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WEEKLY

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LAGNIAPPE

JUNE 15, 2017 - JUNE 21, 2017 | www.lagniappemobile.com

ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com

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BAY BRIEFS

Fairhope Mayor Karin Wilson defended her decision to install keylogging software on some employees’ computers.

COMMENTARY

Everything’s turned upside down in the political world these days.

BUSINESS

Local developers paid $925,000 for 7.16 acres of undeveloped land at Schillinger Road North and Zeigler Boulevard.

CUISINE

ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com

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J. MARK BRYANT Sports Writer sports@lagniappemobile.com STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA RASMUSSEN Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com

With finger foods to complement the bar scene, O’Daly’s Hole in the Wall fills a downtown niche between supper and breakfast.

COVER

A look at who’s behind three upcoming breweries in Mobile — Haint Blue, Serda’s and Iron Hand — and what sets them apart.

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BETH WILLIAMS Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com ALEEN MOMBERGER Advertising Sales Executive aleen@lagniappemobile.com RACHEL THOMAS Advertising Sales Executive rachel@lagniappemobile.com MELISSA EDGE Editorial Assistant events@lagniappemobile.com

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ARTS

Attorney turned author Kathie Farnell penned her first book, a memoir titled “Duck and Cover: A Nuclear Family,” about her childhood in Montgomery.

MUSIC

ROSS PRITCHARD Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager jackie@lagniappemobile.com CONTRIBUTORS: Lee Hedgepeth, Ron Sivak, Jeff Poor, Asia Frey, Brian Holbert, Ken Robinson, Jeremy Beaman ON THE COVER: SERDA’S BREWING BY DANIEL ANDERSON POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Editorial, advertising and production offices are located at 1100B Dauphin St. Mobile, AL 36604. Mailing address is P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Phone: 251.450.4466 Fax 251.450.4498. Email: ashleytoland@lagniappemobile.com or rholbert@lagniappemobile.com LAGNIAPPE is printed at Walton Press. All letters sent to Lagniappe are considered to be intended for publication. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and Alternative Weeklies Network All rights reserved. Something Extra Publishing, Inc. Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced without the expressed permission of the publishers. Individuals may take one copy of the paper free of charge from area businesses, racks or boxes. After that, papers are $3 per issue. Removal of more than one copy from these points constitutes theft. Violators are subject to prosecution.

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Orlando-based band and SouthSounds artist The Sh-Booms are returning to Mobile after a productive and successful few months.

FILM

“Growing Up Smith” is flawed but not without its merits, including a look at the complex immigrant experience that hides a painful depth beneath its amusing surface.

MEDIA

Call News Publisher Willie Gray is defying journalism ethics to run for public office.

SPORTS

Amateurs and professionals alike are expected to compete in Dauphin Island’s inaugural EVP Island Tour volleyball tournament.

STYLE

Boozie’s news from Jimmy Buffett, the Food Network, and this week in butt nakedness.

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GOING POSTAL

College campuses too liberal? What is the reason for Jeff Poor’s column (“College campuses unfriendly to conservatives,” June 8)? In a country where Trump was elected president, there’s no dearth of conservatives, certainly not in Alabama. I doubt seriously that anyone could rightfully consider a college or university in this state to be Marxist-inspired. He may have had a “bad experience” at South Alabama, but big deal. When I was in college eons ago, my sociology teacher called me a hebephrenic because he thought I laughed inappropriately in class. That said more about him than me. Theoretically, the college experience provides students tools to think on their own, to gather information and to decide for themselves. This doesn’t necessarily happen, but I bet there are not many graduates in Alabama or elsewhere in the South who leave the campus as Marxists, or even progressives. Poor’s columns are often not even worth reading. Phyllis Jeffery Mobile

Who’s for kids, who’s just kidding? Baffled. Cautiously optimistic. Flabbergasted. Disheartened. Just a few descriptors that come to mind as I play back the final days of the 2017 legislative session and fate of HB 277, also known as the Child Care Safety Act. Members of the House courageously passed the bill 88-9, but unfortunately it was blocked in the Senate on the final day of session. The question I ponder most: Who’s for kids and who’s just kidding? A question we should all be asking ourselves and, more importantly, the people we send to Montgomery to represent our interests and values.

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For 25 years, VOICES for Alabama’s Children has been the trusted voice for kid-friendly policy and data as home to the Alabama Kids Count Data Book, which tracks child wellbeing in all 67 counties. It’s in the Data Book that our work on child care began over a decade ago. According to the 2016 Alabama Kids Count Data Book, since 2000 the number of unregulated child care centers in Alabama has increased by 50 percent. As of June 2017, there are 984 licensed centers and 954 license-exempt centers. That means nearly half of child care centers in our state are not required to meet basic health and safety standards. If left unchecked, it is estimated that by 2025 license-exempt centers could make up 70 percent of child care in Alabama. Every child is special and unique, and they all deserve basic health and safety protections while spending time in child care. The 2017 legislative session represented a historic opportunity for legislators to address this growing public health crisis for young children, but unfortunately the opportunity was missed. The initial bill called for licensing and inspection of all child care in the state, which, according to public opinion polls, was a no-brainer. In fact, 98 percent of polled Alabama voters said all child care should be licensed and inspected for basic health and safety standards. Amid weeks of negotiations with external forces opposing the bill, both proponents and opponents, led by a key group of legislative champions, were able to devise a substitute bill that prioritized the safety of young children while maintaining protections for faith-based child care businesses that choose not to be licensed. But let’s not lose sight of why this legislation is needed in Alabama. Licensing and inspection is about minimizing unsafe and harmful care to children being served in child care businesses, just like any other business in this state that requires licensure: restaurants, tattoo parlors, hospitals and nail salons. We would

never imagine being cared for in a hospital that is not regulated and inspected. Yet we not only imagine it, we maintain a system that operates in this very way for young children who are unable to speak and fend for themselves. This legislation is about ensuring a child’s right to care that helps keep them safe and promotes healthy development. Period. There were so many voices involved in this effort to advance common-sense protections for kids — from parents, to pastors, to attorneys, to pediatricians. But the voices we won’t hear from are those of children, the population most impacted by our legislators’ inaction on HB 277. Their voices are silenced because they don’t vote. That’s why they sent us. That’s why they are counting on our state leaders to be fearless and bold for them. Unfortunately, Alabama’s children must continue to wait for justice. You see, there were no winners in the outcome of HB 277. There were only losers — our children. Amiyah, Cooper, Max, Kemarion and so many more children are impacted by our state’s choice to not regulate all child care. If they could speak out what might they say? Perhaps they would ask, in this defining moment, how will you fight for me? Are you willing to be uncomfortable for me? Will you speak for me? In the 2017 legislative session the answer to their question is … no. Now a message to our many legislative champions, partner organizations, parent advocates and faith leaders: Great progress was made. The issue of unregulated child care has been exposed like never before. And when the story of how our state cares for its young children is written, we can all walk with our heads high — because we stood on the right side of history. We stood for kids. Melanie R. Bridgeforth, MSW Executive Director, VOICES for Alabama’s Children


BAYBRIEF | FAIRHOPE

Fairhope fallout ALLEGATION OF MAYORAL MISCHIEF SURFACES IN MEETING BY LEE HEDGEPETH

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airhope Mayor Karin Wilson has in that post. “The mayor has the right to denied allegations she “spied” on city protect the city and citizens’ tax dollars from employees through the use of keythe misuse of city property and disruption logging software, instead saying at from the day-to-day efficiency of running the Monday’s regularly scheduled city council city. All cities and most businesses have this meeting that “an extra level of security was in place. … The following is from our policy placed” on computers by Fairhope’s IT book which every employee receives a copy department. of before they’re hired: ‘Employees have no Since Wilson’s election as mayor last personal right of privacy with respect to use year, tensions between the Fairhope City of the city’s email system or internet access. Council and the city executive have at times The city may review, audit and download been fraught. The latest meeting of the city email messages that employees send and/or council, though, seemed to show a somewhat receive and may review employees’ use of relieved relationship between Wilson and the internet.’” council members, but there is a wide, new The employee handbook cited by Wilson divide between the mayor and a member of — and the longer version obtained and the local press, who Wilson called “biased.” reviewed by Lagniappe — covers only “the Cliff McCollum, a city’s email system or reporter for The Courier, internet access” in referrose to speak during the ence to having no expectime allotted for public tation of privacy, not use comments before the of a computer in general. council. McCollum Programs like SentryPC, asked the mayor and THIS IS NOT SPYWARE. the software mentioned council to comment on in The Courier’s report, reports published by track not only email and IT IS A MONITORING The Courier alleging internet access, but all Wilson had keylogging activities on a computer, SYSTEM ... BUT THIS spyware installed on the including every word … CAN BE DONE computers of seven city typed on the device’s employees, including keyboard. AT THE MAYOR’S the finance and human The City Council resources directors. meeting ended in a DISCRETION. Mayor Wilson said closed-door executive the “monitoring system” session concerning is not “spyware,” but a “pending and/or potenprecaution necessary to tial litigation” and other protect the city. matters, another issue that surfaced on the “This is not spyware. It is a monitoring mayor’s Facebook page. system, and I did put it in and quoted the “There are two claims against me and the policy manual. An extra level of security city and we may receive one more,” Mayor was placed on those computers because they Wilson posted on the social media site. “The needed more protection for the city and I cases include falsehoods, exaggerations and explained that in so many words. But this are legally without merit. I have instructed is … can be done at the mayor’s discretion. the attorneys representing the city to fight It was done out of the IT budget — which these baseless claims. I will not agree to pay IT has a budget for that. And I went on the one dime of taxpayer money (or money from recommendations based on information that the city’s insurance company) to anyone for was gathered that this needed to be done to this purpose. To do so would only encourage protect the city.” more of the same in the future.” The mayor then went on to criticize the A Fairhope employee told Lagniappe these reporter’s integrity. “claims,” both potential and actual, involve “So I know that I also said that you know, Sherry Sullivan, Jennifer Fidler and Pandora Cliff, you have been, for lack of a better Heathcoe, who all work for the city, making word, biased in a lot of your coverage since allegations — including wrongful terminaI’ve taken office, and that is your choice to tion and assault — against Wilson. The city do that, but it’s also my choice to say that it was notified of at least two of these claims as lacks both sides,” Wilson said in the meeting. a matter of necessity; Alabama law requires “I do think it’s unfortunate that you have chonotification of potential claims against cities sen to do this to the mayor’s office. I don’t before suit is filed. see how it’s warranted, and I don’t think that One relatively new Fairhope resident, using secret sources is … good reporting.” Ann Brandt, told Lagniappe this was the first In a Facebook post the day before the meetCity Council meeting she’d attended. Asked ing, Wilson suggested the installed computer why she’d chosen to come out last Monday, monitoring program was meant to help review Brandt said it was curiosity … and social employee job performance and that the emmedia. “I came to see if everything I see on ployee handbook given out upon hiring lays Facebook is true. … Does all of it spill out out the possibility of being monitored. into the meetings?” “Recent implications of misuse of moniBy the end of Monday night, Brandt had toring ‘spying’ is groundless,” Wilson wrote her answer.

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BAYBRIEF | GOVERNMENT

Gone fishin’

EXTENDED FEDERAL RED SNAPPER SEASON BEING DISCUSSED BY JASON JOHNSON

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ll five Gulf states are in the process of negotiating a compromise that could potentially pave the way for an extended red snapper season in federal waters — a new found flexibility in Washington for which Alabama officials are crediting President Donald Trump’s administration. For the past several years, the length of the snapper season has been a highly politicized issue along the Gulf Coast, where recreational and commercial snapper fishing are large contributors to the tourism and food production industries. In federal waters, which start nine miles from the coast, the length of red snapper season is set annually by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) through the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council based on assessments of their population in the Gulf. In 2015 and 2016, NOAA set nine-day seasons — some of the shortest seasons on record until this year, when a three-day snapper season was set in early May. While the 2017 the season — June 1 through June 3 —  has already come and gone, the Alabama Department of Conservation and Natural Resources provided a glimmer of hope for anglers last week. Part of the U. S. Department of Commerce, NOAA is under the purvey of newly appointed Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, and Acting ADCNR Commissioner Chris Blankenship said Ross has been far more open to the Gulf states having a bigger role in fisheries management. “We’ve been working to get the department to take a fresh look at the red snapper issue here in the Gulf, and we’ve been successful” he said. “They’ve recognized the disparity between the state and federal government and have agreed to give us the benefit of the doubt this year.”

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Blankenship said officials from Alabama, Florida, Mississippi, Louisiana and Texas have been in talks with Ross and staff as well as several U.S. Congressmen — talks aimed at developing a plan that would allow more snapper fishing opportunities in 2017. Though nothing is finalized, a current proposal would see “state and federal waters open on Saturdays and Sundays through Labor Day, Sept. 4, 2017, beginning June 17. That would also include the extended weekends around the Fourth of July and Labor Day holidays. It could potentially add more than 20 days to a federal season initially scheduled for three but would do so at the expense of the more-lengthy seasons in state-controlled waters. The 2017 season in Alabama’s waters began May 26 and is scheduled to run through Monday, July 31, but under the proposed compromise, state waters overseen by Alabama and the other four Gulf states would all “close on weekdays” for the remainder of the summer. “As part of this agreement to get more federal days, we had to give up some of our state days to make sure we didn’t create a situation where we could overfish,” Blankenship said. “We want it to be good management. There’s been a certain amount of discussion on what that is, but after negotiations, I think we’re very close to reaching an agreement.” According to Blankenship, all four states are behind the effort, but the methods each one uses to set its own seasons can vary, which has added some time to the process. In Alabama, ADCNR can simply set the date and bag limit for each season, but in states like Florida and Texas, those decisions are made by public commissions or require public input.

Despite those hurdles, Blankenship said he’s confident the agreement could be approved this week. That’s a good thing for fishermen, too, because according to U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne’s office, all five states need to all be on the same page with regard to season length in order for the extension to withstand legal challenge. Last week, Byrne told Sean Sullivan on FM Talk 106.5 that similar attempts had been successfully challenged in federal court. He also said there’s little doubt a lawsuit would be filed over extending the 2017 season — either by the “commercial seafood industry” or “one of these big environmental groups.” “I’m not overly optimistic, but I am cautiously optimistic that we can get something worked out for this summer,” Byrne said. “I want to make that very clear — this is just for this summer, not a permanent fix. We still have to have a piece of legislation in order to have a permanent fix.” In a bit of optimism, though, Byrne said he believes “going through this exercise” this year could lend momentum to legislative efforts that have failed to deliver a long-term solution to the red snapper issues in the past, which were mostly due to a lack of support in the Senate. Both Byrne and Blankenship said they’ve been pleasantly surprised by the commitment Ross and his staff have had to working with states toward a compromise — something both said is a change from the rigidity of the previous administration. “I’m very encouraged by the Trump administration and their willingness to listen to the states. I think because of that, the states have been very forthcoming with them and we’ve tried to work towards a solution,” Blankenship said. “We see this as an opportunity to really reset the dynamics between the states and the federal government on how fisheries are managed.” While initial feedback from fishermen has been positive, many have concerns with the proposal — some opposed to cutting into the 49-day season set in Alabama waters, and others seeing it as a band-aid on the larger problem. Others were worried that without changing the methods used to set each season, an increased catch in 2017 might cause overages in pre-set quotas that could adversely affect the length of the 2018 season — especially if a lawsuit challenging the extension is successful. Blankenship seemed confident that won’t occur, though, adding that the possibility of overfishing was factored in when officials determined the number of fishing days that would be shaved off of Alabama’s season. Plus with the 2017 snapper season limited to just three days, Blankenship said something needed to be done as soon as possible. “Really, we were at a place where we had three days to fish,” Blankenship said. “If we didn’t do something that changed the dynamic of how these fisheries are managed, I don’t how next year could have been much longer.”


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Comeback kid JONES TO RUN AGAIN FOR MAYOR BY DALE LIESCH Photo | Lagniappe

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Former Mobile Mayor Sam Jones at a Mobile United debate in 2013.

ormer Mobile Mayor Sam Jones will announce his intention to run again for the city’s top office on Saturday, June 17 at Greater Nazaree Baptist Church, according to an email from the samjones4mayor@ gmail.com account. In a short phone interview, Jones confirmed he is planning a press conference to make the announcement, but gave few additional details. The message itself points to an “important campaign announcement” by Jones at 4:30 p.m. at the church. The email follows months of speculation and several sources confirming that Jones would run against incumbent Mayor Sandy Stimpson in the August contest. Over the past two weeks, Facebook posts have been circulating with Jones pictured sitting at a large table with members of what is purported to be his political team. In one, people are encouraged to send donations to a post office box.

“The fate of our city is in our hands and we need every voice to be heard,” the email reads. “We need your help to build a strong, organized and aggressive grassroots operation.” The campaign also asks for volunteers. “There’s no special expertise required, and you don’t have to be a political expert,” the message states. “Like me, all you need is the personal commitment, determination and belief that you can help make a difference in the quality of life for the citizens of Mobile. I firmly believe that volunteers like you are the most important part of any political movement.” Jones will join Stimpson as a mayoral candidate in the Aug. 22 election. Stimpson defeated Jones for the mayor’s seat four years ago. Jones served as mayor for eight years prior to that after serving on the Mobile County Commission from 1987-2005.

Matter of law

QUESTIONS REMAIN OVER NONPROFIT VP’S STATUS UNDER HATCH ACT BY DALE LIESCH

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s the Mobile Housing Board of Commissioners moves toward transitioning all employees from the entity’s nonprofit Mobile Development Enterprises, questions remain about how the proposed move will impact State Rep. Adline Clarke’s status under a law meant to prohibit employees paid by federal grants from taking partisan office. Clarke, a Democrat, is currently vice president at MDE, and it is unclear how her role will change when the Mobile County Personnel Board redefines the nonprofit’s positions under the direction of MHB. Board Vice Chairman Reid Cummings said MDE employees would have to reapply for the positions. Clarke and former MHB Executive Director Dwayne Vaughn previously told Lagniappe that because Clarke works for a nonprofit her position is not subject to the Hatch Act. The U.S. Office of Special Counsel (OSC) confirmed this week that employees of a nonprofit are regulated by the Hatch Act only if their salaries are paid 100 percent from Community Services Block Grants or Head Start funds. Lagniappe made a formal request in a June 7 email to MHB attorney Raymond Bell for records related to grant funding for all MBE and MHB salaries. Bell responded on June 12 with “Please send this request to the Housing Board.”

Lagniappe also asked Clarke through email how she was paid, among other questions, but she did not respond. In response to a previous email sent earlier in the week asking about her Hatch Act status if she moved to MHB from MDE, Clarke wrote that “all decisions regarding the employment positions will be made by the Board of Commissioners of the Mobile Housing Board and the MDE Board. I do not know what positions will be available after the changes.” Employees who do not work for a nonprofit are prohibited by the Hatch Act from participating in partisan elections if 100 percent of their salary is paid by any federal grant, OSC confirmed. Clarke did receive an advisory opinion from OSC in 2013 stating she was not paid 100 percent from federal funds and therefore was not regulated by the Hatch Act. A source told Lagniappe that Clarke was paid through the Central Office Cost Center budget, which is made up of non-federalized money. Lori Shackelford, housing authority CFO and acting executive director, did not return a call seeking to confirm this. It’s unclear whether Clarke’s status or payment method would have to change if her job is transitioned from MDE to MHB. J u n e 1 5 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 7


BAYBRIEF | SCHOOLS

Redefining ‘success’ SCHOOLS RE-EVALUATE READINESS AMID TESTING CRITICISM BY JASON JOHNSON

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n the past five years, Mobile County has had multiple schools defined as “failing” by the state of Alabama, but with concerns over the test determining that designation swirling in Montgomery, local educators are looking for a “broader and more relevant” way to measure success. Superintendent Martha Peek announced last week the Mobile County Public School System (MCPSS) would be voluntarily taking part in “Redefining Ready,” a national initiative created by the School Superintendents Association (AASA). Though the program has no bearing on standards or performance measures set at the state level, looking at MCPSS through the lens of Redefining Ready could offer a glimpse into student performance against multiple, varied indicators as opposed to a single test. “Right now, in the state of Alabama, we’re using the most high-stakes measures of student achievement that I’ve ever witnessed in my 40-some-odd years in education,” Peek told MCPSS staff last week, referring to the ACT Aspire. “We can use multiple metrics to measure student success, we can recognize the abilities of all of our students, we can help them develop their full potential.” The ACT Aspire, which is given annually to students in grades 3-8 and grade 10, not only determines “failing” schools under the Alabama Accountability Act, it also will impact where schools fall on the “A-F grade scale” the Alabama State Department of Education (ALSDE) is unveiling in December. According to AASA President David Schuler, the research driving Redefining Ready suggests tests like the ACT Aspire don’t adequately measure how prepared students are to enter college or join the workforce. Instead, he said, they measure how well students take tests. The superintendent of a district in the Chicago suburbs,

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Schuler said ACT results indicated only 47 percent of students in his district were “college- and career-ready,” while Redefining Ready suggested 79 percent were — a number more reflective of the 81 percent of graduates Schuler claims attend a second year of college, on average. “Students are more than the score they earn on a test,” Schuler said. “When we allow ourselves to be defined by a single test score, we not only devalue those students, we devalue the teachers, the parents and the communities in which they live. That is simply unfair, it’s inaccurate, it’s inappropriate and it has to change.” In Redefining Ready, students can be deemed “collegeready” based on standardized testing benchmarks, as well as by academic indicators such as GPA and satisfactory performance in advanced placement, dual enrollment or international baccalaureate programs. On a career track, students are considered “ready” when they’ve identified a potential career field and met benchmarks for community service, internships, on-the-job training and earned industry credentials — a number of which are already available to MCPSS students through the Signature Academies at each of the district’s 12 high schools. Though there’s no cost associated with Redefining Ready, keeping up with its standards could require MCPSS to add programming down the road. According to Peek, there’s already “a firm foundation” at MCPSS for those standards, though there’s still some work to be done. “It’s been a series of jumps along the way for us — making sure that we build business, industry and higher education partnerships, that we have internships in place and that coursework is rigorous no matter what you’re going into,” Peek said. “The next stage will be adding additional components we’ll need to reach the level we’re seeing in Redefining Ready. One of the gaps we have right

now is community service, so that’s something we’ll have to increase.” It’s also no coincidence MCPSS is jumping into Redefining Ready as state officials weigh how student performance in Alabama will be evaluated going forward. Peek said she’s hopeful MCPSS can nudge the state toward a system that evaluates more than test results. “Of course, we always have and will follow the state guidelines, but what we would like to do is maybe be a catalyst for the state and get them to look at something other than just one test score,” she said. “Particularly with the Aspire, everybody is struggling right now.” While Alabama’s results on the Aspire have been consistently poor — proficiency averages among all students have hovered around 50 percent since 2014 — concerns over its alignment with Alabama’s College- and Career-Ready standards has added to its problems. Last year, federal education officials raised questions about how well Aspire aligned with those standards, and since then, ALSDE and the Alabama State Board of Education have been slowly moving toward getting rid of the test altogether. Aspire was omitted from ALSDE’s 2017-2018 testing calendar, and State Superintendent Michael Sentance has already asked federal officials once if Alabama could drop Aspire and test students in 2018 using exams that could potentially take its place in the future. At a meeting last Thursday, however, Sentance told state school board members his request had been all but shot down in Washington. He said he plans to present the board with recommendations for action in late June, but in the interim the future of a standardized test with massive implications has been left up in the air. Locally, Aspire is also administered electronically, which has presented its own set of challenges. Recently Peek told Lagniappe she was “concerned with the validity of the test scores for 2017” because technical problems were reported at 48 of 64 MCPSS testing sites. “Some of the problems we experienced included lapses in time between test questions and the test freezing and ending before the students got to the last question,” she said. “We began reporting these problems as they occurred, but we have yet to receive a solution from ACT.” Despite those concerns, though, Peek said the U.S. Department of Education’s rejection of a waiver that would drop the Aspire has left very few shortterm options. She said she regrets federal officials “aren’t looking at the overall complexity of the situation.” “We need time to either identify another test or develop one that is aligned to our academic standards,” Peek said. “The practical thing would have been to issue a waiver and look at our formative data and readiness indicators while we work to replace the ACT Aspire.”


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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE COUNTY

The fuss over buses PRICHARD COUNCILMAN CONTINUES CAMPAIGN FOR EXPANDED TRANSIT BY DALE LIESCH

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f a local city councilman has his way, Prichard and other small communities in Mobile County will be able to make their own decisions when it comes to mass transit. Funding will be the biggest obstacle facing the proposal Prichard City Councilman Lorenzo Martin has been working on since the Mobile City Council voted to cut funding to WAVE Transit routes in Prichard, Chickasaw and other areas of the county in 2016. “To all municipalities outside of Mobile, we have a responsibility to the handicapped, elderly, women and children and all those that are in need of and use public transportation,” Martin wrote in a letter. “I am proposing a countywide public transportation authority that will work and speak on behalf of the citizens of Mobile County.” Trying to find the needed revenue to either replace the previous WAVE routes or add a new service would be “daunting” for any single municipality to take on, Martin wrote. “Together, we can work on [an] authority that will better serve our community and the rural areas for years to come.” The Mobile City Council cut almost $700,000 from WAVE’s budget in fall 2015, before officially cutting the routes in 2016. In a phone interview June 12, Martin said he expects the authority would have to spend from $700,000 to $1 million to re-establish the WAVE routes in Prichard and other portions of the county. “Currently, if we ignore it, people are walking miles to work or to get a ride,” Martin said. The only WAVE stops in Prichard are at the hub,

which is paid for with federal funding. “The buses come as far as the hub,” Martin said. “It’s impossible for three of the city’s districts to benefit from the hub.” If the proposed authority, on the other hand, wanted to start its own service, the capital and infrastructure costs would be much more than that, South Alabama Regional Planning Commission (SARPC) Transportation Director

THERE’S ALWAYS BEEN THIS NATIONAL FIGURE THAT FOR EVERY DOLLAR INVESTED IN TRANSIT THERE’S EIGHT DOLLARS GIVEN BACK. MOBILE IS THE ONLY CITY INVESTING THAT DOLLAR.” Kevin Harrison said. Although Harrison said he supports a regional transit system, he researched on his own how much could be raised through a gasoline tax in Prichard, Saraland and Chickasaw, but said it wouldn’t produce enough revenue to even re-establish the WAVE routes. The funding for such a plan would most likely have to come from another source, according to Harrison.

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In addition to having to buy buses, Harrison said, other startup costs, such as maintenance, would be too great to overcome for a newly formed county authority. The county is eligible for roughly $1 million per year in federal money for rural transit, Harrison said, but Prichard by itself wouldn’t qualify because it is part of a larger urban grant — spanning from Creola to Bayou La Batre — given to Mobile County for WAVE. Since the county doesn’t lay claim to the grant, it is redistributed statewide, Harrison said. One big problem was the city of Mobile was funding the lion’s share of WAVE Transit, Harrison said. Unlike the Baldwin Rural Area Transportation System (BRATS), where one-third is funded by local subsidy, 50 percent to 60 percent of WAVE’s funding came from Mobile, Harrison said; no other municipalities paid for the service. “That’s part of the problem,” Harrison said. Martin said BRATS is successful, in part, because it can schedule pickups and avoid running empty buses along routes during non-peak hours. He also said the Prichard routes cut by the Mobile City Council and WAVE’s parent company, McDonald Transit, benefited the city in the long run. He said Prichard residents who took the bus did most of their shopping in Mobile. “For the most essential things, you have to come to Mobile,” Martin said. “For so many different things, you have to spend money in Mobile. Mobile looked at the budget and made it a cut-and-dry issue. They didn’t consider the money spent.” Harrison agreed having the routes in place probably benefited Mobile, to a point. “It’s a real situation because people in Prichard spent money in Mobile,” Harrison said. “There’s always been this national figure that for every dollar invested in transit there’s eight dollars given back. Mobile is the only city investing that dollar.” Transportation countywide will become more of an issue as distribution centers for Wal-Mart and Amazon come on line in the near future, Harrison said. Two years ago, SARPC commissioned a WAVE Transit development plan, Harrison said. Recommendations from transit consultants at the time included a change to a 30-minute headway on routes and fixed routes to the Mobile Regional Airport and McGowin Park, among other things. Instead of investing the $6 million needed to implement a number of recommendations, the city cut most of the routes outside the city limits. “It’s not operating fairly,” Martin said of WAVE and Mobile. “If you’re going to be the mother of all municipalities, you have to act like it.”


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BAYBRIEF | POLITICS

Senate scramble FULL SLATE OF CANDIDATES BATTLE FOR SESSIONS’ SEAT BY LEE HEDGEPETH

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tive congressmen. “Mo Brooks is a fighter,” Meadows said in an email to supporters. “He has the most conservative voting record in the Alabama congressional delegation. He’s got an A-rating from Numbers USA and the NRA. He has proven himself to be a proven constitutional conservative in the mold of Ted Cruz, Mike Lee, Rand Paul and Ben Sasse. We need more like him in the Senate. I’m all-in to help Mo Brooks defeat the D.C. establishment and send him to the Senate. I hope you are too.” Pittman, a Montrose Republican, is one of the few locals running in the race. While he admits his name recognition isn’t that of Luther Strange or Roy Moore, Pittman declared his candidacy saying his would be a campaign for principles of free enterprise, not popularity. “We can debate the priorities and decide what government can or cannot do, but we need to be 100 percent behind free enterprise,” Sen. Pittman, who owns a tractor supply company in Baldwin County, has said. “It’s the best way for the most people to reach success.” That view hasn’t been shared by all of Pittman’s followers, however. During the state’s last legislative session, Pittman’s lone opposition to a bill mandating coverage of autism therapy caused its near defeat through legislative maneuvering — something supporters of the law, which eventually passed with the addition of an age cap, say was “disappointing.” Pittman was the only lawmaker to vote against the bill when it eventually came up for a vote. “I have great sympathy with people who have autism,” Pittman said at the time. “But as the budget chairman, this bill came through after we passed the budget and there are costs associated with it.” Also running for the GOP nod are Randy Brinson, Dominic Gentile, Bryan Peeples, James Beretta, Mary Maxwell,

Photo/Gabriel Tynes

oters will consider a full slate of 19 candidates — 11 Republicans and eight Democrats — when they head to the polls later this summer for the U.S. Senate special election primary for the seat vacated by Jeff Sessions, now U.S. Attorney General. The seat is currently held by Luther Strange, a Republican who was appointed to replace Sessions by former Gov. Robert Bentley, who later resigned from his seat after pleading guilty to misdemeanor campaign finance violations. That reality cast a cloud over the appointment of Strange, who had been charged with overseeing the Bentley investigation. Now, Strange finds himself in a tight battle to protect his seat in the nation’s highest legislative body. Strange’s strongest opposition in the state’s GOP primary is likely to come from three relatively well-known Republicans: former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice Roy Moore, U.S. House Rep. Mo Brooks and State Sen. Trip Pittman. As of late, Brooks and Strange have gotten into a backand-forth endorsement competition, with Sen. Strange garnering more national, institutional support while Brooks has gotten the backing of both locals and representatives of the far-right base. For example, Strange has been endorsed by the National Rifle Association and his campaign is being aided by the Senate Leadership Fund, a PAC supporting Republican senatorial incumbents. Brooks, on the other hand, has been endorsed by conservative voices such as Sean Hannity and Laura Ingraham, as well as such local grassroots organizations as Alabama Patriots, a tea party group here in the state. In the last few days, Brooks also picked up support from Mark Meadows, a House Representative who heads up the so-called Freedom Caucus, a powerful group of conserva-

Luther Strange was appointed to the Senate after Jeff Sessions’ move to the Justice Department. He will face a score of challengers in the primary election Aug. 15. Joseph Breault and Karen Haiden Jackson. On the Democratic side, the front-runner in the primary election is former U.S. Attorney Doug Jones, who is best known for having successfully prosecuted those involved in the infamous 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, which killed four young black girls in 1963. Other Democratic candidates include Will Boyd, Vann Caldwell, Jason Fisher, Michael Hansen, Robert Kennedy Jr., Brian McGee and Charles Nana Tchienkou. The only public poll released in the race, a Google Consumers survey of a relatively small number of Alabamians, has Jones losing in a two-way race to Moore, 36 percent to 44 percent. The poll has a margin of error of +/- 5.2 percent. The special primary election will be held Aug. 15. A runoff will be held on Sept. 26 if necessary. The general election to permanently replace Sessions will be Dec. 12.

BAYBRIEF | ALABAMA

Death doubled

ported by the state of Alabama and feels he should not suffer a little pain during the execution,” the statement, which was read to the press by the state’s prisons commissioner, said. “What does he think those three people suffered after he shot them, leaving them in a freezer?” ALABAMA EXECUTES SECOND INMATE IN AS MANY WEEKS Alabama Attorney General Steven Marshall also commented on Melson’s execution. BY LEE HEDGEPETH “Robert Melson’s decades-long avoidance of justice is over,” Marshall said in a statement. “For 23 years, the families of the three young people whose lives he ast week the state of Alabama executed Robert backs of both his hands. The execution chamber was small took, as well as a survivor, have waited for closure and healing. That process can Bryant Melson for the 1994 homicide of Tamika Col- and austere, with 14 rows of bare fluorescent bulbs overhead finally begin tonight.” lins, Nathaniel Baker and Darrell Collier, during the lighting up the inmate lying below. Gov. Kay Ivey, who denied a clemency request from Melson, also released a robbery of a Gadsden fast-food restaurant where the Moments later, at about 9:54 p.m., the prison’s warden statement on the execution. three victims worked. Melson’s execution was Alabama’s read the death warrant and asked Melson for any last words. “As governor, I do not relish the responsibility that I hold related to executions second in two weeks. Melson shook his head “no,” and the warden and an assisof those convicted of capital murder in this state. However, it is my duty and my In the two days leading up to his execution, Melson tant left the room, leaving only Melson, a prison guard and charge, on behalf of the people of Alabama, to ensure that justice is done, by both had been visited by his uncle, his brother, his cousin, his a chaplain. the victims and the convicted,” Ivey said. aunt and two lawyers. The day of the execution, Melson At about 9:57 p.m., the chaplain knelt beside Melson “I have given the facts of this case and Mr. Melson’s request for clemency refused both breakfast and a final meal and made no special momentarily, placing his hand over the condemned inmate’s the highest level of scrutiny and review. After carefully considering the nature requests, according to prison officials. and appearing to pray. As the chaplain moved away and the of this crime, a triple murder in a public restaurant, the evidence presented to Prior to the scheduled 6 p.m. execution, the U.S. Suexecution began about a minute later, Melson’s hands, chest and considered by a jury, and the mitigating factors presented by Mr. Melson, I preme Court issued a temporary stay, delaying the procedure and face visibly began shaking against the restraints, move- determined that justice and the law of this state required me to deny his clemency while justices considered Melson’s last-minute legal chalment that lessened, but lasted until about 10:01 p.m. petition and to allow the punishment to be carried out. lenges involving the use of midazolam in the lethal injection At 10:03, the African-American male guard performed “Mr. Melson murdered three people and attempted to murder a fourth, while protocol. Experts say midazolam can fail to work in highconsciousness tests, first saying “inmate Melson” three the victims were trying to do their best to earn a living and provide for their stress situations, and in the December execution of Ronald times without response. The guard then pushed back Melfamilies. Our court system has done its job in this matter and his convictions have Bert Smith here in Alabama the inmate coughed and heaved son’s left eyelid three times and pinched the back of his left been upheld. Accordingly, the laws of this state have been carried out. It is my for 13 minutes after being administered the drug. arm. Melson did not react. prayer that, with tonight’s events, the victims’ families can finally have closure.” The Supreme Court lifted its stay at about 9:10 p.m. By 10:07 p.m., Melson’s breathing had ceased completeSome in Alabama politics used the execution, however, as a means of pointing without comment, allowing the execution to move forward. ly and his lips began turning purple, but both his fists were to larger issues with the death penalty in the Heart of Dixie. At around 9:30 p.m., five members of the media, includ- still clenched with his thumb inside. Alabama State Sen. Dick Brewbaker, who announced he will not run for reing a Lagniappe reporter, were moved by prison van from a At that point, around 10:15, members of the press were election, said the execution should be a chance for the state to scrutinize its death nearby media center to a witness room just outside Holman moved from the witness room back to the media center. On penalty system. Correctional Facility’s execution chamber. the way, prison spokesman Bob Horton confirmed Melson’s “In light of the most recent execution, I’d like to remind my GOP colleagues After a few minutes of waiting in the witness room, time of death as 10:27 p.m. that [Alabama’s] death penalty process isn’t as sound or fair as we think,” Brewwhich was lit by one salmon-colored light, the brown-blue After the execution, family members of those murdered baker tweeted after the execution. “It’s time to revisit the idea of an Innocence curtain concealing the chamber itself from the witness by Melson released a statement decrying the inmate’s fight Commission or at least establish conviction integrity units in each circuit.” room was drawn back. Revealed was Melson, an Africanfor an execution without suffering. While Alabama currently has no other inmates with execution dates set, there American man, strapped to a gurney with IVs entering the “He has been on death row for over 21 years being supare 182 people on death row here in the state.

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COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

‘Dad Bods’ and ‘Dad Jokes’ on Father’s Day ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

THESE DAYS A DAD’S SLIGHTEST FLAWS ARE HARPED UPON MERCILESSLY. LET’S TAKE THE WHOLE “DAD BOD” CONCEPT, FOR INSTANCE.”

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Situation: You’ve just had a haircut. “Dad Joke: What happened to you, son? Had a run-in with a lawn mower?!” First of all, that’s a grandpa joke, so I’m not sure the example really works. But there are basic conceptual issues with the whole idea of Dad Jokes. Dad is in a bad place when it comes to humor. If we dads told the kinds of jokes to the kids, wife and extended family that we might to our other dad friends, the definition of “Dad Joke” might be quite different. Of course, if the kids went to school and repeated those jokes, Dad would be in hot water. Corny jokes are really about the only realm of humor left to Dad. You can’t tell dirty or profane jokes to the kids or their friends, and without any jokes you end up being a “lame dad.” The pressure is on for Dad to be clever without being embarrassing. That’s a mighty thin line. If Dad devolves into knock-knock jokes, yes, ridicule is deserved, but a little bit of corn isn’t going to hurt anyone and it beats Dad telling your new boyfriend a hooker joke. So this Father’s Day, cut Dad a little slack. Let him swim without making whale noises or commenting when he has that third burger. Tolerate the corny jokes knowing Dad may actually have some pretty good zingers he’s holding back so he doesn’t get a frying pan upside the head. And for goodness’ sake, go get the guy a cold beer and say thanks for being there for you, and tell him he doesn’t remind you one bit of a grazing manatee.

THEGADFLY

“If human bodies were cuts of meat, the Dad Bod would skew more to marbled rib eye than filet mignon; or, if human bodies were sea mammals, Dad Bod would be more like a grazing manatee than a speedy dolphin. The Dad Bod is more mudslide than mountain, more soft serve than sorbet, more sad trombone than clarinet, more mashed potato than skinny fry. The Dad Bod is built for comfort.” This explanation is particularly galling to me since my daughter has taken to calling me “beluga” all the time. I’m assuming this is more about the pudgy white whale than the fancy caviar. So the Dad Bod is just another way of calling your father “fat.” But let’s examine how Dad got his “bod,” shall we? Perhaps there’s more behind all of this than Dad just getting lazy now that he has his “mate” and “brood.” First, the expectation that people in general should all have washboard stomachs is one foisted upon us by Hollywood and actors like “The Rock,” those two Ryan guys and Marky Mark, all of whom must have it written into their contracts that they will be shirtless for at least half of any movie in which they appear. I personally like to think many of us dads have washboard stomachs fit for more delicate clothing. You’re not going to wash your silk nighty on some hard, scratchy Marky Mark stomach. No, you’re going to look for something a little more rounded and less likely to create damage, something that works with your fabric softener — like a “mature washboard.”

But let’s say Dad has progressed a bit beyond even that into the “Dunlop Stage” — as in his pants dun lopped over his belt! Ha,ha! (We’ll get to dad jokes next.) There are reasons wholly outside of Dad’s control this might have happened. Cynical children brought up in an age where everyone is supposed to be “ripped” until their mid-80s might point to Dad’s fondness for beer and wings as one cause of his need to buy bigger pants and more billowing shirts. BUT, the root causes of Dad’s beer and chicken intake are probably not at all born of a lack of willpower, gluttony or alcoholism, but rather necessitated by the rigors of his day-to-day life making money for the family so it can be spent on frivolous things. While this type of self-medication might not be the healthiest way to handle simmering resentments, Dad has work to do and doesn’t have time to hang around on a therapist’s couch staring at a navel that is surrounded by a perfect six-pack. Also, having children around — especially teenage children — means lots and lots of food Dad might not otherwise eat ends up in the house. Is Dad supposed to bond with the family eating a yogurt cup while the kids chow down on pizza? So kids, when you see Dad’s gut realize it was built through love and personal sacrifice. The other one I keep hearing from my teenage kids is complaints about “Dad Jokes.” Let’s go back to Urban Dictionary. It defines “Dad Joke” as “an embarrassingly bad joke. Often demonstrated during wedding or 18th/21st birthday speeches.” It offers this rather lame example of a Dad Joke.

Cartoon/Laura Rasmussen

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t’s not easy being a dad these days. Everywhere you look there are references to the “Dad Bod” or “Dad Jokes.” Watch a commercial or sitcom and dad is the idiot who can’t figure out anything, then stands there smiling sheepishly as some snot-nosed kid or smug wife shows him how to screw in a light bulb or properly spread mustard on his sandwich. The days of “Father Knows Best” are long gone. In all the ‘50s sitcoms everyone expected Dad to be able to fix all of their problems. Often good ol’ Dad would let everyone struggle a bit, then walk in like Solomon and make everything right with a couple of sentences or the turn of a wrench. Yeah, that was probably more reverence than we dads deserve, but now it’s swung back too far the other way. These days a dad’s slightest flaws are harped upon mercilessly. Let’s take the whole “Dad Bod” concept, for instance. The Urban Dictionary defines “Dad Bod” as “a male body type that is best described as ‘softly round.’ It’s built upon the theory that once a man has found a mate and fathered a child, he doesn’t need to worry about maintaining a sculpted physique.” I goes on to be a bit more insultingly specific:

WONDER IF JEFF SESSIONS MISSES THE GOOD ‘OL DAYS?


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COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

As Bizzaro World Turns

ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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1. One of the looniest athletes in the history of American sports is seemingly on a diplomatic mission this week to North Korea … again. And just as he arrived, an American student who was in prison serving a 15-year hard-labor term for stealing a propaganda poster was released. Coincidence? Apparently it is. But the very bombastic and controversial former NBA player Dennis Rodman told press on Tuesday he was looking to do “something that’s pretty positive” in the rogue state. Move over, Henry Kissinger. Rodman has been on at least four other trips there, which he dubbed “basketball diplomacy,” and has met with the very chunky North Korean dictator, Kim Jong Un, who enjoys long walks on the beach, starving his people, knockknock jokes, the occasional family poisoning, playing with missiles and trying to kill us. None of this behavior seems to horrify Dennis, though, as he has called the murderous leader “a very good guy.” He even sang “Happy Birthday” to him on one of his trips. (Wonder if it was Marilyn-style? Hap-py Birth-day, Mis-ter Dic-tator!) Crazyville, I tell ya. Crazyville. But the best part of Ambassador Rodman’s diplomatic trip this time is that it is being paid for by the cannabis currency company PotCoin. Seriously. You really can’t even make this stuff up. But thankfully there was something that does give me hope that we can one day escape Bizarro World and return to the American way of life we all know and love. You see, once PotCoin announced they were sponsoring

a crazy basketball player and former reality TV star who was once a contestant on our current president’s former reality TV show (that part of the sentence is still Bizarro, keep reading for news from our old world), their currency value soared almost immediately, jumping more than 60 percent. Of course it did. Of course it did. God bless the USA! 2. The U.S. Attorney General and our former senator from right here in sweet home Alabama, Jeff Sessions, who is regarded by many in the state as the consummate Boy Scout and the straightest of arrows, testified before Congress this week because he is under a red cloud of suspicion that he colluded with Russian spies while working for the Trump campaign. I do not think Sessions is a Russian spy. All of this sounds more like the plot of some cheesy Cold War movie out of the ‘80s than reality. But again, we are living in Bizarro World. As such, maybe we could use some of these lame movies to learn how to deal with these pesky Russians who have been all up in our business. I propose we take a look at the cinematic masterpiece I regard as the greatest Cold War movie of all time, “Rocky IV.” Need a refresher? I got you covered. This is the one where the evil Russian Ivan Drago kills Apollo Creed, while Apollo is wearing those iconic American flag boxing shorts. This aggression against the U.S. and Carl Weathers would not stand for Mr. Balboa. So he went back to Russia and he didn’t come with love. No, instead he brought a can of good ol’ fashioned American whoop ass and opened it up on Drago with a one-two punch. Bam! I guess we showed them who’s boss! USA! USA! USA! Since we can’t seem to control (or won’t) these electionmeddling, rat-hat-wearing, Stoli-swilling spies, I think it is time to call upon a man who has a proven track record of crushing the Russians. That’s right, it’s time to send the Italian-American Stallion to the Mayflower Hotel to give Sergey Kislyak a taste of the same medicine he gave Drago. Problem solved. We win over Russia . . .again!

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Photo | United Artists

t’s official. We are living in Bizarro World. Everything is upside down. Dogs are biting fleas. Trees are falling off leaves. Our president may at any time cause an international incident with 140 words. I know, I know. You probably think I am being hyperbolic, but I assure you I am not. I am deadly serious. And in order to prove my case, I offer you four very concrete pieces of evidence. …

Yo Sessions! It’s time to let Rocky take care of the Russians! Go get ‘em, Rock! 3. Bill Cosby is awaiting a verdict on sexual assault charges. Dr. Heathcliff Huxtable taught Rudy and us all what “zrbtt” spelled and what it was. I still “zrbtt” my own kids to this day. When Theo wanted a “Gordon Gartrell” shirt, he said, “No 14-year-old boy should have a $95 shirt, unless he is on stage, with his four brothers.” A lesson many parents could still stand to hear when their precious little angels are begging for designer purses and sunglasses. He gave birth to a giant sub sandwich and he officiated the “funeral service” for Rudy’s goldfish. The Huxtables were the family we all wished we were a part of and he was the dad we wished we had. I watched it every Thursday night and every afternoon after school at 4 p.m. And the whole time he was acting as “America’s Dad,” he was allegedly drugging and sexually assaulting women. More than 40 have accused him of such. I know sometimes we all like to see a star who has gotten a little too big for their britches fall from grace. But this one is truly disappointing. In the world I want to live in this just can’t be happening. But in the real world, if these allegations are proven to be true, I hope his victims get the justice they deserve and find peace. Just sickening. 4. Man rompers are a real thing. This may be more of a sign of the apocalypse than Bizarro World. But it probably works for both. I rest my case.


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COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

Dems winning with relentless pursuit of obfuscation BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM

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ou have to give it to the opposition party. If there’s one thing Democrats have been successful doing since taking it on the chin last November, it’s promoting an anti-Trump narrative and being nimble enough to adjust as the circumstances and storylines have evolved. That has in effect stalled the Trump agenda that was supposed to hit the ground running immediately after inauguration. Instead, this White House has used up too much political capital on trying to put out a never-ending string of fires that ideally would have been used pursuing a border wall, tax reform and Obamacare repeal. Why didn’t they see this coming? The Trump White House was caught completely flat-footed. It’s difficult to understand why they might have expected a coming together of the nation after such a stunning outcome. It’s as if Trump, who came into office with the lowest approval rating in the history of Gallup, was somehow going to overcome that and lead the nation to a “kumbaya” moment. It wasn’t going to happen in our present-day politics at a time when government plays such a role in everything. There’s also a psychological aspect. It’s like when Alabama beats Auburn, or vice versa, in the Iron Bowl. Let’s say that game plays out like the election and one team wins off of a last-second play even though the other team was a heavy favorite. The state isn’t going to unite behind the winner of the match-up and cheer them on against their next opponent. There is way too much bitterness for that. The two prior presidents had different circumstance upon entering office that made it a little easier for them to have some accomplishments in the early going. President Barack Obama had the benefit of a few things Trump does not. First, there was a desire for the country to somewhat unite behind the first AfricanAmerican president. Given the country’s past sins, many people wanted to embrace Obama’s presidency. Also, the economy was in shambles, and without a lot of good answers from the private sector on how to fix it, many people were seeking solutions from government. That allowed Obama to do some big things, including a $787 billion stimulus bill, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act and the Affordable Care Act (“Obamacare”). After the 2000 election, President George W. Bush faced a similar response from the opposition party as Trump received, given the election came down to a few hundred votes in Florida. But then the Sept. 11, 2001, terror attacks occurred, which immediately altered the political landscape and gave Bush a Republican congressional majority that lasted through the 2006 midterms. He was able to score numerous legislative victories, but it was downhill after the failed push to reform Social Security. Regardless, none of those circumstances are going to line up for the Trump administration in the short term. Fear and demagoguery are going

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to be the name of the game. According to leaders of the Democratic Party, Republicans want to take away your health insurance, cede U.S. sovereignty to Russian President Vladimir Putin, give tax breaks to millionaires and billionaires at the expense of the poor, and flood the entire peninsula of Florida by allowing global warming to melt the polar ice caps. And we’re only 145 days into this presidential term. Wait until the summer of 2018, just months before the midterms when there is something up for grabs. You can’t fault Trump and his administration for not foreseeing just how their own party on Capitol Hill hasn’t done much to further their cause. Right now, there are concurrent investigations — one by the House Intelligence Committee and another by the Senate Intelligence Committee, looking into the alleged collusion of the 2016 Trump presidential campaign and the Russian government. Republicans control both of those committees. Yet, the basis of those investigations, at least publicly, remains a mystery. Sure there’s smoke. But there’s smoke surrounding every presidential administration going back several decades. That doesn’t mean there is a fire requiring some sort of actionable gesture by the GOP-led U.S. Congress. That’s where you have to applaud Democrats. Through a series of well-publicized narratives, they used misdirection to marginalize a White House that appears to be lost in the wilderness. Part of that is imparting fear into Republican members of Congress who want to hang onto their seats and committee chairmanships through the 2018 midterm elections. Even if they part ways with the Trump White House on all the agenda items that won him the election last November, do they think voters will go to the ballot box and say, “I don’t like the Republican president, but our member of Congress is one of those good Republicans”? Or, “Well, I was going to vote Democrat a year-and-a-half from now, but since they convened a congressional inquiry into the White House, my vote is going GOP”? It makes little sense from a political x’s and o’s standpoint to allow the Democratic Party narrative to reign supreme. Still, here we are with no major legislative victories to speak of and an endless stream of Trump administration figures being paraded before congressional committees comprising, in part, Democrats with an ax to grind. All this made possible in part by your member of Congress. “There needs to be an investigation,” Rep. Bradley Byrne said last March at his town hall meeting about any possible Russian interference in the 2016 campaign. Would he have made such a declaration had his party been in the minority and Hillary Clinton was president? There’s no reason to believe the Republicans could drive such a narrative, given the previous eight years of Barack Obama. For now, that’s the quagmire and likely something that will continue foreseeable future. The Democrats do not control any branch of government in Washington, D.C. But with the media as their tailwind, they have control of the narrative and apparently that is all they need.


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COMMENTARY | THE GRIOT’S CORNER

The best Father’s Day gift: being a dad BY KEN ROBINSON/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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f a per capita spending comparison of the major gift-buying holidays were done, I’m sure it would rank at or near the bottom. If you’re not into tools or lawn maintenance you’re pretty much out of luck. Your gift will quite often: a) require some time figuring out exactly what it is; b) be quickly determined to be of no practical value; c) make a fashion statement you have no desire to make; or d) be something that can cause you serious harm due to your lack of skill in its operation. Happy Father’s Day! In all honesty, though, that’s the beauty and charm of dad’s special day. The first Father’s Day observance was June 10, 1910, in the state of Washington. Although only six years passed between the first commercial Mother’s Day observance on May 10, 1908, and its being turned into a national holiday, it would take about 62 years before Father’s Day, through a proclamation signed by President Richard Nixon in 1972, was recognized as a nationwide holiday. That doesn’t mean that throughout much of the 20th century fathers were regarded as insignificant. Presidents from Woodrow Wilson to Lyndon Johnson in some way publicly acknowledged the importance of fathers in American society. In fact, there was little disagreement with the great psychoanalyst Sigmund Freud’s observation that “I cannot think of any need in childhood as strong as the need for a father’s protection,” or that of the poet George Herbert, who declared, “One [good] father is [worth] more than a hundred schoolmasters.” Today, a dad’s importance is not just based on anecdotal knowledge but grounded in research. Being social animals, we humans learn by modeling the behavior we see. It is

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well documented that a dad’s interaction in the life of his kid(s) can have powerful ramifications. Boys, for good or bad, tend to model themselves after their fathers and girls later in life tend to gravitate to men who possess characteristics displayed by their father. Studies have shown that an involved, supportive and affectionate father can contribute greatly to many areas of a child’s life. From academic achievement, language and

AS A FATHER YOU BECOME RESPONSIBLE FOR BEING, AMONG A NUMBER OF THINGS, A PROTECTOR, NURTURER, LEADER AND PROVIDER. SINGULARLY AND COLLECTIVELY, SUCH RESPONSIBILITY IS AMONG THE MOST IMPORTANT A MAN WILL ACQUIRE AND CARRY OUT IN HIS LIFE. ” cognitive development to a strong sense of well-being and healthy social development, dads are important. Sure, on many television sitcoms and in movies dads are often the clueless, hapless and almost unimportant figures in the home, but nothing can be further from the truth. An aware, engaged and loving dad is of immeasurable value. My own journey down the path of fatherhood began about eight years ago. It was not only one of the most monumental events in my life, but also one of the most

beautiful and awe-inspiring. To this day I’m still in awe of the love and commitment I feel toward the child I have helped bring into this world. It’s a feeling unlike any other. Fatherhood has helped redefine my understanding of manliness. Like many, I was more inclined to associate it with toughness or grit. Now, for me, there is one word that seems to define and exemplify manliness more than any other: responsibility. As a father you become responsible for being, among a number of things, a protector, nurturer, leader and provider. Singularly and collectively, such responsibility is among the most important a man will acquire and carry out in his life. The consequences of not taking this responsibility seriously and executing it faithfully can be costly in many ways. To me, responsibility comprises three crucial components: concern, commitment and action. There is a genuine and consistent concern for the welfare and well-being of the life you played a part in bringing into the world. That concern leads to a commitment to always care for that life. The commitment leads to action on one’s part to display that concern and commitment in tangible, concrete ways. That’s the essence of fatherly responsibility. That’s manliness. I have found that embracing and walking in this mindset is a reward in itself. The short poem “A Father’s Love” sums it up well: A father is respected because He gives his children leadership Appreciated because He gives his children care … Valued because He gives his children time ... Loved because He gives his children the one thing They treasure most — himself. Who needs or cares about a Father’s Day gift when this type of relationship is present between a father and their child or children? I feel so blessed to have it. To those dads out there being dads, I salute you and encourage you to continue on in this noblest of callings we’ve been given. And to those who have not fully embraced their calling, their responsibility as fathers, I say to you: There is nothing more important in life that you will ever do and no gift as precious or valuable to you will ever receive than being called “Dad.”


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BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

Retail development accelerates in West Mobile BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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ocal developers paid $925,000 for 7.16 acres of undeveloped land in the southwest quadrant of Schillinger Road North and Zeigler Boulevard in West Mobile. The buyers will develop the property for retail use. Kenny Nichols with Vallas Realty represented the buyer and David Dexter with NAI Mobile worked for the seller. According to Chris Harle with White-Spunner Realty, roughly 3,500 square feet of space was leased by The Road Eastern Shore Church inside the Jubilee Point Shopping Center at 28600 U.S. Highway 98 in Daphne. Plans are in place to open a new worship center at the location in the near future. Carpenter Homes Inc. has purchased a 1,566-squarefoot office building at 7267 Cottage Hill Road in Mobile for $125,000. Angie McArthur with Stirling Properties represented the seller; Mary Carpenter with Bellator Real Estate & Development worked for the buyer. Tuscaloosa-based Bryant Bank officially opened its 15th branch in Alabama this week. The renovated property is at 24847 Commercial Ave. in Orange Beach. While the building was once a bank, the previous tenant was Orange Beach Lifestyle and Performance Medicine. Local residents Doug Sizemore, SVP of commercial lending, and Carla Givens, branch manager, have been tapped to oversee operations. National Health Group LLC has leased 1,750 square feet of office space in the former Harrison Finance building in Palm Plaza, located at 1109 N. McKenzie St., just south of the hospital in Foley. Andrew Dickman with Stirling Properties worked for the property owner; Shelby Chapman with RE/MAX White Sands represented the tenant. Some 900 square feet of floor space was recently leased by children’s clothing retailer Backyard Child at 25637

Canal Road in the Wolf Bay Plaza Shopping Center in Orange Beach. Chris Harle with White-Spunner Realty managed the transaction. Tradesmen International LLC staffing service has leased 1,500 square feet of office space at 2127 Hickory St. in Loxley. Andrew Dickman and Jill Meeks with Stirling Properties represented the property owner and tenant, respectively. Andrew Chason with Marcus & Millichap reported two Sonic Drive-In fast-food restaurant properties, one in Robertsdale and another in Tuscaloosa, were picked up for nearly $4.4 million by a real estate investment trust. The 1,482-square-foot Robertsdale eatery sits on about an acre at 21841 U.S. Highway 59. Both restaurants will remain open for business for the foreseeable future according to Millichap, who worked for the seller in the transactions. Eastern Shore Chiropractic & Sports Clinic Inc. has leased 1,847 square feet of medical space at Pinebrook Shopping Center in Mobile, with plans to open a second location later this summer. David Ashford and Alex Benson with Southpace Properties represented the property owner. Jeff Barnes with Stirling Properties worked for the tenant.

SMG selects new GM for local properties

After an extensive search, Kendall Wall has been selected as SMG’s general manager for the Arthur R. Outlaw Mobile Convention Center, Mobile Civic Center and the Mobile Saenger Theatre. Wall has 30 years of experience that involve the operation and management of public facilities. He has diverse experience within the entertainment industry as well as the convention and tourism entities, producing strong results in revenue performance, economic development and facil-

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ity expansion. For the past 16 years, he served as SMG’s general manager for the Florence, South Carolina, civic center. During his time there, gross revenue at the facility increased 300 percent. “It is an exciting time in Mobile, and SMG is proud to be a part of the city’s vision,” regional vice president Sam Voisin said. “We look forward to strengthened success with Kendall Wall’s leadership and industry experience.” Wall has received national recognition from the industry, ranging from the PAFMS-Ticketmaster award to being named winner of the Prime Site Award by Events & Facilities Magazine. He is a graduate of the Professional Association of Facility Management School and the Senior Executive Symposium at Cornell University. A graduate of the University of Oklahoma, Wall holds a master’s degree in facility management/sports administration and a bachelor’s in athletic administration/mathematics from the University of Southern Mississippi.

Job fair for billing, coding positions

TruBridge, a subsidiary of the locally owned, publicly traded CPSI (NASDAQ: CPSI) family of companies, will host a job fair in Mobile on Saturday, June 24, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at 3725 Airport Blvd., Suite 208A. TruBridge currently has more than 40 available positions at its Mobile and Fairhope locations for experienced insurance billers as well as other openings centered on health care business office positions. Additional work-from-home opportunities are available for certified medical coders. “The sizable number of positions available is due to the success of the expanded range of offerings TruBridge provides to more than 600 health care organizations across the United States,” TruBridge president and CPSI/COO Chris Fowler said. “As we continue to grow as a company, we are looking for team members that are energetic, eager to learn and want to contribute not only to our success, but most importantly our clients’ continued success.” Applicants attending the event should be dressed professionally, show up prepared for onsite interviews with management, and carry a current resume. Per a news release, qualified candidates may be hired immediately. TruBridge provides consulting and managed IT services with its revenue cycle management product, Rycan, proprietary software offering automated workflow and automation solutions to hospitals and physician clinics. Parent company CPSI is one of the largest local employers and a past recipient of the Nappie Award for “Best Local Company to Work For” as chosen by Lagniappe readers. For more information about the job fair, contact Thomas Buchanan at ThomasBuchanan@trubridge.com or visit the company’s website.


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CUISINE THE REVIEW

O’Daly’s Hole in the Wall serves creative ‘drunk food’ BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

BAR FOOD COULD BE ANYTHING YOU SERVE IN A BAR, BUT DRUNK FOOD IS WHAT YOU NEED AFTER ALL THAT BEER, WINE AND LIQUOR GETS THE APPETITE ROLLING AND THAT BRAIN THINKING IT’S A GREAT IDEA TO POWER DOWN CHILI CHEESE FRIES AFTER MIDNIGHT.” smothered in green onions, bacon, cheddar and sour cream sauce with, yes, thinly sliced potatoes, or Conecuh Corn Dogs, you are sure to attract the attention of your bar clientele. This place is a drunk food goldmine. Good thing, with Dauphin Street Blues Co. and O’Daly’s slinging drinks like they’re going out of style. It was after a drink or two that I stopped in for a sampling of what weird “Island of Dr. Moreau” crossbreeding Hole in the Wall offers, and the results were good. It was a Thursday evening and I was looking for an early night with something to take home with me. I ordered enough food for a family of bears and an Abita for the wait. The order came so fast I had to slam half of my pint, walking out with an armload of groceries. Back at the house I tore into the plastic foam containers one by one, beginning with Reuben Wontons ($6). Of course these

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Photos | Daniel Anderson

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et’s talk about drunk food. There is a difference between bar food and drunk food. Bar food could be anything you serve in a bar, but drunk food is what you need after all that beer, wine and liquor gets the appetite rolling and that brain thinking it’s a great idea to power down chili cheese fries after midnight. We’ve all been there. A light dinner before a concert followed by one too many Andygators and you’re convincing yourself and your ride-hailing driver that a Big Buford and fries will right the listing ship, so to speak. Maybe Taco Bell is your poison. Waffle House continues to build more Waffle Houses because of patrons like you. It’s an itch that cannot be scratched by anything remotely healthy. Only drunk food will do. When I first saw the menu from O’Daly’s Hole in the Wall restaurant I knew they were onto something with the drunk crowd. With far-fetched things like Loaded Baked Potato Pizza

O’DALY’S IRISH PUB HOLE IN THE WALL 564 DAUPHIN ST. MOBILE 36602 251-725-6429

Closed on Sunday, Hole in the Wall is open from 4 p.m. to midnight Monday through Thursday, and until 2 a.m. Friday and Saturday. I love Conecuh, I think something not smoked and out of the are made from scratch. Where else would you get wontons casing would have been better suited for the cheese. stuffed with corned beef and sauerkraut? Fried to a crisp and I had to try the wings ($12). Offered in Buffalo sauce or served with Thousand Island dressing on the side, I found these Guinness Glaze, you know I had to choose the weird one just to to be remarkable. It’s a pretty solid app or drunk snack. see what it would be like. The Guinness in the glaze was hard I couldn’t stand there in the bar staring at Country Fried to detect but there was an overpowering sweetness to the sauce, Shepherd’s Pie ($6) and not give it a try, so an order made its if you’re into that sort of thing. Nothing a little blue cheese way home with me. These balls of meat, cheese and mashed dressing couldn’t fix. The wings themselves were cooked well potatoes are battered, fried and served with a side of homemade so I will be back for the Buffalo. gravy. They’re good, and much better drunk. When it comes to eating healthy, you Trashcan Fries ($10) are no easy feat are pretty limited at Hole in the Wall, but to take on, sober or lit. It’s a huge serving we got fairly close with Ahi Street Tacos of waffle fries topped with roast beef and ($9). No, they are not made on Ahi Street. gravy. The kicker is the addition of giant These flour tortillas are filled with seared cheese curds. Eat this dish while it’s still tuna, ginger slaw and a sweet chili Sriracha hot and you won’t be hungry until next I LOVE HOW THE HOLE mayonnaise. It was a set of three and they week. I like fries or hash browns with all kinds of stuff on them. This was a good IN THE WALL OPENS UP went down easily. If these guys gave the option of corn tortillas I would have these take on that but could suit me better if TO DAUPHIN STREET regularly. It is a saucy kind of dish that can they added a generous helping of cooked please the beer drinker in all of us. white onions. WITH FOOD BAR SIDEI love how the Hole in the Wall opens up It’s a Wrap! ($10) came with more to Dauphin Street with food bar sidewalk waffle fries but they played second fiddle to WALK SEATING … IT’S seating. If you’re fortunate enough to grab the burrito-ish grilled chicken thing in front of me. This rollup features lettuce, tomato, LIKE DINNER THEATER. one of the few seats there, you will enjoy the people watching. If not, the courtyard cheddar cheese and Bill E’s small-batch out back has plenty of picnic tables and bacon with a side of buttermilk ranch for people watching of its own. Either way it’s dipping. So far this was about the closest like dinner theater. thing to normal I’d had; I think it could find I think this place fills a perfect niche. It may not be the kind its spot on a lunch menu somewhere. of thing you’d eat for lunch, but after a few cocktails this could The next night I met some friends there for more drunk be your spot. I love the aggressiveness of the menu and hope it food. I had a couple of extra drinks than the previous evening continues to evolve, with more marriages of unlikely flavors. and got a little bolder with my order. Conecuh Queso ($7) Keep it weird, boys. Drunk people enjoy that sort of thing. was a logical starter. Warm tortilla chips and a dip of exactly Closed on Sunday, Hole in the Wall is open from 4 p.m. to what you’re thinking is a decent snack but won’t make you do midnight Monday through Thursday, and until 2 a.m. on Friday backflips. The chopped sausage didn’t have a real presence in and Saturday. our dish but I understood what they were going for. As much as


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FIREHOUSE SUBS ($)

HOT SUBS, COLD SALADS & CATERING 6300 Grelot Rd. • 631-3730

FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES ($) $10/PERSON • $$ 10-25/PERSON • $$$ OVER 25/PERSON

COMPLETELY COMFORTABLE ALL SPORTS BAR & GRILL ($) 3408 Pleasant Valley Rd. • 345-9338

AL’S HOTDOGS ($)

CLASSIC HOTDOGS, GYROS & MILKSHAKES 4701 Airport Blvd. • 342-3243

ATLANTA BREAD COMPANY ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SALADS & MORE. 3680 Dauphin St. • 380-0444

BAKE MY DAY ($)

OLD-FASHIONED SOUTHERN BAKE SHOP 156 N. McGregor Ave. • 219-7261

BOB’S DINER ($)

GOOD OLD AMERICAN COOKING 263 St. Francis St. • 405-1497

BUCK’S DINER ($)

CLASSIC AMERICAN DINER 58 N. Secion St. Fairhope • 928-8521

CAFE 219 ($)

SALADS, SANDWICHES & POTATO SALAD 219 Conti St. • 438-5234

CAMELLIA CAFÉ ($-$$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FARE 61 Section St. • Fairhope • 928-4321

CAMMIE’S OLD DUTCH ($) MOBILE’S CLASSIC ICE CREAM SPOT 2511 Old Shell Rd. • 471-1710

CARPE DIEM ($)

DELI FOODS, PASTRIES & SPECIALTY DRINKS 4072 Old Shell Rd. • 304-0448

CLARK’S KITCHEN ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHERN CUISINE & CATERING 5817 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0200

CHAT-A-WAY CAFE ($)

QUICHES & SANDWICHES 4366 Old Shell Rd. • 343-9889

CHICK-FIL-A ($)

BURGERS, MILKSHAKES & FRIES 4401 Old Shell Rd. • 447-2394 4663 Airport Blvd. • 300-8425 5319 Hwy 90 • 661-0071 1225 Satchel Page Dr.• 378-8768

FOOSACKLY’S ($)

FAMOUS CHICKEN FINGERS 29181 US Hwy 98 • Daphne • 375-1104 7843 Moffett Rd. • 607-6196 1109 Shelton Beach Rd. • 287-1423 310 S. University Blvd. • 343-0047 2250 Airport Blvd. • 479-2922 7641 Airport Blvd. • 607-7667 2558 Schillinger Rd. • 219-7761 3249 Dauphin St. • 479-2000

FOY SUPERFOODS ($) 119 Dauphin St.• 307-8997

GULF COAST EXPLOREUM CAFE ($) HOMEMADE SOUPS & SANDWICHES 65 Government St. • 208-6815

GUMBO SHACK ($-$$)

SEAFOOD & SANDWICHES 212 ½ Fairhope Ave •Fairhope • 928-4100

HOOTERS ($)

3869 Airport Blvd. • 345-9544 5470 Inn Rd. • 661-9117 28975 US 98 • Daphne • 625-3910

JAMAICAN VIBE ($)

MIND-BLOWING ISLAND FOOD 3700 Gov’t Blvd. Ste A • 602-1973

JERSEY MIKE’S ($)

AUTHENTIC SUB SANDWICHES 7449 Airport Blvd. • 375-1820

JIMMY JOHN’S ($)

SANDWICHES, CATERING & DELIVERY TOO 6920 Airport Blvd. • 414-5444 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-8694 62 B Royal St. • 432-0360

JOE CAIN CAFÉ ($)

PIZZAS, SANDWICHES, COCKTAILS 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

JONELLI’S ($)

1252 Govenment St.• 301-7556

107 St. Francis St. • 415-1700 3244 Dauphin St. • 476-0320 3215 Bel Air Mall • 476-8361 4707 Airport Blvd. • 461-9933 435 Schillinger Rd. • 639-1163 1682 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 621-3215 30500 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-3020

JUDY’S PLACE ($-$$)

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK ($)

PUB FOOD AND DRAFT BEERS 251 Dauphin St. • 287-6871

CHICKEN SALAD, SALAD & SOUP 2370 S. Hillcrest Rd. Unit R • 660-0501 5753 Old Shell Rd. • 408-3236 1802 US Hwy 98 Suite F• 625-1092

CHI-TOWN DAWGZ ($) CHICAGO STYLE EATERY 1222 Hillcrest Rd. • 461-6599

CONNECTION FROZEN YOGURT ($) 1880 Industrial Pkwy. • 675-2999

CREAM AND SUGAR ($)

HOME COOKING 4054 Government St. • 665-4557

LICKIN’ GOOD DONUTS ($) 3242 Dauphin St. • 471-2590

LODA BIER GARTEN ($) MAMA’S ($)

SLAP YOUR MAMA GOOD HOME COOKING 220 Dauphin St. • 432-6262

MARS HILL CAFE ($)

GREAT SANDWICHES, COFFEE & MORE 1087 Downtowner Blvd. • 643-1611

MARY’S SOUTHERN COOKING ($) 3011 Springhill Ave. • 476-2232

COFFEE, BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DESSERT 351 George St #B • 405-0003

MICHELI’S CAFE ($)

DAUPHIN ST. CAFE ($)

MCSHARRY’S ($-$$)

HOT LUNCH, DAILY MENU (INSIDE VIA) 1717 Dauphin St. • 470-5231

D’ MICHAEL’S ($)

PHILLY CHEESE STEAKS, GYROS & MORE 7101-A Theodore Dawes Rd. • 653-2979

D NU SPOT ($)

22159 Halls Mill Rd. . • 648-6522

DELISH BAKERY AND EATERY ($) GREAT DESSERTS & HOT LUNCH 23 Upham St. • 473-6115

DEW DROP INN ($)

CLASSIC BURGERS, HOTDOGS & SETTING 1808 Old Shell Rd. • 473-7872

DUNKIN DONUTS ($)

DONUTS, COFFEE & SANDWICHES 1976 Michigan Ave. • 442-4846 3876 Airport Blvd. • 219-7369 505 Schillinger Rd. S. • 442-4845 29160 US Hwy 98 • 621-2228

E WING HOUSE ($)

6358 Cottage Hill Rd. • 725-6917 AUTHENTIC IRISH PUB 101 N. Bancroft St.• 990-5100

MIKO’S ITALIAN ICE ($)

HOTDOGS SANDWICHES & COOL TREATS 3371 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 300–4015

MOMMA GOLDBERG’S DELI ($) SANDWICHES & MOMMA’S LOVE 3696 Airport Blvd. • 344-9500 5602 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6556

MONTEGO’S ($-$$)

FRESH CARIBBEAN-STYLE FOOD & CRAFT BEER 6601 Airport Blvd. • 634-3445 225 Dauphin St. • 375-1576

MOON PIE GENERAL STORE ($)

107 St Francis St #115 • RSA Bank Trust Building

MOSTLY MUFFINS ($) MUFFINS, COFFEE & WRAPS 105 Dauphin St. • 433-9855

NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE ($)

15 N Conception St. • 433-2299

OVEN-BAKED SANDWICHES & MORE 1335 Satchel Page Dr. Suite C. • 287-7356 7440 Airport Blvd. • 633-0096 30500 State Hwy 181 #132 • 625-6544

FATHOMS LOUNGE

O’DALYS HOLE IN THE WALL ($)

195 S University Blvd. Suite H • 662-1829

EUGENE’S MONKEY BAR ($) SMALL PLATES AND CREATIVE COCKTAILS 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

FLOUR GIRLS BAKERY ($) 809 Hillcrest Rd. • 634-2285

562 Dauphin St.• 725-6429

OLD SHELL GROWLERS ($) GROWLER STATION AND BITES 1801 Old Shell Rd. • 345-4767

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PANINI PETE’S ($)

ORIGINAL SANDWICH AND BAKE SHOP 42 ½ Section St. • Fairhope • 929-0122 102 Dauphin St. • 405-0031

PAT’S DOWNTOWN GRILL ($) BAR FOOD 271 Dauphin St • 438-9585

PDQ ($)

WAREHOUSE BAKERY & DONUTS ($)

72. S. Royal St. • 432-SCAM (7226)

WEDGIE’S ($)

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE 271 Glenwood St. • 476-0516

WILD WING STATION ($)

INSIDE THE MOBILE MARRIOTT 3101 Airport Blvd. • 476-6400

COFFEE AND DONUTS 759 Nichols Avenue, Fairhope • 928-7223 GOURMET GRILLED CHEESE 5955 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6134 1500 Gov’t St. • 287-1526

CHICKEN FINGERS, SALAD & SANDWICHES. 1165 University Blvd. • 202-0959

THE WINDMILL MARKET ($)

POLLMAN’S BAKERY ($)

YAK THE KATHMANDU KITCHEN ($-$$)

BAKERY, SANDWICHES & MORE 750 S. Broad St. • 438-1511 4464 Old Shell Rd. • 342-8546 107 St. Francis St. Suite 102 • 438-2261

PUNTA CLARA KITCHEN ($)

FUDGE, PRALINES & MORE 17111 Scenic Hwy 98 • Fairhope • 928-8477

R BISTRO ($-$$)

334 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope • 928-2399

85 N. Bancroft St. Fairhope • 990.8883

AUTHENTIC FOODS FROM HIMALAYAN REGION 3210 Dauphin St. • 287-0115 400 Eastern Shore Center • 459-2862

‘CUE

BACKYARD CAFE & BBQ ($) HOME COOKIN’ LIKE MOMMA MADE. 2804 Springhill Ave. • 473-4739

REGINA’S KITCHEN ($-$$)

BAR-B-QUING WITH MY HONEY ($$)

ROLY POLY ($)

BRICK PIT ($)

ROSHELL’S CAFE ($)

COTTON STATE BBQ ($)

SANDWICHES, SUBS & SOUPS 2056 Gov’t St. • 476-2777

WRAPS & SALADS 3220 Dauphin St. • 479-2480 2906 Springhill Ave. • 479-4614

ROSIE’S GRILL ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHWEST FARE, 7 DAYS 1203 Hwy 98 Ste. 3D • Daphne • 626-2440

ROYAL KNIGHT ($)

LUNCH & DINNER 3004 Gov’t Blvd. • 287-1220

ROYAL STREET CAFE ($) HOMEMADE LUNCH & BREAKFAST 104 N. Royal St. • 434-0011

SALLY’S PIECE-A-CAKE ($) BAKERY 5638 Three Notch Rd.• 219-6379

BBQ, BURGERS, WINGS & SEAFOOD 19170 Hwy 43 Mt. Vernon. • 839-9927 A FAVORITE BARBECUE SPOT 5456 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0001 DOWNTOWN LUNCH 101 N. Conception St. • 545-4682

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT ($-$$) BBQ AND MORE Jubilee Sq.Ctr. Hwy 90, Daphne • 210-2151 McGowin Park Ctr. Satchel Paige Dr. • 471-1050 7721 Airport Blvd. • 380-8957

DREAMLAND BBQ ($)

RIBS, SANDWICHES & GREAT SIDES 3314 Old Shell Rd. • 479-9898

MEAT BOSS ($)

5401 Cottage Hill Rd. • 591-4842

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE ($)

COFFEE, SMOOTHIES, LUNCH & BEERS. 5460 Old Shell Rd. • 344-4575

BARBEQUE & MUSIC Bayfront Park Dr. • Daphne • 625-RIBS 701 Springhill Ave. • 410-7427 4672 Airport Blvd. • 300-8516

SERDA’S COFFEEHOUSE ($)

SAUCY Q BARBQUE ($)

SATORI COFFEEHOUSE ($)

COFFEE, LUNCHES, LIVE MUSIC & GELATO 3 Royal St. S. • 415-3000

SIMPLY SWEET ($)

CUPCAKE BOUTIQUE 6207 Cottage Hill Rd. Suite B • 665-3003

STEVIE’S KITCHEN ($)

SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS & MORE 41 West I-65 Service Rd. N Suite 150. • 287-2793

SUGAR RUSH DONUT CO. ($) 4701 Airport Blvd. • 408-3379

SUNSET POINTE ($-$$)

AT FLU CREEK 831 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-7766

THE BLIND MULE ($)

DAILY SPECIALS MADE FROM SCRATCH 57 N. Claiborne St. • 694-6853

THE GALLEY ($)

OPEN FOR LUNCH, INSIDE GULFQUEST 155 S. Water St • 436-8901

THE HARBERDASHER ($) 113 Dauphin St.• 436-0989

AWARD-WINNING BARBQUE 1111 Gov’t Blvd. • 433-7427

SMOKEY DEMBO SMOKE HOUSE ($)

BAY GOURMET ($$)

A PREMIER CATERER & COOKING CLASSES 1880-A Airport Blvd. • 450-9051

BRIQUETTES STEAKHOUSE ($-$$) GRILLED STEAKS, CHICKEN & SEAFOOD 720A Schillinger Rd. S. S2. • 607-7200 901 Montlimar Dr • 408-3133

CHUCK’S FISH ($$)

SEAFOOD AND SUSHI 551 Dauphin St.• 219-7051

CORNER 251 ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St • 460-3157

DAUPHIN’S ($$-$$$)

THYME BY THE BAY ($-$$)

GREAT FOOD AND COCKTAILS 609 Dauphin St. • 308-3105

DOWN-HOME COUNTRY COOKIN 7351 Theodore Dawes Rd. • 654-0228 13665 N. Wintzell Ave. • 824-1119

DUMBWAITER ($$-$$$) FIVE ($$)

THREE GEORGES CANDY SHOP ($)

LOCAL INGREDIENTS 203 Dauphin St. • 690-6824

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE ($)

INVENTIVE & VERY FRESH CUISINE 6 N. Jackson St. • 433-0377

UNCLE JIMMY’S DELICIOUS HOTDOGS ($)

2550 Dauphin Island Pkwy S. • 307-5328

THE TRELLIS ROOM ($$$)

MAGHEE’S GRILL ON THE HILL ($-$$) NOBLE SOUTH ($$) NOJA ($$-$$$)

OSMAN’S RESTAURANT ($$) SUPREME EUROPEAN CUISINE 2579 Halls Mill Rd. • 479-0006

ROYAL SCAM ($$)

GUMBO, ANGUS BEEF & BAR

BENJAS ($)

THAI & SUSHI 5369 D Hwy 90 W • 661-5100

CHARM ($-$$)

THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR 960 Schillinger Rd. S • 660-4470

CHINA DOLL ($)

3966 Airport Blvd.• 343-5530

CUISINE OF INDIA ($$) LUNCH BUFFET 3674 Airport Blvd. • 341-6171

FUJI SAN ($)

THAI FARE AND SUSHI 2000 Airport Blvd. • 478-9888

GOLDEN BOWL ($)

HIBACHI GRILL & ASIAN CUISINE 309 Bel Air Blvd • 470-8033

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE Battle House Hotel, Royal St. • 338-5493

HIBACHI 1 ($-$$)

THE WASH HOUSE ($$)

ICHIBAN SUSHI ($)

17111 Scenic HWY 98 • Point Clear • 928-4838

A LITTLE VINO DOMKE MARKET

WINE, BEER, GOURMET FOODS, & MORE. 720 Schillinger Rd. S. Unit 8 • 287-1851

FOOD PAK

FOOD, WINE & MORE 5150 Old Shell Rd. • 341-1497

POUR BABY

WINE BAR, CRAFT BEERS & BISTRO 6808 Airport Blvd. • 343-3555

FIREHOUSE WINE BAR & SHOP 216 St Francis St. • 421-2022

RED OR WHITE

2370 Hillcrest Rd. Unit B • 380-6062 JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE 3959 Cottage Hill Rd • 666-6266

KAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($-$$) QUALITY FOOD, EXCELLENT SERVICE 5045 Cottage Hill Rd. • 607-6454

LIQUID ($$)

AMAZING SUSHI & ASSORTMENT OF ROLLS. 661 Dauphin St. • 432-0109

RICE ASIAN GRILL & SUSHI BAR ($) 3964 Gov’t Blvd. • 378-8083

ROCK N ROLL SUSHI ($$)

273 S. McGregor Ave • 287-0445 6345 Airport Blvd. • 287-0555 940 Industrial Pkwy • 308-2158 6850 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 753-4367

323A De La Mare Ave, Fairhope • 990-0003 1104 Dauphin St.. • 478-9494

SAISHO ($$)

ROYAL STREET TAVERN

STIX ($$)

LIVE MUSIC, MARTINIS & DINNER MENU. 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

SOUTHERN NAPA

BISTRO PLATES, CRAFT BEERS & PANTRY 2304 Main St. • 375-2800

THE VINEYARD

UPSCALE WINE BAR 9 Du Rhu Dr. S 201 • 287-7135

7 SPICE ($-$$)

ABBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE ($-$$) 4861 Bit & Spur Rd. • 340-6464

ISTANBUL GRILL ($)

AUTHENTIC TURKISH & MEDITERRANEAN 3702 Airport Blvd. • 461-6901

JERUSALEM CAFE ($-$$)

MOBILE’S OLDEST MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE 5773 Airport Blvd. • 304-1155

KAN ZAMAN ($-$$)

MEDITERRANEAN FOOD AND HOOKAH 326 Azalea Rd • 229-4206

MEDITERRANEAN SANDWICH COMPANY ($)

GREAT & QUICK. 3702 Airport Blvd. • 308-2131 274 Dauphin St. • 545-3161 2502 Schillinger Rd. Ste. 2 • 725-0126 6890 US-90 • DAPHNE • 621-2271

MINT HOOKAH BISTRO ($) GREAT MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 5951 Old Shell Rd. • 450-9191

TAZIKI’S ($-$$)

TP CROCKMIERS ($)

GREAT SMOOTHIES, WRAPS & SANDWICHES. Du Rhu Dr. • 378-5648 570 Schillinger Road • 634-3454

CASUAL FINE DINING 104 N. Section St. • Fairhope • 929-2219

LAUNCH ($-$$)

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOOD 351A George & Savannah St. • 436-8890

GREAT LUNCH & DINNER 3607 Old Shell Rd. • 445-8700

LIGHT LUNCH WITH SOUTHERN FLAIR. 226 Dauphin St. • 433-6725

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($$)

KITCHEN ON GEORGE ($-$$)

TIN ROOF ($-$$)

AMERICAN RESTAURANT & BAR 250 Dauphin St. • 476-1890

SEAFOOD, ASIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE 69 St. Michael St • 375-1113

OLLIE’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St. • 432-8000

SOUTHERN CASUAL FAMILY DINING 10800 US HWY 31 • Spanish Fort• 621-4995

VON’S BISTRO ($-$$)

HEALTHY, DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 3762 Airport Blvd. • 725-1177

9 Du Rhu Dr. Suite 201 167 Dauphin St. • 445-3802

TIME TO EAT CAFE ($)

MODERN GASTROPUB INSPIRED BY JAPANESE KITCHEN 455 Dauphin St • 433-0376

DROP DEAD GOURMET

THE SUNFLOWER CAFE ($)

33 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-5635

SAISHO ($-$$)

3758 Dauphin Island Pkwy. • 473-1401

THE PIGEON HOLE ($)

INSIDE VIRGINIA’S HEALTH FOOD 3055 A Dauphin St • 479-3200

SAGE RESTAURANT ($$)

FALAFEL? TRY SOME HUMMUS

HIGH QUALITY FOOD WITH A VIEW 107 St. Francis St • 444-0200

SOUTHERN COOKING & THEN SOME 1716 Main St. Daphne • 222-4120

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT & HOOKAH 1248 Hillcrest St • 634-9820 MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 1539 US HWY 98• 273-3337

FAR EASTERN FARE ANG BAHAY KUBO ($$)

6455 Dauphin St. • 433-0376 610240 Eastern Shore Blvd. • 621-9088

TASTE OF THAI ($$)

9091 US-90 Irvington • 957-1414

TOKYO JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE ($$) UPSCALE SUSHI & HIBACHI 364 Azalea Rd. • 343-6622

WASABI SUSHI ($$)

JAPANESE CUISINE 3654 Airport Blvd. S. C • 725-6078

FROM THE DEPTHS BAUDEAN’S ($$)

FRIED, GRILLED, STEAMED & ALWAYS FRESH 3300 River Rd. • 973-9070

THE BLUEGILL ($-$$)

A HISTORIC SEAFOOD DIVE W/ LIVE MUSIC 3775 Hwy. 98 • 625-1998

BONEFISH GRILL ($$)

ECLECTIC DINING & SPACE 6955 Airport Blvd. • 633-7196

BOUDREAUX’S CAJUN GRILL ($-$$) QUALITY CAJUN & NEW ORLEANS CUISINE 29249 US Highway 98 Daphne. • 621-1991

CRAVIN CAJUN/DIP SEAFOOD ($) PO-BOYS, SALADS & SEAFOOD 1870 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 287-1168

ED’S SEAFOOD SHED ($$)

FRIED SEAFOOD SERVED IN HEFTY PORTIONS 3382 Hwy. 98 • 625-1947

FELIX’S FISH CAMP ($$) UPSCALE DINING WITH A VIEW 1420 Hwy. 98 • 626-6710

FISHERMAN’S LEGACY ($) DELI, MARKET AND CATERING. 4380 Halls Mill Rd. • 665-2266

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($)

30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 206-8768 3654 Airport Blvd. • 338-9350

LUCY B. GOODE ($$)

GULF COAST CUISINE, REINVENTED 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

LULU’S ($$)

4513 Old Shell Rd.• 473-0007

LIVE MUSIC & GREAT SEAFOOD 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

BAMBOO STEAKHOUSE ($$)

MUDBUGS AT THE LOOP ($)

BANGKOK THAI ($-$$)

RALPH & KACOO’S ($-$$)

SUSHI BAR 650 Cody Rd. S • 300-8383

DELICIOUS, TRADITIONAL THAI CUISINE 28600 US 98 • Daphne • 626-5286 3821 Airport Blvd. • 344-9995

BANZAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($$) TRADITIONAL SUSHI & LUNCH. 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-9077

CAJUN KITCHEN & SEAFOOD MARKET 2005 Government St. • 478-9897 THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1595 Battleship Pkwy. • 626-0045

R&R SEAFOOD ($-$$)

LAID-BACK EATERY & FISH MARKET 1477 Battleship Pkwy. • 621-8366


RIVER SHACK ($-$$)

SEAFOOD, BURGERS & STEAKS 6120 Marina Dr. • Dog River • 443-7318.

THE GRAND MARINER ($-$$) LOCAL SEAFOOD & PRODUCE 6036 Rock Point Rd. • 443-7540

THE HARBOR ROOM ($-$$) UNIQUE SEAFOOD 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

THE SEAFOOD HOUSE ($-$$)

HEROES SPORTS BAR & GRILLE ($) SANDWICHES & COLD BEER 273 Dauphin St. • 433-4376 Hillcrest & Old Shell Rd. • 341-9464

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS ($-$$) WINGS, SEAFOOD, BURGERS & BEER 7721 Airport Blvd. Suite E-180 • 639-6832

ISLAND WING CO ($)

EVERYTHING BAKED OR GRILLED 2617 Dauphin St. • 476-9464

751 Azalea Rd. • 301-7964

MANCIS ($)

TIN TOP RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR ($$)

MCSHARRY’S IRISH PUB ($)

SEAFOOD, STEAKS, & EXTENSIVE WINE LIST 6232 Bon Secour Hwy County Rd. 10. • 949-5086

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) FRESH SEAFOOD FOR OVER 75 YEARS 605 Dauphin St. • 432-4605 6700 Airport Blvd. • 341-1111 1208 Shelton Beach Rd. • Saraland • 442-3335 805 S. Mobile St. • 929-2322

IS THE GAME ON?

ASHLAND MIDTOWN PUB ($-$$) PIZZAS, PASTAS, & CALZONES 245-A Old Shell Rd. • 479-3278

BAUMHOWER’S ($)

WINGS, BURGERS & PUB GRUB 6880 US-90 #14 • Daphne • 625-4695

BISHOP’S ($)

A SOUTHERN GRILL & BAR 3673 Airport Blvd. • 344-2131

BUFFALO WILD WINGS ($) BEST WINGS & SPORTING EVENTS 6341 Airport Blvd. • 378-5955

BUTCH CASSIDY’S ($)

FAMOUS BURGERS, SANDWICHES & WINGS 60 N. Florida St. • 450-0690

CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB ($) BURGERS & BEER 916 Charleston St. • 433-9374

1715 Main St. • 375-0543 BRILLIANT REUBENS & FISH-N-CHIPS. 101 N. Brancroft St. Fairhope • 990-5100

MUG SHOTS ($$)

BAR & GRILL 29740 Urgent Care Dr. • Daphne • 662-9639 6255 Airport Blvd. • 447-2514

GRIMALDI’S ($)

ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL ($$)

QUAINT MEXICAN RESTAURANT 5556 Old Shell Rd. • 345-7484

GUIDO’S ($$)

TAMARA’S BAR & GRILL ($)

MARIA BONITA AGAVE BAR & GRILL ($-$$)

Bel Air Mall • 476-2063 FRESH CUISINE NIGHTLY ON MENU 1709 Main St. • Daphne • 626-6082

HOUSE OF PIZZA ($)

3958 Snow Rd C. • Semmes • 645-3400

LA ROSSO ($$)

COMFORT FOOD 1716 Main St. Ste. C • Daphne • 281-2982

MACARONI GRILL ($$)

SMALL PLATES, PIZZAS, PASTAS & WINE 3250 Airport Blvd. • 450-4556

MARCOS ($)

5055 Cottage Hill Rd. • 308-4888 2394 Dawes Rr. • 639-3535 2004 US 98 • Daphne • 265-6550

MELLOW MUSHROOM ($)

BURGERS, DOGS & 27 BEERS & WINES. 19992 Hwy.181 Old County Rd. Fairhope • 281-2663

PIES & AWESOME BEER SELECTION 2032 Airport Blvd. • 471-4700 5660 Old Shell Rd. • 380-1500 29698 Frederick Blvd.• Daphne • 621-3911

LUCKY’S IRISH PUB ($)

MIRKO ($$)

OLD 27 GRILL ($)

IRISH PUB FARE & MORE 3692 Airport Blvd • 414-3000

WEMOS ($)

WINGS, TENDERS, HOTDOGS & SANDWICHES 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-5877

MAMA MIA!

BUCK’S PIZZA ($$)

DELIVERY 350 Dauphin St. • 431-9444

CORTLAND’S PIZZA PUB ($-$$) GREAT PIZZA. LUNCH & DINNER 4356 Old Shell Rd. • 342-0024

GAMBINO BROTHERS ($) HOMEMADE PASTAS & SANDWICHES 873 Hillcrest Ave. • 344-8115

GAMBINO’S ITALIAN GRILL ($) ITALIAN, STEAKS & SEAFOOD 18 Laurel Ave. • Fairhope • 990-0995

PASTA & MORE 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-6611

NAVCO PIZZA ($$)

PIZZA, SUBS & PASTA 1368 ½ Navco Rd.• 479-0066

PAPA’S PLACE ($$)

A TASTE OF ITALY. BYOB. 28691 U.S. Highway 98 • 626-1999

PINZONE’S ITALIAN VILLAGE ($$) AUTHENTIC ITALIAN DISHES 312 Fairhope Ave. • Fairhope • 990-5535

RAVENITE ($)

PIZZA, PASTA, SALAD & MORE 102 N. Section St. •Fairhope• 929-2525

PIZZERIA DELFINA ($) PIZZA & PASTA 107 Dauphin St. • 375-1644

ROMA CAFE ($-$$)

PASTA, SALAD AND SANDWICHES 7143 Airport Blvd. • 341-7217

3250 Airport Blvd. Springdale Mall• 450-4556

WINGS, PO-BOYS, BURGERS 210 Eastern Shore Center, Hwy. 98 • 929-0002

TRATTORIA PIZZA & ITALIAN ($$) ITALIAN FOOD & PIZZAS 11311 US HIghway 31 Spanish Fort• 375-0076

VIA EMILIA ($$)

HOMEMADE PASTAS & PIZZAS MADE DAILY 5901 Old Shell Rd. • 342-3677

MEXICAN CUISINE 3977 Gov’t Blvd. • 660-4970

OLÉ MI AMIGO ($-$$)

HEARTY MEXICAN FARE 736 holcombe Ave.• 473-0413

POOR MEXICAN ($)

3050 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-7433

MAGNOLIA HOUSE ($$-$$$) FINE DINING, SEAFOOD AND STEAKS

FLAVORS BUFFET ($-$$) ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET

IP CASINO:

850 Bayview Ave. Bilox • 888-946-2847

THIRTY-TWO ($$$) SEAFOOD, STEAKS, WINE

TIEN ($-$$)

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

HIGH TIDE CAFÉ ($)

CASUAL & RELAXING, EXTENSIVE MENU

OLÉ MI AMIGO!

ROOSTER’S ($)

ISLAND VIEW:

TASTE OF MEXICO 5452 Hwy 90 W • 661-5509

LATIN AMERICAN FOOD 211 Dauphin St. • 375-1076

TAQUERIA MEXICO ($-$$)

BEACH BLVD STEAMER ($)

AZTECAS ($-$$)

CAFÉ DEL RIO ($-$$)

MOUTH WATERING MEXICAN FOOD 1175 Battleship Pkwy • 625-2722

CINCO DE MAYO ($) MEXICAN CUISINE 260 Azalea Rd. • 375-1095

DAUPHIN ST. TAQUERIA ($)

ENCHILADAS, TACOS, & AUTHENTIC FARE Ok Bicycle Shop • 661 Dauphin St. • 432-2453

EL MARIACHI ($)

763 Holcombe Ave • 473-0413

FUEGO ($-$$)

OUTSTANDING MEXICAN CUISINE 2066 Old Shell Rd. • 378-8621

HACIENDA SAN MIGUEL ($-$$) TASTE OF MEXICO 880 Schillinger Rd. S. • 633-6122 5805 US 90 • 653-9163

LA COCINA ($)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE 800 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-0783 830 W I65 Service Rd. S • 378-5837 4663 Airport Blvd. • 342-5553

LOS ARCOS ($)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FLAVOR 3733 Airport Blvd. • 414-4496

NO GAMBLING CASINO FARE BEAU RIVAGE:

875 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 888-952-2582

BR PRIME ($$-$$$)

3300 W. Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 877-774-8439 SEAFOOD

CARTER GREEN STEAKHOUSE ($$-$$$) RICH TRADITIONS, STEAK, SEAFOOD

C&G GRILLE ($)

LARGE BREAKFAST, LUNCH OR DINNER MENU

PALACE CASINO:

158 Howard Ave. Biloxi • 800-725-2239

FINE DINING ESTABLISHMENT.

MIGNON’S ($$$)

BURGER, WINGS, PIZZA

PLACE BUFFET ($-$$)

EXOTIC CUISINE AND SUSHI

STACKED GRILL ($-$$)

COAST RESTAURANT ($-$$) JIA ($-$$)

STALLA ($$)

ITALIAN COOKING

STEAKS, SEAFOOD, FINE WINE INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

BURGERS AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

TERRACE CAFE ($)

TREASURE BAY:

HARD ROCK CASINO:

THE DEN ($-$$)

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, LATE NIGHT

777 Beach Blvd.Biloxi • 877-877-6256

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) SEAFOOD

HARD ROCK CAFÉ ($)

AMERICAN FARE & ROCKIN’ MEMORABILIA

1980 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 800-747-2839 INTIMATE & CASUAL WITH DAILY SPECIALS

CQ ($$-$$$)

ELEGANT ATMOSPHERE & TANTALIZING ENTREES

BLU ($)

LOUNGE WITH COCKTAILS & TAPAS MENU

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

WIND CREEK CASINO:

SATISFACTION ($-$$)

FIRE ($$-$$$)

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE SOUTHERN FAVORITES BUFFET

HARRAH’S GULF COAST:

280 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 288-436-2946

303 Poarch Rd. Atmore • 866-946-3360 PRIME STEAKS, SEAFOOD & WINE

GRILL ($)

CONTEMPORARY & OLD-FASHIONED FAVORITES

SEND LISTINGS TO LISTINGS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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CUISINE | WORD OF MOUTH

Dream Dinners opening Daphne location BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR

Department of Conservation and Natural Resources and program administrator for the Alabama Seafood Marketing Commission. “Alabama’s Gulf seafood is known worldwide for its impeccable quality, and we look forward to the upcoming summit where we will discuss how to continue to enhance this valuable contributor to the state’s economy,” said John McMillan, commissioner of the Alabama Department of Agriculture and Industries. Registration is open and attendance is free. To register send your name, business, phone number and email address to logan@ bigcom.com.

Naked Chicken Chips

It was odd when KFC had a sandwich where chicken replaced the bread. Now Taco Bell is throwing its hat into the weird game. Naked Chicken Chips are marinated white meat triangles of chicken cooked up to replace standard chips. Served with nacho cheese, those brave enough to try the crispy

Photo/dreamdinnersfranchise.com

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Alabama Gulf Seafood Summit

The Alabama Gulf Seafood Summit is about to celebrate its fifth year, returning to The Wharf June 26 and 27. The event begins that Friday at 5:30 p.m. with a reception and cook-off at Heron Pointe at The Wharf with emcee Martie Duncan. Finalists Brody Olive of Voyager’s at Perdido Beach Resort, Bryan Cates of Kitchen on George in Mobile, Kelly Grady Hargroves of Wind Creek Casino and Hotel in Montgomery, and Jason Ramirez of Villaggio Grille in Orange Beach will battle it out. Saturday, June 27, the Alabama Gulf Seafood Summit begins at 8 a.m. with registration and breakfast at The Sands, and lasts until 2 p.m. with various programs throughout the day. poultry will be able to use the wedges to shovel the dip into their “The Seafood Summit is one full of educating attendees faces, perhaps avoiding some carbs. around critical issues, fellowshipping with like-minded industry A six-pack of these will cost you about $1.99 and 390 calories. peers and, of course, enjoying delicious Alabama Gulf seafood,” Where were these when I gave up chips for Lent?! said Chris Blankenship, acting commissioner of the Alabama Recycle!

Photo/tacobell.com

F

ans of the originator of the meal assembly industry, Dream Dinners, will be pleased to know the grand opening of the Daphne location is set for July 13. The event is open to the public. It begins at 5:30 p.m. and ends at 7:30 p.m. with a ribbon-cutting ceremony at the 6 p.m. The first 100 families in attendance will receive an herbcrusted flank steak to take home and enjoy. The 1,600-square-foot facility at 1539 U.S. Highway 98, Suite 302, in Daphne’s Shore Oaks Center is owned by former Mobile location employee turned franchisee Heather Chopin, who says, “Dream Dinners can be a resource for busy parents, helping them to get wholesome, home-cooked dinners on the table without the hassle of going to the grocery store or even trying to think about what’s for dinner. I’m so excited to bring Dream Dinners to Daphne to help bring more families in our community together around the dinner table.”


J u n e 1 5 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 29


COVER STORY

Small batch beer industry brewing in Mobile BY TOM WARD/THE BEER PROFESSOR

O

ver the past few years, Mobile has become a as many as a dozen beers on tap, most of which you can only get there. very good beer town, with a number of bars In addition to being a great place to meet friends, with dozens of craft beers available, and not the taproom also hosts regular events, such as trivia and just the usual suspects, but wide varieties from live local music. Since its inception, Fairhope Brewacross the region and around the nation. We also now ing Co. has also been involved in hosting a number of have a number of excellent places for off-site sales of charity events. craft beer, including some grocery stores that even offer “In 2016, we helped to raise over $10,000 in our beer on tap for growlers. taproom for various charities through promotions like However, Mobile still lacks what any good beer our Rescue Dog Red donation to the Baldwin County town needs — its own craft brewery. How can the city Humane Society, [and] our annual ‘Suck It, Cancer’ born to celebrate — the home of Mardi Gras, for goodcrawfish boil for the American Cancer Society,” Foley ness’ sake — not have its own said. “We have made it our miscraft brew? Well, luckily that is sion to have all Lower Alabamians about to change. consider us their hometown brewOf course, our area is not ery, and we view our charitable totally without a craft brewing efforts as a way to make that a movement. Many people rememgoal a reality.” SERDA’S TAPROOM WILL ber when LoDa housed a brewpub, Last year, Baldwin County got Hurricane Brewing Co., but it HOUSE A PILOT BREWERY its second craft brewery when Big shuttered its doors at the end of Beach Brewing Co. opened its 2009 (Montego’s Cafe & Bar now FOR PRODUCING UP TO 15 doors in Gulf Shores in Octooccupies its old location). The SMALL-BATCH BREWS THAT ber. Like Fairhope Brewing, its first true craft brewery in Lower taproom on the corner of 2nd Alabama, Fairhope Brewing Co., WILL ONLY BE AVAILABLE Street and 24th Avenue (across the opened four years ago on Nichols street from Tacky Jack’s) is a great Avenue. Its beers have become ON-SITE, IN A MODERN place to meet people and enjoy staples in our area, and are now a fresh beer. It has an outdoor SPACE WITH ALL TYPES found not only at the brewery green space, and large, garageitself, but on tap at bars throughOF AMENITIES. style doors that create an indoorout Alabama as well as parts of outdoor atmosphere perfect for the coastal Mississippi and the Florida beach. Big Beach hosts a number Panhandle. of events, including regular live music and monthly Fairhope turns out five of its beers year-round, movies, yoga and sushi classes. There is also a special including its (Take the) Causeway IPA and Judge Roy firkin tapping the first Thursday of every month. Bean coffee stout, which are also available in bottles at Owners Jim and Julie Shamburger moved to Gulf stores throughout the area. Shores in 1996 and were surprised there was no craft “When we opened in 2013, we produced less than brewery in the area. 500 barrels of beer and were distributed solely in Mo“We couldn’t understand why smaller communities bile and Baldwin counties,” said Jim Foley, one of the had one or two breweries and Gulf Shores didn’t have brewery’s managing partners. “In 2017, we are on pace one,” remarked Julie. Finally, they decided to make a to brew about 4,500 barrels.” go of it themselves. Eight months in, they have been You therefore can enjoy a variety of Fairhope Brewhappy with the support they’ve received from the local ing’s beers without ever visiting its taproom on the community. Eastern Shore, but you’d be missing out on a lot it has “We opened in a slow period,” Jim said, but have to offer. Along with its staples, the brewery always has developed “a great following from a local clientele” a number of small-batch brews available, usually with throughout Lower Alabama and as far east as Pensaco-

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la. Now they are ready for their first summer season. Aided by brewmaster Rod Murray, who had more than 20 years’ brewing experience before moving to the coast, they offer four regular beers — including their flagship Rod’s Reel Cream Ale — and numerous seasonal brews. They are presently focusing on some lighter beers for the summer, including the Beach Express Blonde, which comes in a 12-ounce pour for $3.50, just like the toll bridge. Across the bay in Mobile, last year Keith Sherrill leased the former Crystal Ice House just off Canal Street to convert into the Haint Blue Brewing Co. “We are planning more of a restoration of the Ice House … than a renovation,” Sherrill said. “We want you to know that you’re sitting in an iconic Southern building when you visit us for a pint of beer.” There is currently a crowdfunding campaign to raise funds for the restoration; information on how to get involved can be found at wefunder. com/haintbluebrew. However, after being granted permission from the city to move ahead with the renovations, the city’s variance was challenged by a Mobile resident and the development of a brewery is on hold for the moment. Sherrill said the case will go before a judge soon, and if all goes well he hopes to open by the end of the year. But wait — haven’t we seen Haint Blue beers on tap around town already? Yes; despite his difficulties in getting the brewery up and running, Sherrill entered into an agreement with Mississippi’s Lazy Magnolia Brewery in Kiln to produce its beers for distribution until the legal issues in Mobile are cleared up. Haint Blue — the name comes from the color found on the porch ceilings of many historic Mobile homes, which is supposed to keep away evil spirits — currently produces three beers: an IPA, a porter and a saffron Saison. The IPA is now available in bottles, so look for it in local stores. While the development of the taphouse for Haint Blue remains on hold for the moment, Serda’s Brewing Co. is planning on an August opening of its brewery and taproom in the old Goodyear tire garage on Government Street, near the Ben May Library. The owner, John Serda (pictured on the cover), is known for his Serda’s Coffee Shops in Mobile and Daphne. Serda has wanted to get involved in the beer business for a while, and expects to distribute his new craft brews not just in the Mobile area, but throughout the Gulf Coast region. “We plan on being the Corona of craft beers,” he said, with a market area from the Florida Keys to the Texas coast. He is building a 30-barrel brewhouse and soon will begin producing four styles — a lager, a porter, an IPA and a Viennese ale — for distribution. Serda believes his lager will help his brand stand out, as fewer craft breweries produce them. Serda said his initial plans were mainly for off-site distribution with just a small taproom, but the demand in Mobile for a place to enjoy local craft beer convinced him to develop a larger, more elaborate space. His taproom will house a pilot brewery for producing up to 15 small-batch brews that will only be available on-site, in a modern space with all types of amenities. There will be high-speed internet access available, along with numerous big-screen TVs. The garage doors from the old repair shop will remain to open the taproom to an outdoor seating area, right on Government Street, and there will also be space for food trucks to hook up next to the brewery. The taproom will also be available for private parties. Serda said he already has five events booked, even before the facility has been


COVER STORY completed. To help fund the renovation of the old Goodyear building, Serda has also launched a crowdfunding campaign. Those who help fund the campaign will receive different rewards — from stickers to glassware to apparel — depending on the amount of their pledge (information can be found at serdabrewing.com). Married couple Ben Ross and Rebecca Williams hope to open a very different type of local brewery by the end of the year in DeTonti Square, just north of downtown Mobile — a neighborhood brewpub. Brewpubs can serve food (unlike the breweries in Alabama) along with their beers, as long as they have seating for at least 80 patrons. Unlike Serda’s or Haint Blue, Iron Hand Brewing will only be selling its beer on-site, as the city of Mobile prohibits brewpubs from any off-premise sales, even growlers. The state of Alabama does allow brewpubs to sell up to 5,000 barrels a year off-site, and while Ross said he hopes that eventually Mobile will change its regulations, for now they are just focused on getting developing some good beers and building a clientele. The brewpub is named for Henri DeTonti, an Italian soldier and explorer who came to North America in the 17th century with the famed French explorer Robert de LaSalle. As an agent of the French government, he established numerous trading posts throughout the lower Mississippi Valley, and was known as the “Father of Arkansas” for his founding of the Arkansas Post along the Mississippi and Arkansas rivers in 1686. Also known for his distinctive iron hook, the result of losing his right hand in battle, DeTonti died in Old Mobile (north of the present-day city) in 1704. Mobile’s DeTonti Square neighborhood is named in his honor, and the brewpub will be located on the ground floor of the old Waterfront Rescue Mission, built as a church in 1927. “We hope to take a building that was an important part of the community and allow it to remain an important part of the community,” Williams said, adding the pub also hoped to host charity events for causes the couple cares about, such as their building’s former tenant, the Waterfront Rescue Mission, and Wounded Warriors, in honor of the pub’s namesake. Iron Hand Brewery plans to feature four or five staple brews, including Ross’ signature pumpkin ale — made with

pumpkin pie — which won the gold medal at a homebrewing competition in Navarre, Florida. He will initially serve as both brewmaster and head of the kitchen, which will feature traditional British and American pub fare, such as bangers and mash, and burgers and fries. He plans to develop a number of seasonal brews to pair with food items, and also hopes to get input from patrons on ideas for beer styles. As the pub will have a full liquor license, he said they are thinking about offering selections from craft distilleries at the bar as well, further distinguishing Iron Hand from the other local breweries. As the number of breweries in the area promises to expand dramatically in the coming months, some have raised the question of whether the craft brew market in Lower Alabama will become saturated. Those in the business certainly did not think so, at least not with the number of breweries currently open or planning to open. “For almost four years, we were the only Alabama brewery within 150 miles, and that is obviously not the best way to create a craft beer culture,” Fairhope Brewing Co.’s Foley said. “The more breweries we have in the area, the more people will be exposed to craft beer, and craft beer’s popularity will continue to grow in our area. So we are very excited to get some friends nearby.” “Look at Portland, other areas of the Northwest,” said Iron Hand’s Ross. “Every corner has a craft brewery.” Closer to home, Pensacola, at about a quarter the size of Mobile, has three breweries and a number of brewpubs; the Mississippi Gulf Coast has three breweries. Huntsville has seven breweries, and Birmingham five. According to the Alabama Brewer’s Guild, the production of Alabama-brewed beer grew by about 34 percent in 2016, providing an environment to embrace the growth of craft brewing. Beer tourism is a real phenomenon, with an estimated 10 million Americans visiting the more than 5,000 craft breweries in the U.S. every year. Both Birmingham and North Alabama have capitalized on beer tourism, promoting “beer trails” for hops pilgrims to follow. Perhaps one day soon we will see a Gulf Coast Beer Trail that stretches from Baton Rouge to Panama City, with Mobile Bay as its hub.

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S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

NIGHTLIFE BEST ALL AROUND BAR A B C D E F

B-Bob’s Brickyard Callaghan’s Five Bar Haberdasher O’Daly’s

BEST BARTENDER A Adam Yunker, Royal Street Tavern B Alex Daniels, Boo Radley’s/Brickyard C Leon Weekley, B-Bob’s D Ricky Havens, Pour Baby E Robert Delmarter, Five Bar F Roy Clark, Haberdasher

BEST BARTENDERESS A Courtney Anthony, Butch Cassidy’s B Kara Bexley, Macaroni Grill C Sarah Smiley, Buffalo Wild Wing D Rachael Norris, Hayley’s E Susan Richardson, Pelican Pub F Tasha Tupa, Haberdasher

HOTTEST BARTENDER A Hunter Vanderlinde, Boo Radley’s/Brickyard B Jerry Grady, B-Bob’s C Michael Rashard Andrews, Buffalo Wild Wings D Rickey Havens, Pour Baby E Ricky Slayton, B-Bobs F Ross Fuentes, Tongue & Groove

HOTTEST BARTENDERESS A Gina Jo Previto, Veet’s B Jaimie Ramsey, O’Daly’s C Jana Padgett Dunn, Brickyard D Lindsey Bembry, Garage E Tori Caldwell, Haberdasher F Whitney Bealer, Butch Cassidy’s

BEST NEW BAR A B C D E F

Dority’s Eugene’s Monkey Bar Haberdasher Kazoola Le Bouchon Old Shell Growlers

BEST DIVE BAR A B C D E F

Garage Hayley’s Industry Pappa Buddha’s Veet’s Traders

BEST E-SHO BAR A B C D E F

Bone & Barrel Flybar Le Bouchon McSharry’s Pour Nelson’s Tongue & Groove

BEST WEMO BAR A B C D E F

Boondocks Cockeyed Charlies Crooked Martini Key West Lounge Patches Pour Baby

BEST MIMO BAR A B C D E F

Ashland Midtown Pub Butch Cassidy’s Mellow Mushroom - Midtown Old Shell Growlers Red or White Silverhorse Pub

BEST LODA BAR A B C D E F

Alchemy Tavern Garage Haberdasher LoDa Biergarten O’Daly’s OK Bike Shop

BEST SOMO BAR A B C D E F

Dority’s Fins Pelican Pub Pelican Reef The River Shack Zebra Lounge

BEST BEACH BAR A B C D E F

Anchor Bar & Grill FloraBama LuLu’s Pink Pony Pirate’s Cove The Hangout

BEST WINE BAR A B C D E F

Domke Market Firehouse Le Bouchon Pour Baby Red or White The Vineyard

BEST FANCY DRINK BAR A B C D E F

Five Bar Flybar Haberdasher Royal Street Tavern Sidecar Lounge Tongue & Groove

BEST AFTER-HOURS BAR A B C D

Alchemy Tavern Boo Radley’s Cockeyed Charlies Gabriel’s

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E Hayley’s F OK Bike Shop

BEST HAPPY HOUR BAR A B C D E F

Five Bar Flipside Garage LoDa Biergarten Merry Widow Wintzell’s

FAVORITE CRAFT BEER

THE PERFECT MARTINI

A Abita Andygator B Avondale Spring Street Saison C Fairhope Brewing Take the Causeway IPA D Fairhope Brewing Judge Roy Bean E Fat Tire F Haint Blue Brewing

A B C D E F

BEST E-SHO HAPPY HOUR FAVORITE IMPORT BEER A B C D E F

California Dreaming Manci’s McSharry’s Pour Nelson’s Sunset Pointe Top of the Bay

BEST SPORTS BAR A B C D E F

Baumhower’s Buffalo Wild Wings Heroes Hooters Island Wing Company Joe Cain Café

BEST COLLEGE BAR A B C D E F

Boo Radley’s Buffalo Wild Wings Heroes USA O’Daly’s Pat’s The Bar

BEST WATERFRONT BAR A B C D E F

Bluegill Pelican Pub Pirate’s Cove Sunset Pointe The Gulf Traders

BAR WHERE YOU ARE MOST LIKELY TO GET LUCKY A B C D E F

B-Bob’s Boo Radley’s Gabriel’s Hayley’s Saddle Up Saloon Tongue & Groove

BEST PLACE TO SHAKE YOUR BOOTY A B C D E F

B-Bob’s Boo Radley’s Brickyard Midnight Rodeo Saddle Up Saloon Veet’s

BEST GAY BAR A B C D

B-Bob’s Flipside Gabriel’s Midtown Pub

A B C D E F

Corona Dos Equis Guinness Modelo Red Stripe Stella Artois

FAVORITE DOMESTIC BEER A B C D E F

Bud Light Budweiser Coors Light Mich Ultra Miller Lite Yuengling

BAR WITH BEST TAP BEER SELECTION A B C D E F

Buffalo Wild Wings Draft Picks LoDa Biergarten Mellow Mushroom Montegos Old Shell Growlers

FAVORITE CASINO A B C D E F

Beau Rivage Golden Nugget Hard Rock IP Casino Palace Casino Wind Creek

BEST BAR BATHROOM A B C D E F

Haberdasher O’Daly’s OK Bike Shop Pour Baby Royal Street Tavern Tongue & Groove

BEST MARGARITA A Five Bar B Fuego C Fuzzy’s D OK Bike Shop (Dauphin St. Taqueria) E Taqueria Mexico F Tongue & Groove

BEST BLOODY MARY A B C D E F

Ashland Midtown Pub Brick & Spoon Five Bar Moe’s BBQ Pelican Pub Wintzell’s

Bonefish Grill Crooked Martini Haberdasher Royal Street Tavern Ruth’s Chris Sidecar Lounge

BEST BUSHWACKER A B C D E F

Fins FloraBama Moe’s BBQ Pelican Pub Pirate’s Cove Tacky Jack’s

BEST SPECIALTY COCKTAIL A Bordeaux Bourbon at Five Bar B Mexican Mule at Eugene’s Monkey Bar C Mississippi Old Fashioned at Haberdasher D Pineapple Jalapeno Margarita at Five Bar E Old Fashioned at Tongue & Groove F Weekend at Fernies at the Haberdasher

BEST BAR TRIVIA A B C D E F

Alchemy Tavern Blind Mule Buffalo Wild Wings Moe’s BBQ OK Bike Shop Tongue & Groove

BEST GENTLEMAN’S CLUB A B C D

Cookies-n-Cream Diamonds Lionz Den The Candy Store

SHOPPING AND SERVICES BEST OVERALL STYLIST A Amy Worley - Estetica B Holly Fountain - Salon DMH C Jason Chambers - Head Dress D Julia Liller - Salon West 5400 E Julie Burrus - Inspire F Taylor Westwood – Inspire

BEST SALON A Estetica B Harlow C Inspire Salon & Gallery D Salon West 5400 E Studio Bliss F Tami’s Mask & Mirror Studio

BEST COLORIST A Ashton Shirley - Solid

Rock Salon B Charlene Lindvink - Bliss Salon & Day Spa C Phrankey Lowery - Studio PH D Ryan Lawrence - Estetica E Tami Williams - Tami’s Mask & Mirror Studio F Destiny Andress – Vanity

SCISSOR WIZARD A Ryan Amacker - Salon West 5400 B Chasity Gray Largay Estetica C Laura Vendetti- Tami’s Mask & Mirror Studio D Brandi Hoover - Sanctuary Salon E Becca Maherg - Vanity F Lauren Holmquist - Salons by JC

BEST BARBER A Mike Edwards- Mike’s Barber Shop B Avis - Mayo’s Barber Shop C Charlene - Mayo’s Barber Shop D Dallas Jones Barber Shop E The Corner Barber Shop F Hillcrest Barbers

BEST MAKEUP ARTIST A Elizabeth Spence - Tami’s Mask & Mirror Studio B Valerie Floore C Carla Dames - Bliss Salon & Day Spa D Alexandrea West - Salon West 5400 E Ashley West F Lauren Kelley

BEST HOOHA WAXER A Anna Bishop - LA Bikini B Crystal Quattrone, Primp C LA Bikini D Elizabeth Spence - Tami’s Mask & Mirror Studio E Tera Shade - Bliss Salon & Day Spa F Jessica Stewart - Wax’d

BEST PLACE TO GET A MANI A B C D E F

Bliss Salon & Day Spa Estetica Lily’s Nails Royal Day Spa Vivian’s Old Shell Nails

BEST PLACE TO GET A PEDI A The Spa at the Battlehouse B Maria’s Nails C Lily’s Nails D Venetian Nails E Royal Day Spa F Vivian’s


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

BEST ESTHETICIAN A Ashley Maynard- Spa at the BattleHouse B Tera Shade - Bliss Salon & Day Spa C Hanna Hogle - Sunrise Dermatology D Sarah Sheffield - Massage Envy E Amberjoy McLean- Medspa at the Park F Katie Davidson - Haley Dermatology

BEST DAY SPA A B C D E F

Spa at the BattleHouse LumaLife Therapy Massage Envy Medspa at the Park Lyons Elite Day Spa Nouveau

BEST MASSAGE THERAPIST A Elements B Hannah Boltz C Heidi Pritchett - Above and Beyond Hot Yoga D Kelsea Tupa - Epione Massage & Bodywork E Massage Envy F Roderick Gibbs - Dynamic Orthopedic

BEST TANNING SALON A B C D E F

LA Bikini Palm Beach Tan Soliel Nu Tiffany Tans Brush of Bronze Ultra Tanz

MOBILE’S BEST DOCTOR A B C D E F

Dr. Gamil Dawood Dr. Charla Evans Dr. Frank Hall Dr. Elizabeth Mathison Dr. Richard Oyler Dr. Jacob Webster

MOBILE’S BEST SPECIALIST A Dr. Daniel Cameron B Dr. Michael Do C Dr. John Hinton D Dr. Ron O’ Gorman E Rihner, Gupta, Grosz, Cardiology P.C. F Dr. K. Scott Saucier

BEST HOOHA DOCTOR A B C D E F

Dr. Quin A. Bixler Dr. Glenn T. Gallaspy III Dr. Lauren Lambrecht Dr. Patton Morrison Barton Dr. Max Rogers Dr. John Val-Gallas

BEST BOOB DOC A Dr. Charles Dyas B Dr. James Koehler

C D E F

Dr. Kitti Outlaw Dr. Christopher Park Dr. Randy Proffitt Dr. Stephen Sheppard

BEST FACELIFT DOC A B C D E F

Dr. Henry Barber Dr. James Koehler Dr. Michael Lyons Dr. Steve Martin Dr. Kitti Outlaw Dr. Christopher Park

BEST DERMATOLOGIST A B C D E F

Dr. Thomas Bender Dr. Kathryn Dempsey Dr. Dena Howell Dr. Amy Morris Dr. Ryan Ramagosa Dr. Scott VanLoock

BEST WEIGHT LOSS DOC A Dr. Lawrence Carpenter B Slim & Trim Medical Weight Loss C Dr. Quint Jardine D Dr. Patrick McGuire E Dr. Ruth Shields F Dr. William T. Urquhart

BEST “DOC IN THE BOX” CLINIC A Compass Urgent Care B Eastern Shore Urgent Care C Greater Mobile Urgent Care D Hillcrest Urgent Care E Immediate Care of the South F Urgent Care by the Bay

BEST BACK CRACKER (CHIROPRACTOR) A Dr. Ken Bishop B Dr. Cevin Cormier C Dr. Chris Corsentino D Liberation Chiropractic Clinic E Dr. Troy Lofton F Dr. Clarke Pradat

BEST DENTIST A Alabama Family Dental B Grelot Dental C Mobile Comprehensive Dentistry D Noblet Family Dental E Dr. Kristopher Portacci F Skyline Family Dental

BEST ORAL SURGEON A B C D E F

Dr. Charles Black III Dr. David Lairmore Dr. Rick Morgan Dr. Chris Mullenix Dr. Robert Pfeffle Dr. Greg Zieman

BEST GYM A B C D E F

Crew Fitness Hillcrest Fitbody Bootcamp Moorer YMCA Planet Fitness ProHealth Thomas Fitness Center

BEST CROSSFIT BOX A B C D E F

CrossFit Saraland CrossFit Spanish Fort JH CrossFit Mobtown Crossfit CrossFit Roadhouse CrossFit Jacked

BEST PERSONAL TRAINER A Emily Powell - ProHealth B Jennifer Savell - Thomas Fitness Center C John Seddon - Life Plus D Josh Foster- Josh the Trainer E LaJuan Black - Moorer YMCA F Braxton Gilbert

BEST VETERIANRIAN A Dr. Christopher Boudreau - Boudreau Veterinary Clinic B Dr. Jennifer Carney Rehm Animal Clinic Tillman’s Corner C Dr. Mary Katherine Cross - Old Shell Road Animal Hospital D Dr. Albert S. Gaston, Jr. E Dr. Roxy Leslie, Village Animal Clinic F Dr. Carl Myers, Theodore Veterinary Hospital

BEST PET GROOMER A Adorable Dos B Bella and Bows C Lola Bells D Glamour Paws E Dapper Dogs F Jeremy Henderson at The Waggy Tail

BEST FLORIST A All A Bloom B Lush C Flowers Etc. Daphne D Julia Greer Fobes Fashion Art Flowers E Belle Bouquet F Sarah Beth’s Florist

BEST WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHER A 3 Words Photography B Baylee Rae Photography C Katherine Thomason KatCo D SLR Photography E Elizabeth Gelineau F One Fine Day Photography

BEST YOGA STUDIO

BEST REAL ESTATE FIRM

A Above and Beyond Hot Yoga B Soul Shine Yoga C Sterling Hot Yoga D Synergy Yoga & Pilates E CORE Studio F Glow Yoga

A Roberts Brothers B Better Home & Gardens Real Estate Generations C Berkshire Hathaway D LLB&B E Port City Realty F The Cummings Company

BEST YOGA INSTRUCTOR A Shoshana Treichel, Above & Beyond Hot Yoga B Teddy Ward, Bikram Yoga C Jamie Ullock, Soul Shine Yoga D Annette Porter Ham, Yoga Alliance E Jennifer Guthrie, Glow Yoga F Sprite Wood, Sterling Hot Yoga

BEST MECHANIC/AUTO SHOP A Foreign & Domestic Autocare B Baehr’s Automotive C Advanced Collision D Buddy’s Service Center E Griffith Service Center F Mark McGugin

BEST CARWASH/DETAIL A B C D E F

Rich’s Bebo’s Down South Detail Ultra Carwash Zippy’s Alabama Auto Clean

BEST LAWYER IF YOUR SPOUSE IS A HO (DIVORCE) A B C D E F

Josh Boone Alison Herlihy Jerry Pilgrim Donald Briskman The Mims Firm Jessica Pilgrim

BEST LAWYER TO KEEP YOU OUT OF PRISON (CRIMINAL) A B C D E F

Art Powell Tom Walsh Donald Friedlander Jeff Deen Grant Gibson Buzz Jordan

BEST LAWYER TO SUE THE PANTS OFF SOMEONE (TRIAL) A Long & Long B John Leech, Warhurst Law C David J. Maloney, Maloney Frost D Greene & Phillips E Dean Waite F Rod Cate, Hand Arendall

BEST REALTOR A Angela Locklier, Berkshire Hathaway B Kevin Loper, Roberts Brothers C Sam Calderone, ReMax D Matt McAllister, Realty Executives E Marcile Sims & Karen Singleton, Synergy Realty Group F Catherine Mackey, LLB&B

BEST INSURANCE AGENT OR AGENCY A Bradley Flowers, Alfa B Donna Gatlin, State Farm C Advanced Insurance Company D Allison Horner, State Farm E Morgan Bradley, Alfa F Jonah Dismukes, Worthy Insurance Agency

BEST MORTGAGE BROKER/FIRM A Mortgage Team One B Craig Anderton, Bank Of England C Vince Hughes, Bryant Bank D New Horizons Credit Union E Jana Williston, Community Bank

BEST INVESTMENT BANKER/FINANCIAL PLANNER A Ryan Mahtani, BB&T Investments B James Eddins, Morgan Stanley C Coldsmith Ryder & Associates D Joseph Lomax, Morgan Stanley E Eric Rickey, Edward Jones F 5 Rivers Group, Morgan Stanley

BEST NEW CAR DEALER A B C D E F

Mullinax Bay Chevrolet Joe Bullard Palmer’s Toyota UJ Chevrolet Tameron Honda

A B C D E F

Keith Kingan MCD Motors Premier Motorsports Andrew’s Imports Carfinders Auto Outlet Tameron Honda

BEST CPA A Andy Cook, R. Andrew Cook, CPA B BJ Gilbert, Karen Simmons, PC C Karen Simmons, Karen Simmons, PC D John Bedsole, Kalifeh, Bedsole, Adams PC E Pat Bessonen, Wilkins Miller

BEST LANDSCAPER A Bay Landscaping B Sexton Lawn & Landscaping C Southern Landscape Solutions D Brian Griffin Landscape Co. E Barry Vittor Landscape Medic F Matt VanGieson, Premier Lawn Service

BEST CONTRACTOR/ HOMEBUILDER A B C D E F

Batten Builders Bo Wilder Contracting Robert Dueitt Construction Heritage Homes David Burks Fulcrum Construction

BEST INTERIOR DESIGNER A B C D E F

Augusta Tapia Mary Jo Matranga Randi Wilson Pat O’Neal Kade Laws Interior Design Catherine Arensberg

BEST HARDWARE STORE A Blankenship’s B Andrews Ace Hardware C Eastern Shore Ace Hardware D Springhill Ace Hardware E Wigman’s Ace Hardware F Dawes Ace Hardware

BEST PEST CONTROL A B C D E F

Aegis Pest Control BugMaster Cook’s Pest Control Kelly’s Pest Control Semmes Pest Control Xtreme Xterminating

BEST PET STORE A B C D E F

B&B Pet Stop Bella and Bows Dog Days Barkery PetSmart Pet Supplies Plus The Waggy Tail

BEST USED CAR DEALER

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S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

BEST ANTIQUE STORE A B C D E F

Antiques at The Loop Backflash Antiques Charles Phillips To Arms Antiques The Brother’s Gallery Whitehouse Antiques

BEST MEN’S CLOTHING STORE A B C D E F

Alabama Outdoors D&K G Harvell Jos A Bank McCoy’s Metzger’s

BEST LINGERIE/ NAUGHTY SHOP A B C D

Gift Spot NT Video The Little Drawer Victoria’s Secret

BEST WOMEN’S BOUTIQUE A B C D E F

Ashbrooke Hemline Lotus Kenzlee Grace Pink Post Office Boutique Sweet Tea Boutique

BEST CLOTHING CONSIGNMENT STORE A B C D E F

Best Kept Secret Consignology Hertha’s Plato’s Closet Rave Reviews Second Edition

BEST DEPARTMENT STORE A B C D E F

Belk Dillards JC Penney Kohl’s Steinmart TJ Maxx

BEST FORMAL WEAR A B C D E F

Bella Bridesmaid D&K Fancy That Francia’s I Do Bridal Putting on the Rtiz

BEST ACCESSORIES/ AFFORDABLE JEWELRY A B C D E F

Emmaleah Boutique Francesca’s Gaudy Galz Knot Just Beads Private Gallery Versona

BEST FINE JEWELRY A B C D E F

Claude Moore Friedman’s Goldstein’s Goldart Karat Patch Zundel’s

BEST DRY CLEANERS A B C D E F

Dixie Cleaners Gulf City Cleaners Jaguar Cleaners Master Cleaners Paragon Waite’s

BEST HOME CLEANING SERVICE A 2 Gals & A Mop B Conde Cleaners C Helping Hands Cleaners D Maids A la Mode E Southern Style Quality Cleans F The Maids

BEST STATIONERY STORE A B C D E F

Gwin’s It’s Inviting JO Acree Paper Jubilee Soiree Signatures The Paper Menu

BEST OUTDOORS STORE A B C D E F

Academy Alabama Outdoors Bass Pro McCoy’s Quint’s Red Beard Outfitters

BEST LOCAL PHARMACY A B C D E F

Christopher Pharmacy Conwell Pharmacy Dawes Point Pharmacy Grand Bay Pharmacy Midtown Pharmacy Saraland Pharmacy

BEST SHOE STORE A B C D E F

Dillards DSW Fleet Feet Shoefly Shoe Station The Gallery

BEST GIFT SHOP A Bellingrath Gardens Gift Shop B Cypress Gift Shop at Five Rivers C Gaillard’s D Marcie N Me E Meggie B’s F Oak Ridge

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BEST HOME FURNISHINGS STORE A B C D E F

Atchison’s Designer Collection J&J Lush Sarah B. Atchison’s Villa Décor

BEST FURNITURE CONSIGNMENT SHOP A B C D E F

All Around the House Best Kept Secret Divine Consignment High Cotton Kaglen’s Something Special

BEST VAPE SHOP A B C D E F

Cloud 9 Vapes Deep South Vape Parlor Vapes Vapor’s Smoke Shop Vapor’s Outpost Vapor Hut

BEST BANK OR CREDIT UNION A Army Aviation Federal Credit Union B BB&T Bank C Coastal Bank and Trust D Community Bank E New Horizons Credit Union F Regions

BEST TATTOO ARTIST/ SHOP A B C D E F

AJ Ludlow CW Neese Kelly Pony Stephenson Kevin Black Sean Herman Suzette Callahan

BEST HOME SECURITY COMPANY A B C D E F

ADT Alert Protection Systems Allied Alarm Avid Home Security Hunter Security TSI Alarms

BEST BODY PIERCER A Chelsea Brown at Medusa’s B Keith Collins at Kaoz C Brett Garrick at Kaoz D Matt Hewett at Kaoz E Chad Reisenweber at Tattoo Town F Aaron Victory at The Bell Rose

KIDS

BEST KIDS’ CLOTHING STORE- NEW A B C D E F

Carter’s GiGi & Jay’s H&M Little Monkey Toes The Holiday Tiny Town

BEST KIDS’ CONSIGNMENT STORE A B C D E F

Carousel Kids Kids Klozet Kidz Kottage Kids Wearhouse Savvy Mom Sale Sweet Seconds

BEST KIDS’ ROOM FURNISHINGS A Just Baby Designs B Polka Tot Designs C Siegel’s Baby Room

BEST SUMMER CAMP A Bayside Academy Summer Camp B Gulf Coast Exploreum Summer Camps C Mobile Museum of Art Summer Art Camp D St. Luke’s Summer Camps E SunnySide Theater F USA Rec Center Summer Camp

BEST DAYCARE A Beck’s B Christ United Methodist Church Kidz Crossing C Dauphin Way Baptist D Springhill Baptist CDC E St. Mark’s F West Mobile Baptist CDC

BEST PRESCHOOL A Bridgeway Academy B Corpus Christi Catholic Preschool C St. Dominic Preschool D St. Luke’s Preschool E St. Paul’s EEC F Westminster Presbyterian Preschool

BEST MOTHER’S DAY OUT A Ashland Place B Christ United Methodist Church C Springhill Baptist MDO D St. Ignatius MDO E St. Mary MDO F Westminster MDO

MOST KID-FRIENDLY RESTAURANT A Buffalo Wild Wings

B C D E F

Chick Fil A Chuck E Cheese Island Wing Company Mellow Mushroom Moe’s Southwest Grill

BEST BIRTHDAY PARTY PLACE A Gulf Coast Exploreum B Get Air C Pete’s Party Castle D Pump It Up E Sunshine Sue’s Play Garden F White Gates Farm

BEST PARK/ PLAYGROUND A Daphne Centennial Park B Fairhope Community Park C Langan Municipal Park D Lavretta Park E Medal of Honor Park F Spanish Fort Town Center Park

MOST KID-FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD A B C D E F

Inverness Jackson Heights Llanfair Ravine Woods Rosswood Sky Ranch

BEST KID-FRIENDLY LOCAL ATTRACTION A 5 Rivers Delta Resource Center B Bellingrath Gardens C Estaurium at Dauphin Island Sea Lab D Gulf Coast Exploreum E Gulf Coast Zoo F USS Alabama

BEST DANCE STUDIO A Broadway South B Dance without Limits C Debbie’s School of Dance D Grace Dance Center E Sheffield School of the Dance F Turning Pointe Dance Academy

BEST PEDIATRIC DENTIST A Dr. Leslie Buckley, General Dentist for Kids, Teens and Young Adults B Dr. Gaines Thomas & Dr. Lauren Moore C Dr. Stephen Greenleaf D Dr. Kelly Jones, Malbis Pediatric Dentistry E Dr. Joel Welford and Dr. Marion McMurphy F Dr. Trey Fellers

BEST ORTHODONTIST

A B C D E F

Hicks & McMurphy Pickett Orthodontics Dr. Rosalyn Salter Dr. James Donaghey Dr. Brian Oliver Glass Orthodontics

BEST PEDIATRICIAN A B C D E F

Dr. Alfred Shearer Dr. Faye Roberts Dr. Karen Calametti Dr. Mary Wells Dr. Matthew Cepeda Dr. Robin McNair

BEST KID PHOTOGRAPHER A B C D E F

Cornerstone Photography Janie Long Photography Laura Cantrell Samantha Vickers Shane Rice Susanna Womack

BEST PUBLIC SCHOOL A Baker High School B Collier Elementary School C Eichold Mertz Magnet School D Mary B. Austin Elementary School E Phillips Preparatory School F Saraland City Schools

BEST PRIVATE SCHOOL A McGill-Toolen B Mobile Christian School C St. Luke’s Episcopal School D St. Paul’s Episcopal School E St. Dominic’s Catholic School F St. Mary’s Catholic School

COOLEST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER A Carey Arensberg, Hall Elementary B Elizabeth Partsch, ER Dickson C Laura Brand, St. Paul’s D Lisa Large, Collier Elementary E Nicole Baranov, Hutchens F Jessica Cassady, Gilliard Elementary

COOLEST MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHER A Jacqueline Richardson, Foley Middle School B La Toya Barnes, Phillips Preparatory School C Rosalie Hyatt, Grand Bay Middle D Peter Stoyka, Corpus Christi Catholic E Melanie Fromdahl, St. F Dominic’s G Hope Herren, Phillips Preparatory


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

COOLEST HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER A Brandi Richardson, St. Luke’s B Jeremiah Quattrone, Citronelle High School C Joe Arensberg, McGill D Margaret Delaney, UMS E Mike Stratas, Theodore High F Nathan Adams, Rain High School

CITY LIFE BEST MOBILIAN EVER A B C D E F

Eugene Walter Hank Aaron Jimmy Buffett Joe Cain The Peanut Man Uncle Henry

BEST MOBILIAN RIGHT NOW A B C D E F

Chief Slac IV Greg Jones, FTZC Jake Peavy Jonathan Frye Mayor Sandy Stimpson Ralph Hargrove

QUINTESSENTIAL MOBILIAN A B C D E F

Gary Cooper Herndon Inge Preston Griffith Reggie Copeland, Sr. Suzanne Cleveland Vivian Figures

MOST ELIGIBLE BACHELOR A B C D E F

Bennie Henderson Charles Matranga Eric Browne Jonathan Friedlander Mike Scalese Vaughan Blacksher

MOST ELIGIBLE BACHELORETTE A B C D E F

Hanna Hogle Liz Bush Morgan Mitchell Sable Williams Sarah-John Smith Suzanne Donaghey

COOLEST NEIGHBORHOOD - MOBILE A B C D E F

Copeland Island Florence Place Midtown Oakleigh Garden District Regency Rosswood

COOLEST NEIGHBORHOOD – EASTERN SHORE A B C D E F

Bellaton Cambron Fruit and Nut District Historic Malbis Olde Towne Daphne Osprey Ridge

BEST ANNUAL EVENT A Bellingrath Magic Christmas in Lights B Dauphin Street Beer Festival C Greater Gulf State Fair D Mardi Gras E MoonPie Drop F Senior Bowl

BEST ANNUAL FUNDRAISING EVENT A Fuse Project Dragon Boat Races B Junior League Christmas Jubilee C Little Black Dress - Ronald McDonald House D Salvation Army Mother Daughter Tea E St. Mary’s Crawfish and Bluegrass Extravaganza F Woofstock

BEST PLACE TO HOLD A RECEPTION/SPECIAL EVENT A B C D E F

23 East 5 Rivers BattleHouse Hotel Fort Conde Inn The Steeple Venue at Dawes

BEST HOTEL A B C D E F

BattleHouse Hotel Berney Fly Grand Hotel Hampton Inn Malaga The Admiral

BEST HIGH SCHOOL MARCHING BAND A B C D E F

Baker Davidson LeFlore McGill Mobile Christian Murphy High School

BEST MARDI GRAS PARADING SOCIETY A B C D E F

Conde Cavaliers Crewe of Columbus Infant Mystics LaShes Mystics of Time Polka Dots

BEST MARDI GRAS MARCHING SOCIETY A B C D

Dauphin Street Drunks Skeleton Krewe Society of Bums Wild Mauvillians

BEST MARDI GRAS BALL A B C D E F

Crewe of Columbus Fifty Funny Fellows Mobile Mystics Mystics of Time Polka Dots Osiris

BEST GOLF COURSE A B C D E F

Azalea City Golf Course Country Club Mobile Heron Lakes Magnolia Grove Spring Hill College Steelwood

MOBILE’S BUMPIEST STREET A B C D

Ann Street Glenwood Street Little Flower Avenue Old Government Street

COOLEST CHURCH OR HOUSE OF WORSHIP A B C D E F

Christian Life Church City Hope Gospel Way Church Grace Lutheran Harvest Church Wesminster Presbyterian

BEST CLERGYMAN/PASTOR/SPIRITUAL LEADER A Dr. Brett Burleson - Dayspring Baptist B David Mauldin - Westminster Presbyterian C Fr. John Lynes - Little Flower Catholic D Fr. Mark Neske - Holy Family Catholic E Patrick Casey - Christian Life Church F Wayne Miller - Grace Lutheran

BEST PLACE TO TAKE OUT-OF-TOWNERS (ATTRACTION) A B C D E F

5 Rivers Battleship Bellingrath Gardens Gulf Coast Ducks History Museum of Mobile Mobile Carnival Museum

BEST PLACE TO TAKE OUT-OF-TOWNERS (RESTAURANT) A Bluegill

B C D E F

Callaghan’s Dauphin’s Felix’s NoJa Wintzell’s

BEST COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY A Spring Hill College B University of Mobile C University of South Alabama

BEST JUNIOR COLLEGE/ TRADE/TECHNICAL SCHOOL A Bishop State B Blue Cliff College C Charles Academy of Beauty D Coastal Alabama Community College E Remington College F Virginia College

COOLEST APARTMENT COMPLEX - MOBILE

MUSIC BEST LOCAL BAND

A B C D E F

BEST NEW LOCAL BAND

BEST JAZZ MUSICIAN

A Camm Lewis & The Live Oaks B Red Clay Strays C The Disco Rednecks D Slide Bayou E The Marlow Boys F Yeah, Probably

A B C D E

BEST COUNTRY BAND/ PERFORMER

A Beamin’ B Clint ”Smitty” Smith C Derek “Truthseekah” Grosskurth D Mr. 88 E Phillip Baggins, Jr. F Pluto & Kid Kembi

A Bruce Smelley B Camm Lewis & The Live Oaks C Hannah McFarland D Holli Mosley E Last Call Rodeo F Muscadine Bloodline

COOLEST APARTMENT COMPLEX – EASTERN SHORE

BEST METAL/PUNK/UNDERGROUND BAND

A Arlington at Eastern Shore B Bay Breeze Apartments C The Colonnade

BEST MOVIE THEATER A Cobb Gulf Shores B Crescent Theater C IMAX at Gulf Coast Exploreum D Premiere Cinema 14 Spanish Fort E Wynnsong 16

BEST LOCAL COMPANY TO WORK FOR A Employee Fiduciary, LLC B Express Employment Professionals C FTZC D Rihner, Gupta & Grosz Cardiology, P.C. E West (formerly Televox) UJ Chevrolet

BEST BEACH RESORT/ CONDO A B C D E F

Caribe Holiday Isle Phoenix on the Bay Phoenix West The Wharf Turquoise Place

A Jamell Richardson B Lisa Mills C Ric McNaughton

A Infant Richard & The Delta Stones B Jimmy Lumpkin & The Revival C Paw Paw’s Medicine Cabinet D Stereo Dogs E The Mulligan Brothers F Underhill Family Orchestra

Four Seasons Marine Street Lofts Old Shell Lofts Stoneridge Tower on Ryan Park Village at Midtown

A B C D E F

BEST BLUES BAND/ARTIST

A B C D

A Sunday Fire Black Titan Curse the Flesh Hibachi Stranglers

BEST CLUB TO SEE LIVE MUSIC A B C D E F

Brickyard Callaghan’s O’Daly’s Soul Kitchen The Blind Mule The Merry Widow

BEST OUTDOOR BAR TO SEE LIVE MUSIC A B C D E F

Bluegill Dority’s Flora Bama Hangout OK Bike Shop The Frog Pond

BEST VENUE TO SEE LIVE MUSIC (NON-BAR) A B C D E F

IP Casino Saenger Theatre The Frog Pond The Listening Room The Steeple The Wharf

BEST SOLO MUSICIAN Andrew Ayers Eric Erdman John Anthony Laurie Anne Armour Ryan Balthrop Phil Proctor

Blake Nolte Chip Herrington John Cochran Roman Street The Bodhi Trio

BEST RAP/HIP HOP ARTIST

BEST MUSIC/RECORD STORE A B C D E

Andy’s Music Bay Sound Dr. Music Mobile Records Picker’s Paradise

BEST LOCAL RECORDING STUDIO A B C D E F

Admiral Bean Dauphin Street Sound Day 6 Dogwood Grave Danger Studio H20

BEST GUITAR PLAYER A B C D E F

Chad Parker Corky Hughes Jimmy Gray Mike Jernigan Patrick Ramsey Phil Proctor

BEST AREA SINGER/ VOICE A B C D E F

Holli Mosley Jimmy Lumpkin Mike Jernigan Ross Newell Ryan Balthrop Symone French

J u n e 1 5 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 35


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

BEST AREA DRUMMER

BEST MUSEUM

A B C D E F

Bryan Ayers Cameron Alidor Chico McCollum Ethan Snedigar Tyler Goodwin Zach Lynd

A Bellingrath Gardens Museum B Eastern Shore Art Center C Gulf Coast Exploreum D History Museum of Mobile E Mobile Carnival Museum F Mobile Museum of Art

A B C D E F

Gabriel Willis Greg Crabtree Jamie Newsome Marc Hendrix Mario Rivera Owen Finley

BEST THEATRE GROUP

BEST AREA BASSIST

BEST PIANO PLAYER/ KEYBOARDIST A B C D E F

Alan Anderson Andrew Ayers Chris Spies Gene Murrell John Anthony Scott Morlock

BEST DRAG QUEEN PERFORMER A B C D E F

Amber Douglas Champagne Munroe Jawakatema Davenport Miss Cie Miss Loretta Venus Shante Da’Vis

BEST DJ (MIXIN’, MASHIN’UP KIND) A DJ Amanda Dean B DJ Blayze C DJ Leroy D DJ Lynch E DJ Mbezzle F DJ Mellly Mell (Melvin Sledge)

BEST AREA MUSIC FESTIVAL A 1065 Music Festival B Hangout Music Festival C SouthSounds Music Festival

ARTS BEST LOCAL PAINTER A B C D E F

Adam Underwood Ardith Goodwin Ben Kaiser Bonnie Fuchs Devlin Wilson Faye Earnest

BEST LOCAL SCULPTOR A B C D E F

April Livingston Bruce Larsen Casey Downing Bertice McPherson Lebaron Heathcoe Shawn Berdux

BEST LOCAL GRAPHIC DESIGN ARTIST A B C D E F

Amanda Pritchard Carl Norman Colby Jackson Hadley Binion Josh Holland Tripp Gustin

BEST MIXED MEDIA ARTIST A B C D E F

Ardith Goodwin Chris Cumbie Julia Greer Fobes Lucy Gafford Mateo Shawn Berdux

BEST ART GALLERY A Alabama Contemporary Art Center B Artology C Cathedral Square Gallery D CATS (Creative Artistic Treasures Studio) E Gallery 450 F Inspire

A Chickasaw Civic Theatre B Eastern Shore Repertory Theatre C Joe Jefferson Players D Mobile Theatre Guild E Playhouse in the Park F Sunnyside Theatre

BEST PLAY OR PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR A A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum - JJP B Beauty and the Beast - St. Paul’s Players C Complete Works of William Shakespeare - Chickasaw Civic Theatre D Sordid Lives - Mobile Theatre Guild E Sweeney Todd - JJP F The Producers – JJP

BEST LOCAL ACTOR A B C D E F

Chandler Smith Cory Olson Gene Murrell Griffin Hood Jason McKenzie Lisa Costa

BEST THEATRICAL SINGER A B C D E F

Chandler Smith Cory Olson Gene Murrell Jessica Head Terri Jackson Stacey Driskell

BEST ARTS EVENT A Artys B Eastern Shore Repertory Theatre on the Bluff C Fairhope Arts & Crafts Festival D LoDa Artwalk E Mobile Symphony Orchestra F Mobile Arts Council Throwdown

EATS & DRINKS BEST OVERALL RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Butch Cassidy’s Dauphin’s Dumbwaiter Felix’s Kitchen on George Ruth’s Chris

BEST LOCALLY OWNED RESTAURANT A Bayley’s Seafood Restaurant B Butch Cassidy’s C Felix’s D Osman’s E Pour Baby F The Noble South

BEST NEW RESTAURANT FINE DINING A Chuck’s Fish B Dumbwaiter on the Hill C Le Bouchon

BEST NEW RESTAURANT CASUAL A B C D

BJ’s Brewhouse FOY Fuzzy’s Taco Shop Nourish

36 | L AG N I A P P E | J u n e 1 5 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 2 1 , 2 0 1 7

E Roosters F Taziki’s

BEST CHAIN RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Chicken Salad Chick Foosackly’s Half Shell Oyster House Moe’s BBQ PF Changs Romano’s Macaroni Grill

BEST EASTERN SHORE RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Boudreaux’s Camellia Cafe Dragonfly Fairhope Inn R Bistro Sunset Pointe

BEST BEACH RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Cobalt Cosmo’s Fisher’s Flora Bama Yacht Club LuLu’s Miguel’s Beach’n Baja

BEST CHEF A Arwen Rice, Red or White B Bill Briand, Fisher’s C Bryan Cates, Kitchen on George D Chris Rainosek, The Noble South E Cortlandt Inge, Cortlandt’s F Weston Simpson, Pour Baby

BEST ATMOSPHERE A B C D E F

Bluegill Chuck’s Fish Dauphin’s NoJa Pour Baby Sunset Pointe

MOST INNOVATIVE MENU A B C D E F

Dragonfly Kitchen on George NoJa Saisho The Noble South Von’s

BEST OUTDOOR DINING A B C D E F

Bluegill Ed’s OK Bike Shop Sunset Pointe The Gulf The River Shack

BEST SWEET TEA A B C D E F

Chick Fil A Cream and Sugar Foosackly’s McAlister’s Raising Cane’s Spot of Tea

BEST BISCUITS A B C D E F

Biscuit King Briquette’s Cracker Barrel Cream and Sugar Dick Russell’s Hardee’s

BEST APPETIZER A Baked Avocado - Five Bar B Brussells Sprouts - Dumbwaiter C Crawfish & Spinach Dip Heroes D Dave’s Pimiento Cheese LeBouchon E Tuna Martini - Royal Scam F Uptown Shrimp - Chuck’s Fish

BEST ENTRÉE IN MOBILE A Chicken & Grits - Pour Baby

B Donkey on Crack Roll Chuck’s Fish C Hangar Steak - NoJa D LA Burger – Callaghan’s E Lamb Chops Gorgonzola - Osman’s F Shrimp & Grits - The Noble South

BEST HOME COOKIN’/ SOUL FOOD A B C D E F

Buck’s Diner Cozy Brown’s Judy’s Place Mama’s Mary’s Southern Cooking Redeemer Community Café

BEST FARM TO TABLE A B C D E F

FOY Kitchen on George Nourish Pour Baby Red or White The Noble South

BEST SERVER A Dominique Kline - Sunflower Café B Jocelyn Phillips - Pour Baby C Megan Baker - Butch Cassidy’s D Pat Ramsey - Felix’s E Robin Trainor - Cream and Sugar F Tommy Watts - Felix’s

BEST OVERALL SERVICE A B C D E F

Briquette’s Dauphin’s Felix’s Kitchen On George Ruth’s Chris Sunflower Café

BEST DESSERT A Blondie at Chuck’s Fish B Buttermilk Pie at Pour Baby C Chocolates at Fairhope Chocolate D Desserts at Cream & Sugar E Desserts at Delish’s Desserts F Key Lime Curd at Sunset Pointe

BEST RESTAURANT WINE LIST A B C D E F

Chuck’s Fish Kitchen on George Pour Baby Red or White Ruth’s Chris The Trellis Room

BEST WINGS A B C D E F

Baumhower’s Buffalo Wild Wings Butch Cassidy’s Island Wing Company Moe’s BBQ WeMo’s

BEST CHICKEN FINGERS A B C D E F

Buffalo Wild Wings Butch Cassidy’s Foosackly’s PDQ Raising Cane’s Zaxby’s

BEST ICE CREAM/ YOGURT/GELATO A B C D E F

Cammie’s Old Dutch Chill Dippin’ Dots Marble Slab Mr. Gene’s Beans Serda’s

BEST LUNCH SPOT A B C D E

Ashland Midtown Pub Café 219 Chicken Salad Chick Honey Baked Ham Regina’s Kitchen

F Rice Asian Grill & Sushi Bar

BEST EASTERN SHORE LUNCH SPOT A B C D E F

East Shore Café Panini Pete’s R Bistro Sandra’s Sunflower Café Windmill Market

BEST WINE/GOURMET SHOP A B C D E F

A la Cork Domke Market Firehouse Wine Red or White Le Bouchon Southern Napa

BEST BEER SELECTION RETAIL A B C D E F

Cottage Hill Package Store Domke Market Kathy’s Package Store Old Shell Growlers Rouse’s Southern Napa

BEST ANNUAL FOOD EVENT OR COOK-OFF A American Cancer Society Chili Cook-off B Bay Bites Food Truck Festival C Downtown Cajun Cook-off D Feeding the Gulf Coast Annual Chef Challenge E Greek Fest F Shrimp Festival

BEST FOOD TRUCK A B C D E F

Benjamin’s Crepe Crusaders Kraken Catering Company Smokin’ Gringos Von’s Will Hughes

BEST GUMBO A B C D E F

Chuck’s Fish Cream and Sugar Felix’s Mudbugs at the Loop Original Oyster House Wintzell’s

BEST PO-BOY A B C D E F

Ashland Midtown Pub Market by the Bay Mudbugs at the Loop R&R The Boiling Pot Wintzell’s

BEST SUSHI A B C D E F

Chuck’s Fish Fuji San Master Joe’s Liquid Lounge Rice Rock-n-Roll Sushi

BEST BAKERY A B C D E F

Bake My Day ellenJay Flour Girls Pollman’s Sally’s Piece of Cake Sugar Rush

BEST WEDDING CAKES A B C D E F

Cakes by Judi Couture Cakes ellenJay Flour Girls Pollman’s The Pastry Shop

BEST CATERER A B C D

Bay Gourmet Clifton Morrissette Creative Catering Georgia Roussos

E Naman’s F Tyners

BEST BURGER A B C D E F

Butch Cassidy’s Callaghan’s Five Guys LoDa Biergarten Mugshots Pirate’s Cove

BEST STEAK A B C D E F

Briquette’s Jessie’s Judy’s Place Osman’s Outback Ruth’s Chris

BEST SEAFOOD A B C D E F

Ed’s Felix’s Half Shell Oyster House JT’s Sunset Grill Ralph & Kacoo’s Wintzell’s

BEST BRUNCH A B C D E F

Ashland Midtown Pub Dauphin’s Five Grand Hotel Kitchen on George The Noble South

BEST ETHNIC RESTAURANT A 7 Spice B Ang Bahay Kubo C Mediterranean Sandwich Company D Rice E Sage Lebanese Cuisine F The Yak

BEST MEXICAN RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Fuego Hacienda San Miguel La Cocina Rio Roosters Taqueria Mexico

BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Café Grazie Carrabba’s Gambino’s Mirko Roma Via Emilia

BEST PIZZA A B C D E F

Ashland Midtown Pub Cortlandt’s Marco’s Mellow Mushroom Pizzeria Delphina Red or White

BEST COFFEEHOUSE A B C D E F

Carpe Diem Chaleur Cream and Sugar RedBar Satori Serda’s

BEST EASTERN SHORE COFFEEHOUSE A B C D E F

Fairhope Roasting Mr. Gene’s Beans Refuge Serda’s Soul Caffeine The Coffee Loft

BEST LOCAL GROCERY STORE A B C D E F

Cain’s Piggly Wiggly Fairhope Health Foods Food Pak Greer’s Old Shell Market Virginia’s Health Foods


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

BEST GROCERY CHAIN A Costco B Publix C Rouse’s D Super Target E Walmart Neighborhood Market F Winn-Dixie

BEST GOURMET GROCERY A B C D

Andree’s Domke Market Fresh Market Whole Foods

BEST PLACE TO GET LOCAL PRODUCE/ FOODS- MOBILE A B C D E F

Lil Brian’s Market on the Square Old Shell Market Sessions Farm Market Ted & Nancy’s Victory Teaching Farm

BEST PLACE TO GET LOCAL PRODUCE/FOODS – BALDWIN A B C D E F

Allegri Bee Natural Burris Country Wagon Hazel’s Seasons in the Sun

BEST BARBECUE RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Brick Pit Cotton State BBQ Dick Russell’s Dreamland Meat Boss Moe’s BBQ

BEST BARBECUE SAUCE A B C D E F

Brick Pit Cotton State BBQ Dreamland Meat Boss Moe’s BBQ Sonny’s

BEST RIBS A B C D E F

Brick Pit Dreamland Hickory Pit Too Meat Boss Moe’s BBQ Saucy Q

BEST RAW OYSTERS A B C D E F

Bluegill Felix’s Half Shell Oyster House Original Oyster House Ralph & Kacoo’s Wintzell’s

BEST TAKE AND BAKE

A B C D E F

Bay Gourmet Clark’s Kitchen Dream Dinners Jamie Roussos Papa Murphy’s Rae’s

BEST CUPCAKE A ellenJay B Flour Girls C Pollman’s D Sally’s Piece of Cake E Simply Sweet Cupcake Boutique F Something Sweet Bake Shop

BEST SEAFOOD MARKET A B C D E F

Mudbugs DIP Seafood Market by the Bay Mudbugs at the Loop Skinner’s Seafood Southern Fish & Oyster Springhill Avenue Seafood

BEST DRUNK FOOD A Buffalo Wild Wings B LoDa Biergarten C Mediterranean Sandwich Company D O’Daly’s Hole in the Wall E OK Bike Shop F Waffle House

BEST HANGOVER FOOD A B C D E F

Blind Mule Butch Cassidy’s Five Bar Foosackly’s Heroes Waffle House

MEDIA FAVORITE RADIO STATION FM A B C D E F

92 ZEW 92.1 95KSJ 94.9 FM Talk 106.5 K Love 98.3 WABD 97.5 WNSP 105.5

FAVORITE RADIO STATION AM A B C D

WNTM 710 WNGL Archangel 1410 WKTD 1440 WERM Gospel 1220

BEST LOCAL DJ A B C D E F

DJ Blayze - 93 WBLX Gene Murrell - WZEW Matt McCoy - 107.3 KISS FM Sean Sullivan - FM TALK Shelby Mitchell - WKSJ Tony Plosczynski – WZEW

BEST DJ TEAM A Dan & Shelby - WKSJ B Matt McCoy & Gossip

Greg - 107.3 KISS FM C Mark Heim and Lee Shrivanian - WNSP D Mobile Mornings - Sean Sullivan, Dalton Orwig, Kelly Jones FM TALK 106.5 E Murphy, Sam and Jodi Lite Mix 99.9 F Tim Camp & LeeAnn Camp TLC in the Morning

Kennedy & Creg Stephenson F Tee Time on the Gulf Coast - FM Talk 106.5

BEST LOCAL EVENING TV NEWSCAST A WALA FOX 10 B WKRG 5 C WPMI 15

BEST MORNING SHOW/DJ BEST LOCAL MORNING TV NEWSCAST A Mobile Mornings - Sean Sullivan, Dalton Orwig, Kelly Jones FM TALK 106.5 B Bobby Bones - WKSJ C Elvis Duran - 107.3 KISS FM D Opening Kickoff with Mark Heim and Lee Shrivanian - WNSP E TLC in the morning with Tim & LeeAnn Camp WZEW F Uncle Henry – WNTM

DJ WHOSE VOICE LEADS YOU TO BELIEVE YOU MAY WANT TO SEE HIM NAKED A Dalton Orwig- FM Talk 106.5 B DJ Blayze - 93 WBLX C Gossip Greg - 107.3 KISS FM D Tony Plosczynski - WZEW E Twiggins- WABD F Uncle Henry – WNTM

DJ WHOSE VOICE LEADS YOU TO BELIEVE YOU MAY WANT TO SEE HER NAKED A B C D E

Jolene Roxbury - FM TALK 106.5 Kelly Jones - FM TALK 106.5 LeeAnn Camp - WZEW Mystic Marge WZEW Shelby Mitchell – WKSJ

BEST TALK RADIO HOST/ SHOW A Afternoon Drive - WNSP B Armed Alabama Radio FM TALK 106.5 C Midday Mobile - FM TALK 106.5 D Mobile Mornings - Sean Sullivan, Dalton Orwig, Kelly Jones FM TALK 106.5 E Today’s Homeowner - FM TALK 106.5 F Uncle Henry – WNTM

BEST SPORTS RADIO HOST/SHOW A Armed Alabama Radio FM TALK 106.5 B John Raciatti Golf Show - WNSP C Opening Kickoff with Mark Heim and Lee Shrivanian - WNSP D Paul Feinbaum - FM TALK 106.5 E Sports Drive with Randy

A WALA FOX 10 B WKRG 5 C WPMI 15

BEST ANCHOR A B C D E F

Bob Grip - WALA Devon Walsh - WKRG Kelly Foster - WPMI Lenise Ligon - WALA Mel Showers - WKRG Sarah Wall – WALA

BEST METEOROLOGIST A B C D E F

Alan Sealls - WKRG Chris Dunn - WPMI Jason Smith - WALA John Nodar - WKRG Kelly Foster - WPMI Michael White – WALA

BEST TV INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER A B C D E F

Andrea Ramey - WPMI Chad Petri - WKRG Christian Jennings - WPMI Kati Weis - WALA Peter Albrecht - WKRG Renee Dials – WALA

FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE WRITER A B C D E F

Andy MacDonald, Cuisine Dale Liesch, Reporter Jason Johnson, Reporter Jeff Poor, Beltway Beat Kevin Lee, Arts Mark Bryant, Sports

FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE COVER STORY A Dethroned by Lee Hedgepeth B Hooked by Jason Johnson C One Mobile by Jason Johnson and Dale Liesch D That’s a Wrap by Dale Liesch E Shell Game by Jason Johnson F Arty Awards by Kevin Lee

FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE COVER IMAGE A Nappies 2016 By Dan Anderson B Dethroned by Dan Anderson C Hooked by Laura Rasmussen D Belt Tightening by Laura Rasmussen E 1065 Illustration by Laura Rasmussen F Shell Game by Dan Anderson

FAVORITE AL.COM CONTENT CREATOR A B C D E F

John Archibald JD Crowe Jared Boyd Kyle Whitmire Michelle Irvin John Sharp

FAVORITE GLOSSY BEST SPORTS COVERAGE MAGAZINE A Joe Emer - WALA B Lance Crawford - WPMI C Randy Patrick - WKRG

BEST WEEKEND TV NEWS TEAM A WALA FOX 10 B WKRG 5 C WPMI 15

HOTTEST LOCAL TV NEWSMAN A B C D E F

Greg Peterson - WPMI Darwin Singleton - WPMI Jason Smith - WALA JB Biunno - WKRG Michael White - WALA Peter Albrecht – WKRG

HOTTEST LOCAL TV NEWSWOMAN A B C D E F

Alexa Knowles - WALA Chasity Byrd - WALA Devan Coffaro - WALA Devon Walsh - WKRG Jessica Taloney - WKRG Kelly Foster – WPMI

A B C D E F

Access Due South Exalte Mobile Bay Monthly Mobile Bay Parents Mobile Mask

FAVORITE LOCAL WEBSITE OR BLOG A Arrested in Mobile B Lemon Baby by Amanda Gibson C Mod Mobilian D Refresh Restyle by Debbie Westbrook E Southern Rambler F When Life Hand You Grapes by Michelle Murrill

BEST LOCAL TV AD A American Carpet B David J. Maloney C Greer’s D Joe Bullard E Mike Slocumb, Alabama Hammer F Wind Creek Casino

POLITICOS HARDEST WORKING OFFICIAL MOBILE A City Attorney Ricardo Woods B Executive Director or Planning & Development Dianne Irby C Finance Director Paul Wesch D Mayor Sandy Stimpson E MPD Chief Lawrence Battiste F Public Safety Director James Barber

HARDEST WORKING MOBILE CITY COUNCILPERSON A Bess Rich B Gina Gregory C Levon Manzie

HARDEST WORKING ELECTED OFFICIAL MOBILE COUNTY A Commissioner Connie Hudson B Commissioner Jerry Carl C Commissioner Merceria Ludgood D District Attorney Ashley Rich E Judge Jill Phillips F Sherriff Sam Cochran

HARDEST WORKING ELECTED OFFICIAL BALDWIN COUNTY A Daphne Mayor Dane Haygood B Fairhope Mayor Karin Wilson C Spanish Fort Mayor Mike McMillan D Commissioner Frank Burt E Commissioner Tucker Dorsey F Sherriff Hoss Mack

HARDEST WORKING LOCAL STATE LEGISLATOR A B C D E F

Rep. Bill Hightower Rep. David Sessions Rep. Napoleon Bracy Rep. Victor Gaston Sen. Rusty Glover Sen. Vivian Figures

WHO WILL BE THE NEXT GOVERNOR OF ALABAMA? A B C D E F

Bradley Byrne Kay Ivey Roy Moore Rusty Glover Twinkle Cavanaugh Walt Maddox

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ART ARTIFICE

history and sociology, the stories are told through the eyes of a child. The book’s dry wit and laconic style fit such innocence, although the signs of the times and ironies are deeply buried without being obvious or insistent. Take Farnell’s professional parents. They lived in Montgomery’s Cloverdale neighborhood, one of the capital city’s most notable suburbs, adjacent to the Montgomery Country Club. “Both my parents were attorneys and if they’d lived some place other than Montgomery they might have been considered socially hot stuff, but in Montgomery it didn’t seem to matter too much what you did for a living, it was if your family was from there,” Farnell said. So when a friend proudly told Kathie she could enjoy steak if she joined the a chamber pot under the bed, a snuff can on the dresser and pal at the country club, Farnell demurred. She said she didn’t like steak only because she didn’t know it. a hoe ready for the backyard. The elder got along with no “I’d seen country fried steak you had to beat with a hammer then you one — son included — but her granddaughter Kathie. “The neighborhood children didn’t like her because she would chase them out of the yard with a skillet, that sort of thing. So they would get up anti-Granny cheers, ‘Today is FARNELL WILL BE AT THE WEST REGIONAL BRANCH OF Friday, I wish it would rain, There goes Granny, Down the THE MOBILE PUBLIC LIBRARY (5555 GRELOT ROAD) drain,’” Farnell recalled. There was no love lost between Granny and the family ON TUESDAY, JUNE 27, AT 6:30 P.M. TO DISCUSS THE COMEDIC maid, Libby, either. “Libby would say, ‘I sure hope I ain’t here when ol’ COLLECTION. A BOOK SIGNING WILL FOLLOW. ” Miss Farnell dies ‘cause the Devil is coming for her in person,’” Farnell said. The pater familias’ position was hard-earned. A teenage dumped it in flour and fried it, and that’s what I thought was on the menu. I hunting accident took his right arm and saved him from an didn’t know there was any other kind,” Farnell said. The book concludes when she headed to Sidney Lanier High School in impoverished fate. “He couldn’t very well farm with one arm so he had to 1967. She later earned her bachelor’s at Montevallo, then graduated law school do something else. That’s why he first put himself through at Alabama. She went on to work in the state attorney general’s office, then in energy college and got a job teaching school and then put himself and environmental law, then specialized in crafting appellate briefs. Some of through law school,” Farnell said. Farnell’s work was instrumental in civil rights cases and in the highest courts at Her father inherited a little of his mom’s attitude. Anboth state and federal levels. gry outbursts were common. Farnell changed careers again with a turn in public television and radio. “The [book] title is a play on words because in addition to the atom bomb drill, around our house you might have Then came travel writing and now her first book. Amidst all the changes she’s witnessed, perhaps the book’s arrival is timely. to cover up your head and duck away from my father,” “Things are different but there’s been a renaissance for Southern cooking Farnell said. Though the setting is at a busy intersection of lifestyles, and writing, stuff like that,” Farnell said.

Quirky Southern childhood spawns first book BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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sk Foley author Kathie Farnell about the changes her native state has undergone, and they readily come to mind. “Things are more homogenous now. We have a lot of chain stores. Everybody sees the same movies and there’s chain restaurants, so I think to some extent you may have lost a sense of place,” Farnell said. Time’s sweep is on her mind these days with the publication of her first book, “Duck and Cover: A Nuclear Family.” Its series of vignettes us drawn from her Atomic Age childhood, a nexus of shifting cultural standards and historic perspectives. Farnell will be at the West Regional Branch of the Mobile Public Library (5555 Grelot Road) on Tuesday, June 27, at 6:30 p.m. to discuss the comedic collection. A book signing will follow. By her remembrance, Farnell’s youth was unusual for the time and place. For instance, both parents shared a law practice in an era when middle-class women didn’t normally work. “We ate in the kitchen because our dining room table was covered with files and a typewriter so they could work when they were at home. A lot of the people my father defended were guilty, so he had a whole drawer full of murder weapons,” Farnell said. Her cantankerous grandmother lived with them, a woman firmly stuck in her rural 1800s background. Granny had

New studio parties for charity

MMoA film series renews for summer

If you’re looking for a cool, dark spot to hide from summer’s humid heat, look no farther than the Mobile Museum of Art (4850 Museum Drive) in Langan Park. Its summer film

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For more information, call 251-208-5200 or go to mobilemuseumofart.com.

Get ready for summer’s solar show

Maybe the biggest event of 2017 is one with a heavenly origin that will cut across the entire continent. On Monday, Aug. 21, a solar eclipse will roll ashore in coastal Oregon. The path of totality will cut a swath across the entire nation before exiting the South Carolina coast that afternoon. Find out all you need to know about this rare and aweinspiring event when Martin Fanning, president of the Mobile Astronomical Society, presents “Preparing for the Great American Eclipse of 2017” on Saturday, June 17, at 11 a.m. at the Ben May Main Library (701 Government St.). Fanning will describe the mechanics of eclipses, what to expect and how to safely view it. The event is free. Registration isn’t required but strongly encouraged. For more info, call 251-208-7078, 251-208-7085 or email jsigler@mplonline.org.

ARTSGALLERY

One local business is blending creativity with charity. Marnee’s Studio (2353 Airport Blvd.) is an artist-owned facility that will partner with a women’s health agency for the event “Picassos for P.P.” on June 29, 6-8:30 p.m. The “twist on traditional paint parties” will use acrylic paints and mixed media. Guests can chose from four figures (two male, two female) to be the focus of the piece. Cost is $35. Half of the proceeds will go toward Planned Parenthood. The event is BYOB. Appetizers, music and supplies are included. Reservations are recommended. Call 318-564-4634 or email info@marneestudio.com with questions.

series takes viewers through the tales of master artists using the modern world’s most familiar artistic medium. Things start on Thursday, June 15, at 3 p.m. with director Julie Taymor’s startling 2002 film “Frida,” starring Salma Hayek. This riveting biography of Mexican artist Frida Kahlo is as visually compelling as its namesake’s work and picked up an Academy Award for its musical score. The movie is rated R for sexuality and language. Attendees must be at least 16 or accompanied by an adult. On Thursday, June 22, at 3 p.m. the museum screens Julian Schnabel’s 1996 biopic “Basquiat,” starring Jeffrey Wright as the iconoclastic modern neo-expressionist. Basquiat’s appearance at the hub of late 20th century’s urban art fusion made him the toast of New York City until his early death in 1988. The director was a contemporary of the titular artist. The movie is unrated but contains drug use and sexual themes. Attendees must be at least 16 or accompanied by an adult. Future films will cover such artist as Picasso, Van Gogh, Banksy and Klimt.


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MUSIC

FEATURE

SouthSounds favorites The Sh-Booms return

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Photo | Provided

THE SH-BOOMS, THE BROOMESTIX SATURDAY, JUNE 17, 7 P.M. THE MERRY WIDOW, 51 S. CONCEPTION ST., WWW.THEMERRYWIDOW.NET TICKETS: $10, AVAILABLE THROUGH TICKETFLY

Orlando-based band and SouthSounds artist The Sh-Booms are returning to Mobile after a productive and successful few months.

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

ach year, the SouthSounds Music Festival features not only established regional bands but also groups on the fringe of notoriety. Two years ago, The Sh-Booms used SouthSounds to expand their listening audience beyond its Orlando home. People who attended either their live show at The Merry Widow or their set in the “Lagniappe New Southern Music Showcase” received their first hit of The ShBooms’ “garage-soul” sound. The group’s progressive mix of old-school soul and garage rock served as a proper introduction for festival-goers unfamiliar with their unique style. The Sh-Booms’ onslaught of snappy horns and garage rock overtones provided an unblemished foundation for the blasting rock ‘n’ soul vocals of Brenda Radney. According to bassist Al “The Thump” Ruiz, The Sh-Booms could not have had a more positive reception or overall experience at SouthSounds, and networked with other regional acts.

“We had a lot of fun watching all these bands that we still keep in contact with,” Ruiz said. “We played The Merry Widow, then we had the showcase the following day. It was great. We met a lot of awesome people. It’s been a highlight for us. We’ve been making weekend trips to [Mobile] now for two or three years. We’re definitely excited to come back.” The Sh-Booms’ momentum since SouthSounds has been nothing but positive, with 2017 one of their most productive years yet. The band’s new management pitched their music to Los Angeles licensing firm Rollo & Grady, and a few months later the firm contacted The Sh-Booms with an interested party. In February, The Sh-Booms’ song “Rolling Down Like Thunder” appeared on the “Mr. and Mrs. Mxyzptlk” episode of “Supergirl,” their garage-soul sounds beamed into homes across the nation. “It’s a nationally syndicated show,” Ruiz said. “It opened up our music to a lot of people, and we were paid well for it. So, that was cool. That was the first of a bunch of stuff that’s happened over the past six to eight months for us.” Ruiz says the group has also been spending time reaching beyond their comfort zone on the road. With each passing month, The Sh-Booms have been venturing further from South Florida. Recently, they joined The B-52s on the road for a trip that took them to cities such as Austin and Houston for the first time. Ruiz says these short runs have resulted in a crop of new fans in each new city. Their upcoming performance at The Merry Widow will come during the band’s longest run yet on a tour that takes them back to Austin and into San Antonio. Ruiz adds this stint to the long list of milestones the band has met since the start of the year. “I think I speak for everybody that we’re all really excited for all the things that have been happening over the past couple of months,” Ruiz said. “We’re looking forward to playing out there more. We all want to do this full-time, and we’re on our way.” The Sh-Booms want to use this eight-day run as not only an instrument of exposure but also as

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preparation for a tour in support of an upcoming full-length. This soon-to-be-titled album is “80 percent done,” he says, adding that the band is currently laying down horns, organ and “auxiliary instruments.” So far, Ruiz says, the recording process has not been as lengthy as that for their previous EP release, “Usage Fee.” “When we put the EP out, it took a couple of years to do,” explained Ruiz. “There were so many instruments, and we were using Pro Tools.” The creation process for this release has been different in many ways. The Sh-Booms have decided to go old school by opting for the analog recording process. With their live performance one of their best weapons, Ruiz says their choice of

paratively short length of time it has taken The Sh-Booms to lay down tracks for their new album. The Sh-Booms’ musical prowess served well in the analog environment. Ruiz says the bass, drum and guitar tracks were recorded live and in tandem with no click track. “Our band has been together for a while, so our rhythm section is pretty tight,” Ruiz said. Even though she was a newcomer to the raw, analog environment, vocalist Brenda Radney has also thrived in this aural setting. Before The ShBooms, Radney spent many years as an artist on Justin Timberlake’s Tennman Records. While with the label, she recorded exclusively in studios featuring cutting-edge technology. However, her first visit

I think I speak for everybody that we’re all really excited for all the things that have been happening over the past couple of months … We all want to do this fulltime, and we’re on our way. recording method was a group decision made in an attempt to capture the power of their stage show. The Sh-Booms looked no farther than their hometown for an engineer and studio, recruiting Sheldon Herschfeld of Orlando garage rock outfit The Woolly Bushmen to man the mixing board. Ruiz cites Herschfeld’s garage rock background and familiarity with the band’s material as positive aspects of working with him. “[Herschfeld] has a studio at his house,” Ruiz explained. “He’s done all [The Woolly Bushmen’s] recordings and some other local bands. They’re a legit garage band. They’re young, but they’re really talented. So, we play a lot of shows with them, and they’re our friends. They understand our sound and how to pursue it in the studio.” Ruiz credits analog recording for the com-

into the analog world resulted in what her bandmates consider one of the most flawless recording sessions of her career “She came in on one of the tracks, and she laid it down, and that was it,” Ruiz said. “We didn’t change anything. It felt good, so we left it there. The vibe is very important for what we want to exude on record.” Ruiz says this continuation of The Sh-Booms’ garage-soul sound will be out in October. For now, he says, the band is contemplating whether to seek a label’s assistance or self-release the album. Until then, this unique Orlando band will continue to lay the groundwork for its release through touring. The band’s upcoming set at The Merry Widow should satisfy the curiosity of any local fans wanting to sample their new material.


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Miss Blues

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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he feminine side of the blues lends itself powerfully to this uniquely American genre. Women such as Bessie Smith, Big Mama Thornton and Janis Joplin have contributed as much to the blues as their male counterparts. Gracie Curran wishes to add to this legacy. Seven years ago, the Boston native combined her potent vo-

Photo | Lisa Mack | Gracie Curran & The High Falutin’ Band

GRACIE CURRAN & THE HIGH FALUTIN’ BAND SATURDAY, JUNE 17, 9 P.M. THE BLUES TAVERN, 2818 GOVERNMENT BLVD., WWW.BLUESTAVERN.COM TICKETS: FREE

cal work with the instrumental talent of her High Falutin’ Band to make a mark on the modern blues scene. After dominating her home region, Curran relocated to Memphis, where she and her group served time as the house band at the legendary Rum Boogie Café on Beale Street. Curran now seeks to win over the discerning crowd at “Mobile’s Blues Room.” Blues Tavern patrons are in for a taste of the band’s past

Low-country stomp BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

and future. In 2013, their debut, “Proof of Love,” documented Curran’s energetic and soulful delivery of original material. Throughout the album, Curran proves her voice and attitude have the power to lift spirits as well as break hearts. Those attending the show may also have the opportunity to sample tracks from her upcoming sophomore effort, produced by blues guitarist Damon Fowler.

Local royalty

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BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM ver the years, playing together as Sugarcane Jane and as two-fourths of Willie Sugarcapps, Anthony and Savana Lee Crawford have become the “first couple” of the Mobile Bay music scene. Sugarcane Jane’s infectious music draws an enthusiastic crowd to every performance. Fans now have the chance to sample new material from their favorite band. On June 2, the duo released their latest album, “Ladders & Edges.” Sugarcane Jane kept the recording process close to home by utilizing Anthony Crawford’s Admiral Bean Studio. This also marks the band’s first release on vinyl. “Ladders & Edges” is marked by layer after layer of rich and lovely instrumentation with acoustic guitar in the forefront. The Crawfords also expertly weave their beautiful harmonies throughout each song. “Ladders & Edges” could not have been released at a more ideal time of year, providing the perfect complement to warm, starry evenings on the Gulf Coast.

Photo | Facebook | Cranford Hollow

BAND: SUGARCANE JANE • DATE: WEDNESDAY, JUNE 21, 5 P.M. VENUE: LUCY BUFFETT’S LULU’S, 200 E. 25TH AVE. (GULF SHORES), WWW.LULUBUFFETT.COM TICKETS: FREE

BAND: CRANFORD HOLLOW • DATE: FRIDAY, JUNE 16, 7 P.M. VENUE: MOE’S ORIGINAL BBQ, 5423 BAYFRONT PARK (DAPHNE), WWW.MOESORIGINALBBQ.COM TICKETS: FREE

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Photo | Facebook | Sugarcane Jane

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ilton Head’s Cranford Hollow will fill the shady setting of Moe’s in Daphne with its eclectic style of alt. Americana, which the band calls “low-country stomp.” The band characterizes its trademark style as displaying “elements of blues, old-time country and Southern psychedelic rock” mixed with “ancient mountain melodies in an energetic, engaging musical root bag sprinkled with some sea island hoodoo.” This five-piece has used persistent touring and a pristine live delivery to expand its listening audience beyond the South Carolina Low Country. Cranford Hollow will try to win over the Eastern Shore crowd with tracks from its latest album, “Color/Sound/Renew/Revive,” in which Cranford Hollow expertly mingles elements of alt. rock and modern country, with ambient warmth acting as a cushion on several tracks.


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AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | June 15 - June 21

THUR. JUNE 15

Bluegill— Brandon White Blues Tavern— Doobious, 8:30p Cockeyed Charlie’s— JJ Felix’s— Grits N Pieces Flora Bama— Dustin Bogue, 2p// Al and Cathy, 5p/// Braxton Trio, 6p//// Mark Sherrill, James Daniel, Chris Newbury and Mel Knapp, 6p//// Mario Mena Band, 10p//// Logan Spicer and Tony Ray Thompson, 10:15p//// Lee Yankie and The Hellz Yeah, 10:130p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Yeah Probably, 8p Listening Room— Wes Jeans and Red Clay Strays, 8p Lulu’s— Lefty Collins, 5p McSharry’s— The Lite Traveller’s, 7:30p Old 27 Grill— Songwriter’s Night, 6:30p SanBar— Jim Andrews Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Melissa Joiner, 6p Wind Creek Casino— Troy Laz, 8p

FRI. JUNE 16

All Sports Bar & Billiards— DJ Markie Mark, 10p Beau Rivage— Kip Moore, 8p Bluegill— Shea White, 12p// Soul Food Junkies, 6p Blues Tavern— Red Clay Strays, 9p Callaghan’s— Blackwater Brass Cockeyed Charlie’s— Mario Mena Band, 10p Dority’s Bar and Grill— Brandon White, 6p Felix’s— Bobby & Jana Flora Bama— Jay Hawkins Trio, 1p// LeaAnne Creswell Duo, 2p/// Christina Christian, 4p//// Jack Robertson Show, 5:30p//// Brian Hill Duo, 6p//// Johnny Barbato Trio, 6p//// Makenna & Brock, 6p//// Chris Bryant Duo, 9p//// Foxy Iguanas, 10p//// Dustin Bogue Duo, 10:15p//// Braxton Calhoun, 10:30p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Brennan Royal, 9:30p IP Casino— Divas Starring Frank Marino Listening Room— Lisa Mills Lulu’s— Light Travelers, 5p Main Street Cigar Lounge— Stephen Sylvester, 8p Manci’s— Lee Yankie McSharry’s— DJ Chi, 10p The Merry Widow— Issa Vibe ft. Big Syx, Tony O. Marquis, Pikasso, 9p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Cranford Hollow, 8p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Phil and Foster, 6:30p O’Daly’s— Gene Murrell, Tony

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Edwards and David White, 10p Old 27 Grill— Blind Dog Mike, 6:30p SanBar— Rex Soul Kitchen— Whiskey Mars, 9p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Jimmy Lee, 12p// Tommy Morse Band, 6p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Damien Lamb, 6p Wind Creek Casino— Troy Laz, 9p

SAT. JUNE 17

Alchemy— Superbob, 10p Blind Mule— Comedy Showcase, 8p Bluegill— Quintin Berry, 12p// Hannah McFarland Blues Tavern— Gracie Curran, 9p Callaghan’s— Robert Sully Cockeyed Charlie’s— Jordan Bramblett Dority’s Bar and Grill— The Foxy Iguanas, 6p Felix’s— Three Bean Soup Flora Bama— Dustin Bogue, 1p// LeaAnne Creswell Trio, 2p/// Red Clay Strays, 2p//// Dave Chastang, 4p//// David Dunn, 5p//// Jack Robertson Show, 5:30p//// Al and Cathy, 6p//// Big Muddy, 6p//// Al and Keith, 9p//// Kurt Thomas, 10p//// Brian Hill Trio, 10:15p//// Mose Wilson and The Delta Twang, 10:30p Golden Nugget— The Bellamy Brothers, 8p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Brennan Royal, 9:30p IP Casino— Divas Starring Frank Marino Listening Room— Eric Erdman Lulu’s— Lee Yankie, 5p Manci’s— Emily Stuckey and Gabe Willis McSharry’s— DJ Carter, 10p The Merry Widow— The ShBooms, The Broomestix, 9p Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Justin Wall, 6p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Glass Joe, 6:30p Old 27 Grill— Lonesome Mel, 6:30p Pirates Cove— Jason Abel Project, 6p SanBar— Krissta Allen Duo Soul Kitchen— Glowrage, 10p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Jason Justice, 11a// Soul Food Junkie, 6p Top of the Bay— Yeah Probably Wind Creek Casino— Anthony Hamilton, 8p// Troy Laz, 9p

SUN. JUNE 18

Alchemy— Skeeterlegs, 3p Bluegill— David Chastang, 12p//

Everybody’s Hero, 6p Blues Tavern— John Hall Trio, 6p Callaghan’s— Grayson Capps Dority’s Bar and Grill— Phil Procter and Stan Foster Felix’s— Bobby Butchka Flora Bama— Foxy Iguanas, 12p// Dustin Bogue, 1p/// Songs of Rusty McCugh w/Jason Justice, 1p//// Al and Cathy, 2p//// Ryan Balthrop Trio, 2p//// Brandon White Duo, 5p//// Lucky Doggs, 5:30p//// Perdido Brothers, 6p//// Shawna P and The Earth Funk Trio, 6p//// Brian Hill Band, 10p//// Dallas Moore, 10:15p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Three 37 Duo, 8p Lulu’s— Cadillac Attack, 5p Manci’s— Hannah McFarland McSharry’s— Trad Irish Music Session, 6:30p Old 27 Grill— Barry Gibson, 11:30a SanBar— David Jones Jazz Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Lisa Christian, 2p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Gerry Gambino, 11a// Beave and Cleave, 6p

MON. JUNE 19

Felix’s— Lee Yankie Flora Bama— Lee Yankie, 5p// Riley Green, 5:30p/// Cathy Pace, 6p//// Whyte Caps, 10p//// Petty and Pace, 10:15p Lulu’s— Brent Burns, 5p

TUE. JUNE 20

Bluegill— Mobile Big Band Society Butch Cassidy’s— Jerry Powell Cockeyed Charlie’s— Jordan Bramblett Felix’s— Bryant Gilley Flora Bama— T-Bone Montgomery, 2p// Riley Green, 5p/// Dustin Bogue, 5:30p//// Perdido Brothers, 6p//// Al and Cathy, 10:15p The Intracoastal— Brent Burns, 6p The Merry Widow— Jacuzzi Boys, Hibachi Stranglers, S.O.S.S., 9p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Chad Parker, 6p

WED. JUNE 21

Bluegill— Ross Newell Felix’s— Matt Neese Flora Bama— Neil Dover, 2p// Mel Knapp, 5p/// Riley Green, 5:30p//// Rhonda Hart & Jonathon Newton, 6p//// Ben Sutton Band, 10p//// Brian Hill Duo, 10:15p Listening Room— Jamie Wyatt and Abe Partiage Lulu’s— Sugarcane Jane, 5p Shipp’s Harbour— Brent Burns, 5p


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American, but not too much

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FILMTHE REEL WORLD

BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

AREA

THEATERS CARMIKE CINEMA’S Wynnsong 16 785 Schillinger Rd. S. (251) 639-7373 CRESCENT THEATER 208 Dauphin Street (251) 438-2005 HOLLYWOOD STADIUM 18 1250 Satchel Paige Dr. (251) 473-9655 RAVE MOTION PICTURE JUBILEE SQUARE 12 6898 U.S. 90 Daphne, (251) 626- 6266

rowing Up Smith” is a tender, funny coming-of-age story about a family of Indian American immigrants in the 1970s. Eager for their son to fit in, his parents gave “Smith” the extremely common American last name as his first name. Smith is a sensitive 10-year-old boy trying to fit in while placating his parents. Their demands are a complex, contradictory mix of American and traditional Indian values. While most of the film is a genial story about culture clashes and charming malapropisms, the threat of sending their kids back to India to be raised hangs over both Smith and his older sister. Smith rides around his Midwestern town on a girl’s bike, wearing a football helmet as a bike helmet and, in an act of rebellion, grabs a bucket of Kentucky Fried Chicken, his dream of an American snack. He immediately spits it out, repulsed; he is a vegetarian. This is one of those moments where we witness who he truly is and, even when not being observed by his parents, he defines it for himself. Smith’s greatest love is not for fried chicken, but for the girl next door. Rather than being an unattainable dream, she is a reliable best friend, an especially perceptive and sweet young lady who regularly impresses Smith’s parents with her knowledge of Indian and Hindu customs.

One reason Smith adores her is her feckless but decent father, Butch (Jason Lee), who mispronounces every Indian name he encounters while remaining extremely lovable. He is the cowboy father figure Smith longs for. Everyone in the film means well; if anything, the story suffers from an overabundance of goodwill. Crowds will indeed be pleased by every character: Smith is adorable, Jason Lee is as warm as possible, the parents are not even effectively overbearing. Then, when the final act takes a serious turn and the parents make good on their threats, it is heartbreaking but also so jarring that it almost loses its effect. We get lulled into a false sense of security because the film seems so harmlessly pleasant, then we find ourselves in what might be a different film for the final 20 minutes. Some of the plot elements strain belief, even if the characters win you over. With its adult voiceover describing in hindsight the precocious foibles of a bygone era, “Growing Up Smith” is derivative, but most people love all of the things that it’s derivative of, including “A Christmas Story,” “The Wonder Years” or even “Hunt for the Wilderpeople” and its tale of an unprepared boy trying to survive in the woods. Sometimes you just want a solid PG movie you can watch with your kids, or

your parents, or both, and this, similar to a very popular movie I recommended a while ago, “The Way, Way Back,” fits the bill. American families have enough to argue about right now without accidentally watching a scene of full-frontal nudity together. Smith is a genuinely memorable little fellow, and his life takes a surprisingly serious turn when his parents determine their children are becoming too American. Theirs is an unwinnable paradox: They wanted to move to the U.S. for a better life for their children, but they have an exacting idea of how it must be lived — and, above all, they want to preserve the very lifestyle they have left behind. In the film’s final scenes, an adult Smith witnesses with disbelief how Americanized his parents have ultimately become, enjoying activities they would have surely forbidden him. It is a bitter realization for the son who gave up everything he wanted so he could become everything they wanted. “Growing Up Smith” is flawed but not without its merits, including heart, humor and a look at the complex immigrant experience that hides a painful depth beneath its amusing surface. The film sneaks up on you with a family drama that is surprisingly unsparing. “Growing Up Smith” is currently available to rent and to stream on Hoopla, available for free from the Mobile Public Library.

CARMIKE CINEMAS 23151 Wharf Ln. Orange Beach (251) 981-4444 COBB THEATRES PINNACLE 14 3780 Gulf Shores Pkwy Gulf Shores (251) 968-7444 EASTERN SHORE PREMIERE CINEMA 14 30500 Alabama 181 #500 Spanish Fort, Al (251) 626-0352 Information accurate at press time; please call theaters for showtimes.

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Photos | Brittany House Pictures / Roger Arpajou

FROM LEFT: Brighton Sharbino and Roni Akurati in “Growing Up Smith.” Smith is a 10-year-old Indian boy who falls for the girl next door, while his desire to become a “good old boy” propels him further away from his family’s ideals. In “Paris Can Wait,” Diane Lane plays the wife of a successful movie producer. NEW IN THEATERS PARIS CAN WAIT

Car trouble sends a married woman on a sumptuous detour through the French countryside in this buzzedabout feature film debut from Eleanor Coppola. Crescent Theater

CARS 3

Lightning McQueen returns. All listed multiplex theaters.

ALL EYES ON ME

Biopic of prolific rapper, actor, poet and activist Tupac Shakur (Demetrius Shipp Jr.),

NOW PLAYING

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CALENDAR OF EVENTS JUNE 15, 2016 - JUNE 21, 2016

MAKE MUSIC DAY ON SATURDAY, JUNE 17, ANDY’S MUSIC WILL CELEBRATE MAKE MUSIC DAY, 10 A.M. UNTIL 4 P.M. EVERY KIND OF MUSICIAN — YOUNG AND OLD, AMATEUR AND PROFESSIONAL — IS WELCOME. EMAIL LINSEY@ANDYSMUSIC.COM. Photo | Provided by Andy’s Musuc

GENERAL INTEREST Kids’ Day in Bienville Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Bienville Square, there will be a variety of activities, performances and displays for kids of all ages. Storytime will begin each week at 11 a.m., 11:30 a.m., noon and 12:30 p.m. Fairhope farmer’s market The city of Fairhope hosts an outdoor farmer’s market Thursdays, 3-6 p.m., through Nov. 2, behind the Fairhope Public Library downtown on Bancroft Street. Call 251-929-1466. Free family movie night Join Dauphin Island on the West End Beach for a free movie at dusk on Thursday and Friday. This Thursday: “Moana”; Friday: “Cars 2.” “The Cat (& Dog) Days of Summer” June 17 from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., the city of Semmes will host this animal awareness/ pet adoption event with water slides, fun activities for kids, food trucks and vendor booths at Semmes Municipal Park on Morris Hill Drive. Email denisedailey@ cityofsemmes.org. Navy ship viewing U.S. Navy ship viewing, alligators and other wildlife of the Mobile-Tensaw River Delta will thrill passengers aboard Historic Blakeley State Park’s tour boat Saturday, June 17, from 9:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Call 251-626-5581 or visit blakeleypark.com. Market in the Square Mobile’s downtown farmer’s market is now held in Cathedral Square on Saturdays, 7:30 a.m. until noon. Come enjoy, music, food, beverages and more. Zoo Camp The Alabama Gulf Coast Zoo’s Zoo Camp is offered to children ages 5 to 11, Monday, June 19, through Friday, June 23, with licensed teachers and trained instructors in full-day sessions, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. daily. Call 251-968-5732.

Teen reading program Area teens are invited to participate in “Build a Better World!” teen summer reading program, through June 30. For more information, call 251-621-2818, ext. 203. Literacy camp and tutoring The camp is for first and rising fifth graders. The program will also employ university literacy faculty and teachers in training from the University of South Alabama College of Education. The camp runs June 19-23. Call 251-380-2891. West Mobile Farmer’s Market This farmer’s market, sponsored by Christ United Methodist Church, is held every Tuesday, 3-6 p.m., on the west side of church property, 6101 Grelot Road, Mobile. Call 251-342-0462. Help Me Grow Wednesdays Join Lifelines Counseling Services and the Help Me Grow staff as we provide free developmental screenings throughout June and July. Just visit us at The Shoppes at Bel Air every Wednesday between 11 a.m. and 1 p.m. to speak with someone.

Toastmasters Do you want to deliver a speech like a pro or gain leadership skills to advance your career? Toastmasters International meets regularly at six locations in Mobile and Baldwin counties. Visit www.toastmasters. org for more information.

FUNDRAISERS “Dinner with Emmitt Smith” On Thursday, June 15, three former NFL players present ​”Dinner with Emmitt Smith,” a fundraising event to benefit the Palmer Williams Group. This inaugural event will be held at The Grounds in West Mobile, 5:30-8 p.m. Visit palmerwilliamsgroup.org. Family Night With each flyer presented at BJ’s, 3748 Airport Blvd., on Thursday, June 15, from 5-10 p.m., BJ’s will donate 20 percent of food and soft drink sales to USA Medical Center Auxiliary. For the flyer, visit mastercalendar.southalabama.edu.

ARTS

Magnolia Cemetery Tour Join Tom McGehee for a special walking tour of Magnolia Cemetery, corner of Ann and Virginia streets, on Wednesday, June 21, at 10:30 p.m. Call 251-459-8864. Visit bellingrath.org.

“The Good Stuff” Dr. Robert Holm, professor of piano at the University of South Alabama, will present a faculty piano recital that promises to include “good stuff.” Thursday, June 15, at 7:30 p.m. Call 251-460-7116.

Providence Farmer’s Market Shop the farmer’s market every Wednesday through July 12, 2-5 p.m., in Lot F at Providence Hospital. Call 251-6313501.

Make Music Day On Saturday, June 17, Andy’s Music will celebrate Make Music Day, 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. Every kind of musician — young and old, amateur and professional — is welcome. Email Linsey@AndysMusic.com.

Dauphin Island Boardwalk Talks Boardwalk Talks are held the first and third Wednesday of each month at 11:15 a.m. at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab, 101 Bienville Blvd. Call 251-861-2141. Midtown Optimist Club Join Midtown Optimist Club every Wednesday at noon for lunch at Azalea City Golf Course. Call 251-348-3542.

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MUSEUMS Historic Buildings of Alabama Please join us after work for a “come and go” reception celebrating the arrival of our summer traveling exhibit featuring historic sites all around Alabama. Wednesday, June 21, 5:30-7:30 p.m. at USA Archaeology Museum, 6052 USA Drive South. Call 251460-6106.

“Windows to the Sea” “Windows to the Sea” is a new permanent exhibit at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab Estuarium. Visit disl.org. “Shipwreck! Pirates and Treasure” A new, highly interactive exhibit at GulfQuest features more than 500 authentic artifacts recovered from deepocean shipwrecks. Visit www.gulfquest.org. “Christenberry: In Alabama” On the occasion of Alabama’s Bicentennial Celebration, this exhibit honors artist William Christenberry’s exploration of themes related to his native state. Mobile Museum of Art, 4850 Museum Drive. Extended through July 9. Call 251-208-5200. “Faces of Africa” The History Museum of Mobile exhibit “Faces of Africa: A Mystical View of Tribal Heritage” runs through Monday, July 31. Call 251-208-7420. “Drugs: Costs and Consequences” The Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration team up to present a powerful interactive exhibit of the effects of drugs on individuals and society. Through August. Visit exploreum.com. Fairhope’s founding Learn more about the 1894 founding of Fairhope at the Fairhope Museum of History, 24 N. Section St. The museum is open daily (except Sunday and Monday) from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 251-929-1471. Little Discoveries “Outside the Box,” aimed at children age 6 and under, explores how innovation and creativity can lead to a world of possibilities, starting with a simple cardboard box. Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Call 251-208-6893 or email jholland@ exploreum.com. Thursdays at MMoA Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., the Mobile Museum of Art offers free admission to all visitors. No reservations


are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive. Call 251-208-5200.

SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES Mobile BayBears The Mobile BayBears are back in action at Mobile’s Hank Aaron Stadium. The team returns from Birmingham to host Biloxi for a five-game home stand June 14-18. Call 251-479-BEAR. Weekly 1K/5K Every Thursday evening at 6 p.m., join Red Beard’s Outfitter and Cortlandt’s Pub in the Spring Hill Village Shopping Center for a 1K or 5K run and walk. No cost to participate.

Hillcrest Road. Public Safety Meeting The Public Safety Committee will meet Tuesday, June 20, at 2 p.m. in the Mobile City Council conference room on the 9th floor of the South Tower in Government Plaza to discuss the proposed UNTCC ordinance. Baldwin County Commission: First and third Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., 322 Courthouse Square, Bay Minette. Work sessions are the second and fourth Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. rotating between Bay Minette, the Foley Satellite Courthouse, the Fairhope Satellite Courthouse and the Baldwin County Central Annex Building in Robertsdale. www.baldwincountyal.gov

Bridge lessons The Mobile Bridge Center offers free bridge lessons each Tuesday at 6 p.m. at 1510 University Blvd. Arrive a few minutes early to register. Call the Bridge Center at 251-666-2147, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Baldwin County Planning Commission: First Thursday at 6 p.m., 22251 Palmer St., Robertsdale, www.baldwincountyal.gov.

Fitness and athletics classes New fitness classes are in progress at Palmer Pillans Middle School. Curvy yoga, Tone It Up ! (fusion workout), Zumba, basketball clinics (ages 8+), and sports conditioning (ages 8-17). To register or for more information, call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com.

Chickasaw City Council: Second and fourth Tuesday at 7 p.m., 224 N. Craft Highway, 251-452-6450.

Dance and art classes Summer classes offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School include belly dance, ballroom dance, ballet and tumbling (ages 6-8), beginning piano (ages 8+), watercolor painting, zombies and superheroes art, and pet portraits art. Call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com. Pickleball for adults (indoors) Offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School, Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon. Great sport for all ages combines tennis, pingpong and badminton on a court one-fourth the size of a tennis court. Call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com. Ballroom dance Azalea Ballroom Dance Club hosts dances the second and fourth Tuesday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Via Health, Fitness & Enrichment Center, 1717 Dauphin St. Call 251-623-9183 or visit azaleaballroomdanceclub.com. Ballroom dance The Moonlight Chassé Ballroom Dance Society hosts dances the first and third Monday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Hot Wheels Skating Rink in Daphne. Email cassief13@aol.com.

WORKSHOPS Understanding Credit & Credit Reports Workshop designed to help you understand creditworthiness and all aspects of your personal credit report. Monday, June 19, at 6 p.m. Register at Lifelines/Consumer Credit Counseling office, 705 Oak Circle Drive E., Mobile. Call 251-602-0011.

PUBLIC MEETINGS District 6 Meeting Thursday, June 15, at 6:30 p.m. will be a District 6 community meeting at Connie Hudson Senior Community Center, 3201

Bayou La Batre City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 13785 S. Wintzell Ave., www.cityofbayoulabatre.com.

Citronelle City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6:30 p.m., 19135 Main St., 251-866-7973. Creola City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6 p.m., 190 Dead Lake Road, #A, 251-675-8142. Daphne City Council: First and third Monday at 6:30 p.m., 1705 Main St. Work sessions are the second Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m., www.daphneal.com. Dauphin Island Town Council: First and third Tuesdays at 7 p.m., 1011 Bienville Blvd., www.townofdauphinisland.org. Elberta Town Council: Third Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m. in the town hall. Workshop meeting on the second Tuesday. townofelberta.com. Fairhope City Council: Second and fourth Monday at 6 p.m., 161 N. Section St. Work sessions are held before each council meeting at 4:30 p.m., www.cofairhope.com. Fairhope Planning Commission: First Monday at 5 p.m., 161 N. Section St. For more information visit www.cofairhope.com. Foley City Council: First and third Monday at 5:30 p.m., 407 E. Laurel Ave. Work sessions begin at 4 p.m., www.cityoffoley.org. Gulf Shores City Council: Second and fourth Mondays at 4 p.m., 1905 W. First St., www.gulfshoresal.gov. Mobile City Council: Tuesdays at Government Plaza, 205 Government St. Pre-council meeting begins at 9 a.m.; council meeting begins at 10:30 a.m., www. cityofmobile.org. Mobile Planning Commission: First and third Thursdays at 2 p.m., 205 Government St., www.urban.cityofmobile.org. Orange Beach City Council: First and third Tuesdays at 5 p.m., 4099 Orange Beach Blvd., www.cityoforangebeach.com. Prichard City Council: Every Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 216 E. Prichard Ave., www. thecityofprichard.org. J u n e 1 5 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 49


SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

Dauphin Island hosts EVP Island Tour volleyball tourney BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

Photos | Submitted

Amateurs and professionals alike are expected to compete in Dauphin Island’s inaugural EVP Island Tour volleyball tournament June 24-25.

B

each volleyball is becoming synonymous with the Alabama coast. Gulf Shores is already known as the epicenter for collegiate teams when national champions are decided. Now it is time for the action to switch to the other side of Mobile Bay. On June 24 and 25, Dauphin Island will welcome the EVP Island Tour volleyball tournament. This will be the first pro-am tournament to take place at Dauphin Island Public Beach. The Mobile Sports Authority is in a partnership with town officials to host the inaugural EVP Island Championships. “The Mobile Sports Authority would like to thank EVP, the town of Dauphin Island, Dauphin Island Parks & Beach Board, Mobile County, South Mobile County Tourism Authority and Connect Meetings,” said Danny Corte, MSA’s executive director. “With an expected economic impact of well over a halfmillion dollars to the Mobile area, this first-time event is sure to make a splash.” The tournament will provide several divisions for all ages and skill levels. Pro, amateur and junior teams will be making the journey to south Mobile County. The tournament will also be aired on the Beach Sports Network. To get the party started, a special EVP teambuilding event for local businesses is planned for that Friday at Cathedral Square in downtown Mobile, 4-5:30 p.m. “We are in the planning process of hosting a corporate challenge for teams of four,” said Susan Shaw, MSA’s director of events and marketing. “This will consist of a few fun games for each team to compete in against their fellow Mobilians, visitors and friends.” The challenge will include such games as cornhole and flying disc toss. The entry fee is $100 per team and includes food. To register, visit www.evptour.com. For more details on the challenge, call Shaw at 251-725-1794 or send email to susan@mobilesportsauthority.com. On Saturday, the action heads to Dauphin Island with play scheduled from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. The divisions include men’s and women’s Pro, AA, A, BB and B along with Juniors 12U, 14U, 16U and 18U. Teams that finish first and second are awarded a bid to compete in the 2017 EVP World Finals of Beach Volley-

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ball Championship in Hampton, Virginia, Aug. 11-12. On Sunday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., there will be action in coed AA, A and B divisions. A Master’s Division for players ages 45 and up is also planned. For more information, visit www. evptour.com. The EVP Island Tour has been hosting beach volleyball events for more than 25 years. The group’s primary aim is “to support beach volleyball events that engage families, fans, athletes, students, communities and sponsors in a great day at the beach.”

BEACH VOLLEYBALL IS BECOMING SYNONYMOUS WITH THE ALABAMA COAST. GULF SHORES IS ALREADY KNOWN AS THE EPICENTER FOR COLLEGIATE TEAMS WHEN NATIONAL CHAMPIONS ARE DECIDED.” This is just one of many events handled by the MSA, whose mission is to create a positive economic and public relations impact for Mobile County by attracting, hosting, managing and supporting sports events. To learn more, visit www.mobilesportsauthority.com.

Sports camps

• Challenger Sports will be hosting several “British Soccer Camps” in Mobile and Baldwin counties. According to its website (www.challengersports.com), these camps are an innovative curriculum that develops skills, speed and confidence in boys and girls of all ages and abilities. The camps will be at the Hearin-Chandler YMCA in Mobile (June 26-30), Gulf Shores Sportsplex (June 26-30), Bayside Academy in Daphne (July 10-14) and Orange Beach Sportsplex (July 31-Aug. 4). Pricing varies, so visit www.challenger.configio.com to select a camp. • The Richard Moodie Soccer Academy has several camps at

The Cage on the University of South Alabama campus. A summer ID camp for girls ages 12-18 will take place June 18-21, and a college prep camp for boys ages 12-18 will run from June 25-28. Both camps are designed for players trying to compete at the collegiate level, with goalkeeper-specific training included. The cost will be $349 for residential campers and $300 for commuters. From June 22-24, there is a girls-only residential team camp for ages 12-18 at a cost of $215 per player, with a minimum of 11 players per team. The focus will be determined by the team’s coach or the camp’s staff. To register, go to www.RichardMoodieSoccerAcademy.com. • The Spring Hill College women’s soccer team will hold a girls’ soccer camp June 19-23. The camp, open to players ages U6-U14, will be at Library Field on the campus of SHC. Check-in takes place 8-8:30 a.m. at Moorer Hall; the half-day academy will run from 8:30 a.m. to noon. Also offered on June 19 is a goalkeeper-specific academy that emphasizes development of proper technique. The training is open to girls and boys ages U10-U18. Finally, from June 30 to July 2, an Elite Residential Camp will be held. This three-day weekend camp is for girls rising grades 8-plus who are interested in a challenging weekend of soccer modeled after the Badgers’ collegiate program training. For more information or to register, visit www.camps.jumpforward.com. • USA men’s tennis head coach Nick Brochu has summer camps set for June 26-30 and July 17-31. The camps will run from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. and are offered to players ages 7 to 17. Campers will work on technical strokes, strategies and match play. Campers must bring their own tennis equipment and lunch. Water and cold snacks will be provided during the day. Registration is at www.JaguarsTennisCamps.com. Questions can be directed to 251-709-2003 or nbrochu@southalabama.edu. • The USA women’s basketball head coach Terry Fowler has set girls’ basketball camps. The final Team Play Date is June 23, while FUNdamentals and Shooting Camp will run from June 19-22 and College Prep Came will take place on June 24. All three camps will be at the Striplin Practice Facility located next to the Mitchell Center, and be directly run by Fowler along with his coaching staff. The Jag players will serve as camp counselors. More information, including registration, can be found at www.TerryFowlerGirlsBasketballCamps.com.


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MEDIA MEDIA FRENZY

Call News publisher running for public office BY ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSWORD PUZZLE ADVICE TO WRITERS BY TOM MCCOY / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Drawing tool 8 One not acting alone 14 Literally, “great O” 19 Ackbar’s rank, in “Star Wars” films 20 Relating to an eye layer 22 What fan fiction is not 23 Writing tip No. 1 25 Accessory 26 Plant anew 27 Lo ____ 29 So 30 Contractor’s guidelines 33 Writing tip No. 2 38 Yearn for 39 Unlike the wind 40 Lead-in to guess or game 41 Got up there 42 Balneotherapy site 45 Bi- and bi-? 48 Train part 49 Writing tip No. 3 54 Relating to a major vessel 55 Hexagonal state 56 Invalidate 59 Restaurant chain with a flag in its logo 62 Band aids 65 Make suitable for indoors, as a plant 67 Home of Ithaca, Athens and Olympia 68 Writing tip No. 4 74 They go from town to town: Abbr. 75 That, in Tijuana 76 Ed.’s request 77 Cell parts 78 “Uh-huh” 80 German auto co. 82 Flew off the handle 85 Writing tip No. 5 93 Bill Clinton or Barack Obama 94 ____ group (structure found in proteins) 95 Old English letter 96 Shoot the breeze 97 Turn on 101 4,840 square yards 103 Cylinder-shaped pasta 104 Writing tip No. 6 109 Regarding 110 Large Hadron Collider org. 111 Hoity-toity sort 112 Became adept in 114 1983 Michael Keaton title role 116 Writing tip No. 7 123 Operative 124 Less watertight 125 Energetic pooch

126 Graph parts 127 Knights’ needs 128 Primes

34 Gala 35 Where to find some very wet sponges 36 Gives in confidence DOWN 37 Gosling of “La La Land” 1 Give the ax 42 Tried 2 Poem of homage 43 Favorite 3 2005, to Cato 44 Santa ____, Calif. 4 Ring bearers, maybe 46 Templeton from “Char5 Bring in lotte’s Web,” e.g. 6 Droops 47 Visibly awed 7 It “knits up the ravell’d 50 “Me, neither,” sleave of care,” per Macbeth formally 8 Doctrines 51 Refuse to talk, with “up” 9 Atop, poetically 52 Conductance quantities 10 RR stop 53 Like a good proof 11 Up to 57 “Makes sense” 12 Jungian inner self 58 ____ Day (June event, 13 Knocked to the ground informally) 14 Andean tuber 59 Not needing a cane, say 15 Like the movies “Brian’s 60 Commanded Song” and “Sharknado” 61 Syria’s Bashar al-____ 16 Circumvention 63 Person of note? 17 It uses the PageRank 64 Fee-free spot, briefly algorithm 66 Unruly hair, metaphorically 18 Irritates 69 Jacob’s twin 21 Classic camera brand 70 Composer of many patriotic 24 Prefix with liberal tunes 28 Vice President John ____ 71 Conveyor part Garner 72 Course part 30 Digitize, in a way 73 Something tacky to hang 31 Bounce along, in a way on the wall? 32 Anticipatory days 79 Stroke of luck?

81 Bill Clinton or Barack Obama, informally 83 It’s mined, all mined! 84 Stayed on the shelf 86 Homework lover, maybe 87 Military stints 88 Like some audiobooks 89 Romance writer Roberts 90 “Yikes!” 91 When repeated, an old sitcom catchphrase 92 Leave in 97 Character that goes “waka, waka, waka …” 98 Exceed 99 Wriggled 100 Punitive 102 Goes in 103 Gently towel 105 Peace signs 106 W.W. II danger 107 Cape ____ 108 Early days 113 Patella site 115 Much of W. Virginia 117 Mike’s confectionery partner 118 Dungeons & Dragons piece 119 Like William Carlos Williams’s wheelbarrow 120 Actress Peeples 121 Ron of the Dodgers 122 ’17 and ’18

ANSWERS ON PAGE 54

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hile most newspapers across the country would scoff at the idea of a publisher, editor or reporter holding public office, Citronelle Call News Publisher Willie Gray recently announced his plans to run for Alabama’s House District 102 seat next year. In an article released in May’s AlaPressa, the Alabama Press Association newsletter, Gray says running for public office is “where the Lord wanted us to go.” He aims to be elected to the seat currently held by Jack Williams, who has announced his intentions to run for the Senate seat being vacated by Rusty Glover. And while Gray’s political ambitions are at odds with national journalistic ethical standards that say members of the press shouldn’t run for public office, in Alabama he wouldn’t be alone in trying to straddle the line between media and politics. According to Alabama Press Association Executive Director Felicia Mason, the Yellowhammer State has at least a few newspaper folks who wear two hats. “There are currently several publishers/editors that serve as mayors or council members throughout the state. Publishers from Jackson and Tallassee have served in the Alabama Legislature,” Mason wrote in response to questions from Lagniappe. APA’s code of ethics, passed in 1968, does not address the matter of members of the press holding public office. Mason affirmed that APA does not have a stance on publishers, editors and reporters running for or holding public office. However, a Society of Professional Journalists’ Ethics Committee position paper on political involvement says it bluntly — “The simplest answer is ‘No.’ Don’t do it. Don’t get involved. Don’t contribute money, don’t work in a campaign, don’t lobby, and especially, don’t run for office yourself.” SPJ’s position paper does address the matter of publishers doing things politically they would not allow of reporters or editors,

including donating to political campaigns, but does not specifically speak to a situation where a publisher actually runs for office. The paper does refer to publishers getting involved in politics financially when they wouldn’t otherwise allow employees to do likewise as a “double standard.” While Gray is the publisher, he also has journalistic duties as a reporter and regular opinion columnist. It is not clear whether the Call News has any policies restraining editorial staff from running for or holding public office. How Gray intends the Call News to report on his or any challenger’s campaign, or upon his activities in office, should he win, are unclear. A good bit of the paper’s primary coverage area is in District 102. Questions posed to Gray were unanswered as of press time.

Farewell Katie Hammond

One of the most universally beloved members of Mobile’s media community passed away last week after almost a decade of battling breast cancer. Katie Hammond, 41, passed away June 8. Professionally she was a producer and assignment editor at WKRG-TV from 2005-2016. Prior to that Katie worked for five years at Fox10 TV and also had a stint at the PressRegister. She was also known to many in local media for her work helping hold together the Mobile Press Club for several years. Katie was known for her upbeat attitude and toughness through her devastating battle. A memorial service will be held at Dauphin Way United Methodist Friday, June 16 at 12 p.m. with a visitation immediately following at the church. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Mobile Patriots Wheelchair Basketball Team, 4595 Hawthorne Place, Mobile, AL 36608 or the Mitchell Cancer Center. Friends will also gather at The Brickyard (266 Dauphin St.) from 6 – 8 p.m. to share happy memories and toast Katie.


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STYLE HOROSCOPES BRINGING BACK MORE THAN FANNY PACKS

F U T U R E S H O C K

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ANSWERS FROM PAGE 52

GEMINI (5/21-6/21) — You’ll pretend to be a 12-year-old so you can spend your summer at Space Camp. One night during an engine test, you and four teenage campers will be accidentally shot into space. Hilarity will ensue. Then it’s time for re-entry. You’ll bring back knee-high socks with shorts. CANCER (6/22-7/22) — Over the course of 90 minutes, you’ll descend into madness due to a lack of snacks in the household. Your Snapchat stories will get increasingly desperate until you finally discover the frozen corn dogs under the mystery meat in the freezer. You’ll bring back doublepopped collars. LEO (7/23-8/23) — You’ll start an epic traffic jam after mistaking the time the Bankhead Tunnel is open for cyclists and pedestrians. Drivers won’t soon forgive your lack of speed and proficiency on rollerblades, or your simultaneous attempt to bring back denim on denim. VIRGO (8/24-9/22) — You’ll resume your occasional quest to understand the international rules and strategy of cricket. Using baseball bats, croquet pegs, hockey masks and tennis balls, you’ll establish Alabama’s first league. You’ll name your team Saban’s Satans. You’ll bring back bangs. LIBRA (9/23-10/22) — In an effort to rid yourself of extra “stuff” and “things,” you’ll host a yard sale. Despite your expectations, no one will be interested in your mismatched and wobbly table lamps, but a bidding war will erupt over your “Spice World” DVD. You never stopped trying to bring back cargo shorts. SCORPIO (10/23-11/21) — You’ll bomb at trivia night after failing to recall James Buchanan’s signature attempt at legislation in 1861. You’ll be surprised to learn the Corwin Amendment was never adopted or withdrawn, but is still supported by states’ rights activists to this day. You’ll bring back fedoras. SAGITTARIUS (11/22-12/22) — Eager to cash in on the local craft beer boom, you’ll begin brewing artisanal mead. But you’ll be bankrupted by PETA, which determines your honeybees are undercompensated on your inhumane factory farm. You’ll bring back powdered wigs. CAPRICORN (12/23-1/19) — You’ll be the belle of the ball after you purchase a vintage Selena T-shirt at a discount clothier. Suddenly, you’ll be both fluent in Spanish and savage at sass. You’ll bring back frosted tipped hair. AQUARIUS (1/20-2/18) — You’ll join the EVP volleyball tournament at Dauphin Island to challenge the professionals to a match. You’ll only manage to score a single lucky point, then be forced to ride home with about a half-cup of sand in your cracks. You’ll bring back patchwork. PISCES (2/19-3/20) — In an effort to cure the late-night munchies, you’ll stop by Taco Bell to try out their new Naked Chicken Chips. Later, you’ll be arrested for indecent exposure after pulling off your clothes and running around screaming, “Why didn’t I think of this?!?!” You’ll bring back velour tracksuits. ARIES (3/21-4/19) — Encouraged by the enthusiasm surrounding your nomination, you’ll begin writing your Nappie Award acceptance speech. But when Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty prepare to announce the winner, you’ll go ahead and concede to the runner-up. You’ll bring back leg warmers. TAURUS (4/20-5/20) — To ease future droughts in western states, you’ll propose a water pipeline from flood-prone South Alabama. The project will spark violent protests from the petroleum industry over concerns it will leak into its oil reserves. You’ll bring back JNCOs.


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STYLE FEATURE

Atmore distillery bringing bourbon to ‘Bama

bourbon is usually 75-99 percent corn. It’s almost all corn, as far as what’s on the market. The primary reason for this is that corn is cheap. What we did is, we did 52 percent corn, and then our flavor grains are 48 percent. Why don’t [big manufacturers] do this? Because it’s expensive, and it very much compliBY JEREMY BEAMAN/CONTRIBUTING WRITER cates the cooking and fermentation process.” The final factor that sets Big Escambia’s bourbon apart from other bourbons any believe bourbon is bourbon only if it Bourbon is a unique spirit classification. By federal law, is the geographical location of its aging. Much of the bourbon on the market is comes from Bourbon County, Kentucky. Seth for a bourbon to be legally called such, it must be: made in made in Kentucky, Illinois and Indiana, all of which have a distinctly different climate than South Alabama. The location causes certain challenges for DetDettling begs to differ. the United States; made with at least 51 percent corn; and tling. Because of heat and humidity, his single-barrel, cask-strength bourbon “That is probably the most widely held distilled at under 160 proof. There are other regulations, unfactual piece of information,” he said, laughing. but these are some of the major ones. It begs the question, will actually come out at a lower proof than when it went into the barrel. “Because we’re humid, we don’t tend to lose water. We lose proof. From Dettling is the CEO and head distiller of Big Escambia if bourbon is so protected, why isn’t it all the same? science, we know that there is an ideal climate for aging spirits, and it’s not Spirits, a craft operation located in Atmore. A real estate “Well, it pretty much is all the same, because only a South Alabama. It’s too hot and too wet.” man by trade, he got his start in the craft spirit world few big manufacturers produce it,” Dettling said. “They However, thanks to technology, Dettling can control the climate of his back in 2008-09 when the housing market collapsed. have great quality control that’s exceptional, they have rickhouse, dictating temperature and humidity levels. The climate of Escambia It wasn’t necessarily the collapse that motivated him very highly skilled people and labs constantly checking County is not ideal, but it has an advantage. to finally plant the longheld seed of an idea, though it everything, and it’s cheap.” “It will produce a geographically identifiable result. If you want to know certainly contributed. That bourbon has such a narrow classification and that what bourbon tastes like in freezing-cold Kentucky, you can go buy that. If you “It just wasn’t that enjoyable of a business,” he said of large companies produce it so easily make it difficult for want to know what it tastes like in steaming, boiling, hot South Alabama, we’re real estate. craft operations to compete with their own products. For going to show you.” Dettling’s interest in making drink didn’t appear out of that reason, many small companies don’t even make their Big whiskey by no means intimidates Dettling, nor does craft whiskey, nowhere. own bourbon. which oftentimes simply buys big whiskey’s product and renames it. He wel“We would make root beer and ginger ale at home. I “What most craft guys do is they buy that juice from grew up around small-batch beverage manufacturing,” them [the big companies] and then say they made it,” Det- comes the competitive challenge, truly believing he can compete by making a uniquely local product, and by not cutting corners. Dettling said. He moved up a stage whenever he became tling said. “With bourbon being so well-defined federally, “What’s a bottle of bourbon worth today? And if it’s craft? You just name old enough to drive. then the question becomes, how do you differentiate? So I “We would make beer at the house, me and my friends. look within the definition and find where, within the rules, your price. We want to go toe-to-toe with the guys buying juice and beat them.” In the meantime We would go across the state line to Pensacola to a little I can play a little bit of a different game.” While waiting for the bourbon to age, Alabamians can test another of Big home brew shop because it wasn’t legal in Alabama at the His solution is to become local and to actually make his Escambia’s products. time. My parents tolerated it.” own booze. CRU Rum hit the market in May of last year. There are three products. All As the adult Dettling began to get serious about the new All the corn used to make Big Escambia bourbon is business, he traveled all around to see how stills, small and grown in Escambia County. Also, the process is fully com- are the same rum, but one is aged in tequila casks, one in white wine casks and one red wine casks, giving each a bit of a different character. The rum, too, is large, operate. He also met with operators, those who are pleted by Dettling and company, which is notably rare. uniquely made. making money and those who aren’t. “We actually do in fact make it, not push a button, not “We do rum the way you would do a bourbon. When you do a bourbon, “Some of them I got to spend days with, some of them connect a hose, not put our name on it. It’s our corn; we you’re not allowed to put fake colors in it, you’re not allowed to add flavors to 10 minutes, but I asked all of them ‘what was your biggest grind it, we ferment it, we distill it, we don’t buy any juice it, so it’s real. We’re listing our ingredients on the label, which we think is the mistake?’ and they all said the same thing: not putting to spike the fermentations.” spirits away for aging.” Dettling also splits from market norms regarding ingre- first in the United States ever, for any spirit category. That’s a reaction to what is happening in rum, where everything is fake. Our juice goes in 100 percent And so he quickly got something into the barrel. dients making up the rest of the bourbon. Back to the bourbon “Bourbon has to be 51 percent corn, but the truth is that and whatever comes out, that’s what goes in the bottle.”

M

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STYLE BOOZIE

Margaritaville monsoon at The Wharf BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

I

t’s arrived — the rainy season, that is. We are at that time of year where it either rains all day for a week straight or it rains every afternoon. Luckily this past weekend was beautiful because we needed a little sunshine after all that rain, or at least Boozie did! But no worries, I didn’t let a little rain scare me away. I’ve got your weekly gossip right here!

our middle-row seats, we realized someone had taken our spot. No worries, some people offered to scoot over, giving us the two end seats. This was going great, the beers were cold and the music was gold. About an hour into the concert, it started to drizzle and Jimmy told the crowd he would take the weather with him and launched into “Take the Weather with You.” A few folks took cover, I guess because they knew what was about to come. It began to rain harder and harder. Fins to the left, lightning to the right Even Jimmy had to scoot back some. Then it started As promised, I’ve got the full Jimmy Buffett scoop! lightning and pouring. Jimmy kept playing while most Last Tuesday night, as I was eating dinner, I received a people found whatever shelter they could. This wasn’t call from my Parrot Head friends that had been partying a little shower like at the Brantley Gilbert concert I told all day. They informed me that I had an hour and half to y’all about last week, this was pouring rain. Let’s just say get to the concert and that they had two tickets for me. I called a guy friend first, no luck; called a pregnant friend it wasn’t the best night for white jeans. We were already wet so figured, what the heck, might — hello, designated driver — she was in a meeting; third as well get back out there and enjoy the concert, which time’s the charm and I had a friend on her way to meet we did! A little rain didn’t hurt us and so many people me. We were headed to The Wharf and knew we’d be had fled the main amphitheater, it was almost as if cutting it close on time. Jimmy was holding a private concert. We get there and the place is packed, people are When it came time to leave, the amphitheater was parked all over the place. Luckily Boozie had the right flooded and Mother Nature was still dumping more rain. connections and could get VIP-ish parking. We pull in Jimmy came back onstage for an encore of “Defying and luckily find a parking spot. An older man asked how likely was it we would get a spot right as the concert was Gravity.” Most people were in the concession area when the concert ended, waiting for the rain to slack off. The about to begin. That’s how Boozie rolls, Gramps! Jimmy wasn’t wasting any time and started the concert security staff began asking people to leave, and when they wouldn’t, they locked arms and started forcing right away. By the time we got beers and started toward

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people out. Boozie’s Parrot Head friends were some of those people and started chanting “Hell no, we won’t go!” They ended up leaving anyway. Let’s just say Wednesday was rough but well worth the lack of sleep, the soaked clothes and pounding head. I’d go back to Margaritaville anyday! Oh, I almost forgot: While Jimmy played “Bama Breeze” a picture of the Flora-Bama was displayed on the backdrop! So I’d say that solved that mystery, now if we could only figure out which place serves the famous “cheeseburger in paradise”!

My bad

All my blabbering the last two weeks caused me to miss informing y’all that Food Network also made a stop at Von’s Bistro downtown! While Josh Denny was in town filming “Ginormous Food” at LoDa Bier Garten he also filmed a bit at Von’s. The Food Network star was treated to one of Von’s spring rolls. But this was no regular order of spring rolls, this was a ginormous one! And If I had to guess, I’m sure it was just as tasty as the regular ones. Ugh, about to have to cancel my diet and go eat!

Huh?

What is going on around here? I have two incidents to report of people missing their clothes. The first one isn’t really in my jurisdiction but close enough. My spy reported a man running down the highway in Pensacola naked! Yep, butt naked, he didn’t even have on shoes. Escambia County Sheriff’s Department was hot on the case. One officer was chasing him but realized he wasn’t going to be able to catch him. Then a sheriff in a car tasered him and he fell face-first to the ground. Ouch! I’m guessing they got him in the booty, it could have been worse considering he was naked. Then, as if that wasn’t enough, as I was driving through midtown I spotted a lady with no pants on. She was walking down the street in a shirt and underwear. No, it wasn’t swimsuit bottoms or short-shorts, it was underwear, because she preceded to pick her wedgie as I passed by. I guess some people just don’t care, or maybe she was on her way to buy clear pants. Yes, they are a thing, check them out. Might be a little hot for Mobile. … Well, kids, that’s all I’ve got this week. Just remember, whether rain or shine, dramatic or scandalous or just some plain ol’ Jimmy Buffett lovin’, I will be there. Ciao!


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com PUBLIC NOTICE

STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE

Notice is hereby given that a bill as described in the synopsis below will be introduced in any Special Session in 2017 and application for its passage and enactment will be made: A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT SYNOPSIS: Relating to Mobile County; to establish the regulatory authority for the Mobile County Health Department to regulate intermittent food service establishments that prepare food in association with a temporary exempt event that is a regional celebration, tradition, or cultural event designated as such by Mobile County, if the intermittent food service establishment does not prepare, sell, or distribute food on a regular basis in its regular line of business. Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 29, July 6, 2017

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made by the herein referenced Grantees in the terms of that certain Vendor’s Lien Deed executed on July 31, 2013, by Curtis M. Ivey and Lorena D. Ivey, as Grantees to Profit Sharing Plan & Trust for MLB Realty Co. Inc., a Alabama corporation and Horace T. Jackson, as Grantors which said Vendor’s Lien Deed was recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book LR7059, Page 494, and default continuing under said Vendor’s Lien Deed, by virtue of and pursuant to the power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, the following described real property will be sold at public outcry, for cash, to the highest bidder, in front of the North entrance of the Courthouse of said County, located at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama 36644, during the legal hours of sale, on July 20, 2017. Lot 14, as per plat of MARCH ESTATES, Unit II as recorded in Map Book 63, Page 85, Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama Said sale is made for the purpose of paying said Vendor’s Lien debt and costs of foreclosure. W. Austin Mulherin Holder of said Vendor’s Lien WILLIAM B. JACKSON, II STOKES & CLINTON, P.C. Attorneys for Lienholder Post Office Box 991801 Mobile, Alabama 36691 (251) 460-2400 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 29, 2017

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness described in and secured by that certain Vendors Lien Deed from Sheila Coleman to Derrick Mosley and Tioka Zenaida Mosley, dated the 19th day of August , 2013, and recorded in Book LR7065, page 1964, of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, said default continuing, notice is hereby given that the undersigned will, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said Vendors Lien Deed, sell at public outcry for cash to the highest bidder during the legal hours of sale on the 29th day of June, 2017, the following described property located in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, to-wit: Lot 4, First Addition to Cecelia Court, as recorded in Map Book 6, Pages 423-4, in the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama. Address: 752 Stanton Road, Mobile, AL 36617. Said sale will be made for the purpose of paying said indebtedness and the expenses incident to this sale, including a reasonable Attorney’s fee, and the other purposes set out in said Vendors Lien Deed. Sheila Coleman Lienholder. William E. Case, Attorney for Lienholder. Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 22, 2017

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made by the herein referenced Grantee in the terms of that certain Vendor’s Lien Deed executed on April 21, 2016, by Anthony E. Powell and Amanda N. Kelley, as Grantee to Anthony Ricchiuti, as Grantor which said Vendor’s Lien Deed was recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book LR7373, Page 771, and default continuing under said Vendor’s Lien Deed, by virtue of and pursuant to the power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, the following described real property will be sold at public outcry, for cash, to the highest bidder, in front of the North entrance of the Courthouse of said County, located at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama 36644, during the legal hours of sale, on July 20, 2017. Lot 20, as per plat of GLENWOOD FARMS, PHASE 3 as recorded in Map Book 74, Page 108, Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying said Vendor’s Lien debt and costs of foreclosure. Anthony Ricchiuti Holder of said Vendor’s Lien. WILLIAM B. JACKSON, II STOKES & CLINTON, P.C. Attorneys for Lienholder Post Office Box 991801 Mobile, Alabama 36691 (251) 460-2400

Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 29, 2017

PROBATE

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION

PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: FRANK HERMAN SPECHALSKE, Deceased Case No. 2017-1049 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 6th day of June, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. RICHARD ALAN SPECHALSKE as Executor under the last will and testament of HERMAN SPECHALSKE, Deceased. Attorney of Record: JON M. SPECHALSKE Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 29, 2017

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING April 26, 2017 Case No. 2014-0494-3

IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of ISAAC B. FRANKLIN Jr., Deceased On to-wit the 24th day of July, 2017 at 2:00 PM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the FINAL SETTLEMENT as filed by JANICE B. FRANKLIN. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate. Attorney: VANESSA ARNOLD SHOOTS, 56 ST. JOSEPH STREET, STE. 1311. MOBILE, ALABAMA 36602.

University Blvd, N., AD245 PH# (251) 460-6151 FX# (251) 414-8291(rbrown@southalabama.edu)Bids must be submitted on Proposal Forms furnished in the Bid Documents or copies thereof. The preceding is an abbreviated advertisement. The complete advertisement may be obtained from the location listed above. All questions concerning the Projects should be submitted in writing to the Project Manager at the address listed below. 307 University Blvd. N., AD001 Mobile, AL 36688 PH# (251) 460-6601FX# (251) 461-1370 mmayberry@ southalabama.edu Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 22, 2017

Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 29, July 6, 2017.

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: MARIAN A. POIRIER, Deceased Case No. 2017-1046 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 6th day of June, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. WILFRED POIRIER III as Executor under the last will and testament of MARIAN A. POIRIER, Deceased. Attorney of Record: KENNETH P. MURRAY Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 29, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: MARGARET T HOHEIM Case No. 2016-2353 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 30th day of May, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. BRANDON CHAYCE HOHEIM as Administrator of the estate of MARGARET T HOHEIM, deceased. Attorney of Record: GERALD C. BROOKS LAGNIAPPE HD June 8, 15, 22, 2017.

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: WYATT JAMES SHELBORNE JR Case No. 2017-0499 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 26th day of May, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. LORI DUBOSE as Administratrix of the estate of WYATT JAMES SHELBORNE JR, deceased. Attorney of Record: HENDRIK S. SNOW, Esq. LAGNIAPPE HD June 8, 15, 22, 2017.

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: GLADYS S. ONEAL, Deceased Case No. 2017-0983 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 26th day of May, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. WILLIAM WORTH ONEAL JR as Executor under the last will and testament of GLADYS S. ONEAL, Deceased. Attorney of Record: MICHAEL E. MARK LAGNIAPPE HD June 1, 8, 15, 2017.

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING May 18, 2017 Case No. 2016-1595 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA CHANGE OF NAME FOR MINOR On to-wit the 31st day of July, 2017 at 9:30 AM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the CHANGE OF NAME FOR MINOR as filed by CHRISTINA L. WILLIAMS. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest, specifically RONALD GOINS, JR. who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate. Attorney Name and Address: MICHAEL S. MCNAIR, 2151 GOVERNMENT STREET, MOBILE, AL 36606 Lagniappe HD May 25, June 1, 8, 15, 2017.

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that the University of South Alabama (Owner) will accept sealed Bids for the following Work: YEARLY BID - FLOOR COATING SYSTEMS University of South Alabama Mobile, Alabama USA JOB NO. 17-47 USA BID NO.7060101 Bids will be received and clocked in at 2:00 p.m. local time on Tuesday, June 27, 2017, in Room AD245 of the USA Administration Building, on the Main Campus of the University of South Alabama. Bids will not be accepted after the time indicated herein and will be returned unopened. A cashier’s check or bid bond payable to the University of South Alabama in an amount not less than five (5) percent of the amount of the bid, but in no event more than $10,000 must accompany the bidder’s proposal. Bid Documents shall be available only through the USA Purchasing Office. Contact as follows: University of South Alabama Purchasing Department 307

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that the University of South Alabama (Owner) will accept sealed Bids for the following Work: YEARLY BID - UNDERGROUND BORING University of South Alabama Mobile, Alabama USA JOB NO. 17-01 USA BID NO.7060501 Bids will be received and clocked in at 2:00 p.m. local time on Thursday, June 29, 2017, in Room AD245 of the USA Administration Building, on the Main Campus of the University of South Alabama. Bids will not be accepted after the time indicated herein and will be returned unopened. A cashier’s check or bid bond payable to the University of South Alabama in an amount not less than five (5) percent of the amount of the bid, but in no event more than $10,000 must accompany the bidder’s proposal. Bid Documents shall be available only through the USA Purchasing Office. Contact as follows: University of South Alabama Purchasing Department 307 University Blvd, N., AD245 PH# (251) 460-6151 FX# (251) 414-8291 (rbrown@southalabama.edu) Bids must be submitted on Proposal Forms furnished in the Bid Documents or copies thereof. The preceding is an abbreviated advertisement. The complete advertisement may be obtained from the location listed above. All questions concerning the Project should be submitted in writing to the Project Manager at the address listed below.  307 University Blvd. N., AD001 Mobile, AL 36688 PH# (251) 460-6601 FX# (251) 461-1370 mmayberry@southalabama.edu  

Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

NOTICE OF SALE

These abandoned vehicles will be sold on 07/13/2017 at 5781 Three Notch Rd. Mobile, AL 36619 at 9am  BUIC    1G4AG55N6P6487970 PONT   1G2NE12T01M501585 HOND  1HGCG66511A120708 TOY     JT3AC12R1M0070646 FORD   1FTCR10UXNTA49613 CHRY   3C8FY78G95T583903 HOND  1HGEM22913L062125 CHEV   1G1AK55F467774317 GMC      1GKCS13W2V2515241 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

These abandoned vehicles will be sold on 07/19/2017 at 5781 Three Notch Rd Mobile Al. 36619 at 9 am CHEV  1GNEC13Z22J253063 SUBA   4S3BMCA65C3029661 HOND   19XFB2F56EE034249 NISS      3N1AB61E77L659267 NISS      1N4AL21E38N480881 HYUN    5NPEB4AC9BH066648 CHEV     2G1WX12KX49271694 MAZD    JM3ER293070162491 FORD     1FMRU15L92LA69352 NISS        1N4AL2AP1AN515117 KIA          KNAFX4A66F5317967 LEXS        JT8BF28G2W0142281 HYUN     KMHDN45DX2U366982 TOYT     JTDBT1235Y0060204 GMC    1GKEC13R0XJ807107 KIA      KNAFK4A69F5389339 TOYT   4T1BG22K8VU011189 LINC     1LNHM93R49G609503 OLDS    1G3AJ55M1S6329851 NISS     1N4AL11D12C129214 CHEV    1GNEC13ZX3R160259 HOND  1HGFA16539L028307 FORD    2FMZA53421BA59160 TOYT    1NXBU40EX9Z073457 FORD    1FTRX17252NB03100 DODG   1B7HC13Y9VJ557332 CHRY     1C3CCBBGXDN554234 HOND   1HGCM723X7A000725 NISS      5N1AA08A36N726845 NISS      1N4AL3AP0EC286646 FORD   1FACP44E3NF115627 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 4763 Lott Rd., Eight Mile, AL 36613. 2007 Nissan Murano JN8AZ08W17W610813 2004 GMC Yukon 1GKEC13Z54R100100 2002 Nissan Frontier 1N6DD26S32C318137 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3101 Davey Allison Blvd., Hueytown, AL 35023. 2000 Chevrolet C1500 3GNEC16T4YG203783 2016 Kia Sorento 5XYPG4A37GG090990 2017 Honda Civic

19XFC2F65HE015251 2002 Hyundai Accent KMHCG35C32U177534

Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3150 Dauphin St., Mobile, AL 36606. 2001 Buick LeSabre 1G4HP54K71U275281 1995 Cadillac Seville 1G6KS52YXSU809684 2009 Saturn Outlook 5GZER23D59J137849 2006 GMC Envoy 1GKES16S966146745 2008 Pontiac Grand Prix 2G2WP552181118303 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 6205 Waringwood Dr. S., Mobile, AL 36608. 2010 Dodge Journey 3D4PG5FVXAT150604 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7741 Old Pascagoula Rd. Lot 45, Theodore, AL 36582. 2000 Hyundai Elantra KMHJF35F4YU905343 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 8085 Brunson Ave., Semmes, AL 36575. 1992 Chevrolet Corvette 1G1YY23P8N5108000 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 112 East 21st Ave.  Apt 7, Gulf Shores, AL 36542. 2005 VW New Beetle 3VWBK31C65M416150 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1147 E I-65 Service Rd. S., Mobile, AL 36606. 2002 Infiniti I35 JNKDA31A72T019751 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1207 Hercules St., Mobile, AL 36603. 1992 Ford Crown Vic 2FACP74WXNX111346 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2008 Hathcox St., Mobile, AL 36617. 2004 GMC Sierra 2GTEC13T241369638 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 305 Martin Luther King Jr Dr. N., Prichard, AL 36610. 2007 Chevrolet Tahoe 1GNFK13067J336947 2010 Dodge Challenger 2B3CJ4DVXAH121897 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 1999 Honda Civic 2HGEJ661XXH511647 2001 Chevrolet Impala 2G1WF52E319223261 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2516 Whistler St., Prichard, AL 36610. 2007 BMW 328I WBAVA33587KX80952 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2865 Government Blvd., Mobile, AL 36606. 2013 Dodge Avenger 1C3CDZAB6DN661633 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  1914 St Stephens Rd., Mt Vernon, AL 36560. 2000 Ford Expedition 1FMRU1562YLB28387 2002 Chevrolet Malibu 1G1ND52J92M585162 2002 Chevrolet Trailblazer 1GNDS13S422187773 2003 Buick Rendezvous 3G5DA03E53S511536 2000 Oldsmobile Alero

1G3NL12E3YC359641 2000 Honda Accord 1HGCG5543YA050397 2009 Hyundai Sonata 5NPET46C39H454684 2002 Mercury Sable 1MEFM50U32A653612 2002 Dodge Ram Truck 1D7HA18N52J190807

Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3952 Dauphin Island Pkwy., Mobile, AL 36605. 1990 Toyota Corolla JT2AE94K1L3399213 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1419 E I-65 Service Rd. S., Mobile, AL 36606. 2007 Saturn VUE 2GZCZ33D97S864318 1994 Cadillac Seville 1G6KS52Y0RU825953 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  2653 N. Tally Ct., Mobile, AL 36606. 2007 Dodge Caravan 1D4GP24R17B150618 2000 Kia Sportage KNDJB723XY5651049 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 6473 Maurice Poiroux Rd., Theodore, AL 36582. 1998 Kentworth Const. T600 1XKADB9X0WJ770324 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 6874 Dauphin Island Pkwy., Mobile, AL 36605. 2005 Nissan Titan 1N6BA07A95N536490 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 5388 Hwy. 90 W., Mobile, AL 36619. 1994 Chevrolet S10 1GCCS1942R8241222 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 31 1/2 Timothy St., Prichard, AL 36610. 1997 Jaguar XJ SAJHX6248VC795811 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2009 Chevrolet Aveo KL1TD56E09B346981 2008 Pontiac G6 1G2ZG57B384191302 1999 Mazda Protege JM1BJ2224X0135931 1999 Volvo S70 YV1LS55A0X2612049 2016 Kia Rio KNADM4A37G6620371 2004 Dodge Intrepid 2B3HD46R54H700037 2000 Pontiac Sunfire 1G2JB1242Y7357921 2000 Mercury Marquis 2MEFM74WXYX601420 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 6445 Todd Acres Dr., Theodore, AL 36582. 2010 Mercedes C300 WDDGF5EB7AF449359 1999 Ford Ranger 1FTYR10V8XPB30068 2013 Hyundai Sonata 5NPEB4AC7DH785609 1994 Jeep Grand Cherokee 1J4FX58S7RC296102 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 509 Dismukes Ave., Prichard, AL 36610. 1994 Chevrolet GMT-400 2GCEC19K7R1109015

Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 21, 2017- Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1354 Odette Ave., Mobile, AL 36605. 2011 Ford Fiesta 3FADP4CJXBM181428 Lagniappe HD June 15, 22, 2017

J u n e 1 5 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 2 1 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 59


Lagniappe: June 15 - June 21, 2017  
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