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WEEKLY

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LAGNIAPPE

JUNE 22, 2017 - JUNE 28, 2017 | www.lagniappemobile.com ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com

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BAY BRIEFS

Mobile Housing Board absorbing non-profit positions.

COMMENTARY

Are voters just getting “Same Jones?”

BUSINESS

With the success of its latest Dragon Boat Race, the Fuse Project is nearing the $1 million fundraising mark.

CUISINE

There are plenty of good summer-style craft beers available that go great with the Alabama heat.

ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com

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J. MARK BRYANT Sports Writer sports@lagniappemobile.com STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA RASMUSSEN Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com

COVER

Former Mobile Mayor Sam Jones and incumbent Sandy Stimpson reverse roles in a rematch election on Aug. 22.

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BETH WILLIAMS Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com ALEEN MOMBERGER Advertising Sales Executive aleen@lagniappemobile.com RACHEL THOMAS Advertising Sales Executive rachel@lagniappemobile.com MELISSA EDGE Editorial Assistant events@lagniappemobile.com

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ARTS

A profile of Red Cup Revolt artist Conz8000.

MUSIC

ay and Lou Smart — a duo known as The Smart Brothers — are returning to the road after a brief hiatus.

ROSS PRITCHARD Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager jackie@lagniappemobile.com CONTRIBUTORS: Lee Hedgepeth, Ron Sivak, Jeff Poor, Asia Frey, Brian Holbert, Tom Ward, Alice Marty, W. Perry Hall ON THE COVER: SAM JONES AND SANDY STIMPSON BY DANIEL ANDERSON POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Editorial, advertising and production offices are located at 1100B Dauphin St. Mobile, AL 36604. Mailing address is P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Phone: 251.450.4466 Fax 251.450.4498. Email: ashleytoland@lagniappemobile.com or rholbert@lagniappemobile.com LAGNIAPPE is printed at Walton Press. All letters sent to Lagniappe are considered to be intended for publication. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and Alternative Weeklies Network All rights reserved. Something Extra Publishing, Inc. Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced without the expressed permission of the publishers. Individuals may take one copy of the paper free of charge from area businesses, racks or boxes. After that, papers are $3 per issue. Removal of more than one copy from these points constitutes theft. Violators are subject to prosecution.

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40 44 48 52 58 FILM

Excellent performances bring depth and nuance to “The Ticket.”

SPORTS

The University of South Alabama won an award for the best Sun Belt athletic program for the third straight year.

GARDEN

With large, showy blooms, hardy hibiscus is more cold-hardy, vigorous and long lasting than tropical hibiscus.

STYLE

“Eveningland: Stories” by Michael Knight “teems with abracadabra moments” for those who have lived near Mobile Bay.

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GOING POSTAL

Say YES to our youth As the school year ends and the hot days of summer creep in, I am reminded of the spike in violent youth crime we experienced last summer. Every time we lost another young person to violence, our hearts broke and we knew we had to find a way to finally put an end to these tragedies. So, we launched YES (Youth Empowered for Success) — our plan to reverse the effects of violence and secure a bright future for all of our children. YES provides our most vulnerable youth access to available resources to assist in education, life and job skills training, employment opportunities, mentoring and safe, productive enrichment. After launching YES, we began asking our young people what they needed to succeed and the answer was simple: more activities and job opportunities. Our young people were hungry and motivated but their talents were untapped. We sought to provide our youth with what they wanted while researching data on what they needed. We worked diligently with our parks and recreation staffs to ensure activities were implemented in our community centers for the young and the young at heart. We created an interdepartmental initiative where our fire and law enforcement recruits are engaged with the community as a part of their training. Now, every single recruit will establish relationships with the community they will serve prior to receiving their badge. The Mobile Police Department launched SWAT (Stop Walk and Talk) to encourage police officers to spend less time in their patrol cars and more time in our community centers and neighborhoods. Our professional athletes stepped up and are now providing summer camps that provide rigor to the body

and mind, and we are launching YES Zones all over our city that ensure safe spaces and places for our youth. We began offering opportunities for jobskill training and creating awareness that our youth are ready to work. We worked with the Mobile County Public Schools and the Mobile Housing Board to secure more businesses to participate in summer job internship programs and we made funding available for businesses to hire at least two young people this summer. We partnered with the city of Gulf Shores and Baldwin County hospitality companies to provide jobs for our youth in Gulf Shores and we hired youth to work in our city departments. On Monday, 250 young people will begin job training. On Tuesday, 75 youth will receive their hospitality certificates from the University of South Alabama. But our work doesn’t stop there. We continue to research new strategies to remove the barriers that prevent our young people from succeeding. People often ask me if young people really want to work. Well, the city received more than 4,000 applications from our young people to work this summer. That is why I am challenging every business in Mobile to employ young people this year. If every business in Mobile were to hire at least two young people, we could begin to change lives. If you think two youth is two too many, the city of Mobile has hired 100 to work in every facet of city government, from public works to public safety. If you follow our lead, we will begin to witness a new generation of leaders, innovators and entrepreneurs. It is our role as mothers, fathers, friends and mentors to guide our young people toward success and away from danger. If we are successful, we will lower, if not eliminate,

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youth violence in Mobile while empowering our youth to succeed in life. Mayor Sandy Stimpson Mobile

A hidden gem As another year of the Nappie Awards rolls around and we are all thinking about local treasures, I would like to share some information about our institution and invite everyone in the Mobile/Baldwin area to visit. Did you know Daphne is home to America’s largest freestanding accredited sports university, an institution that also provides a free public museum housing one of the largest collections of sports art in the world? If you take Interstate 10 to exit 35 and go south about one mile on U.S. 98 in Daphne, you will see a beautiful building on your left surrounded by outdoor sport sculptures and murals. Within that building is the United States Sports Academy, which for more than 45 years has been known around the world for its contributions to sport education and sport art. The United States Sports Academy is an independent, nonprofit, accredited, specialmission sports university created to serve the nation and world with programs in instruction, research and service. The role of the academy is to prepare men and women for careers in the profession of sports. Known around the world as “America’s Sports University,” the academy has thousands of alumni who work in all areas of the sport profession. The academy offers bachelors, masters and doctoral degrees, all in an online format. Over the past four decades,

the academy has also been involved in sport education programs in 65 countries around the world. Located within the same building is the Academy’s American Sport Art Museum & Archives, which was founded in 1984 and is dedicated to the preservation of sports art, history and literature. The ASAMA collection is composed of more than 1,700 works of sport art across a variety of media, including paintings, sculptures, assemblages, prints and photographs. The collection is believed to be the largest of its kind in the U.S. and one of the largest in the world. Some of the greatest moments in sport history are represented in the museum, and the collection includes numerous works of special local interest, including highlights of the University of Alabama and Auburn University, as well as the magnificent paintings of Alabama sport artist Daniel Moore and the “found object art” sculpture creations of Fairhope artist Bruce Larsen, just to name a few. With the theme “Celebrating the Artist and the Athlete,” ASAMA also features numerous works featuring the Olympics throughout the years. The museum is free and open to the public from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. weekdays (except academy holidays). The United States Sports Academy is proud to be a part of the Mobile/Baldwin community. We invite everyone in the area to visit our campus, enjoy our beautiful sport art and learn more about the academy’s contributions to sport education around the world. For more information about the academy or ASAMA, call 251-626-3303, or visit www. ussa.edu or www.asama.org. Dr. T.J. Rosandich, President and CEO United States Sports Academy


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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE COUNTY

Independence, autonomy COUNTY WEIGHS RESTRUCTURE OF PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT

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BY JASON JOHNSON

ast week — nine months after its longtime leader stepped into retirement — Mobile County’s public works department was diagnosed with a number of issues in a report that prescribed a major retooling of its policies, practices, leadership and culture. Conducted by The Mejorando Group, the $30,000 review was part of the Mobile County Commission’s mission to replace former engineer Joe Ruffer, who directed the department for 42 years before retiring as the county’s highest-paid employee in 2016. Ruffer led the department as its responsibilities, budget and independence expanded greatly over the years. However, consultant Patrick Ibarra said, at some point the department’s independence grew into something closer to autonomy. “Going back several years for several reasons, the public works/engineering department has acted as an independent, stand-alone department, separate from county administration,” Ibarra wrote in the report. “Department leaders have exercised significant discretion on operations and services, with fluctuating oversight, utilized unnecessary and overly cumbersome budgetary methods, applied stale and possibly risky management practices, and fostered an extremely unhealthy workplace culture in many of the functions.” Ibarra reached that conclusion after weeks of interviewing stakeholders and employees, reviewing of policies and practices and examining the role the engineering department plays in the county government. Currently, public works oversees millions of dollars in road and bridge projects but also building maintenance, electronics, environmental services, parks and recreation, and a number of functions added over several years by what Ibarra described as a “plug-and-play approach.” More than 30 percent of the county’s $176 million budget in FY 2016-2017 was allocated to line items that

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fall under the purview of public works, some of which Mejorando’s report called unnecessary, duplicative or “inconsistent with the [department’s] overall mission.” While the county has its own information technology, human resources and accounting divisions, public works has developed many of its own in-house versions of those services. Those include separate accounting and HR divisions, independent policies and procedures and stand-alone systems for its email, website, telephone and local networks that require “additional hardware, software, purchases, maintenance and personnel.” While Ibarra said some services could be eliminated, his review didn’t include analysis of what any potential cost savings might be, though he did warn commissioners that inconsistent policies create an unnecessary legal liability for the county. “It’s not uncommon for some departments to have policies specific to their department, but they should not be in direct opposition to county policies, especially regarding time-off requirements, work rights and things of that nature,” he said. “Their policies need to be consistent with the county’s, because this department creates liability for the taxpayers, and exercising too much independence puts them unnecessarily at risk.” Some of those concerns have been raised before, specifically by Commissioner Jerry Carl, who mentioned duplicative functions in a presentation of his own proposed changes to the engineering department — some of which were consistent with Ibarra’s findings. However, with Mejorando’s report in hand, Carl described “a pushback” when previous attempts were made to change the department, at last part of which he blamed on Rufer’s legacy. “We still struggle with a lot of the old administration — the ‘fourth commissioner,’ as I called him. As good as he was at so many things, we’re still struggling internally

with some of those roadblocks,” Carl said. “One thing this plan tells me is the three of us [commissioners] have got to get more hands-on and start asking questions.” It’s worth noting the county has started to clear some roadblocks, though. Prior to Mejorando’s involvement, public works was retooling its work order and billing practices, and efforts were already underway to integrate its IT systems with the county’s. Still, commissioners say there’s work to be done, and the search for a new department head has provided an opportunity to effect change from the top down — to “peel back the layers” and make “positive changes,” as Commissioner Connie Hudson put it. The report concurred. Ibarra claimed the level of “credibility” employees saw in the leadership of the public works department seemed to vary during his interviews with different employees. He described a low morale and a prevailing feeling among employees that the work they perform isn’t valued. Ibarra said whoever takes the helm should have character, substance and style that reflect the culture and mission of the department — warning commissioners not to be so focused on credentials that they overlook an applicant’s approach to management. “Over years the years, the department has adopted a very ‘command and control’ management approach — a sort of ‘do as I say’ mentality that puts more of a focus on compliance than commitment. That was very clear in the interviews I had with employees,” he said. “It’s easy to find people with technical expertise. There’s no shortage of people with the credentials, the degree and the pedigree, but this is about the type of leader a person is going to be as well.” One key suggestion in Mejorando’s assessment was for the county to split the department head’s responsibilities and pursue an organizational model with both a county engineer and public works director, with both reporting jointly to the commission. At the moment, that seems to be the prefered option, although the only action commissioners have taken is to accept the report. Any movements toward implementing the changes Ibarra and his team proposed will be made over time. “I think the biggest thing this told me is that we’re probably not looking for a person, we’re looking for a couple of people,” Carl said. “Let’s get this split up so we’ve got two people that are tying to make this function properly, then we can start setting goals.” While all three commissioners accepted the report, Commission President Merceria Ludgood made a point to tell public works employees the review isn’t an indictment, but a chance to get better. “We know everybody is well intentioned, working hard and doing the very best they can, and when we have an opportunity to up our game, I think all of us are ready to do that,” Ludgood said. “We have consummate professionals who take advice and who can take and hear what we may view as criticism but take them constructively.”


BAYBRIEF | MONTGOMERY

Potent potables STATE ABC BOARD APPROVES 5 PERCENT TAX INCREASE BY LEE HEDGEPETH

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ome Nov. 1, Alabamians will pay 5 percent more for liquor — no matter where they shop — after the state’s Alcohol and Beverage Control Board approved a markup on spirits at its last meeting. The markup brings the state’s total to 35 percent over cost and was approved unanimously by the Board earlier this month after a preliminary approval in March and a period of public comment. ABC officials said the increase was necessary to level the playing field across the state given recent decisions in a couple of counties to increase their markup locally, driving up competition in surrounding areas. “The change in markup will keep the price of a bottle, except in Calhoun and Marshall counties, basically the same everywhere in Alabama, and negates the need for the local sales tax bills,” Dean Argo, an ABC spokesman, wrote about the issue. ABC Board regulations allow its members to increase prices only for specific reasons, including “timing to adjust for price increases or decreases by distillers, deciding whether short­-term and/or small discounts extended by the distiller are to be passed through to customers, depletion of inventory of slow-moving items that are to be closed out and for other unique market circumstances.” In addition to the 30 percent, now 35 percent markup, alcohol sales are taxed at 56 percent plus sales taxes, additional costs that will make a $10 bottle of liquor cost $22.32 starting in November, according to the Alabama Retail Association,

which opposed the price jump. But local law enforcement and prosecution officials said alcohol revenue, much of which is earmarked for their use, has been in decline in recent years, stymying already cash-strapped prosecutors for resources. In 2010, district attorneys received approximately $40 million in state dollars. Right now, though, they receive less than $30 million. “This is a matter of being able to perform our constitutional duties,” one prosecutor told the ABC Board at its meeting. Local DAs and the state’s judicial system could receive millions each year from the price hike, although this specific increase is not earmarked specifically for their use, something the same prosecutor said isn’t helpful for them. “We have to have permanent, solid funding,” he said. “It’s unfortunate this circumstance exists,” another district attorney, Tom Anderson, told members of the Board. “But these monies, this markup, it’s a lifeline for us to be able to serve victims … to be able to perform our constitutional functions. To be able to serve the people in the circuits that we live in.” The Alabama Beverage Licensees Association, which represents more than 100 bars, package stores and restaurants, also opposed the increase. “Any kind of increase is bad for our business,” a spokesman for the group said after the ABC Board met. “It’’s going to make it hard for our guys to survive.”

BAYBRIEF | EASTERN SHORE

A city subdivided FAIRHOPE EXTENDS MORATORIUM ON RESIDENTIAL EXPANSION BY LEE HEDGEPETH

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he Fairhope City Council voted to extend its six-month moratorium on subdivisions and other multi-family structures for another 90 days, citing the need for officials to catch up with the “rapid and substantial” growth the coastal community has seen in recent years. The prohibition, first approved at the end of 2016 and set to end July 4, only applies to new projects, and so won’t halt any construction already underway. Minor projects are also excluded from the ordinance. Those are caveats Fairhope leaders emphasized when the ordinance originally passed, staving off criticism that officials are potentially stymying the city’s residential boom. “We have to become citizen-friendly,” Mayor Karin Wilson said. “We need a moratorium because we are in an emergency mode right now. We are not stopping development. We are taking the time we need to protect the citizens, those who voted us in several months ago.” One issue at the forefront of the 2016 campaign that led to Wilson’s and most of the current council’s rise to power was their predecessors’ approval of a controversial 240-unit housing complex in the city. Within the five-year period following 2010, Fairhope’s population ballooned from 15,228 to just under 19,000 — a 22 percent increase — making it one of the fastest growing municipalities in the state. City officials at the council meeting on June 12 said the extension of the moratorium was necessary because, despite the time they’ve had, city workers and contractors have more work to do in planning for the infrastructural and regulatory future of the burgeoning city.

The text of the original ordinance said during the building freeze the city would “evaluate public utility availability, address traffic issues, review the City’s drainage regulations, review requirements to protect sensitive environmental areas, review of existing subdivision regulations and zoning ordinance, access management on major corridors and other traffic related concerns.” It’s unclear what real progress has been made toward achieving those goals in the six months since, and that’s a harsh reality one Fairhope citizen warned about when the entire process began. “At least get your ducks in a row and know who’s doing the studies, what do you want to accomplish, and how to get out of the moratorium,” one resident said at the December meeting. There was also some discussion in the meeting of the length of the extension — three months — being a compromise between those who wanted longer to complete the work and those who fear potential litigation against the city because of the subdivision postponement. Legal action wouldn’t be out of the question, either, given the demand for large residential projects in the city. Before the original ordinance restricting development passed in December, Fairhope’s director of planning and zoning, Jonathan Swift, said the number of applications for large residential projects had drastically increased in anticipation of the freeze. “I would say a whole lot of panic has taken place,” Smith said at the time. In the end, the extension of the moratorium passed without opposition. It is set to expire in early October. J u n e 2 2 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 2 8 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 7


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Consolidations and mergers MOBILE HOUSING BOARD ABSORBING NONPROFIT POSITIONS BY DALE LIESCH

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he Mobile Housing Board of Commissioners voted 4-0 to convert positions from its troubled nonprofit, Mobile Development Enterprises, to MHB positions. The move continues a series of changes the board has made to MDE since a United States Department of Housing and Urban Development Office of Inspector General report found that, among other things, a conflict of interest existed between the nonprofit and a contractor the board used starting in 2011. MHB was already ordered to reimburse $1.2 million to HUD through its non-federalized capital funds as restitution for the conflict. HUD also made other recommendations related to the nonprofit. The board must now work with the Mobile County Personnel Board to create a number of new positions. Commissioner Reid Cummings has previously said current MDE employees — including State Rep. Adline Clarke — would have to reapply for the positions. Commissioner Norman Hill was initially hesitant to vote on the new organizational chart without elaboration. “I am opposed to voting on the organizational chart today as it’s presented,” he said. “I believe we should have a full presentation matching each job with the budget so we can understand it. I’m not comfortable with looking at this sheet, going to the Personnel Board and saying, ‘This is our new staff.’” Board Chairwoman Kimberly Pettway said she feels the board has done that already and has spent enough time on it.

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“I’m pretty clear,” she said. “Since the first time I saw this, a lot has happened.” Commissioner Joyce Freeman said she was prepared to vote on the item for the good of the employees affected by the changes. “I feel we have kept the employees in limbo,” she said. “We’ve had the organizational chart for a while. It’s not fair to the employees. Those employees need to know. We need to move on with this.” The changes are expected to save the board some $250,000, but Hill said he wasn’t sure if that was the amount of savings HUD was looking for from MHB. “When we were looking at this I thought we were going to take a holistic look at the staff to see where we can make cuts,” he said. “I was looking at a bigger savings than this.” Further, Hill said the board should take a look at titles, responsibilities and salaries to see if they make sense. Pettway said she understood Hill’s concerns. “I do believe we have some top-heavy positions we should rethink,” she said. “The process has taken way too long. … We should move on.” The new positions have not been finalized, board attorney Raymond Bell said. Some positions will be revised from their current descriptions and some will be created. He said for the jobs that aren’t created, the Personnel Board will find something similar within the merit system and apply it to MHB. Interim Executive Director Lori Shackelford did not

provide a copy of the new organizational chart following the meeting on Wednesday, June 14, even though the board approved it in an open meeting. She said she wanted to have time to present the changes to affected employees. Lagniappe obtained an email from Shackelford detailing the changes and new positions, in which she said MHB would absorb the MDE positions and all MDE positions would eventually be abolished. “At this time we are not certain how long it will take to work through this process,” Shackelford wrote. “There will be some newly created MHB positions to augment current staffing.” The message provided a breakdown of the new positions and the divisions to which they’re being added. In finance, the MHB is adding a purchasing agent, accounting supervisor and an office assistant. In the human resources department, MHB is adding two office assistants. In the management information services, the board is adding a network engineer and computer support coordinator. In development, MHB is acquiring a capital fund and development director. Some new positions are being created in MHB’s executive office, including a deputy executive director and an office assistant. The Housing Choice Voucher program will see the addition of a director, an assistant director, two resident services advisors, three office assistants and a housing technician. Resident services is adding a number of former MDE positions as well. There will be a director of client/community relations, an office assistant, a resident services coordinator, a resident services supervisor and six resident services advisors. In the low-income public housing department there will be a director of asset management, an operations and compliance manager, a housing manager and a housing technician. In other business, the board received a presentation from Stan Waterhouse, representing the Hunt Companies, on the progress of the demolition and revitalization of Roger Williams Homes. Waterhouse said the company has received a $1.7 million bid for the demolition from Gulf Coast Contracting. The demolition will be a five-month process. Waterhouse also presented a conceptual site plan for the transformation project. He estimated a new mixed-use, mixed-income development could consist of 532 units. As many as 124 of those could be market rate with 342 units being a one-for-one replacement of the public housing units that existed at the site previously. Any remaining units would be what are referred to as “affordable,” Waterhouse said. The number of units would depend largely on the type of financing and the amount of tax credits received for the project.


BAYBRIEF | CRIME

Cellblock request INMATE ALLEGEDLY SOUGHT HITS ON WITNESSES IN MURDER CASE BY JASON JOHNSON

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ne of the men charged in the twoyear-old murder of Ke’lei Morris was slapped with additional felony charges Friday after a grand jury found probable cause he had attempted to orchestrate the murder of at least three witnesses from inside the Mobile County Metro Jail. Morris, a 24-year-old Biloxi native, was employed as a respiratory therapist at Mobile Infirmary when she was found shot to death near her apartment on Grelot Road in February 2015. More than two years later, Steven O’Brien Mason, 33, was charged in connection with the murder on March 20. According to prosecutors, Mason was also a nurse at Mobile Infirmary who had dated Morris, though the pair broke up shortly before the murder. When discussing Mason’s bond hearing with local reporters in April, Assistant District Attorney Jennifer Wright said prosecutors believed he potentially posed a threat to the witnesses in the case — some of whom were members of the victim’s immediate family. Mobile County Circuit Judge Jay York set bond in the case at $600,000, though Mason has been unable to pay and has remained in Metro Jail since his arrest. However, prosecutors say that didn’t stop Mason from soliciting another man to kill those witnesses for him. Specifically, the indictments handed down by a local grand jury on June 16 list three new and separate charges for “solicitation to commit murder” — each of which is a Class A felony carrying a potential sentence of “no less than 10 years and no more than 99 years in prison.” “Steven Mason has been served with these indictments within the Metro Jail, and he has been moved within the jail to a more secure area to ensure the safety of all of the witnesses in this particular case,” Wright said. “These are witnesses that will testify in the murder case. They have been in contact with us and with the police department working this case.” Though Wright confirmed the targets were witnesses, they were only identified in the indictment by their initials. However, Derrick Myles’ name is clearly stated in the indictment, but much less is known about the man Mason allegedly asked to commit multiple murders on his behalf. Wright declined to address any specifics about Myles, including his relationship to Mason, when and where their conversations occurred, whether Myles could face charges himself, whether he’s been cooperating with investigators and whether he was offered money in exchange for the murders Mason was allegedly seeking from his cell. Though a timeline of the allegations was not disclosed, records indicate only one inmate named Derrick Myles has passed through Metro Jail since Mason’s arrest March 20 — a 31-year-old who was arrested May 5 on a number of charges ranging from robbery to sexual abuse. He was released on his own recognizance June 9, though authorities have not confirmed whether he is the same Derrick

Myles named in Mason’s June 16 indictments. At this point, the solicitation charges against Mason are being treated separately from his pending murder trial. It will be up to Judge York to decide if those charges will become part of trial he faces in Morris’ death and whether prosecutors can present those charges to the jury. No matter how they proceed, though, some say soliciting a murder isn’t a common occurrence in Mobile, according to Wright, who called it “an extremely rare situation.” “Going back and looking, we were only able to find about four other solicitation-tocommit-murder cases that we’ve handled since the late ‘90s. It’s not something we come across every day, and certainly not with respect to witnesses in a homicide case,” Wright said. “It’s upsetting that there would be any attempt or any plan to harm or cause the death of any witnesses in any case. We take any threat like that very seriously.” Earlier this week, Wright said the family of Ke’lei Morris had been notified about the new charges against Mason, saying they were “certainly upset, disturbed and concerned” by them. “They just want justice to prevail,” she added. While Mason’s new indictments are the biggest news in the two-year-old investigation of Morris’ murder, other developments have occurred behind closed doors. On May 4, a motion was filed seeking to have the case sealed from the public — one that appears to have been granted. Files previously available through Alacourt are no longer publicly accessible, though Wright declined to comment when asked about that change. It’s unclear whether it is related to the case’s sealed status, but prosecutors have previously sought to access sealed records from a 2002 juvenile case when Mason was charged with murder for the death of 17-yearold Mesha Anglin. Mason, who was 18 at the time of Anglin’s death, was granted youthful offender status in that case, sealing the records and limiting his ultimate sentence. Other media have spoken to Anglin’s family, who claim Mason served just three years behind bars for the murder. Earlier this month, Mason’s lawyer filed a motion seeking records from Mobile Infirmary he claimed would prove Mason was working at the time of Morris’ death on Feb. 2, 2015. It also sought clarification about which of two suspects prosecutors believe killed Morris. A second suspect, 26-year-old Adam Tyler Miller, attended high school with Morris in Biloxi and, according to Mason’s attorney, was one of her patients at Mobile Infirmary when he was admitted there from Dec. 26, 2014, through Feb. 4, 2015 — two days after Morris’ death. According to jail records, Miller currently lists an address in Denver and was arrested by police in Aurora, Colorado, nine days after Mason was first indicted. Both suspects are charged with murder.

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BAYBRIEF | MONTGOMERY

Schooling the stats FEDS SAY ALABAMA MISREPRESENTED PAST GRADUATION RATES BY LEE HEDGEPETH

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n audit just released by the federal Office of the Inspector General found Alabama officials disregarded federal educational standards, miscalculating and misreporting graduation rates as recently as the 2013-2014 school year and as early as 2010-2011. The 35-page audit report, which was released last Friday, says the Alabama State Department of Education (ALSDE) lacked an accurate and effective method to ensure the validity of school systems’ graduation rates and “misreported” these figures to federal education officials. “We found that ALSDE’s system of internal control did not provide reasonable assurance that reported graduation rates were accurate and complete during our audit period,” the report says. “In addition, ALSDE misreported [graduation rate data].” The report was particularly critical of Dr. Tommy Bice, Alabama’s former state superintendent, who federal officials say refused to accept that certain students who completed life skills-oriented and other non-diploma track programs could not be counted as having graduated. “The former State Superintendent decided to continue counting students who earned an alternative diploma after being advised by the department that those students could not be included as graduates in the ACGR [adjusted cohort graduation rate],” the audit found. Bice, also a former special education teacher, has said he believed the students should be counted as having graduated. “Why wouldn’t we count as graduates a group of students who have completed the coursework outlined in their IEP [Individualized Education Program] within four years?” Bice said in an interview on the topic. “I stand by that decision.”

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Alabama was one of several states chosen for the federal audit due to several factors, including an abnormal hike in graduation rates since about 2010. For the 2010-2011 school year, the national average graduation rate was 79 percent, and Alabama’s was about 72 percent. Just three school years later, in 2013-2014, Alabama’s graduation rate was reported as just over 86 percent, a jump of 14 points, while the national average rose only about 3 points to just over 82 percent. Singled out in the report are Birmingham and Mobile, two of the state’s largest school systems, which saw similarly dramatic rises in graduation rates. “Mobile was the largest [school district] in Alabama and reported a graduation rate of 82.3 percent in 2013-14 for its 12 high schools. Mobile’s graduation rate increased 18.3 percentage points from 2010-11 through 2013-14,” the report says. One concern outlined in the report was that some of the students sampled for the audit had been removed from the cohort without proper documentation. “Through our testing, we found that students were both erroneously counted as graduates and removed from the ACGR cohort without sufficient documentation or for unallowable reasons,” the report says. “Specifically, Birmingham did not have adequate documentation for five of the six students and Mobile lacked documentation for one of the six students to support their removal from the cohort.” When it comes to the case from Mobile, county school officials told Lagniappe recordkeeping is a big job, and in the specific case mentioned in the audit report “someone on the school level” failed to make the necessary official documents request required for a particular student’s trans-

fer from a public high school to a private one. Susan Hinton with the Mobile County Public School System read the specific details of the finding regarding Mobile that was released to the system itself to a Lagniappe reporter: “We found that Mobile County Public School System did not always ensure that students’ removal from a cohort was supported and allowable,” the finding said, according to Hinton. “Of the 44 students that we examined, one student was removed from the cohort without written documentation to confirm the reason the student was removed. A … printout shows the student withdrew for transfer to a private school. No official records request was provided.” Asked to elaborate on the case, Hinton and Rena Philips, another MCPSS official, said the specific issue cited was the error of a single person at an individual school, not a systemwide effort to fudge graduation rates. “Someone on the school level did not provide the official record request,” Philips said. “It actually doesn’t mean that the school doesn’t have it or that the student didn’t enroll. It just means that that that person at the school level did not upload it in the portal.” When it comes to students not on a typical diploma track, Philips said, it’s not up to the local system whether or not to count the student as graduating; it’s up to state officials, who direct locals on how to make such measurements. “Between the state and the federal government, what [MCPSS superintendent] Mrs. [Martha] Peek has said is we have followed and will continue to follow the directions that we get from the state on how to report our graduate. When we get a record that we know that he graduated or didn’t graduate, the state verifies it.” State officials have already begun responding to the federal audit. State Board of Education member Mary Scott Hunter said in a statement, “I’m extremely disappointed in those whose job it was to get this right. I prefer to praise in public and criticize in private. I’ve alluded to the discussions I’ve had internally with department leadership when I’ve spoken at board meetings about the importance of management. The management failures evident in this report are simply inexcusable.” Controversy over graduation rates isn’t just a thing of the past. In May, state education officials posted graduation rates online but they were quickly removed after local districts challenged the numbers. An investigation into that matter is still ongoing. In response to the audit, the ALSDE says it has suggested and begun to take corrective action to prevent similar errors from occurring again.


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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Candid camera

LAWSUIT PROMPTS RELEASE OF MPD BODY CAMERA POLICY

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BY JASON JOHNSON

ore than a year after the city of Mobile created its first policy on police body cameras and more than two years after officials dedicated $2 million toward their procurement, a lawsuit filed by a local television station has prompted the policy’s public release. On Thursday, WALA FOX 10 — a local affiliate of the Meredith Corporation — filed suit against the city after officials denied a request to produce the MPD’s policy regarding body cameras worn by its uniformed officers. According to Fox10, less than five hours after the lawsuit was filed in Mobile County Circuit Court, George Talbot, Mayor Sandy Stimpson’s communication director, released the policy to the news station while simultaneously publishing it on the city’s website. At this point, it’s unclear how the disclosure of that policy might affect the freshly filed suit. On Friday, an associate news director with WALA told Lagniappe the station couldn’t comment on the city’s decision to release the policy, which appears to have been drafted in March 2016. The lawsuit indicates the station’s legal team began requesting the body camera policy last September. It also claims the city agreed to, then failed to seek, an attorney general’s opinion related to the release of footage captured on MPD’s body cameras. When asked about the delay in releasing the policy, spokeswoman Laura Byrne said the Stimpson administration and the city’s lawyers followed the same process typically used when requests for public records are filed. “Like any public records request, there’s a process,” Byrne said. “Anytime we processed a request, we had to speak to our legal team, and after it was reviewed, it was approved for release. It’s part of our process. You send in an application to the communications office, then it’s routed to our legal team, and once they’ve deemed it a public record, it can be released.” Byrne did confirm the city has yet to seek an opinion from Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall’s office related to MPD’s body camera policy, which FOX 10’s lawsuit claims it agreed to do last year. However, Byrne said that’s something the city is “still pursuing.” “We have to get approval from the [Mobile City] Council to send that request to the attorney general, and you’ll probably see that on the council’s agenda not this week, but the following week,” Byrne said. She added that item wouldn’t be requested by the administration this week because Stimpson is overseas attending the Paris Air Show with other state and local officials. While it only took officials five hours to produce a copy of the policy once FOX 10’s lawsuit was filed, the city has filed no formal response to the litigation. Besides the policy, FOX 10 claims to have made previous requests for footage and correspondence related to specific incidents. Attorney Carroll Sullivan, who is representing the station, declined to comment on what the release of the camera policy would mean for the lawsuit, which is still pending in circuit court.

Lights, camera, controversy

After the 2014 shooting of Mike Brown

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caused nationwide unrest and riots in the city of Ferguson, Missouri, law enforcement agencies around the country put an increased focus on outfitting patrol officers with body cameras. Mobile was no different. In March 2015, the city council agreed to enter into a five-year, $1.9 million contract with TASER to use its Axon Flex cameras and supporting software. At the time, former Public Safety Director Adm. Richard Landolt said the camera systems would be operational by that summer, yet MPD’s policy indicates the guidelines for their use weren’t drafted until March 4, 2016. Then, last June, a local officer-involved shooting prompted a renewed debate about the issue when it was revealed MPD Officer Harold Hurst was not wearing a body camera during the traffic stop that resulted in the death of 19-yearold Michael Moore. A Mobile County grand jury ultimately cleared Hurst of any wrongdoing, though a federal civil rights investigation was launched by the Department of Justice. More than a year later, it has still not officially been concluded. At the time of Moore’s shooting, Councilman Levon Manzie said incidents of that nature were “the reason” the city spent millions on body cameras, adding that had Hurst been wearing one, the city could have potentially avoided “the unrest, speculation, allegations and distrust” that followed Moore’s death. Former Police Chief James Barber told Lagniappe a review of the MPD’s policy was being conducted shortly after that incident, but an MPD spokesperson recently confirmed no changes were made to the policy. Another incident created public interest in body cameras last September when students from McGill-Toolen Catholic High School were pepper-sprayed by an MPD officer while painting the Midtown cannon after their annual football matchup with neighborhood rival Murphy High School. FOX 10 also cited that incident — one captured on the responding officers’ body cameras — in its lawsuit. Barber ultimately issued a personal apology, saying students weren’t given enough time to comply with the responding officers’ orders before the spray was deployed. Despite repeated requests from several media outlets, the footage from those body cameras was never released, with MPD citing an “ongoing investigation” into the incident. With the policy now available to the public, though, it’s clear Barber alone had the authority to grant those requests. “Only the chief of police, or his designee, shall reveal the existence and/or content of video recordings to the media,” the policy states, adding civilians can be shown video footage to further the efforts of “criminal investigations,” “internal investigations” or “serve a public safety interest” with approval of the chief of police. The release of the policy also revealed MPD is using TASER’s online storage option, evidence.com, to store footage — allowing officers and supervisors to remotely access footage from body cameras they’re approved to review. The policy states “any viewing of video in Evidence. com” should be “notated with a reason for the viewing” in each video file.


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BAYBRIEF | HISTORY

Looking back, moving forward OLDEST METHODIST CHURCH MARKS CENTENNIAL OF REDESIGN BY JASON JOHNSON

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cupola that remain in the sanctuary to this day. “I can’t imagine the money they had at that time, which is reflected in the mansions along Government Street built in that same period,” Park said. “The windows rival anything in a European cathedral. We call it stained glass, but it’s actually a translucent medieval glass. They’re absolutely invaluable, as is the cupola above.” Another piece that will be featured at the centennial celebration is the organ — the largest two-manual pipe organ functioning in Mobile. However, Park said, the church didn’t realize the organ’s historic significance until a man walked in during Mardi Gras this year and asked to play. “Turns out, his name is Andrew Adkison, and this kid is a virtuoso. He kicked off his shoes and just went through one hymn after another,” Park said. “He climbed up in the loft to look at the pipes and found a plaque that said ‘Installed 1917.’ Went back and looked into the commemoration of the sanctuary’s completion, and sure enough, the organ was played for the first time on that day. So, all of this is beautiful history just sort of came together at one time.” Adkison will be playing the organ as part of the June 25 centennial celebration. Like the city it was built in, the size of The Bee Hive’s congregation has fluctuated with the economic and societal changes of the past 100 years. When the Methodist missionary came to Mobile in 1819, there were almost no Protestants in the predominantly Catholic city. Park said that’s why the first facility on Franklin Street combined parishioners from Methodist and Episcopal backgrounds. With World War II and the jobs created by Brookley Air

Photo | Lagniappe

t’s been 100 years since Government Street United Methodist Church acquired the Spanish Colonial-style façade that sets it apart, but while history is important to Methodism’s oldest church in the area, its leaders are also looking to the future. Though the first church was established in 1832 as Franklin Street Methodist Episcopal Church, it wouldn’t take on its distinct appearance for another 85 years, after moving from Franklin Street to its current location at Broad and Government streets. “They started a renovation of the sanctuary, the outside and the façade in 1906,” Rev. Bert E. Park told Lagniappe. “It took them 11 years, and the first sermon in this sanctuary was June 24, 1917.” Government Street UMC — or “The Bee Hive” as it’s commonly known — will celebrate the centennial of those renovations with a special 10 a.m. service on Sunday, June 25. According to Park, the service will focus on the church’s storied history in Mobile, but more specifically address the relocation and redesign it underwent back in 1907. Today, the structure is perhaps best known for its elaborate, baroque-style façade, which features several symbols important to the early Christian church, such as the Cross of Constantine and one of earliest known symbols of Christ, the Greek Chi Rho. However, that’s not what the church looked like when its congregation moved from Franklin Street in 1890. Originally built as a Gothic structure, the congregation hired architect George B. Rogers to redesign the facility and paid Boston artist Harry E. Goodhue, a pioneer in his time, to design and install the stained glass windows and

Force Base and local shipyards, the number of Protestants grew, and so did The Bee Hive, at one point seeing average attendance of 300. However, since Brookley closed in 1969, the challenges of an inner-city location and a westward-moving population didn’t spare the church. Its numbers began to dwindle, and last year an average of just 25 people attended regular services, according to Park. The importance of the church’s legacy in the area has not been forgotten by Methodist leaders, though, who in the past have made grant funding available. Park jokingly says he’s been sent in on “4th down with 55 yards to go to throw a Hail Mary pass” that might keep The Bee Hive afloat. Yet, Park seems hopeful, and said the number of church members has grown to something closer to 50 in the past year. Plus, with continued growth downtown and a $14.5 million Broad Street revitalization on the horizon, Park believes it’s as good a time as any to return The Bee Hive back to its former prominence as the neighborhood church of the Oakleigh District. “We are strategically located to connect a resurgent downtown with a growing midtown. I don’t want people to be threatened by our church, but I want them to know we’re here,” Park said. “If we can get them in the door, I’m convinced the package we present is good, and the centennial is just a wonderful time to really kick-start this whole thing.”


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COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

Don’t buy into ‘Same Jones’ ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

this “nonprofit” that appeared primarily designed to allow the Housing Board to circumvent the county’s Personnel Board and also seems to have existed to make some unusual business deals. State Rep. Adline Clarke — who Jones helped get elected — also served as MDE’s vice president, and one of the things the OIG report questioned was a conflict of interest in $1.2 million in contracts her brother’s company, Superior Masonry, received through MDE. Now HUD is requiring the Housing Board to pay that money back. Sam Jones’ influence over the Mobile Housing Board can’t be understated. His buddy and now employer ran the board and Jones never made any moves to clean up the problems. As most of the board members’ terms were expired when he took office, Jones could have replaced them. He didn’t. Then he let them stay eight more years and watched as they closed Josephine Allen without consulting HUD, costing MHB millions. He just watched as Roger Williams became a burned-out shell of what it had once been, where the remaining residents lived in squalor. Keeping his political cronies happy and in control of the jobs and the money was far more important to Sam than making sure Mobile’s public housing wasn’t a travesty. So why would black voters who watched all that happen want to put “Same Jones” back in so he can load MHB back up with his buddies? “How do you know he’d do it all over again?” you might ask. He did it before.

THEGADFLY

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office. Ball’s son is running Jones’ current campaign. So they’re close. While the mayor doesn’t have direct authority over the day-to-day operation of MHB, the way in which he does have power is in board appointments. During his eight years in office, Jones left in place Ball and others who oversaw the decline of public housing in Mobile. Not only did he not replace them, Jones didn’t even bother to reappoint them when their terms on the board were up. He just let things hang in limbo — until he lost the election. Then he made three appointments to the fivemember board, including filling a position he’d left vacant more than a year. The two members he reappointed had each been on the board more than 20 years and re-upping their terms meant they would stay on the board throughout Stimpson’s first term. The result was keeping Jones cronies in control of MHB until last year. Only because board vice president Donald Langham suddenly resigned just before the OIG report came down was Stimpson able to have enough of his own appointees on the board to start some house cleaning. MHB has been a mess. Stimpson’s appointees to the board finally got rid of the flim-flam man Ball and Langham had hired as director, Dwayne Vaughn. One of Vaughn’s major sins had been to continue pushing the fiction that Mobile Development Enterprises was an entity separate from MHB — even though MDE employees worked at Housing Board desks, answered Housing Board phones and were paid through Housing Board accounts. So far already OIG has peeled through

Cartoon/Laura Rasmussen

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erhaps one of the more interesting parts of former mayor Sam Jones’ announcement last week that he’s running to get his old job back was the conversation Greater Nazaree Baptist Church Pastor James Parrish relayed to build excitement for his candidate. In the conversation, a friend quizzed the pastor about his support for a second Jones tenure in City Hall. “I told him Sam Jones would improve our parks and recreation facilities for all communities. He said, ‘How do you know?’ He did it before. I told him Sam Jones would strengthen and develop his infrastructure and make sure that our roads are better and that he would strengthen and support the drainage and make sure we have a good drainage system. He said, ‘How do you know?’ I said, ‘He did it before.’” No offense to the good pastor and his inquisitive friend, but the one thing Sam Jones probably doesn’t want to run on is “He did it before.” “He did it before” is what hangs around his neck like an anvil. “He did it before” is the biggest reason Jones faces long odds in trying to get his old job back. The Jones campaign fired out of the blocks this week with a message that in essence was simply an appeal to the black majority in this city to elect a black mayor again. In particular a black mayor named Sam Jones. There was no real story about exactly how Jones would make things better for the black community and there was certainly zero effort to reach out to the 48 percent of non-black people who call Mobile home. Sam quickly established he doesn’t care about being the mayor for white, Asian or Hispanic Mobilians. But if he hopes to regain the mayor’s seat simply by virtue of being a member of the city’s largest ethnic group, Jones might also have to start explaining why he hung the people who put him in office out to dry during his last tenure. It would be easy to start going through Silent Sam’s two terms as mayor and point out the massive increases in positions at the city, the dereliction of duty when it came to the city’s infrastructure, and the secretive and damaging way in which he wielded power. But rather than go through all that right now, it might be best to look at one particular area that best exemplifies how little Jones cared for members of the very community he now expects to put him back in office — the Mobile Housing Board. During his tenure Jones allowed this city’s public housing to disintegrate to such a degree that much of it looked like it belonged in the Third World. His willful disregard for those housing projects and their overwhelmingly African-American residents no doubt played a big role in his loss four years ago. As anyone who has been paying attention knows, Mobile Housing Board is under investigation by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Office of Inspector General. OIG blistered MHB last year in a report questioning the way the organization has been run, especially as it relates to a supposed nonprofit arm called Mobile Development Enterprises. While the OIG letter came during Stimpson’s tenure, the troubles at MHB belong to Jones and his political cronies. MHB’s board was chaired by Clarence Ball for 25 years, including the entire time Jones was in office. Ball has routinely been one of Jones’ bigger financial contributors and even hired the ex-mayor after he left

SAM QUIXOTE PREPARES TO RIDE.


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COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

Condescending politicians fishing for votes ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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ell golly! I guess we are all just a bunch of dirty, toothless, uneducated, weak-minded idiots who can be manipulated or bought with great ease or on the cheap. Or at least that’s what our state and local politicians seem to think of us, judging by their ads and campaigns. I am sure there are many more examples from our city and state over the years, but three politicos in particular have really caught my attention in the last week and year with their condescending ads and/or platforms. The first one that comes to mind is the “Sixty-Seven” ad United States Senator Richard Shelby used for his 9,000th re-election campaign last year. You know the one. He rides all over Alabama on the “back roads” to all “67 counties” using “shortcuts.” I can just imagine the slick copywriter who crafted this campaign sitting in some wellappointed office in Manhattan or D.C. It must have taken him hours to pry the “g” off his keyboard so he could make sure everyone knew ol’ Dick hates the letter “G” as much as he hates Obama. When he’s in Washington, he is always “listenin’,” “workin’,” and “helpin’” Alabamians until it’s time for him to start “hightailin’” it back to ‘Bama. Barf. Can’t you just see that same copywriter coaching the voice-over guy? “Now make sure you use your best hillbilly voice, think Jim Nabors meets Forrest Gump. You know, ‘tawlk l-eye-ke theis.’ You know those hicks don’t like hearing the sound of someone’s voice who may have graduated from college, or hell, even high school. It’s too fancy for them. They think you are talking down to them, so you have to try and talk like you are one of them. So just remember there is no such thing as -ing in Alabama, and really add some hatred to your voice when talking about Obama. Those morons really eat that up.” And apparently we do, because we voted him back into office, although I think it had more to do with the amount of good old-fashioned bacon he is known for bringin’ back to ‘Bama than with him hatin’ Obama. And I swear Luther Strange must have the same ad agency. His ads for the special election for Jeff Sessions’ former seat are just as bad. This is how I imagine the meeting went down at the agency after Luther saw his ads for the first time. … Luther Strange: Well I really like them, especially the car wash part, but you know I didn’t actually prosecute Mike Hubbard and you know that Bentley situation was kind of sketchy so we probably shouldn’t give me credit for that. Ad Agency: Nonsense! These idiots aren’t going to remember all those “minor” details. Hell, the vast majority of them probably don’t even know who Mike Hubbard is. LS: True. But I’m not familiar with the newspaper you are quoting. The Valley Times? Where is that? AA: Oh, Luther, please. We totally made that up. Do I have to remind you, you are not running for the senate seat in Connecticut? You are from Alabama. Your constituents don’t read newspapers. Hell, half of ‘em probably can’t

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even read. Trust me, they won’t even realize it’s actually “fake news.” Bahahahahahaha. LS: I guess you are right. But I noticed we are still mentioning Obama in the ads. I mean, he’s not even there anymore. Shouldn’t we be going after Pelosi or someone who currently holds office? AA: Your naiveté is so cute, Luther. We are planning on using “fighting Obama” in ads until it stops working, which, for your voters, may be right about the time we elect our 53rd president. So just hush up now and grab that shotgun over there and look directly in the camera, smile and talk about how much you love the Second Amendment. You love it so much you would leave your wife and kids and marry it. You feel me? LS: I can do that. I mean, if you think it will work. AA: Trust me, Big Lu, go ahead and order new drapes for your office on Capitol Hill, if you haven’t already. You’re not going anywhere. Or as your people would say, “you ain’t goin’ nowhere, boy!” And sadly, it’s not just our big-time politicians in Washington who put out insulting stuff like this. We have local ones too. Last weekend, after months of speculation, former mayor Sam Jones made it official that he wants his old job back. He will face the man who defeated him, current mayor Sandy Stimpson. Though Jones is expected to run a grassroots campaign since his budget for advertising is rather limited, there seems to be a common theme emerging from his surrogates and supporters. “Let’s be ALL IN FOR SAM JONES!! Don’t be fooled by cookouts, blues shows and fish fry events. Focus on the candidate that genuinely cares about you and this city,” one supporter wrote. And numerous other supporters have also mentioned these events on Facebook and even at his campaign announcement, seeming to suggest that Jones would have won last time if Sandy Stimpson hadn’t “bought” their votes with fish and barbecue. Really? First off, how demeaning is that to Jones’ would-be supporters? I love fried fish and I love barbecue and would probably take plates of both if the Devil himself was serving it up, but no piece of food or fancy party or band is ever going to change my mind about anything, especially who I am voting for in an election. Secondly, it’s also pretty demeaning to former mayor Jones, since they are essentially saying his supporters’ passion for him was so weak they could be swayed by a free plate of food. If I were him, I would be insulted by that. I guess they think this is a good strategy, but I don’t get it. The political climate in general is pretty depressing and exhausting these days. But from Mobile to Montgomery to Washington, D.C., it’s time for all of these politicos to give us just a little more credit and stop talking down to us. But then again, if we keep buying the messages they are selling, I guess we are getting exactly what we deserve. But I, for one, think more of us. I guess we’ll see.


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COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

The infrastructure myth BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM

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hroughout the 2016 campaign and into the early stages of his presidency, Donald Trump vowed to make infrastructure improvements around the country. The promise was all part of his brand of populism — spend more money domestically and less abroad. America first. “We need members of both parties to join hands and work with us to pass a $1 trillion infrastructure plan to build new roads and bridges and airports and tunnels and highways and railways all across our great nation,” Trump pledged at a campaign rally in Melbourne, Florida, earlier this year. Given Trump’s Russia investigation toxicity, it will be very tough for a $1 trillion infrastructure package to make it through Congress, at least in the near term. The most conservative members of the Republican caucus likely will not go along with it. Trump would need a sizable proportion of the Democratic members of Congress to join pro-infrastructure-spending Republicans. For the sake of argument, let’s assume eventually Trump and the GOP leadership can muster the necessary votes to get $1 trillion in infrastructure spending signed into law. Let’s take a step further and say — with Sen. Richard Shelby in the Senate and an Alabama delegation in the House rising in seniority — some of this funding makes it to the Yellowhammer State to fund a laundry list of highway projects. In 2016, a Washington, D.C.-based private nonprofit organization called TRIP compiled a wishlist of Alabama highway projects that it claimed would improve “growth and quality of life.” Among the Mobile-area projects were improvements to Interstate 10 across Mobile Bay, widening U.S. 98 and I-10 from Mobile to the Mississippi state line and more lanes in Baldwin County for I-10. There were others around the state — a freeway bypass in Montgomery, widening the perpetually clogged I-65 in Shelby County and improvements to Ross Clark Circle in Dothan. All of those proposals are worthy of consideration. Over the last 30 years, Alabama’s metropolitan areas have grown, but the thoroughfares in those areas have been woefully unprepared for that growth. Will highway projects like these spark new economic growth for Alabama? Not necessarily. Consider Mississippi as a limited case study. When you leave Alabama going into Mississippi on any of the major highways leaving Mobile — U.S. 98 headed toward Hattiesburg or U.S. 45 headed toward Meridian — the road magically widens from a treacherous, curvy Alabama two-lane road to a straight four-lane Mississippi highway — often with hardly a vehicle in sight. The reasons for this disparity can be found in Washington, D.C. The Mississippi congressional delegation over the years has been very successful steering federal funds to its state. For a period, Republican Trent Lott was the majority leader of the Senate. Sen. Thad Cochran is the third-longest serving U.S. senator (a Republican in office since 1978), behind

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Sens. Patrick Leahy (D-Vermont) and Orrin Hatch (R-Utah). In the years following the construction of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway — a waterway that connects the Tennessee River to the Tombigbee River, empties into the Mobile River and exits into Mobile Bay — Mississippi started putting an emphasis on improving its highways. You can crisscross the state of Mississippi without having to navigate a congested two-lane road for the most part. If you want to drive from Natchez to Corinth, Pascagoula to the Memphis suburbs, Jackson to Tupelo or Columbus to Greenville, the trip can be multilane all the way. As many well know, that is not the case in Alabama. The quickest way from Mobile to Dothan consists mostly of driving through the Florida Panhandle. Trying to get from Mobile to Tuscaloosa for an Alabama football game? Prepare for a mostly rural two-lane trek through the state’s Black Belt region. Mobile to Huntsville? Yes, I-65 is a four-lane interstate the entire way but was built going 50 miles out of the way so it would go through Montgomery. Navigating Alabama is arguably more difficult than our neighbor to the west. But that does not mean Mississippi is prospering compared to Alabama. According to the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis, as of May 11 Alabama’s gross domestic product, the total value of goods produced and services provided in the state over one year, was nearly $200 billion. That put the state at No. 27 among all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Farther down the list at $106 billion was Mississippi, at No. 36. Despite all these infrastructure improvements in Mississippi, Alabama over the last five years has continued to outpace the Magnolia State economically. Conventional wisdom suggests infrastructure is the name of the game for growing the economy. All over the country, the more liberal and progressive precincts tout high-speed rail. There is much more required for economic growth than getting people, goods and services transported more efficiently. Education, natural resources, public safety — those are all parts of the equation as well. Certainly, one can make the argument that getting home from Mobile to the peaceful suburbs of the Eastern Shore will increase productivity slightly. That, however, is hardly a significant enough economic gain to justify pushing a $1 trillion spending bill, the bulk of which the federal government probably will borrow. It may make recruiting industry a little easier, but the state can create incentives more cost effectively through its tax code. Alabama, to its credit, has done just that to lure auto manufacturing to the state. Once you get those companies to the state, you expand the tax base, which ultimately means more revenue for the government. And then it’s more feasible to take on infrastructure improvement. In the meantime, it is important to keep in mind that if you build, it doesn’t necessarily mean they will come.


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BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

Fuse Project nears $1M fundraising mark BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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he Fuse Project’s 4th annual Dragon Boat Festival, reportedly one of the largest events of its kind in the nation, was recently held at USS Alabama Battleship Memorial Park and reportedly raised $205,000 for charity. Fifty-four teams paddled against one another in 46-foot rowboats to compete for the title of “Dragon Boat Champion” and “Top Fundraising Team” on race day. According to a news release, more than 1,400 corporate and community paddlers were in attendance The following causes will receive funding from this year’s festival, Fuse Project recently announced: USA College of Education Literacy Center, Mobile Baykeeper, Mobile Police Department, Little Angels, Raven’s Promise and Boy Scouts of America. Over the last few years, Fuse Project’s Dragon Boat Festival has doubled in size as the organization continues to raise funds to support local projects with immediate impact on children in the community. This year an estimated 9,000 people were in attendance to witness the races and take part in the festival “We are honored to partner with these wonderful organizations who continuously strive to make a positive impact on the lives of children in our community one day at a time. Our goal is to provide every child in South Alabama a chance at success,” Grant Zarzour, Fuse Project’s co-founder and chairman of the board, said. Since its formation in 2012, Fuse Project has raised more than $900,000 in donations that have funded 27 different charity projects aimed at promoting health, fitness, education and social responsibility of children along Alabama’s Gulf Coast. “We are thrilled with the success of this year’s festival,” Adrienne Golden, Fuse Project executive director, said. “We are thankful for all of the continued support we received from our volunteers, teams and sponsors.” This year, the

event had 39 local sponsors. Fuse Project is a local 501(c)(3) organization that supports existing philanthropies with specific project ideas and grassroots efforts by members of the community. For more information, visit its website or email Adrienne Golden at adrienne@FuseProject.org.

Providence names new chief quality officer

Stephen Mayfield has been selected as the chief quality officer of Providence Hospital in Mobile and Sacred Heart Health System in Pensacola. Sacred Heart and Providence are both part of Ascension, the largest nonprofit health system in the country and the world’s largest Catholic health system. Mayfield has primary responsibility for clinical outcomes, quality and safety. He brings over 25 years’ experience working across the country with hospitals and health systems and is a nationally recognized expert in health care quality and safety. Mayfield completed his doctorate in health care administration at the Medical University of South Carolina, earned an MBA from Emory University and a bachelor’s degree from Georgia State University. He serves as faculty for the Institute of Industrial and System Engineers and the University of California at Irvine. Mayfield is also known for creating the Quality Center at the American Hospital Association, a resource for 5,000 member hospitals supporting pursuit of the Institute of Medicine’s health care research.  He is a member of various organizations including the American College of Healthcare Executives, the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, the American Society for Quality, the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society and the Institute of Industrial Engineers.  Together, these Ascension health care facilities have served Gulf Coast communities for more than 160 years and

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employ more than 6,600 people. Across the Southern region, Ascension provided more than $113 million in community benefit and care of persons living in poverty in fiscal year 2016. The not-for-profit operates 2,500 sites encompassing 141 hospitals and more than 30 senior living facilities in 24 states and the District of Columbia.

MTI designated “continuing education provider”

MTI Business Solutions, a division of Mobile Technical Institute, has been designated an American Staffing Association Approved Continuing Education Provider. Participants in training and professional development programs are now pre-approved for continuing education hours to maintain the ASA-administered Certified Staffing Professional, Certified Search Consultant, Certified Healthcare Staffing Professional and Technical Services Certified credentials.  “We are excited to be recognized as an ACEP of the American Staffing Association,” MTI Business Solutions vice president Randall Olson said. “This allows us to help certified professionals in the staffing industry meet their continuing education needs through participation in learning experiences delivered by our trainers and facilitators.”  MTI Business Solutions is a Mobile-based firm that provides assessment, talent development and corporate training services with clients throughout the U.S. For more information, visit www.mtibusiness.com The American Staffing Association and its affiliated chapters advance the interests of the industry across all sectors through advocacy, research, education and the promotion of high standards of legal, ethical and professional practices. For more information, visit its website.

USA hosts BASF Teens’ Lab program

Eighteen high school juniors in Washington County recently attended BASF’s Teens’ Lab, a newly launched two-day program hosted by the University of South Alabama geared toward students learning about college and careers in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM). “Through this joint effort with the University of South Alabama, BASF is showing students how chemistry and careers are created,” Jason Slinkard, site director for BASF in McIntosh, said. “Teens’ Lab will be an annual opportunity that we will offer to inspire local students to be future leaders in the industry.” The Washington County school district identified the Teens’ Lab participants. High school juniors currently enrolled in chemistry, or those who have taken chemistry, were eligible to participate. Students who complete the program are eligible for a University of South Alabama scholarship and a summer internship at the BASF facility in McIntosh. “The students all did a great job working through the various laboratory experiments,” Jason W. Coym, associate professor of chemistry at USA, said. “The Teens’ Lab program offers encouragement to students to pursue higher education and careers in STEM fields. We look forward to continuing this partnership with BASF.”


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CUISINE | THE DISH

Mixed with soda, blackberry acid is perfect pick-me-up BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

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lackberry acid. It’s nothing like the dreaded brown stuff you were warned to avoid at Woodstock. It’s a Prohibition-era recipe (from what we can tell) that was a soda fountain mainstay as well as a home treat, usually kept under lock and key until the preacher or other important visitors made their way to your doorstep. This neat little charm is actually fermented and a touch fizzy but remains alcohol free. Think of Italian sodas. I love those things. This is a great way to have a DIY soda shop in your own kitchen, at a party or on the go. All you need is a jar of your homemade blackberry acid and a bottle of soda water and you’ll be the hit of the picnic. The process of making this stuff is extremely easy, provided you have the right tools. Why am I not doing it right now? It takes almost a month to make. Yeah, it’s not hard. But the reward comes much later. Here is a quick guide to getting this fermentation process moving forward. You’ll need to make a checklist of items you must have before you pick your berries. The first thing is tartaric acid. You can ask your local drugstore but chances are they don’t carry it. This organic crystalline acid develops naturally in the process of winemaking but doesn’t find its way to the shelves in a commercial manner as much as it used to. Mixed with sodium bicarbonate it becomes baking powder.

It acts well as a preservative in jams and jellies. It also carries certain health benefits with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. You may not see it in your local grocery store but you can find it on most any cheesemaking website. A quick Google unearthed brands selling for a couple of ounces under $5 or a pound for around $8. Once you have your tartaric acid you’ll need a large mixing bowl, lots of cheesecloth, two quart-sized Mason jars and glass bottles with the nifty ceramic stoppers. Then it is time to pick your blackberries. You’ll need about 8 cups.

INGREDIENTS • 8 cups blackberries • 7 cups sugar • 2 tablespoons plus another 2 teaspoons tartaric acid • 2 cups filtered water In that giant mixing bowl combine all 8 cups of blackberries with the sugar. Add the acid and the filtered water and stir. You don’t have to break up the blackberries or cook them (although some recipes I’ve found do), just allow them to macerate in the sugar water for 24 hours with the mixing bowl covered with a towel or cheesecloth. The next step is to strain the liquid through a fine

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sieve or cheesecloth. Pour the liquid into the Mason jars (boiled and cooled for sterilization) and cover them with cheesecloth fastened with rubber bands or the ring lids. This will have to sit in a dark, cool location, such as a cabinet, for three weeks. At this point you could either put lids on the Mason jars or pour the acidic syrup into bottles. What you are looking for is a liquid that is a little thick, maybe like cough syrup, and will coat the back of a spoon. It should be slightly fizzy with a garnet or ruby color. Now we have our syrup. What’s next? Well, back in the day great granny may have impressed the pre-Coca-Cola preacher by mixing one part blackberry acid to two parts water. That’s a pretty stout non-alcoholic cocktail. A better result might be straight soda water over ice and the syrup to taste. This stuff is pretty potent. A little will usually do the trick. It’s a great flavoring for lemonade. The kids will love that. Don’t go hog wild with it, just change the color a shade or two. That is a spectacular summer drink for sitting by the pool, underneath the shade tree or reclined on the hammock. The effect is amplified by the removal of your shoes. As a dessert enhancer blackberry acid can work wonders, but use it sparingly. We want to have as much soda as we can. But if you really have to break open the jar to impress a guest, drizzle just a touch over cheesecake or ice cream. May I suggest Cammie’s Old Dutch Mexican vanilla? If you get into making this you may want to quadruple the recipe or possibly start a new batch once per week until the blackberries run out. You can use it as currency once you’ve jarred it all up. And there’s nothing like reaching for a jar off the shelf during those midwinter blues to remind you there will be another summer. Though blackberry acid is traditionally used for sodas and nonalcoholic drinks, there is an adult version. It’s a drink known as either the Black Lily or the Sweet Lily. They are one and the same; maybe there are more names of which I am unaware. Start with a tablespoon of the syrup in a champagne glass and fill with prosecco. Any dry champagne should do. Garnish with mint leaves and a seasonal blackberry. Move over, mimosas and poinsettias. Brunch just got better. Take advantage of blackberries while you can. Dewberries will work very well, too. I’d imagine you could use just about anything you wish. I love blackberries, though. And I love sodas. Go out and get yourself some acid and cheesecloth and find a cool, dark spot. It’s worth the wait. I’ve got some coming my way in two weeks. Let me know how yours turns out. I’m always up for a sample.


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FIREHOUSE SUBS ($)

HOT SUBS, COLD SALADS & CATERING 6300 Grelot Rd. • 631-3730

FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES ($) $10/PERSON • $$ 10-25/PERSON • $$$ OVER 25/PERSON

COMPLETELY COMFORTABLE ALL SPORTS BAR & GRILL ($) 3408 Pleasant Valley Rd. • 345-9338

AL’S HOTDOGS ($)

CLASSIC HOTDOGS, GYROS & MILKSHAKES 4701 Airport Blvd. • 342-3243

ATLANTA BREAD COMPANY ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SALADS & MORE. 3680 Dauphin St. • 380-0444

BAKE MY DAY ($)

OLD-FASHIONED SOUTHERN BAKE SHOP 156 N. McGregor Ave. • 219-7261

BOB’S DINER ($)

GOOD OLD AMERICAN COOKING 263 St. Francis St. • 405-1497

BUCK’S DINER ($)

CLASSIC AMERICAN DINER 58 N. Secion St. Fairhope • 928-8521

CAFE 219 ($)

SALADS, SANDWICHES & POTATO SALAD 219 Conti St. • 438-5234

CAMELLIA CAFÉ ($-$$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FARE 61 Section St. • Fairhope • 928-4321

CAMMIE’S OLD DUTCH ($) MOBILE’S CLASSIC ICE CREAM SPOT 2511 Old Shell Rd. • 471-1710

CARPE DIEM ($)

DELI FOODS, PASTRIES & SPECIALTY DRINKS 4072 Old Shell Rd. • 304-0448

CLARK’S KITCHEN ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHERN CUISINE & CATERING 5817 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0200

CHAT-A-WAY CAFE ($)

QUICHES & SANDWICHES 4366 Old Shell Rd. • 343-9889

CHICK-FIL-A ($)

BURGERS, MILKSHAKES & FRIES 4401 Old Shell Rd. • 447-2394 4663 Airport Blvd. • 300-8425 5319 Hwy 90 • 661-0071 1225 Satchel Page Dr.• 378-8768

FOOSACKLY’S ($)

FAMOUS CHICKEN FINGERS 29181 US Hwy 98 • Daphne • 375-1104 7843 Moffett Rd. • 607-6196 1109 Shelton Beach Rd. • 287-1423 310 S. University Blvd. • 343-0047 2250 Airport Blvd. • 479-2922 7641 Airport Blvd. • 607-7667 2558 Schillinger Rd. • 219-7761 3249 Dauphin St. • 479-2000

FOY SUPERFOODS ($) 119 Dauphin St.• 307-8997

GULF COAST EXPLOREUM CAFE ($) HOMEMADE SOUPS & SANDWICHES 65 Government St. • 208-6815

1880 Industrial Pkwy. • 675-2999

CREAM AND SUGAR ($)

3869 Airport Blvd. • 345-9544 5470 Inn Rd. • 661-9117 28975 US 98 • Daphne • 625-3910

JAMAICAN VIBE ($)

MIND-BLOWING ISLAND FOOD 3700 Gov’t Blvd. Ste A • 602-1973

JERSEY MIKE’S ($)

AUTHENTIC SUB SANDWICHES 7449 Airport Blvd. • 375-1820

JIMMY JOHN’S ($)

SANDWICHES, CATERING & DELIVERY TOO 6920 Airport Blvd. • 414-5444 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-8694 62 B Royal St. • 432-0360

JOE CAIN CAFÉ ($)

PIZZAS, SANDWICHES, COCKTAILS 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

JONELLI’S ($)

1252 Govenment St.• 301-7556 HOME COOKING 4054 Government St. • 665-4557

LICKIN’ GOOD DONUTS ($) 3242 Dauphin St. • 471-2590

LODA BIER GARTEN ($) MAMA’S ($)

SLAP YOUR MAMA GOOD HOME COOKING 220 Dauphin St. • 432-6262

MARS HILL CAFE ($)

GREAT SANDWICHES, COFFEE & MORE 1087 Downtowner Blvd. • 643-1611

MARY’S SOUTHERN COOKING ($) 3011 Springhill Ave. • 476-2232

COFFEE, BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DESSERT 351 George St #B • 405-0003

MICHELI’S CAFE ($)

DAUPHIN ST. CAFE ($)

MCSHARRY’S ($-$$)

HOT LUNCH, DAILY MENU (INSIDE VIA) 1717 Dauphin St. • 470-5231

D’ MICHAEL’S ($)

PHILLY CHEESE STEAKS, GYROS & MORE 7101-A Theodore Dawes Rd. • 653-2979

D NU SPOT ($)

22159 Halls Mill Rd. . • 648-6522

DELISH BAKERY AND EATERY ($) GREAT DESSERTS & HOT LUNCH 23 Upham St. • 473-6115

DEW DROP INN ($)

CLASSIC BURGERS, HOTDOGS & SETTING 1808 Old Shell Rd. • 473-7872

DUNKIN DONUTS ($)

DONUTS, COFFEE & SANDWICHES 1976 Michigan Ave. • 442-4846 3876 Airport Blvd. • 219-7369 505 Schillinger Rd. S. • 442-4845 29160 US Hwy 98 • 621-2228

E WING HOUSE ($)

6358 Cottage Hill Rd. • 725-6917 AUTHENTIC IRISH PUB 101 N. Bancroft St.• 990-5100

MIKO’S ITALIAN ICE ($)

HOTDOGS SANDWICHES & COOL TREATS 3371 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 300–4015

MOMMA GOLDBERG’S DELI ($) SANDWICHES & MOMMA’S LOVE 3696 Airport Blvd. • 344-9500 5602 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6556

MONTEGO’S ($-$$)

FRESH CARIBBEAN-STYLE FOOD & CRAFT BEER 6601 Airport Blvd. • 634-3445 225 Dauphin St. • 375-1576

MOON PIE GENERAL STORE ($)

107 St Francis St #115 • RSA Bank Trust Building

MOSTLY MUFFINS ($) MUFFINS, COFFEE & WRAPS 105 Dauphin St. • 433-9855

NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE ($)

15 N Conception St. • 433-2299

OVEN-BAKED SANDWICHES & MORE 1335 Satchel Page Dr. Suite C. • 287-7356 7440 Airport Blvd. • 633-0096 30500 State Hwy 181 #132 • 625-6544

FATHOMS LOUNGE

O’DALYS HOLE IN THE WALL ($)

195 S University Blvd. Suite H • 662-1829

EUGENE’S MONKEY BAR ($) SMALL PLATES AND CREATIVE COCKTAILS 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

FLOUR GIRLS BAKERY ($) 809 Hillcrest Rd. • 634-2285

PDQ ($)

CHICKEN FINGERS, SALAD & SANDWICHES. 1165 University Blvd. • 202-0959

POLLMAN’S BAKERY ($)

BAKERY, SANDWICHES & MORE 750 S. Broad St. • 438-1511 4464 Old Shell Rd. • 342-8546 107 St. Francis St. Suite 102 • 438-2261

PUNTA CLARA KITCHEN ($)

FUDGE, PRALINES & MORE 17111 Scenic Hwy 98 • Fairhope • 928-8477

R BISTRO ($-$$)

334 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope • 928-2399

562 Dauphin St.• 725-6429

OLD SHELL GROWLERS ($) GROWLER STATION AND BITES 1801 Old Shell Rd. • 345-4767

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WAREHOUSE BAKERY & DONUTS ($)

72. S. Royal St. • 432-SCAM (7226)

WEDGIE’S ($)

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE 271 Glenwood St. • 476-0516

WILD WING STATION ($)

INSIDE THE MOBILE MARRIOTT 3101 Airport Blvd. • 476-6400

COFFEE AND DONUTS 759 Nichols Avenue, Fairhope • 928-7223 GOURMET GRILLED CHEESE 5955 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6134 1500 Gov’t St. • 287-1526

THE WINDMILL MARKET ($)

85 N. Bancroft St. Fairhope • 990.8883

YAK THE KATHMANDU KITCHEN ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC FOODS FROM HIMALAYAN REGION 3210 Dauphin St. • 287-0115 400 Eastern Shore Center • 459-2862

‘CUE

BACKYARD CAFE & BBQ ($) HOME COOKIN’ LIKE MOMMA MADE. 2804 Springhill Ave. • 473-4739

REGINA’S KITCHEN ($-$$)

BAR-B-QUING WITH MY HONEY ($$)

ROLY POLY ($)

BRICK PIT ($)

ROSHELL’S CAFE ($)

COTTON STATE BBQ ($)

HOOTERS ($)

PUB FOOD AND DRAFT BEERS 251 Dauphin St. • 287-6871

CONNECTION FROZEN YOGURT ($)

BAR FOOD 271 Dauphin St • 438-9585

WRAPS & SALADS 3220 Dauphin St. • 479-2480

SEAFOOD & SANDWICHES 212 ½ Fairhope Ave •Fairhope • 928-4100

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK ($)

CHICAGO STYLE EATERY 1222 Hillcrest Rd. • 461-6599

PAT’S DOWNTOWN GRILL ($)

GUMBO SHACK ($-$$)

JUDY’S PLACE ($-$$)

CHI-TOWN DAWGZ ($)

ORIGINAL SANDWICH AND BAKE SHOP 42 ½ Section St. • Fairhope • 929-0122 102 Dauphin St. • 405-0031

SANDWICHES, SUBS & SOUPS 2056 Gov’t St. • 476-2777

107 St. Francis St. • 415-1700 3244 Dauphin St. • 476-0320 3215 Bel Air Mall • 476-8361 4707 Airport Blvd. • 461-9933 435 Schillinger Rd. • 639-1163 1682 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 621-3215 30500 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-3020 CHICKEN SALAD, SALAD & SOUP 2370 S. Hillcrest Rd. Unit R • 660-0501 5753 Old Shell Rd. • 408-3236 1802 US Hwy 98 Suite F• 625-1092

PANINI PETE’S ($)

2906 Springhill Ave. • 479-4614

ROSIE’S GRILL ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHWEST FARE, 7 DAYS 1203 Hwy 98 Ste. 3D • Daphne • 626-2440

ROYAL KNIGHT ($)

LUNCH & DINNER 3004 Gov’t Blvd. • 287-1220

ROYAL STREET CAFE ($) HOMEMADE LUNCH & BREAKFAST 104 N. Royal St. • 434-0011

SALLY’S PIECE-A-CAKE ($) BAKERY 5638 Three Notch Rd.• 219-6379

BBQ, BURGERS, WINGS & SEAFOOD 19170 Hwy 43 Mt. Vernon. • 839-9927 A FAVORITE BARBECUE SPOT 5456 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0001 DOWNTOWN LUNCH 101 N. Conception St. • 545-4682

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT ($-$$) BBQ AND MORE Jubilee Sq.Ctr. Hwy 90, Daphne • 210-2151 McGowin Park Ctr. Satchel Paige Dr. • 471-1050 7721 Airport Blvd. • 380-8957

DREAMLAND BBQ ($)

RIBS, SANDWICHES & GREAT SIDES 3314 Old Shell Rd. • 479-9898

MEAT BOSS ($)

5401 Cottage Hill Rd. • 591-4842

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE ($)

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$) SAGE RESTAURANT ($$) SAISHO ($-$$)

MODERN GASTROPUB INSPIRED BY JAPANESE KITCHEN 455 Dauphin St • 433-0376

VON’S BISTRO ($-$$)

SEAFOOD, ASIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE 69 St. Michael St • 375-1113

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($$)

CASUAL FINE DINING 104 N. Section St. • Fairhope • 929-2219

THE TRELLIS ROOM ($$$)

A LITTLE VINO DOMKE MARKET

WINE, BEER, GOURMET FOODS, & MORE. 720 Schillinger Rd. S. Unit 8 • 287-1851

FOOD PAK

FOOD, WINE & MORE 5150 Old Shell Rd. • 341-1497

POUR BABY

WINE BAR, CRAFT BEERS & BISTRO 6808 Airport Blvd. • 343-3555

FIREHOUSE WINE BAR & SHOP 216 St Francis St. • 421-2022

RED OR WHITE

STEVIE’S KITCHEN ($)

DROP DEAD GOURMET

HEALTHY, DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 3762 Airport Blvd. • 725-1177

SUNSET POINTE ($-$$)

AT FLU CREEK 831 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-7766

THE BLIND MULE ($)

DAILY SPECIALS MADE FROM SCRATCH 57 N. Claiborne St. • 694-6853

THE GALLEY ($)

OPEN FOR LUNCH, INSIDE GULFQUEST 155 S. Water St • 436-8901

THE HARBERDASHER ($) 113 Dauphin St.• 436-0989

A PREMIER CATERER & COOKING CLASSES 1880-A Airport Blvd. • 450-9051

BRIQUETTES STEAKHOUSE ($-$$) GRILLED STEAKS, CHICKEN & SEAFOOD 720A Schillinger Rd. S. S2. • 607-7200 901 Montlimar Dr • 408-3133

CHUCK’S FISH ($$)

SEAFOOD AND SUSHI 551 Dauphin St.• 219-7051

CORNER 251 ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St • 460-3157

DAUPHIN’S ($$-$$$)

THE PIGEON HOLE ($)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD WITH A VIEW 107 St. Francis St • 444-0200

THE SUNFLOWER CAFE ($)

9 Du Rhu Dr. Suite 201 167 Dauphin St. • 445-3802

THYME BY THE BAY ($-$$)

GREAT FOOD AND COCKTAILS 609 Dauphin St. • 308-3105

SOUTHERN COOKING & THEN SOME 1716 Main St. Daphne • 222-4120 INSIDE VIRGINIA’S HEALTH FOOD 3055 A Dauphin St • 479-3200

33 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-5635

TIME TO EAT CAFE ($)

DOWN-HOME COUNTRY COOKIN 7351 Theodore Dawes Rd. • 654-0228 13665 N. Wintzell Ave. • 824-1119

DUMBWAITER ($$-$$$) FIVE ($$)

TP CROCKMIERS ($)

THREE GEORGES CANDY SHOP ($)

LOCAL INGREDIENTS 203 Dauphin St. • 690-6824

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE ($)

INVENTIVE & VERY FRESH CUISINE 6 N. Jackson St. • 433-0377

GREAT SMOOTHIES, WRAPS & SANDWICHES. Du Rhu Dr. • 378-5648 570 Schillinger Road • 634-3454

UNCLE JIMMY’S DELICIOUS HOTDOGS ($)

2550 Dauphin Island Pkwy S. • 307-5328

UPSCALE WINE BAR 9 Du Rhu Dr. S 201 • 287-7135

7 SPICE ($-$$)

ABBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE ($-$$) 4861 Bit & Spur Rd. • 340-6464

ISTANBUL GRILL ($)

AUTHENTIC TURKISH & MEDITERRANEAN 3702 Airport Blvd. • 461-6901

JERUSALEM CAFE ($-$$)

MOBILE’S OLDEST MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE 5773 Airport Blvd. • 304-1155

KAN ZAMAN ($-$$)

MEDITERRANEAN FOOD AND HOOKAH 326 Azalea Rd • 229-4206

MEDITERRANEAN SANDWICH COMPANY ($)

GREAT & QUICK. 3702 Airport Blvd. • 308-2131 274 Dauphin St. • 545-3161 2502 Schillinger Rd. Ste. 2 • 725-0126 6890 US-90 • DAPHNE • 621-2271

MINT HOOKAH BISTRO ($) GREAT MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 5951 Old Shell Rd. • 450-9191

LAUNCH ($-$$)

GREAT LUNCH & DINNER 3607 Old Shell Rd. • 445-8700

LIGHT LUNCH WITH SOUTHERN FLAIR. 226 Dauphin St. • 433-6725

THE VINEYARD

TAZIKI’S ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St. • 432-8000

AMERICAN RESTAURANT & BAR 250 Dauphin St. • 476-1890

BISTRO PLATES, CRAFT BEERS & PANTRY 2304 Main St. • 375-2800

KITCHEN ON GEORGE ($-$$)

TIN ROOF ($-$$)

SOUTHERN CASUAL FAMILY DINING 10800 US HWY 31 • Spanish Fort• 621-4995

SOUTHERN NAPA

OLLIE’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL ($-$$)

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOOD 351A George & Savannah St. • 436-8890

MAGHEE’S GRILL ON THE HILL ($-$$) NOBLE SOUTH ($$) NOJA ($$-$$$)

OSMAN’S RESTAURANT ($$) SUPREME EUROPEAN CUISINE 2579 Halls Mill Rd. • 479-0006

ROYAL SCAM ($$)

GUMBO, ANGUS BEEF & BAR

FUJI SAN ($)

THAI FARE AND SUSHI 2000 Airport Blvd. • 478-9888

GOLDEN BOWL ($)

HIBACHI GRILL & ASIAN CUISINE 309 Bel Air Blvd • 470-8033 2370 Hillcrest Rd. Unit B • 380-6062 JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE 3959 Cottage Hill Rd • 666-6266

KAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($-$$) QUALITY FOOD, EXCELLENT SERVICE 5045 Cottage Hill Rd. • 607-6454

LIQUID ($$)

AMAZING SUSHI & ASSORTMENT OF ROLLS. 661 Dauphin St. • 432-0109

RICE ASIAN GRILL & SUSHI BAR ($) 3964 Gov’t Blvd. • 378-8083

ROCK N ROLL SUSHI ($$)

273 S. McGregor Ave • 287-0445 6345 Airport Blvd. • 287-0555 940 Industrial Pkwy • 308-2158 6850 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 753-4367

STIX ($$)

LIVE MUSIC, MARTINIS & DINNER MENU. 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

FALAFEL? TRY SOME HUMMUS

4701 Airport Blvd. • 408-3379

LUNCH BUFFET 3674 Airport Blvd. • 341-6171

ROYAL STREET TAVERN

3758 Dauphin Island Pkwy. • 473-1401

SUGAR RUSH DONUT CO. ($)

CUISINE OF INDIA ($$)

SAISHO ($$)

SMOKEY DEMBO SMOKE HOUSE ($)

BAY GOURMET ($$)

3966 Airport Blvd.• 343-5530

323A De La Mare Ave, Fairhope • 990-0003 1104 Dauphin St.. • 478-9494

SIMPLY SWEET ($)

SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS & MORE 41 West I-65 Service Rd. N Suite 150. • 287-2793

CHINA DOLL ($)

ICHIBAN SUSHI ($)

17111 Scenic HWY 98 • Point Clear • 928-4838

SAUCY Q BARBQUE ($)

CUPCAKE BOUTIQUE 6207 Cottage Hill Rd. Suite B • 665-3003

THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR 960 Schillinger Rd. S • 660-4470

THE WASH HOUSE ($$)

SERDA’S COFFEEHOUSE ($)

AWARD-WINNING BARBQUE 1111 Gov’t Blvd. • 433-7427

CHARM ($-$$)

HIBACHI 1 ($-$$)

COFFEE, SMOOTHIES, LUNCH & BEERS. 5460 Old Shell Rd. • 344-4575 COFFEE, LUNCHES, LIVE MUSIC & GELATO 3 Royal St. S. • 415-3000

THAI & SUSHI 5369 D Hwy 90 W • 661-5100

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE Battle House Hotel, Royal St. • 338-5493

BARBEQUE & MUSIC Bayfront Park Dr. • Daphne • 625-RIBS 701 Springhill Ave. • 410-7427 4672 Airport Blvd. • 300-8516

SATORI COFFEEHOUSE ($)

BENJAS ($)

MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT & HOOKAH 1248 Hillcrest St • 634-9820 MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 1539 US HWY 98• 273-3337

FAR EASTERN FARE ANG BAHAY KUBO ($$)

6455 Dauphin St. • 433-0376 610240 Eastern Shore Blvd. • 621-9088

TASTE OF THAI ($$)

9091 US-90 Irvington • 957-1414

TOKYO JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE ($$) UPSCALE SUSHI & HIBACHI 364 Azalea Rd. • 343-6622

WASABI SUSHI ($$)

JAPANESE CUISINE 3654 Airport Blvd. S. C • 725-6078

FROM THE DEPTHS BAUDEAN’S ($$)

FRIED, GRILLED, STEAMED & ALWAYS FRESH 3300 River Rd. • 973-9070

THE BLUEGILL ($-$$)

A HISTORIC SEAFOOD DIVE W/ LIVE MUSIC 3775 Hwy. 98 • 625-1998

BONEFISH GRILL ($$)

ECLECTIC DINING & SPACE 6955 Airport Blvd. • 633-7196

BOUDREAUX’S CAJUN GRILL ($-$$) QUALITY CAJUN & NEW ORLEANS CUISINE 29249 US Highway 98 Daphne. • 621-1991

CRAVIN CAJUN/DIP SEAFOOD ($) PO-BOYS, SALADS & SEAFOOD 1870 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 287-1168

ED’S SEAFOOD SHED ($$)

FRIED SEAFOOD SERVED IN HEFTY PORTIONS 3382 Hwy. 98 • 625-1947

FELIX’S FISH CAMP ($$) UPSCALE DINING WITH A VIEW 1420 Hwy. 98 • 626-6710

FISHERMAN’S LEGACY ($) DELI, MARKET AND CATERING. 4380 Halls Mill Rd. • 665-2266

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($)

30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 206-8768 3654 Airport Blvd. • 338-9350

LUCY B. GOODE ($$)

GULF COAST CUISINE, REINVENTED 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

LULU’S ($$)

4513 Old Shell Rd.• 473-0007

LIVE MUSIC & GREAT SEAFOOD 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

BAMBOO STEAKHOUSE ($$)

MUDBUGS AT THE LOOP ($)

BANGKOK THAI ($-$$)

RALPH & KACOO’S ($-$$)

SUSHI BAR 650 Cody Rd. S • 300-8383

DELICIOUS, TRADITIONAL THAI CUISINE 28600 US 98 • Daphne • 626-5286 3821 Airport Blvd. • 344-9995

BANZAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($$) TRADITIONAL SUSHI & LUNCH. 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-9077

CAJUN KITCHEN & SEAFOOD MARKET 2005 Government St. • 478-9897 THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1595 Battleship Pkwy. • 626-0045

R&R SEAFOOD ($-$$)

LAID-BACK EATERY & FISH MARKET 1477 Battleship Pkwy. • 621-8366


RIVER SHACK ($-$$)

SEAFOOD, BURGERS & STEAKS 6120 Marina Dr. • Dog River • 443-7318.

THE GRAND MARINER ($-$$) LOCAL SEAFOOD & PRODUCE 6036 Rock Point Rd. • 443-7540

THE HARBOR ROOM ($-$$) UNIQUE SEAFOOD 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

THE SEAFOOD HOUSE ($-$$)

HEROES SPORTS BAR & GRILLE ($) SANDWICHES & COLD BEER 273 Dauphin St. • 433-4376 Hillcrest & Old Shell Rd. • 341-9464

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS ($-$$) WINGS, SEAFOOD, BURGERS & BEER 7721 Airport Blvd. Suite E-180 • 639-6832

ISLAND WING CO ($)

EVERYTHING BAKED OR GRILLED 2617 Dauphin St. • 476-9464

751 Azalea Rd. • 301-7964

MANCIS ($)

TIN TOP RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR ($$)

MCSHARRY’S IRISH PUB ($)

SEAFOOD, STEAKS, & EXTENSIVE WINE LIST 6232 Bon Secour Hwy County Rd. 10. • 949-5086

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) FRESH SEAFOOD FOR OVER 75 YEARS 605 Dauphin St. • 432-4605 6700 Airport Blvd. • 341-1111 1208 Shelton Beach Rd. • Saraland • 442-3335 805 S. Mobile St. • 929-2322

IS THE GAME ON?

ASHLAND MIDTOWN PUB ($-$$) PIZZAS, PASTAS, & CALZONES 245-A Old Shell Rd. • 479-3278

BAUMHOWER’S ($)

WINGS, BURGERS & PUB GRUB 6880 US-90 #14 • Daphne • 625-4695

BISHOP’S ($)

A SOUTHERN GRILL & BAR 3673 Airport Blvd. • 344-2131

BUFFALO WILD WINGS ($) BEST WINGS & SPORTING EVENTS 6341 Airport Blvd. • 378-5955

BUTCH CASSIDY’S ($)

FAMOUS BURGERS, SANDWICHES & WINGS 60 N. Florida St. • 450-0690

CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB ($) BURGERS & BEER 916 Charleston St. • 433-9374

1715 Main St. • 375-0543 BRILLIANT REUBENS & FISH-N-CHIPS. 101 N. Brancroft St. Fairhope • 990-5100

MUG SHOTS ($$)

BAR & GRILL 29740 Urgent Care Dr. • Daphne • 662-9639 6255 Airport Blvd. • 447-2514

GRIMALDI’S ($)

ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL ($$)

QUAINT MEXICAN RESTAURANT 5556 Old Shell Rd. • 345-7484

GUIDO’S ($$)

TAMARA’S BAR & GRILL ($)

MARIA BONITA AGAVE BAR & GRILL ($-$$)

Bel Air Mall • 476-2063 FRESH CUISINE NIGHTLY ON MENU 1709 Main St. • Daphne • 626-6082

HOUSE OF PIZZA ($)

3958 Snow Rd C. • Semmes • 645-3400

LA ROSSO ($$)

COMFORT FOOD 1716 Main St. Ste. C • Daphne • 281-2982

MACARONI GRILL ($$)

SMALL PLATES, PIZZAS, PASTAS & WINE 3250 Airport Blvd. • 450-4556

MARCOS ($)

5055 Cottage Hill Rd. • 308-4888 2394 Dawes Rr. • 639-3535 2004 US 98 • Daphne • 265-6550

MELLOW MUSHROOM ($)

BURGERS, DOGS & 27 BEERS & WINES. 19992 Hwy.181 Old County Rd. Fairhope • 281-2663

PIES & AWESOME BEER SELECTION 2032 Airport Blvd. • 471-4700 5660 Old Shell Rd. • 380-1500 29698 Frederick Blvd.• Daphne • 621-3911

LUCKY’S IRISH PUB ($)

MIRKO ($$)

OLD 27 GRILL ($)

IRISH PUB FARE & MORE 3692 Airport Blvd • 414-3000

WEMOS ($)

WINGS, TENDERS, HOTDOGS & SANDWICHES 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-5877

MAMA MIA!

BUCK’S PIZZA ($$)

DELIVERY 350 Dauphin St. • 431-9444

CORTLAND’S PIZZA PUB ($-$$) GREAT PIZZA. LUNCH & DINNER 4356 Old Shell Rd. • 342-0024

GAMBINO BROTHERS ($) HOMEMADE PASTAS & SANDWICHES 873 Hillcrest Ave. • 344-8115

GAMBINO’S ITALIAN GRILL ($) ITALIAN, STEAKS & SEAFOOD 18 Laurel Ave. • Fairhope • 990-0995

PASTA & MORE 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-6611

NAVCO PIZZA ($$)

PIZZA, SUBS & PASTA 1368 ½ Navco Rd.• 479-0066

PAPA’S PLACE ($$)

A TASTE OF ITALY. BYOB. 28691 U.S. Highway 98 • 626-1999

PINZONE’S ITALIAN VILLAGE ($$) AUTHENTIC ITALIAN DISHES 312 Fairhope Ave. • Fairhope • 990-5535

RAVENITE ($)

PIZZA, PASTA, SALAD & MORE 102 N. Section St. •Fairhope• 929-2525

PIZZERIA DELFINA ($) PIZZA & PASTA 107 Dauphin St. • 375-1644

ROMA CAFE ($-$$)

PASTA, SALAD AND SANDWICHES 7143 Airport Blvd. • 341-7217

3250 Airport Blvd. Springdale Mall• 450-4556

WINGS, PO-BOYS, BURGERS 210 Eastern Shore Center, Hwy. 98 • 929-0002

TRATTORIA PIZZA & ITALIAN ($$) ITALIAN FOOD & PIZZAS 11311 US HIghway 31 Spanish Fort• 375-0076

VIA EMILIA ($$)

HOMEMADE PASTAS & PIZZAS MADE DAILY 5901 Old Shell Rd. • 342-3677

MEXICAN CUISINE 3977 Gov’t Blvd. • 660-4970

OLÉ MI AMIGO ($-$$)

HEARTY MEXICAN FARE 736 holcombe Ave.• 473-0413

POOR MEXICAN ($)

3050 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-7433

MAGNOLIA HOUSE ($$-$$$) FINE DINING, SEAFOOD AND STEAKS

FLAVORS BUFFET ($-$$) ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET

IP CASINO:

850 Bayview Ave. Bilox • 888-946-2847

THIRTY-TWO ($$$) SEAFOOD, STEAKS, WINE

TIEN ($-$$)

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

HIGH TIDE CAFÉ ($)

CASUAL & RELAXING, EXTENSIVE MENU

OLÉ MI AMIGO!

ROOSTER’S ($)

ISLAND VIEW:

TASTE OF MEXICO 5452 Hwy 90 W • 661-5509

LATIN AMERICAN FOOD 211 Dauphin St. • 375-1076

TAQUERIA MEXICO ($-$$)

BEACH BLVD STEAMER ($)

AZTECAS ($-$$)

CAFÉ DEL RIO ($-$$)

MOUTH WATERING MEXICAN FOOD 1175 Battleship Pkwy • 625-2722

CINCO DE MAYO ($) MEXICAN CUISINE 260 Azalea Rd. • 375-1095

DAUPHIN ST. TAQUERIA ($)

ENCHILADAS, TACOS, & AUTHENTIC FARE Ok Bicycle Shop • 661 Dauphin St. • 432-2453

EL MARIACHI ($)

763 Holcombe Ave • 473-0413

FUEGO ($-$$)

OUTSTANDING MEXICAN CUISINE 2066 Old Shell Rd. • 378-8621

HACIENDA SAN MIGUEL ($-$$) TASTE OF MEXICO 880 Schillinger Rd. S. • 633-6122 5805 US 90 • 653-9163

LA COCINA ($)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE 800 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-0783 830 W I65 Service Rd. S • 378-5837 4663 Airport Blvd. • 342-5553

LOS ARCOS ($)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FLAVOR 3733 Airport Blvd. • 414-4496

NO GAMBLING CASINO FARE BEAU RIVAGE:

875 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 888-952-2582

BR PRIME ($$-$$$)

3300 W. Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 877-774-8439 SEAFOOD

CARTER GREEN STEAKHOUSE ($$-$$$) RICH TRADITIONS, STEAK, SEAFOOD

C&G GRILLE ($)

LARGE BREAKFAST, LUNCH OR DINNER MENU

PALACE CASINO:

158 Howard Ave. Biloxi • 800-725-2239

FINE DINING ESTABLISHMENT.

MIGNON’S ($$$)

BURGER, WINGS, PIZZA

PLACE BUFFET ($-$$)

EXOTIC CUISINE AND SUSHI

STACKED GRILL ($-$$)

COAST RESTAURANT ($-$$) JIA ($-$$)

STALLA ($$)

ITALIAN COOKING

STEAKS, SEAFOOD, FINE WINE INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

BURGERS AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

TERRACE CAFE ($)

TREASURE BAY:

HARD ROCK CASINO:

THE DEN ($-$$)

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, LATE NIGHT

777 Beach Blvd.Biloxi • 877-877-6256

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) SEAFOOD

HARD ROCK CAFÉ ($)

AMERICAN FARE & ROCKIN’ MEMORABILIA

1980 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 800-747-2839 INTIMATE & CASUAL WITH DAILY SPECIALS

CQ ($$-$$$)

ELEGANT ATMOSPHERE & TANTALIZING ENTREES

BLU ($)

LOUNGE WITH COCKTAILS & TAPAS MENU

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

WIND CREEK CASINO:

SATISFACTION ($-$$)

FIRE ($$-$$$)

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE SOUTHERN FAVORITES BUFFET

HARRAH’S GULF COAST:

280 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 288-436-2946

303 Poarch Rd. Atmore • 866-946-3360 PRIME STEAKS, SEAFOOD & WINE

GRILL ($)

CONTEMPORARY & OLD-FASHIONED FAVORITES

SEND LISTINGS TO LISTINGS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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CUISINE | THE BEEF PROFESSOR

Summertime brews BY TOM WARD/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

N

WORD OF MOUTH

Cheryl’s Café expands, bolsters menu BY ANDY MACDONALD Spanish Fort is fortunate to have one of my favorite lunch spots, and if you haven’t experienced Cheryl’s Café you should make arrangements to do so. Cheryl’s draws a dining crowd from Daphne, Fairhope, Stapleton, Loxley and downtown Mobile. Nestled atop the hill where the causeway becomes Highway 31, our groups of professionals on this side of the bay make the quick drive for incredible lunch items such as Parmesan-encrusted pork chops, fresh veggies and the ultimate Dream Pie. Often they find a packed house with no place to sit. Have no fear, young lawyers and business folk, you are almost guaranteed a spot with their newest addition to the dining area.

its Blue — an ale with blueberry flavorings — has added a pineapple IPA called Goin’ Coastal and Grass Monkey, a wheat ale with lemongrass favoring. I don’t think I’ve ever tasted lemongrass, so I’m not sure if they got the flavorings right, but it was OK, not too grassy. Much better was the Goin’ Coastal, which was really an excellent light IPA. I didn’t taste too much pineapple, but there was good hop flavor. It’s a nice option for a hot day. Samuel Adams, best known for its flagship Boston Lager, has put out its Summer Ale more than 20 years now, and it’s another good option for those looking for a lighter-tasting craft beer during the hot months. It tastes like a beer first — a good ale — with just hints of citrus, not overpowering. Another Boston brewery, Harpoon, has been around almost as long as Sam Adams’ Boston Brewing Co., opening in 1987, but is not nearly as well known and has just recently become available in our area. Its IPA is good, but its summertime brew Camp Winnamango is best left behind — too much mango and not enough hops. As the overwhelming number of summer styles seem to be lighter and with fruit flavorings, I was surprised when I tasted Philadelphia’s Victory Brewing Co.’s Summer Love ale. While advertised as being a “burst of lemony refreshment,” I found it instead to be a superb, full-bodied blonde ale, in great contrast to so many of the seasonal brews out there. While I am loathe to ever say anything nice about Philadelphia, I am looking forward to trying more of Victory’s beers in the hope they are as good as Summer Love.

Cheryl’s has added to the south side of the building, creating an open room with plenty of natural light and air conditioning, adding 600 square feet of eating space. My most recent visit proved to me they haven’t gotten too big for their britches. The food was amazing as usual, and Cheryl’s son Mitch is still putting out more grub than possible on a tiny stove. There are kitchen renovations in the works. Just in time for summer Cheryl’s is adding homemade ice cream to the dessert list, which for me is only an option if they run out of Dream Pie. My only problem with Cheryl’s is the side item section of the menu: I cannot narrow it down. It’s easier for me when they run out of things, lest I order six different veggies. Don’t get too big, Cheryl. Keep being the place where everybody knows your name.

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Visit 6580 Spanish Fort Blvd.

Lil Brian’s Produce a hit

A recent trip to Butch Cassidy’s landed me a score of pickled eggs. Owner Roy Seewer and I are both fans of the delicacy and I’ve been on him to put his version on the menu. But on this day I walk in to see a smiling Roy (who is usually rather stoic) with a jar of Amish Wedding brand jalapeño eggs. He explained he hit the jackpot with these bad boys while visiting Lil Brian’s Produce at 5830 Highway 90 W. in Theodore. This former Jimmy Lowe’s spot is brimming with all your fresh produce needs and a wide range of pickled whatever. I’m told they even have pickled Brussels sprouts! I appreciate the jar, Roy. Put them on your menu. I’ll visit Lil Brian’s as soon

Photo | Sweetwater Brewing Co.

ow that summer is here, along with the heat and the humidity, you might be tempted to reach for something light — a white wine spritzer, perhaps? — as you sit poolside or at the beach. Don’t do it! There are plenty of good craft beer summer styles now available that go great in the Alabama heat. As you probably have noticed, a number of breweries, both large and small, have begun putting out different seasonal beers, and with summer upon us a host of beers is now available with a summertime theme. Many of these beers are on the lighter side, and a number have some type of fruit flavoring. A seasonal beer that has been put out for a number of years is Summer Shandy by Wisconsin’s Leinenkugel’s brewery. No Johnny-come-lately, Leinenkugel’s was founded in 1867, but only in the past few years has it been distributed outside the Midwest. Its seasonal Summer Shandy is one of its most popular styles, and readily found in our area. A shandy is traditionally a drink made half with beer and half with some type of juice or soda. Leinenkugel’s recreates the taste of a wheat beer mixed with lemonade, and the lemon flavor is pronounced. It is refreshing, but you’ll have to like lemonade (as I do) to enjoy it. In addition to Summer Shandy, Leinenkugel’s recently came out with grapefruit and watermelon shandys for the summer season as well. Other brewers have incorporated fruit flavors into their summer beers, but more delicately than in a shandy. Atlanta’s Sweetwater Brewing Co., which has long been known for

as I can. Open 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Saturday.

Local beer news looking good

Those of you who love craft beer may have the tingling feeling this city is about to have a beer renaissance. It’s already happening. Haint Blue Brewing Co. has sneaked into various bars and restaurants with its porter and IPA as well as a recent release of a Saffron Saison. We are even starting to see its IPA in bottles! Good for them. We look forward to a taproom. Serda Brewing is steadily making progress and will be here before you know it. Expect German-style beers with American craft beer flair. John Serda doesn’t take these things lightly. My prediction is they will be fantastic. Recycle!


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COVER STORY

Sam Jones enters mayoral race for rematch with Sandy Stimpson DALE LIESCH/REPORTER

I

n his childhood church filled with supporters, former Mobile Mayor Sam Jones made his case for why he should again be elected to the city’s top office last Saturday, ending months of speculation about whether he would run. In an announcement that was interrupted by standing ovations and chants of “all in,” Jones relied on his experience, record and identity politics to paint Mobile as a city traveling down the wrong path and himself as the only man who can move it in the right direction. With the announcement at Greater Nazaree Baptist Church in downtown Mobile, Jones becomes the main competition for incumbent Mayor Sandy Stimpson in a rematch of the contest four years ago, with the two men’s roles reversed.

Voter turnout

Jones and his supporters at the announcement hammered home to those in attendance the importance of strong voter turnout among the city’s black majority. “We are 52 percent and don’t you forget that,” selfdescribed activist Angela Agnew said from the podium. “We’ve got to show them what we are capable of … We will show up. We will show out and we will win.” Jones also made similar points during his own speech. He asked for “motivated voters” who would encourage family, friends and neighbors to go to the polls Aug. 22. “When you’re able to participate at that level, you’re a force to be reckoned with,” he said. “We can only be successful if we go all in.” The Rev. Melvin Clark, a Mobile Housing Board commissioner, encouraged those in attendance to register to vote, then gave a closing prayer. The former mayor also alluded to campaign events thrown by Stimpson during the last election. “Now, I’m not going to tell you not to eat no hot dog,” Jones said. “I’m not going to tell you not to listen to no news, but what I’m going to tell you is don’t let it break your spirit … Everybody sees you eating a hot dog, but don’t nobody see you when you vote.” Stimpson won the 2013 election with 30,939 votes to Jones’ 26,699, according to certified election results, giving him nearly 54 percent of the vote. In total, 57,638 votes were cast in the election — about 4,000 more votes than were cast in the 2005 mayoral runoff election when Jones defeated John Peavy. But the current mayor looks to be a heavy favorite this go-round as he sports an enormous fundraising advantage and an approval rating of 73 percent, according to a survey conducted in May for WALA-TV by Strategy Inc.

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And though Jones’ early campaign rhetoric is heavily focused on motivating the city’s African-American majority to vote for him, the Strategy survey also reported that Stimpson has a 60 percent favorability rating among black voters and an 89 percent approval among white voters. Asked about a potential matchup between Stimpson and Jones, the surveyed 2,900 registered voters picked Stimpson 58 percent to 42 percent. The survey has a margin of error of plus or minus 2 percent.

“One Mobile”

Jones and supporters told the crowd during the announcement that they hadn’t seen much progress toward Stimpson’s “One Mobile” slogan in the nearly four years he’s been in office. Greg Harris said Jones would be the mayor to truly unite the city. “Sam Jones will, for once and for all, set a course to truly unite this city because it’s one thing to talk about ‘One Mobile;’ I mean, it sounds good,” he said. “It rolls off the tongue. It makes for a good slogan and a good catch phrase, but it’s a whole other thing to set a course and see it through.” Jones called the slogan a “cliche” and said he’d heard about it, but hadn’t seen much happen. “Anything real you should see,” he said. “You ought to be able to see it if it’s real.” In response to Jones’ announcement, Stimpson released a statement reaffirming his commitment to every community in the city. The mayor is attending the Paris Air Show this week with a statewide delegation of economic development officials. “Each day, my administration is committed to making sure every community has an opportunity to share in the momentum,” he wrote. “We’ve proven that the greatest level of success is achieved when everyone has a seat at the table. I’m looking forward to a discussion with Mobilians about all the progress we’ve made in my first term and everything we have in store for the future as we seek to become the safest, most business and family friendly city in America by 2020.”

The Trump factor

Jones and his supporters wasted no time attempting to connect Stimpson to national politics and Republican President Donald J. Trump, who visited Mobile twice before taking office in January. Jessica Norwood, who introduced Jones at the event, described national politics and Trump’s administration as a “darkness.” “There’s a darkness moving around this country and it

has settled in Mobile,” she said. “That is a fact that the connection between Washington D.C. comes all the way to Mobile … There’s a connection between the two. So, that darkness that you’re feeling, it got invited into Mobile and I’m here to say all we have to do is get it out.” Norwood told the crowd that Jones would “hold the line” against what’s happening in Washington. “I don’t know about you, but there’s only a few people I would trust, seasoned enough, a veteran — a real veteran — to stand on that front line and that’s Sam Jones,” Norwood said. “You’ve got to hold the line and push it back. That’s the job we have to do.” Jones himself took the current administration to task for its welcoming of Trump to the Port City. During the announcement, Jones referenced the city’s rentla of buses to help move visitors to Trump’s rally in and out of Ladd-Peebles Stadium in August 2015. He also mentioned the Christmas tree decoration used during Trump’s return trip last December. The city spent just over $16,000 for Trump’s campaign rally in August 2015. Roughly half of the total, or $8,125, was spent on the 14 buses. Taxpayers spent nearly $60,000 for the president-elect’s stop in Mobile in December for his “thank you” tour. The majority of the expenses came from overtime for Mobile police officers in the amount of $49,691.90. Mobile Fire-Rescue Department personnel overtime also accounted for $8,726.58. The public safety total of $58,418.48 was paid for by the city. Jones did not say how his administration would save on such safety expenses should the U.S. President visit Mobile again with him in the mayor’s seat. Jones also criticised members of Stimpson’s administration for having a tree cut down from a “city street” to decorate the stadium for Trump’s visit eight days before Christmas last year. The tree was cut down from a city park and former Chief of Staff Colby Cooper took the blame for the mistake. Cooper resigned shortly after the incident. Despite attempting to make connections between Stimpson and Trump, Jones, in a move reminiscent of something the current president might approve of, blamed local media for negative coverage of him since he left office in 2013. “At one time — for about a year or two — every time I picked up the paper, or watched television ‘well, Sam Jones did that’ — whatever was bad,” he said. “‘Sam Jones is responsible for that.’ I thought I might catch something good Sam Jones did on one newscast and I didn’t, so I stopped watching the six o’clock news.”

Jones’ platform

During the announcement, Jones hit the highlights of his two terms in office, claiming responsibility for luring ThyssenKrupp to north Mobile County and signing two agreements to bring the Airbus final assembly line to the Brookley Aeroplex. He added that he signed the agreement for the McGowin Park retail development as well. The state and a consortium of local governments offered tax abatements to help entice ThyssenKrupp to build a $5 billion facility in Calvert. However, according to a study published by the Manuel H. Johnson Center for Political Economy at Troy University, those incentives — worth about $800 million — cost the state and county much more than TK was able to generate, as of 2015. The plant has also changed hands. In addition, Jones said his administration built the last two new fire stations and he signed the agreement to expand Austal USA’s footprint. He also touted the city’s annexation of Mobile Terrace and Theodore as helping to expand the tax base. Jones said the tax base is currently shrinking under Stimpson because so many of Mobile’s workers live elsewhere. “People got those checks and drove back across the bayway,” he said. “If you wanted to determine why the revenue base is shrinking it’s because the workforce here is a third of the economy. It doesn’t take any rocket scientist


COVER STORY to know that.” Jones said an eroding tax base has made the “penny,” a 20 percent increase in Mobile’s sales tax first passed in Jones’ second term, worth less than it was when he was in office. While he was initially against keeping the tax increase on the books, even vetoing its addition to the budget, Stimpson’s administration has helped facilitate a capital improvement plan using the proceeds. Councilman Joel Daves and other councilors have applauded Stimpson on the program and the fiscal restraint it has taken to maintain its funding.

Downtown

Jones also believes the city should’ve supported BayFest to prevent it from going away due to a lack of funding. The former mayor said the loss of BayFest makes the city less competitive when it comes to tourism. “It was a mistake to let our music festival die,” he said. “Mobile was known throughout the country for it.” BayFest canceled its 2015 event due to lackluster ticket sales. The financial woes for the festival were a recurring problem. Total revenue for the festival in 2013, according to IRS disclosures, was $5.8 million with $3.5 million in expenses, but that year was buoyed by nearly $3.4 million in BP oil spill grants dumped into the festival’s coffers. Without the infusion, BayFest would have lost roughly $1.1 million in 2013, putting the festival’s cash reserves severely in the red. The city did support the festival, allocating $98,000 in both 2014 and 2015. In a previous story, Cooper told Lagniappe the city also provided “hundreds of thousands” of dollars to the festival in in-kind services. While BayFest no longer exists, this will be the third year for the free TenSixtyFive fest, which sprung up through the support of private money when BayFest organizers abruptly announced the festival wouldn’t happen. TenSixtyFive has taken over the early October weekend that was traditionally held by BayFest. The entertainment corridor also hosts SouthSounds annually, and that festival has grown rapidly over the past few years. While he distanced himself from the conception of the GulfQuest Maritime Museum of the Gulf of Mexico, Jones ran the city while construction of the building was underway. He said nobody could argue that the building itself was great. “On GulfQuest, we never got a chance to

get into the operations of it,” he said. He blamed “overly optimistic” management for a large part of the museum’s failure a little more than a year after it opened. Jones said he never believed the museum would attract some 300,000 visitors per year. In November, former GulfQuest Executive Director Tony Zodrow blamed the Jones administration for some of the museum’s financial woes. He said Jones and then-city attorney Larry Wettermark approached the museum board with a deal that would have GulfQuest assume nearly $2 million in building expenses in exchange for the city covering the nonprofit’s expenses at a later date. Zodrow said the board entered into the agreement, but was never reimbursed. Both Jones and Wettermark denied there was a loan agreement in place. Wettermark told Lagniappe in November that the agreement was to give the board any remaining money from a bond issue, but there was no money remaining. On GulfQuest, Jones said he would’ve stepped in to help more quickly than Stimpson did. “We can’t afford to give up on it,” he said. While the city and state have been working for years toward obtaining funding for the Interstate 10 bridge project over the Mobile River, Jones didn’t seem supportive. He said the project could potentially pull visitors out of downtown.

Cuts

During a short press conference following the announcement, Jones accused the Stimpson administration of making too many financial cuts. As an example, he told a gaggle of reporters the city should have done more to prevent 15 Place, a local homeless shelter, from closing. Many of 15 Place’s ancillary services were cut in February, Housing First Executive Director Eric Jefferson said at the time. He said 15 Place would remain open for intake and counseling. The organization asked the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development for additional funding this year, but was denied, Jefferson said. The services were estimated to cost around $186,000. At one time, the city did provide funding for 15 Place through a performance contract with Housing First, but that contract was canceled in 2015. In February, Councilman Levon Manzie asked Stimpson and council colleagues to provide 15 Place with a $162,000 performance contract, but nothing has been done yet.

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S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

NIGHTLIFE BEST ALL AROUND BAR A B C D E F

B-Bob’s Brickyard Callaghan’s Five Bar Haberdasher O’Daly’s

BEST BARTENDER A Adam Yunker, Royal Street Tavern B Alex Daniels, Boo Radley’s/Brickyard C Leon Weekley, B-Bob’s D Ricky Havens, Pour Baby E Robert Delmarter, Five Bar F Roy Clark, Haberdasher

BEST BARTENDERESS A Courtney Anthony, Butch Cassidy’s B Kara Bexley, Macaroni Grill C Sarah Smiley, Buffalo Wild Wing D Rachael Norris, Hayley’s E Susan Richardson, Pelican Pub F Tasha Tupa, Haberdasher

HOTTEST BARTENDER A Hunter Vanderlinde, Boo Radley’s/Brickyard B Jerry Grady, B-Bob’s C Michael Rashard Andrews, Buffalo Wild Wings D Rickey Havens, Pour Baby E Ricky Slayton, B-Bobs F Ross Fuentes, Tongue & Groove

HOTTEST BARTENDERESS A Gina Jo Previto, Veet’s B Jaimie Ramsey, O’Daly’s C Jana Padgett Dunn, Brickyard D Lindsey Bembry, Garage E Tori Caldwell, Haberdasher F Whitney Bealer, Butch Cassidy’s

BEST NEW BAR A B C D E F

Dority’s Eugene’s Monkey Bar Haberdasher Kazoola Le Bouchon Old Shell Growlers

BEST DIVE BAR A B C D E F

Garage Hayley’s Industry Pappa Buddha’s Veet’s Traders

BEST E-SHO BAR A B C D E F

Bone & Barrel Flybar Le Bouchon McSharry’s Pour Nelson’s Tongue & Groove

BEST WEMO BAR A B C D E F

Boondocks Cockeyed Charlies Crooked Martini Key West Lounge Patches Pour Baby

BEST MIMO BAR A B C D E F

Ashland Midtown Pub Butch Cassidy’s Mellow Mushroom - Midtown Old Shell Growlers Red or White Silverhorse Pub

BEST LODA BAR A B C D E F

Alchemy Tavern Garage Haberdasher LoDa Biergarten O’Daly’s OK Bike Shop

BEST SOMO BAR A B C D E F

Dority’s Fins Pelican Pub Pelican Reef The River Shack Zebra Lounge

BEST BEACH BAR A B C D E F

Anchor Bar & Grill FloraBama LuLu’s Pink Pony Pirate’s Cove The Hangout

BEST WINE BAR A B C D E F

Domke Market Firehouse Le Bouchon Pour Baby Red or White The Vineyard

BEST FANCY DRINK BAR A B C D E F

Five Bar Flybar Haberdasher Royal Street Tavern Sidecar Lounge Tongue & Groove

BEST AFTER-HOURS BAR A B C D

Alchemy Tavern Boo Radley’s Cockeyed Charlies Gabriel’s

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E Hayley’s F OK Bike Shop

BEST HAPPY HOUR BAR A B C D E F

Five Bar Flipside Garage LoDa Biergarten Merry Widow Wintzell’s

FAVORITE CRAFT BEER

THE PERFECT MARTINI

A Abita Andygator B Avondale Spring Street Saison C Fairhope Brewing Take the Causeway IPA D Fairhope Brewing Judge Roy Bean E Fat Tire F Haint Blue Brewing

A B C D E F

BEST E-SHO HAPPY HOUR FAVORITE IMPORT BEER A B C D E F

California Dreaming Manci’s McSharry’s Pour Nelson’s Sunset Pointe Top of the Bay

BEST SPORTS BAR A B C D E F

Baumhower’s Buffalo Wild Wings Heroes Hooters Island Wing Company Joe Cain Café

BEST COLLEGE BAR A B C D E F

Boo Radley’s Buffalo Wild Wings Heroes USA O’Daly’s Pat’s The Bar

BEST WATERFRONT BAR A B C D E F

Bluegill Pelican Pub Pirate’s Cove Sunset Pointe The Gulf Traders

BAR WHERE YOU ARE MOST LIKELY TO GET LUCKY A B C D E F

B-Bob’s Boo Radley’s Gabriel’s Hayley’s Saddle Up Saloon Tongue & Groove

BEST PLACE TO SHAKE YOUR BOOTY A B C D E F

B-Bob’s Boo Radley’s Brickyard Midnight Rodeo Saddle Up Saloon Veet’s

BEST GAY BAR A B C D

B-Bob’s Flipside Gabriel’s Midtown Pub

A B C D E F

Corona Dos Equis Guinness Modelo Red Stripe Stella Artois

FAVORITE DOMESTIC BEER A B C D E F

Bud Light Budweiser Coors Light Mich Ultra Miller Lite Yuengling

BAR WITH BEST TAP BEER SELECTION A B C D E F

Buffalo Wild Wings Draft Picks LoDa Biergarten Mellow Mushroom Montegos Old Shell Growlers

FAVORITE CASINO A B C D E F

Beau Rivage Golden Nugget Hard Rock IP Casino Palace Casino Wind Creek

BEST BAR BATHROOM A B C D E F

Haberdasher O’Daly’s OK Bike Shop Pour Baby Royal Street Tavern Tongue & Groove

BEST MARGARITA A Five Bar B Fuego C Fuzzy’s D OK Bike Shop (Dauphin St. Taqueria) E Taqueria Mexico F Tongue & Groove

BEST BLOODY MARY A B C D E F

Ashland Midtown Pub Brick & Spoon Five Bar Moe’s BBQ Pelican Pub Wintzell’s

Bonefish Grill Crooked Martini Haberdasher Royal Street Tavern Ruth’s Chris Sidecar Lounge

BEST BUSHWACKER A B C D E F

Fins FloraBama Moe’s BBQ Pelican Pub Pirate’s Cove Tacky Jack’s

BEST SPECIALTY COCKTAIL A Bordeaux Bourbon at Five Bar B Mexican Mule at Eugene’s Monkey Bar C Mississippi Old Fashioned at Haberdasher D Pineapple Jalapeno Margarita at Five Bar E Old Fashioned at Tongue & Groove F Weekend at Fernies at the Haberdasher

BEST BAR TRIVIA A B C D E F

Alchemy Tavern Blind Mule Buffalo Wild Wings Moe’s BBQ OK Bike Shop Tongue & Groove

BEST GENTLEMAN’S CLUB A B C D

Cookies-n-Cream Diamonds Lionz Den The Candy Store

SHOPPING AND SERVICES BEST OVERALL STYLIST A Amy Worley - Estetica B Holly Fountain - Salon DMH C Jason Chambers - Head Dress D Julia Liller - Salon West 5400 E Julie Burrus - Inspire F Taylor Westwood – Inspire

BEST SALON A Estetica B Harlow C Inspire Salon & Gallery D Salon West 5400 E Studio Bliss F Tami’s Mask & Mirror Studio

BEST COLORIST A Ashton Shirley - Solid

Rock Salon B Charlene Lindvink - Bliss Salon & Day Spa C Phrankey Lowery - Studio PH D Ryan Lawrence - Estetica E Tami Williams - Tami’s Mask & Mirror Studio F Destiny Andress – Vanity

SCISSOR WIZARD A Ryan Amacker - Salon West 5400 B Chasity Gray Largay Estetica C Laura Vendetti- Tami’s Mask & Mirror Studio D Brandi Hoover - Sanctuary Salon E Becca Maherg - Vanity F Lauren Holmquist - Salons by JC

BEST BARBER A Mike Edwards- Mike’s Barber Shop B Avis - Mayo’s Barber Shop C Charlene - Mayo’s Barber Shop D Dallas Jones Barber Shop E The Corner Barber Shop F Hillcrest Barbers

BEST MAKEUP ARTIST A Elizabeth Spence - Tami’s Mask & Mirror Studio B Valerie Floore C Carla Dames - Bliss Salon & Day Spa D Alexandrea West - Salon West 5400 E Ashley West F Lauren Kelley

BEST HOOHA WAXER A Anna Bishop - LA Bikini B Crystal Quattrone, Primp C LA Bikini D Elizabeth Spence - Tami’s Mask & Mirror Studio E Tera Shade - Bliss Salon & Day Spa F Jessica Stewart - Wax’d

BEST PLACE TO GET A MANI A Sarah ChesterBliss Salon & Day Spa B Estetica C Lily’s Nails D Royal Day Spa E Vivian’s F Old Shell Nails

BEST PLACE TO GET A PEDI A B C D E F

The Spa at the Battlehouse Maria’s Nails Lily’s Nails Venetian Nails Royal Day Spa Vivian’s


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

BEST ESTHETICIAN A Ashley Maynard- Spa at the BattleHouse B Tera Shade - Bliss Salon & Day Spa C Hanna Hogle - Sunrise Dermatology D Sarah Sheffield - Massage Envy E Amberjoy McLean- Medspa at the Park F Katie Davidson - Haley Dermatology

BEST DAY SPA A B C D E F

Spa at the BattleHouse LumaLife Therapy Massage Envy Medspa at the Park Lyons Elite Day Spa Nouveau

BEST MASSAGE THERAPIST

C D E F

Dr. Kitti Outlaw Dr. Christopher Park Dr. Randy Proffitt Dr. Stephen Sheppard

BEST FACELIFT DOC A B C D E F

Dr. Henry Barber Dr. James Koehler Dr. Michael Lyons Dr. Steve Martin Dr. Kitti Outlaw Dr. Christopher Park

BEST DERMATOLOGIST A B C D E F

Dr. Thomas Bender Dr. Kathryn Dempsey Dr. Dena Howell Dr. Amy Morris Dr. Ryan Ramagosa Dr. Scott VanLoock

BEST WEIGHT LOSS DOC

A Elements B Hannah Boltz C Heidi Pritchett - Above and Beyond Hot Yoga D Kelsea Tupa - Epione Massage & Bodywork E Massage Envy F Roderick Gibbs - Dynamic Orthopedic

A Dr. Lawrence Carpenter B Slim & Trim Medical Weight Loss C Dr. Quint Jardine D Dr. Patrick McGuire E Dr. Ruth Shields F Dr. William T. Urquhart

BEST TANNING SALON

BEST “DOC IN THE BOX” CLINIC

A B C D E F

LA Bikini Palm Beach Tan Soliel Nu Tiffany Tans Brush of Bronze Ultra Tanz

MOBILE’S BEST DOCTOR A B C D E F

Dr. Gamil Dawood Dr. Charla Evans Dr. Frank Hall Dr. Elizabeth Mathison Dr. Richard Oyler Dr. Jacob Webster

MOBILE’S BEST SPECIALIST A Dr. Daniel Cameron B Dr. Michael Do C Dr. John Hinton D Dr. Ron O’ Gorman E Rihner, Gupta, Grosz, Cardiology P.C. F Dr. K. Scott Saucier

BEST HOOHA DOCTOR A B C D E F

Dr. Quin A. Bixler Dr. Glenn T. Gallaspy III Dr. Lauren Lambrecht Dr. Patton Morrison Barton Dr. Max Rogers Dr. John Val-Gallas

BEST BOOB DOC A Dr. Charles Dyas B Dr. James Koehler

A Compass Urgent Care B Eastern Shore Urgent Care C Greater Mobile Urgent Care D Hillcrest Urgent Care E Immediate Care of the South F Urgent Care by the Bay

BEST BACK CRACKER (CHIROPRACTOR) A Dr. Ken Bishop B Dr. Cevin Cormier C Dr. Chris Corsentino D Liberation Chiropractic Clinic E Dr. Troy Lofton F Dr. Clarke Pradat

BEST DENTIST A Alabama Family Dental B Grelot Dental C Mobile Comprehensive Dentistry D Noblet Family Dental E Dr. Kristopher Portacci F Skyline Family Dental

BEST ORAL SURGEON A B C D E F

Dr. Charles Black III Dr. David Lairmore Dr. Rick Morgan Dr. Chris Mullenix Dr. Robert Pfeffle Dr. Greg Zieman

BEST GYM A B C D E F

Crew Fitness Hillcrest Fitbody Bootcamp Moorer YMCA Planet Fitness ProHealth Thomas Fitness Center

BEST CROSSFIT BOX A B C D E F

CrossFit Saraland CrossFit Spanish Fort JH CrossFit Mobtown Crossfit CrossFit Roadhouse CrossFit Jacked

BEST PERSONAL TRAINER A Emily Powell - ProHealth B Jennifer Savell - Thomas Fitness Center C John Seddon - Life Plus D Josh Foster- Josh the Trainer E LaJuan Black - Moorer YMCA F Braxton Gilbert

BEST VETERIANRIAN A Dr. Christopher Boudreau - Boudreau Veterinary Clinic B Dr. Jennifer Carney Rehm Animal Clinic Tillman’s Corner C Dr. Mary Katherine Cross - Old Shell Road Animal Hospital D Dr. Albert S. Gaston, Jr. E Dr. Roxy Leslie, Village Animal Clinic F Dr. Carl Myers, Theodore Veterinary Hospital

BEST PET GROOMER A Adorable Dos B Bella and Bows C Lola Bells D Glamour Paws E Dapper Dogs F Jeremy Henderson at The Waggy Tail

BEST FLORIST A All A Bloom B Lush C Flowers Etc. Daphne D Julia Greer Fobes Fashion Art Flowers E Belle Bouquet F Sarah Beth’s Florist

BEST WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHER A 3 Words Photography B Baylee Rae Photography C Katherine Thomason KatCo D SLR Photography E Elizabeth Gelineau F One Fine Day Photography

BEST YOGA STUDIO

BEST REAL ESTATE FIRM

A Above and Beyond Hot Yoga B Soul Shine Yoga C Sterling Hot Yoga D Synergy Yoga & Pilates E CORE Studio F Glow Yoga

A Roberts Brothers B Better Home & Gardens Real Estate Generations C Berkshire Hathaway D LLB&B E Port City Realty F The Cummings Company

BEST YOGA INSTRUCTOR A Shoshana Treichel, Above & Beyond Hot Yoga B Teddy Ward, Bikram Yoga C Jamie Ullock, Soul Shine Yoga D Annette Porter Ham, Yoga Alliance E Jennifer Guthrie, Glow Yoga F Sprite Wood, Sterling Hot Yoga

BEST MECHANIC/AUTO SHOP A Foreign & Domestic Autocare B Baehr’s Automotive C Advanced Collision D Buddy’s Service Center E Griffith Service Center F Mark McGugin

BEST CARWASH/DETAIL A B C D E F

Rich’s Bebo’s Down South Detail Ultra Carwash Zippy’s Alabama Auto Clean

BEST LAWYER IF YOUR SPOUSE IS A HO (DIVORCE) A B C D E F

Josh Boone Alison Herlihy Jerry Pilgrim Donald Briskman The Mims Firm Jessica Pilgrim

BEST LAWYER TO KEEP YOU OUT OF PRISON (CRIMINAL) A B C D E F

Art Powell Tom Walsh Donald Friedlander Jeff Deen Grant Gibson Buzz Jordan

BEST LAWYER TO SUE THE PANTS OFF SOMEONE (TRIAL) A Long & Long B John Leech, Warhurst Law C David J. Maloney, Maloney Frost D Greene & Phillips E Dean Waite F Rod Cate, Hand Arendall

BEST REALTOR A Angela Locklier, Berkshire Hathaway B Kevin Loper, Roberts Brothers C Sam Calderone, ReMax D Matt McAllister, Realty Executives E Marcile Sims & Karen Singleton, Synergy Realty Group F Catherine Mackey, LLB&B

BEST INSURANCE AGENT OR AGENCY A Bradley Flowers, Alfa B Donna Gatlin, State Farm C Advanced Insurance Company D Allison Horner, State Farm E Morgan Bradley, Alfa F Jonah Dismukes, Worthy Insurance Agency

BEST MORTGAGE BROKER/FIRM A Mortgage Team One B Craig Anderton, Bank Of England C Vince Hughes, Bryant Bank D New Horizons Credit Union E Jana Williston, Community Bank

BEST INVESTMENT BANKER/FINANCIAL PLANNER A Ryan Mahtani, BB&T Investments B James Eddins, Morgan Stanley C Coldsmith Ryder & Associates D Joseph Lomax, Morgan Stanley E Eric Rickey, Edward Jones F 5 Rivers Group, Morgan Stanley

BEST NEW CAR DEALER A B C D E F

Mullinax Bay Chevrolet Joe Bullard Palmer’s Toyota UJ Chevrolet Tameron Honda

A B C D E F

Keith Kingan MCD Motors Premier Motorsports Andrew’s Imports Carfinders Auto Outlet Tameron Honda

BEST CPA A Andy Cook, R. Andrew Cook, CPA B BJ Gilbert, Karen Simmons, PC C Karen Simmons, Karen Simmons, PC D John Bedsole, Kalifeh, Bedsole, Adams PC E Pat Bessonen, Wilkins Miller

BEST LANDSCAPER A Bay Landscaping B Sexton Lawn & Landscaping C Southern Landscape Solutions D Brian Griffin Landscape Co. E Barry Vittor Landscape Medic F Matt VanGieson, Premier Lawn Service

BEST CONTRACTOR/ HOMEBUILDER A B C D E F

Batten Builders Bo Wilder Contracting Robert Dueitt Construction Heritage Homes David Burks Fulcrum Construction

BEST INTERIOR DESIGNER A B C D E F

Augusta Tapia Mary Jo Matranga Randi Wilson Pat O’Neal Kade Laws Interior Design Catherine Arensberg

BEST HARDWARE STORE A Blankenship’s B Andrews Ace Hardware C Eastern Shore Ace Hardware D Springhill Ace Hardware E Wigman’s Ace Hardware F Dawes Ace Hardware

BEST PEST CONTROL A B C D E F

Aegis Pest Control BugMaster Cook’s Pest Control Kelly’s Pest Control Semmes Pest Control Xtreme Xterminating

BEST PET STORE A B C D E F

B&B Pet Stop Bella and Bows Dog Days Barkery PetSmart Pet Supplies Plus The Waggy Tail

BEST USED CAR DEALER

J u n e 2 2 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 2 8 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 33


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

BEST ANTIQUE STORE A B C D E F

Antiques at The Loop Backflash Antiques Charles Phillips To Arms Antiques The Brother’s Gallery Whitehouse Antiques

BEST MEN’S CLOTHING STORE A B C D E F

Alabama Outdoors D&K G Harvell Jos A Bank McCoy’s Metzger’s

BEST LINGERIE/ NAUGHTY SHOP A B C D

Gift Spot NT Video The Little Drawer Victoria’s Secret

BEST WOMEN’S BOUTIQUE A B C D E F

Ashbrooke Hemline Lotus Kenzlee Grace Pink Post Office Boutique Sweet Tea Boutique

BEST CLOTHING CONSIGNMENT STORE A B C D E F

Best Kept Secret Consignology Hertha’s Plato’s Closet Rave Reviews Second Edition

BEST DEPARTMENT STORE A B C D E F

Belk Dillards JC Penney Kohl’s Steinmart TJ Maxx

BEST FORMAL WEAR A B C D E F

Bella Bridesmaid D&K Fancy That Francia’s I Do Bridal Putting on the Rtiz

BEST ACCESSORIES/ AFFORDABLE JEWELRY A B C D E F

Emmaleah Boutique Francesca’s Gaudy Galz Knot Just Beads Private Gallery Versona

BEST FINE JEWELRY A B C D E F

Claude Moore Friedman’s Goldstein’s Goldart Karat Patch Zundel’s

BEST DRY CLEANERS A B C D E F

Dixie Cleaners Gulf City Cleaners Jaguar Cleaners Master Cleaners Paragon Waite’s

BEST HOME CLEANING SERVICE A 2 Gals & A Mop B Conde Cleaners C Helping Hands Cleaners D Maids A la Mode E Southern Style Quality Cleans F The Maids

BEST STATIONERY STORE A B C D E F

Gwin’s It’s Inviting JO Acree Paper Jubilee Soiree Signatures The Paper Menu

BEST OUTDOORS STORE A B C D E F

Academy Alabama Outdoors Bass Pro McCoy’s Quint’s Red Beard Outfitters

BEST LOCAL PHARMACY A B C D E F

Christopher Pharmacy Conwell Pharmacy Dawes Point Pharmacy Grand Bay Pharmacy Midtown Pharmacy Saraland Pharmacy

BEST SHOE STORE A B C D E F

Dillards DSW Fleet Feet Shoefly Shoe Station The Gallery

BEST GIFT SHOP A Bellingrath Gardens Gift Shop B Cypress Gift Shop at Five Rivers C Gaillard’s D Marcie N Me E Meggie B’s F Oak Ridge

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BEST HOME FURNISHINGS STORE A B C D E F

Atchison Home Designer Collection J&J Lush Sarah B. Atchison’s Villa Décor

BEST FURNITURE CONSIGNMENT SHOP A B C D E F

All Around the House Best Kept Secret Divine Consignment High Cotton Kaglen’s Something Special

BEST VAPE SHOP A B C D E F

Cloud 9 Vapes Deep South Vape Parlor Vapes Vapor’s Smoke Shop Vapor’s Outpost Vapor Hut

BEST BANK OR CREDIT UNION A Army Aviation Federal Credit Union B BB&T Bank C Coastal Bank and Trust D Community Bank E New Horizons Credit Union F Regions

BEST TATTOO ARTIST/ SHOP A B C D E F

AJ Ludlow CW Neese Kelly Pony Stephenson Kevin Black Sean Herman Suzette Callahan

BEST HOME SECURITY COMPANY A B C D E F

ADT Alert Protection Systems Allied Alarm Avid Home Security Hunter Security TSI Alarms

BEST BODY PIERCER A Chelsea Brown at Medusa’s B Keith Collins at Kaoz C Brett Garrick at Kaoz D Matt Hewett at Kaoz E Chad Reisenweber at Tattoo Town F Aaron Victory at The Bell Rose

KIDS

BEST KIDS’ CLOTHING STORE- NEW A B C D E F

Carter’s GiGi & Jay’s H&M Little Monkey Toes The Holiday Tiny Town

BEST KIDS’ CONSIGNMENT STORE A B C D E F

Carousel Kids Kids Klozet Kidz Kottage Kids Wearhouse Savvy Mom Sale Sweet Seconds

BEST KIDS’ ROOM FURNISHINGS A Just Baby Designs B Polka Tot Designs C Siegel’s Baby Room

BEST SUMMER CAMP A Bayside Academy Summer Camp B Gulf Coast Exploreum Summer Camps C Mobile Museum of Art Summer Art Camp D St. Luke’s Summer Camps E SunnySide Theater F USA Rec Center Summer Camp

BEST DAYCARE

B C D E F

Chick Fil A Chuck E Cheese Island Wing Company Mellow Mushroom Moe’s Southwest Grill

BEST BIRTHDAY PARTY PLACE A Gulf Coast Exploreum B Get Air C Pete’s Party Castle D Pump It Up E Sunshine Sue’s Play Garden F White Gates Farm

BEST PARK/ PLAYGROUND A Daphne Centennial Park B Fairhope Community Park C Langan Municipal Park D Lavretta Park E Medal of Honor Park F Spanish Fort Town Center Park

MOST KID-FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD A B C D E F

Inverness Jackson Heights Llanfair Ravine Woods Rosswood Sky Ranch

BEST KID-FRIENDLY LOCAL ATTRACTION

A Beck’s B Christ United Methodist Church Kidz Crossing C Dauphin Way Baptist D Springhill Baptist CDC E St. Mark’s F West Mobile Baptist CDC

A 5 Rivers Delta Resource Center B Bellingrath Gardens C Estaurium at Dauphin Island Sea Lab D Gulf Coast Exploreum E Gulf Coast Zoo F USS Alabama

BEST PRESCHOOL

BEST DANCE STUDIO

A Bridgeway Academy B Corpus Christi Catholic Preschool C St. Dominic Preschool D St. Luke’s Preschool E St. Paul’s EEC F Westminster Presbyterian Preschool

BEST MOTHER’S DAY OUT A Ashland Place B Christ United Methodist Church C Springhill Baptist MDO D St. Ignatius MDO E St. Mary MDO F Westminster MDO

MOST KID-FRIENDLY RESTAURANT A Buffalo Wild Wings

A Broadway South B Dance without Limits C Debbie’s School of Dance D Grace Dance Center E Sheffield School of the Dance F Turning Pointe Dance Academy

BEST PEDIATRIC DENTIST A Dr. Leslie Buckley, General Dentist for Kids, Teens and Young Adults B Dr. Gaines Thomas & Dr. Lauren Moore C Dr. Stephen Greenleaf D Dr. Kelly Jones, Malbis Pediatric Dentistry E Dr. Joel Welford and Dr. Marion McMurphy F Dr. Trey Fellers

BEST ORTHODONTIST

A B C D E F

Hicks & McMurphy Pickett Orthodontics Dr. Rosalyn Salter Dr. James Donaghey Dr. Brian Oliver Glass Orthodontics

BEST PEDIATRICIAN A B C D E F

Dr. Alfred Shearer Dr. Faye Roberts Dr. Karen Calametti Dr. Mary Wells Dr. Matthew Cepeda Dr. Robin McNair

BEST KID PHOTOGRAPHER A B C D E F

Cornerstone Photography Janie Long Photography Laura Cantrell Samantha Vickers Shane Rice Susanna Womack

BEST PUBLIC SCHOOL A Baker High School B Collier Elementary School C Eichold Mertz Magnet School D Mary B. Austin Elementary School E Phillips Preparatory School F Saraland City Schools

BEST PRIVATE SCHOOL A McGill-Toolen B Mobile Christian School C St. Luke’s Episcopal School D St. Paul’s Episcopal School E St. Dominic’s Catholic School F St. Mary’s Catholic School

COOLEST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER A Carey Arensberg, Hall Elementary B Elizabeth Partsch, ER Dickson C Laura Brand, St. Paul’s D Lisa Large, Collier Elementary E Nicole Baranov, Hutchens F Jessica Cassady, Gilliard Elementary

COOLEST MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHER A Jacqueline Richardson, Foley Middle School B La Toya Barnes, Phillips Preparatory School C Rosalie Hyatt, Grand Bay Middle D Peter Stoyka, Corpus Christi Catholic E Melanie Fromdahl, St. F Dominic’s G Hope Herren, Phillips Preparatory


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

COOLEST HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER A Brandi Richardson, St. Luke’s B Jeremiah Quattrone, Citronelle High School C Joe Arensberg, McGill D Margaret Delaney, UMS E Mike Stratas, Theodore High F Nathan Adams, Rain High School

CITY LIFE BEST MOBILIAN EVER A B C D E F

Eugene Walter Hank Aaron Jimmy Buffett Joe Cain The Peanut Man Uncle Henry

BEST MOBILIAN RIGHT NOW A B C D E F

Chief Slac IV Greg Jones, FTZC Jake Peavy Jonathan Frye Mayor Sandy Stimpson Ralph Hargrove

QUINTESSENTIAL MOBILIAN A B C D E F

Gary Cooper Herndon Inge Preston Griffith Reggie Copeland, Sr. Suzanne Cleveland Vivian Figures

MOST ELIGIBLE BACHELOR A B C D E F

Bennie Henderson Charles Matranga Eric Browne Jonathan Friedlander Mike Scalese Vaughan Blacksher

MOST ELIGIBLE BACHELORETTE A B C D E F

Hanna Hogle Liz Bush Morgan Mitchell Sable Williams Sarah-John Smith Suzanne Donaghey

COOLEST NEIGHBORHOOD - MOBILE A B C D E F

Copeland Island Florence Place Midtown Oakleigh Garden District Regency Rosswood

COOLEST NEIGHBORHOOD – EASTERN SHORE A B C D E F

Bellaton Cambron Fruit and Nut District Historic Malbis Olde Towne Daphne Osprey Ridge

BEST ANNUAL EVENT A Bellingrath Magic Christmas in Lights B Dauphin Street Beer Festival C Greater Gulf State Fair D Mardi Gras E MoonPie Drop F Senior Bowl

BEST ANNUAL FUNDRAISING EVENT A Fuse Project Dragon Boat Races B Junior League Christmas Jubilee C Little Black Dress - Ronald McDonald House D Salvation Army Mother Daughter Tea E St. Mary’s Crawfish and Bluegrass Extravaganza F Woofstock

BEST PLACE TO HOLD A RECEPTION/SPECIAL EVENT A B C D E F

23 East 5 Rivers BattleHouse Hotel Fort Conde Inn The Steeple Venue at Dawes

BEST HOTEL A B C D E F

BattleHouse Hotel Berney Fly Grand Hotel Hampton Inn Malaga The Admiral

BEST HIGH SCHOOL MARCHING BAND A B C D E F

Baker Davidson LeFlore McGill Mobile Christian Murphy High School

BEST MARDI GRAS PARADING SOCIETY A B C D E F

Conde Cavaliers Crewe of Columbus Infant Mystics LaShes Mystics of Time Polka Dots

BEST MARDI GRAS MARCHING SOCIETY A B C D

Dauphin Street Drunks Skeleton Krewe Society of Bums Wild Mauvillians

BEST MARDI GRAS BALL A B C D E F

Crewe of Columbus Fifty Funny Fellows Mobile Mystics Mystics of Time Polka Dots Osiris

BEST GOLF COURSE A B C D E F

Azalea City Golf Course Country Club Mobile Heron Lakes Magnolia Grove Spring Hill College Steelwood

MOBILE’S BUMPIEST STREET A B C D

Ann Street Glenwood Street Little Flower Avenue Old Government Street

COOLEST CHURCH OR HOUSE OF WORSHIP A B C D E F

Christian Life Church City Hope Gospel Way Church Grace Lutheran Harvest Church Wesminster Presbyterian

BEST CLERGYMAN/PASTOR/SPIRITUAL LEADER A Dr. Brett Burleson - Dayspring Baptist B David Mauldin - Westminster Presbyterian C Fr. John Lynes - Little Flower Catholic D Fr. Mark Neske - Holy Family Catholic E Patrick Casey - Christian Life Church F Wayne Miller - Grace Lutheran

BEST PLACE TO TAKE OUT-OF-TOWNERS (ATTRACTION) A B C D E F

5 Rivers Battleship Bellingrath Gardens Gulf Coast Ducks History Museum of Mobile Mobile Carnival Museum

BEST PLACE TO TAKE OUT-OF-TOWNERS (RESTAURANT) A Bluegill

B C D E F

Callaghan’s Dauphin’s Felix’s NoJa Wintzell’s

BEST COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY A Spring Hill College B University of Mobile C University of South Alabama

BEST JUNIOR COLLEGE/ TRADE/TECHNICAL SCHOOL A Bishop State B Blue Cliff College C Charles Academy of Beauty D Coastal Alabama Community College E Remington College F Virginia College

COOLEST APARTMENT COMPLEX - MOBILE

MUSIC BEST LOCAL BAND

BEST SOLO MUSICIAN

BEST NEW LOCAL BAND

BEST JAZZ MUSICIAN

A Camm Lewis & The Live Oaks B Red Clay Strays C The Disco Rednecks D Slide Bayou E The Marlow Boys F Yeah, Probably

A B C D E

BEST COUNTRY BAND/ PERFORMER

A Beamin’ B Clint ”Smitty” Smith C Derek “Truthseekah” Grosskurth D Mr. 88 E Phillip Baggins, Jr. F Pluto & Kid Kembi

A Bruce Smelley B Camm Lewis & The Live Oaks C Hannah McFarland D Holli Mosley E Last Call Rodeo F Muscadine Bloodline

COOLEST APARTMENT COMPLEX – EASTERN SHORE

BEST METAL/PUNK/UNDERGROUND BAND

A Arlington at Eastern Shore B Bay Breeze Apartments C The Colonnade

BEST MOVIE THEATER A Cobb Gulf Shores B Crescent Theater C IMAX at Gulf Coast Exploreum D Premiere Cinema 14 Spanish Fort E Wynnsong 16

BEST LOCAL COMPANY TO WORK FOR A Employee Fiduciary, LLC B Express Employment Professionals C FTZC D Rihner, Gupta & Grosz Cardiology, P.C. E West (formerly Televox) UJ Chevrolet

BEST BEACH RESORT/ CONDO A B C D E F

Caribe Holiday Isle Phoenix on the Bay Phoenix West The Wharf Turquoise Place

A Jamell Richardson B Lisa Mills C Ric McNaughton

A Infant Richard & The Delta Stones B Jimmy Lumpkin & The Revival C Paw Paw’s Medicine Cabinet D Stereo Dogs E The Mulligan Brothers F Underhill Family Orchestra

Four Seasons Marine Street Lofts Old Shell Lofts Stoneridge Tower on Ryan Park Village at Midtown

A B C D E F

BEST BLUES BAND/ARTIST

A B C D

A Sunday Fire Black Titan Curse the Flesh Hibachi Stranglers

BEST CLUB TO SEE LIVE MUSIC A B C D E F

Brickyard Callaghan’s O’Daly’s Soul Kitchen The Blind Mule The Merry Widow

BEST OUTDOOR BAR TO SEE LIVE MUSIC A B C D E F

Bluegill Dority’s Flora Bama Hangout OK Bike Shop The Frog Pond

BEST VENUE TO SEE LIVE MUSIC (NON-BAR) A B C D E F

IP Casino Saenger Theatre The Frog Pond The Listening Room The Steeple The Wharf

A B C D E F

Andrew Ayers Eric Erdman John Anthony Laurie Anne Armour Ryan Balthrop Phil Proctor

Blake Nolte Chip Herrington John Cochran Roman Street The Bodhi Trio

BEST RAP/HIP HOP ARTIST

BEST MUSIC/RECORD STORE A B C D E

Andy’s Music Bay Sound Dr. Music Mobile Records Picker’s Paradise

BEST LOCAL RECORDING STUDIO A B C D E F

Admiral Bean Dauphin Street Sound Day 6 Dogwood Grave Danger Studio H20

BEST GUITAR PLAYER A B C D E F

Chad Parker Corky Hughes Jimmy Gray Mike Jernigan Patrick Ramsey Phil Proctor

BEST AREA SINGER/ VOICE A B C D E F

Holli Mosley Jimmy Lumpkin Mike Jernigan Ross Newell Ryan Balthrop Symone French

J u n e 2 2 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 2 8 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 35


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

BEST AREA DRUMMER

BEST MUSEUM

A B C D E F

Bryan Ayers Cameron Alidor Chico McCollum Ethan Snedigar Tyler Goodwin Zach Lynd

A Bellingrath Gardens Museum B Eastern Shore Art Center C Gulf Coast Exploreum D History Museum of Mobile E Mobile Carnival Museum F Mobile Museum of Art

A B C D E F

Gabriel Willis Greg Crabtree Jamie Newsome Marc Hendrix Mario Rivera Owen Finley

BEST THEATRE GROUP

BEST AREA BASSIST

BEST PIANO PLAYER/ KEYBOARDIST A B C D E F

Alan Anderson Andrew Ayers Chris Spies Gene Murrell John Anthony Scott Morlock

BEST DRAG QUEEN PERFORMER A B C D E F

Amber Douglas Champagne Munroe Jawakatema Davenport Miss Cie Miss Loretta Venus Shante Da’Vis

BEST DJ (MIXIN’, MASHIN’UP KIND) A DJ Amanda Dean B DJ Blayze C DJ Leroy D DJ Lynch E DJ Mbezzle F DJ Mellly Mell (Melvin Sledge)

BEST AREA MUSIC FESTIVAL A 1065 Music Festival B Hangout Music Festival C SouthSounds Music Festival

ARTS BEST LOCAL PAINTER A B C D E F

Adam Underwood Ardith Goodwin Ben Kaiser Bonnie Fuchs Devlin Wilson Faye Earnest

BEST LOCAL SCULPTOR A B C D E F

April Livingston Bruce Larsen Casey Downing Bertice McPherson Lebaron Heathcoe Shawn Berdux

BEST LOCAL GRAPHIC DESIGN ARTIST A B C D E F

Amanda Pritchard Carl Norman Colby Jackson Hadley Binion Josh Holland Tripp Gustin

BEST MIXED MEDIA ARTIST A B C D E F

Ardith Goodwin Chris Cumbie Julia Greer Fobes Lucy Gafford Mateo Shawn Berdux

BEST ART GALLERY A Alabama Contemporary Art Center B Artology C Cathedral Square Gallery D CATS (Creative Artistic Treasures Studio) E Gallery 450 F Inspire

A Chickasaw Civic Theatre B Eastern Shore Repertory Theatre C Joe Jefferson Players D Mobile Theatre Guild E Playhouse in the Park F Sunnyside Theatre

BEST PLAY OR PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR A A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum - JJP B Beauty and the Beast - St. Paul’s Players C Complete Works of William Shakespeare - Chickasaw Civic Theatre D Sordid Lives - Mobile Theatre Guild E Sweeney Todd - JJP F The Producers – JJP

BEST LOCAL ACTOR A B C D E F

Chandler Smith Cory Olson Gene Murrell Griffin Hood Jason McKenzie Lisa Costa

BEST THEATRICAL SINGER A B C D E F

Chandler Smith Cory Olson Gene Murrell Jessica Head Terri Jackson Stacey Driskell

BEST ARTS EVENT A Artys B Eastern Shore Repertory Theatre on the Bluff C Fairhope Arts & Crafts Festival D LoDa Artwalk E Mobile Symphony Orchestra F Mobile Arts Council Throwdown

EATS & DRINKS BEST OVERALL RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Butch Cassidy’s Dauphin’s Dumbwaiter Felix’s Kitchen on George Ruth’s Chris

BEST LOCALLY OWNED RESTAURANT A Bayley’s Seafood Restaurant B Butch Cassidy’s C Felix’s D Osman’s E Pour Baby F The Noble South

BEST NEW RESTAURANT FINE DINING A Chuck’s Fish B Dumbwaiter on the Hill C Le Bouchon

BEST NEW RESTAURANT CASUAL A B C D

BJ’s Brewhouse FOY Fuzzy’s Taco Shop Nourish

36 | L AG N I A P P E | J u n e 2 2 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 2 8 , 2 0 1 7

E Roosters F Taziki’s

BEST CHAIN RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Chicken Salad Chick Foosackly’s Half Shell Oyster House Moe’s BBQ PF Changs Romano’s Macaroni Grill

BEST EASTERN SHORE RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Boudreaux’s Camellia Cafe Dragonfly Fairhope Inn R Bistro Sunset Pointe

BEST BEACH RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Cobalt Cosmo’s Fisher’s Flora Bama Yacht Club LuLu’s Miguel’s Beach’n Baja

BEST CHEF A Arwen Rice, Red or White B Bill Briand, Fisher’s C Bryan Cates, Kitchen on George D Chris Rainosek, The Noble South E Cortlandt Inge, Cortlandt’s F Weston Simpson, Pour Baby

BEST ATMOSPHERE A B C D E F

Bluegill Chuck’s Fish Dauphin’s NoJa Pour Baby Sunset Pointe

MOST INNOVATIVE MENU A B C D E F

Dragonfly Kitchen on George NoJa Saisho The Noble South Von’s

BEST OUTDOOR DINING A B C D E F

Bluegill Ed’s OK Bike Shop Sunset Pointe The Gulf The River Shack

BEST SWEET TEA A B C D E F

Chick Fil A Cream and Sugar Foosackly’s McAlister’s Raising Cane’s Spot of Tea

BEST BISCUITS A B C D E F

Biscuit King Briquette’s Cracker Barrel Cream and Sugar Dick Russell’s Hardee’s

BEST APPETIZER A Baked Avocado - Five Bar B Brussells Sprouts - Dumbwaiter C Crawfish & Spinach Dip Heroes D Dave’s Pimiento Cheese LeBouchon E Tuna Martini - Royal Scam F Uptown Shrimp - Chuck’s Fish

BEST ENTRÉE IN MOBILE A Chicken & Grits - Pour Baby

B Donkey on Crack Roll Chuck’s Fish C Hangar Steak - NoJa D LA Burger – Callaghan’s E Lamb Chops Gorgonzola - Osman’s F Shrimp & Grits - The Noble South

BEST HOME COOKIN’/ SOUL FOOD A B C D E F

Buck’s Diner Cozy Brown’s Judy’s Place Mama’s Mary’s Southern Cooking Redeemer Community Café

BEST FARM TO TABLE A B C D E F

FOY Kitchen on George Nourish Pour Baby Red or White The Noble South

BEST SERVER A Dominique Kline - Sunflower Café B Jocelyn Phillips - Pour Baby C Megan Baker - Butch Cassidy’s D Pat Ramsey - Felix’s E Robin Trainor - Cream and Sugar F Tommy Watts - Felix’s

BEST OVERALL SERVICE A B C D E F

Briquette’s Dauphin’s Felix’s Kitchen On George Ruth’s Chris Sunflower Café

BEST DESSERT A Blondie at Chuck’s Fish B Buttermilk Pie at Pour Baby C Chocolates at Fairhope Chocolate D Desserts at Cream & Sugar E Desserts at Delish’s Desserts F Key Lime Curd at Sunset Pointe

BEST RESTAURANT WINE LIST A B C D E F

Chuck’s Fish Kitchen on George Pour Baby Red or White Ruth’s Chris The Trellis Room

BEST WINGS A B C D E F

Baumhower’s Buffalo Wild Wings Butch Cassidy’s Island Wing Company Moe’s BBQ WeMo’s

BEST CHICKEN FINGERS A B C D E F

Buffalo Wild Wings Butch Cassidy’s Foosackly’s PDQ Raising Cane’s Zaxby’s

BEST ICE CREAM/ YOGURT/GELATO A B C D E F

Cammie’s Old Dutch Chill Dippin’ Dots Marble Slab Mr. Gene’s Beans Serda’s

BEST LUNCH SPOT A B C D E

Ashland Midtown Pub Café 219 Chicken Salad Chick Honey Baked Ham Regina’s Kitchen

F Rice Asian Grill & Sushi Bar

BEST EASTERN SHORE LUNCH SPOT A B C D E F

East Shore Café Panini Pete’s R Bistro Sandra’s Sunflower Café Windmill Market

BEST WINE/GOURMET SHOP A B C D E F

A la Cork Domke Market Firehouse Wine Red or White Le Bouchon Southern Napa

BEST BEER SELECTION RETAIL A B C D E F

Cottage Hill Package Store Domke Market Kathy’s Package Store Old Shell Growlers Rouse’s Southern Napa

BEST ANNUAL FOOD EVENT OR COOK-OFF A American Cancer Society Chili Cook-off B Bay Bites Food Truck Festival C Downtown Cajun Cook-off D Feeding the Gulf Coast Annual Chef Challenge E Greek Fest F Shrimp Festival

BEST FOOD TRUCK A B C D E F

Benjamin’s Crepe Crusaders Kraken Catering Company Smokin’ Gringos Von’s Will Hughes

BEST GUMBO A B C D E F

Chuck’s Fish Cream and Sugar Felix’s Mudbugs at the Loop Original Oyster House Wintzell’s

BEST PO-BOY A B C D E F

Ashland Midtown Pub Market by the Bay Mudbugs at the Loop R&R The Boiling Pot Wintzell’s

BEST SUSHI A B C D E F

Chuck’s Fish Fuji San Master Joe’s Liquid Lounge Rice Rock-n-Roll Sushi

BEST BAKERY A B C D E F

Bake My Day ellenJay Flour Girls Pollman’s Sally’s Piece of Cake Sugar Rush

BEST WEDDING CAKES A B C D E F

Cakes by Judi Couture Cakes ellenJay Flour Girls Pollman’s The Pastry Shop

BEST CATERER A B C D

Bay Gourmet Clifton Morrissette Creative Catering Georgia Roussos

E Naman’s F Tyners

BEST BURGER A B C D E F

Butch Cassidy’s Callaghan’s Five Guys LoDa Biergarten Mugshots Pirate’s Cove

BEST STEAK A B C D E F

Briquette’s Jessie’s Judy’s Place Osman’s Outback Ruth’s Chris

BEST SEAFOOD A B C D E F

Ed’s Felix’s Half Shell Oyster House JT’s Sunset Grill Ralph & Kacoo’s Wintzell’s

BEST BRUNCH A B C D E F

Ashland Midtown Pub Dauphin’s Five Grand Hotel Kitchen on George The Noble South

BEST ETHNIC RESTAURANT A 7 Spice B Ang Bahay Kubo C Mediterranean Sandwich Company D Rice E Sage Lebanese Cuisine F The Yak

BEST MEXICAN RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Fuego Hacienda San Miguel La Cocina Rio Roosters Taqueria Mexico

BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Café Grazie Carrabba’s Gambino’s Mirko Roma Via Emilia

BEST PIZZA A B C D E F

Ashland Midtown Pub Cortlandt’s Marco’s Mellow Mushroom Pizzeria Delphina Red or White

BEST COFFEEHOUSE A B C D E F

Carpe Diem Chaleur Cream and Sugar RedBar Satori Serda’s

BEST EASTERN SHORE COFFEEHOUSE A B C D E F

Fairhope Roasting Mr. Gene’s Beans Refuge Serda’s Soul Caffeine The Coffee Loft

BEST LOCAL GROCERY STORE A B C D E F

Cain’s Piggly Wiggly Fairhope Health Foods Food Pak Greer’s Old Shell Market Virginia’s Health Foods


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

BEST GROCERY CHAIN A Costco B Publix C Rouse’s D Super Target E Walmart Neighborhood Market F Winn-Dixie

BEST GOURMET GROCERY A B C D

Andree’s Domke Market Fresh Market Whole Foods

BEST PLACE TO GET LOCAL PRODUCE/ FOODS- MOBILE A B C D E F

Lil Brian’s Market on the Square Old Shell Market Sessions Farm Market Ted & Nancy’s Victory Teaching Farm

BEST PLACE TO GET LOCAL PRODUCE/FOODS – BALDWIN A B C D E F

Allegri Bee Natural Burris Country Wagon Hazel’s Seasons in the Sun

BEST BARBECUE RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Brick Pit Cotton State BBQ Dick Russell’s Dreamland Meat Boss Moe’s BBQ

BEST BARBECUE SAUCE A B C D E F

Brick Pit Cotton State BBQ Dreamland Meat Boss Moe’s BBQ Sonny’s

BEST RIBS A B C D E F

Brick Pit Dreamland Hickory Pit Too Meat Boss Moe’s BBQ Saucy Q

BEST RAW OYSTERS A B C D E F

Bluegill Felix’s Half Shell Oyster House Original Oyster House Ralph & Kacoo’s Wintzell’s

BEST TAKE AND BAKE

A B C D E F

Bay Gourmet Clark’s Kitchen Dream Dinners Jamie Roussos Papa Murphy’s Rae’s

BEST CUPCAKE A ellenJay B Flour Girls C Pollman’s D Sally’s Piece of Cake E Simply Sweet Cupcake Boutique F Something Sweet Bake Shop

BEST SEAFOOD MARKET A B C D E F

Mudbugs DIP Seafood Market by the Bay Mudbugs at the Loop Skinner’s Seafood Southern Fish & Oyster Springhill Avenue Seafood

BEST DRUNK FOOD A Buffalo Wild Wings B LoDa Biergarten C Mediterranean Sandwich Company D O’Daly’s Hole in the Wall E OK Bike Shop F Waffle House

BEST HANGOVER FOOD A B C D E F

Blind Mule Butch Cassidy’s Five Bar Foosackly’s Heroes Waffle House

MEDIA FAVORITE RADIO STATION FM A B C D E F

92 ZEW 92.1 95KSJ 94.9 FM Talk 106.5 K Love 98.3 WABD 97.5 WNSP 105.5

FAVORITE RADIO STATION AM A B C D

WNTM 710 WNGL Archangel 1410 WKTD 1440 WERM Gospel 1220

BEST LOCAL DJ A B C D E F

DJ Blayze - 93 WBLX Gene Murrell - WZEW Matt McCoy - 107.3 KISS FM Sean Sullivan - FM TALK Shelby Mitchell - WKSJ Tony Plosczynski – WZEW

BEST DJ TEAM A Dan & Shelby - WKSJ B Matt McCoy & Gossip

Greg - 107.3 KISS FM C Mark Heim and Lee Shrivanian - WNSP D Mobile Mornings - Sean Sullivan, Dalton Orwig, Kelly Jones FM TALK 106.5 E Murphy, Sam and Jodi Lite Mix 99.9 F Tim Camp & LeeAnn Camp TLC in the Morning

Kennedy & Creg Stephenson F Tee Time on the Gulf Coast - FM Talk 106.5

BEST LOCAL EVENING TV NEWSCAST A WALA FOX 10 B WKRG 5 C WPMI 15

BEST MORNING SHOW/DJ BEST LOCAL MORNING TV NEWSCAST A Mobile Mornings - Sean

Sullivan, Dalton Orwig, Kelly Jones FM TALK 106.5 B Bobby Bones - WKSJ C Elvis Duran - 107.3 KISS FM D Opening Kickoff with Mark Heim and Lee Shrivanian - WNSP E TLC in the morning with Tim & LeeAnn Camp WZEW F Uncle Henry – WNTM

DJ WHOSE VOICE LEADS YOU TO BELIEVE YOU MAY WANT TO SEE HIM NAKED A Dalton Orwig- FM Talk 106.5 B DJ Blayze - 93 WBLX C Gossip Greg - 107.3 KISS FM D Tony Plosczynski - WZEW E Twiggins- WABD F Uncle Henry – WNTM

DJ WHOSE VOICE LEADS YOU TO BELIEVE YOU MAY WANT TO SEE HER NAKED A B C D E

Jolene Roxbury - FM TALK 106.5 Kelly Jones - FM TALK 106.5 LeeAnn Camp - WZEW Mystic Marge WZEW Shelby Mitchell – WKSJ

BEST TALK RADIO HOST/ SHOW A Afternoon Drive - WNSP B Armed Alabama Radio FM TALK 106.5 C Midday Mobile - FM TALK 106.5 D Mobile Mornings - Sean Sullivan, Dalton Orwig, Kelly Jones FM TALK 106.5 E Today’s Homeowner - FM TALK 106.5 F Uncle Henry – WNTM

BEST SPORTS RADIO HOST/SHOW A Armed Alabama Radio FM TALK 106.5 B John Raciatti Golf Show - WNSP C Opening Kickoff with Mark Heim and Lee Shrivanian - WNSP D Paul Feinbaum - FM TALK 106.5 E Sports Drive with Randy

A WALA FOX 10 B WKRG 5 C WPMI 15

BEST ANCHOR A B C D E F

Bob Grip - WALA Devon Walsh - WKRG Kelly Foster - WPMI Lenise Ligon - WALA Mel Showers - WKRG Sarah Wall – WALA

BEST METEOROLOGIST A B C D E F

Alan Sealls - WKRG Chris Dunn - WPMI Jason Smith - WALA John Nodar - WKRG Kelly Foster - WPMI Michael White – WALA

BEST TV INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER A B C D E F

Andrea Ramey - WPMI Chad Petri - WKRG Christian Jennings - WPMI Kati Weis - WALA Peter Albrecht - WKRG Renee Dials – WALA

FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE WRITER A B C D E F

Andy MacDonald, Cuisine Dale Liesch, Reporter Jason Johnson, Reporter Jeff Poor, Beltway Beat Kevin Lee, Arts Mark Bryant, Sports

FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE COVER STORY A Dethroned by Lee Hedgepeth B Hooked by Jason Johnson C One Mobile by Jason Johnson and Dale Liesch D That’s a Wrap by Dale Liesch E Shell Game by Jason Johnson F Arty Awards by Kevin Lee

FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE COVER IMAGE A Nappies 2016 By Dan Anderson B Dethroned by Dan Anderson C Hooked by Laura Rasmussen D Belt Tightening by Laura Rasmussen E 1065 Illustration by Laura Rasmussen F Shell Game by Dan Anderson

FAVORITE AL.COM CONTENT CREATOR A B C D E F

John Archibald JD Crowe Jared Boyd Kyle Whitmire Michelle Irvin John Sharp

FAVORITE GLOSSY BEST SPORTS COVERAGE MAGAZINE A Joe Emer - WALA B Lance Crawford - WPMI C Randy Patrick - WKRG

BEST WEEKEND TV NEWS TEAM A WALA FOX 10 B WKRG 5 C WPMI 15

HOTTEST LOCAL TV NEWSMAN A B C D E F

Greg Peterson - WPMI Darwin Singleton - WPMI Jason Smith - WALA JB Biunno - WKRG Michael White - WALA Peter Albrecht – WKRG

HOTTEST LOCAL TV NEWSWOMAN A B C D E F

Alexa Knowles - WALA Chasity Byrd - WALA Devan Coffaro - WALA Devon Walsh - WKRG Jessica Taloney - WKRG Kelly Foster – WPMI

A B C D E F

Access Due South Exalte Mobile Bay Monthly Mobile Bay Parents Mobile Mask

FAVORITE LOCAL WEBSITE OR BLOG A Arrested in Mobile B Lemon Baby by Amanda Gibson C Mod Mobilian D Refresh Restyle by Debbie Westbrook E Southern Rambler F When Life Hand You Grapes by Michelle Murrill

BEST LOCAL TV AD A American Carpet B David J. Maloney C Greer’s D Joe Bullard E Mike Slocumb, Alabama Hammer F Wind Creek Casino

POLITICOS HARDEST WORKING OFFICIAL MOBILE A City Attorney Ricardo Woods B Executive Director or Planning & Development Dianne Irby C Finance Director Paul Wesch D Mayor Sandy Stimpson E MPD Chief Lawrence Battiste F Public Safety Director James Barber

HARDEST WORKING MOBILE CITY COUNCILPERSON A Bess Rich B Gina Gregory C Levon Manzie

HARDEST WORKING ELECTED OFFICIAL MOBILE COUNTY A Commissioner Connie Hudson B Commissioner Jerry Carl C Commissioner Merceria Ludgood D District Attorney Ashley Rich E Judge Jill Phillips F Sherriff Sam Cochran

HARDEST WORKING ELECTED OFFICIAL BALDWIN COUNTY A Daphne Mayor Dane Haygood B Fairhope Mayor Karin Wilson C Spanish Fort Mayor Mike McMillan D Commissioner Frank Burt E Commissioner Tucker Dorsey F Sherriff Hoss Mack

HARDEST WORKING LOCAL STATE LEGISLATOR A B C D E F

Rep. Bill Hightower Rep. David Sessions Rep. Napoleon Bracy Rep. Victor Gaston Sen. Rusty Glover Sen. Vivian Figures

WHO WILL BE THE NEXT GOVERNOR OF ALABAMA? A B C D E F

Bradley Byrne Kay Ivey Roy Moore Rusty Glover Twinkle Cavanaugh Walt Maddox

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ART ARTIFICE

Red Cup artist pushes as hard as he can BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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he June ArtWalk crowd at Mobile Arts Council was captivated by artist Conz8000’s exhibit. It’s not the first buzz he’s made with his work, but it was a bang that almost did him in. No metaphor — the noise was a head-on collision with a truck on Moffett Road just a week before his opening. Conz said it totaled the car, “pushed the motor in” on the passengers and the odor of imminent explosion arose. “When I opened the door, all I saw was tombstones. I’m thinking I’m dead, but he hit us right in front of a monument and headstone business,” Conz quipped. The accident crimped his exhibit plans. He wasn’t able to include some sculptures, some customized shoes, a few paintings ... but what was there was plenty. His images implied the storyline: a young girl in a post-apocalyptic Mobile scavenging for life and love. There was enough allusion to action and enough mystery between story segments that imagination and mystery became dominant elements. The style was obviously derived from comic work and graphic novels. It was easy to see through subtleties of form, composition and hue the artist is talented. “I’ve been drawing all my life, oil painting, sculpting, making vases, all kinds of stuff. I went to Mary B. Austin, Dunbar, LeFlore High School. I took after-school classes. They had a thing called ‘Culture Black & White’ that was at Bishop State and I took classes down there,” Conz said.

He credits his grandmother as a pillar of support. His goal then was to work at Disney. Shortly after high school, Conz fell in love with music. He pushed visual art aside for about a dozen years as his drive and frustration put him on the road. Conz and his cousin FDR hit the ATL. They brought equipment with the intention of building a studio but the visual muse whispered to Conz. She finally coaxed him homeward. About the time he returned to Mobile, what Conz saw on Instagram spurred him further. Artists built vast networks around the globe and where ideas were the currency of relevance and acclaim. That’s how he met another Mobile artist, Diplomat. “Long story short, we end up linking up and we had the same vision, same ideas and trying to go the same direction. I was working [as a tattoo artist] at Medusa’s Art and Soul Diplomat walked in and was like ‘I really want you to help me build this brand, this Red Cup Revolt,” Conz said. Both men wanted to recreate what they saw in Atlanta, a surge in attention for those outside the usual artistic circles. They saw opportunity wasted. “There’s not like street art or urban art. Everything’s kind of the same down here, but there’s so much more to art, a whole other side. Art doesn’t have to be political and edgy or whatever but there’s so much more than just trees and beach scenes and flowers,” Conz said.

MAC awards grants

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THE JUNE ARTWALK CROWD AT MOBILE ARTS COUNCIL WAS CAPTIVATED BY ARTIST CONZ8000’S EXHIBIT. IT’S NOT THE FIRST BUZZ HE’S MADE WITH HIS WORK, BUT IT WAS A BANG THAT ALMOST DID HIM IN. ” For Conz, there may be more tangible results. He just has to find the time. “I’ve got one graphic novel that is about 75 percent done and it looks more like ‘Akira’ or ‘Ghost in the Shell.’ I’ve got stories for about 10 more so I need to find help. I’ve been trying to go recruit a lot of younger artists in Mobile because I know they’re here and not seen,” Conz said. Through auto accidents, home burglaries and other setbacks, Conz’s determination remains. “I just turned 37. This life only happens once that I know of so I’m going hard to put my stuff out there,” Conz said.

For more questions regarding arts grants, contact program director Lucy Gafford at lgafford@mobilearts.org.

Screen printing workshop at USA

AIGA Mobile joins forces with the University of South Alabama’s Matt Hopson-Walker to explore photo emulsion screen printing at a June 24 workshop. Things get underway at 10 a.m at the USA Visual Arts Building (399 N. University Blvd.). Participants will learn every step of the process and print their own T-shirt at the day’s close. Participants must bring their own light-colored T-shirt. The workshop runs until 2 p.m.; lunch is provided. Cost is $35 for AIGA members and students, $45 for non-members. Pre-registration is required as only 15 spots are available. For more information, call 251-461-1438.

Six-string jazz review on tap

Though jazz is most closely associated with the saxo-

phone, the guitar has earned its place as well. Modern technology has given it incredible versatility, an ability to quickly assume countless voices and fit seamlessly into a panoply of styles. John Cochran will take listeners on a tour of various guitar stars when MOJO presents a “Galaxy of Guitar Jazz” for its monthly jambalaya series on Monday, June 26, at 6:30 p.m. at Gulf City Lodge (601 State St.). Cochran will front The Bodhi Trio — including bassist JoJo Morris and drummer John Milham — and be joined by guest saxophonist Rebecca Barry as they cover work by masters such as Django Reinhardt, Charlie Christian, Jim Hall, Wes Montgomery, Grant Green, John Scofield, Pat Metheny, Bill Frisell and Kurt Rosenwinkel. Entrance is $15, $12 for students/military and $10 for members. Entrance includes a light jambalaya dinner and a cash bar is available. For more information, call 251-459-2298, email mobilejazz@bellsouth.net or go to mojojazz.org.

ARTSGALLERY

The Mobile Arts Council announced four winners of new $1,000 grants available for member artists or organizations that have not previously received funds from MAC. The umbrella group took in a total of 19 applications from various organizations, crafters, graphic designers, photographers, musicians, theaters, visual artists and videographers. A panel of professional artists and educators selected the following winners: • Photographer Karen Bullock • Quilter Nancy Goodman • Musician/composer Peter Kohrman • Nonprofit organization the Mystic Order of the Jazz Obsessed (MOJO). Recipients are free to use the funds in any way they see fit. OJO has its grant earmarked for a July 29 children’s education program in conjunction with the Mobile Public Library. MAC said in its press release it “strives to make this an ongoing service.”

So what’s with the name? What’s the Red Cup about? “People come together at house parties or events, they always have the red cups in their hands. Usually when you have the red cups out, it’s a diverse crowd,” Conz said. In that light, the cup is a signifier of a union of minds. The movement has built momentum. Red Cup Revolt gathered more artists and has had a pair of shows: a 2016 affair at the Ultra Lounge and another in May 2017 at Alabama Contemporary Art Center. The collective’s most visible product was the elaborate mural on the building at 401 Dauphin St., an effort that likely landed them their 2017Arty Award nomination. Of their members, Conz has the current individual show at MAC. Noelle Goodson has designed posters for area festivals and previous nominations for Best Artist in readers choice awards.


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FEATURE

MUSIC

Get Smart

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

Band: Jesse Daniel Edwards, The Smart Brothers Date: Thursday, June 29, 8 p.m. Venue: Callaghan’s Irish Social Club, 916 Charleston St., www.callaghansirishsocialclub.com Tickets: Call 251-433-9374 for more info

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Lou the ins and outs of the music business. They learned to book their own shows as well as act as their own publicists. They also benefited from a connection made with John Prine’s longtime manager, Al Bunetta, who placed the two growing songwriters in the midst of a group of Music Row professionals. During the sessions, Jay and Lou learned songwriting techniques they still use. “[Music Row songwriters] churn out material and know what sells,” Smart said. “They look at it like sanding down a chest of drawers [rather] than the ‘Mona Lisa.’ That was a formative experience for us. It helped us formulate a process that works for us and made us professional writers.” Even though their music career was gradually thriving, The Smart Brothers became disillusioned with their endeavors. Their financial dependence on live performances left them bewildered as to how and when to take the next step in their musical career, either with a studio album and/or a label deal. Jay Smart says their frustration began to seep into their music, replacing optimistic subject matter and arrangements with reflections on the stress of road life away from family and friends, matched with tense “chord structures.” Eventually their love affair with music began to fade. “It was so hard trying to figure out what we wanted to do with it,” Smart explained. “We were pretty young. We learned that the greatest takeaway was the craft of songwriting and being professional, but coming full circle, it was about loving and enjoying music again. It got lost in the mix.” The Smart Brothers quietly left the madness of the road and slowly shifted back to more stable surroundings. However, they have maintained busy daily schedules. Jay says when his brother Lou isn’t spending time with his wife and children he distributes a “vegan, gluten-free” form of hummus made from nuts. Since starting this venture, Lou has gone from selling his food products at farmer’s markets to distribution in major grocery stores. Jay continues to work in the music business behind the scenes. He says he spent years as Morrissey’s tour manager.

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Photo | Facebook

hile Callaghan’s hosts a wide variety of musicians, Americana has remained a staple for the neighborhood pub. Several years ago Nashville duo The Smart Brothers debuted at Callaghan’s, introducing the Azalea City to their classically influenced folk sounds. Jay and Lou Smart won over the crowd with their acoustic-based harmonic sermons forged from life experience. As they grew in popularity across the Southeast and beyond, The Smart Brothers regularly included Callaghan’s in their rigorous tour schedule. But after several years, their regular Mobile performances unexpectedly ceased — until now. Jay and Lou Smart will return to Callaghan’s June 29 for an evening of smooth Americana and new material reflecting where they’ve been for the past few years. Lagniappe went to Jay Smart for an explanation of The Smart Brothers’ sudden departure, which has its roots in the band’s early days. When the duo started, Jay says, he and his brother built their project on a foundation that began with busking and later moved to the stage. As they grew in popularity, The Smart Brothers realized it would be more profitable to focus on live performances than recorded material. Eventually, the duo established a rigorous tour schedule Jay says included “270-odd dates a year from Florida to Virginia and all around the Southeast and the West Coast.” Their efforts to finance their lives through music forced the brothers to remain on the road, with little time for the studio or their family and friends. “Playing live, especially with low-key genres, is a good way to make money,” Jay Smart said. “The hard part is that you have to be at every show. You’ve got to be ready every show to leave all onstage and bring it. So we got pigeonholed into having to perform. We were a live band. We didn’t have many recordings. The opportunities that we got were all live. We weren’t getting any other opportunities in other aspects of music. It was grueling for a few years.” Jay admits the duo’s time on the road was educational. Their DIY regimen taught both Jay and

Brothers Jay and Lou Smart went on hiatus after a rigorous touring schedule left little time for friends and family. While their touring has stopped, neither brother has made a complete departure from performing. Currently, the brothers are cutting a record, with Tom Petty & the Heartbreakers bassist Ron Blair as producer. Jay and Lou’s younger brother, Harrison, is providing the drums for this album. According to Jay, the time off from performing has resulted in new material he describes as “good or better than anything you’ll hear.” He also likens the sonic quality of this next step in the musical evolution as “reminiscent of the Eagles.” Ultimately, Jay credits their time off as one of the biggest benefits to both their songwriting and their work ethic. “We’re using everything that we’ve learned with The Smart Brothers in the past,” said Smart. “Now that we have the know-how, we want to apply it. We have a little bit of hardearned wisdom. There’s always more to learn, because everything is changing all the time.” With the duo older and wiser, Jay says the upcoming months will serve as a “set-up year” for The Smart Brothers. Once the album is completed, the two will use their knowledge to take their new material into unfamiliar realms. Jay assures those familiar with their previous work they won’t be disappointed with the new material. Their new album will maintain the heart and soul Jay and Lou skillfully extract from daily life. “You have to live a pretty full life to have anything to write about,” said Smart. “Writing comes from that. We’ve been doing the same things as always but more grown-up. We’ve got families and jobs and things like that.”


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MUSIC BRIEFS

Up and comers

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

Photo | Facebook | Acid Tongue

Band: Acid Tongue, Universal Sigh, Deluna • Date: Friday, June 23, with doors at 9 p.m. Venue: The Blind Mule, 57 N. Claiborne St., www.theblindmule.net Tickets: $5 (age 21+)/$10 (age 18+)

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ver the years, The Blind Mule has opened its arms to many new and up-and-coming alt. rock acts, both touring and local. This cozy venue has become a launching pad for many bands. For this show, an Azalea City group will be hosting two out-of-towners. Judging from their respective sounds, the lineup should feature an eclectic mix of music from three very different bands. Pulling influence from Brooklyn and Seattle, Acid Tongue’s infectious sound is a chaotic

conglomeration of retro sounds. Their garage style mixes elements of surf and psychedelic rock and cuts it with an onslaught of raucous classic soul. Universal Sigh from Athens, Georgia, will bring its intricate mellow prog rock from one of the Southeast’s most iconic music scenes, performing tracks from “Atoms & Void,” its latest album. Mobile band Deluna specializes in alt. rock sounds accented by ethereal grandeur, as captured on its debut, “Moogley Boogley.”

Remembering Ben

Band: Ben Walls Memorial Jam Date: Sunday, June 25, with doors at noon • Venue: The Garage, 9 S. Washington Ave., 251433-2223 • Tickets: $10 at the door Ben Walls was a man who appreciated life. This familiar face on the downtown scene filled his days with his wife, Noretta, his boat and his friends. After losing his battle to colon cancer, Walls’ wife, his family, his close friends and numerous local bands decided to memorialize his life in the name of philanthropy through the Ben Walls Memorial Jam. Proceeds from this annual event traditionally are dedicated to an individual struggling with a life-threatening medical condition. This year’s jam is dedicated to Leigh Ankerson Bailey, a 39-year-old wife and mother battling stage 4 internal melanoma. The musical entertainment for this charitable event is a versatile mix of local notables representing a variety of styles.

The Harrison McInnis Trio will bring its quality brand of smooth grooves. McInnis’ bandmate from Slide Bayou, Ryan Balthrop, is also featured on the bill. With this in mind, the crowd can probably expect some collaborative jams between the two. Last Call Rodeo and Red Clay Strays will add a little country charm to the mix. Day of the Iguana alum Roy Truxillo will be joining Brian Adam’s Family Band for a set. Mother Mojo will rock out with crowd favorites and original songs such as “Into the Abyss.” Stereo Dogs will complete this year’s jam. These young rockers will use their musical prowess to prove why they remain a beloved group on the local scene.

Dynamic duo

Band: The Dukes Date: Sunday, June 25, with doors at 8 p.m. Venue: Alchemy Tavern, 7 S. Joachim St., 251-441-7741 Tickets: Free

Alchemy Tavern is bringing a taste of Van’s Warped Tour 2017 to downtown Mobile for an evening of free entertainment from a unique musical project — The Dukes. These days, guitar/drum duos are not uncommon, but this French duo has turned the combination into a sonic war machine that inundates, both visually and aurally. Francois “Shanka” Maigret and Greg Jacks bring rock fury, accenting their live set with a wave of

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light and animation. While the band prepares for their next release, the band’s sound can be sampled through their last album, “Smoke Against the Beat.” Each song is a raucous mix of raw, grimy guitars and intense drum beats. The Dukes take this sound into another world with volley after volley of electronic and ambient goodness. Their show at Alchemy Tavern will not be for the faint of heart.


AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | June 22 - June 28

THUR. JUNE 22

Alchemy— WBA After Hours Networking, 5p Bluegill— Hannah McFarland Blues Tavern— George Eberlien Trio, 8:30p Callaghan’s— Lee Yankie Cockeyed Charlie’s— JJ Dority’s Bar and Grill— Johnny Hayes Trio Felix’s— Delta Reign Flora Bama— Brittany Grimes, 2p// Reed Lightfoot, 5p/// Dueling Pianos, 5:30p//// Den Sutton Band, 6p//// Mark Sherrill, James Daniel, Chris Newbury & Mel Knapp, 6p//// Karen Waldrup, 10p//// Mario Mena Duo, 10:15p//// Jay Williams Band, 10:30p Hangout— The Perry Wall, 6p// Scoot and Jeremy, 10p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — West Story Road, 8p Listening Room— Caroline Gray Lulu’s— Adam Holt Duo, 5p McSharry’s— Rondale and The Kit Katz, 7:30p Old 27 Grill— Craig Brayer, 6:30p SanBar— Krissta Allen Duo Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Mart McIntosh, 6p Wind Creek Casino— Mickey Utley, 8p

FRI. JUNE 23

All Sports Bar & Billiards— DJ Markie Mark, 10p Beau Rivage— Charlie Wilson, 8p Blind Mule— Deluna the Band / Acid Tongue, 10p Bluegill— Lee Yankie, 12// Matt Neese Duo, 6p Blues Tavern— Johnny Barbato & The Lucky Doggs, 9p Cockeyed Charlie’s— DJ Chill Dority’s Bar and Grill— Vickie Bailey Duo Felix’s— Blind Dog Mike Fin’s— The Brett LaGrave Band, 8p Flora Bama— Jay Hawkins Trio, 1p// LeaAnne Creswell Duo, 2p/// Logan Spicer, 4p//// Jason Justice Duo, 5p//// Jack Robertson Show, 5:30p//// Oliver’s Twist, 6p//// Sugarcane Jane, 6p//// Sam Glass Duo, 9p//// Karen Waldrup, 10p//// Brian Hill Trio, 10:15p//// Lee Yankie and the Hellz Yeah, 10:30p Hangout— Philo, 6p// Ja’Rhythm, 10p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Phil Vaught, 9:30p IP Casino— Paul Anka, 8p Listening Room— The Kit Thorn Band Lulu’s— CoConut Radio, 5p Main Street Cigar Lounge— Category $, 8p McSharry’s— DJ Tiger, 10p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Jeri, 8p Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Reed Lightfoot, 6p

Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Lefty Collins, 6:30p O’Daly’s— Gene Murrell, Tony Edwards and David White, 10p Old 27 Grill— Chad Austin Parker, 6:30p SanBar— Scott Koehn/Lisa Zanghi Duo Soul Kitchen— Riley Green, Channing Wilson, 9:30p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Jimmy Lee, 12p// Soul Food Junkies, 6:30p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Hippy Jim Duo, 6p Wind Creek Casino— Mickey Utley, 9p

SAT. JUNE 24

Bluegill— Bruce Smelley, 12p// Fat Lincoln, 6p Blues Tavern— John Hall Trio, 9p Callaghan’s— Los Colognes Cockeyed Charlie’s— DJ Chill, 10p Dority’s Bar and Grill— Eric Erdman Felix’s— Bust Fin’s— Sugarcane Jane, 2p Flora Bama— Brian Hill Trio, 1p// JoJo Pres, 1p/// Big Muddy, 2p//// Dave McCormick, 4p//// Brandon White, 5p//// Jack Robertson Show, 5:30p//// Karen Waldrup, 6p//// Last Honky Tonk, 6p//// Adam Brown Duo, 9p//// Logan Spicer & Tony Ray Thompson, 10:15p//// Foxy Iguanas, 10:30p Hangout— Philo, 6p// Greg Lyon, 10p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Phil Vaught, 9:30p Hard Rock (Live) — Vince Neil of Motley Crue, 8p Listening Room— Frankie Boots Lulu’s— Hundred Dollar Car, 5p McSharry’s— DJ Lewis, 10p The Merry Widow— Big Deal Burlesque ft. Roxie Le Rouge, 10p Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Reed Lightfoot, 6p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Stephen Sylvester Duo, 6:30p Old 27 Grill— Christina Christian, 6:30p SanBar— Malcolm Bond Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Three Bean Soup, 6p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Beave and Cleave, 11a// Melissa Joiner Trio, 6p Top of the Bay— Whyte Caps Wind Creek Casino— Mickey Utley, 9p

SUN. JUNE 25

Alchemy— Fat Lip, 3p// The Dukes, 8p Bluegill— Quntin Berry, 12p// Heritage Band, 6p Blues Tavern— John Hall Trio, 6p Callaghan’s— Seth Walker Dority’s Bar and Grill— Slide Bayou Felix’s— Bobby Butchka

Fin’s— Jerry Smith, 3p Flora Bama— Foxy Iguanas, 12p// Al and Cathy, 1p/// Jason Justice, 1:30p//// Kyle Wilson Duo, 2p//// Reed Lightfoot, 2p//// David Dunn, 5p//// Lucky Doggs, 5:30p//// Josh Hoyer & The Soul Colossal, 6p//// Perdido Brothers, 6p//// Whyte Caps, 10p//// Alabama Lightning, 10:15p Golden Nugget— Asian Show Hangout— Ben Loftin and the Family, 6p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Jason Turner Band, 8p Listening Room— Sally Barris Lulu’s— Greg Brown, 1p// Delta Reign Duo, 5p McSharry’s— Trad Irish Music Session, 6:30p Old 27 Grill— Lisa Zanghi, 1:30p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Lisa Christian, 2p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Melissa Joiner Duo, 12p// Jimmy Lee Hannaford, 6p

MON. JUNE 26

Big Beach Brewing— Cornbred, 6:30p Felix’s— Chris Hergenroder Flora Bama— Founders and Friends, 2p// Lee Yankie, 5p/// Wilson, 5:30p//// Cathy Pace, 6p//// 100 Dollar Car, 10p//// Petty and Pace, 10:15p Hangout— The Good Looking, 6p// Whyte Caps, 10p Lulu’s— Brent Burns, 5p

TUE. JUNE 27

Bluegill— Quntin Berry Butch Cassidy’s— Jimmy Lee Hannaford Cockeyed Charlie’s— Jordan Bramblett Felix’s— Lee Yankee Flora Bama— T-Bone Montgomery, 2p// Gary Story, 5p/// Dave McCormick, 5:30p//// Perdido Brothers, 6p//// Ja Rhythm, 10p//// Alabama Lightning, 10:15p Garage— Loaded Gunn Hangout— Jason Abel Project, 6p// Philly Cheese Shea, 10p The Intracoastal— Brent Burns, 6p Lulu’s— Ronnie Presley, 5p

WED. JUNE 28

Bluegill— Ross Newell Callaghan’s— Phil and Foster Felix’s— Brandon and Pierce Flora Bama— Neil Dover, 2p// Mel Knapp, 5p/// Logan Spicer, 5:30p//// Rhonda Hart & Jonathan Newtown, 6p//// Whyte Caps, 10p//// Davis Nix Duo, 10:15p Hangout— Rhythm Intervention, 6p// Justin Wall + 1, 10p Lulu’s— Justin Yawn, 5p McSharry’s— Doc Rogers and the Rock Dodgers, 7p Shipp’s Harbour— Brent Burns, 5p J u n e 2 2 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 2 8 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 43


Dan Stevens branches out in ‘The Ticket’

FILMTHE REEL WORLD

BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

AREA THEATERS CARMIKE CINEMA’S Wynnsong 16 785 Schillinger Rd. S. (251) 639-7373 CRESCENT THEATER 208 Dauphin Street (251) 438-2005 HOLLYWOOD STADIUM 18 1250 Satchel Paige Dr. (251) 473-9655 RAVE MOTION PICTURE JUBILEE SQUARE 12 6898 U.S. 90 Daphne, (251) 626- 6266

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hen actor Dan Stevens left the beloved television series “Downton Abbey” to pursue a career in film, it set off a traumatic course of fictional events in that show’s plotlines, for which I completely blame him as a person. Therefore, I must judge any subsequent projects of his by the question, Was it worth killing Matthew on “Downton Abbey” for this? Sure, he got to play “Beast” in a giant Disney film, but what about the heartache he caused? As far as juicy parts for an actor, Stevens’ leading role as James in film festival breakout “The Ticket” fits the bill. When the film begins, his character gets to be blind, and actors’ love of playing a physical affliction is an accepted fact. In an interesting opening sequence, the audience experiences life through James’ eyes — just a blur of light — and the warm conversation with his dear wife is rendered with great intimacy. To his great astonishment, James wakes the next morning and his sight is restored. He rushes to his son’s bed and sees him for the first time. James also sees his own face for the first time — and, as we all know, it looks pretty darn good. Even as he wanders through his house, the viewer cannot help but

notice the garish wallpaper — chosen, like everything, by his wife. While the shrinking of the pituitary tumor that left him blind is undoubtedly a positive turn of events, it causes a major shift in the dynamics of every aspect of his life. The film’s problems can be summed up by his wife’s exclamation the first night, “I need to do something with my hair, now that you can see it.” James and his family were satisfied when he was sightless, but now that he has had his eyes opened, he gradually becomes disenchanted by what he sees. When he was blind, James went to great pains to feel and express contentment. When his blindness is cured, it is like he develops a radically different set of standards for himself. His job, cold-calling potential clients for a housing developer, is no longer good enough for him, and he launches a predatory scheme that earns him and the business more money. He is also no longer content with his wife, played by a surprisingly dowdy Malin Akerman, and once he realizes what his good looks allow him to get away with, he cannot help himself. “The Ticket” becomes something of a Biblical parable, complete with a miracle cure, and a good family man falls prey to greed and avarice. The excellent performances bring

depth and nuance to this cautionary tale. They do a good job of creating both sympathy and culpability to all sides of the story. It is natural for James to rebel against the almost infantile state he was, by necessity, in before. The most challenging part for me was the extent to which his wife was accustomed to manipulating their lives, because her husband literally could not see the truth. Their son comes home with a black eye; it turns out it’s not the first time, but his mother had previously instructed him not to tell his father. Of course, the evidence wasn’t visible to his father until now. Having been manipulated for reasons both kindly and less so his entire life, James soon manipulates others, giving motivational speeches for mercenary reasons to promote the housing company. The film’s title comes from an anecdote about a man who prays to win the lottery but never actually buys a ticket. James certainly acts on the message of self-actualization, but loses a great deal in the process. And Dan Stevens’ performance keeps the film fascinating, even when the storyline makes things too black and white. “The Ticket” is currently available to rent.

CARMIKE CINEMAS 23151 Wharf Ln. Orange Beach (251) 981-4444 COBB THEATRES PINNACLE 14 3780 Gulf Shores Pkwy Gulf Shores (251) 968-7444

Photos | Shout! Factory / Wilson Webb

FROM LEFT: In “The Ticket,” a blind man who regains his vision finds himself becoming metaphorically blinded by his obsession with the superficial. “Baby Driver” is the story of a young getaway driver taking part in a heist doomed to fail. NEW IN THEATERS

EASTERN SHORE PREMIERE CINEMA 14 30500 Alabama 181 #500 Spanish Fort, Al (251) 626-0352 Information accurate at press time; please call theaters for showtimes.

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TRANSFORMERS: THE LAST KNIGHT

The latest entry to this toy-based franchise boasts Anthony Hopkins and Mark Wahlberg in its cast.

BABY DRIVER

Comedy director Edgar Wright (“Shaun of the Dead”) helms this action heist movie about a young getaway driver who attempts to change his life after meeting the girl of his dreams. With Kevin Spacey, Ansel Elgort and Jon Hamm. All listed multiplex theaters.

NOW PLAYING PARIS CAN WAIT Crescent Theater, AMC Classic Wharf 47 METERS DOWN All listed multiplex theaters. ALL EYES ON ME All listed multiplex theaters. CARS 3 All listed multiplex theaters. ROUGH NIGHT All listed multiplex theaters. IT COMES AT NIGHT All listed multiplex theaters. THE MUMMY All listed multiplex theaters. MEGAN LEAVEY

All listed multiplex theaters. WONDER WOMAN All listed multiplex theaters. CAPTAIN UNDERPANTS: THE FIRST EPIC MOVIE All listed multiplex theaters. PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: DEAD MEN TELL NO TALES All listed multiplex theaters. BAYWATCH AMC Mobile 16 EVERYTHING, EVERYTHING Eastern Shore Premiere Cinema GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY, VOL. 2 All listed multiplex theaters. THE BOSS BABY AMC Mobile 16


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CALENDAR OF EVENTS JUNE 22, 2017 - JUNE 28, 2017

GENERAL INTEREST Kids’ Day in Bienville Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Bienville Square, there is a variety of activities, performances and displays for kids of all ages. Storytime begins each week at 11 a.m., 11:30 a.m., noon and 12:30 p.m.

life of an individual. Saturday, June 24, TOPS 7 p.m. at the Serpents of Bienville, 755 Take Off Pounds Sensibly meets every Government St. For more information, 251- Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. at Spanish Fort 304-9008. Presbyterian Church. For more information, call 251-625-6888. Zoo Camp The Alabama Gulf Coast Zoo’s Zoo Camp is open to children ages 5 to 11, Monday, June 19, through Friday, June 23, with licensed teachers and trained instructors from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily. Call 251-9685732. Teen reading program Area teens are invited to participate in “Build a Better World!” teen summer reading program, through June 30. For more information, call 251-621-2818, ext. 203.

Photo | Facebook | Market in the Park

Market in the Square Mobile’s downtown farmer’s market is now held in Cathedral Square on Saturdays, 7:30 a.m. until noon. Come enjoy, music, food, beverages and more. Fairhope farmer’s market The city of Fairhope hosts an outdoor farmer’s market Thursdays, 3-6 p.m., through Nov. 2, behind the Fairhope Public Library downtown on Bancroft Street. Call 251-929-1466.

Literacy camp and tutoring The camp is for first and rising fifth graders. The program will also employ university literacy faculty and teachers in training from the University of South Alabama College of Education. The camp runs June 19-23. Call 251-380-2891. West Mobile Farmer’s Market This farmer’s market, sponsored by Christ United Methodist Church, is held every Tuesday, 3-6 p.m., on the west side of church property, 6101 Grelot Road, Mobile. Call 251-342-0462. Movie in the Park The Mobile Police Department will host Movie in the Park this summer. The next film will be Wednesday, June 28, at 5:30 p.m. in Langan Park, 4901 Zeigler Blvd.

Providence Farmer’s Market Shop the farmer’s market every Wednesday through July 12, 2-5 p.m., in Lot F at Providence Hospital. Call 251631-3501. Dauphin Island Boardwalk Talks Boardwalk Talks are held the first and third Wednesday of each month at 11:15 a.m. at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab, 101 Bienville Blvd. Call 251-861-2141. Midtown Optimist Club Join Midtown Optimist Club every Wednesday at noon for lunch at Azalea City Golf Course. Call 251-348-3542.

USS Alabama Living History Come see history come to life as the USS Alabama Living History Crew comes aboard ship. These historical re-enactors show you what life aboard ship was like during World War II. Saturday, June 24, and Sunday, June 25. Call 251-433-2703. “Chronicle: Stories to be Shared” Sean Herman will tell stories of his experience with exorcism, his grappling with religion and its implications for the

MUSEUMS “Shipwreck! Pirates and Treasure” A new, highly interactive exhibit at GulfQuest features more than 500 authentic artifacts recovered from deepocean shipwrecks. Visit www.gulfquest. org.

ARTS Art Education Sampler Thinking of signing up for an art class at Mobile Museum of Art? Come Thursday, June 22, at 6 p.m. for a sample of upcoming classes. Visit mobilemuseumofart.com.

Photo | Courtesy of Dauphin Island Sea Lab

“Windows to the Sea” “Windows to the Sea” is a new permanent exhibit at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab Estuarium. Visit disl.org. “Christenberry: In Alabama” On the occasion of Alabama’s Bicentennial Celebration, this exhibit honors artist William Christenberry’s exploration of themes related to his native state. Mobile Museum of Art, 4850 Museum Drive. Extended through July 9. Call 251-208-5200.

Free family movie night Join Dauphin Island on the West End Beach for a free movie at dusk on Thursday and Friday. This Thursday: “Rio”; Friday: “Finding Nemo.”

Candidate forum On Saturday, June 24, at 10 a.m., gather at Ben May Library, Bernheim Hall, to hear from the Democratic candidates for the upcoming U.S. Senate special election.

Sunset concert Dauphin Island West End Beach invites you for a Sunday Concert at sunset from Jonesy Jones and The Crowned Jewels. Admission is $5 and goes toward preserving the Little Red School House.

Toastmasters Do you want to deliver a speech like a pro or gain leadership skills to advance your career? Toastmasters International meets regularly at six locations in Mobile and Baldwin counties. Visit www.toastmasters. org for more information.

Community blood drive The city of Fairhope will host a community blood drive on Friday, June 23, from 7 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Fairhope Public Utilities Warehouse, 555 S. Section St. All blood types needed. Call 251-929-1466.

Physician assistant positions The USA Department of Physician Assistant Studies will provide information on the program, admissions requirements and the application process. Friday, June 23, at 1:30 p.m. in the Health Science Building on South Alabama’s campus. Call 251-445-9345.

Summer organ recital Enjoy an afternoon organ recital featuring the music of two masters of the German Baroque period, Buxtehude and Bach, on Sunday, June 25, at 4 p.m. at Christ Church Cathedral, 115 S. Conception St.

Photo | bellingrath.org

Wonderful Wednesdays at Bellingrath Learn about new roses as well as the Southern standards from James Mills, owner of K & M Roses in Buckatunna, Mississippi, on Wednesday, June 28, at 10:30 a.m. Call 251-459-8864. Visit bellingrath.org for the full schedule. Help Me Grow Wednesdays Join Lifelines Counseling Services and the Help Me Grow staff as we provide free developmental screenings throughout June and July. Just visit us at The Shoppes at Bel Air every Wednesday between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. to speak with someone. Shining Star Camp The Baldwin County Sheriff’s Office is pleased to host a series of camps. The second camp will be at Fairhope Intermediate School in Fairhope, June 2830, for ages 8-13. Call 251-972-6890.

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Photo | Amazon

Share the Memories Join Kathie Farnell as she talks about her latest work, “Duck and Cover: A Nuclear Family.” Tuesday, June 27, at 6:30 p.m., West Regional Library, 5555 Grelot Road. Call 251-208-7097. Cellphone photography A professional photographer teaches you tips and tricks for maximizing your smartphone’s camera function as well as creating artistic images from your handheld device. Saturday, June 24. Apple at 9 a.m., Android at 12:30 p.m. Call 251460-7200.

Photo | Courtesy of The History Museum of Mobile

“Faces of Africa” The History Museum of Mobile exhibit “Faces of Africa: A Mystical View of Tribal Heritage” runs through Monday, July 31. Call 251-208-7420. “Drugs: Costs and Consequences” The Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center and the U.S. Drug Enforcement


and pet portraits art. Call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com.

Administration team up to present a powerful interactive exhibit of the effects of drugs on individuals and society. Through August. Visit exploreum.com.

Pickleball for adults (indoors) Offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School, Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon. Great sport for all ages combines tennis, pingpong and badminton on a court one-fourth the size of a tennis court. Call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com.

Fairhope’s founding Learn more about the 1894 founding of Fairhope at the Fairhope Museum of History, 24 N. Section St. The museum is open daily (except Sunday and Monday) from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 251-929-1471.

Photo | Facebook | Mobile BayBears

Mobile BayBears The Mobile BayBears are back in action at Mobile’s Hank Aaron Stadium. The team hosts Tennessee for a five-game home stand June 22-26. Call 251-479-BEAR.

Photo | www.exploreum.com

Little Discoveries “Outside the Box,” aimed at children age 6 and under, explores how innovation and creativity can lead to a world of possibilities, starting with a simple cardboard box. Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Call 251-208-6893 or email jholland@ exploreum.com. Thursdays at MMoA Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., the Mobile Museum of Art offers free admission to all visitors. No reservations are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive. Call 251-208-5200.

SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES Pure Barre pop-up Pure Barre Mobile will be popping up at FIVE on Thursday, June 22, at 5:30 p.m. Join the Pure Barre Mobile team for a free, intense 45-minute class. FIVE is located at 609 Dauphin St. AFC Mobile AFC Mobile will take on the Louisiana Fire on Saturday, June 24, at 7 p.m., Archbishop Lipscomb Stadium, 3610 Michael Blvd. Go to www.afcmobile.net for more information.

Group rides South Alabama and Mississippi Mountain Bike Association invites all levels of cyclists to join them every Tuesday and Thursday at 6 p.m. at USA Bike Trails and Sunday at 9 a.m. at Chickasabogue Park. Email carrie@rideSAMBA.com. Weekly 1K/5K Every Thursday evening at 6 p.m., join Red Beard’s Outfitter and Cortlandt’s Pub in the Spring Hill Village Shopping Center for a 1K or 5K run and walk. No cost to participate. Bridge lessons The Mobile Bridge Center offers free bridge lessons each Tuesday at 6 p.m. at 1510 University Blvd. Arrive a few minutes early to register. Call the Bridge Center at 251-666-2147, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fitness and athletics classes New fitness classes are in progress at Palmer Pillans Middle School. Curvy yoga, Tone It Up ! (fusion workout), Zumba, basketball clinics (ages 8+), and sports conditioning (ages 8-17). To register or for more information, call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com. Dance and art classes Summer classes offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School include belly dance, ballroom dance, ballet and tumbling (ages 6-8), beginning piano (ages 8+), watercolor painting, zombies and superheroes art,

Ballroom dance Azalea Ballroom Dance Club hosts dances the second and fourth Tuesday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Via Health, Fitness & Enrichment Center, 1717 Dauphin St. Call 251-623-9183 or visit azaleaballroomdanceclub.com. Ballroom dance The Moonlight Chassé Ballroom Dance Society hosts dances the first and third Monday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Hot Wheels Skating Rink in Daphne. Email cassief13@aol.com.

WORKSHOPS Pitch Perfect The Public Relations Council of Alabama Mobile annual professional development event offers all the tools you need to make your pitch perfect every time. Friday, June 23, 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 2440 Gordon Smith Drive. Visit http://ow.ly/O2ri30aQA9G.

PUBLIC MEETINGS Baldwin County Commission: First and third Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., 322 Courthouse Square, Bay Minette. Work sessions are the second and fourth Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. rotating between Bay Minette, the Foley Satellite Courthouse, the Fairhope Satellite Courthouse and the Baldwin County Central Annex Building in Robertsdale. www.baldwincountyal.gov Baldwin County Planning Commission: First Thursday at 6 p.m., 22251 Palmer St., Robertsdale, www.baldwincountyal.gov. Bayou La Batre City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 13785 S. Wintzell Ave., www.cityofbayoulabatre. com. Chickasaw City Council: Second and fourth Tuesday at 7 p.m., 224 N. Craft Highway, 251-452-6450.

Citronelle City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6:30 p.m., 19135 Main St., 251-866-7973. Creola City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6 p.m., 190 Dead Lake Road, #A, 251-675-8142. Daphne City Council: First and third Monday at 6:30 p.m., 1705 Main St. Work sessions are the second Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m., www.daphneal.com. Dauphin Island Town Council: First and third Tuesdays at 7 p.m., 1011 Bienville Blvd., www.townofdauphinisland.org. Elberta Town Council: Third Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m. in the town hall. Workshop meeting on the second Tuesday. townofelberta.com. Fairhope City Council: Second and fourth Monday at 6 p.m., 161 N. Section St. Work sessions are held before each council meeting at 4:30 p.m., www.cofairhope. com. Fairhope Planning Commission: First Monday at 5 p.m., 161 N. Section St. For more information visit www.cofairhope. com. Foley City Council: First and third Monday at 5:30 p.m., 407 E. Laurel Ave. Work sessions begin at 4 p.m., www. cityoffoley.org. Gulf Shores City Council: Second and fourth Mondays at 4 p.m., 1905 W. First St., www.gulfshoresal.gov. Mobile City Council: Tuesdays at Government Plaza, 205 Government St. Pre-council meeting begins at 9 a.m.; council meeting begins at 10:30 a.m., www.cityofmobile.org. Mobile Planning Commission: First and third Thursdays at 2 p.m., 205 Government St., www.urban.cityofmobile.org. Orange Beach City Council: First and third Tuesdays at 5 p.m., 4099 Orange Beach Blvd., www.cityoforangebeach.com. Prichard City Council: Every Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 216 E. Prichard Ave., www. thecityofprichard.org.

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SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

USA deemed Sun Belt’s best program for third time BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

finish first-team All-American after everything he has been through is a testament to his ability and character. He and his coach, Aaron James, did a fantastic job. We are looking forward to more successes from him in the future.” The sophomore cleared a height of 5.45 meters on his second attempt, a season-best mark. Matthew Ludwig from the University of Akron (Ohio) won the title with a 5.60-meter effort. “It was great; I had a great season,” Collins said. “The coaching staff and teammates were really supportive of me coming back. I couldn’t have done it without them. Our athletic trainers also really helped get me back to full speed before the season started. “I’ve grown up in Mobile, I know the locals and they know me. They have followed me my entire high school and collegiate career. I know family, friends and everyone in Mobile have all been so supportive, not to mention the South Alabama community. I’m so proud I get to come home as a first-team All-American.”

Local players taken in MLB Draft

Photo/ University of South Alabama

After the Jaguars baseball team won its tournament, the University of South Alabama won an award for the best Sun Belt athletic program for the third straight year.

T

he athletic program for the University of South Alabama has again been crowned the best in the Sun Belt Conference, but only by the closest of margins. When the Jaguar baseball team won the SBC Tournament title with a walk-off single, it also secured USA its third consecutive Vic Bubas Cup. Because of the baseball trophy, the Jaguars got an extra point in the standings recognizing the top all-around school. Their total of 119 points edged Texas State by one point and Texas-Arlington by two. “We are humbled, proud and honored to have earned the Vic Bubas Cup,” said Joel Erdmann, USA director of athletics. “The elevated competitive level among our Sun Belt Conference member institutions is what makes this so rewarding. “This does not happen without the good, hard work and support of student-athletes, coaches, support staff, the university community and all members of the Jaguar Nation. Having a well-balanced, competitive department with equal expectations of excellence for every program is something we strive for daily.” In addition to baseball, which was a runner-up in the regular-season standings, South’s soccer program won both regular season and tournament Sun Belt titles. Ten other Jag

teams were in the top half of the standings for their respective sports. This list includes men’s and women’s cross country, volleyball, women’s indoor track and field, men’s and women’s tennis, men’s golf, softball and men’s and women’s outdoor track and field.

Collins earns All-American honors

Sean Collins was one of the most celebrated athletes ever at McGill-Toolen Catholic High School. He set the state indoor and outdoor pole vault records before deciding to stay close to home and compete for the University of South Alabama. He lived up to his reputation as a freshman, finishing as the runner-up at the NCAA Indoor Championship. Collins appeared to be on his way to match his efforts at the Sun Belt’s outdoor finals before a dislocated ankle brought his season to a sudden end. One year later, Collins earned another shot at the NCAA Outdoor Track and Field Championships. The sophomore claimed first-team All-American honors with an eighthplace finish. “We are very proud of Sean,” said head track and field coach Paul Brueske. “He has overcome a lot of adversity just to get back to the NCAA Championships. For him to

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Collins is not the only McGill-Toolen graduate in the news. The Texas Rangers selected outfielder Bubba Thompson in the first round of the Major League Baseball Draft with the 26th overall pick. As a senior for the Jackets, Thompson hit .429 with 11 home runs, 35 RBI and 18 stolen bases while posting a .857 slugging percentage. The 6-foot-2, 180-pound Thompson, who celebrated his 19th birthday June 9, led McGill-Toolen to the No. 1 ranking in Class 7A before they were upset in the playoffs. On the gridiron, Thompson quarterbacked McGill-Toolen to the 2015 state title. The right-handed batter was named the Alabama Sports Writers Association’s Player of the Year. Baseball America had Thompson as the top prospect from Alabama and the 25th-best prospect overall. He is committed to the University of Alabama for baseball, but an estimated $2.5 million bonus is waiting for him should he turn pro. • The University of South Alabama also had players taken in the draft. They are catcher Jared Barnes, right-handed pitchers Randy Bell and Matt Peacock plus incoming signees JoJo Booker, Hunter Brittain and Cole Watts. Barnes was firstteam all-conference; Bell was on the NCAA All-Regional roster with teammates Wells Davis and Dylan Hardy, while Peacock finished with 10 saves. Booker and Brittain recently graduated from T.R. Miller High School in Brewton, where both earned all-state honors. Watts pitched last year for Skyline College in California.

USA plans volleyball camps

Amy Hendrichovsky Volleyball Camps at the University of South Alabama will take place next month at Jaguar Gym. The All Skills Camp will be July 6-8 for those entering grades five through 12. It will run each day from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and cost $230. The Position Training Camp from July 11-12 for children entering grades seven through 12. Cost is $215 for commuters and $255 for residents. The camp will run 1-8 p.m. on Day 1 and conclude with Day 2, scheduled to go from 8:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. South Alabama will close the week with its Team Camp, which is held for freshmen, junior varsity and varsity squads July 13-15. The cost is $205 per commuter or $280 per resident. More information is available at AmyHendrichovskyVolleyballCamps.com.

SHC hosts Outlaw golf event

The third annual Arthur R. Outlaw Memorial Golf Classic will be Friday at the Spring Hill College Golf Course. The tournament will start at 1 p.m., with registration beginning at 11 a.m. Four-member teams can enter the tournament by contacting Assistant Athletic Director Michael Patrick at mpatrick@shc.edu or 251-380-4461. Entry is $400 per team. Hole and tee box sponsorships are also available. In 2016, Team Reggie Copeland placed first among the Tier 1 participants by edging Team Jim Hall in a tie-breaker after both teams posted a score of 57 in the shotgun-start scramble format event.


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THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE THINK TWICE BY CHARLES M. DEBER / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Zip along 7 Example of 22- and of 65-Across 12 Conscience-stricken 19 Opposites of alphas 20 It may be grand 21 “Hah!” 22 7- and 112-Across 24 Flashing lights 25 What scouts gather 26 Intentions 27 Donkey’s call 29 Naval engineer 31 Example of 65-Across and 39-Down 33 Subsides slowly 37 Org. for ex-G.I.s 40 Diddley and Derek 41 Farewells in Florence 42 Take temporarily 44 First lady before Bess 47 116-Across and 96-Down 49 Levin who wrote “A Kiss Before Dying” 50 Silver, for example, in the opening to TV’s “The Lone Ranger” 51 Torah receptacles 52 A professional may need one to practice: Abbr. 53 Work unit 54 Intimates 55 Wash’n ____ (towelette brand) 56 Caribbean land whose capital is St. George’s 59 It’ll knock you out 60 Ricochet 62 Ambition for an actor 64 In view 65 7- and 31-Across 67 “So long,” for short 69 Part of a machine assembly 71 Like Odin or Thor 72 Titter 73 Some scratchy attire 74 “Sprechen ____ Deutsch?” 75 Lowest points 76 Car for which you “listen to her tachin’ up now, listen to her whine,” in a 1964 hit 78 Land in the Seine 79 “I cannot tell ____” 81 “Nuh-uh!” 82 Film critic Christopher 83 112-Across and 96-Down 86 Dress adornment

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87 Lathers (up) 89 Not esos or estos 90 Coiled killer 91 Nikon product, for short 92 “____ Rebel” (1962 No. 1 hit) 93 Example of 34-Down and 108-Across 94 Dimes, essentially 97 Straight 100 “Othello” traitor 101 Milky gems 105 Admit 108 93- and 116-Across 112 Example of 83- and 22-Across 113 “Little Women” author 114 Ruined 115 Dead Sea Scrolls sect 116 Example of 108- and 47-Across 117 “See ya!” DOWN 1 Desert crossed by the Silk Road 2 Gulf state 3 Celebration 4 Writer/critic James and family 5 Animal with luxurious fur 6 Org. with a “3-1-1” rule

7 Twenty-one words 8 Give ____ all 9 Damage 10 Blight victim 11 Film again 12 Money in the bank, e.g. 13 This and that 14 Razor brand 15 Example of 39- and 34-Down 16 Lang. heard in Haifa 17 Before, to a bard 18 ____ Moines 20 Bugs about the trash 23 Toil 28 Competitor of Petro-Canada 30 Scrub, as a mission 31 Squealer 32 They may be high in a fallout zone 34 93-Across and 15-Down 35 When repeated, a Polynesian getaway 36 What trees do in fierce storms 37 Is on the brink 38 Passed quickly 39 31-Across and 15-Down 41 Len of stage and screen 42 They’re often pulled at night

43 131/2-inch gold-plated figure 45 Hall of fame 46 A mere stone’s throw from 47 Upscale London retailer 48 Fatty-acid compound 55 One of a pair of best friends in Greek legend 56 Heights of achievement 57 Witherspoon of “Legally Blonde” 58 Fussed over, as a grandchild 60 Like some diplomats 61 AOL alternative 63 Skeptical response 65 Dudes 66 Puts forward 68 Holt of NBC News 70 Part in an animated film 72 “Well, look what I did!” 75 Lightly bite 76 Word of wonder 77 “Really!” 79 Ear: Prefix 80 Den denizen 84 ____ the Explorer 85 Guide to studying the night sky 86 What “Mc-” means in a name 88 Richard Strauss opera

ANSWERS ON PAGE 56


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STYLE GARDENING

Have you tried growing a hardy hibiscus? BY ALICE MARTY/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Q: Recently our garden club had quite a

discussion about the hardiness of hibiscus in the Mobile area. I say they are not, but several members thought otherwise. Perhaps you could settle our disagreement.

A: Well, how about a hardy hibiscus? Yes,

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Photo/ Alice Marty

some hibiscuses are hardy in Alabama. Local gardeners have long loved the tropical hibiscus, hibiscus rosa-sinensis, seen commonly in the landscapes of south and central Florida. These evergreen shrubs with dark, glossy leaves and large, flamboyant flowers in shades of red, gold, orange, yellow, pink and white are popular in pots and in the ground. But, as almost every winter reaffirms, the tropical hibiscus is not reliably hardy when planted in the ground in zone 8b. Unlike their tropical counterparts, hardy hibiscus, botanically known as hibiscus moscheutos, is more cold-hardy, vigorous and long lasting. They can grow quickly up to 8 feet tall and 4-6 feet wide. They are close relatives of the tropical hibiscus but have larger flowers. The blooms, measuring 6-12 inches across, are impressive, to say the least. Your neighbors’ heads will turn when they see these giant flowers. Strangers may stop and ask you to identify the huge blooms. William. C. Welch, professor of horticulture at Texas A&M University, calls these plants “giant rose mallow,” and explains that they “have the largest flowers of any cultivated perennial.” These plants are native to marshy areas of North America. Being herbaceous perennials, they lose their leaves and the branches die back with the coming of winter, then resprout from the ground the following spring. They are root-hardy to zone 4 with some protection. For years, the only hardy hibiscus colors available were white, pink and red, but over the last decade plant breeders have provided new colors and combinations. Mauve, hot pink and purple combinations with ruffled edges and overlapping petals can be found. Hardy hibiscus flowers, though tough, look delicate, resembling crinkly crepe paper. Each exotic bloom typically lasts only one day, but many open each day over a long blooming season until frost cuts them down. The blooms are also a magnet for hummingbirds and butterflies. The new hybrid varieties sport foliage varying in color from bright green to burgundy and almost black. The “too large” size has also been addressed. Plant size has been scaled down to the 2-to-3-foot range, making them ideal for

pots. “Indeterminate” is a term many have heard regarding tomatoes, and that trait has been bred into newer hibiscus varieties, meaning more blooms from top to bottom of each stem, not just at the tips. A hibiscus needs a minimum of six hours of sun each day. It can be afternoon sun if supplemental water is supplied the first year. Remember, they were marsh plants at one time, yet a well-draining area works best. After being in the ground a couple of years, they can tolerate dry or moist conditions. They are not particular about soil and will grow in most areas with a little water-soluble fertilizer added. Of course, improving the planting site with aged compost will insure better growth. Hibiscus work well planted as specimens or interplanted with perennials. Staking should not be needed except for the first year. If you want to encourage better branching just pinch them back lightly early in the growing season. When plants begin to go dormant, cut old stems back to 3-6 inches above ground level. An important thing to keep in mind: Hardy hibiscus is very late to emerge in the spring. Be patient! They make up for their late start with rapid growth and should be blooming May through October. The major insect pest of hardy hibiscus is the caterpillar-like larva of the hibiscus sawfly, atomacera decepta. Several of these larvae often feed on the same leaf or plant and can quickly defoliate the entire plant. The least toxic way to

eliminate the sawfly larvae is by picking them off; find them on the underside of the leaves. Other pests include whiteflies, mealy bugs, grasshoppers and spider mites. The primary diseases are various leaf spots caused by cladosporium, cercospora, phyllosticta and other fungi. Check with your local Alabama County Extension Office Master Gardener Home Garden Helpline, 877-252-4769, before using pesticide or fungicide. We can help you decide on the best course of action for the most satisfactory and safest results. Refer also to this publication: https:// tinyurl.com/ya2d5nax

YOU ARE INVITED TO THESE UPCOMING GARDENING EVENTS

What: Roses for the Gulf Coast When: Wednesday, June 28, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Where: Bellingrath Gardens & Home, 12401 Bellingrath Gardens Road, Theodore Admission: Fees apply; call 251-973-2217 for more information. What: Mobile Master Gardeners Monthly Meeting When: Thursday, Aug. 3, 10:30-11:45 a.m. Where: Jon Archer Center, 1070 Schillinger Road N., Mobile Topic: Favorite Plants for Mobile Gardens, Mobile Master Gardeners Master Gardener Helpline: 1-877-252-4769, or send your gardening questions to coastalalabamagardening@gmail.com.


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STYLE FEATURE

‘Eveningland’ gleams like moonbeams on Mobile Bay BY W. PERRY HALL/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

A

great writer creates stories that refresh our perceptions. Familiarity often blinds us to the beauty of the world around us, so that when the “writer shakes up the familiar scene,” as Anais Nin said, it is “as if by magic, we see a new meaning in it.” I’m not going out on a limb in calling Michael Knight a wizard of Mobile Bay. After all, his “Eveningland: Stories,” a “story cycle” comprising six short stories and a novella set in the past decade, teems with abracadabra moments for anyone who has lived within 50 miles of Mobile Bay, such as: hearing “the buzz of an outboard motor fussing in through the screen” of a home on the water; smelling batter “on the kitchen exhaust” as a boat “cruises under [Dog River] bridge;” meandering off Dog River under “cypress branches arching over the creek, painting a filigree in shadow;” viewing from a distance “fingers of blue smoke” above factories “like machines for making clouds;” wondering at the shades of red in a Catholic church’s stained-glass rose; using as a makeout den a canopy beneath a magnolia “at least three stories tall,” with its “cool, shadowy space ..., the world and the sky barely visible through the leaves;” and duck hunting on “cold, early mornings,” watching “mist over the water and the lazy rising of the sun” with a “dog shivering in the blind.” Knight, a St. Paul’s alum, now serves as an English professor at the University of Tennessee in Knoxville. He anchors his latest story collection with a quote from “The Moviegoer,” Walker Percy’s 1961 award-winning novel set in New Orleans in which the aunt of young, lonely and disillusioned Binx Bolling lamented the “going under of the evening land,” by which she meant the decline of a way of life from the Old South. She explained her disappointment at her inability to “pass on to [Binx] the one heritage of the men of our family, a certain quality of spirit, a gaiety, a sense of duty, a nobility worn lightly, a sweetness, a gentleness with women — the only good things the South ever had and the only things that really matter in this life.” As W.J. Cash explained in his 1941 “The Mind of the South,” “the gentlemanly idea, driven from England by Cromwell, [took] refuge in the South and fashioned for itself a world to its heart’s desire: a world … wholly dominated by ideals of honor and chivalry and ‘noblesse.’” While Knight’s characters are mostly those whom many “outsiders” might consider the usual suspects to mourn the sinking of evening land — mostly white in the upper-middle to upper classes, his stories seem to subtly

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chronicle, in a life cycle, this “going under” by way of education and nature, as the older generations pass and the younger ones recede further. Knight does not romanticize the genteel way of life. Instead, as in “The Moviegoer,” most of the characters here float adrift — lonely, restless, regretful — in the doldrums of an existential dilemma or spiritual crisis. Perhaps more significantly, all of their lives are overshadowed by the accomplishments, or haunted by the sins, of the father. In “Our Lady of the Roses,” set over the two weeks of Mardi Gras, a 26-year-old art teacher at a parochial K-8 confronts her first life crisis in the confluence of an anticipated marriage proposal, the head nun’s push for her to teach a more liturgical curriculum, her disillusionment with the church and her doubts concerning her faith since attending Brown and the loss of her cat, until being pushed to the edge by the actualization of a recurring dream. “Eveningland” transports the reader past dozens of familiar places, such as Fort Morgan and Dog River, in “Water and Oil,” a poignant story of innocence lost and the ache of nostalgia. In the summer of 2011, 17-year-old Bragg is charged with scouting between forts Gaines and Morgan on his skiff for signs of the ominous, obsidian cloud of oil slowly approaching from Deepwater Horizon.  While operating out of his dad’s Dog River marina, Bragg infatuates over a 19-year-old marina employee, a “damaged beauty” with a rough beau and no aspirations. I take a moment here to heap extra praise on Knight for brilliantly pegging a sentiment from my distant past, which I suspect many other men experienced in younger years: “He could not have explained the intensity of his attraction to [her], that blissful ache that welled up in his chest at the sight of her barefooting across the dock, the feeling a distant cousin of nostalgia, as if he’d already won and loved and lost her.” Truly, fiction reveals “truths that reality obscures,” as Jessamyn West wrote. At the other end of life, the old narrator, a widower living in a houseboat docked at the marina, concludes with this insight into lost love in youth: “I can tell you this: there will be other girls, other disasters. And there will be nights to come, his life mostly behind him, when he will long to hurt like that again.” “Jubilee” is the collection’s middle story, in which an attorney approaches age 50, and his homemaker wife in Point Clear plans a jubilee celebration at the “old hotel” (i.e., the Grand). Knight nicely contrasts the birthday jubilee with the biological jubilee in Mobile Bay, “the only

place in the world where shrimp and crab and flounder occasionally abandon deep water in the summer and swarm the shallows for no good reason, practically leaping into nets and buckets, presenting themselves for a feast.” Knight deftly captures the Grand’s mystique, with its “history shining like wax on every surface, in every room and hall, on the brass-railed bar, windows reflecting wavery images of passing figures, walking paths buckled by the roots of oak trees even older than the hotel.”  In “Grand Old Party,” a cuckold-mad 50-something travels with 12-gauge shotgun — with its “black walnut” and “engraved plates” — to a home in a fictionalized Oakleigh district to confront his wife of 31 years and the horner, with whom she recently began an affair after they volunteered together for the 2012 Romney campaign.   The “King of Dauphin Island” is a local 68-year-old real estate tycoon, “the sixth richest man in Alabama,” who just lost his wife to cancer. He moves to an older condo complex he owns on Dauphin Island and begins, of a sudden, a buying spree for “all” private land on the Island in what can only be seen as his attempt to rescue the island from development and destruction and navigate his way through grief after his fortune proved essentially worthless in his efforts to save his late wife from cancer.  The pièce de résistance of “Eveningland” is “Landfall,” a novella that is both intense and heartrending. It follows the family of a recently deceased shipbuilding magnate fighting to survive and come together during a fictional Category 3 hurricane bearing down on Mobile, after the septuagenarian matriarch slips and hits her head on the tile bathroom floor, soaked by a tub overflowing in preparation for the storm.  That evening, her 40-something daughter waits in the hospital, running on generators, as her mom suffers seizures from a brain hemorrhage. Meanwhile, her two brothers, in their late 30s, fight the furious forces of nature trying to return to see their mom, who may not make it through the night. One brother must survive the raging Gulf after taking a crew out to save a commercial fishing vessel that the family company just built. The vessel is seaworthy but not quite fully finished, and thus would risk much more damage at the shipyard.   The other journeys south from the family hunting camp — now his residence — up the Tombigbee River. Past nightfall, he finds all lanes of Interstate 65 directed north and chances a nameless road going toward Mobile. Thirty miles from the city limits, he comes upon a bridge with what appears to be a foot of water flowing over it from the creek swollen from the storm surge. His truck stalls out, of course, and rocks “in the current like a boat on gentle seas.” As he is about to jump out the window, “the railing creaked and splintered and the current washed his back end around so he was looking upstream a moment, his rear wheels poised over nothing. Then it was like the bottom dropped out of the Earth … as he plunged into the creek … water pouring through the window, beer cans floating by his head, the whole world upside-down and dark.” Knight concludes “Landfall” with one of the most emotionally stirring scenes of any story, long or short, that I’ve read in quite some time, without the need to resort, as lesser authors do, to the sentimental or the mawkish.   The stories in the edifying “Eveningland” gleam like moonbeams on Mobile Bay, evoking both viscerally and visually the land, history, weather, landmarks, waters and people of this storied region.

“Eveningland: Stories” Michael Knight Atlantic Monthly Press, 2017 $25 hardcover


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STYLE HOROSCOPES A HARD RAIN’S A-GONNA FALL

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CANCER (6/22-7/22) — In celebration of your birth month and the conclusion of an extended Netflix binge, you’ll emerge from your waterlogged home to find the daylight much brighter than you remembered. You’ll suffer the first documented case of snow blindness, sans snow. Your rain song is Led Zeppelin’s “The Rain Song.” LEO (7/23-8/23) — Tired of the precipitation, you’ll attempt to deter the bad weather the way your grandmother taught you — waving a broom and shouting rated PG-13 nonsense. You’ll stub your toe and the nonsense will become R rated. Your rain song is Garbage’s “Only Happy When It Rains.” VIRGO (8/24-9/22) — Cursory scientific research will lead you to conclude recent downpours are the result of global warming. Your next refrigerator purchase will use fewer kilowatt hours, but produce twice as much ice. Your rain song is CCR’s “Have You Ever Seen The Rain.” LIBRA (9/23-10/22) — Preparing for the inevitable swarm of post-rain mosquitos, you’ll infect yourself with the West Nile virus. You won’t develop an immunity, but it will help you achieve that sickly beach body you were hoping for. Your rain song is Milli Vanilli’s “Blame It On The Rain.” SCORPIO (10/23-11/21) — With the remnants of a tropical low still churning in the gulf, you’ll finally attempt to teach yourself how to surf. Eventually surrendering to your poor sense of balance, you’ll have to find new uses for leftover sex wax. Your rain song is Tom Waits’ “Make it Rain.” SAGITTARIUS (11/22-12/22) — Mocking the threat of severe weather, you’ll do your best Jim Cantore impression for a Facebook Live video. It’ll go viral after you’re struck by lightning. Jim Cantore will use it as a cautionary tale. Your rain song is Bob Dylan’s “Buckets of Rain.” CAPRICORN (12/23-1/19) — Taking a cue from “Back to the Future II,” you’ll develop a self-drying jacket. The Consumer Product Safety Commission will issue a recall after several reports of third-degree armpit burns. Your rain song is Rihanna’s “Umbrella.” AQUARIUS (1/20-2/18) — For ease of maneuverability around midtown’s flooded streets, you’ll trade in your compact car for a duck boats. You’ll run a-fowl of the U.S. Coast Guard. #dadjokes. Your rain song is Guns N’ Roses’ “November Rain.” PISCES (2/19-3/20) — Trying to lure the ladies downtown during inclement weather, you’ll host the world’s first and last wet boxer shorts contest. The rain won’t be the only thing measured in inches. Your rain song is Prince’s “Purple Rain.” ARIES (3/21-4/19) — Reenacting a scene from Stephen King’s “It,” you’ll follow a paper boat into a storm drain. To your delight, you won’t be coaxed down by a homicidal clown, but Tyrone Biggums will be in there looking for some crack. Your rain song is Gene Kelly’s “Singin’ In The Rain.” TAURUS (4/20-5/20) — To save the planet from complete inundation, you’ll retreat to your lab and develop water-resistant earth. Your research will hit a breakthrough when your simpleton neighbor stops by and suggests developing earth-resistant water instead. Your rain song is B.J. Thomas’ “Raindrops Keep Falling On My Head.” GEMINI (5/21-6/21) — You’ll cower in your bathtub alongside your pets while slowly rocking back and forth and chanting for an end to the rain. It’ll be the most crazy thing you’ve done — this year anyway. Your rain song is Blind Melon’s “No Rain.”


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STYLE BOOZIE

Mobile’s Bubba makes the MLB Draft! BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

E

nough is enough! I swear it has never rained this much in my life. I can’t even make plans to be outside because the second I do, it rains. Not to mention all this rain can’t be good for your health — we Mobilians are used to being the rainiest city in the country, but it is starting to feel like we live in a tropical rain forest. Luckily we got a little break Monday, but it was Monday so it still sucked. On the bright side, wink wink (you see what I did there), I haven’t had to water the plants in weeks, which means the mint for my evening cocktails is growing like crazy. So we better use it up. You grab the rum. I’ll bring the mint and, of course, all of this week’s crazy gossip. Enjoy!

Texas-Bama

Alright, so last week my column had already been submitted when this news broke, so I wasn’t able to tell y’all about Mobile’s new big sports name. Last Monday night, a recent McGill-Toolen grad, Bubba Thompson, was selected into the MLB Draft! Now, I don’t know a whole lot about baseball but this is a big freaking deal for a few reasons. Where do I start? First off, it’s not every day someone from high school is drafted straight from high school into the pros.

F U T U R E S H O C K

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It’s also not every day an 18-year-old is drafted in the first round. So can you say bad*ss?! I am sure you are thinking, this kid’s name sounds familiar. That’s probably because you’ve heard it before regardless of whether you follow high school sports or not. Bubba led the McGill-Toolen Jackets to a state title in football when he was quarterback. Then of course he dominated in baseball. I don’t follow sports but I’d heard of Bubba because, well, I don’t live under a rock … and because he had mentioned he was going to Auburn, then changed to Alabama, then said nah to both schools when he was invited to the draft, for which I don’t blame him. Yeah, sure, he will be missing out on the some of the greatest years of his life, but Boozie is willing to bet the $2.1 million signing bonus helps dry any tears. So now that Mobile has yet another MLB player, it’s time for us to ditch the Atlanta Braves and become Texas Rangers fans! We have to rally behind him, like the family members he never knew he had until last Monday. But we don’t ask for money, instead we support and cheer him on! Bubba’s family and friends did that last Monday at a viewing party at Heroes on Hillcrest. Watch out, Hank Aaron — if Bubba keeps up the

good work, The Hank might become the Aaron-Thompson Stadium or, even better, the Hank and Bubba Studium. “Hank and Bubba” sounds more like a morning radio show but it does have a nice ring to it. Boozie wishes Bubba the best of luck — and roll, Rangers, roll!

Mobile > NYC

Hello, New York! Our dear friend Mobile was spotted in good ol’ New York City! I am sure you are wondering how one city can be spotted inside another, and the answer is rather simple: Mobile visited New York to show it how great the Port City is! Still confused? I will explain. Alabama — Mobile in particular — is looking to boost our tourism, and what better way than visiting the most populous city in the U.S. To show New Yorkers what life in Mob-Town is like and to let them know who really started Mardi Gras, the Alabama Tourism Department let the good times roll in the Big Apple. Here’s how it went down: A float appeared in Times Square along with revelers, a band and plenty of throws, including moonpies. The float was extra detailed and happy to inform everyone we have the original Mardi Gras! Boozie’s favorite story from the event is that even one of NYC’s boys in blue couldn’t resist dancing along to brass bands’ familiar tunes! He wasn’t as good as the Mobile officer that broke it down during one of our Mardi Gras parades last year, but he gets an A for effort! The police officer wasn’t the only one dancing, either … the band had a few little kids dancing around collecting throws and getting to experience Mobile’s culture right there in the middle of Times Square! I’d say the tourism group captured life in Mobile pretty well with the moonpies, cups and beads, the band and even the scratch-and-sniff cards. (Don’t worry, guys, it wasn’t Mardi Gras scent, it was pine trees.) The only thing they could have done differently would to have been handing out gumbo and Gulf seafood. Gosh, we really are born to celebrate! Well, kids, that’s all I’ve got this week. Just remember, whether rain or shine, dramatic or scandalous or just some plain ol’ Mardi Gras lovin’, I will be there. Ciao!


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE NOTICE OF COMPLETION In accordance with Chapter I, Title 39, Code of Alabama, 1975, NOTICE IS HEREBY given that J Hunt Enterprises, General Contractors, has completed the contract for Maitre Park Improvements-Combination Football and Soccer Field, 2401 Halls Mill Road, Mobile, Alabama 36606, PR239-16. All persons having any claim for labor, material or otherwise in connection with this project should immediately notify the Architectural Engineering Department, City of Mobile, P.O. Box 1827, Mobile, Alabama 36633-1827. Lagniappe HD June 22, 29, July 6, 13, 2017

STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE Notice is hereby given that a bill as described in the synopsis below will be introduced in any Special Session in 2017 and application for its passage and enactment will be made: A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT SYNOPSIS: Relating to Mobile County; to establish the regulatory authority for the Mobile County Health Department to regulate intermittent food service establishments that prepare food in association with a temporary exempt event that is a regional celebration, tradition, or cultural event designated as such by Mobile County, if the intermittent food service establishment does not prepare, sell, or distribute food on a regular basis in its regular line of business. June 15, 22, 29, July 6, 2017

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made by the herein referenced Grantees in the terms of that certain Vendor’s Lien Deed executed on July 31, 2013, by Curtis M. Ivey and Lorena D. Ivey, as Grantees to Profit Sharing Plan & Trust for MLB Realty Co. Inc., a Alabama corporation and Horace T. Jackson, as Grantors which said Vendor’s Lien Deed was recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book LR7059, Page 494, and default continuing under said Vendor’s Lien Deed, by virtue of and pursuant to the power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, the following described real property will be sold at public outcry, for cash, to the highest bidder, in front of the North entrance of the Courthouse of said County, located at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama 36644, during the legal hours of sale, on July 20, 2017. Lot 14, as per plat of MARCH ESTATES, Unit II as recorded in Map Book 63, Page 85, Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama Said sale is made for the purpose of paying said Vendor’s Lien debt and costs of foreclosure. W. Austin Mulherin Holder of said Vendor’s Lien WILLIAM B. JACKSON, II STOKES & CLINTON, P.C. Attorneys for Lienholder Post Office Box 991801 Mobile, Alabama 36691 (251) 460-2400 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 29, 2017

debt and costs of foreclosure. Anthony Ricchiuti Holder of said Vendor’s Lien. WILLIAM B. JACKSON, II STOKES & CLINTON, P.C. Attorneys for Lienholder Post Office Box 991801 Mobile, Alabama 36691 (251) 460-2400 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 29, 2017

PROBATE

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: RITA RICHARDSON, Deceased Case No. 2016-2445 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 15h day of June, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. KENNETH ROYAL as Executor under the last will and testament of RITA RICHARDSON, Deceased. Attorney of Record: JEROME C. CARTER Lagniappe HD June 22, 29, July 6, 2017.

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: FRANK HERMAN SPECHALSKE, Deceased Case No. 2017-1049 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 6th day of June, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. RICHARD ALAN SPECHALSKE as Executor under the last will and testament of HERMAN SPECHALSKE, Deceased. Attorney of Record: JON M. SPECHALSKE Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 29, 2017

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING April 26, 2017 Case No. 2014-0494-3 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of ISAAC B. FRANKLIN Jr., Deceased On to-wit the 24th day of July, 2017 at 2:00 PM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the FINAL SETTLEMENT as filed by JANICE B. FRANKLIN. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate. Attorney: VANESSA ARNOLD SHOOTS, 56 ST. JOSEPH STREET, STE. 1311. MOBILE, ALABAMA 36602. Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 29, July 6, 2017.

FORECLOSURE NOTICE

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION

Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness described in and secured by that certain Vendors Lien Deed from Sheila Coleman to Derrick Mosley and Tioka Zenaida Mosley, dated the 19th day of August , 2013, and recorded in Book LR7065, page 1964, of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, said default continuing, notice is hereby given that the undersigned will, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said Vendors Lien Deed, sell at public outcry for cash to the highest bidder during the legal hours of sale on the 29th day of June, 2017, the following described property located in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, to-wit: Lot 4, First Addition to Cecelia Court, as recorded in Map Book 6, Pages 423-4, in the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama. Address: 752 Stanton Road, Mobile, AL 36617. Said sale will be made for the purpose of paying said indebtedness and the expenses incident to this sale, including a reasonable Attorney’s fee, and the other purposes set out in said Vendors Lien Deed. Sheila Coleman Lienholder. William E. Case, Attorney for Lienholder.

PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: MARIAN A. POIRIER, Deceased Case No. 2017-1046 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 6th day of June, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. WILFRED POIRIER III as Executor under the last will and testament of MARIAN A. POIRIER, Deceased. Attorney of Record: KENNETH P. MURRAY

Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 22, 2017

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made by the herein referenced Grantee in the terms of that certain Vendor’s Lien Deed executed on April 21, 2016, by Anthony E. Powell and Amanda N. Kelley, as Grantee to Anthony Ricchiuti, as Grantor which said Vendor’s Lien Deed was recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book LR7373, Page 771, and default continuing under said Vendor’s Lien Deed, by virtue of and pursuant to the power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, the following described real property will be sold at public outcry, for cash, to the highest bidder, in front of the North entrance of the Courthouse of said County, located at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama 36644, during the legal hours of sale, on July 20, 2017. Lot 20, as per plat of GLENWOOD FARMS, PHASE 3 as recorded in Map Book 74, Page 108, Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying said Vendor’s Lien

Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 29, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: MARGARET T HOHEIM Case No. 2016-2353 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 30th day of May, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. BRANDON CHAYCE HOHEIM as Administrator of the estate of MARGARET T HOHEIM, deceased. Attorney of Record: GERALD C. BROOKS LAGNIAPPE HD June 8, 15, 22, 2017.

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: WYATT JAMES SHELBORNE JR Case No. 2017-0499 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 26th day of May, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by

law, or they will be barred. LORI DUBOSE as Administratrix of the estate of WYATT JAMES SHELBORNE JR, deceased. Attorney of Record: HENDRIK S. SNOW, Esq. LAGNIAPPE HD June 8, 15, 22, 2017.

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that the University of South Alabama (Owner) will accept sealed Bids for the following Work: YEARLY BID - FLOOR COATING SYSTEMS University of South Alabama Mobile, Alabama USA JOB NO. 17-47 USA BID NO.7060101 Bids will be received and clocked in at 2:00 p.m. local time on Tuesday, June 27, 2017, in Room AD245 of the USA Administration Building, on the Main Campus of the University of South Alabama. Bids will not be accepted after the time indicated herein and will be returned unopened. A cashier’s check or bid bond payable to the University of South Alabama in an amount not less than five (5) percent of the amount of the bid, but in no event more than $10,000 must accompany the bidder’s proposal. Bid Documents shall be available only through the USA Purchasing Office. Contact as follows: University of South Alabama Purchasing Department 307 University Blvd, N., AD245 PH# (251) 460-6151 FX# (251) 414-8291(rbrown@southalabama. edu)Bids must be submitted on Proposal Forms furnished in the Bid Documents or copies thereof. The preceding is an abbreviated advertisement. The complete advertisement may be obtained from the location listed above. All questions concerning the Projects should be submitted in writing to the Project Manager at the address listed below. 307 University Blvd. N., AD001 Mobile, AL 36688 PH# (251) 460-6601FX# (251) 461-1370 mmayberry@ southalabama.edu Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 22, 2017

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that the University of South Alabama (Owner) will accept sealed Bids for the following Work: YEARLY BID - UNDERGROUND BORING University of South Alabama Mobile, Alabama USA JOB NO. 17-01 USA BID NO.7060501 Bids will be received and clocked in at 2:00 p.m. local time on Thursday, June 29, 2017, in Room AD245 of the USA Administration Building, on the Main Campus of the University of South Alabama. Bids will not be accepted after the time indicated herein and will be returned unopened. A cashier’s check or bid bond payable to the University of South Alabama in an amount not less than five (5) percent of the amount of the bid, but in no event more than $10,000 must accompany the bidder’s proposal. Bid Documents shall be available only through the USA Purchasing Office. Contact as follows: University of South Alabama Purchasing Department 307 University Blvd, N., AD245 PH# (251) 460-6151 FX# (251) 414-8291 (rbrown@southalabama. edu) Bids must be submitted on Proposal Forms furnished in the Bid Documents or copies thereof. The preceding is an abbreviated advertisement. The complete advertisement may be obtained from the location listed above. All questions concerning the Project should be submitted in writing to the Project Manager at the address listed below.  307 University Blvd. N., AD001 Mobile, AL 36688 PH# (251) 460-6601 FX# (251) 461-1370 mmayberry@ southalabama.edu  

Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

NOTICE OF SALE

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  1914 St Stephens Rd., Mt Vernon, AL 36560. 2000 Ford Expedition 1FMRU1562YLB28387 2002 Chevrolet Malibu 1G1ND52J92M585162 2002 Chevrolet Trailblazer 1GNDS13S422187773 2003 Buick Rendezvous 3G5DA03E53S511536 2000 Oldsmobile Alero 1G3NL12E3YC359641 2000 Honda Accord 1HGCG5543YA050397 2009 Hyundai Sonata 5NPET46C39H454684 2002 Mercury Sable 1MEFM50U32A653612 2002 Dodge Ram Truck 1D7HA18N52J190807 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3952 Dauphin Island Pkwy., Mobile, AL 36605. 1990 Toyota Corolla JT2AE94K1L3399213 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1419 E I-65 Service Rd. S., Mobile, AL 36606. 2007 Saturn VUE 2GZCZ33D97S864318

1994 Cadillac Seville 1G6KS52Y0RU825953

Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  2653 N. Tally Ct., Mobile, AL 36606. 2007 Dodge Caravan 1D4GP24R17B150618 2000 Kia Sportage KNDJB723XY5651049 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 6473 Maurice Poiroux Rd., Theodore, AL 36582. 1998 Kentworth Const. T600 1XKADB9X0WJ770324 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 6874 Dauphin Island Pkwy., Mobile, AL 36605. 2005 Nissan Titan 1N6BA07A95N536490 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 5388 Hwy. 90 W., Mobile, AL 36619. 1994 Chevrolet S10 1GCCS1942R8241222 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 31 1/2 Timothy St., Prichard, AL 36610. 1997 Jaguar XJ SAJHX6248VC795811 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2009 Chevrolet Aveo KL1TD56E09B346981 2008 Pontiac G6 1G2ZG57B384191302 1999 Mazda Protege JM1BJ2224X0135931 1999 Volvo S70 YV1LS55A0X2612049 2016 Kia Rio KNADM4A37G6620371 2004 Dodge Intrepid 2B3HD46R54H700037 2000 Pontiac Sunfire 1G2JB1242Y7357921 2000 Mercury Marquis 2MEFM74WXYX601420 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 6445 Todd Acres Dr., Theodore, AL 36582. 2010 Mercedes C300 WDDGF5EB7AF449359 1999 Ford Ranger 1FTYR10V8XPB30068 2013 Hyundai Sonata 5NPEB4AC7DH785609 1994 Jeep Grand Cherokee 1J4FX58S7RC296102 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 509 Dismukes Ave., Prichard, AL 36610. 1994 Chevrolet GMT-400 2GCEC19K7R1109015 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1354 Odette Ave., Mobile, AL 36605. 2011 Ford Fiesta 3FADP4CJXBM181428 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

These abandoned vehicles will be sold on 07/19/2017 at 5781 Three Notch Rd Mobile Al. 36619 at 9 am CHEV  1GNEC13Z22J253063 SUBA   4S3BMCA65C3029661 HOND   19XFB2F56EE034249 NISS      3N1AB61E77L659267 NISS      1N4AL21E38N480881 HYUN    5NPEB4AC9BH066648 CHEV     2G1WX12KX49271694 MAZD    JM3ER293070162491 FORD     1FMRU15L92LA69352 NISS        1N4AL2AP1AN515117 KIA          KNAFX4A66F5317967 LEXS        JT8BF28G2W0142281 HYUN     KMHDN45DX2U366982 TOYT     JTDBT1235Y0060204

GMC   1GKEC13R0XJ807107 KIA      KNAFK4A69F5389339 TOYT   4T1BG22K8VU011189 LINC     1LNHM93R49G609503 OLDS    1G3AJ55M1S6329851 NISS     1N4AL11D12C129214 CHEV    1GNEC13ZX3R160259 HOND  1HGFA16539L028307 FORD    2FMZA53421BA59160 TOYT    1NXBU40EX9Z073457 FORD    1FTRX17252NB03100 DODG   1B7HC13Y9VJ557332 CHRY     1C3CCBBGXDN554234 HOND   1HGCM723X7A000725 NISS      5N1AA08A36N726845 NISS      1N4AL3AP0EC286646 FORD   1FACP44E3NF115627

Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 28, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 4763 Lott Rd., Eight Mile, AL 36613. 2007 Saturn Aura 1G8ZS57N17F145629 1999 Toyota Corolla 2T1BR12E0XC163843 2012 Chrysler 300 2C3CCAAG1CH118004 2011 Ford Fusion 3FADP0L38BR123735 Lagniappe HD June 22, 29, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 28, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 802 Celeste Rd., Saraland, AL 36571. 1998 Chevrolet C1500 1GCEC14W7WZ132405 Lagniappe HD June 22, 29, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 28, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 1996 Honda Accord 1HGCD563XTA168017 Lagniappe HD June 22, 29, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 28, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 928 Hannon Rd., Mobile, AL 36605. 2007 Chrysler 300 2C3KA53G57H715491 Lagniappe HD June 22, 29, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 28, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1015 N Craft Hwy., Prichard, AL 36610. 2007 Cadillac CTS 1G6DM57T970123134 1999 Mazda 626 1YVGF22C2X5835525 Lagniappe HD June 22, 29, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 28, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2507 Hand Ave., Bay Minette, AL 36507. 1999 Acura 3.0CL 19UYA2250XL011255 Lagniappe HD June 22, 29, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 28, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2024 Halls Mill Rd., Mobile, AL 36606. 2002 Cadillac Deville 1G6KF57972U138058 2006 Chevrolet Cobalt 1G1AK55F567703224 Lagniappe HD June 22, 29, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 28, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  2951 South St., Theodore, AL 36582. 2010 Kawasaki EX250-J JKAEXMJ19ADA60544

Lagniappe HD June 22, 29, 2017

These abandoned vehicles will be sold on 07/27/2017 at 5781 Three Notch Rd Mobile Al. 36619 at 9 am. GMC    2CTA1MEC1B6405420 NISS    1N4AL3AP0EC286646 PLA     L9NTELKE7E1265557 FORD  1FMZU63K14UC40552 Lagniappe HD June 22, 29, 2017

Deadline for legal advertising in Lagniappe HD is every Monday at 3 p.m. LagniappeHD is distributed each Thursday. Lagniappe HD offices are located at 1100B Dauphin St. Mobile, AL 36604. For more information or to place your ad call Jackie at 251-450-4466. Or email at legals@lagniappemobile.com

J u n e 2 2 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 2 8 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 59


Lagniappe: June 22 - June 28, 2017  
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