch Cassidy’s BEST NEW RESTAURANT FINE DINING Dumbwaiter on the Hill BEST NEW RESTAURANT – CASUAL Roosters BEST CHAIN RESTAURANT Moe’s BBQ BEST EASTERN SHORE

‘there’s no way,’ but when she said she’d come work with us in the radio business, I was on cloud nine.” Sullivan was referring to former “Local 15 Today” co-anchor Kelly Jones, who — after four years at WPMI and a broadcast career that took her across the country and beyond — made the transition to “Mobile Mornings” in late April. Though there are a few differences, Jones said she’s still working to connect with and inform the people of Mobile like she always has. “Our mission is to keep people informed and to be the go-to source for getting a person’s day started, but even more importantly, we’re building a relationship,” Jones said. “That relationship is only present when you’re really out and about in the city

RESTAURANT Boudreaux’s

BEST ENTRÉE IN MOBILE Shrimp & Grits, The Noble South

BEST BEACH RESTAURANT LuLu’s

BEST HOME COOKIN’/ SOUL FOOD Judy’s Place

BEST CHEF Chris Rainosek, The Noble South BEST ATMOSPHERE Dauphin’s MOST INNOVATIVE MENU Kitchen on George BEST OUTDOOR DINING Sunset Pointe BEST SWEET TEA Chick-fil-a BEST BISCUITS Dick Russell’s BEST APPETIZER Crawfish & Spinach Dip - Heroes

42 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

BEST FARM TO TABLE Kitchen on George BEST SERVER Megan Baker, Butch Cassidy’s BEST OVERALL SERVICE Ruth’s Chris BEST DESSERT Desserts at Delish’s Desserts BEST RESTAURANT WINE LIST Red or White BEST WINGS Buffalo Wild Wings BEST CHICKEN FINGERS Foosackly’s

we work and play in.” The show’s third co-host is no stranger to 106.5’s listeners. At 25, Dalton Orwig has almost a decade of experience in radio. He hosted a morning on “Bama 106” in Jackson at age 19 and has filled in on various FM Talk 106.5 shows during his three years at the station. “[Winning a Nappie], it’s a huge deal,” Orwig said. “It means we were able to come in after Wayne, who was so good in this market and everywhere he was for so many years, and win the same award we won last year.” While “Mobile Mornings” is often fun for listeners and the hosts, Sullivan said it’s always a serious endeavor that requires hard work and planning from everyone involved. Most important, though, is the connection the listeners make every day with Sullivan, Jones

BEST ICE CREAM/YOGURT/ GELATO Cammie’s Old Dutch BEST LUNCH SPOT Chicken Salad Chick BEST EASTERN SHORE LUNCH SPOT Panini Pete’s BEST WINE/GOURMET SHOP Domke Market BEST BEER SELECTION – RETAIL Old Shell Growlers BEST ANNUAL FOOD EVENT OR COOK-OFF Greek Fest BEST FOOD TRUCK Von’s BEST GUMBO Cream and Sugar

and Orwig. From their personalities on the air to their interest and investment in the community, Sullivan said that’s what makes a great local show. It’s another reason why a Nappie win “means everything.” “Our neighbors, our listeners and people in the community, that’s who I care about,” he added. “I’m way more excited about a Nappie than a state or national award. Those are great, but that’s a bunch of people patting each other on the back in the same business. This is real, and that’s what we like about it.”

BEST PO’ BOY Ashland Midtown Pub

BEST ETHNIC RESTAURANT Mediterranean Sandwich Company

BEST SUSHI Rock-n-Roll Sushi

BEST MEXICAN RESTAURANT La Cocina BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT Via Emilia

BEST BAKERY Sally’s Piece of Cake BEST WEDDING CAKES Pollman’s BEST CATERER Naman’s BEST BURGER Callaghan’s BEST STEAK Briquettes

BEST PIZZA Mellow Mushroom BEST COFFEEHOUSE Carpe Diem BEST EASTERN SHORE COFFEEHOUSE Serda’s

BEST SEAFOOD Half Shell Oyster House

BEST LOCAL GROCERY STORE Greer’s BEST GROCERY CHAIN Publix

BEST BRUNCH Grand Hotel

BEST GOURMET GROCERY Whole Foods


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 43


No limits for documentarians of Southern culture 2017 Nappie Winner | Favorite Local Website or Blog — Southern Rambler

Photo | Catt Sirten

BY GABRIEL TYNES/ ASSISTANT MANAGING EDITOR

I

f you want a good selection of novels there’s no better place to visit than the library. If you prefer to read local news and current events pick up a Lagniappe. But if you’re looking to get on a personal level with the people and places behind the South’s rich culture, art and music, navigate to readers’ Favorite Local Website or Blog, www.southernrambler.com, where for the past five years writer Lynn Oldshue and photographer Michelle Stancil (pictured above with The Frog Pond at Blue Moon Farm owner Cathe Steele) have created a veritable archive of Southern sights, sounds and personalities, each with a unique story to tell. “Michelle wanted to take photographs and I wanted to write, and after submitting stories to a few magazines and other publications we decided we’d publish it ourselves,” Oldshue

BEST PLACE TO GET LOCAL PRODUCE/FOODS – MOBILE Old Shell Market BEST PLACE TO GET LOCAL PRODUCE/FOODS – BALDWIN Allegri BEST BARBECUE RESTAURANT Moe’s BBQ BEST BARBECUE SAUCE Meat Boss BEST RIBS Dreamland BEST RAW OYSTERS Wintzell’s BEST TAKE AND BAKE Papa Murphy’s BEST CUPCAKE Flour Girls

explained. “I grew up in Mississippi so I have a love for [this area] and telling her stories — there’s such a rich collection of people, culture, art and music — so much good in the South — I felt like we needed to change the story, change the perception of who we are.” In addition to the website, Oldshue and Stancil also publish an annual companion magazine and have recently branched out to publish a blog called “Our Southern Souls,” a man-on-thestreet style interview with strangers. “The stories are funny and inspiring, sad and heartbreaking, or a quick moment in time,” Oldshue describes it online. “Readers say they find a part of themselves in the stories or share similar thoughts and feelings.” The pair has also produced a number of striking videos — including “Give

BEST SEAFOOD MARKET Mudbugs at the Loop BEST DRUNK FOOD O’Daly’s Hole in the Wall BEST HANGOVER FOOD Foosackly’s

MEDIA

FAVORITE RADIO STATION FM 92 ZEW 92.1 FAVORITE RADIO STATION AM WNTM 710 BEST LOCAL DJ Gene Murrell - WZEW BEST DJ TEAM Dan & Shelby - WKSJ BEST MORNING SHOW/DJ Mobile Mornings - Sean Sullivan, Dalton Orwig, Kelly Jones FM TALK 106.5

44 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

DJ WHOSE VOICE LEADS YOU TO BELIEVE YOU MAY WANT TO SEE HIM NAKED Tony Plosczynski - WZEW DJ WHOSE VOICE LEADS YOU TO BELIEVE YOU MAY WANT TO SEE HER NAKED Shelby Mitchell - WKSJ BEST TALK RADIO HOST/SHOW Uncle Henry – WNTM BEST SPORTS RADIO HOST/SHOW Sports Drive with Randy Kennedy & Creg Stephenson

a Lift Mobile,” which focused on Sheena and Zionne Williams, parents who rely on public transportation daily to get their children to school. The project inspired Oldshue to launch a fundraising campaign to buy benches for bus stops. A total of 10 were purchased and are currently being installed. Oldshue described another, more widely shared video, “Mobile’s Potential is Her People,” as “kind of a love letter about all the people who have taken risks to make this city what it is. … I’ve been so thankful to meet all the people I have and appreciate it and fall more in love with Mobile the more I write about it, and it makes me just want to keep giving back.” Other projects include a partnership with The Steeple to host occasional concerts and an upcoming public art installation with artist Chris

Cumbie, Oldshue said. She has a shortlist of musicians and artists she’d still like to interview, but Southern Rambler has “exceeded my expectations,” she said. “It’s great for us because it has the flexibility to be anything we want it to be,” Oldshue said. “We make zero money off it but it is our magic carpet to go anywhere we want. If it ended today it would have far exceeded anything I wanted to it be … but having a platform like that and telling those stories — for me it’s giving a voice for people that otherwise aren’t heard.”

BEST ANCHOR Kelly Foster - WPMI

FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE WRITER Andy MacDonald, Cuisine Editor

BEST METEOROLOGIST Alan Sealls - WKRG

FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE COVER STORY One Mobile by Jason Johnson and Dale Liesch

BEST TV INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER Peter Albrecht - WKRG BEST SPORTS COVERAGE Randy Patrick - WKRG BEST WEEKEND TV NEWS TEAM WPMI 15

BEST LOCAL EVENING TV NEWSCAST WALA FOX 10

HOTTEST LOCAL TV NEWS MAN Jason Smith - WALA

BEST LOCAL MORNING TV NEWSCAST WKRG 5

HOTTEST LOCAL TV NEWS WOMAN Chasity Byrd - WALA

FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE COVER IMAGE 1065 Illustration by Laura Rasmussen FAVORITE AL.COM CONTENT CREATOR JD Crowe FAVORITE GLOSSY MAGAZINE Mobile Bay Monthly FAVORITE LOCAL WEBSITE OR BLOG Southern Rambler BEST LOCAL TV AD David J. Maloney

POLITICOS

HARDEST WORKING OFFICIAL - CITY OF MOBILE (ELECTED OR APPOINTED) Mayor Sandy Stimpson HARDEST WORKING MOBILE CITY COUNCILPERSON Bess Rich HARDEST WORKING ELECTED OFFICIAL - MOBILE COUNTY District Attorney Ashley Rich HARDEST WORKING ELECTED OFFICIAL - EASTERN SHORE Fairhope Mayor Karin Wilson HARDEST WORKING ELECTED OFFICIAL - BALDWIN COUNTY Sherriff Hoss Mack HARDEST WORKING LOCAL STATE LEGISLATOR Sen. Rusty Glover WHO WILL BE THE NEXT GOVERNOR OF ALABAMA? Gov. Kay Ivey


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 45


ART ARTIFICE

2017 Nappies feature fresh talent, unvanquished faves BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

A

June 2017 announcement about recent Moroccan discoveries doubled the apparent age of homo sapiens, back to about 300,000 years ago. Among the evidence in the dig site was the control and manipulation of fire, handmade tools and the first Nappie awards for some of this year’s winners. However, among the perennial victories there are faces resurgent and new. So let’s get to it: Best Local Painter: Devlin Wilson This is the second win in a row for Wilson, his fifth since the arts categories first appeared in 2008. He also finished second in 2010. If you haven’t seen his work or heard of him, you’re obviously new to these parts. Best Local Sculptor: Bruce Larsen This celebrated found-object sculptor has grabbed this award since it debuted in 2015. The area is replete with his work, and his biomechanical creations have been used in about 40 movies to date. Best Local Graphic Design: Colby Jackson A Jacksonville native, this first-time winner’s LinkedIn page says he served as media director and youth pastor for Cross Church from March 2012 until July 2016. Though he’s worked at Calagaz Photo teaching photography since, his primary focus is his own business. Colby Jackson Media’s recent projects include logo design for Fabric Hoarders, Resonate Youth Movement,

Reality Masters Commission and 3 Posh Chairs. More of his projects can be seen at colbyjacksonmedia.com. Best Mixed Media Artist: Julia Greer Fobes When you walk into the Nappie Awards ceremony, take a gander at the flower arrangements to see what earned Fobes her award. After graduating from Ole Miss with a degree in art and theatrical costume design, she had her sights set on the Big Apple but stayed in her hometown to work with noted international artist Nall. Before long, Fobes was assisting Mardi Gras master Ron Barrett with sets, floral displays and lavish costumes. After six years, she moved out from under his wing. Fobes made costumes for kings and queens of both the MCA and MAMGA courts for the last few years. She has headed her own business for only a year, doing artwork, “commission stuff” and flowers for weddings and magazine shoots. Fobes was also a finalist for Best Florist. “The Nappies will be a family affair. My sister will be in town and Greer’s (supermarket) actually won a Nappie too, so we’ll all be together. It’ll be a good night,” Fobes said. Best Art Gallery: Cathedral Square Gallery Telling someone “you’re getting mighty big and mighty old” usually can be enough to get your face slapped — unless you’re referencing Cathedral Square Gallery. This 22-year-old, 45-member cooperative on the corner of Dauphin and Dearborn has exceeded norms.

All aboard for MOJO jazz journey

Playhouse cranks up imagination factory

Roald Dahl’s wild tale “Charlie and the Chocolate Factory” was a dark delight. The 1971 film starring Gene Wilder affixed the name Willy Wonka alongside “Alice in Wonderland” and “The Wizard of Oz” in the firmament of childhood fantasies. The familiar components are all present at Playhouse in

46 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

Correction for July 13 Artifice: While Elan Barnehama taught at UMass Amherst, he has moved on to Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston.

the Park (4851 Museum Drive): the quirky candy genius, the ill-mannered tykes and sweetly earnest Charlie Bucket who tours the factory with his grandfather. So are songs such as “The Candyman,” “Pure Imagination” and the Oompa-Loompa variations. Note for parents: “Willy Wonka: The Musical” omits the somewhat frightening tunnel ride, so as to spare younger viewers. It plays July 21 through Aug. 13. Friday and Saturday curtain is at 7:30 p.m., Sunday matinees at 2:30 p.m. Tickets are $16 for adults, $14 for students and seniors. For more information, call 251-602-0630 or go to playhouseinthepark.org.

JJP bestows awards

Joe Jefferson Players handed out the following Joey Awards for their 69th season on Saturday, July 15, at their Carlen Street facility. Outstanding Performance by Male Actors: Cory Olson for “Sweeney Todd,” Jerel Ely for “The Producers” and Mike Green for “Much Ado About Nothing.” Outstanding Performance by Female Actors: Lesley Roberts for “Sweeney Todd,” Katie Jeansonne for “Chapter Two”

and Whitney Upton for “Much Ado About Nothing.” Outstanding Newcomers: Mark Wyatt for “Much Ado About Nothing” and Lisa Smith for “Chapter Two.” Rising Star: Anna Fillingim for “Sweeney Todd” and “Rock of Ages.” Outstanding Musical Direction: Daniel Driskell for “Sweeney Todd.” Outstanding Choreography: Rebekah Howard for “The Producers.” Outstanding Set Design: Ed Kryger for “Chapter Two.” Outstanding Costuming: Anna Merchant for “The Producers.” Outstanding Production of the Season: “The Producers.” Directors Awards: “Sweeney Todd” from Dr. Patrick Jacobs to Ann Sands; “The Producers” from Eric C. Browne to Jake Coleman; “Chapter Two” from Cathy Bouler to David Peeler; “Much Ado About About Nothing” from Joe Fuselli to Sarah J. David; “Rock of Ages” from Jeffrey Williamson to Sam Watkins. YAMMI (You Are Mostly Missed Indeed): Mark Jeansonne. President’s Award: James Avera of Avera Design Inc. Sparky Award: Katie Jeansonne. Harris Award: Ryan Northrup.

ARTSGALLERY

Inspiration takes many forms, and sometimes it can be right under your rump. A trip can spark emotions, and that’s why rails and wings have undergirded a suitcase full of tunes such as “Take the A Train” and “Flyin’ Home.” The Mystic Order of the Jazz Obsessed will pay homage to musical numbers spawned by trains and planes on Monday, July 24, 6:30 p.m. at Gulf City Lodge (601 State St.). The City Rhythm Big Band will be at center stage for a roundtrip ticket through the Great American Songbook. Entrance is $15, $12 for students/military and $10 for MOJO members. It includes a light jambalaya dinner; a cash bar will be available. For more information, call 251-459-2298, email mobilejazz@bellsouth.net or go to mojojazz.org.

“I’ve done research, and we’re the biggest and oldest cooperative in the state,” Gallery Director Linda Tehnunfeld said. Cathedral Square won this award in 2008, 2010 and 2011 and placed second in 2014. “We have absolutely the most eclectic art you can find. We have something for everyone. There’s a reason why we’re number one,” Tehnunfeld said. Best Museum: Mobile Museum of Art Now 54 years old, this showplace in Langan Park boasts roughly 10,000 works in its collection. Its varied presentations and spacious building makes it easy to see why it has won this award eight times since it began in 2008. Best Theater Group: Chickasaw Civic Theatre This plucky institution began in 1963 and has moved from a tiny building seating 65 to a 10,000-square-foot showplace. This is the group’s first Nappie win, although they finished second in 2011. Best Play or Performance of the Year: “Sordid Lives” This “black comedy about white trash” directed by Tania Radoslovich is the first win for Mobile Theatre Guild and the first non-Joe Jefferson Playhouse winner since South of the Salt Line’s 2013 production, “Don’t Frack with Society Shell.” Best Local Actor: Chandler Smith Though he’s only 15, Smith has been on numerous local stages since his debut 11 years ago. Most closely associated with Chickasaw Civic Theatre and its Explorers Post program, Smith beat a host of grown folks and was also a finalist for Best Theatrical Singer. “I’m honored to be picked for this award,” Smith said. If you want to congratulate him yourself, stop in to Butch Cassidy’s Café, where he works as a host “for lunch and sometimes dinner.” Best Theatrical Singer: Terri Jackson As comfortable in the theater as she is singing lounge jazz, Jackson is a top talent featured in our center section. Best Arts Event: LoDa Artwalk Three years we’ve had this category and three years Artwalk has won. No surprise since Mobilians love their monthly street parties.


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 47


S

The Marlow Boys, featuring (from left) Joe Langley, Phil Proctor, Karl Langley and Stan Foster, is the Mobile area’s favorite new local band.

ince the inception of the Nappie Awards, the annual people’s choice event has become a barometer of the local music scene. Not only do the awards give insight into the public’s favorite artists, but they also give Lagniappe readers an inside look into those artists’ attitudes toward the local music scene. If there is a consistent thread that can be observed through this year’s recipients, it is their humility and respect for fellow musicians. With this in mind, Lagniappe is proud to reveal the winners in the music categories of the 2017 Nappie Awards. The Mulligan Brothers win the Nappie for this year’s Best Local Band. This group’s mellow mix of Americana and adult contemporary have made dedicated fans in the Azalea City and beyond. The Mulligan Brothers’ set at this year’s St. Patrick’s Day street party at Callaghan’s might have propelled them to the award. Fans hung onto every note and lyric as they sang along. The band’s latest release is “Live from the Netherlands.” Mobile has voted The Marlow Boys as Best New Local Band and member Phil Proctor as Best Guitar Player. Proctor said it’s an honor to receive the award, especially considering all the other talented guitarists in the area. For bassist Stan Foster, Proctor’s musical talent is just one of many benefits each member of The Marlow Boys — which also includes Joe Langley and Karl Langley — contributes to their sound. The band’s next release, tentatively titled “Green Room, Vol. 2,” will be released soon. Foster says the local acceptance and creative motivation of The Marlow Boys is due to what he describes as “the old sumof-all-the-parts thing.” “For me, I think it’s the fact we honestly like each other and enjoy the music we create,” Foster said. “Getting the [Nappie] helps us feel encouraged and energized to keep on keepin’ on with our next CD. With the local market that is filled with insane talent, this is a real honor!” Over the past few years, Lagniappe readers have been introduced to a variety of local country performers. This year, the people have chosen

Bruce Smelley as Best Country Band/Performer. A regular performer at venues such as Veet’s, The Listening Room of Mobile and The Crooked Martini, Smelley says he is preparing to head into the studio to create an EP release of original material. “This is by far the biggest accomplishment I’ve achieved so far,” Smelley said. “I couldn’t have done it without the love and support of my family and friends and the people of Mobile.” Last year, the Nappie Awards reinstituted the Best Metal/Underground Band category, which Black Titan won. Once again, this stoner/doom metal powerhouse is taking home the award. Unfortunately, the departure of half the band has left the group in limbo. Lead vocalist Allin Killpatrick says he and guitarist Jimmy Lee are recruiting members to assist them in bringing Black Titan back to life. Lisa Mills was in Freiberg, Germany, when she received word she had won in the Best Blues Band/Artist category. Yearly visits across the pond have made her a worldwide sensation. Her current European tour will be a three-month romp across the continent, including a set at the Edinburgh Jazz & Blues Festival. When she returns to the states, Mills will begin a recording project that will use her “Southern roots” as a foundation. Speaking of Europe, Chris Spies was touring with Honey Island Swamp Band on its European tour when he received word he once again won the Nappie Award for Best Piano Player/Keyboardist. After he finishes with Honey Island’s tour, Spies will begin another project with Eddie Roberts (The New Mastersounds) and Alan Evans (Soulive). This project will debut at an event called “Brooklyn Comes Alive” in September. “Mobile’s got some awesome young musicians coming up these days,” Spies said. “With me being out of town so much, I’m just glad that everyone hasn’t forgotten about me.” Singer/songwriter Eric Erdman remains one of Mobile’s favorite musicians. This year, he wins the Nappie Award for Best Solo Musician. This talented local just finished recording an upcoming album at Dauphin Street Sound with Trina Shoemaker. Rick Hirsch (Wet Willie) joined Erdman as

48 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

MUSIC

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

FEATURE

Music winners reflect area’s diverse interests

co-producer of this album. A seasoned Nappie Award winner, Erdman recognizes the growing local scene makes taking home this honor much more special. “Mobile has historically been a music-rich city, but even though that is the case, I’m not sure it has ever had more musical firepower than it does currently,” Erdman noted. “So, being recognized when I stand among some of the best solo acts in the country is a big deal to me. I’m very appreciative.” Winning the Nappie for Best Jazz Musician makes the members of Roman Street recognize the Mobile Bay area is “a wonderful place, with people who truly care about and support their local musicians,” according to member Josh Thompson. Fans can expect a new experience from this exotic group. On Aug. 25-26, Roman Street will bring “The Hot Club” to The Venue in Fairhope. This event will be a two-night “Gypsy Jazz” show featuring some of the most refreshing sounds in the area. Mr. 88, winner of the Nappie Award for Best Hip-Hop Artist, says taking home this award is honorable and humbling, especially when he considers it was his passion that allowed him to win. Mr. 88 is working on both a mixtape and an EP. Until then, the public can sample his sounds through available singles such as “On God” and “Flex Sum,” which is available through various online music outlets. From Slow Moses to Loose Cannons, Ryan Balthrop has remained a consummate member of the local music scene. Since the beginning, he has received a number of Nappie Awards. This year, he was named Best Area Singer/Voice. Currently, the public has two ways to sample his vocal talent — as a solo artist as well as a member of Nappie-nominated Slide Bayou, featuring Lee Yankie and Harrison McInnis. “It feels amazing and humbling, especially knowing the singers that were also nominated,” said Balthrop, who also lightheartedly added that winning this award humbles him but also makes him “a little cocky.” Chico McCollum is the people’s choice for Best Area Drummer. In addition to his time spent with Chico & Chris and the Disco Rednecks, McCollum boasts 25 years as one of Mardi Gras’ most memorable drummers. He cites the love and support of local music lovers as the reason for winning this Nappie. Ultimately, he hopes more people will get into local venues and support live music. Gabriel Willis of Paw Paw’s Medicine Cabinet is the winner of Best Area Bassist. His smooth runs can be heard on the band’s double debut albums “The Great Room” and “Somebody Else’s Dream.” As far as winning the Nappie, Willis admits he’s “conflicted.” “I’m certainly happy and honored to have won the award, but I fully believe any of the other players that were nominated could run me off the stage,” Willis humblebragged. “That being said, I’m ecstatic to have won the award and I can’t thank Lagniappe and its readers enough for the support they’ve shown to Paw Paw’s Medicine Cabinet.”

Getting the [Nappie] helps us feel encouraged and energized to keep on keepin’ on with our next CD. With the local market that is filled with insane talent, this is a real honor! DJ MBezzle is a favorite at local establishments such as The Bar, where he drops the beat every Thursday and Saturday. His success in getting the crowd on its feet helped him win the Nappie award for Best DJ (Mixin’/Mashin’up Kind). MBezzle says he has been nominated many time in the past, but the feelings he has for finally winning cannot be put into words. Currently, he is working on a very unique project for the area. “On Fridays, I am performing at my newest endeavor, Club Air at Get Air Trampoline Park in West Mobile,” MBezzle explained. “My goal there is to expose a broader audience to real DJ’ing and provide quality entertainment to those who are unable to experience this art form in a [nightclub] setting.” Mobile has a fun and familiar roster of flamboyant female impersonators, so winning the Nappie Award for Best Drag Queen Performer can be very special. Amber Douglas admits she was “shocked” and “honored” to receive news of her win. From appearances on televisions shows such as “Maury” and “Jerry Springer” to winning Miss Gay Mobile, Douglas says she has done her best to properly represent the Azalea City, both on and off the stage. The Nappie music categories would not be complete without recognition of the various outlets for music across Mobile. These entities have earned their positive reputations for attracting the masses to experience a variety of musical artists from across genres. Soul Kitchen has been chosen by the public as the Best Club to See Live Music. Bluegill takes home the Nappie for Best Outdoor Bar to See Live Music. Mobile’s historic Saenger Theatre wins the Nappie for Best Venue to See Live Music (Non-Bar). Mobile Records’ vast collection of vinyl helped it win the award for Best Music/Record Store. Finally, Rick Hirsch’s Studio H2O makes its third appearance in the Nappies for Best Local Recording Studio.


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 49


MUSIC BRIEFS

Mobile meets T-town

Band: King’s German Legion, Jake Sanford & His Orchestra, The Paranormals Date: Friday, July 21, with doors at 9 p.m. Venue: The Blind Mule, 57 N. Claiborne St., www.theblindmule.net Tickets: Call 251-694-6853 for more info.

T

his lineup will feature music from Mobile to Tuscaloosa. The Paranormals are a new band on the local scene. So far they can only be heard live, but the band describes its style as one featuring bluegrass instruments but does not focus on bluegrass. Jake Sanford & His Orchestra is one of two Tuscaloosa bands joining The Paranormals. This group has become a regular at Tuscaloosa venues such as Druid City Brewing Co. The band’s sound has been classified as power folk rock that is “live and unscripted.” Tuscaloosa’s King’s German Legion is returning to The Blind Mule. This trio is gathering a following with its fiery blues-influenced garage rock. Raw, dirty guitar and unrelenting rhythms highlight this band’s electrifying rock sound. Frontman Jake Gordin has no problem delivering memorable lyrics and mind-blowing runs across the fretboard through its sets.

Photo | Facebook | King’s German Legion

50 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 51


MUSIC BRIEFS

Sure, why not?

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

Photo | Facebook | Yeah, Probably

Band: Yeah, Probably EP Release Date: Sunday, July 23, 6 p.m. Venue: Bluegill, 3775 Battleship Parkway, www.bluegillrestaurant.com Tickets: $10 at the door

Y

eah, Probably has been successfully filling Mobile’s need for original soul and funk. The band’s buttery grooves have made it a favorite at many local venues. Whether performing original material or familiar favorites, the band’s music makes repeat customers of people new to its sound. In addition to live shows, Yeah, Probably’s local acceptance got a strong boost through its domination of the Lagniappe New Southern Music Showcase at SouthSounds 2017. The band is taking the next step with the release of its debut EP and using Nappie Awardwinning venue the Bluegill as the launching

point. The first 125 people through the door will receive a free copy of the EP. Yeah, Probably is using the EP’s initial single, “Wasted Time,” as a preview. Just seconds into this track, the band sets the tone with an eclectic mix of harmonies cushioned by clean guitar and drums. As the chorus drops, a sweet ribbon of saxophone and electric keys slides into the mix and takes this track into new sonic dimensions. The single’s excellent production and thoughtful arrangements are an excellent harbinger of great things to come from this release. Anyone wanting to get a jump on Yeah, Probably’s new material can also catch them at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Biloxi on July 21 and the Flora-Bama in Orange Beach on July 22.

Always Sonny in Alabama Band: Sonny Bama, AllGetOut Date: Saturday, July 22, 8 p.m. Venue: Midnight Rodeo, 7790 Tanner Road, www.midnightrodeomob.com Tickets: $10, via Midnight Rodeo’s website

Photo | Facebook | Sonny Bama

52 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

Two local favorites, past and present, will take to the Midnight Rodeo stage to showcase two different yet wonderful homegrown musical styles. Local hip-hop artist Sonny Bama will serve as the evening’s headliner. Bama’s smooth baritone flow and Mobile-centric lyrics have made him a hometown hero among local hiphop enthusiasts. His single “From the Bottom” (featuring Ryan Balthrop) made its way into the hearts and ears of many locals. Bama will accent his set with a live band featuring Gregg Fells. Before Bama takes the stage, the audience will witness the return of AllGetOut. This Azalea City alt. country outfit formulated its sound in the days when the genre was distinctively alternative. This group concocted a mix of Southern-fried rock riddled with overtones of classic country and rockabilly to create its fulllength album “Southern Business.” Founding members Charlie Alexander (bass/ vocals), Mark Loftin (guitar) and Albert Robinson (drums) are also bringing in local guitarist P.T. Marston as a special guest for this show. Marston’s legacy boasts stints with Turbo Crab and Johnny No.


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 53


AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | July 20 - July 26

THUR. JULY 20

Blind Mule— S.O.S.S. Fascinating Shnnarahs Bluegill— Hannah McFarland Blues Tavern— Doobious, 8:30p Callaghan’s— Phil Proctor Dority’s Bar and Grill— Rick Carter and John Cochran Fairhope Brewing— Bluegrass Jam Felix’s— Grits N Pieces Fin’s— Johnny No, 9p Flora Bama— Jeff Dayton, 2p// Pale Moon Rising, 5:30p/// Dueling Pianos, 5:30p//// Big Muddy, 6p//// Mark Sherrill, James Daniel, Chris Newbury, 6p//// Mario Mena Band, 10p//// Shawna P Duo, 10:15p//// Lee Yankie and the Hellz Yeah, 10:30p Hangout— The Perry Wall, 6p// DJ Dr. One, 10p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Brandon Green, 8p Lulu’s— Adam Holt Duo, 5p Manci’s— Ross Newell Old 27 Grill— Songwriter’s Night, 6:30p SanBar— Platinum Premier Duo Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Jason Justice, 6p Wind Creek Casino— No Idea Band, 8p

FRI. JULY 21

Alchemy— Society of Sin Burlesque, 9p All Sports Bar & Billiards— DJ Markie Mark, 10p Beau Rivage— Scotty McCreery, 8p Bluegill— Lee Yankie, 12p// Soulshine, 6p Blues Tavern— Elmo and The BluesMen, 9p Dority’s Bar and Grill— Sugarcane Jane Felix’s— Millcreek Band Fin’s— The Modern Eldorados, 9p Flora Bama— Jay Hawkins Duo, 1p// LeaAnne Creswell Duo, 2p/// Dave McCormick, 4p//// Jack Robertson Show, 5:30p//// Big Muddy, 6p//// Jeff Dayton, 6p//// Wes Loper, 6p//// Jason Justice Duo, 9p//// Foxy Iguanas, 10p//// Brian Hill Trio, 10:15p//// JoJo Pres, 10:30p Hangout— Jamie Bergeron, 7p// Zewmob, 11p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Contraflow, 9:30p Hard Rock (Live) — WAR, 8p IP Casino— The Oak Ridge Boys, 8p Listening Room— Webb Wilder Lulu’s— CoConut Radio, 5p Main Street Cigar Lounge— Category 4 Band, 8p Manci’s— Rock Botttom The Merry Widow— Sound Clash producer/artist showcase, 8p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Stephen Sylvester Band, 8p Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Brittany Bell, 6p

54 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Harrison McInnis, 6:30p Moe’s BBQ (Semmes) — The Dunaway Brothers Old 27 Grill— Jimmy Lee Hannaford, 6:30p SanBar— Scott Koehn/ Lisa Zanghi Duo Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Damien Lamb, 6p Wind Creek Casino— No Idea Band, 9p

SAT. JULY 22

Bluegill— Bruce Smelley, 12p// DOTC, 6p Blues Tavern— Heather Gillis Band, 9p Callaghan’s— Underhill Family Orchestra Dority’s Bar and Grill— Joey Abruscato Trio Felix’s— Matt Neese Duo Fin’s— Melissa Joiner, 1p// Fat Lincoln, 9p Flora Bama— Red Clay Strays, 1p// Sam Glass Duo, 1p/// Big Al and the Heavyweights, 2p//// Jeff Dayton, 2p//// Destiny Brown, 4p//// Lefty Collins, 5p//// Jack Robertson Show, 5:30p//// Al and Cathy, 6p//// Brian Hill Band, 6p//// Kevin Swanson, 9p//// Mose Wilson abd The Delta Twins, 10p//// Logan Spicer and Tony Ray Thompson, 10:15p//// Yeah Proabably, 10:30p Hangout— Jamie Bergeron, 7p// G-Rivers, 11p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Contraflow, 9:30p Listening Room— Abe Patridge with Laurie Anne Armour Lulu’s— Hundred Dollar Car, 5p Manci’s— Wes Loper The Merry Widow— Jamell Richardson w/Eric Erdman, 8p Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Poarch Ninjas, 6p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Joshua Stephen Ward Duo, 6:30p Moe’s BBQ (OBA) — Mason Henderson, 6p Old 27 Grill— Christina Christian, 6:30p Pirates Cove— Rhythm Intervention, 5p SanBar— Malcolm Bond Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Matt Slowick, 11a// Gringofife, 6p Top of the Bay— Concave Wind Creek Casino— No Idea Band, 9p

SUN. JULY 23

Alchemy— The Bodhi Trio, 3p Bluegill— Quntin Berry, 12p// Yeah Probably, 6p Blues Tavern— John Hall Trio, 6p Callaghan’s— Molly Thomas and The Rare Birds Cortland’s Pizza Pub— David

Shivers, 1p Dority’s Bar and Grill— Eric Erdman Felix’s— Brandon Bailey Fin’s— Emily Stuckey & Gabe Willis, 3p Flora Bama— Foxy Iguanas, 12p// Logan Spicer, 1p/// Al and Cathy, 2p//// Zachery Diedrich, 2p//// Sean Casaway, 5p//// Jezebel’s Chill’n, 5:30p//// Perdido Brothers, 6p//// Alabama Lightning, 10:15p Hangout— Ben Loftin and the Family, 6p// Mason Henderson, 10p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Adam Holt, 8p Lulu’s— Greg Brown, 1p// Cadillac Attack, 5p Manci’s— Lee Yankie Old 27 Grill— Lisa Zanghi, 11:30a Saenger— Blazing Saddles SanBar— David Jones Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Gringofife, 11a// Matt Slowick, 6p

MON. JULY 24

Dority’s Bar and Grill— Phil Proctor Felix’s— Bryant Gilley Flora Bama— Founders and Friends, 2p// Lee Yankie, 5p/// Logan Spicer, 5:30p//// Cathy Pace, 6p//// Red Clay Strays, 10p//// Petty and Pace, 10:15p Hangout— The Good Lookings, 6p// Whyte Caps, 10p Lulu’s— Brent Burns, 5p

TUE. JULY 25

Bluegill— Les Hall Butch Cassidy’s— Chris Powell Cortland’s Pizza Pub— Rodger Fleshamn, 7:30p The Diner— Brent Burns, 6p Dority’s Bar and Grill— Hannah McFarland Felix’s— Lee Yankie Flora Bama— T-Bone Montgomery, 2p// Gary Story, 5p/// Zach Diedrich, 5:30p//// Perdido Brothers, 6p//// JoJo Pres, 10p//// Alabama Lightning, 10:15p Hangout— Continuum, 6p// Shea White, 10p Lulu’s— Ronnie Presley, 5p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Denver

WED. JULY 26

Bluegill— Ross Newell Felix’s— Jimmy Lumpkin Duo Flora Bama— Neil Dover, 2p// Mel Knapp, 5p/// Lee Yankie, 5:30p//// Rhonda Hart and Jonathan Newton, 6p//// Jay Williams Band, 10p//// Logan Spicer and Tony Ray Thompson, 10:15p Hangout— Rhythm Intervention, 6p// Justin Wall, 10p Listening Room— Sam Mooney with Summerlyn Powers Lulu’s— Justin Yawn, 5p Shipp’s Harbour Grill— Brent Burns, 5p


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 55


Little insight in disappointing Ledger doc

T

FILMTHE REEL WORLD

BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

AREA THEATERS CARMIKE CINEMA’S Wynnsong 16 785 Schillinger Rd. S. (251) 639-7373 CRESCENT THEATER 208 Dauphin Street (251) 438-2005 HOLLYWOOD STADIUM 18 1250 Satchel Paige Dr. (251) 473-9655 RAVE MOTION PICTURE JUBILEE SQUARE 12 6898 U.S. 90 Daphne, (251) 626- 6266

he emotional but pointless documentary “I Am Heath Ledger” is really more of a tribute than a documentary, shedding literally no new light on the death of the extremely talented young actor. Heath Ledger was a phenomenon and this film is nice to watch as a further appreciation of him. But the avoidance of any substance whatsoever becomes pretty frustrating by the time his story reaches its inevitable conclusion. Ledger was clearly loved by all who knew him — or at least by all who were interviewed in this excursion. All documentaries are vastly subjective, but some are more so than others. In “I Am heath Ledger,” we must work double time to read between the lines to glean any information. Fortunately, Ledger himself shot almost constant footage of himself and those around him. His “energy” was nonstop, and every interviewee mentions it. The fact that he felt the need to work so much might tell us more than the work itself. Everyone laughs off his erratic hours and lack of sleep as an enduring quirk, even though he died from an accidental overdose of, among many kinds of pills, sleeping pills. Did no one who loved him want to admit that sometimes all this “energy” is “mania?”

This ends up being a documentary of enabling, and a tale told through omission. No one even uses the word “drugs.” They say that right before he died, he got really cold and wet filming “The Imaginarium of Dr. Parnassus,” and that’s as far as anyone goes. He did not die from being cold and wet. The most interesting part of this film concerns his role as The Joker in Christopher Nolan’s “The Dark Knight.” It has been a popular concept that he got so deeply into preparing for this role that he went crazy and maybe even killed himself. Interview subjects such as his agent speak directly to this, and insist this was not the case. He was thrilled with the film and his role, and proud to see it come out. Of course, we know he ended up winning a posthumous Academy Award for his legendary turn. His preparation was intense, and intensely interesting. He came up with that makeup himself. I would gladly watch a documentary that was more about him as an actor; interviews with his “Brokeback Mountain” director, Ang Lee, were fascinating, but he was the only director interviewed. There are many directions this story could have taken, and the director — who also directed films called “I Am Chris Farley,” “I Am JFK Jr.” and “I Am

Bruce Lee” — chose to go with “lovefest” as the theme. We have 20 adoring friends and family members talking about how much Ledger loved Michelle Williams and how being a dad was the most important thing in the world to him, but Williams herself is notably absent. She is praised glowingly, but still obliquely. Surely his breakup from her a few months before his death had some bearing on elements of this story. What I heard was the devoted father of a young child described as being up all night working on music and calling friends at all hours and showing up in the middle of the night to film a music video. And everyone is in awe of how amazing his energy was, but I just pictured Williams and their baby at home. What better job for an insomniac than midnight infant feedings? The fact is, Ledger was talented, handsome and endlessly watchable, and that makes “I Am Heath Ledger” watchable, too. The film is mostly a tribute to his career, which is great, but we learn precious little about the personal life that led this career to end so abruptly. And considering the amount of footage shot by the subject himself, this seems like a pretty big missed opportunity to me. “I Am Heath Ledger” is currently available to rent.

CARMIKE CINEMAS 23151 Wharf Ln. Orange Beach (251) 981-4444 COBB THEATRES PINNACLE 14 3780 Gulf Shores Pkwy Gulf Shores (251) 968-7444 EASTERN SHORE PREMIERE CINEMA 14 30500 Alabama 181 #500 Spanish Fort, Al (251) 626-0352 Information accurate at press time; please call theaters for showtimes.

56 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

Photos | Spike TV / Vikram Gounassegarin

FROM LEFT: Known for leading roles in “A Knight’s Tale,” “Brokeback Mountain” and “The Dark Knight,” Heath Ledger died of a prescription drug overdose at age 28. In “Valerian and the City of a Thousand Planets,” special operatives Valerian and Laureline must race to identify the marauding menace and safeguard the future of the universe. NEW IN THEATERS DUNKIRK

Christopher Nolan directs Tom Hardy, Kenneth Branagh and Mark Rylance in a film about a massive evacuation effort in WWII. All listed multiplex theaters.

GIRLS TRIP

Four lifelong female friends travel to New Orleans for

the Essence Festival for bawdy bonding. All listed multiplex theaters.

VALERIAN AND THE CITY OF A THOUSAND PLANETS Directed by Luc Besson, this film, set in the 28th century, sees special operatives attempting to maintain order among diverse species as dark forces threaten. All listed multiplex theaters.

NOW PLAYING

All listed multiplex theaters. TRANSFORMERS: THE LAST KNIGHT WISH UPON All listed multiplex theaters. All listed multiplex theaters. BABY DRIVER THE BIG SICK All listed multiplex theaters. Crescent Theater, Regal Mobile ALL EYES ON ME Stadium 18, AMC Mobile 16, Cobb All listed multiplex theaters. Pinnacle 14, AMC Jubilee Square 16 WAR FOR THE PLANET OF THE CARS 3 All listed multiplex theaters. APES THE MUMMY All listed multiplex theaters. AMC Classic Wharf SPIDER-MAN: HOMECOMING WONDER WOMAN All listed multiplex theaters. All listed multiplex theaters. THE HOUSE PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: Regal Mobile Stadium 18 DEAD MEN TELL NO TALES DESPICABLE ME 3 All listed multiplex theaters.


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 57


CALENDAR OF EVENTS JULY 20, 2017 - JULY 26, 2017

“WILLY WONKA — THE MUSICAL” JOIN US FOR PLAYHOUSE IN THE PARK’S PRODUCTION OF “WILLY WONKA — THE MUSICAL,” FRIDAY, JULY 21, THROUGH SUNDAY, AUG. 13. CURTAIN TIMES ARE FRIDAYS AND SATURDAYS AT 7:30 P.M. AND SUNDAYS AT 2:30 P.M. VISIT PLAYHOUSEINTHEOARK.ORG.

Photos | Provided/playhouseinthepark.org

GENERAL INTEREST

10 a.m., at 760 St. Anthony St. in Mobile.

books. Call 251-621-2818, ext. 211.

Fairhope farmer’s market The city of Fairhope hosts an outdoor farmer’s market Thursdays, 3-6 p.m., through Nov. 2, behind the Fairhope Public Library downtown on Bancroft Street. Call 251-929-1466.

Stop the Violence Rally Free family event with live music, food, local artists, poets and much more. Saturday, July 22, at noon, Taylor Park, 1050 Baltimore St., Mobile. Organized by members of Faith Plus Work.

West Mobile farmer’s market This farmer’s market, sponsored by Christ United Methodist Church, is held every Tuesday, 3-6 p.m., on the west side of church property, 6101 Grelot Road, Mobile. Call 251-342-0462.

Alabama Deep Sea Fishing Rodeo The 84th annual Alabama Deep Sea Fishing Rodeo will take place July 20-22. The weigh station will be open 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday and Saturday and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Sunday. For more information and tickets, visit adsfr.com.

Market in the Square Mobile’s downtown farmer’s market is held in Cathedral Square on Saturdays, 7:30 a.m. until noon. Come enjoy music, food, beverages and more.

Lunch and learn Mitchell Cancer Institute hosts monthly “lunch and learn” events. On Tuesday, July 25 at noon will be “Cooking with Care: Eating Right for the Cancer Fight.” The lunch will be held in the multipurpose room on the second floor of MCI. Call 251-4459647.

Free family movie night Join Dauphin Island on the West End Beach for a free movie at dusk on Thursday and Friday. This weeks films are “Middle School” (Thursday) and “Finding Dory” (Friday). Historic marker unveiling The Dora Franklin Finley African-American Heritage Trail of Mobile will unveil a historic marker honoring Vivian Malone Jones, the first African-American graduate of the University of Alabama. Saturday, July 22,

Saenger Movie Series Saenger Theatre is hosting its Summer Classic Movie Series every Sunday. This week’s film is “Blazing Saddles.” Cost is $6 per adult, $3 per child 12 and under and for seniors 60 and over. Doors open at 2:30 p.m., film begins at 3 p.m. Call 251208-5601. Summer Author Series Daphne Public Library presents Summer Author Series Tuesdays at 6 p.m. On July 25, Joe Formichella and Suzanne Hudson will be on hand to discuss and sign their

58 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

Help Me Grow Wednesdays Lifelines Counseling Services and the Help Me Grow staff provide free developmental screenings throughout July. Visit us at The Shoppes at Bel Air every Wednesday from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. to speak with someone. Shining Star Youth Camp The Baldwin County Sheriff’s Office will host camps for youth ages 8-13 at Central

Baldwin Middle School, Aug. 2-5. Call 251-972-6890. TOPS Take Off Pounds Sensibly meets every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. at Spanish Fort Presbyterian Church. For more information, call 251-625-6888. “Movie in the Park” The Mobile Police Department is hosting “Movie in the Park” this summer. The next film will be Wednesday, July 26, at 5:30 p.m. at Tricentennial Park, 2121 Lake Drive. “Wonderful Wednesday” Join curator Tom McGehee to explore Mrs. Bellingrath’s most prized pieces at Bellingrath Gardens & Home. Admission is $13 for adults and $7.50 for ages 5-12. Visit bellingrath.org or call 251-459-8864 to register. Dauphin Island Boardwalk Talks Boardwalk Talks are held the first and third Wednesday of each month at 11:15 a.m. at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab, 101 Bienville Blvd. Call 251-861-2141. Midtown Optimist Club Join Midtown Optimist Club every


Wednesday at noon for lunch at Azalea City Golf Course. Call 251-348-3542. Toastmasters Toastmasters International meets regularly at six locations in Mobile and Baldwin counties. Visit www. toastmasters.org for more information.

ARTS “Underwater Forest” premier “Underwater Forest” is the latest documentary from Ben Raines. It was produced by ACF and This Is Alabama. The premier will be held at noon on Friday, July 21, at the Crescent Theater in downtown Mobile. Tickets include lunch. Visit joinACF.org. “Willy Wonka — The Musical” Join us for Playhouse in the Park’s production of “Willy Wonka — The Musical,” Friday, July 21, through Sunday, Aug. 13. Curtain times are Fridays and Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2:30 p.m. Visit playhouseintheoark.org. Mobile Mystery Dinners A performance of “Murder on the Carnivore Cruise” will take place Saturday, July 22, 7 p.m. at Azalea Manor. Tickets include dinner and unlimited wine. Advance reservations are required; visit mobilemysterydinners. com.

FUNDRAISERS Strike Out Domestic Violence Join the Mobile BayBears as they take on Chattanooga Friday, July 21, at 7:05 p.m. Pledge $20 for each strikeout by a BayBears pitcher to help strike out domestic violence in our community. Call 251-342-2809. “Bay Bites” Join Mobile Baykeeper for Bay Bites, a unique event featuring a variety of local cuisine, craft beer, live music and lawn games at Cooper Riverside Park on Wednesday, July 26, 5-8 p.m. Visit mobilebaykeeper.org or call 251-433-4229.

MUSEUMS Tea for Two Tuesday afternoons at 2 p.m. the Fairhope Museum of History hosts a tea with a lecture on Fairhope history. The July 25 speaker will be Amy Thompson. Call 251-929-1471. “Windows to the Sea” “Windows to the Sea” is a new permanent exhibit at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab Estuarium. Visit disl.org. “Shipwreck! Pirates and Treasure” A new, highly interactive exhibit at GulfQuest features more than 500 authentic artifacts recovered from deepocean shipwrecks. Visit www.gulfquest. org. “Faces of Africa” The History Museum of Mobile exhibit “Faces of Africa: A Mystical View of Tribal Heritage” runs through Monday, July 31. Call 251-208-7420.

“Drugs: Costs and Consequences” The Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration team up to present a powerful interactive exhibit of the effects of drugs on individuals and society. Through August. Visit exploreum.com. Fairhope’s founding Learn more about the 1894 founding of Fairhope at the Fairhope Museum of History, 24 N. Section St. The museum is open daily (except Sunday and Monday) from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 251929-1471. Little Discoveries “Outside the Box,” aimed at children age 6 and under, explores how innovation and creativity can lead to a world of possibilities, starting with a simple cardboard box. Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Call 251-208-6893 or email jholland@exploreum.com. Thursdays at MMoA Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., the Mobile Museum of Art offers free admission to all visitors. No reservations are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive. Call 251-208-5200.

SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES Mobile BayBears The Mobile BayBears are back in action at Mobile’s Hank Aaron Stadium. The team hosts Chattanooga for a five-game home stand July 19-23. Call 251-479BEAR. Hula lessons Open enrollment for the Mobile branch of Hawai’i’s Halau Ka Lihilihilehua ‘O Hopoe Kuikanani will be July 17, 3-6:30 p.m. Come learn traditional Hawaiian Hula. Call 251-463-6822. Classes will be held at 5566 Andrew Road, Suite D. Group rides South Alabama and Mississippi Mountain Bike Association invites all levels of cyclists to join them every Tuesday and Thursday at 6 p.m. at USA Bike Trails and Sunday at 9 a.m. at Chickasabogue Park. Email carrie@ rideSAMBA.com. Weekly 1K/5K Every Thursday evening at 6 p.m., join Red Beard’s Outfitter and Cortlandt’s Pub in the Spring Hill Village Shopping Center for a 1K or 5K run and walk. No cost to participate. Bridge lessons The Mobile Bridge Center offers free bridge lessons each Tuesday at 6 p.m. at 1510 University Blvd. Arrive a few minutes early to register. Call the Bridge Center at 251-666-2147, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fitness and athletics classes New fitness classes are in progress at Palmer Pillans Middle School. Curvy yoga, Tone It Up ! (fusion workout), Zumba, basketball clinics (ages 8+) and sports conditioning (ages 8-17). To register or for more information, call 251-463-7980 or visit communityactivitiesprogram.com.

J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 59


CALENDAR OF EVENTS JULY 20, 2017 - JULY 26, 2017 fourth Thursday at 6:30 p.m., 19135 Main Dance and art classes St., 251-866-7973. Summer classes offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School include belly dance, ballroom dance, ballet and tumbling (ages Creola City Council: Second and fourth 6-8), beginning piano (ages 8+), watercolor Thursday at 6 p.m., 190 Dead Lake Road, painting, zombies and superheroes art, #A, 251-675-8142. and pet portraits art. Call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com. Daphne City Council: First and third Monday at 6:30 p.m., 1705 Main St. Work Pickleball for adults (indoors) sessions are the second Monday of each Offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School, month at 6:30 p.m., www.daphneal.com. Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon. Great sport for all ages combines tennis, pingpong and Dauphin Island Town Council: First and badminton on a court one-fourth the size of a tennis court. Call 251-463-7980 or go third Tuesdays at 7 p.m., 1011 Bienville Blvd., www.townofdauphinisland.org. to communityactivitiesprogram.com. Ballroom dance Azalea Ballroom Dance Club hosts dances the second and fourth Tuesday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Via Health, Fitness & Enrichment Center, 1717 Dauphin St. Call 251-623-9183 or visit azaleaballroomdanceclub.com. Ballroom dance The Moonlight ChassĂŠ Ballroom Dance Society hosts dances the first and third Monday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Hot Wheels Skating Rink in Daphne. Email cassief13@aol.com.

PUBLIC MEETINGS Baldwin County Commission: First and third Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., 322 Courthouse Square, Bay Minette. Work sessions are the second and fourth Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. rotating between Bay Minette, the Foley Satellite Courthouse, the Fairhope Satellite Courthouse and the Baldwin County Central Annex Building in Robertsdale. www.baldwincountyal.gov

Elberta Town Council: Third Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m. in the town hall. Workshop meeting on the second Tuesday. townofelberta.com. Fairhope City Council: Second and fourth Monday at 6 p.m., 161 N. Section St. Work sessions are held before each council meeting at 4:30 p.m., www.cofairhope. com. Fairhope Planning Commission: First Monday at 5 p.m., 161 N. Section St. For more information visit www.cofairhope. com. Foley City Council: First and third Monday at 5:30 p.m., 407 E. Laurel Ave. Work sessions begin at 4 p.m., www. cityoffoley.org. Gulf Shores City Council: Second and fourth Mondays at 4 p.m., 1905 W. First St., www.gulfshoresal.gov.

Mobile City Council: Tuesdays at Government Plaza, 205 Government St. Baldwin County Planning Commission: Pre-council meeting begins at 9 a.m.; First Thursday at 6 p.m., 22251 Palmer council meeting begins at 10:30 a.m., St., Robertsdale, www.baldwincountyal. www.cityofmobile.org. gov. Mobile Planning Commission: First and Bayou La Batre City Council: Second third Thursdays at 2 p.m., 205 Government and fourth Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 13785 St., www.urban.cityofmobile.org. S. Wintzell Ave., www.cityofbayoulabatre. com. Orange Beach City Council: First and third Tuesdays at 5 p.m., 4099 Orange Chickasaw City Council: Second and Beach Blvd., www.cityoforangebeach.com. fourth Tuesday at 7 p.m., 224 N. Craft Highway, 251-452-6450. Prichard City Council: Every Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 216 E. Prichard Ave., www. Citronelle City Council: Second and thecityofprichard.org.

60 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 61


SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

Mobile Tennis Center secures national tournaments BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

“We are thrilled to be coming back to the city of Mobile and this beautiful facility,” said Chris Walling, director of adult tennis for USTA Southern. “Scott Novak and the city of Mobile do an amazing job for our players in providing an exemplary tournament experience, and Mobile has quickly become a player-favorite spot for our league championships. His team has proven to us many times in the past that they will take care of the details and create a great championship for the USTA Southern Section.” Also on the MTC schedule this summer is the USTA Boys’ 14 and Boys’ 12 National Hard Court Championships, taking place Aug. 5-12. Sept. 8-10 will be the Alabama Junior Open for Boys and Girls ages 12 to 18. More tournaments will take place in the fall. To learn more, visit www.MobileTennisCenter.net.

Anglers descend on Dauphin Island

MTC / Thigpen Photography Inc.

The 84th annual Alabama Deep Sea Fishing Rodeo (ADSFR) is here once again. Activities for the world’s largest fishing tournament get underway Thursday night, July 20, with the “Spot Liars Contest” and the captains’ meeting on the rodeo site at 531 Lemoyne Drive. A cannon blast at 5 a.m. on Friday will mark the official start of the competition. The weigh station will open at 10 a.m. and close at 7 p.m. on both Friday and Saturday. On Sunday, the weigh station will again open at 10 a.m. but close at 5 p.m. The ADSFR is a project of the Mobile Jaycees. Founded in 1929, the fishing rodeo now attracts more than 3,000 anglers and 75,000 spectators each year. The three-day event includes 30 categories of fish, with first-, second- and third-place prizes awarded. One “master angler” is recognized and cash prizes for king mackerel, speckled trout and “big game” jackpots are awarded. The ADSFR is also a Captain’s Choice tournament and a Southern Kingfish Association event. These sponsors bump the total award package to $1 million in cash and prizes. “One of the main goals of the 84th Alabama Deep Sea Fishing Rodeo will be continuing our conservation efforts that we have introduced over the past several years,” rodeo president Van Sims said. “Returning will be the live weigh-in for speckled trout and redfish, catch-and-release tarpon, catch-and-release shark and newly added catch-and-release billfish. “Special thanks to the Mobile County Sheriff’s Flotilla for use of the 1,400-gallon tank used in the live weigh-in. Through this we hope to improve The U.S. Tennis Association will conduct its eight-day Southern Sectionals tournament at the Mobile Tennis the fisheries in the northern Gulf of Mexico so future generations can enjoy Center July 21-31. them as we do today.” Sims pointed out the rodeo has helped fund graduate-level scholarships for the Department of Marine Science at the University of South Alabama. he Mobile Tennis Center (MTC) has long been Association.” Donations have now topped $250,000. Other groups that benefit from the rodeo considered one of the top athletic facilities in the Since opening in 1958, MTC has hosted numerous include the American Cancer Society, the Billfish Foundation and the Mobile nation. That honor must be well deserved, as the USTA Southern and National tournaments. The facility Jaycees Christmas Shopping Tour (which provides local children the opportuworld’s largest tennis competition is now booked at includes 60 courts, plus 10 courts at Medal of Honor Park nity to shop for gifts for their families). the center near Langan Municipal Park for the next three and five courts at Lyons Park. The MTC is recognized as Live music will be provided by such groups as the Wes Loper Band, Eric years. the world’s largest municipal facility. Erdman, the Mulligan Brothers and Rolling in the Hay. For dates and times, July 21-24 the U.S. Tennis Association (USTA) will The USTA Southern Section consists of players from conduct its Southern Sectionals for players age 18 and Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missis- visit http://adsfr.com. above. Coming back the following weekend, July 28-31, sippi, North Carolina, South Carolina and Tennessee. College briefs will be the USTA’s Southern Sectionals for players age 40 The economic impact of the two tournaments will also • Spring Hill senior Jesse Redman of Spanish Fort was named the Southand above. be felt outside Mobile. Economist Dr. Phil Forbus said the ern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference Golfer of the Year. Redman finished The two events are expected to draw 2,000 players to tournament is estimated to generate $722,636 in city tax his final collegiate season with a 73.53 stroke average and won the individual Mobile. Over the eight days of play, the estimated total revenue and $153,247 in county revenue. economic impact is $13.2 million per year, or nearly $40 “Mobile is proud to host the Southern Sectional Tennis championship of the SHC Badger Shootout. Joining him on the all-league million during the three-year contract. Tournament,” Mobile County Commission President Mer- first-team was senior David Kirkman, while junior Kalle Nilsson was on the second-team roster. “It’s an honor to play host to this prestigious tournaceria Ludgood said. “The hard work of the Mobile Sports • The National Football Foundation and College Hall of Fame have named ment,” Mobile City Council President Gina Gregory said. Authority and the Tennis Center to bring the tournament to USA’s Roman Buchanan to its Hampshire Honor Society. A four-year letter “This would not have been possible without the amazing Mobile is a real ace for our county.” winner for the Jaguars, Buchanan earned his bachelor’s degree after being effort by [general manager] Scott Novak and his team at USTA officials cited the team effort by the local organamed to the Sun Belt Conference’s Academic Honor Roll three times. He was the tennis center, the city and county, Visit Mobile, Mobile nizations as a leading factor in awarding the three-year second on the team last season with 86 stops. Sports Authority and, of course, the United States Tennis commitment to MTC.

T

62 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 63


SPORTS EXTRA

NCAA declines inclusion of Spring Hill College BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

M

uch to the dismay of officials and students at Spring Hill College, the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) has again denied the Badgers full acceptance into Division II competition. On July 14, the Division II membership committee notified SHC President Christopher P. Puto it will not recommend to the NCAA Division II Management Council that the Badgers be allowed to advance to full membership. This came despite the group saying it was impressed by the Jesuit school’s compliance program and enhancements to its athletics department. The sole reason cited by the membership committee was SHC’s current accreditation status with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). SHC is currently in a 12-month probation by SACS’s Commission on Colleges because of financial instability. By December, SACS will decide to reaffirm or not to reaffirm SHC’s accreditation. While SHC is currently accredited, SACS has yet to reaffirm it for the next 10 years. “Naturally, we are disappointed with the recommendation of the membership committee. However, we understand the rationale for the decision,” Puto said. “As a college, we remain optimistic for a positive outcome through the management council’s review process.” This is not the first setback for SHC’s trek to move beyond the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. In what was scheduled to be a three-year process, the NCAA asked the Badgers to repeat Candidacy Year Two to give new campus personnel with direct compliance responsibilities adequate time to get up to speed with NCAA requirements.

64 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

Then, in 2016, the membership committee ruled SHC had successfully completed the second phase and recommended advancement to Provisional Membership. This phase was completed during the previous school year. Hope is not lost that the decision can be overturned. The recommendation of the membership committee must still be reviewed and voted upon by the Division II Management Council, which has the option to either approve or overturn the membership committee’s recommendation. If the council approves the committee’s recommendation, SHC has the option of pursuing an appeal of the council’s decision. This ruling would be crucial to Spring Hill College’s future. A news release concerning the NCAA’s decision states: “The committee voted to remove Emmanuel [Georgia] and Spring Hill from the membership process. Both schools previously had been required to repeat one year of the three-year process, which is the maximum permitted by Division II legislation. If a school cannot complete the membership requirements within the established timeline, it is removed from the process and must wait one year to reapply.” The SHC community now must wait for the management council to rule. “For the sake of our student-athletes, I am hopeful the management council’s review will lead to a decision that allows us to move forward towards full membership,” said Jim Hall, director of athletics. “If the membership committee’s recommendation is approved, we will carefully consider our options and develop a plan for an appeal of the decision.”

Photo | Spring Hill College

Citing the school’s financial instability and threatened accreditation, the NCAA denied Spring Hill College’s acceptance into Division II competition last week. If the committee’s recommendation ultimately stands, SHC’s 16 varsity athletic programs would continue to play full schedules of NCAA Division II, Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference and Gulf South Conference competition during the 2017-18 regular seasons, as these schedules have been finalized. However, SHC teams would not be eligible for conference championships or NCAA postseason play. While the news from the membership committee wasn’t good for Spring Hill, several other schools were approved for full membership, including California State University-San Marcos, Concordia (California), Concordia Portland, Embry-Riddle (Florida) and Oklahoma Baptist University. They can now compete in conference and NCAA postseason events effective Sept. 1. This brings the number of colleges and universities in Division II to 308. The committee also recommended the progression of five other schools working through the process. Westminster (Utah) was approved to begin the third year of the membership process, while Auburn-Montgomery, Biola, Davenport and Purdue Northwest were approved to begin the second year.


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 65


STYLE HOROSCOPES WE’RE ALL WINNERS! CANCER (6/22-7/22) — You will be disappointed to discover two people can’t Snapchat each other using instant film technology. But you can add “filters” on the photos with markers and send them to others via raven. You win a Nappie Award for Pretty Effective With Coupons. LEO (7/23-8/23) — You’ll lose your lunch after your first ride on OWA’s new roller coaster Rollin’ Thunder. You’ll recover your composure with a smoothie and granola bar before riding the teacups and Sky Balloons. You win a Nappie Award for Kinda Predictable. VIRGO (8/24-9/22) — You’ll cause a brief panic when you yell “SHARK!” on Dauphin Island this weekend. It will take a few moments for people to realize you’re just really excited about the fishing rodeo. You win a Nappie Award for A Little Doughy. LIBRA (9/23-10/22) — You’ll binge-eat at Bay Bites food truck festival next week. After devouring all of the Crepe Crusader’s chicken and waffles, you’ll drain Grillbillies of their entire supply of pulled pork and Conecuh sausage. You win a Nappie Award for Enthusiastic Greetings. SCORPIO (10/23-11/21) — You will press the flesh at the Nappie Awards after party, and I’m not talking about handshakes. You’ll fail to set the Guinness World Record for longest motorboating on a single breath, but take solace knowing you’ll win a Nappie Award for Gentleman Scholar. SAGITTARIUS (11/22-12/22) — When you fail to secure fresh red snapper for your dinner party, you’ll resort to dyeing frozen catfish pink. Diners won’t even notice the difference, so it might be the perfect opportunity to pass off your leftover pig anus as calamari. You win a Nappie Award for Denim Queen. CAPRICORN (12/23-1/19) — Acting on a hunch based on mere seconds of irrational thought, you will fill your gas tank with pecan husks as an alternative fuel. Once the resulting mechanical failures are repaired, you’ll try again with peanut shells. You win a Nappie Award for Uncomfortable Silences. AQUARIUS (1/20-2/18) — You’ll feel like you’ve broken every bone after a visit to a trampoline park, but you’ll find work as a Wacky Waving Inflatable Arm Flailing Tube Man at Al Harrington’s Wacky Waving Inflatable Arm Flailing Tube Man Emporium and Warehouse. You win the Nappie Award for Migos Say What? PISCES (2/19-3/20) — You’ll be arrested for violating the cruising ordinance while trying to find a parking space before the Nappie Awards. To deter similar behavior, the judge will incarcerate you in a room lined with Ed Sheeran posters. You win a Nappie Award for Snappiest Ginger Snaps. ARIES (3/21-4/19) — You will be carried away by an aggressive of swarm of mosquitos who will hold you hostage until you give them a bootleg copy of the new Jay Z album. You win a Nappie Award for Effortless TAURUS (4/20-5/20) — You’ll play the role of “Dr. Nipslip,” a credentialed physician with two-sided tape tasked with preventing embarrasing wardrobe malfunctions. But after an incident at the pool, you’ll be known as “Dr. Ballfall.” You win a Nappie Award for Having Killed A Mockingbird. GEMINI (5/21-6/21) — You’ll turn over the latest stone in the Trump-Russia investigation when you discover Jared Kushner once watched the Trololo video. You win a Nappie Award for Oh, That Guy. 66 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 67


THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE FIRST FOR KNOWLEDGE BY WILL NEDIGER / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Relieves 9 “You ____!” 15 Noted brand once owned by a utopian colony in Iowa 20 Theodore, for one 21 Display no talent for 22 Like boots 23 Deadliness 24 Make lots of people stop in their tracks? 26 Heartbeat 27 Bite stopper 29 When Juno Beach was attacked 30 Herb in absinthe 31 Be watchfully ever-present 34 Flub 36 Obtain through trickery 37 Roughly equal 39 “Austin Powers: The Spy Who Shagged Me,” e.g. 40 Demanding 41 One of the singing Carpenters 42 Unnecessary extras that don’t cost much? 44 One may be circular 47 Neighbor of Turkey 48 Did some farm work 49 Sharp 50 Lugosi of film fame 51 Cry of Pontius Pilate 53 Company behind the Falcon 9 launch vehicle 56 Grad-student headaches 57 Ancient Greek vessel 59 Diamond stat 60 Mountain in the logo of Yerevan State University 61 Sweetheart, in slang 63 Brother who’s a criminal? 67 Subject of the photo “Guerrillero Heroico” 68 Trembling, say 70 Friend of Huck 71 Hectic scramble 73 Cirrus clouds, e.g. 74 King of the Titans, in Greek legend 77 Movie starring Michael J. Fox as a lycanthrope 80 French-press alternative 81 Look ecstatic 82 Neighbors 84 How Bilbo Baggins traveled 85 Currency with notes in denominations of 1,000, 5,000 and 10,000 86 Annoy actors Keaton and Crabbe? 89 Clog clearer 90 On again 91 Green 92 Scotland’s ____ Islands 93 Doomed 96 Soprano Fleming

97 Cold treat eaten with a spoon 98 Strapped, say 99 ____ relative 100 Boris Pasternak heroine 102 Org. that might come pounding at the door 105 Safety worry? 108 Home to some flying monkeys 111 Heals 112 “Am I the only one thinking this …?” 113 Hollywood resident, e.g. 114 Said “C-O-L-O-U-R,” e.g. 115 Kind of acting 116 Made fun of mercilessly DOWN 1 Doesn’t just sit there 2 Flat, e.g. 3 With 44-Down, half-dozen real estate agents? 4 Longtime news inits. 5 “Breaking Bad” channel 6 One escorting 7 Log 8 Terrier named after a Scottish island 9 Real pal, for short 10 Bit of jewelry with a pendant 11 Attached with a knot at the end 12 Not nebulous 13 Nebulous 14 Downed

15 Climbs 16 ____ sauce (macaroni and cheese ingredient) 17 Word after sing or string 18 Post on a banister 19 Perplex 25 Off the beaten path 28 Plain dwelling? 32 Part of a concert that many people impatiently sit through 33 Moving vehicle 35 Some infrastructure 36 Name for a cat 37 Depression Era refugee 38 Stash hunter 39 Hebrew name that means “his peace” 40 Annotation on Santa’s list 42 About which you might ask, “One lump or two?” 43 Theme in “To Kill a Mockingbird” 44 See 3-Down 45 Name on THE Saudi flag 46 Refuse 48 Not engaged 50 It has two cups 52 LP players 54 Teaser 55 ____-Bakr (father-in-law of Muhammad) 56 Like Mork 58 Put in a crypt 60 Aconcagua’s range 61 Like most Judd Apatow comedies

62 In flames 64 One may be polyatomic 65 Ripe 66 “Golden Boy” playwright 69 Pokémon Go, for one 72 Posh 74 Yogurtlike beverage 75 Whole lot 76 “Gymnopédies” composer 78 Africa’s ____ Chad 79 James who wrote the best seller “A Million Little Pieces” 81 City next to Gulfport 83 Cut at a slant 86 Selfish demand 87 Discover 88 City on the Italian Riviera 89 Sign of a hit 90 What jets may do midair 92 Word often said to lack a rhyme 93 Contents of drives 94 Do better than 95 Mother-of-pearl 96 Size again 97 Candid 99 Nasdaq alternative 101 “C’est la vie!” 103 Paleontologist’s find 104 Polo brand 106 Cook who’s entrepreneurial 107 ____ talks 109 It might get your feet wet 110 Stadium cry

ANSWERS ON PAGE 71

68 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7


J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 69


STYLE GARDENING

Use ferns to create a serene garden BY JUDY WEAVER | MOBILE MASTER GARDENER | COASTALALABAMAGARDENING@GMAIL.COM Photos/Judy Weaver

Among the 900 varieties of recognized ferns in the United States are Brazilian tree fern, variegated cretan brake and ghost fern.

Q: I have a shady yard at my new house and am interested in planting ferns. What works best in coastal Alabama?

A:

Fortunately, one of our Mobile County Master Gardeners, Sue Stephan, became interested in ferns three to four years ago and now tends 114 varieties. I visited Sue’s garden to learn more, and could hardly bring myself to leave the beautiful garden rooms she has created.

Fern basics

Hardy ferns are ancient plants, older than dinosaurs. Most thrive in partial to full shade and a moist environment. Some ferns tolerate sun and dry conditions. Gerald Klingaman, an emeritus professor of horticulture at the University of Arkansas, says there are 20 fern families with more than 900 taxa recognized in the United States, and over 20,000 species known worldwide. Ferns reproduce by their spores, which can be found in sori (appear to be small dots) on the underside of their fronds. They also spread by creeping rhizomes. Unlike flowering annuals and perennials, ferns look their best after they have had a couple of years to establish themselves. Your patience will pay dividends. Ferns do best in soil with a pH range of 5.0 to 5.5. A north or east exposure is ideal, especially if rainwater can keep the growing medium moist. If you don’t have woodlands soil, you can amend your soil with sand and organic matter such as peat moss, leaf compost or pine bark to break up a heavy clay soil. Your ferns will be happier and showier.

Tough as nails evergreen ferns

A couple of woods ferns are sure things in our growing zone. The Southern woodfern (Dryopteris ludoviciana) is an evergreen in our climate that can eventually reach 48 inches. It performs

70 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

best in moist areas, though the Southern woodfern can also grow in dry conditions. Its habit is upright with dark green fronds, and can be used for massing. If you are looking for a ground cover, the evergreen autumn fern (Dryopteris erythrosora) from Asia can grow in a clump up to two feet tall and wide. New fronds unfurl in a warm, maroonred color before maturing to a deep green by summer. Rita’s Gold fern (Nephrolepis exaltata “Rita’s Gold”) has chartreuse-green fronds (18-24 inches long) that make it an effective accent plant. It is only hardy to USDA zones 9 and 10; the city of Mobile is in zone 8b. Holly fern (Cyrtomium falcatum) is big, bold and shiny, growing about two feet wide and 18 inches tall.

Easy-to-grow deciduous ferns

The Japanese painted fern (Athyrium niponicum var.pictum) is beautifully showy with its white-splashed fronds. Mass plantings can brighten an area in your shade garden. The ghost fern (Athyrium “ghost”) has the symmetrical form of the lady fern and the grayish white fronds of the Japanese painted fern.

Tips from Sue

• The common maidenhair fern (Adiantum capillus-veneris) likes a slightly alkaline soil (pH of 6.6 to 7.5). Sue uses seashells mixed into the soil to achieve that alkalinity. • Resurrection fern (Pleopeltis polypodioides), an epiphyte or air plant, can be used to line your walking paths. Sue finds fallen live oak limbs with the ferns already on them and lays them along the garden pathways. Resurrection fern gets its nutrients from the air and from water. It can survive years-long drought and will rehydrate in a single day when water is present. • Look for ferns to add to your collection at local nurseries,

the Mobile Botanical Gardens and even at Fresh Market. There are so many treasured ferns to put on your list: maidenhair, foxtail, ghost, staghorn, birds nest, Boston, Australian fern tree, Japanese holly fern, ET fern, Rita’s Gold, mahogany, crocodile, elkhorn, lace, shiny bristle, wood fern, kangaroo paw, bear paw, leather fern and many more. • Advice on feeding ferns varies from using ¼ strength liquid plant food to feeding them with fish emulsion to not feeding them at all. Experiment. • Finally, take the time to sit in your garden among your ferns and breathe in the restful and serene atmosphere they create.

YOU ARE INVITED TO THESE UPCOMING GARDENING EVENTS What: New, Better, Yours: Plant the Newest, Best Plants When: Wednesday, July 26, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Where: Bellingrath Gardens, 12401 Bellingrath Gardens Road, Theodore Admission: Fees apply. Call 251-973-2217 for more information. What: Mobile Master Gardeners Monthly Meeting When: Thursday, Aug. 3, 10:30-11:45 a.m. Where: Jon Archer Center, 1070 Schillinger Road, N., Mobile Topic: Favorite Plants for Mobile Gardens, Mobile Master Gardeners What: Baldwin County Master Gardeners Monthly Meeting When: Thursday, Aug. 10, 9:30 a.m. Where: Gulf Coast Regional Research & Extension Center, 8300 Highway 104, Fairhope Topic: Native American Horticulture Master Gardener Helpline: 1-877-252-4769, or send your gardening questions to coastalalabamagardening@gmail.com.


ANSWERS FROM PAGE 68

J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 71


STYLE FEATURE

Poarch Creek’s OWA amusement park opens Friday BY JOHN MULLEN/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

I

t’ll be a game changer, says longtime Pleasure Island tourism chief Herb Malone. Welcoming the public for the first time on July 21, the OWA entertainment complex in Foley will unveil The Park at OWA, Phases I and II, featuring 21 rides — including the Rollin’ Thunder roller coaster, built by the designer of Coney Island’s famous Thunderbolt thrill ride. “OWA is adding an entire new dimension to the entertainment offerings of Alabama’s Gulf Coast,” said Malone, president and CEO of Gulf Shores and Orange Beach Tourism. “It’s a game changer that’s really going

72 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

Also opening on the site by this fall are a 150-room Marriott TownPlace Suites; 154,000 square feet of retail, dining and entertainment space; and a 14-acre lake with island amphitheater and boat house, according to company officials. But the crown jewel of the July 21 opening will be the 14-acre amusement park with six thrill rides, six family-friendly rides for those aged 11 to 13 and nine kiddie rides. Also available in The Park at OWA will be midway games, family-friendly entertainment and food vendors. More dining options are expected to open in September to complete the $241 million first two phases. Included among those is Wahlburgers, a gourmet hamburger restaurant chain owned by actors and brothers Donnie and Mark Wahlberg and another brother, Paul. Other retail and food options coming this fall include Alvin’s Island beach shop, Fairhope Soap Co., Sunglass World, Utopia and Hershey’s Ice Cream Shop. The park’s companion attraction is the new Foley Sports Tourism Complex connected to the east side of OWA. It includes 16 outdoor fields that opened in May 2016 and are already home to major college tournaments. “While we initially got our feet wet with smaller tournaments, we’ve already been competing on a national level,” said Don Stanley, executive director. “On the outdoor side we hosted the 2016 Sun Belt Conference Women’s Soccer Championship and we look forward to doing it again this year.” A 90,000-square-foot indoor events center is part of the sports complex and will host hundreds of gymnasts and their families for the 2017 Alabama Compulsory Championship, Dec. 1-3. The meet is the culmination of Alabama’s youth gymnastics season. OWA is projected to have a huge economic impact on the South Baldwin County landscape. It is expected to provide a $244 million boost including Photo | Shane Rice $78.5 million in payroll, and add an equivalent of 3,462 full-time jobs. An to give us that boost to being a year-round destination for Alabama Department of Commerce report recently announced OWA was the top new job creator in the state. the whole region.” “We are also proud that OWA is positively impacting families living in The 520-acre entertainment complex on the Foley Foley and the surrounding region through the job creation generated by this Beach Express and County Road 20 in South Baldwin County is a $500 million Poarch Creek Indian project with development,” Poarch CEO Bryan said. And the tribe is not done. Future enhancements planned are a luxury RV a planned five-year build-out. Opening the amusement resort, four hotels, resort-style condominiums and an outdoor water park. park is the first step, organizers said. Starting July 21 The Park at OWA will open at 10 a.m. daily. Admission “Our tribe is excited to offer a family destination near Alabama’s beautiful beaches that will create memories this fees range from $34.99 with special pricing for children, seniors and military summer and for years to come,” said Stephanie A. Bryan, personnel. Yearly passes are also available for $89.99. Tickets are available at the gate or online at VisitOWA.com. Poarch Creek Indians Tribal Chair and CEO.


F U T U R E S H O C K

J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 73


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com PUBLIC NOTICE ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that the University of South Alabama (Owner) will accept sealed bids for the following work: MOBILE STREET LIGHTING University of South Alabama Mobile, Alabama USA JOB NO. 16-52 USA BID NO. 7062701 Bids will be received and clocked in at 2:00 p.m. local time on Tuesday, July 25, 2017, in Room AD245 of the USA Administration Building, on the Main Campus of the University of South Alabama. Bids will not be accepted after the time indicated herein and will be returned unopened. A cashier’s check or bid bond payable to the University of South Alabama in an amount not less than five (5) percent of the amount of the bid, but in no event more than $10,000 must accompany the bidder’s proposal. Bid Documents shall be available only through the USA Purchasing Office. Contact as follows: University of South Alabama Purchasing Department 307 University Blvd, N., AD245 PH# (251) 460-6151 FX# (251) 414-8291 rbrown@southalabama.edu) Bids must be submitted on Proposal Forms furnished in the Bid Documents or copies thereof. The preceding is an abbreviated advertisement. The complete advertisement may be obtained from the location listed above. All questions concerning the Project should be submitted in writing to the Project Manager at the address listed below. 307 University Blvd. N., AD001 Mobile, AL 36688 PH# (251) 460-6601 FX# (251) 4611370 mmayberry@southalabama.edu Lagniappe HD July 6, 13, 20, 2017

FORECLOSURES MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Christine R. Hughes, a single person having been assumed by Lillian M. Hughes, originally in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., on the 26th day of December, 2007, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6313, Page 93; having been assumed in Book LR7396, Page 1583; the undersigned Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on August 10, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Commencing on the West line of Tuttle Avenue at the Southeast corner of Lot 7, Block 2, Zimlich and Strauss Addition to Mobile, as recorded in Deed Book 153, Pages 32-33 in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama; thence run Northwardly along said West line of Tuttle Avenue, a distance of 12.3 feet to a point, said point being the point of beginning; thence with a deflection angle of 85 Degrees 16 Minutes to the left, run Westwardly and along a smooth wire fence a distance of 153.65 feet to a point on the West line of said Lot 7; thence run Northwardly a distance of 88.8 feet along the West line of said Lot 7 and Lot 6 to a point, said point being the Northwest corner of said Lot 6; thence run Eastwardly along the North line of said Lot 6, a distance of 168.0 feet to a point on the West line of said Tuttle Avenue; thence run Southwardly along the West line of Tuttle Avenue a distance of 77.8 feet to the point of beginning. Property street address for informational purposes:  558 Tuttle Ave, Mobile, AL  36604 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVEDESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC, Mortgagee/Transferee Elizabeth Loefgren

SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL 35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 339937

Lagniappe HD July 6, 13, 20, 2017

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by James W. Music, Jr., and Shelli S. Music, husband and wife, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for GMAC Mortgage, LLC dba Ditech.com, on the 12th day of December, 2006, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6110 Page 1311; the undersigned Ditech Financial LLC f/k/a Green Tree Servicing LLC, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on August 17, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: All that parcel of land in the City of Theodore, Mobile County, State of Alabama, as more fully described in Deed Book 4989, Page 1777, ID Number 02050764, being known and designated as Lot 164 also the South 20.0 feet of Lot 165, Lakewood Acres Subdivision, Filed in Plat Book 10, Page 130. Property street address for informational purposes:  8216 Old Pascagoula Rd, Theodore, AL  36582 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a nonrefundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation.Ditech Financial LLC f/k/a Green Tree Servicing LLC, Mortgagee/Transferee   Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 413953 Lagniappe HD July 13, 20, 27, 2017

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Jenester R. White, an unmarried person, originally in favor of Cendant Mortgage Corporation, on the 17th day of January, 2001, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 4923 Page 0194; having been modified by Loan Modification Agreement recorded in Book 6566 Page 1378, executed by Jenester White Pettway fka Jenester Rochele White and Henry Walker Pettway, wife and husband, further modified by Loan Modification Agreement recorded in Book 6863 Page 904, executed by Jenester R. White Pettway fka Jenester R. White and Henry Pettway, and further modified by Loan Modification Agreement recorded in Book LR7058 Page 317, executed by Jenester R. White Pettway fka Jenester R. White, an unmarried person; the undersigned MidFirst Bank, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on September 14, 2017, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 92, West Park Manor, according to the plat thereof recorded in Map Book 10, Page 263 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  6455 North Barker Drive,

74 | L AG N I A P P E | J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

Mobile, AL 36608 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVEDESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. MidFirst Bank, Mortgagee/Transferee Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 334099 Lagniappe HD July 13, 20, 27, 2017

PROBATE NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING May 18, 2017 Case No. 2015-1644-1 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of DORIS ANN BARNES, Deceased On to-wit the 7th day of August, 2017 at 2:00 PM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the FINAL SETTLEMENT as filed by MORRIS BARNES. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. Don Davis, Judge of Probate. Attorney Name and Address: JAMES D. WILSON, P. O. Box 40425 Mobile, AL 36604 Lagniappe HD July 13, 20, 27, August 3, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: GORDIE WILLIAM TAYLOR, Deceased Case No. 2017-0627 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 5th day of July, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. JOHN V. LANDS as Executor under the last will and testament of GORDIE WILLIAM TAYLOR, Deceased. Attorney of Record: PRO SE Lagniappe HD July 13, 20, 27, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: MICHAEL BRUCE BROWN, Deceased Case No. 2017-0924 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 6th day of July, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. KIMBERLY NICHOLS BROWN as Executrix under the last will and testament of MICHAEL BRUCE BROWN, Deceased. Attorney of Record: PRO SE Lagniappe HD July 13, 20, 27, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: ERIC LAMONTE SMITH Case No. 2017-0517

Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 6th day of July, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. DANIELLE DAILEY SMITH as Administratrix of the estate of ERIC LAMONTE SMITH, deceased. Attorney of Record: HENDRIK S. SNOW, Esq. Lagniappe HD July 13, 20, 27, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: CHARLES E. BOLIVAR, Deceased Case No. 2017-0916 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 6th day of July, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. STANLEY RAY BOLIVAR as Executor under the last will and testament of CHARLES E. BOLIVAR, Deceased. Attorney of Record: JAMES H. MCDONALD Lagniappe HD July 13, 20, 27, 2017

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING June 16, 2017 Case No. 2015-0586-2 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of WILLIAM J. WILLIAMSON, Deceased On to-wit the 31st day of July, 2017 at 2:00 PM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the PETITION FOR FINAL SETTLEMENT BY FORMER ADMINISTRATOR as filed by TYDUS WILLIAMSON. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate. Attorney Name and Address: VANESSA ARNOLD SHOOTS, 56 ST. JOSEPH STREET, STE 1311, Mobile, AL 36602. Lagniappe HD June 29, July 6, 13, 20, 2017

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING June 26, 2017 Case No. 2013-1263-3 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of HENRY LOUIS POWE, Deceased On to-wit the 31st day of July 2017 at 2:00 PM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the Petition for Final Settlement as filed by FREDERICK THOMPSON. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. Don Davis, Judge of Probate. Attorney Name and Address: Frederick Thompson 1314 Melrose Street Mobile, AL 36605 Lagniappe HD July 6, 13, 20, 2017

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING June 21, 2017 Case No. 2015-0238-1 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of MARGOT H. BEAN, Deceased On to-wit the 25th day of September, 2017 at 2:00 PM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the FINAL SETTLEMENT as filed by RICHARD G. BEAN. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. Don Davis, Judge of Probate. Lagniappe HD July 6, 13, 20, 27, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: ALEXANDER JOSEPH PAGE JR, Deceased Case No. 2017-0476 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 28th day of June, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. MARTHA ELIZABETH PAGE as Executrix under the last will and testament of ALEXANDER JOSEPH PAGE JR, Deceased. Attorney of Record: J. PATRICK COURTNEY Lagniappe HD July 6, 13, 20, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: GERTRUDE MARTIN, Deceased Case No. 2016-1633 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 12th day of July, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. ELICIA JAXON SUTTON as Executrix under the last will and testament of GERTRUDE MARTIN, Deceased. Attorney of Record: VANESSA ARNOLD SHOOTS Lagniappe HD July 20, 27, Aug. 3, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: ELLIS VINCENT OLLINGER JR, Deceased Case No. 2017-0719 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 12th day of July, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. REGINA S. OLLINGER as Executrix under the last will and testament of ELLIS VINCENT OLLINGER, Deceased. Attorney of Record: PRO SE Lagniappe HD July 20, 27, Aug. 3, 2017 NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: EDITH E. ORR, Deceased Case No. 2017-0407 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 12th day of July, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. THOMAS L. SMITH as Executor under the last will and testament of EDITH E. ORR, Deceased. Attorney of Record: JOHN R. PARKER Lagniappe HD July 20, 27, Aug. 3, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: WILLIAM C. LUCAS, SR., Deceased Case No. 2017-1322 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 11th day of July, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. DAWN LUCAS JAMES FKA DAWN LUCAS as Executrix under the last will and testament of WILLIAM C. LUCAS SR, Deceased. Attorney of Record: PRO SE. Lagniappe HD July 20, 27, Aug. 3, 2017

NOTICE OF SALE THESE ABANDONED VEHICLES WILL BE SOLD ON 08/17/2017 AT 5781 THREE NOTCH RD MOBILE AL. 36619 AT 9 AM. BUIC     2G4WS52M6X1483215 BUIC     1G4HP52K05U149045 SUNL    7KNDX250AM5 PLA      L9NTECKE7E1265557 HOND   2HGEJ8641XH573864 Lagniappe HD July 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 18, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 1009 Cloverdale Dr., Mobile, AL 36606. 1998 Isuzu Rodeo 4S2CK58D9W4316000 Lagniappe HD July 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 18, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 11426 County Rd. 65 Unit 2, Foley, AL 36535. 2002 Honda Civic 1HGES16532L037071 2000 Jeep Wrangler 1J4FA29P4YP727951 Lagniappe HD July 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 18, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 5750 Three Notch Rd., Mobile, AL 36619. 2004 Honda Accord 1HGCM56844A001553 Lagniappe HD July 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 18, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 6508 Sugar


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS Creek Dr. S., Mobile, AL 36695. 2000 Hyundai Accent KMHCG45G3YU087429

Lagniappe HD July 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 18, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed – at 12970 Millbrook Ct., Summerdale, AL 36580. 2005 Kawasaki EN500 JKAENVC1X5A190930

Lagniappe HD July 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 18, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 3806 Moffett Rd., Mobile, AL 36618. 2006 Jeep Commander 1J8HG58296C247292 Lagniappe HD July 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 18, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 6445 Todd Acres Dr., Theodore, AL 36582. 2005 Nissan Altima 1N4AL11D25N927830 2007 HD XL1200N 1HD1CZ3437K438166 Lagniappe HD July 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 18, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 1904 N McKenzie St., Foley, AL 36535. 1998 Ford F150 1FTZF18WXWNB46180 Lagniappe HD July 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 18, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at  7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2006 Ford Freestar 2FMZA51646BA29539 2002 Chevrolet Prizm 1Y1SK528X2Z400001 2003 Oldsmobile Alero 1G3NL52E53C226685 2004 Kia Rio KNADC125546342292 Lagniappe HD July 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 18, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 4763 Lott Rd., Eight Mile, AL 36613. 2014 Hyundai Sonata 5NPEB4AC1EH823482 Lagniappe HD July 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 25, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 500 Lincoln St. Apt. 101 A, Daphne, AL 36526. 2008 VW EOS WVWAA71FX8V043255 Lagniappe HD July 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 25, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2010 Dodge Avenger 1B3CC4FBXAN209918 1995 Mitsubishi Eclipse 4A3AK44Y4SE106038 2002 Honda Accord 1HGCG31492A026431 1996 Honda Accord 1HGCD563XTA142338 1994 Toyota Camry 4T1GK13E2RU059364 2006 Honda CR-V JHLRD68596C012205

STYLE BOOZIE

Vaulting into the dog days

A

BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

hhhhh, it’s Nappie time! Somehow the Nappies are already here and y’all didn’t vote me as your favorite Lagniappe columnist. How does Andy over in Cuisine win every year? I know y’all love to hear what went on, and not what great restaurant you should try and how great the food was and all the tasty cocktails they had. I mean come on, it’s flavorful here! Don’t worry, I won’t hold a grudge. I am better than that. Sit back and enjoy this plate of delicious gossip — Bone apple tea! (That’s how one of my dimmer spies thought it was spelled – bless her heart!)

more impressed when I learned that earlier in the day little kids were out there pole vaulting. I would have loved to see a little fourth grader giving it her all! Everyone did an awesome job, and when they cleared the bar they were given T-shirts to throw. Sadly, I didn’t get! Maybe I will start my training now and enter the little kids’ division. All I have to do to get there is build upper-body strength, core strength, be able to do a lot of high knees and get over my fear of getting hurt. Oh, and find somewhere to practice. Seems pretty simple, especially if I can drink Red Bull (though I will probably add vodka to mine) while I do it! Who wants to be my coach?! Get over it Strange spottings First things first: If you have never been Not your usual “spotted” section but someto Dauphin Street Vault you better mark your times some of these sightings make you sit back calendar for the second or third weekend of July and wonder, what the heck? First up, the alligator for 2018, because this is one event you’ve gotta in midtown? Like, how does that even happen? attend. To be honest, I don’t know what took me Boozie’s friend who lives on Mohawk said the so long to check it out, but it might be my new alligator was gone before they knew about it, but favorite thing and should be for you, too! they were worried about their five-pound pup! The only other times there was a chance to If Boozie had to guess, this alligator likely came watch pole vaulting was back in high school at from the storm drain like they do in all the movies. Saturday morning track meets. But let’s be honest, Talk about a wacky Wednesday! who was going to get up and go to those things beThen, if that wasn’t enough for one week, sides the students participating and their parents? Buddy the Elf was spotted walking the streets of That’s right, no one. Who is going to go downtown downtown Mobile on Friday afternoon. One of the on a Saturday night, get drinks and watch people spies spotted him but was unable to get a closepole vault? Well, it should be everyone and each up or find out what this guy was doing. I’m sure year that has been the case, with a growing crowd walking around in an elf costume in the middle of every year! July in Mobile was making him wish he was back Boozie and friends arrived downtown as the at the North Pole! “elites” were warming up. Right before Boozie Next, in true summer fashion the Bayway got got there a spy reported one of the vaulters broke backed up and traffic was at a standstill. So what their pole, and it was very loud. After Googling the did one group do? They dropped the tailgate of price of a pole, looks like you don’t ever want to their truck and smoked a few cigs. Whole new break one of those. Honestly, we were a little lost meaning to sitting on the dock of the bay! on what was going on, but one thing that wasn’t That’s not all! I have one celebrity spotting to confusing was that pole vaulters are in incredible report. The husband and wife country duo Thompshape. Boozie couldn’t stop staring and wondering son Square were spotted hanging out at Veet’s how old is too old to start pole vaulting? one night! Apparently they were taking some The first girl we noticed was Anicka Newell. pictures around the pool table. My spy wasn’t sure Maybe it was her abs or her Olympic rings tattoo why they were in town since they have no shows ... either way, in warm-ups she did not touch the nearby, but Boozie remembers Shawna Thompson practice bar. The more the night went on, the more is from good ol’ Chatom, just an hour up the road. we found out. She competed in the Olympics in So I’m going to speculate and say they were visitRio for Canada (her mom is Canadian) in pole ing home between shows. vaulting; she was the best and knew it. Another thing, she was drinking what appeared to be some Well, kids, that’s all I’ve got this week. Just sort of Red Bull drink, so maybe that stuff really remember, whether rain or shine, dramatic or does give you wings because she was killing it. scandalous, or just some plain ol’ pole vault lovin’, Boozie was impressed by the sport and even I will be there. Ciao!

Lagniappe HD July 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 25, 2017 - Time 12pm, if not claimed - at 1806 Duval St., Mobile, AL 36605. 1999 Mercury Marquis 2MEFM75W6XX653768 2003 Mercury Marquis 2MEHM75WX3X602289 2000 Honda Civic 1HGEJ8649YL014213 Lagniappe HD July 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on August 25, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 507 Abernathy Ave., Bay Minette, AL 36507. 2003 Chevrolet Tahoe 1GNEC13ZX3R113426 Lagniappe HD July 20, 27, 2017

J u l y 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - J u l y 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 75


Lagniappe: July 20 - July 26, 2017  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you