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WEEKLY

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LAGNIAPPE

JUNE 8, 2017 - JUNE 14, 2017 | www.lagniappemobile.com ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com

ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com

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BAY BRIEFS

An Amazon sortation center under construction in Mobile County is expected to provide hundreds of seasonal, part-time jobs.

COMMENTARY

Rob wonders if Jeff Sessions wishes he had a doover.

BUSINESS

Manci’s in Daphne is introducing Buster’s, a small bar serving wood-fired pizza.

CUISINE

Gulf Distributing is introducing Austin’s Oasis Texas Brewing Co. to Alabama, Mississippi and Florida.

ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com

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J. MARK BRYANT Sports Writer sports@lagniappemobile.com STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA RASMUSSEN Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com BETH WILLIAMS Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com ALEEN MOMBERGER Advertising Sales Executive aleen@lagniappemobile.com MELISSA EDGE Editorial Assistant events@lagniappemobile.com

COVER

The city of Foley is banking on a mixed-use commercial and entertainment development to complement existing sports and recreation facilities to anchor “a huge draw for tourism of all kinds.”

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ARTS

A judge will consider Mobile Ballet’s motion to dismiss a complaint of malfeasance and breach of fiduciary duty.

MUSIC

ROSS PRITCHARD Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager jackie@lagniappemobile.com CONTRIBUTORS: Lee Hedgepeth, Ron Sivak, Jeff Poor, Asia Frey, Brian Holbert, Sharman Egan, Tom Ward, Judy Stout, W. Perry Hall ON THE COVER: ON THE COVER: OWA BY SHANE RICE POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Editorial, advertising and production offices are located at 1100B Dauphin St. Mobile, AL 36604. Mailing address is P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Phone: 251.450.4466 Fax 251.450.4498. Email: ashleytoland@lagniappemobile.com or rholbert@lagniappemobile.com LAGNIAPPE is printed at Walton Press. All letters sent to Lagniappe are considered to be intended for publication. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and Alternative Weeklies Network All rights reserved. Something Extra Publishing, Inc. Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced without the expressed permission of the publishers. Individuals may take one copy of the paper free of charge from area businesses, racks or boxes. After that, papers are $3 per issue. Removal of more than one copy from these points constitutes theft. Violators are subject to prosecution.

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Guitar phenom Wes Jeans is back on the road as a frontman after taking time off to raise children and work in the studio.

FILM

In spite of a fine supporting cast, perhaps Robert De Niro wasn’t the best choice to portray “The Comedian.”

GARDEN

Getting kids involved in gardening is all about catering to their interests.

SPORTS

In four years, the Fuse Project’s annual Dragon Boat Festival has become one of the area’s signature nonprofit fundraising events.

STYLE

The late Gregg Allman’s 2012 autobiography, “My Cross to Bear,” is a colorful tale with plenty of “sex, drugs and rock ‘n’ roll.”

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POLICE DISPATCH

Man behind midtown crimespree nabbed in Atlanta By Jason Johnson Police in Atlanta captured a local man wanted for allegedly robbing three stores and shooting and carjacking a woman in midtown Mobile last week. According to police, Lionel “Deon” Gray was apprehended by officers of the Atlanta Police Department on the evening of June 5, after he’d been sought by authorities more than 24 hours. According to reports from the Mobile Police Department, Gray used a handgun to rob Griffith Service Station on Saturday, June 3, at around 9:35 p.m. The following day, he returned to the area and executed a similar robbery of the Rite Aid at the intersection of Government and Ann streets. At approximately 4:18 p.m. on June 4, police responded to a report of shots being fired at the 1100 block of Selma Street. There, they heard a female screaming inside a nearby residence who was later found in her own kitchen suffering from a gunshot wound to the arm. According to police, the woman said Gray knocked on the door and when she let him in, he shot her and fled the scene in her vehicle. That vehicle was later recovered in Chickasaw, where Gray is believed to have abandoned it after committing a third commercial robbery. The victim has yet to be identified and police have not disclosed the the state of her medical condition to the public at this time. According to Mobile County Metro Jail records, Gray is homeless and has an extensive criminal history in Mobile County including multiple charges for drug offenses,

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probation violations, robbery, burglary and attempted rape. Gray, 33, is also a registered sex offender, according to a database maintained by the Alabama Law Enforcement Agency. Court records indicate that after being charged with “attempted rape” on two separate occasions in 2002, Gray pleaded guilty in a first-degree rape involving a 15-year-old girl. More recently, Gray was charged with possession of drug paraphernalia on May 26 but was released two days later.

Alabama Power, city team up to recycle limbs By Dale Liesch Mayor Sandy Stimpson’s administration and Alabama Power have agreed to help recycle limbs and other woody material each entity collects. Previously, limbs collected by Alabama Power and the city’s Urban Forestry Department were sent to the Dirt, Inc. landfill in West Mobile. Now, those same limbs and material collected during trimming and other activities will be turned into mulch at an outdoor facility at the corner of Marion Street and Fisher’s Alley near the Renaissance public housing community downtown, Stimpson said at a press conference Tuesday afternoon. “One of the great things about this is not only is it a collaboration, but it will save both entities money in the long run,” Stimpson said. The mulch will be used on public landscaping projects, something the city previously had no budget for, Parks and Recreation Director Matt Capps said. Stimpson added that the city is expecting to save at least $50,000 in both tipping fees

and materials. Mike Saxon, Alabama Power’s Mobile division vice president, said the company was “delighted to be involved.” Yard debris that the city picks up for residents will continue to be sent to Dirt, Inc., city spokeswoman Laura Byrne said. The mulching will be on-site and although the facility, which is already in operation, is close to Mobile Housing Board’s Renaissance properties, Stimpson said the mulching would be periodic and “won’t take that long.” “My guess is the neighbors won’t be able to hear what’s going on,” Stimpson said. Capps added that mulching hasn’t even taken place since April to stress how infrequent it occurs. He said the mulching would not occur at night only during regular business hours.

Man sentenced for meth Submitted Acting U.S. Attorney Steve Butler announced U.S. District Court Chief Judge Kristi K. DuBose sentenced Jay Kimberly Ponder on June 2 to serve a term of imprisonment of 120 months followed by five years of supervised release for the conspiracy to distribute methamphetamine. Both federal and local authorities began their initial investigation of the case in 2015 and discovered the defendant was distributing methamphetamine throughout the Mobile region. The defendant, who has an extensive criminal history, entered a guilty plea before the court on Dec. 1, 2016. This case was investigated by the FBI, the Drug Enforcement Administration, the Mobile County Sheriff’s Office, the Mobile Police Department and the U.S. Marshals Service. The case was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Lawrence J. Bullard.


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE COUNTY

‘A history of winning’ MOBILE NETS ANOTHER ‘MARQUEE NAME’ IN AMAZON BY JASON JOHNSON

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fter a year of behind-the-scenes negotiations, city and county officials were surprised last Thursday when Amazon announced it would be making a $30 million investment here, opening its first Alabama sortation center in Mobile and bringing hundreds of jobs to the area. On Friday, Mayor Sandy Stimpson and Mobile County Commissioners confirmed their involvement with the project, which will generate roughly 1,500 part-time and seasonal jobs. According to Troy Wayman, vice president of economic development at the Mobile Area Chamber of Commerce, the bulk of those jobs would be available at the height of Amazon’s operations ahead of the Christmas holidays — one reason Johnson Development, of Greenville, South Carolina, is required to have the 362,000-square-foot facility operational by November. As for location, the sortation center will be situated near 6735 Trippel Road, where Johnson Development owns lands in an existing industrial park through Mobile Industrial Properties LLC. Even though the vast majority of the jobs are part-time, Wayman said they would have an economic impact equivalent to 250 to 300 fulltime jobs and be a good fit for college students, young adults, retirees and those who are underemployed and looking to add a second job. “We have to attract jobs for every segment of our citizenry in the community, and if you look at what this could mean for [those groups], it really fills some gaps that we don’t currently have,” Wayman said. “We think it has the potential to help lower our unemployment rate [7.1 percent in Mobile County] even further.” News of the Amazon facility comes as bigbox competitor Wal-Mart develops its own distribution center at Interstate 10 and McDonald Road, which is projected to generate 550 jobs and a 10 percent spike in activity at container terminals at the Alabama State Port Authority. Volume-wise, though, Amazon’s operation will be smaller. Unlike its larger fulfillment centers, where customer orders are picked, packed and shipped, sortation centers allow Amazon to sort packages so they can be shipped more efficiently to consolidated regions of the country. As for Amazon customers in Mobile, a company spokeswoman said last week areas near sortation centers typically see “faster and expanded delivery options, like Sunday delivery and later purchase cutoff times.”

Incentives, tax abatements

According to Mobile County Attorney Jay Ross, city and county officials have agreed to split the cost of constructing a $1.3 million secondary access road at the facility. If the cost exceeds $1.25 million, though, the developer has agreed to make up the difference. A spokeswoman for Mobile County said outside of agreeing to help with the cost of that road construction, commissioners haven’t signed anything with Amazon yet. Calls to Stimpson’s office about the extent of the city’s contribution have so far gone unreturned. Ross was able to confirm Amazon would receive a 10-year tax abatement from the city’s Industrial Development Board — meaning all the sales and use taxes related to the construction of

the facility will be waived, as will a decade of the company’s non-educational property taxes. While those abatements will be valuable for Amazon, they aren’t as extensive as what’s been offered to other large developments in the past. Alabama law permits the abatement of ad valorem taxes for up to 20 years — an incentive the county has recently used in agreements with APM Terminals and in the Wal-Mart deal. However, Commissioner Jerry Carl — in whose district the facility will be located — said he was upfront, when discussions with Amazon first began, that a tax abatement on the county level just didn’t seem appropriate for this project. “At some point the abatements have got to go away, but right now, they’re part of it. Using them to get businesses in are necessary, but not in every case, and I truly didn’t feel like this was one of those cases,” Carl said. “Historically, I think some of our leaders have given the farm away in some of these abatements, and I’m trying to bring some of them them back.” Though Wayman said money forgone in abatements wouldn’t exist if companies receiving them weren’t successfully recruited, he agreed with Carl, adding that “20 years is a long time” and packages offering that level of tax incentive are best saved for “mega projects” like Wal-Mart.

A history of winning

Public officials were quick to tout the “hundreds of jobs” that the deal will bring to the Mobile area, but Wayman said the cachet attached to companies like Amazon can have intangible benefits down the road. Wayman said in its sector of the business and economic development world, Amazon is the standard-bearer — the next household name on a list that includes Airbus, Continental Motors, FedEx and other companies that have set up shop in the Mobile area over the past decade. “One term we use a lot is, ‘marquee names,’” Wayman said. “Amazon is a marquee name, and together with Wal-Mart, two of the largest retailers in the world now have a presence here.” In a historical context of economic development, Wayman said the past decade has been unprecedented for Mobile, and economic development statistics kept by the chamber of commerce seem to support his claim. From 2006 through 2016, the Mobile area has seen the creation of 14,726 new jobs with an average salary of $46,019, recruited 34 new businesses while expanding 64 existing companies and enjoyed $8.2 billion of capital investment — figures that don’t include Wal-Mart or Amazon. As Wayman puts it, Mobile has “a history of winning” that has created a momentum for recruiting economic development, adding that project activity has “already spawned from the Wal-Mart project,” and he “expects the same from Amazon.” “It is remarkable the way things continue to happen for this community,” he added. “We’re blessed with a lot of great infrastructure and resources that make us an attractive location for companies, but it’s not blind luck. It takes strong elected leadership, strong work out of this organization and from our other partners that are part of Team Mobile.”

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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

New leader on horizon HOUSING BOARD NARROWS SEARCH FOR DIRECTOR

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BY DALE LIESCH

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in the position for a while. “I don’t want to bring someone in who is here for a short time,” he said. “This is a big decision for us. It’s important to make the best decision we can.” Cummings added he is looking forward to the face-toface interviews, as that gives the board an opportunity to get another look at the candidates in another situation. During the second round of interviews, Cummings said, the candidates will also meet with executive staff members. Complicating the search for a new leader, HUD and the board must reach a “mutual” agreement to put off the housing authority’s remaining RAD conversion tasks until a new executive director is named, Pettway said. Converting to RAD would allow the board to act as a private developer and receive financing through bank loans. The program, which will require partnerships with private entities, will allow the board to operate with more steady funding in the future. In addition, the program will result in the conversion of all board properties to housing choice vouchers, or Section 8. Pettway said the search for an executive director, with the help of the personnel board, has taken longer than expected. She called the decision to hold off on continued conversion a “mutual decision.” “It has been a while,” she said. “There was no expectation it would take this long.” Pettway added that the board would have to rethink some of the RAD conversion plans anyway. “That concept is relatively new,” she said. “… We want to follow the guidance of the executive director.” The board is looking at making other changes as well. The board is looking to make all the positions under its

Photo | Daniel Anderson

he Mobile Housing Board of Commissioners has narrowed its search for a new executive director to four candidates, with face-to-face interviews scheduled for later in the month, Chairwoman Kimberly Pettway said recently. The four finalists, who are all from out of town, were chosen from 10 applicants after a series of Skype interviews last month. Pettway did not name the candidates at this point out of respect for the fact that they are currently working other jobs. The face-to-face interviews will take place June 19 and 20, Pettway said, with plans for the board to call a special meeting at the end of the month to name a replacement for interim Executive Director Lori Shackelford. Only one of the 10 candidates found to qualify for the job by the Mobile County Personnel Board is local, Pettway said. She said the board is seeking candidates who havd experience with conversions to the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Rental Assistance Demonstration program. “We’re looking for someone … who went through the RAD process,” Pettway said. “We’re looking for someone who can engage our clientele.” Reid Cummings, vice chairman of the board, said he personally wants the next executive director to be “somebody who has a very broad range of talents.” “Somebody who’s a good manager and a good executive,” Cummings said. “Somebody who has been exposed to public housing in a city our size or larger, or an organization our size, who understands the tenor of the changes taking place.” Cummings said he hopes the person they choose will be

The Mobile Housing Board’s next director will oversee a $750 million redevelopment effort. nonprofit arm, Mobile Development Enterprises, board positions, Pettway said. The move would effectively make every employee there part of the merit system. MDE would still be used, but would not have employees. “MDE will still exist,” Pettway said. “It can be used as we get individual grants. It won’t have anymore employees.” Cummings said he has been in favor of the proposed change since the board’s first conversation about it. He said the plan would reset the nonprofit that “grew in all different directions.” “It makes perfect sense,” Cummings said. Current MDE employees will have it reapply for their positions under the Mobile County Personnel Board, Pettway said. This apparently includes State Rep. Adline Clarke, who works as a vice president for MDE. “All decisions regarding the employment positions will be made by the Board of Commissioners for the Mobile Housing Board and the MDE Board,” Clarke wrote in an email message. “I don’t know what positions will be available after the changes.” Cummings said it’s possible “one or two” positions could be lost due to the change because some jobs may not transfer from MDE to MHB. “I think we have some positions throughout the organization that might have a different shape and form once the personnel board gets involved,” he said.


BAYBRIEF | EDUCATION

Getting ahead

ALABAMA EXPANDS ‘TOP-RANKED’ PRE-K LOCALLY BY JASON JOHNSON

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fter more than a decade ranked among the top state-funded prekindergarten programs, Alabama’s First Class pre-k is continuing its expansion and adding 122 new classrooms this fall, including five in Mobile and Baldwin counties. First Class Pre-K, a voluntary program for 4-year-olds, is funded through state grants appropriated in the Education Trust Fund (ETF). Classrooms can be located in public or private schools as well as in child care, faith-based or Head Start centers throughout Alabama. The program is managed by the Alabama Department of Early Childhood Education, organized under the governor’s office, and the First Class designation indicates a classroom has met “high-quality standards” recognized by the National Institute for Early Education Research. For instance, classes in First Class cannot exceed 18 students and a required staff-to-child ratio of 1 to 9 means each classroom uses as teacher as well as an assistant. All First Class teachers are required to have a bachelor’s degree, while assistants must have at least a Child Development Associate credential or an equivalent certification. Former Gov. Robert Bentley often pushed for the expansion of the First Class program, which saw its funding increase substantially during his time in office. However, Gov. Kay Ivey appears to share predecessors’ zeal for growing parents’ access to high-quality pre-K options in Alabama. “A high-quality childhood education program has long lasting benefits on our society as a whole,” Ivey said in a statement last month. “Investment in our people through education, no matter at what level, is an investment in economic development.” Ivey made those comments shortly after the National Institute for Early Education Research’s 2016 State of Preschool Yearbook named First Class among the nation’s top statefunded pre-K programs in the country for the 11th straight year. In 2005, the ETF only allocated $4 million to pre-K programs, but that’s changed drastically. This year, lawmakers put up more than $77 million — a $13 million increase from 2017 that will ultimately fund and staff 122 additional units this fall. By August, there will be 938 First Class pre-K classrooms serving roughly 16,884 students statewide, which is equal to 28 percent of all the 4-year-olds in in the state of Alabama. Among them will be programs at Point Clear Rotary Youth Program in Fairhope, Chickasaw Elementary, the Starlight pre-K center, Elsie Collier Elementary and Robert E. Lee Elementary in Satsuma. Paula Reese, who oversees the prekindergarten programs in the Mobile County Public School System (MCPSS), said the newly funded unit at Collier would be a welcome addition to the existing First Class classrooms as well as other pre-K offerings throughout the district. “We have a great need for pre-K programs in this area, and the farther west you go, the greater that need is because of the the population,” Reese said. “Currently, we have 58 pre-K classrooms, and of those, eight are First-Class. The addition of Collier will be the ninth.”

Though the state’s push for pre-K is somewhat of a new trend, MCPSS has been providing pre-K education for nearly three decades using federal funding for special education and low-income students through its inclusion units and pre-K programs offered at schools receiving Title 1 funds. In an inclusion unit, special-needs students are paired with others from the general population who act as “peer role models.” While the special-needs students are enrolled at no cost, Reese said the units “don’t have funding for typical children,” whose parents can pay up to $65 per week for tuition in some cases. First Class programs, however, are free to all students regardless of income or ability, though entry is based on a random selection similar to that used in magnet programs. Altogether, Reese said, MCPSS has the capacity for 1,062 4-year-olds, but that’s less than a fifth of the 5,400 kindergartners entering the system in an average year. Currently, Reese said, there are more than 2,500 MCPSS students who went through the prescreening and got approved for the program, only to be placed on a waiting list until more funding or space became available. Since registration ended in April, Reese estimates 200 more parents have called asking about the program, sometimes dozens in a single day. “The state has to provide for every child to attend kindergarten, but with pre-K, we haven’t gotten there,” Reese said. “I do foresee that coming, but right now it’s a funding issue.” While the consistently increased appropriations pre-K has seen since 2012 have given supporters hope, the nonprofit Alabama School Readiness Alliance estimates it would take a level funding of $144 million before every family would have an option to voluntarily enroll their child. However, Reese believes the results speak for themselves, telling Lagniappe there is already data showing “high-quality” pre-K programs aren’t only effective in preparing children for kindergarten, but also have lasting effects down the road — making students “less likely to repeat a grade” and “more likely to graduate from high school and graduate on time.” In the meantime, Reese said MCPSS is looking for ways to spread its existing resources and use a combination of its three existing programs to offer the option to as many interested families as possible. Sometimes that means working with pre-K units not part of MCPSS by referring students placed on waiting lists to facilities within the district. In other cases, it’s allowing programs like Head Start in Grand Bay to use facilities such as Breitling Elementary School for classroom space. Reese said those are efforts to “ensure as many children as possible” can get access to “quality pre-K” programming, which she encouraged all parents of young children to take advantage of. “We are really grateful to our school board and superintendent, who for years have believed in pre-K and supported this program,” Reese said. “I also can’t say enough about the state’s support and the funds being put in it. It’s nice Alabama is number one in something other than football.”

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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Inconvenient enforcement

MOBILE POLICE RETURN TO ‘SAFETY CHECKPOINTS’ BY JASON JOHNSON

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o combat an uptick in violent crime in Mobile, police have returned to an old tactic of setting up roadblocks in areas known for criminal activity. These so-called “safety checkpoints,” however, aren’t new and often aren’t very popular. Last October, when 13 homicides were reported in a single month, the Mobile Police Department announced “safety checkpoints” — commonly called roadblocks — would be used as part of a heightened enforcement initiative dubbed Operation City H.E.A.T. Popular under the administration of former Mayor Sam Jones and former Police Chief Michael Williams, routine roadblocks conducted by MPD had largely gone by the wayside under Mayor Sandy Stimpson and then-Chief James Barber. When the announcement about safety checkpoints was made last fall, some quickly expressed concern that they were indistinguishable from Williams’ roadblocks, which were criticized in the past for disproportionately impacting African-American and low-income communities. However, Barber and now his successor, Chief Lawrence Battiste, have both utilized safety checkpoints, though only in locations they deem “high-crime areas.” Recently, Battiste said he views safety checkpoints as a deterrent to criminal activity and a reassurance to the public — one that lets criminals and law-abiding citizens alike know the MPD is out in force. “They know that there will be an increased level of law enforcement presence out there by way of conducting safety checkpoints,” Battiste said. “Even if nobody gets shot, just hearing gunfire is cause for people to become apprehensive and to feel unsafe. So again, with the increased presence, we hope we can drive down crime, but we also want to give individuals in these areas where we’ve seen those upticks

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some peace of mind.” According to Battiste, MPD evaluates crime reports and trends before setting up a safety checkpoint in a particular area. For instance, he said, prior to an operation near Baltimore Street, police had received reports of three individuals being shot in a single weekend. On the evening of May 24, MPD checkpoints were set up at Michigan Avenue at Duval Street and Azalea Road at Michael Boulevard. Those resulted in 10 arrests on two felony and 24 misdemeanor charges. In all, nine of those detained were black and one was white. The arrests were for such infractions as drug possession and domestic violence, as well as for existing warrants on things like seat belt and driver’s license violations. In addition to the arrests, police wrote 33 tickets and towed four vehicles on Michigan Avenue, and issued 63 tickets and towed eight vehicles at the Azalea Road location. A full list of charges, tickets and arrests reported from those checkpoints is available at lagniappemobile.com. Battiste has previously said he wants to continue his predecessor’s approach to communities impacted by violence and the illegal drug trade in Mobile by targeting those who are committing crime and not the community itself. When asked how a mandatory roadblock fits into that approach, Battiste said while the checkpoints might be an inconvenience for residents in those neighborhoods, so is crime. “Unfortunately, when we go into a neighborhood, some of those people who are not involved in any criminal activity are inconvenienced by our presence, but they’re also inconvenienced by the presence of people committing illegal activity,” he said. “I would like to think that us being there is less of an inconvenience when you compare the two.” Battiste said for motorists who have the proper documen-

tation and paperwork, going through a safety checkpoint is “a minor inconvenience.” For those who receive tickets, Battiste said Mobile’s municipal court has flexible options. “If there’s a vehicle equipment violation, they can take care of the equipment violation by going to one of the [MPD] precincts and having somebody inspect it once it’s repaired and pay a minimal fee as opposed to having to go to court,” he said. While the current use of roadblocks hasn’t seen any substantial backlash from the public, the use of similar techniques has caused problems before in Mobile and other parts of the South. In 2015, checkpoints in the Village Green community, which is also near Azalea Road, raised concerns about the racial demographics in the areas MPD was targeting. Similar complaints about roadblocks in Montgomery were made by a group of black citizens there in 2016. This year, the American Civil Liberties Union is representing several plaintiffs in Mississippi who have sued the Madison County Sheriff’s Department over claims that it used “unconstitutional checkpoints” and other tactics that unfairly targeted black residents. Sam Brooke, deputy legal director at the Southern Poverty Law Center in Montgomery, said the law is clear that roadblocks are constitutional. However, he said that’s only true in a limited number of circumstances, most of which are centered around keeping the public safe. “The courts have described these as an administrative search, but to be viewed as an administrative search it has to have a purpose that’s not about stopping crime,” Brooke said. “The most widely recognized exceptions are usually related to some other public safety purpose.” Brooke said checkpoints set up check for intoxicated drivers or to make sure drivers have a license aren’t considered a violation of the Fourth Amendment to the Constitution, which protects suspicionless search and seizure, because their intent isn’t to “ferret out criminal activity” as much as to make the public safer. “It’s a subtle distinction but the reason that matters is because, normally, we’d insist that you can’t do a search unless you have some reason to suspect that a person did something wrong,” he added. “As a general rule, that’s what we would call a suspicionless search.” Brooke said he couldn’t speak directly to MPD’s practices, though in general, he said, targeting an area with a checkpoint just because there’s been criminal activity there isn’t something “generally recognized by the courts as an acceptable use.” When asked about the practice of roadblocks, MPD attorney Wanda Rahman said, “the operations are legally sound and carried out with great thought and precision. “Driving in the state of Alabama is a privilege, not a right,’ she added. “As the city’s law enforcement agency, MPD is charged with making sure all motorists are abiding by the laws.”


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BAYBRIEF | BALDWIN COUNTY

‘20/20’ division SPANISH FORT RAPE CASE GARNERS NATIONAL ATTENTION

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BY LEE HEDGEPETH body. It’s like my head was telling me something’s not right,” she said. “Like I could feel myself kind of fading out from [not] having control of myself.” Witnesses, including Jessica, say Savannah was carried up the stairs to a bedroom so she could sleep. But minutes later when Jessica came back to check on Savannah, the door was locked. Jessica and another person were able to open the door, and what they saw surprised them: Cameron Harrison and Savannah, completely naked. “I was like, ‘Oh my gosh. What just happened?’ Savannah, like half her body’s on the bed with, like, her arms back and then, like, half her body’s, like, draped off the bed,” Jessica said. “I started yelling at Cameron. I was, like, ‘What are you doing? Like, she’s obviously not OK right now. Like, what are you — like, why would you do that?” she said. “He was, like, ‘She wanted me to.’” Later, Savannah would tell friends — and even Harrison himself — that she felt “taken advantage of,” but not raped. “I was thinking like brutal, like holding, tied down, like gun to your head, tight, just very violent. That’s what I thought [rape] was,” Savannah said. A woman at the center of a Spanish Fort High School rape case told Savannah and others were arguing about this — with her story to ABC’s “20/20” program last week. her friends encouraging her to report what they saw as rape — when they were overheard by a teacher, who sent A private investigator hired by the Harrison family denies the veracity of Savannah to the guidance counselor. that story. After being explained the crime’s definition, Savannah As the “20/20” investigation points out, however, there may never be a true was certain: She had been raped by Cameron Harrison. ending to the case. Although former Baldwin County District Attorney Hallie The allegation quickly rocked Spanish Fort. Daphne Dixon had committed to prosecuting the case to the fullest extent of the law, police, in whose jurisdiction the house party took place, Robert Wilters, who now fills the position, made no such promise. arrested Harrison for first-degree rape, and the city’s high In April, Harrison was granted youthful offender status, which automatically school became a battleground: Team Savannah versus seals a case — and its conclusions — from public view. While it’s unclear what Team Cameron. punishment was finally doled out, Harrison received no jail time, and according Harrison, egged on by friends who told him he needed to his Facebook page, he has signed to play football with the Gulf Coast Prep to get his story “out there,” allegedly went to Savannah’s Sports Academy as part of a post-high school graduation non-degree program. home to tell her parents the encounter was consensual — As for Savannah, who has since moved out of Spanish Fort, she told and short. “20/20” she now blogs about her experiences, something she hopes will help “[He said] he only did our daughter for five minutes … herself and others. only five minutes,” Savannah’s father said on the “20/20” “It helps,” she said. “I feel strong that I can put that out there. I wanted to special. While he said his gut reaction was violence, he have a voice. I wanted people to see that I’m just a normal teenage girl who’s, was able to control himself. “I told him to get the f--- off you know, living just a teenage life.” my property,” Savannah’s father said.

Hope floats BOAT PROTEST AIMS AT SHORTENED RED SNAPPER SEASON

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BY LEE HEDGEPETH

lthough turnout wasn’t quite what organizers had hoped for, participants in a floating protest on Perdido Pass got their point across — the federal red snapper season is too short, and many fishermen here on the Gulf Coast aren’t too happy about it. “I think we had a decent turnout,” Justin Fadalla with Saltwater Finaddicts, one of the organizers of the protest, told the press. “It wasn’t what we expected. We expected a few more boats … But we’re all fishermen. That’s what this is all about, to protect our fishing rights. That’s what we really needed.” A couple dozen boats, not the 200 predicted, descended on Perdido Pass last weekend for a floating protest aimed at the shortened federal red snapper season, which this year was only three days, June 1-3. Every year, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s sustainable fisheries division uses reported fishing numbers, mathematical modeling and other data to calculate the length of the private fishing season, which is different from the commercial season. This year’s three-day season didn’t impress Gulf Coast fishermen or state and local officials, many of whom say

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the federal regulations are overbearing and unnecessary. “The next thing, they are going to tell us how to hold the pole, the rod and reel,” said Roy Moore, former Alabama Supreme Court Chief Justice and current U.S. Senate candidate, of the shortened season. “When they do that, they can do anything.” State Sen. Trip Pittman, also running for the U.S. Senate, said federal regulators are miscalculating the number of fish and thereby unnecessarily limiting the season. “We have a good fishery in the northern Gulf,” Pittman said. “We’re just not getting credit for the number of fish we have.” That sentiment was echoed by Gov. Kay Ivey in a letter she sent to the Trump administration asking that the season be lengthened, something the president could do with an executive order. “Red snapper fishing is vital to Alabamians as it is a major source of recreational enjoyment and provides great economic impact,” Ivey said in a statement on the issue. “Overreaching federal bureaucrats have unjustly made the 2017 red snapper season shorter than any season in history — that decision is simply unacceptable for Alabama.

“I have asked President Trump to extend the season to include every Friday, Saturday and Sunday in June along with July 3 and July 4,” Ivey said. “The federal government’s estimates of the number of red snapper being caught and living in the wild are simply not accurate. I hope the president will do the right thing and take swift action on my request and right this wrong.” Ivey’s request says “the population of this valuable species is thriving” and “the federal management has not kept up with the rapid rebuilding success of this stock.” NOAA officials, though, say that that successful rebuilding of the red snapper stock is one of the very reasons for the shortened seasons: as the stock improves, fishermen catch more and more snapper in a day, lessening the need for a long season. Another factor they say necessitates a short season? Inconsistent state regulations, which is something protesters at Perdido Pass seemed to misunderstand. “They allow Texas to fish 365 days a year, four snapper per person,” Tom Steber with Zeke’s Marina told media after the protest. “Alabama can’t do nothing.” Texas’ federal red snapper season is the same as Alabama’s — three days — but Steber alludes to Texas’ 365-day state season. While Alabama’s state red snapper season is 66 days this year, still shorter than Texas’, that’s not what many see as the problem. During a state’s individual red snapper season, fishing can only be done in local waters. It’s the federal season when fishermen are able to go past “local” waters — more than nine miles offshore — to fish where they say the red snapper bite the best. All in all, while he says the floating protest may not have been the huge success he’d hoped for, Fadalla said the protesters achieved their goal. “Gathering in Perdido Pass is not going to change anything,” he said. “But I hope it gets the word out there that we’re mad.”

Photo | ABC

n a newly aired ABC “20/20” special, the survivor of an alleged rape by former Spanish Fort High School football player Cameron Harrison speaks out about the night in October 2015 that would eventually become the talk of the town. The girl, called “Savannah” by “20/20,” talks openly on camera about what she says happened to her and the effect it’s had on her life. Back in the fall of 2015, Spanish Fort High seniors had been celebrating the birthday of a classmate at a house party in Daphne when the crime allegedly occurred. According to those at the party, upward of 40 or 50 teens were in the house, most of them drinking alcohol, with only the occasional supervision of Cathy Roberts, a grandmother of one of the students, who eventually pleaded guilty to hosting an open house party. Savannah, who said she didn’t know Harrison well, said she drank multiple beers and did double shots with friends. She said the last thing she remembers clearly was singing “Happy Birthday” as a group. “There’s already a good amount of people there,” she said of the party. “They’re all drinking. In an hour I consume a crazy amount of alcohol. “The last thing that I remember is standing in the kitchen with everybody singing ‘Happy Birthday,’” Savannah said. “It’s like I wasn’t even in my body. It’s like my head was telling me like something’s not right, but I feel myself kind of fading out, like you know, from having control of myself.” Another student, called “Jessica” in her interview, picks up the story from there. “All of a sudden I see someone carrying her up the stairs,” Jessica said. “It was probably four people that were carrying her up the stairs, like she was a doll, basically, like they just, like, each had like a limb. And I was like, ‘What the heck, when did this happen?’” A video was eventually released of this moment, and Savannah can clearly be seen being carried by multiple people toward a staircase, seemingly helpless to move. “It’s like I could hear things going on but it’s like my eyes are shut, but I could just hear everything. I just didn’t feel with it,” Savannah said. “It’s like I wasn’t even in my


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BAYBRIEF | EXECUTION

Death under fire MOST RECENTLY DELAYED EXECUTION RAISES QUESTIONS ABOUT LETHAL INJECTION

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BY LEE HEDGEPETH

ntil last week, Alabama had already scheduled its second execution in less than a month, but a stay by the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals has delayed that move and instead brought to the surface many old — and some new — questions about the state’s method of lethal injection. The execution of Robert Melson, 46, had been scheduled for Thursday, June 8, but the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals — second only to the U.S. Supreme Court — put the pause button on the process until it rules on the merits of Melson’s claims. Melson’s legal team has challenged the execution on several grounds, primarily arguing that the state’s use of midazolam, a sedative, is not enough to render Melson unconscious for the remaining two injections that stop respiration and circulation. Melson’s attorneys say previous state executions, such as that of Ronald Bert Smith in December, prove the point. “Mr. Smith’s execution, during which Mr. Smith was not anesthetized, but responded to two consciousness tests and coughed and wheezed for 13 minutes during the execution, illustrates the unreliability of midazolam as the first drug in a three-drug execution protocol,” Melson’s defense team wrote in a brief. Indeed, according to media witnesses, Smith’s execution was unusual, with the inmate moving, even clenching one hand into a fist, after the sedative had been administered and a consciousness test conducted. However, Jeff Dunn, commissioner of the Alabama Department of Corrections, contradicted that observation, saying “from where I was seated I didn’t see any reaction to the consciousness assessment.”

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That disparity between media witnesses and state officials is present in other cases involving midazolam as well. In 2014, the state of Arizona used the drug as part of an execution that took over two hours. One media witness said the inmate gasped for air 640 times before Photo/ADOC | Robert Melson dying. The execution was “very disturbing to watch,” the Fox reporter said, “like a fish on shore gulping for air. At a certain point, you wondered whether he was ever going to die.” A state official present for that execution, though, had an entirely different interpretation of the same event. “He went to sleep and appeared to be snoring,” the representative of the state’s attorney general said. “This was my first execution, and I was surprised at how peaceful it was.” According to the Food and Drug Administration, midazolam is a sedative used in minor procedures such as colonoscopies, and experts say the drug may not be effective in high-stress situations. The state of Alabama hasn’t always used midazolam.

Alabama used sodium thiopental until 2011, when its manufacturer stopped production in the U.S. over its use in lethal injections. After that, the state switched to another barbiturate, pentobarbital, but eventually ran out. In September 2014, the state for the first time acknowledged it would use the newest sedative — midazolam — as the first drug in its three-drug protocol. Given its shelf life, if it has not been able to acquire more of the drug, Alabama may run out of midazolam this September. The Alabama Attorney General’s office has filed a brief with the U.S. Supreme Court asking it to lift the 11th Circuit’s stay and allow the execution to move forward. “No one disputes that Alabama will execute Melson using the same lethal

UNTIL LAST WEEK, ALABAMA HAD ALREADY SCHEDULED ITS SECOND EXECUTION IN LESS THAN A MONTH, BUT A STAY BY THE 11TH CIRCUIT COURT OF APPEALS HAS DELAYED THAT MOVE AND INSTEAD BROUGHT TO THE SURFACE MANY OLD — AND SOME NEW — QUESTIONS ABOUT THE STATE’S METHOD OF LETHAL INJECTION. ” injection protocol which this court approved [in 2015],” the Attorney General’s brief says. “The 11th Circuit’s stay was improper and fundamentally misapplied this Court’s long-standing stay principles by completely failing to address, much less find, a ‘likelihood of success on the merits’ of Melson’s method-ofexecution challenge.” In that 2015 case, the Supreme Court approved the use of midazolam in Oklahoma’s three-drug lethal injection protocol, but multiple justices dissented, saying they would have halted the execution for further investigation into midazolam’s effectiveness. Alabama currently has 183 inmates, including Melson, on death row.


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COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

Wonder if Sessions would like a do-over? ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

what happens when Trump doesn’t like the way you’re handling Russia. Gulag time. All of this leaves one to wonder if, a year after Trump swept him off his feet and took him on a whirlwind ride to the political promised land, Sessions isn’t thinking he may have misjudged who or what he was dealing with. “Did I really give up my sweetheart Senate gig for THIS?!!!” had to be going through his mind Monday. Let’s face it, Sessions — in our state’s more rustic parlance — was dug in like a tick. He could’ve held that Senate seat until they carried him out feet first in another 15 or 20 years. He could’ve just continued doing whatever it is senators do that makes them multi-millionaires on $174,000 a year. Now — if we can bring ourselves to turn off Fox News and believe the dreaded New York Times — Sessions’ star may have already waned in the frenetic Trump White House. There’s still a long way to go in this first term if the rather mercurial president is looking at you like a “loser” contestant on “The Apprentice.” How can Sessions not worry Trump might currently be reconsidering his decision to pass over both Meatloaf and Gary Busey for the AG’s position? It’s also hard not to wonder whether, in the wee hours of the morning as he stares at the ceiling contemplating what he’s done to himself, Sessions also feels any remorse for the hell he unleashed upon his home state by leaving his seat’s appointment to be handled by the totally out of control Robert Bentley.

Certainly one of the more bizarre unintended consequences of last year’s presidential election is that we have 19 people running to fill Jeff Sessions’ seat and, right now at least, the leading candidates are a twice-defrocked judge and a political opportunist of biblical proportions. It would be hard to get even money these days that anyone in the Trump administration — including Trump himself — will still be there in three months. Of course, some of that may simply be distorted wishful thinking filtering down from pundits and journalists who’ve lost their way because they have Trump rabies. But then again, there’s enough hard, unspun evidence to suggest keeping or losing the president’s goodwill can boil down to telling him you like his haircut or not being “loyal” when it comes to the Russia investigation.   It is hard to imagine anyone currently working in the administration thinking about what they’ll be doing for this president in seven or eight years. More than a few probably make themselves feel better at night by whispering “President Pence” to themselves before sleep. That may be the only path to longevity for Sessions and many others who changed their political trajectories to “Make America Great Again.” So, 10 months later, do you that think if Sessions could climb into the fabled DeLorean, hit 88 mph and go back to Ladd-Peebles last August that 2017 Jeff would tell 2016 Jeff to toss that big hat in the wastebasket and just go back home?

THEGADFLY Cartoon/Laura Rasmussen

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atching Jeff Sessions walk out on that stage at Ladd-Peebles Stadium last August sporting an oversized “Make America Great Again” ball cap to offer his endorsement of Donald Trump for president is still one of the more memorable moments in the most bizarre presidential season ever. Even then political observers felt strongly that if The Donald won, Mobile’s homeboy would likely end up as U.S. Attorney General — a very big IF at the time. But Sessions put his money on the right horse and after an improbable election win and a bruising confirmation hearing — during which just about every liberal commentator in America spoke matter-of-factly of Sessions’ racism as if he had been a cross-burning member of the Ku Klux Klan — our junior senator won the job he apparently coveted enough to put his political life in Donald Trump’s hands. It was a pretty big comeback of sorts for a man who was rejected for a federal judgeship based upon those same sketchy racial charges we heard about during his confirmation. It had to be hard for Sessions to stick his neck back out there knowing this rehash of the leftwing doctrine that Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III fought under Lee at Gettysburg, was a boyhood friend of James Earl Ray and bought Bull Conner his first German shepherd was coming. But he must have thought it would be worth going through all that to run Trump’s Justice Department — back to law-enforcing instead of law-making. But a short four months later the papers are full of stories saying Trump is no longer happy with his AG. The Twitter account serving as the most accurate barometer of which personality has control of the president’s brain that day also indicates the “bromance” may be over. On Monday Trump lashed out via tweet his obvious displeasure over his Justice Department’s attempts to get judicial approval for his latest travel ban aimed at areas of the world known to produce radical Muslims itching to create terroristic mayhem and death. Trump’s attempts to push through the ban have been stymied by the courts and the DoJ is tasked with trying to win for the president in front of the Supreme Court. “The Justice Dept. should have stayed with the original Travel Ban, not the watered down, politically correct version they submitted to S.C.,” one tweet read. He added, “The Justice Dept. should ask for an expedited hearing of the watered down Travel Ban before the Supreme Court — & seek much tougher version!” It couldn’t have been fun for Sessions to see Trump dissing the DoJ so openly. It’s kind of the equivalent of your boss reading your latest subpar quarterly evaluation out over the company intercom. Hopefully by now Sessions is aware the president has a better handle on the definition of “covfefe” than “discreet.” The evil New York Times added to the mix Monday with a story about the maelstrom and quoted leakers from inside the White House who said Trump is none too happy with Sessions not only for the way DoJ is handling the travel ban, but also because the AG recused himself from the ever-widening investigation into Russian election tampering. According to these leaky people talking to the Times reporters, Trump is especially miffed about the recusal because he believes it led directly to the appointment of a special counsel to handle the investigation. Sessions has to have noticed, a la James Comey,

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COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

With adulthood comes weenie-fication ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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did some really crazy things in my teens and 20s. Some would call these acts fearless; others (particularly my mother), stupid and/ or insane. Where I grew up in the lovely small town of Jackson (“Alabama, not Mississippi,” a phrase uttered a million times by every native Jacksonian) we had two really hilly streets, both affectionately known as “Thrill Hill.” There was more than one occasion I rode down those exhilarating hills at top speed in the bed of a pick-up truck. Weeeee! I camped out with friends in what I am sure was a snake/spider/bear/Bigfoot-infested pitchblack river swamp. I explored creeks that I’m sure were filled with brain-hungry amoebas and flesh-eating bacteria. I visited a church in the middle of nowhere that was most definitely haunted. I climbed down the ladder on the side of the Tombigbee River Bridge with my friends to sit on the catwalk. If any of us had fallen, we would have plunged to our deaths. I was wearing flats. After I moved to Mobile for college, on a latenight jaunt over to the Panhandle I once jumped off the Destin Bridge (the lower part) into the dark emerald waters below. What character in “Forrest Gump” was it that said, “Stupid is as stupid does”? It definitely was not Jenn-NAY. I think it was Mama. My own Mama would have said, “Are you an absolute complete and total idiot?” Yes ma’am. Yes ma’am, I am. Admittedly I was not fearless, I was just more fearful of getting left out of doing whatever it was my friends were doing, even if said activity was incredibly dangerous, slightly illegal and/or “idiotic.” Which probably puts me in the category of the weak minded rather than courageous, but hey, at least I have a few things to brag about from my somewhat misspent youth. And I need these things to cling onto now, because I have somehow become a giant weenie. Not some cocktail or bun-length type of wiener, mind you. I’m talking full-on, foot-long fraidy cat. I am not sure when it happened but it did. And it’s not just that I’m old and wise enough to stay away from bridges and Bigfoots (Bigfeet?) at night. Nope, I am pretty much scared of everything. What happened to me? Whaaaaaaaa! I hate escalators and roller coasters. I am terrified of driving on the interstate. Mainly because of all those killer 18-wheelers. There is a reason there are ambulance chasers who specialize in “big truck” accidents, people! And also there are super-morons who let big chunky metal things fly off the back of their regularly-sized trucks. I swear I almost ran over a window unit one day on I-10. Talk about almost wetting your pants! But it doesn’t stop there. I didn’t get married until I was 30. I spent a lot of nights all alone sleeping soundly in my one-bedroom apartment. I was never scared. Now, when my husband is gone, I make the kids get in bed with me and I stay awake most of the night listening to all of the axe murderers trying

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to get into my house. Usually said axe-wielding psychopaths turn out to be the air-conditioner cutting on and off, but it’s hard to distinguish between the two at 2 a.m. My husband wants to take a family ski trip soon and all I can picture is plunging to my death after falling off the ski lift. I would prefer to go to some remote island in the Caribbean, but we’d probably just get abducted. Earlier this week, we watched a bit of the Stanley Cup final. One guy got hit in the head with a stick and another guy looked like he was going 90 mph toward the goalie. I am not much of a hockey fan, which is probably a good thing, because it was painful just to watch. There’s cold ice, and sticks and sharp shoes, and blood and missing teeth! Could there be a more violent sport? I kept thinking if I suddenly I ended up in one of the player’s bodies, a la Scott Bakulastyle in “Quantum Leap,” I would be reduced to nothing but a bloody pool on the ice in seconds. Oh boy! I have lots of these hypothetical “Quantum Leap” tragedy moments. Waking up on top of a skateboard about to go down a halfpipe is one I have repeatedly. Hello, body cast! Another involves the circus, a trapeze bar and an unfortunately placed external vein, but I’ll spare you the details of that one. Just get me out of here, Ziggy! I think the genesis of having all of these irrational fears/visions (which are sometimes filtered through the lens of an ‘80s TV show) came with having children. I don’t know what it is, but after you have kids you are so terrified of losing them you can envision almost every possible scenario that could take them away from you in almost any environment. I think it is some innate, maternal evolutionary trait. Cavewomen were probably sizing up all of the lions, tigers and bears after their young, among other things. I know this new fire thing is great, but you can’t play with it, young (cave)man! Don’t run with our cave-marking stick! If you fall on it, it could puncture your eye out or kill you! You don’t always say these things out loud (because you know how highly unlikely they are) but you often think them. Don’t swing on that tree swing. I don’t like the looks of that limb. It could kill you if it breaks. Don’t knock on that glass door too hard. That glass could kill you if it breaks. No you are not riding on that thing, it could kill you if it breaks. Do not climb up on top of that thing, it could kill you if you fall. Do not get up under that thing, it could kill you if it falls. You better hold on tight to that thing … You get the idea. DEAD! Perhaps after having these fears for your children for so long, you finally start projecting them onto everyone else too, including yourself. Or maybe I did pick up of those brain-eating amoebas, and I have just been slowly losing my mind. Literally. Oh boy! Or maybe I’ve just been a giant weenie all along.


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COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

College campuses unfriendly to conservatives BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM

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t has become blatantly apparent college campuses are openly hostile to conservative points of view. Most notably, conservative firebrands Milo Yiannopoulos and Ann Coulter have been forced to cancel scheduled appearances at the University of CaliforniaBerkley due to threats to public safety. Critics of these cancellations have said this goes against the idea of the university as a place where free speech can flourish, and that speech one doesn’t like should be countered with more speech. But the question is, when was the last time that was true? When was the university really a place where all viewpoints, especially conservative, were not just tolerated but encouraged? The ideological right has two forces working against it. First, it’s no secret institutions of higher education are playgrounds for the modern left. Your

allowing conservative individuals the right to free speech. However, taking such a radical action wouldn’t alleviate the fundamental problem of conservatives being shut out at universities and colleges. Even in bright-red, conservative Alabama, academia still functions from the liberal perspective. As a young, budding right-wing journalist hopeful running the college newspaper at the University of South Alabama, the biggest pushback for my not-fully-evolved opinions came from the faculty. I once had a professor refer to me to her class as a “neo-con asshole.” That’s hardly an environment that fosters the free exchange of ideas. It’s going to be the norm in higher academia for the foreseeable future, most likely. Certainly there are pockets here and there. You’ll have a conservative professor here or there that slipped through the cracks somehow. Those are few and far between. At some point, perhaps it will take Americans realizing these taxpayer-funded institutions have been completely hijacked by a far left-wing ideology. They’ll realize that the government student loan program allows for schools to build these elaborate campuses and pay salaries to faculty and staff that are above the national average. All of this is on the backs of students left behind with thousands of dollars of debt for a degree that in many cases is worthless. Until this is realized and the public shows it is willing to act, you will have this largely left-of-center apparatus continuing to function as it does. Even at that stage, conservatives will not likely be able to conquer academia. Often you hear some commentators long for the day when conservatives and liberals were equally pitted against one another, but is there evidence this era ever existed? Conservatives have their turf — talk radio, Fox News, Christian evangelicals. Liberals have their turf — mainstream media, Hollywood and, of course, academia. It doesn’t seem likely their staked-out portions of society are ever going to change politically. Liberal talk radio has been tried and has failed. Democrats always underperform among Christian voters. Likewise, conservatives always struggle to get their message out through pop culture. And the same will go for academia. Academia, however, seems to be a very prized element of the left. Everyone has to have a college education, right? If I were an academic, I wouldn’t get too comfortable. A lot of things go in cycles. There’s no question there’s a higher-education bubble, as the price of tuition has far outpaced anything else in modern economics. Is it sustainable for college and universities to maintain this borderline Marxist element and continuously raise the price for a four-year liberal arts degree? Only time will tell.

ACADEMIA, HOWEVER, SEEMS TO BE A VERY PRIZED ELEMENT OF THE LEFT. EVERYONE HAS TO HAVE A COLLEGE EDUCATION, RIGHT? typical college professor is left of center and tends to view the world as a place that just needs the proper plan in place. They postulate these ideas in the classroom. They devise ways to apply classic literature like Plato’s “The Republic” to societal problems. Basically, it’s the idea that the power of the people is greater than the power of the individual and it just takes the proper plan to harness and unleash that power. The problem with that is it undermines the individual. The other force working against the conservative or the Republican point of view is the way colleges and universities are funded. Schools, both private and public, receive massive amounts of money from the government. Conservative philosophy would dictate the less growth of public spending and less burden on the taxpayer, the better. The Democratic politician sees it very differently. The more spending on higher education, the more benefit it will have economically. Therefore, colleges tend to prefer Democratic politicians to Republicans. Those reasons aren’t the direct cause of rioting at Berkeley over conservative speakers. But it does nurture an environment that could lead to hostilities aimed at conservatives. What can be done? One idea that has been floated is having the National Guard accompany conservative speakers to these campuses. Just as John F. Kennedy federalized the National Guard in 1963 leading to George Wallace’s stand at the schoolhouse door at the University of Alabama, Donald Trump could do the same thing. Just as Kennedy was acting to protect the civil rights of Vivian Malone and James A. Hood, Trump would be acting to protect the civil rights guaranteed by the First Amendment

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BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

Manci’s Antique Club opening new concept in Daphne BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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ccording to Harry Johnson of Baldwin Rental Properties, some 1,500 square feet of restaurant space will open in the same building as Manci’s Antique Club at 1715 Main St. in Daphne to accommodate Buster’s, a new bar. The concept is the brainchild of Manci’s owners and will include a wine bar and small menu featuring wood-fired pizza, among other offerings. A group of local investors sold the office/warehouse building at 1944 S. Broad St. to Ram Tool for $400,000. The building has approximately 25,000 square feet of space. Allan Cameron of NAI Mobile represented the buyers. Tommy Praytor of Praytor Realty worked for the sellers.  Per Ballard Sweat with RE/MAX Paradise in Orange Beach, a 100-square-foot site fronting the gulf and located at 1933 W. Beach Blvd. in Gulf Shores was acquired by a local area investor for nearly $1 million. The property is zoned for single-family residential use. Ballard Sweat worked for the seller; Stephen Harrison of REMAX Gulf Shores represented the buyer. Nature Conservancy purchased 10 acres of gulf beach frontage property off Bienville Boulevard on Dauphin Island for $2.6 million. Roughly 1,000 square feet of the acquisition sits directly on the Gulf of Mexico, according to Allan Cameron of NAI Mobile, who brokered the transaction.  Some 1,500 square feet of space was recently leased by Snohomish, Washington-based dinner assembly franchise Dream Diners inside the Shore Oaks Center at 1511 U.S. Highway 98 in Daphne. Colby Herrington with Herrington Realty managed the transaction.

‘Safety Director of the Year’

Associated Builders & Contractors (ABC) of Alabama,

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along with industry partners Associated General Contractors (AGC) of Alabama and SubAla, recently announced statewide safety award winners at a ceremony in Montgomery. “Safe Day is ABC’s, AGC’s and SubAla’s summit day for celebrating and recognizing the importance of safety in our industry,” ABC Alabama president Jay Reed said. “Participation has grown in recent years, reflecting our members’ acknowledgement that facilitating safety procedures and practices is the most important thing we do as responsible construction companies.” The event is touted as a recognition and networking event that helps construction companies, engineering firms and related businesses share accomplishments. Industry best practices are highlighted and adherence to occupational health and safety standards is emphasized as a common theme to be followed by all industry professionals. In a highlight, safety manager Ross Moyer with WhiteSpunner Construction (WSC) was selected as the 2017 Safety Director of the Year. An Oklahoma native, Moyer is a 2012 graduate of Northeastern University with a bachelor’s degree in safety management. In 2014, his first year at WSC, he was selected as the Mobile-Area Safety Leader of the Year. At 27, Moyer is reportedly one of the youngest professionals selected for the prestigious, multi-association-sponsored accolade. Other local companies earning safety awards at the ceremony included: Volkert Engineering, Gold Award and Innovation in Safety Awards; Thompson Engineering, Gold Award; and White-Spunner Construction, 2017 STEP Diamond Award. “For ABC, AGC, SubAla and its members, Safe Day represents the true heart and character of who we are. Our

industry can be challenging and is also very competitive. There are many issues we are faced with every day on our jobsites that require our focus and attention. Safety is the one common denominator that is unanimous among us all as a top priority,” Reed said. For a complete list of 2017 winners, visit ABC Alabama’s website.

Law firm wins decision in landmark court case

After nearly four years of litigation, the Supreme Court of Alabama issued a recent decision unanimously affirming a lower court ruling that upheld a defense award for 11 corporate and individual defendants represented by Phelps Dunbar Alabama litigation lawyers Bo Williams, Will Gamble and Bradley Sanders. The lawsuit began in 2013, when Mobile-based Clear Image Construction Inc. filed suit against 11 individuals for alleged usurpation of corporate opportunity, minority shareholder oppression, breach of corporate duty and interference with contract in connection with an out-of-state oil industry support business. The law firm moved the dispute to the Circuit Court of Mobile County for arbitration.   “Given the number of parties, claims and defenses involved in this case, we believed that the most advantageous forum was arbitration, in front of a threeperson panel of experienced lawyers with extensive backgrounds in complex, commercial litigation,” Phelps Dunbar attorney Bo Williams said. During the proceeding, Clear Image Construction made landmark legal claims exceeding $100 million, including punitive damages. This amount was later reduced to a range of $9 million to $18 million following the arbitration hearing. Following a post-hearing briefing, a panel of three arbitrators from Atlanta entered a unanimous defense award for Phelps Dunbar’s clients along with an attorneys’ fee award for one of the firm’s clients against the plaintiff. The law firm also successfully defended the plaintiff’s subsequent appeal to the trial court and then to the Alabama Supreme Court.   Phelps Dunbar is a regional law firm of more than 260 attorneys with offices in Mobile; New Orleans and Baton Rouge; Jackson, Tupelo and Gulfport; Houston and Dallas/Fort Worth; Tampa; Raleigh, North Carolina; and London, U.K.

2017 Dragon Boat Festival update

Local nonprofit Fuse Project reports 53 teams have registered so far to participate in the annual Dragon Boat Festival scheduled for Saturday, June 10, at the USS Alabama Battleship Memorial Park. Just a dozen spots remain.   “Without a doubt, last year’s move to the Battleship allowed us to increase participation in our festival,” Adrienne Golden, Fuse Project’s executive director, said. “We only have 12 spots remaining, so if you are planning to participate in our festival, please go online and register to reserve your team.”   Read more about the Dragon Boat Festival in this week’s sports column by J. Mark Bryant.


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CUISINE | THE DISH

First Father’s Day remembering dear old Dad BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

S

o here it is. This is my first year celebrating Father’s Day as top dog. After losing my dad last October, I became the eldest male in my immediate family, a position I neither applied for nor looked forward to but am doing my best to handle with grace. You can quote me when I say, “It is all bitter and no sweet.” Let’s not cry in our beer, here. He’d hate to ruin a good Busch (or Bushmills) with a weeping session. Instead, I have found these weeks leading up to this milestone a time to look back on our family history of the fathers and how they cooked. From toddler size, I remember the men in the family cooking. My grandfather Arnold Dean “Mac” MacDonald took the task seriously. Usually he was grilling. Sunday afternoons postchurch we’d meet for lunch or dinner with him and my grandmother Mammaw Mac. I can still smell the chicken coming off that grill coated in barbecue sauce. Hot dogs were always done until they charred on one side, a practice I still prefer today. Hobo bags were my favorite. If you’re unfamiliar, that is a pouch of foil filled with vegetables. It was while making my way through one of these that I remember the moment I decided I loved onions. One story passed about my family was when a very young me blankly stared at the naked mashed potatoes and began to cry. Why would he do such a thing? Mashed potatoes without gravy? Full disclosure: He was a Yankee transplanted from Minnesota. My parents tried to hush my tantrum but Pappaw Mac was already saving face. “Gravy? Oh, I’ll get you some gravy.” The man returned with a ladle of barbecue sauce for my creamy spuds and the waterworks ceased. My lunchtime hero saved the day.

WORD OF MOUTH

Harvest Night comes to Weeks Bay Plantation

Get ready for Fairhope’s Harvest Night at Weeks Bay Plantation on Saturday, June 10, at 4 p.m. It’s a night featuring live music, blueberry picking, a farmer’s market and food trucks. With Gove Scrivenor and Chris Clifton picking the flat tops, you know the music will be a grand affair. Add to that farm-totable treats, local artisans and kids’ activities. Bring your own blanket and a bottle of whatever you’re drinking and enjoy the evening under the stars. Admission is $5 per adult, with kids getting in free. On Harvest Night blueberries are only $8 per pound so make room in the freezer. You’ll find the plantation at 12562

This love of cooking certainly filtered down to my old man, Darryl Dean “Mac” MacDonald. My mother was and is an excellent cook, but in my formative years my father would occasionally show his talents with crabmeat dip, snacks and such. Who could forget late-night hash for my drunken high school friends seeking refuge and sobriety, unable to afford or navigate the trip across town to Waffle House. As I grew up, his cooking became finely honed and there were several dishes bearing his signature. His barbecue shrimp were killer. Before vacationing every summer in Gulf Shores with his wife, Andree, and her very hospitable Louisiana family, he would go to the docks and ask everyone to “show me your big ones.” Whoever won out would sell him pound after pound of extra-large shrimp to make the next week of condo living more tolerable. His version of New Orleans-style barbecue shrimp was nothing like the famous Mr. B’s. Mr. B’s uses straight butter and Worcestershire sauce in a skillet. Big D’s were actually done in the oven, shell on, with olive oil and Worcestershire. We’d line up with bits of crusty bread and peel these monsters until our fingers were raw. The next night he would use the rest of his catch for stuffed shrimp. Individually wrapped in foil, covered with crabmeat stuffing, these single servings were a bigger hit than the barbecue. You were lucky if you got more than one. He’d always give preferential treatment to the band and we’d make out with three or four. Closely akin to the stuffing, he would line muffin tins with the paper cups and make crabmeat muffins. Amazing. Always the dirty old man, I heard he once told a woman, “Now be careful.

Mary Ann Beach Road in Fairhope.

Fairhope Brewing helps APR

This month is a milestone for our friends at Fairhope Brewing Co., as they celebrate one year of being able to sell beer to go. Not only are they serving up some fantastic suds in the taproom and on wheels, the good folks are squeezing in a fundraiser to “Put the Pub in Public Radio.” Sponsored by Hall’s Sausage (you know I love those guys), the event is this Saturday, June 10, 4-7 p.m. Along with live music provided by Mitch Johnston and yours truly, you will have plenty of opportunities to soak up the suds with food from Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill onsite. Tickets cost $25 in advance and $30 the

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You’re gonna get to eating that and if you aren’t careful you’re gonna eat the paper. And if you eat the paper you’re gonna have your fingers in your mouth. And you don’t want your fingers in your mouth because there’s no telling where they’ve been.” That is the kind of artist he was. He was a bit of a showoff, and he could damned sure do it. There is the platitude involving apples and trees, stale as it may be, but I certainly found myself following his footsteps toward the kitchen. We have a similar cooking style but I was never trying to be just like him. Quite the contrary. We cooked side by side enough that we were always trying to outdo each other, yet had a healthy respect for what the other was doing. The last time I spent the night with him I cooked three meals. I could tell he wanted to get up and get his hands dirty next to mine, but he couldn’t. He didn’t have it in him anymore. Instead of the son at the father’s feet begging to help, the old man was now at the feet of his son. So here we are. It’s another first in a long list of things I’ll have to face this year. You can imagine I have a different perspective being thrust into the No. 1 slot, but perhaps it has afforded me a certain responsibility. It isn’t something I will take lightly. Every chance I get I try to carry on the tradition with my two boys and my brother, Big Al. Whether it’s frying turkeys, smoking chickens, baking honey buns or whipping up frittatas, the men in this family cook. It’s in our blood. This Father’s Day, before you invest in a tie or a set of tools, take a step back and ask yourself if your dad is like the ones in my family. Sure, you feel obligated to buy him a gift. But you can’t buy time. Go cook for your dad. I wish I could.

day of the event. This includes an event glass and a T-shirt. Proceeds along with $1 from every pint sold will go to support Alabama Public Radio. Take advantage of this fun opportunity to further listener-supported radio. We guarantee it will be better than a telephone pledge drive!

Red or White still on top

This past Saturday was Red or White’s “Summer Whites and BBQ Reds” event and it was a hit. With so many impressive new wines, I overindulged in my purchasing a bit, but I’m sure it will be worth it when the bottles roll in. The food certainly did not disappoint, though the weather made it more of an indoor affair than originally intended. A

shrimp boil, hot chicken on a stick and succulent ribs were some of the culinary highlights. The brisket was one of the things I wanted to take home. The oddity was something they called a cornbread biscuit, which was a little cakey, but the surprise was banana pudding tiramisu. Keep in mind Chef Arwen makes a mean melon salad. Summer is here so bring on the rosé. You may want to take advantage of Lafage Miraflors, a blend of mourvedre and grenache gris. Fans of the light will appreciate this recommendation. Don’t plan your dinner until you check Red or White’s specials on Facebook and Instagram. If only I could get them to stay open later … Recycle!


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FIREHOUSE SUBS ($)

HOT SUBS, COLD SALADS & CATERING 6300 Grelot Rd. • 631-3730

FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES ($) $10/PERSON • $$ 10-25/PERSON • $$$ OVER 25/PERSON

COMPLETELY COMFORTABLE ALL SPORTS BAR & GRILL ($) 3408 Pleasant Valley Rd. • 345-9338

AL’S HOTDOGS ($)

CLASSIC HOTDOGS, GYROS & MILKSHAKES 4701 Airport Blvd. • 342-3243

ATLANTA BREAD COMPANY ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SALADS & MORE. 3680 Dauphin St. • 380-0444

BAKE MY DAY ($)

OLD-FASHIONED SOUTHERN BAKE SHOP 156 N. McGregor Ave. • 219-7261

BOB’S DINER ($)

GOOD OLD AMERICAN COOKING 263 St. Francis St. • 405-1497

BUCK’S DINER ($)

CLASSIC AMERICAN DINER 58 N. Secion St. Fairhope • 928-8521

CAFE 219 ($)

SALADS, SANDWICHES & POTATO SALAD 219 Conti St. • 438-5234

CAMELLIA CAFÉ ($-$$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FARE 61 Section St. • Fairhope • 928-4321

CAMMIE’S OLD DUTCH ($) MOBILE’S CLASSIC ICE CREAM SPOT 2511 Old Shell Rd. • 471-1710

CARPE DIEM ($)

DELI FOODS, PASTRIES & SPECIALTY DRINKS 4072 Old Shell Rd. • 304-0448

CLARK’S KITCHEN ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHERN CUISINE & CATERING 5817 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0200

CHAT-A-WAY CAFE ($)

QUICHES & SANDWICHES 4366 Old Shell Rd. • 343-9889

CHICK-FIL-A ($)

BURGERS, MILKSHAKES & FRIES 4401 Old Shell Rd. • 447-2394 4663 Airport Blvd. • 300-8425 5319 Hwy 90 • 661-0071 1225 Satchel Page Dr.• 378-8768

FOOSACKLY’S ($)

FAMOUS CHICKEN FINGERS 29181 US Hwy 98 • Daphne • 375-1104 7843 Moffett Rd. • 607-6196 1109 Shelton Beach Rd. • 287-1423 310 S. University Blvd. • 343-0047 2250 Airport Blvd. • 479-2922 7641 Airport Blvd. • 607-7667 2558 Schillinger Rd. • 219-7761 3249 Dauphin St. • 479-2000

FOY SUPERFOODS ($) 119 Dauphin St.• 307-8997

GULF COAST EXPLOREUM CAFE ($) HOMEMADE SOUPS & SANDWICHES 65 Government St. • 208-6815

1880 Industrial Pkwy. • 675-2999

CREAM AND SUGAR ($)

3869 Airport Blvd. • 345-9544 5470 Inn Rd. • 661-9117 28975 US 98 • Daphne • 625-3910

JAMAICAN VIBE ($)

MIND-BLOWING ISLAND FOOD 3700 Gov’t Blvd. Ste A • 602-1973

JERSEY MIKE’S ($)

AUTHENTIC SUB SANDWICHES 7449 Airport Blvd. • 375-1820

JIMMY JOHN’S ($)

SANDWICHES, CATERING & DELIVERY TOO 6920 Airport Blvd. • 414-5444 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-8694 62 B Royal St. • 432-0360

JOE CAIN CAFÉ ($)

PIZZAS, SANDWICHES, COCKTAILS 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

JONELLI’S ($)

1252 Govenment St.• 301-7556 HOME COOKING 4054 Government St. • 665-4557

LICKIN’ GOOD DONUTS ($) 3242 Dauphin St. • 471-2590

LODA BIER GARTEN ($) MAMA’S ($)

SLAP YOUR MAMA GOOD HOME COOKING 220 Dauphin St. • 432-6262

MARS HILL CAFE ($)

GREAT SANDWICHES, COFFEE & MORE 1087 Downtowner Blvd. • 643-1611

MARY’S SOUTHERN COOKING ($) 3011 Springhill Ave. • 476-2232

COFFEE, BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DESSERT 351 George St #B • 405-0003

MICHELI’S CAFE ($)

DAUPHIN ST. CAFE ($)

MCSHARRY’S ($-$$)

HOT LUNCH, DAILY MENU (INSIDE VIA) 1717 Dauphin St. • 470-5231

D’ MICHAEL’S ($)

PHILLY CHEESE STEAKS, GYROS & MORE 7101-A Theodore Dawes Rd. • 653-2979

D NU SPOT ($)

22159 Halls Mill Rd. . • 648-6522

DELISH BAKERY AND EATERY ($) GREAT DESSERTS & HOT LUNCH 23 Upham St. • 473-6115

DEW DROP INN ($)

CLASSIC BURGERS, HOTDOGS & SETTING 1808 Old Shell Rd. • 473-7872

DUNKIN DONUTS ($)

DONUTS, COFFEE & SANDWICHES 1976 Michigan Ave. • 442-4846 3876 Airport Blvd. • 219-7369 505 Schillinger Rd. S. • 442-4845 29160 US Hwy 98 • 621-2228

E WING HOUSE ($)

6358 Cottage Hill Rd. • 725-6917 AUTHENTIC IRISH PUB 101 N. Bancroft St.• 990-5100

MIKO’S ITALIAN ICE ($)

HOTDOGS SANDWICHES & COOL TREATS 3371 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 300–4015

MOMMA GOLDBERG’S DELI ($) SANDWICHES & MOMMA’S LOVE 3696 Airport Blvd. • 344-9500 5602 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6556

MONTEGO’S ($-$$)

FRESH CARIBBEAN-STYLE FOOD & CRAFT BEER 6601 Airport Blvd. • 634-3445 225 Dauphin St. • 375-1576

MOON PIE GENERAL STORE ($)

107 St Francis St #115 • RSA Bank Trust Building

MOSTLY MUFFINS ($) MUFFINS, COFFEE & WRAPS 105 Dauphin St. • 433-9855

NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE ($)

15 N Conception St. • 433-2299

OVEN-BAKED SANDWICHES & MORE 1335 Satchel Page Dr. Suite C. • 287-7356 7440 Airport Blvd. • 633-0096 30500 State Hwy 181 #132 • 625-6544

FATHOMS LOUNGE

O’DALYS HOLE IN THE WALL ($)

195 S University Blvd. Suite H • 662-1829

EUGENE’S MONKEY BAR ($) SMALL PLATES AND CREATIVE COCKTAILS 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

FLOUR GIRLS BAKERY ($) 809 Hillcrest Rd. • 634-2285

PDQ ($)

CHICKEN FINGERS, SALAD & SANDWICHES. 1165 University Blvd. • 202-0959

POLLMAN’S BAKERY ($)

BAKERY, SANDWICHES & MORE 750 S. Broad St. • 438-1511 4464 Old Shell Rd. • 342-8546 107 St. Francis St. Suite 102 • 438-2261

PUNTA CLARA KITCHEN ($)

FUDGE, PRALINES & MORE 17111 Scenic Hwy 98 • Fairhope • 928-8477

R BISTRO ($-$$)

334 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope • 928-2399

562 Dauphin St.• 725-6429

OLD SHELL GROWLERS ($) GROWLER STATION AND BITES 1801 Old Shell Rd. • 345-4767

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WAREHOUSE BAKERY & DONUTS ($)

72. S. Royal St. • 432-SCAM (7226)

WEDGIE’S ($)

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE 271 Glenwood St. • 476-0516

WILD WING STATION ($)

INSIDE THE MOBILE MARRIOTT 3101 Airport Blvd. • 476-6400

COFFEE AND DONUTS 759 Nichols Avenue, Fairhope • 928-7223 GOURMET GRILLED CHEESE 5955 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6134 1500 Gov’t St. • 287-1526

THE WINDMILL MARKET ($)

85 N. Bancroft St. Fairhope • 990.8883

YAK THE KATHMANDU KITCHEN ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC FOODS FROM HIMALAYAN REGION 3210 Dauphin St. • 287-0115 400 Eastern Shore Center • 459-2862

‘CUE

BACKYARD CAFE & BBQ ($) HOME COOKIN’ LIKE MOMMA MADE. 2804 Springhill Ave. • 473-4739

REGINA’S KITCHEN ($-$$)

BAR-B-QUING WITH MY HONEY ($$)

ROLY POLY ($)

BRICK PIT ($)

ROSHELL’S CAFE ($)

COTTON STATE BBQ ($)

HOOTERS ($)

PUB FOOD AND DRAFT BEERS 251 Dauphin St. • 287-6871

CONNECTION FROZEN YOGURT ($)

BAR FOOD 271 Dauphin St • 438-9585

WRAPS & SALADS 3220 Dauphin St. • 479-2480

SEAFOOD & SANDWICHES 212 ½ Fairhope Ave •Fairhope • 928-4100

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK ($)

CHICAGO STYLE EATERY 1222 Hillcrest Rd. • 461-6599

PAT’S DOWNTOWN GRILL ($)

GUMBO SHACK ($-$$)

JUDY’S PLACE ($-$$)

CHI-TOWN DAWGZ ($)

ORIGINAL SANDWICH AND BAKE SHOP 42 ½ Section St. • Fairhope • 929-0122 102 Dauphin St. • 405-0031

SANDWICHES, SUBS & SOUPS 2056 Gov’t St. • 476-2777

107 St. Francis St. • 415-1700 3244 Dauphin St. • 476-0320 3215 Bel Air Mall • 476-8361 4707 Airport Blvd. • 461-9933 435 Schillinger Rd. • 639-1163 1682 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 621-3215 30500 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-3020 CHICKEN SALAD, SALAD & SOUP 2370 S. Hillcrest Rd. Unit R • 660-0501 5753 Old Shell Rd. • 408-3236 1802 US Hwy 98 Suite F• 625-1092

PANINI PETE’S ($)

2906 Springhill Ave. • 479-4614

ROSIE’S GRILL ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHWEST FARE, 7 DAYS 1203 Hwy 98 Ste. 3D • Daphne • 626-2440

ROYAL KNIGHT ($)

LUNCH & DINNER 3004 Gov’t Blvd. • 287-1220

ROYAL STREET CAFE ($) HOMEMADE LUNCH & BREAKFAST 104 N. Royal St. • 434-0011

SALLY’S PIECE-A-CAKE ($) BAKERY 5638 Three Notch Rd.• 219-6379

BBQ, BURGERS, WINGS & SEAFOOD 19170 Hwy 43 Mt. Vernon. • 839-9927 A FAVORITE BARBECUE SPOT 5456 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0001 DOWNTOWN LUNCH 101 N. Conception St. • 545-4682

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT ($-$$) BBQ AND MORE Jubilee Sq.Ctr. Hwy 90, Daphne • 210-2151 McGowin Park Ctr. Satchel Paige Dr. • 471-1050 7721 Airport Blvd. • 380-8957

DREAMLAND BBQ ($)

RIBS, SANDWICHES & GREAT SIDES 3314 Old Shell Rd. • 479-9898

MEAT BOSS ($)

5401 Cottage Hill Rd. • 591-4842

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE ($)

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$) SAGE RESTAURANT ($$) SAISHO ($-$$)

MODERN GASTROPUB INSPIRED BY JAPANESE KITCHEN 455 Dauphin St • 433-0376

VON’S BISTRO ($-$$)

SEAFOOD, ASIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE 69 St. Michael St • 375-1113

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($$)

CASUAL FINE DINING 104 N. Section St. • Fairhope • 929-2219

THE TRELLIS ROOM ($$$)

A LITTLE VINO DOMKE MARKET

WINE, BEER, GOURMET FOODS, & MORE. 720 Schillinger Rd. S. Unit 8 • 287-1851

FOOD PAK

FOOD, WINE & MORE 5150 Old Shell Rd. • 341-1497

POUR BABY

WINE BAR, CRAFT BEERS & BISTRO 6808 Airport Blvd. • 343-3555

FIREHOUSE WINE BAR & SHOP 216 St Francis St. • 421-2022

RED OR WHITE

STEVIE’S KITCHEN ($)

DROP DEAD GOURMET

HEALTHY, DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 3762 Airport Blvd. • 725-1177

SUNSET POINTE ($-$$)

AT FLU CREEK 831 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-7766

THE BLIND MULE ($)

DAILY SPECIALS MADE FROM SCRATCH 57 N. Claiborne St. • 694-6853

THE GALLEY ($)

OPEN FOR LUNCH, INSIDE GULFQUEST 155 S. Water St • 436-8901

THE HARBERDASHER ($) 113 Dauphin St.• 436-0989

A PREMIER CATERER & COOKING CLASSES 1880-A Airport Blvd. • 450-9051

BRIQUETTES STEAKHOUSE ($-$$) GRILLED STEAKS, CHICKEN & SEAFOOD 720A Schillinger Rd. S. S2. • 607-7200 901 Montlimar Dr • 408-3133

CHUCK’S FISH ($$)

SEAFOOD AND SUSHI 551 Dauphin St.• 219-7051

CORNER 251 ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St • 460-3157

DAUPHIN’S ($$-$$$)

THE PIGEON HOLE ($)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD WITH A VIEW 107 St. Francis St • 444-0200

THE SUNFLOWER CAFE ($)

9 Du Rhu Dr. Suite 201 167 Dauphin St. • 445-3802

THYME BY THE BAY ($-$$)

GREAT FOOD AND COCKTAILS 609 Dauphin St. • 308-3105

SOUTHERN COOKING & THEN SOME 1716 Main St. Daphne • 222-4120 INSIDE VIRGINIA’S HEALTH FOOD 3055 A Dauphin St • 479-3200

33 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-5635

TIME TO EAT CAFE ($)

DOWN-HOME COUNTRY COOKIN 7351 Theodore Dawes Rd. • 654-0228 13665 N. Wintzell Ave. • 824-1119

DUMBWAITER ($$-$$$) FIVE ($$)

TP CROCKMIERS ($)

THREE GEORGES CANDY SHOP ($)

LOCAL INGREDIENTS 203 Dauphin St. • 690-6824

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE ($)

INVENTIVE & VERY FRESH CUISINE 6 N. Jackson St. • 433-0377

GREAT SMOOTHIES, WRAPS & SANDWICHES. Du Rhu Dr. • 378-5648 570 Schillinger Road • 634-3454

UNCLE JIMMY’S DELICIOUS HOTDOGS ($)

2550 Dauphin Island Pkwy S. • 307-5328

UPSCALE WINE BAR 9 Du Rhu Dr. S 201 • 287-7135

7 SPICE ($-$$)

ABBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE ($-$$) 4861 Bit & Spur Rd. • 340-6464

ISTANBUL GRILL ($)

AUTHENTIC TURKISH & MEDITERRANEAN 3702 Airport Blvd. • 461-6901

JERUSALEM CAFE ($-$$)

MOBILE’S OLDEST MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE 5773 Airport Blvd. • 304-1155

KAN ZAMAN ($-$$)

MEDITERRANEAN FOOD AND HOOKAH 326 Azalea Rd • 229-4206

MEDITERRANEAN SANDWICH COMPANY ($)

GREAT & QUICK. 3702 Airport Blvd. • 308-2131 274 Dauphin St. • 545-3161 2502 Schillinger Rd. Ste. 2 • 725-0126 6890 US-90 • DAPHNE • 621-2271

MINT HOOKAH BISTRO ($) GREAT MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 5951 Old Shell Rd. • 450-9191

LAUNCH ($-$$)

GREAT LUNCH & DINNER 3607 Old Shell Rd. • 445-8700

LIGHT LUNCH WITH SOUTHERN FLAIR. 226 Dauphin St. • 433-6725

THE VINEYARD

TAZIKI’S ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St. • 432-8000

AMERICAN RESTAURANT & BAR 250 Dauphin St. • 476-1890

BISTRO PLATES, CRAFT BEERS & PANTRY 2304 Main St. • 375-2800

KITCHEN ON GEORGE ($-$$)

TIN ROOF ($-$$)

SOUTHERN CASUAL FAMILY DINING 10800 US HWY 31 • Spanish Fort• 621-4995

SOUTHERN NAPA

OLLIE’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL ($-$$)

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOOD 351A George & Savannah St. • 436-8890

MAGHEE’S GRILL ON THE HILL ($-$$) NOBLE SOUTH ($$) NOJA ($$-$$$)

OSMAN’S RESTAURANT ($$) SUPREME EUROPEAN CUISINE 2579 Halls Mill Rd. • 479-0006

ROYAL SCAM ($$)

GUMBO, ANGUS BEEF & BAR

FUJI SAN ($)

THAI FARE AND SUSHI 2000 Airport Blvd. • 478-9888

GOLDEN BOWL ($)

HIBACHI GRILL & ASIAN CUISINE 309 Bel Air Blvd • 470-8033 2370 Hillcrest Rd. Unit B • 380-6062 JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE 3959 Cottage Hill Rd • 666-6266

KAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($-$$) QUALITY FOOD, EXCELLENT SERVICE 5045 Cottage Hill Rd. • 607-6454

LIQUID ($$)

AMAZING SUSHI & ASSORTMENT OF ROLLS. 661 Dauphin St. • 432-0109

RICE ASIAN GRILL & SUSHI BAR ($) 3964 Gov’t Blvd. • 378-8083

ROCK N ROLL SUSHI ($$)

273 S. McGregor Ave • 287-0445 6345 Airport Blvd. • 287-0555 940 Industrial Pkwy • 308-2158 6850 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 753-4367

STIX ($$)

LIVE MUSIC, MARTINIS & DINNER MENU. 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

FALAFEL? TRY SOME HUMMUS

4701 Airport Blvd. • 408-3379

LUNCH BUFFET 3674 Airport Blvd. • 341-6171

ROYAL STREET TAVERN

3758 Dauphin Island Pkwy. • 473-1401

SUGAR RUSH DONUT CO. ($)

CUISINE OF INDIA ($$)

SAISHO ($$)

SMOKEY DEMBO SMOKE HOUSE ($)

BAY GOURMET ($$)

3966 Airport Blvd.• 343-5530

323A De La Mare Ave, Fairhope • 990-0003 1104 Dauphin St.. • 478-9494

SIMPLY SWEET ($)

SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS & MORE 41 West I-65 Service Rd. N Suite 150. • 287-2793

CHINA DOLL ($)

ICHIBAN SUSHI ($)

17111 Scenic HWY 98 • Point Clear • 928-4838

SAUCY Q BARBQUE ($)

CUPCAKE BOUTIQUE 6207 Cottage Hill Rd. Suite B • 665-3003

THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR 960 Schillinger Rd. S • 660-4470

THE WASH HOUSE ($$)

SERDA’S COFFEEHOUSE ($)

AWARD-WINNING BARBQUE 1111 Gov’t Blvd. • 433-7427

CHARM ($-$$)

HIBACHI 1 ($-$$)

COFFEE, SMOOTHIES, LUNCH & BEERS. 5460 Old Shell Rd. • 344-4575 COFFEE, LUNCHES, LIVE MUSIC & GELATO 3 Royal St. S. • 415-3000

THAI & SUSHI 5369 D Hwy 90 W • 661-5100

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE Battle House Hotel, Royal St. • 338-5493

BARBEQUE & MUSIC Bayfront Park Dr. • Daphne • 625-RIBS 701 Springhill Ave. • 410-7427 4672 Airport Blvd. • 300-8516

SATORI COFFEEHOUSE ($)

BENJAS ($)

MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT & HOOKAH 1248 Hillcrest St • 634-9820 MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 1539 US HWY 98• 273-3337

FAR EASTERN FARE ANG BAHAY KUBO ($$)

6455 Dauphin St. • 433-0376 610240 Eastern Shore Blvd. • 621-9088

TASTE OF THAI ($$)

9091 US-90 Irvington • 957-1414

TOKYO JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE ($$) UPSCALE SUSHI & HIBACHI 364 Azalea Rd. • 343-6622

WASABI SUSHI ($$)

JAPANESE CUISINE 3654 Airport Blvd. S. C • 725-6078

FROM THE DEPTHS BAUDEAN’S ($$)

FRIED, GRILLED, STEAMED & ALWAYS FRESH 3300 River Rd. • 973-9070

THE BLUEGILL ($-$$)

A HISTORIC SEAFOOD DIVE W/ LIVE MUSIC 3775 Hwy. 98 • 625-1998

BONEFISH GRILL ($$)

ECLECTIC DINING & SPACE 6955 Airport Blvd. • 633-7196

BOUDREAUX’S CAJUN GRILL ($-$$) QUALITY CAJUN & NEW ORLEANS CUISINE 29249 US Highway 98 Daphne. • 621-1991

CRAVIN CAJUN/DIP SEAFOOD ($) PO-BOYS, SALADS & SEAFOOD 1870 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 287-1168

ED’S SEAFOOD SHED ($$)

FRIED SEAFOOD SERVED IN HEFTY PORTIONS 3382 Hwy. 98 • 625-1947

FELIX’S FISH CAMP ($$) UPSCALE DINING WITH A VIEW 1420 Hwy. 98 • 626-6710

FISHERMAN’S LEGACY ($) DELI, MARKET AND CATERING. 4380 Halls Mill Rd. • 665-2266

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($)

30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 206-8768 3654 Airport Blvd. • 338-9350

LUCY B. GOODE ($$)

GULF COAST CUISINE, REINVENTED 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

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4513 Old Shell Rd.• 473-0007

LIVE MUSIC & GREAT SEAFOOD 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

BAMBOO STEAKHOUSE ($$)

MUDBUGS AT THE LOOP ($)

BANGKOK THAI ($-$$)

RALPH & KACOO’S ($-$$)

SUSHI BAR 650 Cody Rd. S • 300-8383

DELICIOUS, TRADITIONAL THAI CUISINE 28600 US 98 • Daphne • 626-5286 3821 Airport Blvd. • 344-9995

BANZAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($$) TRADITIONAL SUSHI & LUNCH. 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-9077

CAJUN KITCHEN & SEAFOOD MARKET 2005 Government St. • 478-9897 THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1595 Battleship Pkwy. • 626-0045

R&R SEAFOOD ($-$$)

LAID-BACK EATERY & FISH MARKET 1477 Battleship Pkwy. • 621-8366


RIVER SHACK ($-$$)

SEAFOOD, BURGERS & STEAKS 6120 Marina Dr. • Dog River • 443-7318.

THE GRAND MARINER ($-$$) LOCAL SEAFOOD & PRODUCE 6036 Rock Point Rd. • 443-7540

THE HARBOR ROOM ($-$$) UNIQUE SEAFOOD 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

THE SEAFOOD HOUSE ($-$$)

HEROES SPORTS BAR & GRILLE ($) SANDWICHES & COLD BEER 273 Dauphin St. • 433-4376 Hillcrest & Old Shell Rd. • 341-9464

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS ($-$$) WINGS, SEAFOOD, BURGERS & BEER 7721 Airport Blvd. Suite E-180 • 639-6832

ISLAND WING CO ($)

EVERYTHING BAKED OR GRILLED 2617 Dauphin St. • 476-9464

751 Azalea Rd. • 301-7964

MANCIS ($)

TIN TOP RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR ($$)

MCSHARRY’S IRISH PUB ($)

SEAFOOD, STEAKS, & EXTENSIVE WINE LIST 6232 Bon Secour Hwy County Rd. 10. • 949-5086

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) FRESH SEAFOOD FOR OVER 75 YEARS 605 Dauphin St. • 432-4605 6700 Airport Blvd. • 341-1111 1208 Shelton Beach Rd. • Saraland • 442-3335 805 S. Mobile St. • 929-2322

IS THE GAME ON?

ASHLAND MIDTOWN PUB ($-$$) PIZZAS, PASTAS, & CALZONES 245-A Old Shell Rd. • 479-3278

BAUMHOWER’S ($)

WINGS, BURGERS & PUB GRUB 6880 US-90 #14 • Daphne • 625-4695

BISHOP’S ($)

A SOUTHERN GRILL & BAR 3673 Airport Blvd. • 344-2131

BUFFALO WILD WINGS ($) BEST WINGS & SPORTING EVENTS 6341 Airport Blvd. • 378-5955

BUTCH CASSIDY’S ($)

FAMOUS BURGERS, SANDWICHES & WINGS 60 N. Florida St. • 450-0690

CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB ($) BURGERS & BEER 916 Charleston St. • 433-9374

1715 Main St. • 375-0543 BRILLIANT REUBENS & FISH-N-CHIPS. 101 N. Brancroft St. Fairhope • 990-5100

MUG SHOTS ($$)

BAR & GRILL 29740 Urgent Care Dr. • Daphne • 662-9639 6255 Airport Blvd. • 447-2514

GRIMALDI’S ($)

ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL ($$)

QUAINT MEXICAN RESTAURANT 5556 Old Shell Rd. • 345-7484

GUIDO’S ($$)

TAMARA’S BAR & GRILL ($)

MARIA BONITA AGAVE BAR & GRILL ($-$$)

Bel Air Mall • 476-2063 FRESH CUISINE NIGHTLY ON MENU 1709 Main St. • Daphne • 626-6082

HOUSE OF PIZZA ($)

3958 Snow Rd C. • Semmes • 645-3400

LA ROSSO ($$)

COMFORT FOOD 1716 Main St. Ste. C • Daphne • 281-2982

MACARONI GRILL ($$)

SMALL PLATES, PIZZAS, PASTAS & WINE 3250 Airport Blvd. • 450-4556

MARCOS ($)

5055 Cottage Hill Rd. • 308-4888 2394 Dawes Rr. • 639-3535 2004 US 98 • Daphne • 265-6550

MELLOW MUSHROOM ($)

BURGERS, DOGS & 27 BEERS & WINES. 19992 Hwy.181 Old County Rd. Fairhope • 281-2663

PIES & AWESOME BEER SELECTION 2032 Airport Blvd. • 471-4700 5660 Old Shell Rd. • 380-1500 29698 Frederick Blvd.• Daphne • 621-3911

LUCKY’S IRISH PUB ($)

MIRKO ($$)

OLD 27 GRILL ($)

IRISH PUB FARE & MORE 3692 Airport Blvd • 414-3000

WEMOS ($)

WINGS, TENDERS, HOTDOGS & SANDWICHES 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-5877

MAMA MIA!

BUCK’S PIZZA ($$)

DELIVERY 350 Dauphin St. • 431-9444

CORTLAND’S PIZZA PUB ($-$$) GREAT PIZZA. LUNCH & DINNER 4356 Old Shell Rd. • 342-0024

GAMBINO BROTHERS ($) HOMEMADE PASTAS & SANDWICHES 873 Hillcrest Ave. • 344-8115

GAMBINO’S ITALIAN GRILL ($) ITALIAN, STEAKS & SEAFOOD 18 Laurel Ave. • Fairhope • 990-0995

PASTA & MORE 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-6611

NAVCO PIZZA ($$)

PIZZA, SUBS & PASTA 1368 ½ Navco Rd.• 479-0066

PAPA’S PLACE ($$)

A TASTE OF ITALY. BYOB. 28691 U.S. Highway 98 • 626-1999

PINZONE’S ITALIAN VILLAGE ($$) AUTHENTIC ITALIAN DISHES 312 Fairhope Ave. • Fairhope • 990-5535

RAVENITE ($)

PIZZA, PASTA, SALAD & MORE 102 N. Section St. •Fairhope• 929-2525

PIZZERIA DELFINA ($) PIZZA & PASTA 107 Dauphin St. • 375-1644

ROMA CAFE ($-$$)

PASTA, SALAD AND SANDWICHES 7143 Airport Blvd. • 341-7217

3250 Airport Blvd. Springdale Mall• 450-4556

WINGS, PO-BOYS, BURGERS 210 Eastern Shore Center, Hwy. 98 • 929-0002

TRATTORIA PIZZA & ITALIAN ($$) ITALIAN FOOD & PIZZAS 11311 US HIghway 31 Spanish Fort• 375-0076

VIA EMILIA ($$)

HOMEMADE PASTAS & PIZZAS MADE DAILY 5901 Old Shell Rd. • 342-3677

MEXICAN CUISINE 3977 Gov’t Blvd. • 660-4970

OLÉ MI AMIGO ($-$$)

HEARTY MEXICAN FARE 736 holcombe Ave.• 473-0413

POOR MEXICAN ($)

3050 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-7433

MAGNOLIA HOUSE ($$-$$$) FINE DINING, SEAFOOD AND STEAKS

FLAVORS BUFFET ($-$$) ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET

IP CASINO:

850 Bayview Ave. Bilox • 888-946-2847

THIRTY-TWO ($$$) SEAFOOD, STEAKS, WINE

TIEN ($-$$)

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

HIGH TIDE CAFÉ ($)

CASUAL & RELAXING, EXTENSIVE MENU

OLÉ MI AMIGO!

ROOSTER’S ($)

ISLAND VIEW:

TASTE OF MEXICO 5452 Hwy 90 W • 661-5509

LATIN AMERICAN FOOD 211 Dauphin St. • 375-1076

TAQUERIA MEXICO ($-$$)

BEACH BLVD STEAMER ($)

AZTECAS ($-$$)

CAFÉ DEL RIO ($-$$)

MOUTH WATERING MEXICAN FOOD 1175 Battleship Pkwy • 625-2722

CINCO DE MAYO ($) MEXICAN CUISINE 260 Azalea Rd. • 375-1095

DAUPHIN ST. TAQUERIA ($)

ENCHILADAS, TACOS, & AUTHENTIC FARE Ok Bicycle Shop • 661 Dauphin St. • 432-2453

EL MARIACHI ($)

763 Holcombe Ave • 473-0413

FUEGO ($-$$)

OUTSTANDING MEXICAN CUISINE 2066 Old Shell Rd. • 378-8621

HACIENDA SAN MIGUEL ($-$$) TASTE OF MEXICO 880 Schillinger Rd. S. • 633-6122 5805 US 90 • 653-9163

LA COCINA ($)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE 800 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-0783 830 W I65 Service Rd. S • 378-5837 4663 Airport Blvd. • 342-5553

LOS ARCOS ($)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FLAVOR 3733 Airport Blvd. • 414-4496

NO GAMBLING CASINO FARE BEAU RIVAGE:

875 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 888-952-2582

BR PRIME ($$-$$$)

3300 W. Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 877-774-8439 SEAFOOD

CARTER GREEN STEAKHOUSE ($$-$$$) RICH TRADITIONS, STEAK, SEAFOOD

C&G GRILLE ($)

LARGE BREAKFAST, LUNCH OR DINNER MENU

PALACE CASINO:

158 Howard Ave. Biloxi • 800-725-2239

FINE DINING ESTABLISHMENT.

MIGNON’S ($$$)

BURGER, WINGS, PIZZA

PLACE BUFFET ($-$$)

EXOTIC CUISINE AND SUSHI

STACKED GRILL ($-$$)

COAST RESTAURANT ($-$$) JIA ($-$$)

STALLA ($$)

ITALIAN COOKING

STEAKS, SEAFOOD, FINE WINE INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

BURGERS AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

TERRACE CAFE ($)

TREASURE BAY:

HARD ROCK CASINO:

THE DEN ($-$$)

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, LATE NIGHT

777 Beach Blvd.Biloxi • 877-877-6256

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) SEAFOOD

HARD ROCK CAFÉ ($)

AMERICAN FARE & ROCKIN’ MEMORABILIA

1980 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 800-747-2839 INTIMATE & CASUAL WITH DAILY SPECIALS

CQ ($$-$$$)

ELEGANT ATMOSPHERE & TANTALIZING ENTREES

BLU ($)

LOUNGE WITH COCKTAILS & TAPAS MENU

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WIND CREEK CASINO:

SATISFACTION ($-$$)

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EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE SOUTHERN FAVORITES BUFFET

HARRAH’S GULF COAST:

280 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 288-436-2946

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GRILL ($)

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SEND LISTINGS TO LISTINGS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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CUISINE | THE BEER PROFESSOR

Texas newcomer in town BY TOM WARD/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Photo/Facebook

Gulf Distributing is teaming up with Oasis Texas Brewing Co. to introduce three new beers to Alabama, Mississippi and Florida.

T

exas is known for two iconic beers — Lone Star, which first began brewing in San Antonio in 1884, and Shiner, which has been brewed at the Spoetzl Brewery in the tiny town of Shiner (about halfway between San Antonio and Houston) since 1909. Lone Star was actually started by Adolphus Busch, of Budweiser fame, while Shiner was also founded by a German immigrant, Kosmos Spoetzl. For those who have never tried it, Lone Star is a very traditional American lager, perfect if you are enjoying ribs at the Country Tavern, but otherwise fairly nondescript. Shiner’s flagship Bock, on the other hand, is excellent, with a smooth, malty flavor in the German tradition. Also, unlike Lone Star, Shiner has recently expanded its offerings with a number of new styles, including a very good Wicked IPA, which is not too strong but with good hop flavor, and its Berliner Weisse, which is excellent — tasty with lemon flavorings. Despite its long brewing history, Texas has been fairly slow to embrace the craft brewing movement, with a relatively small number of independent breweries for such a large state. Other than Lone Star and Shiner, Texas beers are hard to find outside the state. That is about to change, however, at least in our area, as one of the most popular craft breweries in Texas is about to make some of its beers available here on the Gulf Coast. Austin’s Oasis Texas Brewing Co. has selected Gulf Distributing to handle the first expansion of its beers outside of Texas, beginning this month. “After shopping around … and then heading to Mobile and touring the market,” remarked Hamilton Stewart, co-founder of Oasis Texas Brewing, “we felt really comfortable putting our brand in their hands.” Not surprisingly, Austin is the mecca for craft brewing in Texas, with numerous brewpubs and breweries in and around the state’s capital city. Oasis Texas Brewing Co., founded in 2014 and located outside the city on Lake Travis, has become a favorite of locals because of both its fine beers and its picturesque taproom. I was recently able to sample some of the

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beers that will soon be available in our area, and was impressed. Its London Homesick Ale won the gold medal at the 2014 Great American Beer Festival in the “Ordinary or Special Bitter” category, and for good reason. It was a smooth English ale with a definite bitter bite at the end. The Luchesa is an unfiltered lager that is excellent, with much more heft than we are used to from most American lagers. It tasted European, like a Grolsch or a Heineken. Finally, I sampled the Metamodern Session IPA. It, too, was very good — a light, easydrinking IPA with a nice flavor, not overthe-top with hops, and at only 4.5 APV not overpowering. The Metamodern was probably my favorite, but I am partial to IPAs; as someone who has largely moved away from lagers, I was really impressed with the Luchesa — it tasted like a beer should. Oasis Texas beers will soon be available in the areas served by Gulf Distributing, not just Mobile but as far north as Birmingham and Tuscaloosa and into the Florida Panhandle eastward to Panama City. “We are excited to partner with Oasis Texas Brewing Co.,” said Evan Maisel, vice president of Gulf Distributing. “The fact that we are the first Oasis distributor outside of Texas is a testament to our experienced and dedicated craft beer division. We look forward to working with Oasis to grow their brands and bring their award-winning beer to Alabama and Florida consumers.” If you want to be among the first to try Oasis Texas brews, there will be a number of kick-off events this week. On June 7, the downtown Wintzell’s will host a launch party for Oasis Texas at 5 p.m., followed at 7 p.m. by a similar event just up Dauphin Street at Moe’s Original BBQ. Across the bay, Mellow Mushroom in Daphne will also host a tap event for Oasis Texas from 5-7 p.m. that night. The next evening, June 8, West Mobile will get its taste of the Oasis Texas Brewing Co. with kick-off events at Fuzzy’s Tacos at 5 p.m. and the Mellow Mushroom on Old Shell Road at 7:30 p.m. Cowboy up!


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COVER STORY The entire OWA buildout represents a 520-acre resort and a $500 million investment by the Poarch Band of Creek Indians, according to information from OWA. The first two phases of the project represent a $240 million investment, with total buildout scheduled over the next five years. According to a fact sheet OWA provided, the project will help increase Baldwin County’s economic output by $244 million and add $78.5 million to the region’s payroll.

OWA on target for July openDALE LIESCH/REPORTER

Incentives

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Photo/Shane Rice

I

n years past Baldwin County has relied on its sunThe development’s shopping and dining areas will foltoasted beaches to help push a booming tourism low in phases. industry. But with a large amusement park and enter“OWA will be announcing its official open date and tainment complex currently under construction a few pricing for The Park at OWA, the 14-acre amusement miles north in Foley, officials are excited about adding park, in the coming weeks,” Hellmich wrote. even more attractions to entice visitors. The park will consist of 21 themed rides, she wrote. The Poarch Band of Creek Indians’ OWA develop“One of those rides is our signature steel coaster, ment is under construction at the intersection of the Bald- Rollin’ Thunder. Rides are geared toward the young and win Beach Express and County Road 20 and expected old alike, whether they seek a classic amusement ride or to open this year. County tourism high-thrill adventure on one of our officials are excited about the future three coasters.” of the project, which includes a 14The park will also include famacre amusement park. ily rides and kids’ rides, according “From where we sit, it’ll have a to a fact sheet OWA provided. The huge impact on new visitors,” said THE POARCH BAND OF CREEK facility will also include a 14-acre Lee Lawson, president of the Bald- INDIANS’ OWA DEVELOPMENT lake with a 1.5-acre island, comwin County Economic Developplete with a 400-seat amphitheater IS UNDER CONSTRUCTION and boathouse. The island also will ment Alliance. “It’ll add diversity to the tourism base that wasn’t feature boat rentals and fountain AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE shows. there before.” Herb Malone, president and CEO Developers have ambitious BALDWIN BEACH EXPRESS of Gulf Shores and Orange Beach plans following the opening of AND COUNTY ROAD 20 Tourism, said the development the first phase of the park. These would help the region gain visitors. include a 16-acre amusement park AND IS EXPECTED TO OPEN expansion, a 170-slot RV park and “Tourists who think of going to a different beach might think of two more hotels, one of which will THIS YEAR. coming down here for the beach and include an indoor/outdoor wateran amusement park,” Malone said. park, Hellmich wrote. “We’re very excited about what the “Timing for construction will added attraction brings to our region depend upon market demands,” she wrote. “Preliminary of South Alabama.” growth indicators reveal that construction on several of these amenities could begin within the next 12 months.” Other amenities, such as shopping and dining options, OWA amenities have already been announced. Last month it was anThe amusement park buildout will be one of the nounced Wahlburgers would open its second-largest U.S. first tasks completed, OWA Director of Marketing and location at the OWA complex in late summer. It will be PR Kristin Hellmich wrote in an email. Initially slated the restaurant’s first Alabama storefront. for Memorial Day, the opening has been pushed back “We are excited to announce Wahlburgers will be because of construction delays. opening at OWA this summer, along with several other “When the OWA vision was announced last Novemsignificant tenants who have signed on to join us in this ber 2016, we realized the timeline was very aggressive exciting endeavor,” Stephanie A. Bryan, tribal chairgiven the magnitude of the project,” she wrote. “While woman and CEO for the Poarch Band of Creek Indians, our construction teams pushed hard for a Memorial Day said. “We are proud to continue building partnerships opening there were factors outside of our control, like that will create jobs in the hospitality industry, helping to Mother Nature and her rains.” grow a strong economic future for the state.” Now, Hellmich wrote, a 150-room Marriott TowneOther future tenants announced in May include: Place Suites on the site is slated to open this month, Sunglass World, Fairhope Soap Co., Alvin’s Island, with the amusement park coming online in mid-July. Hershey’s Ice Cream Shop and Utopia.

The city of Foley and the state believe the OWA development will be successful, as each has provided incentives to help developers defray the costs of related infrastructure and other expenses. The state is giving OWA developers a 1.5 percent investment credit, which is not to exceed $10 million, Alabama Department of Commerce Deputy Secretary Angela Till wrote in an email message. The credit, which maxes out at 1.5 percent, is used for qualified capital investment expenses for up to 10 years and is taken against the state’s income tax liability, according to information from the Department of Commerce’s website. To receive the credit, a project must create at least 50 new jobs. In addition to the state incentives, a local cooperative district, which includes the OWA property, voted to levy a 2-cent fee on the total sales tax charged within the district up to $175 million or for 20 years, whichever comes first. The Foley City Council then voted to give that additional money to OWA to help pay for capital expenses, Foley’s Economic Development Director Jeff Rouzie said. The $175 million is a cap, which he doesn’t expect will be reached, he said. The additional fee would only be added to goods and services purchased within the district. It would not add to the sales tax rate in other parts of the city, Rouzie said. The fee will be added to hotel rooms within the district as well. The sales tax on rooms is at 11 percent now and breaks down to 7 cents to the city and 4 cents to the state. The cooperative district borders Juniper Street and Pride Drive and extends out to the beach express to County Road 20, Rouzie said. In addition to OWA, the district includes a city-owned sports complex featuring a 91,000-square-foot facility that can accommodate 12 volleyball courts or six basketball courts. The district also includes a soccer complex with 16 state-of-the-art soccer fields built to drain huge rain accumulations, Rouzie said. The area also includes the Graham Creek Nature Preserve, which Rouzie said could attract ecotourism. The district could be a huge draw for tourism of all kinds once OWA is completed, Rouzie said. “This will have a huge impact on Foley and the region,” he said.

Return on investment

Dr. Christopher Keshock, associate professor of sport management and program director in the Department of Health, Kinesiology and Sport at the University of South Alabama, wrote in an email that there are several factors to consider when determining whether the state or city will get a good return on investment from the OWA incentives. While the project is certain to bring in additional tourism dollars, Keshock said, those dollars can only be considered an economic gain for the city and state if the intent of the tourists is to come to the park in the first place. “Otherwise, visitors who already planned a trip to the Gulf Shores/ Orange Beach area and happened to go to the amusement park while here are considered casual visitors,” he wrote. “In other words, they would have come to the impact area even if the amusement park was not built.” The increased revenue must also be weighed against factors such as additional traffic congestion, crime and law enforcement presence in new areas of the city. The quality of the attractions to locals should also be considered, Keshock wrote. “The OWA facility provides another entertainment option for locals to enjoy instead of traveling to distant places to experience amusement parks,” he wrote. “It would keep locals home … where they would keep their leisure spending here instead of spending at an amusement park in another state.” All in all, Keshock wrote OWA will be an asset to the region, but it may be too early to tell how valuable it will be. “The OWA facility will add to the already-great tourism demand existing in Baldwin County, and the symbiotic relationship with the adjacent Foley Sports Complex will provide greater group travel opportunities, which extend beyond single-family beach vacations,” he wrote. “Only the Foley residents may be able to answer whether the OWA facility is worth it since they will face the impact of added visitors. If the sales tax generated by tourists while in the area pay for or improve the community, then residents typically accept new ventures, while also having a modern amusement park to enjoy in their own backyard.” Jane Nicholes contributed information to this story.


COVER STORY

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S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

NIGHTLIFE BEST ALL AROUND BAR A B C D E F

B-Bob’s Brickyard Callaghan’s Five Bar Haberdasher O’Daly’s

BEST BARTENDER A Adam Yunker, Royal Street Tavern B Alex Daniels, Boo Radley’s/Brickyard C Leon Weekley, B-Bob’s D Ricky Havens, Pour Baby E Robert Delmarter, Five Bar F Roy Clark, Haberdasher

BEST BARTENDERESS A Courtney Anthony, Butch Cassidy’s B Kara Bexley, Macaroni Grill C Sarah Smiley, Buffalo Wild Wing D Rachael Norris, Hayley’s E Susan Richardson, Pelican Pub F Tasha Tupa, Haberdasher

HOTTEST BARTENDER A Hunter Vanderlinde, Boo Radley’s/Brickyard B Jerry Grady, B-Bob’s C Michael Rashard Andrews, Buffalo Wild Wings D Rickey Havens, Pour Baby E Ricky Slayton, B-Bobs F Ross Fuentes, Tongue & Groove

HOTTEST BARTENDERESS A Gina Jo Previto, Veet’s B Jaimie Ramsey, O’Daly’s C Jana Padgett Dunn, Brickyard D Lindsey Bembry, Garage E Tori Caldwell, Haberdasher F Whitney Bealer, Butch Cassidy’s

BEST NEW BAR A B C D E F

Dority’s Eugene’s Monkey Bar Haberdasher Kazoola Le Bouchon Old Shell Growlers

BEST DIVE BAR A B C D E F

Garage Hayley’s Industry Pappa Buddha’s Veet’s Traders

BEST E-SHO BAR A B C D E F

Bone & Barrel Flybar Le Bouchon McSharry’s Pour Nelson’s Tongue & Groove

BEST WEMO BAR A B C D E F

Boondocks Cockeyed Charlies Crooked Martini Key West Lounge Patches Pour Baby

BEST MIMO BAR A B C D E F

Ashland Midtown Pub Butch Cassidy’s Mellow Mushroom - Midtown Old Shell Growlers Red or White Silverhorse Pub

BEST LODA BAR A B C D E F

Alchemy Tavern Garage Haberdasher LoDa Biergarten O’Daly’s OK Bike Shop

BEST SOMO BAR A B C D E F

Dority’s Fins Pelican Pub Pelican Reef The River Shack Zebra Lounge

BEST BEACH BAR A B C D E F

Anchor Bar & Grill FloraBama LuLu’s Pink Pony Pirate’s Cove The Hangout

BEST WINE BAR A B C D E F

Domke Market Firehouse Le Bouchon Pour Baby Red or White The Vineyard

BEST FANCY DRINK BAR A B C D E F

Five Bar Flybar Haberdasher Royal Street Tavern Sidecar Lounge Tongue & Groove

BEST AFTER-HOURS BAR A B C D

Alchemy Tavern Boo Radley’s Cockeyed Charlies Gabriel’s

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E Hayley’s F OK Bike Shop

BEST HAPPY HOUR BAR A B C D E F

Five Bar Flipside Garage LoDa Biergarten Merry Widow Wintzell’s

FAVORITE CRAFT BEER

THE PERFECT MARTINI

A Abita Andygator B Avondale Spring Street Saison C Fairhope Brewing Take the Causeway IPA D Fairhope Brewing Judge Roy Bean E Fat Tire F Haint Blue Brewing

A B C D E F

BEST E-SHO HAPPY HOUR FAVORITE IMPORT BEER A B C D E F

California Dreaming Manci’s McSharry’s Pour Nelson’s Sunset Pointe Top of the Bay

BEST SPORTS BAR A B C D E F

Baumhower’s Buffalo Wild Wings Heroes Hooters Island Wing Company Joe Cain Café

BEST COLLEGE BAR A B C D E F

Boo Radley’s Buffalo Wild Wings Heroes USA O’Daly’s Pat’s The Bar

BEST WATERFRONT BAR A B C D E F

Bluegill Pelican Pub Pirate’s Cove Sunset Pointe The Gulf Traders

BAR WHERE YOU ARE MOST LIKELY TO GET LUCKY A B C D E F

B-Bob’s Boo Radley’s Gabriel’s Hayley’s Saddle Up Saloon Tongue & Groove

BEST PLACE TO SHAKE YOUR BOOTY A B C D E F

B-Bob’s Boo Radley’s Brickyard Midnight Rodeo Saddle Up Saloon Veet’s

BEST GAY BAR A B C D

B-Bob’s Flipside Gabriel’s Midtown Pub

A B C D E F

Corona Dos Equis Guinness Modelo Red Stripe Stella Artois

FAVORITE DOMESTIC BEER A B C D E F

Bud Light Budweiser Coors Light Mich Ultra Miller Lite Yuengling

BAR WITH BEST TAP BEER SELECTION A B C D E F

Buffalo Wild Wings Draft Picks LoDa Biergarten Mellow Mushroom Montegos Old Shell Growlers

FAVORITE CASINO A B C D E F

Beau Rivage Golden Nugget Hard Rock IP Casino Palace Casino Wind Creek

BEST BAR BATHROOM A B C D E F

Haberdasher O’Daly’s OK Bike Shop Pour Baby Royal Street Tavern Tongue & Groove

BEST MARGARITA A Five Bar B Fuego C Fuzzy’s D OK Bike Shop (Dauphin St. Taqueria) E Taqueria Mexico F Tongue & Groove

BEST BLOODY MARY A B C D E F

Ashland Midtown Pub Brick & Spoon Five Bar Moe’s BBQ Pelican Pub Wintzell’s

Bonefish Grill Crooked Martini Haberdasher Royal Street Tavern Ruth’s Chris Sidecar Lounge

BEST BUSHWACKER A B C D E F

Fins FloraBama Moe’s BBQ Pelican Pub Pirate’s Cove Tacky Jack’s

BEST SPECIALTY COCKTAIL A Bordeaux Bourbon at Five Bar B Mexican Mule at Eugene’s Monkey Bar C Mississippi Old Fashioned at Haberdasher D Pineapple Jalapeno Margarita at Five Bar E Old Fashioned at Tongue & Groove F Weekend at Fernies at the Haberdasher

BEST BAR TRIVIA A B C D E F

Alchemy Tavern Blind Mule Buffalo Wild Wings Moe’s BBQ OK Bike Shop Tongue & Groove

BEST GENTLEMAN’S CLUB A B C D

Cookies-n-Cream Diamonds Lionz Den The Candy Store

SHOPPING AND SERVICES BEST OVERALL STYLIST A Amy Worley - Estetica B Holly Fountain - Salon DMH C Jason Chambers - Head Dress D Julia Liller - Salon West 5400 E Julie Burrus - Inspire F Taylor Westwood – Inspire

BEST SALON A Estetica B Harlow C Inspire Salon & Gallery D Salon West 5400 E Studio Bliss F Tami’s Mask & Mirror Studio

BEST COLORIST A Ashton Shirley - Solid

Rock Salon B Charlene Lindvink - Bliss Salon & Day Spa C Phrankey Lowery - Studio PH D Ryan Lawrence - Estetica E Tami Williams - Tami’s Mask & Mirror Studio F Destiny Andress – Vanity

SCISSOR WIZARD A Ryan Amacker - Salon West 5400 B Chasity Gray Largay Estetica C Laura Vendetti- Tami’s Mask & Mirror Studio D Brandi Hoover - Sanctuary Salon E Becca Maherg - Vanity F Lauren Holmquist - Salons by JC

BEST BARBER A Mike Edwards- Mike’s Barber Shop B Avis - Mayo’s Barber Shop C Charlene - Mayo’s Barber Shop D Dallas Jones Barber Shop E The Corner Barber Shop F Hillcrest Barbers

BEST MAKEUP ARTIST A Elizabeth Spence - Tami’s Mask & Mirror Studio B Valerie Floore C Carla Dames - Bliss Salon & Day Spa D Alexandrea West - Salon West 5400 E Ashley West F Lauren Kelley

BEST HOOHA WAXER A Anna Bishop - LA Bikini B Crystal Quattrone, Primp C LA Bikini D Elizabeth Spence - Tami’s Mask & Mirror Studio E Tera Shade - Bliss Salon & Day Spa F Jessica Stewart - Wax’d

BEST PLACE TO GET A MANI A B C D E F

Bliss Salon & Day Spa Estetica Lily’s Nails Royal Day Spa Vivian’s Old Shell Nails

BEST PLACE TO GET A PEDI A The Spa at the Battlehouse B Maria’s Nails C Lily’s Nails D Venetian Nails E Royal Day Spa F Vivian’s


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

BEST ESTHETICIAN A Ashley Maynard- Spa at the BattleHouse B Tera Shade - Bliss Salon & Day Spa C Hanna Hogle - Sunrise Dermatology D Sarah Sheffield - Massage Envy E Amberjoy McLean- Medspa at the Park F Katie Davidson - Haley Dermatology

BEST DAY SPA A B C D E F

Spa at the BattleHouse LumaLife Therapy Massage Envy Medspa at the Park Lyons Elite Day Spa Nouveau

BEST MASSAGE THERAPIST A Elements B Hannah Boltz C Heidi Pritchett - Above and Beyond Hot Yoga D Kelsea Tupa - Epione Massage & Bodywork E Massage Envy F Roderick Gibbs - Dynamic Orthopedic

BEST TANNING SALON A B C D E F

LA Bikini Palm Beach Tan Soliel Nu Tiffany Tans Brush of Bronze Ultra Tanz

MOBILE’S BEST DOCTOR A B C D E F

Dr. Gamil Dawood Dr. Charla Evans Dr. Frank Hall Dr. Elizabeth Mathison Dr. Richard Oyler Dr. Jacob Webster

MOBILE’S BEST SPECIALIST A Dr. Daniel Cameron B Dr. Michael Do C Dr. John Hinton D Dr. Ron O’ Gorman E Rihner, Gupta, Grosz, Cardiology P.C. F Dr. K. Scott Saucier

BEST HOOHA DOCTOR A B C D E F

Dr. Quin A. Bixler Dr. Glenn T. Gallaspy III Dr. Lauren Lambrecht Dr. Patton Morrison Barton Dr. Max Rogers Dr. John Val-Gallas

BEST BOOB DOC A Dr. Charles Dyas B Dr. James Koehler

C D E F

Dr. Kitti Outlaw Dr. Christopher Park Dr. Randy Proffitt Dr. Stephen Sheppard

BEST FACELIFT DOC A B C D E F

Dr. Henry Barber Dr. James Koehler Dr. Michael Lyons Dr. Steve Martin Dr. Kitti Outlaw Dr. Christopher Park

BEST DERMATOLOGIST A B C D E F

Dr. Thomas Bender Dr. Kathryn Dempsey Dr. Dena Howell Dr. Amy Morris Dr. Ryan Ramagosa Dr. Scott VanLoock

BEST WEIGHT LOSS DOC A Dr. Lawrence Carpenter B Slim & Trim Medical Weight Loss C Dr. Quint Jardine D Dr. Patrick McGuire E Dr. Ruth Shields F Dr. William T. Urquhart

BEST “DOC IN THE BOX” CLINIC A Compass Urgent Care B Eastern Shore Urgent Care C Greater Mobile Urgent Care D Hillcrest Urgent Care E Immediate Care of the South F Urgent Care by the Bay

BEST BACK CRACKER (CHIROPRACTOR) A Dr. Ken Bishop B Dr. Cevin Cormier C Dr. Chris Corsentino D Liberation Chiropractic Clinic E Dr. Troy Lofton F Dr. Clarke Pradat

BEST DENTIST A Alabama Family Dental B Grelot Dental C Mobile Comprehensive Dentistry D Noblet Family Dental E Dr. Kristopher Portacci F Skyline Family Dental

BEST ORAL SURGEON A B C D E F

Dr. Charles Black III Dr. David Lairmore Dr. Rick Morgan Dr. Chris Mullenix Dr. Robert Pfeffle Dr. Greg Zieman

BEST GYM A B C D E F

Crew Fitness Hillcrest Fitbody Bootcamp Moorer YMCA Planet Fitness ProHealth Thomas Fitness Center

BEST CROSSFIT BOX A B C D E F

CrossFit Saraland CrossFit Spanish Fort JH CrossFit Mobtown Crossfit CrossFit Roadhouse CrossFit Jacked

BEST PERSONAL TRAINER A Emily Powell - ProHealth B Jennifer Savell - Thomas Fitness Center C John Seddon - Life Plus D Josh Foster- Josh the Trainer E LaJuan Black - Moorer YMCA F Braxton Gilbert

BEST VETERIANRIAN A Dr. Christopher Boudreau - Boudreau Veterinary Clinic B Dr. Jennifer Carney Rehm Animal Clinic Tillman’s Corner C Dr. Mary Katherine Cross - Old Shell Road Animal Hospital D Dr. Albert S. Gaston, Jr. E Dr. Roxy Leslie, Village Animal Clinic F Dr. Carl Myers, Theodore Veterinary Hospital

BEST PET GROOMER A Adorable Dos B Bella and Bows C Lola Bells D Glamour Paws E Dapper Dogs F Jeremy Henderson at The Waggy Tail

BEST FLORIST A All A Bloom B Lush C Flowers Etc. Daphne D Julia Greer Fobes Fashion Art Flowers E Belle Bouquet F Sarah Beth’s Florist

BEST WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHER A 3 Words Photography B Baylee Rae Photography C Katherine Thomason KatCo D SLR Photography E Elizabeth Gelineau F One Fine Day Photography

BEST YOGA STUDIO

BEST REAL ESTATE FIRM

BEST USED CAR DEALER

A Above and Beyond Hot Yoga B Soul Shine Yoga C Sterling Hot Yoga D Synergy Yoga & Pilates E CORE Studio F Glow Yoga

A Roberts Brothers B Better Home & Gardens Real Estate Generations C Berkshire Hathaway D LLB&B E Port City Realty F The Cummings Company

A B C D E F

BEST REALTOR

A Andy Cook, R. Andrew Cook, CPA B BJ Gilbert, Karen Simmons, PC C Karen Simmons, Karen Simmons, PC D John Bedsole, Kalifeh, Bedsole, Adams PC E Pat Bessonen, Wilkins Miller

BEST YOGA INSTRUCTOR A Shoshana Treichel, Above & Beyond Hot Yoga B Teddy Ward, Bikram Yoga C Jamie Ullock, Soul Shine Yoga D Annette Porter Ham, Yoga Alliance E Jennifer Guthrie, Glow Yoga F Sprite Wood, Sterling Hot Yoga

BEST MECHANIC/AUTO SHOP A Foreign & Domestic Autocare B Baehr’s Automotive C Advanced Collision D Buddy’s Service Center E Griffith Service Center F Mark McGugin

BEST CARWASH/DETAIL A B C D E F

Rich’s Bebo’s Down South Detail Ultra Carwash Zippy’s Alabama Auto Clean

BEST LAWYER IF YOUR SPOUSE IS A HO (DIVORCE) A B C D E F

Josh Boone Alison Herlihy Jerry Pilgrim Donald Briskman The Mims Firm Jessica Pilgrim

BEST LAWYER TO KEEP YOU OUT OF PRISON (CRIMINAL) A B C D E F

Art Powell Tom Walsh Donald Friedlander Jeff Deen Grant Gibson Buzz Jordan

BEST LAWYER TO SUE THE PANTS OFF SOMEONE (TRIAL) A Long & Long B John Leech, Warhurst Law C David J. Maloney, Maloney Frost D Greene & Phillips E Dean Waite F Rod Cate, Hand Arendall

A Angela Locklier, Berkshire Hathaway B Kevin Loper, Roberts Brothers C Sam Calderone, ReMax D Matt McAllister, Realty Executives E Marcile Sims & Karen Singleton, Synergy Realty Group F Catherine Mackey, LLB&B

BEST INSURANCE AGENT OR AGENCY A Bradley Flowers, Alfa B Donna Gatlin, State Farm C Advanced Insurance Company D Allison Horner, State Farm E Morgan Bradley, Alfa F Jonah Dismukes, Worthy Insurance Agency

BEST MORTGAGE BROKER/FIRM A Mortgage Team One B Craig Anderton, Bank Of England C Vince Hughes, Bryant Bank D New Horizons Credit Union E Jana Williston, Community Bank F Sharon Thompson, SWBC Mortgage

BEST INVESTMENT BANKER/FINANCIAL PLANNER A Ryan Mahtani, BB&T Investments B James Eddins, Morgan Stanley C Coldsmith Ryder & Associates D Joseph Lomax, Morgan Stanley E Eric Rickey, Edward Jones F 5 Rivers Group, Morgan Stanley

BEST NEW CAR DEALER A B C D E F

Mullinax Bay Chevrolet Joe Bullard Palmer’s Toyota UJ Chevrolet Tameron Honda

Keith Kingan MCD Motors Premier Motorsports Andrew’s Imports Carfinders Auto Outlet Tameron Honda

BEST CPA

BEST LANDSCAPER A Bay Landscaping B Sexton Lawn & Landscaping C Southern Landscape Solutions D Brian Griffin Landscape Co. E Barry Vittor Landscape Medic F Matt VanGieson, Premier Lawn Service

BEST CONTRACTOR/ HOMEBUILDER A B C D E F

Batten Builders Bo Wilder Contracting Robert Dueitt Construction Heritage Homes David Burks Fulcrum Construction

BEST INTERIOR DESIGNER A B C D E F

Augusta Tapia Mary Jo Matranga Randi Wilson Pat O’Neal Kade Laws Interior Design Catherine Arensberg

BEST HARDWARE STORE A Blankenship’s B Andrews Ace Hardware C Eastern Shore Ace Hardware D Springhill Ace Hardware E Wigman’s Ace Hardware F Dawes Ace Hardware

BEST PEST CONTROL A B C D E F

Aegis Pest Control BugMaster Cook’s Pest Control Kelly’s Pest Control Semmes Pest Control Xtreme Xterminating

BEST PET STORE A B C D E F

B&B Pet Stop Bella and Bows Dog Days Barkery PetSmart Pet Supplies Plus The Waggy Tail

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S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

BEST ANTIQUE STORE A B C D E F

Antiques at The Loop Backflash Antiques Charles Phillips To Arms Antiques The Brother’s Gallery Whitehouse Antiques

BEST MEN’S CLOTHING STORE A B C D E F

Alabama Outdoors D&K G Harvell Jos A Bank McCoy’s Metzger’s

BEST LINGERIE/ NAUGHTY SHOP A B C D

Gift Spot NT Video The Little Drawer Victoria’s Secret

BEST WOMEN’S BOUTIQUE A B C D E F

Ashbrooke Hemline Lotus Kenzlee Grace Pink Post Office Boutique Sweet Tea Boutique

BEST CLOTHING CONSIGNMENT STORE A B C D E F

Best Kept Secret Consignology Hertha’s Plato’s Closet Rave Reviews Second Edition

BEST DEPARTMENT STORE A B C D E F

Belk Dillards JC Penney Kohl’s Steinmart TJ Maxx

BEST FORMAL WEAR A B C D E F

Bella Bridesmaid D&K Fancy That Francia’s I Do Putting on the Rtiz

BEST ACCESSORIES/ AFFORDABLE JEWELRY A B C D E F

Emmaleah Boutique Francesca’s Gaudy Galz Knot Just Beads Private Gallery Versona

BEST FINE JEWELRY A B C D E F

Claude Moore Friedman’s Goldstein’s Goldart Karat Patch Zundel’s

BEST DRY CLEANERS A B C D E F

Dixie Cleaners Gulf City Cleaners Jaguar Cleaners Master Cleaners Paragon Waite’s

BEST HOME CLEANING SERVICE A 2 Gals & A Mop B Conde Cleaners C Helping Hands Cleaners D Maids A la Mode E Southern Style Quality Cleans F The Maids

BEST STATIONERY STORE A B C D E F

Gwin’s It’s Inviting JO Acree Paper Jubilee Soiree Signatures The Paper Menu

BEST OUTDOORS STORE A B C D E F

Academy Alabama Outdoors Bass Pro McCoy’s Quint’s Red Beard Outfitters

BEST LOCAL PHARMACY A B C D E F

Christopher Pharmacy Conwell Pharmacy Dawes Point Pharmacy Grand Bay Pharmacy Midtown Pharmacy Saraland Pharmacy

BEST SHOE STORE A B C D E F

Dillards DSW Fleet Feet Shoefly Shoe Station The Gallery

BEST GIFT SHOP A Bellingrath Gardens Gift Shop B Cypress Gift Shop at Five Rivers C Gaillard’s D Marcie N Me E Meggie B’s F Oak Ridge

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BEST HOME FURNISHINGS STORE A B C D E F

Atchison’s Designer Collection J&J Lush Sarah B. Atchison’s Villa Décor

BEST FURNITURE CONSIGNMENT SHOP A B C D E F

All Around the House Best Kept Secret Divine Consignment High Cotton Kaglen’s Something Special

BEST VAPE SHOP A B C D E F

Cloud 9 Vapes Deep South Vape Parlor Vapes Vapor’s Smoke Shop Vapor’s Outpost Vapor Hut

BEST BANK OR CREDIT UNION A Army Aviation Federal Credit Union B BB&T Bank C Coastal Bank and Trust D Community Bank E New Horizons Credit Union F Regions

BEST TATTOO ARTIST/ SHOP A B C D E F

AJ Ludlow CW Neese Kelly Pony Stephenson Kevin Black Sean Herman Suzette Callahan

BEST HOME SECURITY COMPANY A B C D E F

ADT Alert Protection Systems Allied Alarm Avid Home Security Hunter Security TSI Alarms

BEST BODY PIERCER A Chelsea Brown at Medusa’s B Keith Collins at Kaoz C Brett Garrick at Kaoz D Matt Hewett at Kaoz E Chad Reisenweber at Tattoo Town F Aaron Victory at The Bell Rose

KIDS

BEST KIDS’ CLOTHING STORE- NEW A B C D E F

Carter’s GiGi & Jay’s H&M Little Monkey Toes The Holiday Tiny Town

BEST KIDS’ CONSIGNMENT STORE A B C D E F

Carousel Kids Kids Klozet Kidz Kottage Kids Wearhouse Savvy Mom Sale Sweet Seconds

BEST KIDS’ ROOM FURNISHINGS A Just Baby Designs B Polka Tot Designs C Siegel’s Baby Room

BEST SUMMER CAMP A Bayside Academy Summer Camp B Gulf Coast Exploreum Summer Camps C Mobile Museum of Art Summer Art Camp D St. Luke’s Summer Camps E SunnySide Theater F USA Rec Center Summer Camp

BEST DAYCARE

B C D E F

Chick Fil A Chuck E Cheese Island Wing Company Mellow Mushroom Moe’s Southwest Grill

BEST BIRTHDAY PARTY PLACE A Gulf Coast Exploreum B Get Air C Pete’s Party Castle D Pump It Up E Sunshine Sue’s Play Garden F White Gates Farm

BEST PARK/ PLAYGROUND A Daphne Centennial Park B Fairhope Community Park C Langan Municipal Park D Lavretta Park E Medal of Honor Park F Spanish Fort Town Center Park

MOST KID-FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD A B C D E F

Inverness Jackson Heights Llanfair Ravine Woods Rosswood Sky Ranch

BEST KID-FRIENDLY LOCAL ATTRACTION

A Beck’s B Christ United Methodist Church Kidz Crossing C Dauphin Way Baptist D Springhill Baptist CDC E St. Mark’s F West Mobile Baptist CDC

A 5 Rivers Delta Resource Center B Bellingrath Gardens C Estaurium at Dauphin Island Sea Lab D Gulf Coast Exploreum E Gulf Coast Zoo F USS Alabama

BEST PRESCHOOL

BEST DANCE STUDIO

A Bridgeway Academy B Corpus Christi Catholic Preschool C St. Dominic Preschool D St. Luke’s Preschool E St. Paul’s EEC F Westminster Presbyterian Preschool

BEST MOTHER’S DAY OUT A Ashland Place B Christ United Methodist Church C Springhill Baptist MDO D St. Ignatius MDO E St. Mary MDO F Westminster MDO

MOST KID-FRIENDLY RESTAURANT A Buffalo Wild Wings

A Broadway South B Dance without Limits C Debbie’s School of Dance D Grace Dance Center E Sheffield School of the Dance F Turning Pointe Dance Academy

BEST PEDIATRIC DENTIST A Dr. Leslie Buckley, General Dentist for Kids, Teens and Young Adults B Dr. Gaines Thomas & Dr. Lauren Moore C Dr. Stephen Greenleaf D Dr. Kelly Jones, Malbis Pediatric Dentistry E Dr. Joel Welford and Dr. Marion McMurphy F Dr. Trey Fellers

BEST ORTHODONTIST

A B C D E F

Hicks & McMurphy Pickett Orthodontics Dr. Rosalyn Salter Dr. James Donaghey Dr. Brian Oliver Glass Orthodontics

BEST PEDIATRICIAN A B C D E F

Dr. Alfred Shearer Dr. Faye Roberts Dr. Karen Calametti Dr. Mary Wells Dr. Matthew Cepeda Dr. Robin McNair

BEST KID PHOTOGRAPHER A B C D E F

Cornerstone Photography Janie Long Photography Laura Cantrell Samantha Vickers Shane Rice Susanna Womack

BEST PUBLIC SCHOOL A Baker High School B Collier Elementary School C Eichold Mertz Magnet School D Mary B. Austin Elementary School E Phillips Preparatory School F Saraland City Schools

BEST PRIVATE SCHOOL A McGill-Toolen B Mobile Christian School C St. Luke’s Episcopal School D St. Paul’s Episcopal School E St. Dominic’s Catholic School F St. Mary’s Catholic School

COOLEST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER A Carey Arensberg, Hall Elementary B Elizabeth Partsch, ER Dickson C Laura Brand, St. Paul’s D Lisa Large, Collier Elementary E Nicole Baranov, Hutchens F Jessica Cassady, Gilliard Elementary

COOLEST MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHER A Jacqueline Richardson, Foley Middle School B La Toya Barnes, Phillips Preparatory School C Rosalie Hyatt, Grand Bay Middle D Peter Stoyka, Corpus Christi Catholic E Melanie Fromdahl, St. F Dominic’s G Hope Herren, Phillips Preparatory


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

COOLEST HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER A Brandi Richardson, St. Luke’s B Jeremiah Quattrone, Citronelle High School C Joe Arensberg, McGill D Margaret Delaney, UMS E Mike Stratas, Theodore High F Nathan Adams, Rain High School

CITY LIFE BEST MOBILIAN EVER A B C D E F

Eugene Walter Hank Aaron Jimmy Buffett Joe Cain The Peanut Man Uncle Henry

BEST MOBILIAN RIGHT NOW A B C D E F

Chief Slac IV Greg Jones, FTZC Jake Peavy Jonathan Frye Mayor Sandy Stimpson Ralph Hargrove

QUINTESSENTIAL MOBILIAN A B C D E F

Gary Cooper Herndon Inge Preston Griffith Reggie Copeland, Sr. Suzanne Cleveland Vivian Figures

MOST ELIGIBLE BACHELOR A B C D E F

Bennie Henderson Charles Matranga Eric Browne Jonathan Friedlander Mike Scalese Vaughan Blacksher

MOST ELIGIBLE BACHELORETTE A B C D E F

Hanna Hogle Liz Bush Morgan Mitchell Sable Williams Sarah-John Smith Suzanne Donaghey

COOLEST NEIGHBORHOOD - MOBILE A B C D E F

Copeland Island Florence Place Midtown Oakleigh Garden District Regency Rosswood

COOLEST NEIGHBORHOOD – EASTERN SHORE A B C D E F

Bellaton Cambron Fruit and Nut District Historic Malbis Olde Towne Daphne Osprey Ridge

BEST ANNUAL EVENT A Bellingrath Magic Christmas in Lights B Dauphin Street Beer Festival C Greater Gulf State Fair D Mardi Gras E MoonPie Drop F Senior Bowl

BEST ANNUAL FUNDRAISING EVENT A Fuse Project Dragon Boat Races B Junior League Christmas Jubilee C Little Black Dress - Ronald McDonald House D Salvation Army Mother Daughter Tea E St. Mary’s Crawfish and Bluegrass Extravaganza F Woofstock

BEST PLACE TO HOLD A RECEPTION/SPECIAL EVENT A B C D E F

23 East 5 Rivers BattleHouse Hotel Fort Conde Inn The Steeple Venue at Dawes

BEST HOTEL A B C D E F

BattleHouse Hotel Berney Fly Grand Hotel Hampton Inn Malaga The Admiral

BEST HIGH SCHOOL MARCHING BAND A B C D E F

Baker Davidson LeFlore McGill Mobile Christian Murphy High School

BEST MARDI GRAS PARADING SOCIETY A B C D E F

Conde Cavaliers Crewe of Columbus Infant Mystics LaShes Mystics of Time Polka Dots

BEST MARDI GRAS MARCHING SOCIETY A B C D

Dauphin Street Drunks Skeleton Krewe Society of Bums Wild Mauvillians

BEST MARDI GRAS BALL A B C D E F

Crewe of Columbus Fifty Funny Fellows Mobile Mystics Mystics of Time Polka Dots Osiris

BEST GOLF COURSE A B C D E F

Azalea City Golf Course Country Club Mobile Heron Lakes Magnolia Grove Spring Hill College Steelwood

MOBILE’S BUMPIEST STREET A B C D

Ann Street Glenwood Street Little Flower Avenue Old Government Street

COOLEST CHURCH OR HOUSE OF WORSHIP A B C D E F

Christian Life Church City Hope Gospel Way Church Grace Lutheran Harvest Church Wesminster Presbyterian

BEST CLERGYMAN/PASTOR/SPIRITUAL LEADER A Dr. Brett Burleson - Dayspring Baptist B David Mauldin - Westminster Presbyterian C Fr. John Lynes - Little Flower Catholic D Fr. Mark Neske - Holy Family Catholic E Patrick Casey - Christian Life Church F Wayne Miller - Grace Lutheran

BEST PLACE TO TAKE OUT-OF-TOWNERS (ATTRACTION) A B C D E F

5 Rivers Battleship Bellingrath Gardens Gulf Coast Ducks History Museum of Mobile Mobile Carnival Museum

BEST PLACE TO TAKE OUT-OF-TOWNERS (RESTAURANT) A Bluegill

B C D E F

Callaghan’s Dauphin’s Felix’s NoJa Wintzell’s

BEST COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY A Spring Hill College B University of Mobile C University of South Alabama

BEST JUNIOR COLLEGE/ TRADE/TECHNICAL SCHOOL A Bishop State B Blue Cliff College C Charles Academy of Beauty D Coastal Alabama Community College E Remington College F Virginia College

COOLEST APARTMENT COMPLEX - MOBILE

MUSIC BEST LOCAL BAND

BEST SOLO MUSICIAN

BEST NEW LOCAL BAND

BEST JAZZ MUSICIAN

A Camm Lewis & The Live Oaks B Red Clay Strays C The Disco Rednecks D Slide Bayou E The Marlow Boys F Yeah, Probably

A B C D E

BEST COUNTRY BAND/ PERFORMER

A Beamin’ B Clint ”Smitty” Smith C Derek “Truthseekah” Grosskurth D Mr. 88 E Phillip Baggins, Jr. F Pluto & Kid Kembi

A Bruce Smelley B Camm Lewis & The Live Oaks C Hannah McFarland D Holli Mosley E Last Call Rodeo F Muscadine Bloodline

COOLEST APARTMENT COMPLEX – EASTERN SHORE

BEST METAL/PUNK/UNDERGROUND BAND

A Arlington at Eastern Shore B Bay Breeze Apartments C The Colonnade

BEST MOVIE THEATER A Cobb Gulf Shores B Crescent Theater C IMAX at Gulf Coast Exploreum D Premiere Cinema 14 Spanish Fort E Wynnsong 16

BEST LOCAL COMPANY TO WORK FOR A Employee Fiduciary, LLC B Express Employment Professionals C FTZC D Rihner, Gupta & Grosz Cardiology, P.C. E West (formerly Televox) UJ Chevrolet

BEST BEACH RESORT/ CONDO A B C D E F

Caribe Holiday Isle Phoenix on the Bay Phoenix West The Wharf Turquoise Place

A Jamell Richardson B Lisa Mills C Ric McNaughton

A Infant Richard & The Delta Stones B Jimmy Lumpkin & The Revival C Paw Paw’s Medicine Cabinet D Stereo Dogs E The Mulligan Brothers F Underhill Family Orchestra

Four Seasons Marine Street Lofts Old Shell Lofts Stoneridge Tower on Ryan Park Village at Midtown

A B C D E F

BEST BLUES BAND/ARTIST

A B C D

A Sunday Fire Black Titan Curse the Flesh Hibachi Stranglers

BEST CLUB TO SEE LIVE MUSIC A B C D E F

Brickyard Callaghan’s O’Daly’s Soul Kitchen The Blind Mule The Merry Widow

BEST OUTDOOR BAR TO SEE LIVE MUSIC A B C D E F

Bluegill Dority’s Flora Bama Hangout OK Bike Shop The Frog Pond

BEST VENUE TO SEE LIVE MUSIC (NON-BAR) A B C D E F

IP Casino Saenger Theatre The Frog Pond The Listening Room The Steeple The Wharf

A B C D E F

Andrew Ayers Eric Erdman John Anthony Laurie Anne Armour Ryan Balthrop Phil Proctor

Blake Nolte Chip Herrington John Cochran Roman Street The Bodhi Trio

BEST RAP/HIP HOP ARTIST

BEST MUSIC/RECORD STORE A B C D E

Andy’s Music Bay Sound Dr. Music Mobile Records Picker’s Paradise

BEST LOCAL RECORDING STUDIO A B C D E F

Admiral Bean Dauphin Street Sound Day 6 Dogwood Grave Danger Studio H20

BEST GUITAR PLAYER A B C D E F

Chad Parker Corky Hughes Jimmy Gray Mike Jernigan Patrick Ramsey Phil Proctor

BEST AREA SINGER/ VOICE A B C D E F

Holli Mosley Jimmy Lumpkin Mike Jernigan Ross Newell Ryan Balthrop Symone French

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S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

BEST AREA DRUMMER

BEST MUSEUM

A B C D E F

Bryan Ayers Cameron Alidor Chico McCollum Ethan Snedigar Tyler Goodwin Zach Lynd

A Bellingrath Gardens Museum B Eastern Shore Art Center C Gulf Coast Exploreum D History Museum of Mobile E Mobile Carnival Museum F Mobile Museum of Art

A B C D E F

Gabriel Willis Greg Crabtree Jamie Newsome Marc Hendrix Mario Rivera Owen Finley

BEST THEATRE GROUP

BEST AREA BASSIST

BEST PIANO PLAYER/ KEYBOARDIST A B C D E F

Alan Anderson Andrew Ayers Chris Spies Gene Murrell John Anthony Scott Morlock

BEST DRAG QUEEN PERFORMER A B C D E F

Amber Douglas Champagne Munroe Jawakatema Davenport Miss Cie Miss Loretta Venus Shante Da’Vis

BEST DJ (MIXIN’, MASHIN’UP KIND) A DJ Amanda Dean B DJ Blayze C DJ Leroy D DJ Lynch E DJ Mbezzle F DJ Mellly Mell (Melvin Sledge)

BEST AREA MUSIC FESTIVAL A 1065 Music Festival B Hangout Music Festival C SouthSounds Music Festival

ARTS BEST LOCAL PAINTER A B C D E F

Adam Underwood Ardith Goodwin Ben Kaiser Bonnie Fuchs Devlin Wilson Faye Earnest

BEST LOCAL SCULPTOR A B C D E F

April Livingston Bruce Larsen Casey Downing Bertice McPherson Lebaron Heathcoe Shawn Berdux

BEST LOCAL GRAPHIC DESIGN ARTIST A B C D E F

Amanda Pritchard Carl Norman Colby Jackson Hadley Binion Josh Holland Tripp Gustin

BEST MIXED MEDIA ARTIST A B C D E F

Ardith Goodwin Chris Cumbie Julia Greer Fobes Lucy Gafford Mateo Shawn Berdux

BEST ART GALLERY A Alabama Contemporary Art Center B Artology C Cathedral Square Gallery D CATS (Creative Artistic Treasures Studio) E Gallery 450 F Inspire

A Chickasaw Civic Theatre B Eastern Shore Repertory Theatre C Joe Jefferson Players D Mobile Theatre Guild E Playhouse in the Park F Sunnyside Theatre

BEST PLAY OR PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR A A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum - JJP B Beauty and the Beast - St. Paul’s Players C Complete Works of William Shakespeare - Chickasaw Civic Theatre D Sordid Lives - Mobile Theatre Guild E Sweeney Todd - JJP F The Producers – JJP

BEST LOCAL ACTOR A B C D E F

Chandler Smith Cory Olson Gene Murrell Griffin Hood Jason McKenzie Lisa Costa

BEST THEATRICAL SINGER A B C D E F

Chandler Smith Cory Olson Gene Murrell Jessica Head Terri Jackson Stacey Driskell

BEST ARTS EVENT A Artys B Eastern Shore Repertory Theatre on the Bluff C Fairhope Arts & Crafts Festival D LoDa Artwalk E Mobile Symphony Orchestra F Mobile Arts Council Throwdown

EATS & DRINKS BEST OVERALL RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Butch Cassidy’s Dauphin’s Dumbwaiter Felix’s Kitchen on George Ruth’s Chris

BEST LOCALLY OWNED RESTAURANT A Bayley’s Seafood Restaurant B Butch Cassidy’s C Felix’s D Osman’s E Pour Baby F The Noble South

BEST NEW RESTAURANT FINE DINING A Chuck’s Fish B Dumbwaiter on the Hill C Le Bouchon

BEST NEW RESTAURANT CASUAL A B C D

BJ’s Brewhouse FOY Fuzzy’s Taco Shop Nourish

34 | L AG N I A P P E | J u n e 8 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 1 4 , 2 0 1 7

E Roosters F Taziki’s

BEST CHAIN RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Chicken Salad Chick Foosackly’s Half Shell Oyster House Moe’s BBQ PF Changs Romano’s Macaroni Grill

BEST EASTERN SHORE RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Boudreaux’s Camellia Cafe Dragonfly Fairhope Inn R Bistro Sunset Pointe

BEST BEACH RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Cobalt Cosmo’s Fisher’s Flora Bama Yacht Club LuLu’s Miguel’s Beach’n Baja

BEST CHEF A Arwen Rice, Red or White B Bill Briand, Fisher’s C Bryan Cates, Kitchen on George D Chris Rainosek, The Noble South E Cortlandt Inge, Cortlandt’s F Weston Simpson, Pour Baby

BEST ATMOSPHERE A B C D E F

Bluegill Chuck’s Fish Dauphin’s NoJa Pour Baby Sunset Pointe

MOST INNOVATIVE MENU A B C D E F

Dragonfly Kitchen on George NoJa Saisho The Noble South Von’s

BEST OUTDOOR DINING A B C D E F

Bluegill Ed’s OK Bike Shop Sunset Pointe The Gulf The River Shack

BEST SWEET TEA A B C D E F

Chick Fil A Cream and Sugar Foosackly’s McAlister’s Raising Cane’s Spot of Tea

BEST BISCUITS A B C D E F

Biscuit King Briquette’s Cracker Barrel Cream and Sugar Dick Russell’s Hardee’s

BEST APPETIZER A Baked Avocado - Five Bar B Brussells Sprouts - Dumbwaiter C Crawfish & Spinach Dip Heroes D Dave’s Pimiento Cheese LeBouchon E Tuna Martini - Royal Scam F Uptown Shrimp - Chuck’s Fish

BEST ENTRÉE IN MOBILE A Chicken & Grits - Pour Baby

B Donkey on Crack Roll Chuck’s Fish C Hangar Steak - NoJa D LA Burger – Callaghan’s E Lamb Chops Gorgonzola - Osman’s F Shrimp & Grits - The Noble South

BEST HOME COOKIN’/ SOUL FOOD A B C D E F

Buck’s Diner Cozy Brown’s Judy’s Place Mama’s Mary’s Southern Cooking Redeemer Community Café

BEST FARM TO TABLE A B C D E F

FOY Kitchen on George Nourish Pour Baby Red or White The Noble South

BEST SERVER A Dominique Kline - Sunflower Café B Jocelyn Phillips - Pour Baby C Megan Baker - Butch Cassidy’s D Pat Ramsey - Felix’s E Robin Trainor - Cream and Sugar F Tommy Watts - Felix’s

BEST OVERALL SERVICE A B C D E F

Briquette’s Dauphin’s Felix’s Kitchen On George Ruth’s Chris Sunflower Café

BEST DESSERT A Blondie at Chuck’s Fish B Buttermilk Pie at Pour Baby C Chocolates at Fairhope Chocolate D Desserts at Cream & Sugar E Desserts at Delish’s Desserts F Key Lime Curd at Sunset Pointe

BEST RESTAURANT WINE LIST A B C D E F

Chuck’s Fish Kitchen on George Pour Baby Red or White Ruth’s Chris The Trellis Room

BEST WINGS A B C D E F

Baumhower’s Buffalo Wild Wings Butch Cassidy’s Island Wing Company Moe’s BBQ WeMo’s

BEST CHICKEN FINGERS A B C D E F

Buffalo Wild Wings Butch Cassidy’s Foosackly’s PDQ Raising Cane’s Zaxby’s

BEST ICE CREAM/ YOGURT/GELATO A B C D E F

Cammie’s Old Dutch Chill Dippin’ Dots Marble Slab Mr. Gene’s Beans Serda’s

BEST LUNCH SPOT A B C D E

Ashland Midtown Pub Café 219 Chicken Salad Chick Honey Baked Ham Regina’s Kitchen

F Rice Asian Grill & Sushi Bar

BEST EASTERN SHORE LUNCH SPOT A B C D E F

East Shore Café Panini Pete’s R Bistro Sandra’s Sunflower Café Windmill Market

BEST WINE/GOURMET SHOP A B C D E F

A la Cork Domke Market Firehouse Wine Red or White Le Bouchon Southern Napa

BEST BEER SELECTION RETAIL A B C D E F

Cottage Hill Package Store Domke Market Kathy’s Package Store Old Shell Growlers Rouse’s Southern Napa

BEST ANNUAL FOOD EVENT OR COOK-OFF A American Cancer Society Chili Cook-off B Bay Bites Food Truck Festival C Downtown Cajun Cook-off D Feeding the Gulf Coast Annual Chef Challenge E Greek Fest F Shrimp Festival

BEST FOOD TRUCK A B C D E F

Benjamin’s Crepe Crusaders Kraken Catering Company Smokin’ Gringos Von’s Will Hughes

BEST GUMBO A B C D E F

Chuck’s Fish Cream and Sugar Felix’s Mudbugs at the Loop Original Oyster House Wintzell’s

BEST PO-BOY A B C D E F

Ashland Midtown Pub Market by the Bay Mudbugs at the Loop R&R The Boiling Pot Wintzell’s

BEST SUSHI A B C D E F

Chuck’s Fish Fuji San Master Joe’s Liquid Lounge Rice Rock-n-Roll Sushi

BEST BAKERY A B C D E F

Bake My Day ellenJay Flour Girls Pollman’s Sally’s Piece of Cake Sugar Rush

BEST WEDDING CAKES A B C D E F

Cakes by Judi Couture Cakes ellenJay Flour Girls Pollman’s The Pastry Shop

BEST CATERER A B C D

Bay Gourmet Clifton Morrissette Creative Catering Georgia Roussos

E Naman’s F Tyners

BEST BURGER A B C D E F

Butch Cassidy’s Callaghan’s Five Guys LoDa Biergarten Mugshots Pirate’s Cove

BEST STEAK A B C D E F

Briquette’s Jessie’s Judy’s Place Osman’s Outback Ruth’s Chris

BEST SEAFOOD A B C D E F

Ed’s Felix’s Half Shell Oyster House JT’s Sunset Grill Ralph & Kacoo’s Wintzell’s

BEST BRUNCH A B C D E F

Ashland Midtown Pub Dauphin’s Five Grand Hotel Kitchen on George The Noble South

BEST ETHNIC RESTAURANT A 7 Spice B Ang Bahay Kubo C Mediterranean Sandwich Company D Rice E Sage Lebanese Cuisine F The Yak

BEST MEXICAN RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Fuego Hacienda San Miguel La Cocina Rio Roosters Taqueria Mexico

BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Café Grazie Carrabba’s Gambino’s Mirko Roma Via Emilia

BEST PIZZA A B C D E F

Ashland Midtown Pub Cortlandt’s Marco’s Mellow Mushroom Pizzeria Delphina Red or White

BEST COFFEEHOUSE A B C D E F

Carpe Diem Chaleur Cream and Sugar RedBar Satori Serda’s

BEST EASTERN SHORE COFFEEHOUSE A B C D E F

Fairhope Roasting Mr. Gene’s Beans Refuge Serda’s Soul Caffeine The Coffee Loft

BEST LOCAL GROCERY STORE A B C D E F

Cain’s Piggly Wiggly Fairhope Health Foods Food Pak Greer’s Old Shell Market Virginia’s Health Foods


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

BEST GROCERY CHAIN A Costco B Publix C Rouse’s D Super Target E Walmart Neighborhood Market F Winn-Dixie

BEST GOURMET GROCERY A B C D

Andree’s Domke Market Fresh Market Whole Foods

BEST PLACE TO GET LOCAL PRODUCE/ FOODS- MOBILE A B C D E F

Lil Brian’s Market on the Square Old Shell Market Sessions Farm Market Ted & Nancy’s Victory Teaching Farm

BEST PLACE TO GET LOCAL PRODUCE/FOODS – BALDWIN A B C D E F

Allegri Bee Natural Burris Country Wagon Hazel’s Seasons in the Sun

BEST BARBECUE RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Brick Pit Cotton State BBQ Dick Russell’s Dreamland Meat Boss Moe’s BBQ

BEST BARBECUE SAUCE A B C D E F

Brick Pit Cotton State BBQ Dreamland Meat Boss Moe’s BBQ Sonny’s

BEST RIBS A B C D E F

Brick Pit Dreamland Hickory Pit Too Meat Boss Moe’s BBQ Saucy Q

BEST RAW OYSTERS A B C D E F

Bluegill Felix’s Half Shell Oyster House Original Oyster House Ralph & Kacoo’s Wintzell’s

BEST TAKE AND BAKE

A B C D E F

Bay Gourmet Clark’s Kitchen Dream Dinners Jamie Roussos Papa Murphy’s Rae’s

BEST CUPCAKE A ellenJay B Flour Girls C Pollman’s D Sally’s Piece of Cake E Simply Sweet Cupcake Boutique F Something Sweet Bake Shop

BEST SEAFOOD MARKET A B C D E F

Mudbugs DIP Seafood Market by the Bay Mudbugs at the Loop Skinner’s Seafood Southern Fish & Oyster Springhill Avenue Seafood

BEST DRUNK FOOD A Buffalo Wild Wings B LoDa Biergarten C Mediterranean Sandwich Company D O’Daly’s Hole in the Wall E OK Bike Shop F Waffle House

BEST HANGOVER FOOD A B C D E F

Blind Mule Butch Cassidy’s Five Bar Foosackly’s Heroes Waffle House

MEDIA FAVORITE RADIO STATION FM A B C D E F

92 ZEW 92.1 95KSJ 94.9 FM Talk 106.5 K Love 98.3 WABD 97.5 WNSP 105.5

FAVORITE RADIO STATION AM A B C D

WNTM 710 WNGL Archangel 1410 WKTD 1440 WERM Gospel 1220

BEST LOCAL DJ A B C D E F

DJ Blayze - 93 WBLX Gene Murrell - WZEW Matt McCoy - 107.3 KISS FM Sean Sullivan - FM TALK Shelby Mitchell - WKSJ Tony Plosczynski – WZEW

BEST DJ TEAM A Dan & Shelby - WKSJ B Matt McCoy & Gossip

Greg - 107.3 KISS FM C Mark Heim and Lee Shrivanian - WNSP D Mobile Mornings - Sean Sullivan, Dalton Orwig, Kelly Jones FM TALK 106.5 E Murphy, Sam and Jodi Lite Mix 99.9 F Tim Camp & LeeAnn Camp TLC in the Morning

Kennedy & Creg Stephenson F Tee Time on the Gulf Coast - FM Talk 106.5

BEST LOCAL EVENING TV NEWSCAST A WALA FOX 10 B WKRG 5 C WPMI 15

BEST MORNING SHOW/DJ BEST LOCAL MORNING TV NEWSCAST A Mobile Mornings - Sean

Sullivan, Dalton Orwig, Kelly Jones FM TALK 106.5 B Bobby Bones - WKSJ C Elvis Duran - 107.3 KISS FM D Opening Kickoff with Mark Heim and Lee Shrivanian - WNSP E TLC in the morning with Tim & LeeAnn Camp WZEW F Uncle Henry – WNTM

DJ WHOSE VOICE LEADS YOU TO BELIEVE YOU MAY WANT TO SEE HIM NAKED A Dalton Orwig- FM Talk 106.5 B DJ Blayze - 93 WBLX C Gossip Greg - 107.3 KISS FM D Tony Plosczynski - WZEW E Twiggins- WABD F Uncle Henry – WNTM

DJ WHOSE VOICE LEADS YOU TO BELIEVE YOU MAY WANT TO SEE HER NAKED A B C D E

Jolene Roxbury - FM TALK 106.5 Kelly Jones - FM TALK 106.5 LeeAnn Camp - WZEW Mystic Marge WZEW Shelby Mitchell – WKSJ

BEST TALK RADIO HOST/ SHOW A Afternoon Drive - WNSP B Armed Alabama Radio FM TALK 106.5 C Midday Mobile - FM TALK 106.5 D Mobile Mornings - Sean Sullivan, Dalton Orwig, Kelly Jones FM TALK 106.5 E Today’s Homeowner - FM TALK 106.5 F Uncle Henry – WNTM

BEST SPORTS RADIO HOST/SHOW A Armed Alabama Radio FM TALK 106.5 B John Raciatti Golf Show - WNSP C Opening Kickoff with Mark Heim and Lee Shrivanian - WNSP D Paul Feinbaum - FM TALK 106.5 E Sports Drive with Randy

A WALA FOX 10 B WKRG 5 C WPMI 15

BEST ANCHOR A B C D E F

Bob Grip - WALA Devon Walsh - WKRG Kelly Foster - WPMI Lenise Ligon - WALA Mel Showers - WKRG Sarah Wall – WALA

BEST METEOROLOGIST A B C D E F

Alan Sealls - WKRG Chris Dunn - WPMI Jason Smith - WALA John Nodar - WKRG Kelly Foster - WPMI Michael White – WALA

BEST TV INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER A B C D E F

Andrea Ramey - WPMI Chad Petri - WKRG Christian Jennings - WPMI Kati Weis - WALA Peter Albrecht - WKRG Renee Dials – WALA

FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE WRITER A B C D E F

Andy MacDonald, Cuisine Dale Liesch, Reporter Jason Johnson, Reporter Jeff Poor, Beltway Beat Kevin Lee, Arts Mark Bryant, Sports

FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE COVER STORY A Dethroned by Lee Hedgepeth B Hooked by Jason Johnson C One Mobile by Jason Johnson and Dale Liesch D That’s a Wrap by Dale Liesch E Shell Game by Jason Johnson F Arty Awards by Kevin Lee

FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE COVER IMAGE A Nappies 2016 By Dan Anderson B Dethroned by Dan Anderson C Hooked by Laura Rasmussen D Belt Tightening by Laura Rasmussen E 1065 Illustration by Laura Rasmussen F Shell Game by Dan Anderson

FAVORITE AL.COM CONTENT CREATOR A B C D E F

John Archibald JD Crowe Jared Boyd Kyle Whitmire Michelle Irvin John Sharp

FAVORITE GLOSSY BEST SPORTS COVERAGE MAGAZINE A Joe Emer - WALA B Lance Crawford - WPMI C Randy Patrick - WKRG

BEST WEEKEND TV NEWS TEAM A WALA FOX 10 B WKRG 5 C WPMI 15

HOTTEST LOCAL TV NEWSMAN A B C D E F

Greg Peterson - WPMI Darwin Singleton - WPMI Jason Smith - WALA JB Biunno - WKRG Michael White - WALA Peter Albrecht – WKRG

HOTTEST LOCAL TV NEWSWOMAN A B C D E F

Alexa Knowles - WALA Chasity Byrd - WALA Devan Coffaro - WALA Devon Walsh - WKRG Jessica Taloney - WKRG Kelly Foster – WPMI

A B C D E F

Access Due South Exalte Mobile Bay Monthly Mobile Bay Parents Mobile Mask

FAVORITE LOCAL WEBSITE OR BLOG A Arrested in Mobile B Lemon Baby by Amanda Gibson C Mod Mobilian D Refresh Restyle by Debbie Westbrook E Southern Rambler F When Life Hand You Grapes by Michelle Murrill

BEST LOCAL TV AD A American Carpet B David J. Maloney C Greer’s D Joe Bullard E Mike Slocumb, Alabama Hammer F Wind Creek Casino

POLITICOS HARDEST WORKING OFFICIAL MOBILE A City Attorney Ricardo Woods B Executive Director or Planning & Development Dianne Irby C Finance Director Paul Wesch D Mayor Sandy Stimpson E MPD Chief Lawrence Battiste F Public Safety Director James Barber

HARDEST WORKING MOBILE CITY COUNCILPERSON A Bess Rich B Gina Gregory C Levon Manzie

HARDEST WORKING ELECTED OFFICIAL MOBILE COUNTY A Commissioner Connie Hudson B Commissioner Jerry Carl C Commissioner Merceria Ludgood D District Attorney Ashley Rich E Judge Jill Phillips F Sherriff Sam Cochran

HARDEST WORKING ELECTED OFFICIAL BALDWIN COUNTY A Daphne Mayor Dane Haygood B Fairhope Mayor Karin Wilson C Spanish Fort Mayor Mike McMillan D Commissioner Frank Burt E Commissioner Tucker Dorsey F Sherriff Hoss Mack

HARDEST WORKING LOCAL STATE LEGISLATOR A B C D E F

Rep. Bill Hightower Rep. David Sessions Rep. Napoleon Bracy Rep. Victor Gaston Sen. Rusty Glover Sen. Vivian Figures

WHO WILL BE THE NEXT GOVERNOR OF ALABAMA? A B C D E F

Bradley Byrne Kay Ivey Roy Moore Rusty Glover Twinkle Cavanaugh Walt Maddox

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ART ARTIFICE

Bench decides future of ballet lawsuit BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

A

June 7 hearing before Circuit Judge Jay York will determine the future of a lawsuit against Mobile Ballet filed by a group of current and former board members. York will rule on a volley of amended actions and motions, which have flown since the original action was filed in late January. Plaintiffs alleged malfeasance, breach of fiduciary duty and other charges by Mobile Ballet director Karen Kennedy and a collection of board members in a 52-page document. The attached 25 pages of evidence drew a line to former artistic director Winthrop Corey’s sudden departure in November 2016. A Feb. 18 letter from board president Dr. Sandra Parker called the lawsuit “false and reckless” and “harmful to the organization.” “The original complaint was filed allegedly for the benefit of Mobile Ballet. They have now changed that to actually sue Mobile Ballet along with 10 of the directors and so clearly the lawsuit is clearly not for the benefit of the Mobile Ballet. If they contend that it is, then these plaintiffs have no standing to bring that lawsuit,” Caine O’Rear III said. O’Rear and Windy Bitzer are defense counsel for the board. Monty Thull, Beverly Davis and Rhea Mostellar were plaintiffs in the original action. According to defense counsel, Thull and Mostellar are no longer on the Mobile Ballet board. Judge York previously feared a potential conflict of interest from a prior relationship with a named party. The conflict — a case of mistaken identity — was resolved but plaintiff’s attorney Ray Thompson needed to amend the suit in late April. “[Thompson] agreed with our motion to dismiss for the most part and so that’s why he filed that amended

Artist family tales at MMoA

complaint. What we’ve done now is move to dismiss that amended complaint,” attorney Warren Butler said. Kennedy retained individual representation in Butler and Alex Terry Wood. “[Kennedy] remains very positive of the things going on with Mobile Ballet but she has not appreciated the negative statements made by Mr. Thompson against her when she has had total support from the supermajority of the board members and has decisions based on their approval,” Butler said. Dismissal motions from both the board and Kennedy characterize the initial lawsuit as containing “flamboyant histrionics and disparagement.” They cite not only the lack of standing for plaintiffs to file this action but defendants’ immunity through Alabama’s Volunteer Service Act and the lack of any actions beyond the power of Mobile Ballet as grounds. “So what we have now is really actions that have been taken by the Mobile Ballet that were approved by a substantial majority of the board at the time — 12 members of a 16-member board approved these actions and business decisions,” O’Rear said. In kind, Thompson filed a June 1 response to defense’s dismissal motion. He claimed their references to a statute of limitations and the plaintiffs’ standing on the board should be adjusted to the case’s particular timeframe. Defense attorneys proffered other motivations for the initial legal action. “I think one other point here is we believe the allegations are motivated by an effort to enhance a newly created ballet school in competition with the Mobile Ballet. It’s headed by plaintiff’s counsel’s wife — Classical Ballet of Mobile,” O’Rear said. Thompson’s wife, Pamela, is a former director of the

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A JUNE 7 HEARING BEFORE CIRCUIT JUDGE JAY YORK WILL DETERMINE THE FUTURE OF A LAWSUIT AGAINST MOBILE BALLET FILED BY A GROUP OF CURRENT AND FORMER BOARD MEMBERS. YORK WILL RULE ON A VOLLEY OF AMENDED ACTIONS AND MOTIONS, WHICH HAVE FLOWN SINCE THE ORIGINAL ACTION WAS FILED IN LATE JANUARY. ” Ray Thompson admitted his wife left Mobile Ballet about the same time Corey did. He also said his wife has been approached about teaching at the new school. “As I appreciate it, there are 40 or 50 families who have left Mobile Ballet and are involved in the new work. In January, these families came to my wife and wanted her to teach ballet. There was no entity then. I don’t represent Classical Ballet of Mobile at all,” Thompson said. As to imminent proceeding, both sides stand firm. “We look forward to arguing our motion to dismiss with Judge York next week,” Butler said. “Get ready, I think it’s going to be interesting. There may be some fireworks at this hearing,” Thompson said.

For more information, call 251-208-5200 or go to mobilemuseumofart.com.

Lady Justice featured at June Learning Lunch

Baldwin County’s Janie Shores was bound for greatness after graduating Samford University, and then schools of law at the universities of Alabama and Virginia. No one anticipated that lofty perch would be atop the highest court in her native state. Cumberland School of Law made Shores the first female law professor in Alabama in 1965, and in 1974 she became the first female to serve on the Alabama Supreme Court.

She was considered as a nominee for the United States Supreme Court when Justice Byron “Whizzer” White retired in 1993. The seat eventually went to Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Shores will be at the History Museum of Mobile (111 S. Royal St.) on Wednesday, June 14, at noon to discuss her storied life and new book, “Just Call Me Janie: The Unlikely Story of the First Woman Elected to the Alabama Supreme Court.” Entrance is free. Visitors are encouraged to bring their own lunch. For more information, call Jennifer Theeck at 251-3010270 or contact her by email at theeckj@historymuseumofmobile.com.

ARTSGALLERY

Heralded Alabama artist William Christenberry’s work is a visual manifestation of the Southern penchant for place and storytelling. Now Mobilians can hear their own tales behind the artist himself from those who knew him best. Saturday, June 10, at 2 p.m., members of the Christenberry family will be on hand to give visitors at the Mobile Museum of Art (4850 Museum Drive) a tour through the backstories and times of Christenberry’s life and work. This glimpse into the man behind the art will be rare and unique. Entrance to the museum is free for members. Regular admission rates apply for nonmembers.

Mobile Ballet School and is named as such in the original lawsuit. Artifice found a website for Classical Ballet of Mobile on June 2. It was incomplete but under its “about” heading was a summary describing the school’s start as the result of interested parents who approached Pamela Thompson for ballet instruction. Little other information was available other than its location in Mobile and a map showing where attire can be purchased. As of Sunday, June 4, the website had changed. While its logo is there, the remainder of its content has been removed except the page describing the school’s formation, which no longer bears Pamela Thompson’s name. Artifice acquired a State of Alabama Nonprofit Corporation certificate filed June 1, 2017, in Mobile County Probate for Classical Ballet of Mobile Inc. The form said it was prepared by attorney Edward Hawkins, that its registered agent is Doug Bridges and its incorporator Connie Catranis. The corporation’s address is listed as 744 Museum Drive in Mobile.


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MUSIC

FEATURE

WES JEANS TRIO WITH THE RED CLAY STRAYS THURSDAY, JUNE 15, 8 P.M. THE LISTENING ROOM OF MOBILE, 78 ST. FRANCIS ST., WWW.THELISTENINGROOMMOBILE.COM TICKETS: $20 ARTIST DONATION (RESERVATIONS ENCOURAGED)

Return of the Wes Jeans Trio

T

Photo | Wikimedia Commons | Wes Jeans

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

he Listening Room of Mobile is noteworthy for providing the Azalea City with live music performances in a cozy setting. The venue’s intimate nature allows artists to create a closer social and musical bond with their audience. Many assume “listening room” shows consist of performances by purist singer-songwriters armed with only an acoustic guitar, but in recent months, owner Jim Pennington has proved full bands have just as much to offer the setting. The talent lined up for this performance may be a perfect opportunity to witness a facet of Pennington’s unique vision. The evening will begin with a set from one of Skate Mountain Records’ newest additions to its roster, The Red Clay

Strays. This band will serve up their Southernfried mélange of homegrown rock and classically influenced country delivered with electrifying charisma. Next, a familiar face will take the stage, one that has been mysteriously missing for a very long time — Wes Jeans. Several years ago, Jeans used his fiery Texas blues and regular visits to Mobile to establish a zealous fan base. Locals fell in love with his work on the guitar and on the stage. This Lone Star State musician’s superior work on the fretboard earned him consistent shows at venues such as The Temple and Bluegill. Locals also saw Jeans open at the Saenger Theatre for artists including Buddy Guy and B.B. King, who once told Jeans he was “going places.” Jeans’ career began when he was 15. After playing guitar just nine months, he entered the International Jimi Hendrix Competition and placed second. He also earned the praise of Hendrix’s father, Al, who personally told Jeans he played with the same passion as his son. “I always said that losing that deal and coming in second was probably one of the best things that ever happened to me,” Jeans said. “Instead of getting a big head and being all like, ‘I was great and won this deal,’ it made me try harder. I learned that there is always somebody better than you. So you’ve got to practice and work harder and get better at your craft.” Jeans began touring and supplying steady releases. Along the way, Guitar Player magazine held a poll asking readers to rate 2004’s “Top Young Gun Guitar Players.” Once again, Jeans came in second, between Derek Trucks and Johnny Lang. But Jeans was the only independent artist in the poll’s top 10. As his reputation continued to grow, Jeans seemed to disappear from the road. But his disappearance was the result of an honorable and worthy decision to concentrate on another important project in his life. “I had kids,” he explained. “Once my kids

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were born, I joined into a different band and was playing regionally here in Texas and Louisiana and Oklahoma and Arkansas. It was anywhere that I could get to with a day’s drive. I could do the gigs and come back and not be away from my babies. I even ended up playing in two different country bands, which is out of character for me.” Jeans also embarked on other endeavors that allowed him to balance family with work, opening a recording studio and a music school. During the day he instructed young guitarists in method and by night he manned the studio console. While this

the satisfaction of being in creative control. For Jeans, the reformation of his namesake project is a chance to continue forward with a dream that was put aside. “I feel real comfortable doing my own thing,” Jeans said. “I sing, play and do whatever I want to do. I don’t have to worry about anybody else or whatever. I’m really excited about that.” Jeans is already in talks with Los Angelesbased indie label Cleopatra Records, discussing a variety of options for the potential release of his next album. While he could not provide many

It made me try harder. I learned that there is always somebody better than you. So you’ve got to practice and work harder and get better at your craft. new regimen allowed him to spend time with his children, Jeans admits he never got comfortable with being off the road. “I had never gone to the same job at the same place every day,” he said. “It didn’t take long for me to get cabin fever ...” When it seemed his life as a Texas blues guitarist was finished, Jeans’ career took another sudden turn that resulted from two events: a divorce, and the realization that his children were no longer “babies.” The guitarist decided it was time to reignite his blazing Texas blues with the reformation of the Wes Jeans Trio and the organization of his first extensive tour in many years. After years as a hired gun for other musicians’ projects, Jeans admits he is already feeling

details, Jeans did say he already has a track list for this album. Ultimately, he wants to record 15 tracks and choose 11 for an upcoming release. After the album hits, Jeans will redirect his attention to overseas prospects. European countries have always had a fascination with American-born genres such as jazz and blues. Jeans hopes to capitalize on Europe’s love of American sounds. The guitarist will spend a great deal of time in Europe promoting this new album, then return home and see if it has spread through the states. “I’ll tour through Europe and stay over there and play as many big festivals as we can and spread the word over there,” Jeans said. “Hopefully by the time I come back home, the album will have gained enough traction here.”


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MUSIC BRIEFS

Soul supremacy

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

Photo | Facebook | Thomas Wynn & the Believers

BAND: THOMAS WYNN & THE BELIEVERS • DATE: SATURDAY, JUNE 10, 7 P.M. • VENUE: CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB, 916 CHARLESTON ST., WWW.CALLAGHANSIRISHSOCIALCLUB.COM TICKETS: $7 AT THE DOOR

C

allaghan’s maintains its reputation for bringing to Mobile musical acts that could be “the next big thing.” Thomas Wynn & the Believers’ honest and versatile blend of rock, country and soul make them a unique musical commodity in their hometown of Orlando, which is known more for edgier local sounds. Wynn and his sister’s smooth harmonic chemistry mingle well with the band’s impeccable arrangements. This formula has allowed

them to spend seven years at the top of Orlando Weekly’s “Best of Orlando” awards. Thomas Wynn & the Believers will use their latest release, “Wade Waist Deep,” as an introduction for Callaghan’s patrons. The song “Man Out of Time” matches a rocking beat and a blitz of lyrical prowess that takes advantage of every beat in each measure. The title track follows with a cool sample of modern country. The easygoing, heartfelt “Heartbreak Alley” is the third facet of this threefold trip through the band’s sound.

Big Earl’s beach

Band: Jack Robertson Show Date: Saturday, June 10, 5:30 p.m. Venue: Flora-Bama, 17401 Perdido Key Drive (Orange Beach), www.florabama.com Tickets: $5 at the door With beach season in full swing, locals and visitors alike are making the almost obligatory visit to the Flora-Bama, which has long entertained patrons with an extensive daily lineup of music. From country to rock, the Flora-Bama does not discriminate. However, one FloraBama regular continues to be particularly interesting and entertaining: the beautiful madness of the Jack Robertson Show. For more than 20 years, Robertson has reigned supreme as the Flora-Bama’s comic prince. However, those attending the Jack Rob-

ertson Show will not meet this off-beat singersongwriter. Instead, Flora-Bama patrons will get to know a brash, irreverent elementary school teacher named Big Earl. If there is one thing his audience learns, it’s that Big Earl knows no boundaries and holds nothing sacred. Big Earl shocks and thrills the crowd with hits such as “Poontang on the Pontoon,” “Titty Bar on the Waffle House” and “I Hate Tennessee.” While some may be shocked by his songs, nothing compares to his hilariously ribald live show.

Phlorescent phlashback

Band: The Happy Together Tour Date: Friday, June 9, 8 p.m. Venue: IP Casino, Resort & Spa, 850 Bayview Ave. (Biloxi), www.ipbiloxi.com Tickets: $60-$70, available through Ticketmaster

The Happy Together Tour promises to give patrons a flashback to the sounds of the ‘60s and ‘70s. The Turtles featuring Flo & Eddie serve as the centerpiece of this tour. As founding members of The Turtles, Flo (Mark Volman) and Eddie (Howard Kaylan) continue to build upon the band’s legacy. The Turtles’ mega-hit “Happy Together” still finds its way to a variety of media outlets as well as into the ears of new listeners. Flo & Eddie are bringing a cavalcade of

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classics. Chuck Negron earned fame as onethird of the vocal trio Three Dog Night, with such hits as “Mama Told Me Not to Come” and “Joy to the World.” The Association will entertain the crowd with such hits as “Windy” and “Along Comes Mary.” Ron Dante will perform songs by The Archies, including their huge hit “Sugar, Sugar.” Rocking family band The Cowsills are scheduled to perform, as well as The Box Tops.


AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | June 8 - June 14

THUR. JUNE 8

Bluegill— Al and Cathy Callaghan’s— Ross Newell Cockeyed Charlie’s— JJ Blues Tavern— John Fleming Duo Dority’s Bar and Grill— Brittany Grimes, 6p Felix’s— Soulshine Trio Flora Bama— Dave McCormick, 2p// David Dunn, 5p/// Mark Sherrill, James Daniel, Chris Newbury, 6p//// Winstoon Ramble, 6p//// Johnny and the Loveseats, 10p//// Four Unplugged, 10:15p//// Oliver’s Twist, 10:30p Hangout— The Perry Wall, 6p// Justin Wall, 10p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Tyler Kinchen & The Right Pieces, 8p Live Bait— Brandon Styles, 8p Lulu’s— Adam Holt Duo, 5p Manci’s— Sean Carter McSharry’s— The String Slingers, 7:30p Old 27 Grill— Jim Wainwright, 6:30p SanBar— Strictly Isbell Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Hippy Jim,, 6p Wind Creek Casino— Fortag, 8p

FRI. JUNE 9

All Sports Bar & Billiards— DJ Markie Mark, 10p Beau Rivage— Gary Allen, 8p Bluegill— Lee Yankie, 12p// Blind Dog Mike, 6p Blues Tavern— Johnny No Cockeyed Charlie’s— DJ Chill, 10p Crooked Martini— The Perry Wall, 9p Dority’s Bar and Grill— Harrison McInnis, 6p Fairhope Brewing— Put the Pub in Public Radio Felix’s— Grits N Pieces Flora Bama— LeaAnne Creswell Trio, 2p// Destiny Brown, 4p/// Jack Robertson Show, 5:30p//// Dave McCormick, 5:30p//// Four Unplugged, 6p//// Johnny Barbato Trio, 6p//// Jason Justice Duo, 9p//// Ryan Balthrop and Friends, 10p//// Brian Hill Trio, 10:15p//// Kyle Wilson Band, 10:30p Hangout— Voodoo Gumbo, 6p// Ja’Rhythm, 10p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Five Finger Discount, 9:30p IP Casino— Happy Together Tour, 8p Listening Room— Stephen Lee Veal ft. Fram Rea, 8p Live Bait— Brandon Styles, 8p Lulu’s— Cool Rayz, 5p Main Street Cigar Lounge— Rogerwood, 8p Manci’s— Brittany Bell McSharry’s— DJ Lewis, 10p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Retrobution, 8p Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Reed Lightfoot Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Rock Bottom Duo, 6:30p O’Daly’s— Gene Murrell,Tony Edwards and David White, 10p

Old 27 Grill— Them Again, 6:30p SanBar— Malcom Bond Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Jimmy Lee, 12p// Lefty Collins, 6p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Lisa Christian Duo, 6p Top of the Bay— Camellia Bay Burlesque Show Wind Creek Casino— Fortag, 9p

SAT. JUNE 10

Alchemy— Glass War and Strange Her, 9p Bluegill— Brandon Bailey, 12p// Fat Lincoln, 6p Blues Tavern— Disciples of the Crow Callaghan’s— Thomas Wynn and The Believers Cockeyed Charlie’s— DJ Chill, 10p Dority’s Bar and Grill— Lisa Mills Fairhope Brewing— Marlow Boys Felix’s— Blind Dog Mike Flora Bama— Big Muddy, 1p// Jay Williams Band, 1p/// Jay Hawkins Trio, 2p//// Sean Gasaway, 4p//// Brian Hill Duo, 5p//// Jack Robertson Show, 5:30p//// Four Unplugged, 6p//// Lee Yankie Trio, 6p//// Sam Glass Duo, 9p//// Mario Mena Band, 10p//// Logan Spicer and Tony Ray Thompson, 10:15p//// Kyle Wilson Band, 10:30p Hangout— Voodoo Gumbo, 6p// G-Rivers, 10p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Five Finger Discount, 9:30p Hard Rock (Live) — 38 Special, 8p Listening Room— The Rising Sons, 8p Lulu’s— Alvarado Road Show, 5p Manci’s— Chris Powell McSharry’s— DJ Tiger, 10p Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Nick Peraino Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — This Side of 49, 6:30p Old 27 Grill— Leavin Brothers, 1:30p Pirates Cove— Jonny Barbato, 6p SanBar— Rex Soul Kitchen— Plies, 8p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Soul Food Junkies, 6p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Marty McIntosh, 11a// Gringofife, 6p Top of the Bay— Venom Wind Creek Casino— Fortag, 9p

SUN. JUNE 11

Alchemy— Sherry Court, 3p Blind Mule— Florance and Normandie and Glass Girl Bluegill— Jamie Adamson, 12p// Jamell Richardson, 6p Blues Tavern— John Hall Trio Callaghan’s— Lilly Winwood Dority’s Bar and Grill— John Hart Trio Felix’s— Brandon Bailey

Flora Bama— Foxy Iguanas, 12p// Brian Hill Duo, 1p/// Songs of Rusty, 1:30p//// Al and Cathy, 2p//// Reed Lightfest, 2p//// Lefty Collins, 5p//// Lucky Doggs, 5:30p//// Mose Wilson and The Delta Twang, 6p//// Perdido Brothers, 6p//// Whyte Caps, 10p//// Mario Mena Duo, 10:15p Hangout— Luke Langford & 311 South, 6p// Greg Lyon, 10p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — James Gillies, 8p Listening Room— Sergio and the Satin Dogs, 8p Lulu’s— Alvarado Road Show, 5p Manci’s— Molly Thomas and the Rare Birds McSharry’s— Trad. Irish Music, 6:30p Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Porach Ninjas, 6p Old 27 Grill— Lisa Zanghi, 11:30a SanBar— David Jones Jazz Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Lisa Christian, 2p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Hippy Jim, 11a// Gringofife, 6p

MON. JUNE 12

Felix’s— Jamie Anderson Flora Bama— Founders and Friends, 2p// Lee Yankie, 5p/// Albert Simpson and John Kulinich, 5:30p//// Cathy Pace, 6p//// Petty and Pace, 10:15p Hangout— The Good Looking, 6p// Whyte Caps, 10p Lulu’s— Brent Burns, 5p

TUE. JUNE 13

Bluegill— Lee Yankie Butch Cassidy’s— Chris Powell Cockeyed Charlie’s— Jordan Bramblett Fairhope Brewing— Green Drinks Felix’s— Lee Yankie Flora Bama— T-Bone Montgomery, 2p// Albert Simpson and John Kulinich, 5p/// Logan Spicer, 5:30p//// Perdido Brothers, 6p//// Hung Jury, 10p//// Alabama Lightning, 10:15p Hangout— Continuum, 6p// Quintin Berry, 10p The Intracostal— Brent Burns, 6p Lulu’s— Ronnie Presley, 5p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Matt Neese, 6p

WED. JUNE 14

Bluegill— Ross Newell Callaghan’s— Phil and Foster Felix’s— Bust Duo Flora Bama— Neil Dover, 2p// Mel Knapp, 5p/// Dave McCormick, 5:30p//// Rhonda Hart and Jonathan Newton, 6p//// Braxton Calhoun, 10p//// Albert Simpson and John Kulinich, 10:15p Hangout— Rhythm Intervention, 6p// Justin Wall, 10p Lulu’s— Justin Yawn, 6p Shipp’s Harbour Grill— Brent Burns, 5p J u n e 8 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 1 4 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 41


FILMTHE REEL WORLD

Not everyone’s a comedian

A

BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

AREA THEATERS CARMIKE CINEMA’S Wynnsong 16 785 Schillinger Rd. S. (251) 639-7373 CRESCENT THEATER 208 Dauphin Street (251) 438-2005 HOLLYWOOD STADIUM 18 1250 Satchel Paige Dr. (251) 473-9655

stable of comic veterans helming a script with Robert De Niro as the star, plus a phenomenal supporting cast, still left the bitter film “The Comedian” with way fewer laughs than the title suggests. On the other hand, the film does not go so far as to render its title ironic; it’s neither black enough nor funny enough to succeed as the black comedy it’s meant to be. De Niro stars as Jackie, a mean old comedian who is still recognized for a beloved sitcom role, but is currently performing as many profane stand-up gigs as his long-suffering agent (Edie Falco) can scrape up for him. One of the few attendees at his show turns out to be a heckler, who provokes De Niro for the sake of his own web show about heckling comedians. As the heckler’s wife records, the men come to blows, and soon the video is viral and De Niro is in the slammer. After 30 days in jail, he is performing community service and meets Harmony (Leslie Mann), who is doing the same thing. Every time a new member of the

supporting cast pops up, it’s someone incredible. Danny DeVito stars as his brother, and Patti LuPone as DeVito’s wife. Their scenes are almost enough to carry the film. Harvey Keitel plays Harmony’s father, himself an ex-con who also happens to be a controlling dad. Mann’s usual tartness works well for this role, and her character works well with Jackie. They are genuinely troubled people whose motivations and backgrounds are reasonably well explained. There are some sequences when Jackie is around his fellow comedians at real locations, such as the Comedy Cellar and the Friar’s Club, when the experience of the writers seeps through and the film becomes real and interesting. One of the co-writers, Jeffrey Ross, is a major Friar’s Club elder statesman, and longtime comedy and Hollywood insiders Richard LaGravenese and Lewis Friedman also co-wrote. Their expertise casually but completely informs the film in these scenes. It seems we could have gotten a brilliant backstage take on the comedy world from these screenwriters, but the film’s

star slows it all down. It is when De Niro takes the stage and performs his comedy act that things come to a grinding halt and, since this is a movie about him being a comedian, he does so repeatedly. So many films have been made by real comedians about the inner workings of the life of a stand-up comic, but this film stands out because “The Comedian” in question simply is not one. Some just have “it,” and De Niro does not. “It,” apparently, cannot be faked. In the end, and especially at the actual end of the film when a child delivers a stand-up routine at her school talent show, “The Comedian” is tonally perplexing. I really don’t know who this film is for. We see a geezer getting his mojo back through a form — the internet — with which he isn’t really familiar, so maybe older people would like it, but it’s also incredibly profane. In one particularly painful episode, De Niro addresses a room full of nursing home residents, who are surprised and delighted by his potty humor. If it had actually been funny, we viewers might have been, too.

RAVE MOTION PICTURE JUBILEE SQUARE 12 6898 U.S. 90 Daphne, (251) 626- 6266 CARMIKE CINEMAS 23151 Wharf Ln. Orange Beach (251) 981-4444 Photos | Sony Pictures Classics / Abramorama

COBB THEATRES PINNACLE 14 3780 Gulf Shores Pkwy Gulf Shores (251) 968-7444 EASTERN SHORE PREMIERE CINEMA 14 30500 Alabama 181 #500 Spanish Fort, Al (251) 626-0352 Information accurate at press time; please call theaters for showtimes.

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FROM LEFT: In “The Comedian,” Robert De Niro is an aging insult comic named Jack Burke. Scott Freiman, composer/producer and Beatles historian, shows audiences how the Beatles made their 1967 masterpiece album, “Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Heart’s Club Band.” NEW IN THEATERS DECONSTRUCTING SGT. PEPPER’S LONELY HEARTS CLUB BAND

In this documentary, Beatles expert Scott Freiman looks at the album from multiple angles, exploring the history behind the music. He offers an educational journey into the creative process of The Beatles’ performances and recording sessions. Crescent Theater

IT COMES AT NIGHT

Two families forge an uneasy alliance in a house to keep evil at bay during the apocalypse. As one does. Regal Mobile Stadium 18, AMC Mobile 16

THE MUMMY

A battle in the Middle East accidentally unearths Ahmanet, a betrayed Egyptian princess who was entombed under the desert. Now, a soldier of fortune must stop the resurrected monster as she embarks on a furious rampage through London. All listed multiplex theaters.

NOW PLAYING

THE LOVERS Crescent Theater WONDER WOMAN All listed multiplex theaters. CAPTAIN UNDERPANTS: THE FIRST EPIC MOVIE All listed multiplex theaters. PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: DEAD MEN TELL NO TALES MEAGAN LEAVY All listed multiplex Based on the true story of a theaters. young Marine corporal (played by BAYWATCH Kate Mara) whose unique disciAll listed multiplex theaters. pline and bond with her military combat dog saved many lives ALIEN: COVENANT All listed multiplex theaters during their deployment in Iraq. AMC Mobile 16, AMC Jubilee EVERYTHING, EVERYTHING Square 12, AMC Classic Wharf Cobb Pinnacle 14, Regal

Mobile Stadium 18, AMC Mobile 16, AMC Jubilee Square 12 DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: THE LONG HAUL Regal Mobile Stadium 18, AMC Mobile 16 KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD All listed multiplex theaters. SNATCHED All listed multiplex theaters. GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY, VOL. 2 All listed multiplex theaters. FATE OF THE FURIOUS All listed multiplex theaters. THE BOSS BABY AMC Classic Wharf, Regal Mobile Stadium 18, AMC Mobile 16


J u n e 8 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 1 4 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 43


CALENDAR OF EVENTS JUNE 8, 2017 - JUNE 14, 2017

GENERAL INTEREST Coastal Seafood Craze The sixth annual Coastal Seafood Craze invites local restaurants to feature dishes made with locally caught seafood on Thursday, June 8. $25 ticket includes food, a beverage and admission to the BayBears game at Hank Aaron Stadium. Visit joinacf. org. Fairhope farmer’s market The city of Fairhope hosts an outdoor farmer’s market Thursdays, 3-6 p.m., through Nov. 2, behind the Fairhope Public Library downtown on Bancroft Street. Call 251-929-1466. Free family movie night Join Dauphin Island on the West End Beach for a free movie at dusk on Thursday and Friday. Thursday: “Sing”; Friday: “Ice Age.” Nonprofit summit University of South Alabama host a nonprofit summit for nonprofit leaders on Friday, June 9 at 9 a.m. in the Student Center, 307 N. University Blvd. Visit bit. do/2017SouthAlabmaSummit. Market in the Square Mobile’s downtown farmer’s market is now held in Cathedral Square on Saturdays, 7:30 a.m. until noon. Come enjoy, music, food, beverages and more. Teen reading program Area teens are invited to participate in “Build a Better World!” teen summer reading program, June 5-30. The official kickoff will be Monday, June 5, 10 a.m. at the Daphne Civic Center. Call 251-6212818, ext. 203. Literacy Camp and Tutoring The camp is for first and rising fifth graders. The program will also employ university literacy faculty and teachers in training from USA College of Education. The camp runs June 12-16. Call 251-3802891. West Mobile Farmer’s Market This farmer’s market, sponsored by Christ United Methodist Church, is held every

Tuesday, 3-6 p.m., on the west side of church property, 6101 Grelot Road, Mobile. Call 251-342-0462. Shining Star Camp The Baldwin County Sheriff’s Office is pleased to host a series of camps. The first camp will be Magnolia School in Foley, June 14-16 for ages 8-13. Call 251-9726890. Providence Farmer’s Market Shop the farmer’s market every Wednesday through July 12, 2-5 p.m., in Lot F at Providence Hospital. Call 251-6313501. Dauphin Island Boardwalk Talks Boardwalk Talks are held the first and third Wednesday of each month at 11:15 a.m. at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab, 101 Bienville Blvd. Call 251-861-2141. Midtown Optimist Club Join Midtown Optimist Club every Wednesday at noon for lunch at Azalea City Golf Course. Call 251-348-3542. Toastmasters Do you want to deliver a speech like a pro or gain leadership skills to advance your career? Toastmasters International meets regularly at six locations in Mobile and Baldwin counties. Visit www.toastmasters. org for more information.

institutions, studios and unique shops as they open their doors and welcome you inside Friday, June 9, 6-9 p.m. in the Lower Dauphin Street district. Rock the Block Join The Steeple on St. Francis for a fun, family friendly block party in partnership with The Back Lot at Hilton Garden Inn Mobile Downtown! Live music and food trucks Friday, June 9, during LoDa Artwalk, 5:30-8:30 p.m., Joachim Street. A Tour of Christenberry Stories of photographer William Christenberry himself, and the Alabama landscape to which he devoted his life’s work, from some of the people who knew him best. Sunday, June 10, at 2 p.m. at Mobile Museum of Art, 4850 Museum Drive. Mobile Mystery Dinners A performance of “Dial M for Marriage” will take place Saturday, June 10, 7 p.m. at Renaissance Riverview Hotel. Tickets include dinner and unlimited wine. Advance reservations are required; call 251-4153092. Three on a String Join Mobile Public Library, Ben May, for an afternoon of good, clean, hilarious entertainment on Sunday, June 11, at 3 p.m. Admission is $10. Call 251-208-7097.

FUNDRAISERS

MUSEUMS

Dragon Boat Festival On Saturday, June 10, Fuse Project’s 4th annual Dragon Boat Festival will be at the U.S.S. ALABAMA Battleship Memorial Park. Admission into the festival is $5 and children under age 3 get in free. For more information, go to www.fuseproject.org.

Learning Lunch History Museum of Mobile will host Janie Shores, first female Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court, on Wednesday, June 14, at 12 p.m. Call 251-208-7508.

Pure Imagination Join Playhouse in the Park for a wine tasting event, Tuesday, June 13, at 5:30 p.m. at Red or White in Mobile. Call 251422-5434.

“Windows to the Sea” “Windows to the Sea” is a new permanent exhibit at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab Estuarium. Visit disl.org.

On the occasion of Alabama’s Bicentennial Celebration, this exhibit honors artist William Christenberry’s exploration of themes related to his native state. Mobile Museum of Art, 4850 Museum Drive. Extended through July 9. Call 251-208-5200. “Faces of Africa” The History Museum of Mobile exhibit “Faces of Africa: A Mystical View of Tribal Heritage” runs through Monday, July 31. Call 251-208-7420. “Drugs: Costs and Consequences” The Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration team up to present a powerful interactive exhibit of the effects of drugs on individuals and society. Through August. Visit exploreum.com. Fairhope’s founding Learn more about the 1894 founding of Fairhope at the Fairhope Museum of History, 24 N. Section St. The museum is open daily (except Sunday and Monday) from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 251-929-1471. Little Discoveries “Outside the Box,” aimed at children age 6 and under, explores how innovation and creativity can lead to a world of possibilities, starting with a simple cardboard box. Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Call 251-208-6893 or email jholland@ exploreum.com. Thursdays at MMoA Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., the Mobile Museum of Art offers free admission to all visitors. No reservations are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive. Call 251-208-5200.

SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES

ARTS

“Shipwreck! Pirates and Treasure” A new, highly interactive exhibit at GulfQuest features more than 500 authentic artifacts recovered from deepocean shipwrecks. Visit www.gulfquest.org.

AFC Mobile AFC Mobile will take on Biloxi City FC in the first leg of the Forgotten Coast Cup. This will be the first ever regular season meeting of these two sides. Saturday, June 10, 7 p.m., Archbishop Lipscomb Stadium, 3610 Michael Blvd. www.afcmobile.net.

LoDa Artwalk Join downtown Mobile art galleries,

“Christenberry: In Alabama”

Mobile BayBears

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The Mobile BayBears are back in action at Mobile’s Hank Aaron Stadium. The team returns from Birmingham to host Biloxi for a five-game home stand June 14-18. Call 251-479-BEAR. Weekly 1K/5K Every Thursday evening at 6 p.m., join Red Beard’s Outfitter and Cortlandt’s Pub in the Spring Hill Village Shopping Center for a 1K or 5K run and walk. No cost to participate. Bridge lessons The Mobile Bridge Center offers free bridge lessons each Tuesday at 6 p.m. at 1510 University Blvd. Arrive a few minutes early to register. Call the Bridge Center at 251-666-2147, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fitness and athletics classes New fitness classes are in progress at Palmer Pillans Middle School. Curvy yoga, Tone It Up ! (fusion workout), Zumba, basketball clinics (ages 8+), and sports conditioning (ages 8-17). To register or for more information, call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com. Dance and art classes Summer classes offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School include belly dance, ballroom dance, ballet and tumbling (ages 6-8), beginning piano (ages 8+), watercolor painting, zombies and superheroes art, and pet portraits art. Call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com. Pickleball for Adults (indoors) Offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School, Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon, starting June 10. Great sport for all ages combines tennis, ping pong and badminton on a court one-fourth the size of a tennis court. Call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com. Ballroom dance Azalea Ballroom Dance Club hosts dances the second and fourth Tuesday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Via Health, Fitness & Enrichment Center, 1717 Dauphin St. Call 251-623-9183 or visit azaleaballroomdanceclub.com. Ballroom dance The Moonlight Chassé Ballroom Dance Society hosts dances the first and third Monday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Hot Wheels Skating Rink in Daphne. Email cassief13@aol.com.

WORKSHOPS

to register in advance.

PUBLIC MEETINGS Baldwin County Commission: First and third Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., 322 Courthouse Square, Bay Minette. Work sessions are the second and fourth Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. rotating between Bay Minette, the Foley Satellite Courthouse, the Fairhope Satellite Courthouse and the Baldwin County Central Annex Building in Robertsdale. www.baldwincountyal.gov Baldwin County Planning Commission: First Thursday at 6 p.m., 22251 Palmer St., Robertsdale, www.baldwincountyal.gov. Bayou La Batre City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 13785 S. Wintzell Ave., www.cityofbayoulabatre. com. Chickasaw City Council: Second and fourth Tuesday at 7 p.m., 224 N. Craft Highway, 251-452-6450. Citronelle City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6:30 p.m., 19135 Main St., 251-866-7973. Creola City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6 p.m., 190 Dead Lake Road, #A, 251-675-8142. Daphne City Council: First and third Monday at 6:30 p.m., 1705 Main St. Work sessions are the second Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m., www.daphneal.com. Dauphin Island Town Council: First and third Tuesdays at 7 p.m., 1011 Bienville Blvd., www.townofdauphinisland.org. Elberta Town Council: Third Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m. in the town hall. Workshop meeting on the second Tuesday. townofelberta.com. Fairhope City Council: Second and fourth Monday at 6 p.m., 161 N. Section St. Work sessions are held before each council meeting at 4:30 p.m., www.cofairhope. com. Fairhope Planning Commission: First Monday at 5 p.m., 161 N. Section St. For more information visit www.cofairhope. com. Foley City Council: First and third Monday at 5:30 p.m., 407 E. Laurel Ave. Work sessions begin at 4 p.m., www. cityoffoley.org. Gulf Shores City Council: Second and fourth Mondays at 4 p.m., 1905 W. First St., www.gulfshoresal.gov.

CPR Training Course The Daphne Public Library will provide a Red Cross Certified CPR class on June 14. The workshop will be conducted by Lieutenant Adam Byrd from the Daphne Fire Department. The class will begin at 2 p.m. at the Daphne Public Library. Call 251621-2818, ext. 211, to register.

Mobile City Council: Tuesdays at Government Plaza, 205 Government St. Pre-council meeting begins at 9 a.m.; council meeting begins at 10:30 a.m., www. cityofmobile.org.

Predatory lending and high-cost loans Learn some of the more common practices and how much high-fee loans are costing you and how to avoid them. 6-7 p.m. on Monday, June 12, at Lifelines/ Consumer Credit Counseling, 705 Oak Circle Drive E. (Mobile). Call 251-602-0011

Orange Beach City Council: First and third Tuesdays at 5 p.m., 4099 Orange Beach Blvd., www.cityoforangebeach.com.

Mobile Planning Commission: First and third Thursdays at 2 p.m., 205 Government St., www.urban.cityofmobile.org.

Prichard City Council: Every Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 216 E. Prichard Ave., www. thecityofprichard.org. J u n e 8 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 1 4 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 45


SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

Dragons to appear on Mobile Bay BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

area young people is the Palmer Williams Group. Its motto is “Helping today’s youth see a better tomorrow.” Co-founder Sherman Williams exploded onto the sports scene by rushing for 3,000 yards as a senior in leading the Blount Leopards to the 1990 state title. He continued to shine at the University of Alabama and was a member of the Super Bowl champion Dallas Cowboys in his rookie year. Once his NFL career ended, he got into trouble with the law and spent time in jail. During his incarceration, he remained in touch with David Palmer, his roommate in Tuscaloosa. Once Williams was released the two formed PWG, which focuses on developing disadvantaged youth through programs offering physical fitness activities, nutritional counseling and life skills development. PWG offers free youth programs, including the Lifesync Academy (life skills program), financial literacy clinics, athletic youth camps and cheer, football and soccer teams. All of these efforts take money to operate. As the centerpiece of PWG’s inaugural fundraiser, Williams reached out to a former Cowboys teammate to serve as guest speaker. On June 15 at The Grounds (1035 Cody Road N. in West Mobile) there will be “Dinner with Emmitt Smith.” Smith led Escambia High School in Pensacola to two state titles before starring at the University of Florida. He then became the all-time leading rusher in NFL history. Smith has gone to excel as a real estate developer and sports analyst. The doors open at 5:30 p.m. with dinner at 6 p.m. Smith is scheduled to speak at 6:30 p.m. and participate in a meet-and-greet session from 7-8 p.m. Tickets to the dinner cost $100 (plus fees) while the VIP ticket is $175 (plus fees). Suggested attire is business casual. For addition information, visit www. palmerwilliamsgroup.org or send an email to info@palmerwilliamsgroup.org.

Youth activities

Two athletic camps are scheduled for Saturday, June 17. • The fourth annual Palmer Williams Group Athletic Youth Camp will take place from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. in Prichard at Chickasabogue Park (760 Aldock Road). This free event is open to boys and girls ages 4-13. According to sponsors, the camp will feature athletic skills and drills led by former professional NFL players, college soccer players and cheerleaders. Photo/J. Mark Bryant There will be nutrition and physical fitness training by local providers, along Last year the Fuse Project’s Dragon Boat Festival raised more than $220,000. with other family activities and food. Participants can register online at eventbrite.com. Registration forms can also be requested by sending an email to info@palmerwilliamsgroup.org. he Fuse Project’s annual Dragon Boat Festival Golden said. “And those funds benefited NEST of Mobile, • On the same day at Mobile Christian School (5900 Cottage Hill Road) the has become a highly popular fundraiser to aid local the Daphne Kappa League, Victory Teaching Farm and fifth annual Wells Fargo Youth Football Clinic will be presented by the Dollar youth on both sides of Mobile Bay. Started in 2014, Fuse Factory.” General Bowl. This free clinic is for boys and girls ages 5-13 and runs from 8 it has grown into one of the largest Hong KongSeventy-two is the maximum number of teams the Fuse a.m. to noon. style boat races in the United States. Project can accommodate for the one-day festival. Each According to organizers, participants will have the opportunity to meet and The event returns again to the USS Alabama Battleteam consists of 20 paddlers, a drummer and an experiwork with college football coaches; run offensive, defensive and agility drills; ship Memorial Park, having outgrown its original facilities enced person to steer. The 46-foot-long boats race for 250 learn proper techniques to promote on-field football safety; and learn about the at Five Rivers Delta Resource Center. Another capacity meters, and each team races at least twice. The top 15 importance of character development and good sportsmanship. crowd is expected Saturday, June 10. teams will race a third time to compete for the title Fuse For more information, visit dollargeneralbowl.com, call 251-635-0011 or “Without a doubt, last year’s move to the Battleship Project Dragon Boat Champion. send an email to sam@dollargeneralbowl.com. allowed us to vastly increase participation in our festival,” Activities start at 8 a.m. at this family-friendly, alcoholAdrienne Golden, Fuse Project’s executive director, told free event. There will be a children’s area along with food Take me out to the ball game Lagniappe. “We currently have 67 teams registered, and and fashion trucks. Spectators are charged $2 for parking I attended a BayBears game over Memorial Day weekend. What a great our goal is to provide every child in South Alabama a and $5 admission. For those also wishing to visit the adja- night at The Hank, even if the home team fell short on the scoreboard. chance at success.” cent Battleship exhibits, that cost will be $15. The visit got me thinking: Is being a minor league manager the toughest job Since forming in 2012, the Fuse Project has supported To learn more, please visit www.fuseproject.org/dragin sports? You are expected to prepare players for the parent club, and at the numerous causes that promote health, fitness, education on-boat-festival/ or www.racedragonboats.com. To contact same time field a competitive squad to entertain local fans. and social responsibility of children in Mobile and BaldGolden, call 251-265-FUSE (3873) or send an email to A roster change seems to take place every day in the Los Angeles Angels’ orwin counties. In 2016, the group focused on after-school adrienne@fuseproject.org. ganization, with players being promoted, demoted or placed on injured reserve. programs for children along the Alabama Gulf Coast. I wonder how difficult it is for the BayBears’ Sal Fasano to complete his lineup “This year’s grant recipients haven’t been announced NFL legend comes to Mobile card when the roster is in constant flux? Still, the team remains in the hunt for yet, but last year’s festival raised more than $220,000,” Another local nonprofit organization that works with Southern League honors.

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THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE IN BAD TASTE BY ANDREW ZHOU / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 “____ Davis Eyes,” 1981 No. 1 hit 6 Some lookout notices, for short 10 One thrown for a loop? 15 Musical genre for “Gangnam Style” 19 Sundance Film Festival local 20 Sack 21 Venusian or Jovian 22 Pointer for a weather person? 23 Vertical part of a plane 24 Soprano on TV 25 Drifting sort 26 America’s Cup, e.g. 27 Step 1: Raise hell 31 Opus ____ 32 “Golly!” 33 ____ Picchu 36 Wild guess 39 Step 2: Make some literary gaffes 47 Reciprocal in trigonometry 49 Targets of a cleanse 50 Undecided, on a sked 51 Many residents of Holmes County, Ohio 52 Movie-release day, often: Abbr. 54 Had pants? 55 ____ rock 56 Step 3: Devote energy to something hopeless 59 Prefix with second 60 One who’s been tapped on the shoulder 61 West Coast news inits. 62 Numbers after a decimal point: Abbr. 65 Activewear brand 66 Step 4: Be a financial wastrel 74 Doxycycline target 75 Refusals 76 When doubled, a drink with vodka, peach schnapps and cranberry juice 77 Address not in a phone book 78 ____ film 79 Step 5: Look pretty schlubby 87 Partner of hems 88 Eliot’s “Silas ____” 90 Employer of the Bond girl in “The Spy Who Loved Me,” for short 91 Where 84-Down is, colloquially 92 Actress Gardner 93 Figure out 94 Zoology class 96 And finally: Has divided loyalties 101 Org. involved in a probe 102 1990s tennis phenom 103 Company with a lightning bolt in its logo

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104 Lee on a set 106 What 27-, 39-, 56-, 66-, 79- and 96-Across together make up? 116 “Such is life” 119 A Wayans brother 120 Israeli magazine holders 121 “Pipes” 122 Buddha, for one 123 Made some calls 124 “Ain’t I sumthin’!” 125 Zac of “Dirty Grandpa” 126 ____ asst. 127 Tweets, e.g. 128 Bank deposit? 129 Hospital opening?

tion, informally 28 High-grade cotton 29 C.E.O. of the Planetary Society starting in 2010 30 Depletes 34 Stream coming down a mountain? 35 Pope who initiated the First Crusade 36 One crossing the line? 37 “The Complete Works of William Shakespeare,” e.g. 38 It spans 11 time zones 40 Conflagration 41 More, in ads 42 Navigator’s aid 43 Shaded growth DOWN 44 Anticipate 1 Totally believes 45 Lace 2 Nouveau-Mexique, e.g. 46 Nonvoting member in the 3 Prepare to take off U.S. House of Representatives 4 Like a bronze medalist 48 Gulf 5 Follow 53 Without forethought 6 Resort in the Wasatch 54 Begin fighting Mountains 55 Growl like a dog 7 “Oh, nuts!” 57 Best-selling Cana8 Chimpanzee variety dian singer of all time (with 9 William who wrote “The 200-million-plus record sales) Confessions of Nat Turner” 58 Duped 10 Running-track part 63 James who wrote “The 11 Much Secret Life of Walter Mitty” 12 Family in a computer game 64 Medieval toiler 13 Trump spokesman Spicer 66 Grand viziers, e.g. 14 TV-watching option 67 Scales span them 15 Bellyache 68 Napping, so to speak 16 Handle roughly 69 Rules and ____ 17 & 18 Distribution limita70 Some money set aside

71 Doo-____ 72 Recess 73 Like minor celebrities 80 Repeal 81 Be swarming (with) 82 “Hop-o’-My-Thumb” villain 83 Melting 84 It has a noted school of theater, film and television 85 Pulitzer winner Armantrout and others 86 “Frozen” princess 88 Really not O.K. 89 Part of a musical 93 Ovine : sheep :: cervine : ____ 95 Ad Council output, for short 97 Pickle brand 98 Pound sound 99 Talent seekers 100 Whom Kala reared 105 Altar approaches 107 Some G.I. wear, for short 108 Little hellions 109 Brooke or Brooks 110 Closes 111 Character with the aria “When I am laid in earth” 112 “Vidi” 113 Fade 114 Major before going to B-school, maybe 115 Big figure in Manhattan? 116 Response that’s often repeated 117 Bagel topper 118 ____-appropriate

ANSWERS ON PAGE 49


STYLE HOROSCOPES PUT YOURSELF IN THE RIGHT POSITION GEMINI (5/21-6/21) — You’ll claim Artwalk itself is a performance art. You’ll adapt it into an off-Broadway musical that will be highly anticipated, but ultimately received with tepid reviews. You are, however, a champ in the Alley. CANCER (6/22-7/22) — Thanks to Minzy’s ankle injury, you’ll be asked to perform as a stand-in for 2NE1’s reunion tour. After nailing the “I Am the Best” choreography, you’ll overstay your welcome by introducing your debut single, “Give me the Spicy Peppers.” You’ll excel at the Leopard. LEO (7/23-8/23) — In pursuit of science, you’ll begin a painstaking doorto-door census of red snapper in the Gulf. Several trillion federal dollars later and with the ability to free dive for two days on a single breath, the answer will be clear: tree fiddy. Go home, grab your partner and be a Narcissus. VIRGO (8/24-9/22) — You’ll improvise a Mobile Mystery Dinner of your own after guests turn on each other following the mysterious disappearance of a bay leaf from a pot of gumbo. Spoiler alert: the damn dog ate it. Relax; while the NBA finals are boring, have Ice Cream. LIBRA (9/23-10/22) — You’ll be one of the first in line to try the “Rolling Thunder” roller coaster at OWA in Foley. There will be a rain delay. Consider you and them and the Basset Hound. SCORPIO (10/23-11/21) — You’ll be tossed out of Toastmasters for plagiarizing a Trump speech. It’s not the plagiarism that broke the rules, it was just nonsensical and uninspiring. Find your balance with the help of a Staff. SAGITTARIUS (11/22-12/22) — In your latest get-rich-quick scheme, you’ll turn free, alternative newspapers into fashionable umbrellas available for only $9.99 at the Urban Emporium. Reality check: They are not waterproof. Float like a Butterfly. CAPRICORN (12/23-1/19) — After a casual trip to downtown Fairhope, you’ll bemoan the lack of an artisanal cinnamon boutique. Your brunch guests will not soon forgive your French toast faux pax — “psst … it was powdered with … McCormick.” You know what’s a beautiful instrument? The Harp. AQUARIUS (1/20-2/18) — You’ll offer the slowest dragon boat team a chance to redeem themselves by paddling inflatables across a pond full of alligators. Afterward, you’ll voluntarily resign from the board of a nonprofit. Resign yourself to the Anvil. PISCES (2/19-3/20) — After a pleasant experience at a local establishment, you’ll vote aggressively for them in the Nappie Awards. But your support does not end there. It ends on your end, where you’ll get a tattoo of their logo. Talk to a Nun. ARIES (3/21-4/19) — You’ll lobby the Legislature to extend the Historic Rehabilitation Development Tax Credit program to your fishing camp. You’ll argue it was originally constructed by a family of beavers in 1884. Coil up in the Yin-Yang. TAURUS (4/20-5/20) — You’ll talk like Matthew McConaughey while you sample beers from Oasis Texas Brewing Co. You’ll be interrogated after saying something uncomfortable about high school girls. No one ever said you were a Hero.

ANSWERS FROM PAGE 48

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STYLE GARDENING

Gardening with li’l sprouts BY JUDY STOUT, PH.D./CONTRIBUTING WRITER

Photos/Judy Stout

Q: With school out for summer, I not only have my children at

home but also many neighborhood children. How can I involve them in gardening and get them outside, away from the digital screen?

A:

Good question! We received a similar inquiry from a grandmother looking for outdoor activities for her grandchildren. Gardening with children is a great intergenerational activity that can occur at any time and is as flexible as the imagination of the children and adults involved. What a wonderful way to make memories! More than a seed is planted in a garden. Subtly, children are offered the opportunity to observe, wonder, question and predict. They learn the importance of taking responsibility for caring for something dependent upon them. Skills such as scooping, digging, pouring, measuring and counting are acquired unconsciously. Planting edibles teaches where food comes from and the work required in producing and harvesting food. Your li’l sprout may begin to experiment, and even like, foods never tried before. A 2011 report identified the top five things children like to play with. Included were sticks, string and dirt, with water following closely. All are naturals for gardening experiences. With this endorsement, we can all accept that it is OK to get dirty and wet! Some suggestions: • You don’t need a large yard to garden. Use readily available containers like single-serving cereal or snack cups, yogurt containers, egg cartons or plastic clamshells from produce. Just make sure to put drainage holes in the bottoms and something underneath to catch water. You can garden on the window sill, growing avocado pits, garlic cloves, pineapple tops and celery bases. Or buy a small bag of potting soil, punch holes in the bottom then turn it over and slice planting holes in the top. • Involve the child in planning the garden, selecting plants,

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planting, watering, weeding, harvesting, cleaning food items, and even preparing food or arranging flowers — showing, instead of telling, how to do things. Let older children experiment with how, where and when to carry out gardening activities — e.g., How deep? When to water? How close together? Is it ripe? It’s okay to fail and then figure out why. Don’t make and enforce rules or do the work for the child. • Start small and age-appropriate: a corner of a flower bed, a large pot or a designated child’s garden plot. Select sturdy tools with wooden handles and metal working ends (not toys that break easily), the right size for the child. How much fun can buckets, watering cans and a child-sized wheelbarrow be?! • In plant selection, consider your child’s dexterity and fine motor skills: beans, sunflowers, cucumbers or marigolds for the youngest, and smaller seeds such as radishes or lettuce for older children. Transplanting purchased plants into your garden may be best for very young gardeners. Iris, caladium and daffodil bulbs are also easily handled, and offer great surprises when their leaves emerge. • Plant some fun and surprise varieties such as peppermint, peanuts, snapdragons, lambs ear, pansy faces, mini-pumpkins, sugar cane or yard long beans (a wonderful opportunity to use those sticks and string!). Grow your own new plants by rooting cuttings, especially easy with square-stemmed plants such as coleus, mints or basil. Try short cuttings from your Christmas cactus. • Do not use pesticides! • Add features that attract animals to your garden: bird houses, shallow dishes of water, homemade bird feeders. Include wind chimes (make your own), a place to sit and observe or read, or child-crafted stepping stones. Use white plastic knives and an indelible marker to label your crops for future observa-

tion and harvest. • Water the garden and your children. After all, it gets hot in summer Mobile. Make mud. Provide pots, pans and spoons to improvise an outdoor kitchen for preparing and “cooking” mud food. • Welcome creativity and imagination. You may be surprised how much fun gardening with children can be!

YOU ARE INVITED TO THESE UPCOMING GARDENING EVENTS What: Kids Gulf Discovery Day

When: Wednesday, June 14, 9 a.m. to noon Where: Bellingrath Gardens & Home, 12401 Bellingrath Gardens Road, Theodore Admission: Fees apply; call 251-973-2217 for more information. What: Mobile Master Gardeners Lunch and Learn When: Monday, June 19, noon to 1 p.m. Where: Jon Archer Center, 1070 Schillinger Road N., Mobile Topic: Tomato Taste-Off, Ellen Huckabay What: 2017 Mobile County Master Gardener Class When: Wednesdays, Aug. 9 through Nov. 15, 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Where: Jon Archer Center, 1070 Schillinger Road N., Mobile Cost: $160 for materials and educational field trip (limited number of scholarships available) Application deadline: June 17 For more information: Call 251-574-8445 or email jda0002@ aces.edu Print application at mg.aces.edu/mobile. Master Gardener Helpline: 1-877-252-4769, or send your gardening questions to coastalalabamagardening@gmail.com.


STYLE BOOK REVIEW

Allman’s ‘Cross to Bear’ a timely read BY W. PERRY HALL, CONTRIBUTING WRITER with the moniker “Coyotus Maximus,” likely a fitting nickname for a tall young man with long blond hair and a “cute little accent,” who transformed onstage into a rock god belting out blues rock, many say, like a black man. Allman recalls, without seeming to boast or providing n a pivotal scene in Cameron Crowe’s graphic details, how some nights he would movie “Almost Famous,” Lester Bangs, a have a woman in each of four or five different famous rock critic played by Philip Seyrooms, and “for a while there I was with at mour Hoffman, scolds 15-year-old William least three women a week — at least three.” Miller for making friends with the rock band Allman covers his marriage to Cher from Stillwater. Miller is the fictional alter ego of 1975 to 1979 without addressing how it was Crowe, who toured with The Allman Brothers being half of the first modern celebrity tabloid Band — which largely inspired the fictional couple. He regrets his absence as a father to his Stillwater — as a teen in late 1973 to write an five children. He wished at least one had been article for Rolling Stone magazine, when the raised in the South, noting “not one of my kids band was at the top of the rock world. has got a Southern accent. Ain’t that a bitch?” Teenaged Miller admits being friends with Decadence didn’t stop at promiscuity. As the band made him feel cool, to which Bangs Allman describes, at one time all the band replies: “I met you. You are not cool ... while members were addicted to heroin. The band’s women will always be a problem for us, most tour bus was stopped twice in Alabama in the of the great art in the world is about that very early 1970s, the second time in Grove Hill same problem. Good-looking people don’t when Allman made the mistake of throwing a have any spine. Their art never lasts. They get bag of heroin out the window.  the girls, but we’re smarter.” Once they kicked heroin, they proceeded Though Gregg Allman, who died May 27, to cocaine and booze. On first entering their got more than his share of “foxy ladies,” most newly purchased Boeing 730, “Welcome Allrock fans would strongly disagree with anyone man Bros.” was written on the bar in cocaine.   claiming Allman’s art won’t last. His “MidAllman struggled mightily with substance night Rider” and “Whipping Post” are two abuse, making 18 trips to rehab. He got serious of the most covered songs in rock music and about sobriety the morning after showing up staples for many club bands.  soused at the 1995 ceremony inducting the The live “At Fillmore East” version of band into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame. He “Whipping Post” (which Allman wrote in the claimed to be sober since.   middle of the night with burnt matchsticks on Addressing his power struggle after Duane’s an ironing board cover) has one of the most death with lead guitarist Dickey Betts, who he memorable openings in any musical genre, depicts as a callous, controlling jerk, Allman with maybe the most recognized bass intro ... said he had a bad vibe from the beginning followed by one, then the other of dual lead when Betts showed up to practices wearing guitars pealing in from Duane Allman and ruffled shirts. Yet, “Dickey ain’t no devil. He’s Dickey Betts ... then Gregg’s Hammond organ just a mixed-up guy.”  and his gritty voice sliding in with “I’ve been Allman was proud Jaimoe, an Africanrun down / I’ve been lied to.” In 2002, Rolling American drummer from Ocean Springs, was Stone lauded this as “the finest live perforone of The Allman Brothers Band’s founding mance ever” recorded. members in 1969, with racial tensions still Allman’s 2012 memoir, “My Cross to prevalent in the South. Allman and other memBear,” has its share of tragedies. Gregg and bers of the band rejected the label “Southern Duane, his 18-months-older brother, grew up rock,” particularly after it became synonymous without their father, who was murdered in a with uncouth rednecks flying rebel flags at carjacking. The book’s first half covers the Lynyrd Skynyrd concerts. early years until Duane’s premature death at 24 The Allman Brothers Band’s music was from a motorcycle accident in Macon, Georgia.  an unprecedented mix of blues, jazz, soul and Allman sketches a vivid portrait of Duane, psychedelic rock. As ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons named second greatest guitarist of all time by wrote for Rolling Stone, the band “defined the Rolling Stone in 2003, in part due to his sigbest of every music from the American South nature slide guitar playing that famously cries in that time. They were the best of all of us ... like a wounded angel on Derek & the Domi[and] went beyond race and ego.” nos’ “Layla,” most notably on the outro into This book is outstanding as rock memthe piano exit. Allman looked up to Duane, oirs go, primarily due to Allman’s incredible who was more driven and confident of his candor and his compelling insight into the musical talents. music and behind the scenes. He tells his story Allman tells his tale in a candid, casual tone without beefs or flourishes, showing the sort like an affable throwback hippie who neither of spiritual serenity he says he got when he pulls punches nor aggrandizes his remarkable finally got clean, without closing the door on life. He is forthright and fascinating on the rise “all the hell I caused other people” or moraland fall of this quintessential rock band, as he izing about his sobriety.  is on his experiences with “sex, drugs and rock Allman concludes “My Cross to Bear” with a ‘n’ roll,” rock’s early mantra. prescient epitaph: “If I died today, I have had me Allman’s bandmates pegged him early a blast,” but “I don’t know if I’d do it again.”

“My Cross to Bear” Gregg Allman William Morrow, 2012 $8.79 paperback

I

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STYLE MOBILITY

Attention turns to Africatown BY SHARMAN EGAN/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

W

hat a May it was in Mobile! Market in the Park became Market in the Square once again as the heat (on the powers that be) drove the farmer’s market back to Cathedral Square. Thank you from the bottom of my fresh veggie-loving stomach. The Food Channel blew through town, packing tables at LoDa Bier Garten and Von’s Bistro. And it was Halloween in May, as MobiCon filled downtown with sci fi-ers and gamers. Highlights included a cosplay parade and a steampunk ball. Those knuckleheads in Montgomery were busy, passing three bills that benefit Mobile. Rejoice, your free mudbugs are safe (and you can still down a beer with them). It all started when the Mobile County Health Department and ABC Board (the adult beverage police) thought we were having way too much fun down here in “sweet lunacy’s county seat.” They decided to crack down on two timehonored downtown sidewalk traditions: crawfish boils and consumption of adult beverages. The so-called Crawfish Bill passed in May, ending the panic. It allows non-restaurants to serve food (and not just crawfish) at “regional celebrations, traditions or cultural events” without having to jump through all the Health Department hoops. Back in March, HB 185 passed, allowing you to continue to order an adult beverage from a sidewalk cafe in the downtown entertainment district. The third bill isn’t nearly as much fun as crawfish and beer but it’s far more important to the future of Mobile. Much of the revitalization in downtown and midtown over the last four years has been driven by the Alabama Historic Rehabilitation Tax Credit Program approved in 2013. Tax credits, which could reduce the cost of re-

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hab projects by as much as $5 million, were key to the redevelopment of the Admiral Semmes Hotel, the Staples Pake building, Marine Street Lofts, Old Shell Lofts, Broad Street Lofts and numerous others. The program expired in May 2016, and it looked like it would not be renewed. After a lengthy lobbying effort by preservationists, developers and Mayor Sandy Stimpson, among others, the Legislature reinstated the credits in May for a period of five years. The new law has more restrictions but is still good news for continued redevelopment in Mobile.

FOUNDED IN 1876, THE CEMETERY IS THE FINAL RESTING PLACE OF MANY OF THE 110 MEN, WOMEN AND CHILD SLAVES WHO ARRIVED IN MOBILE IN 1860 ABOARD THE SCHOONER CLOTILDE — 52 YEARS AFTER THE U.S. ABOLISHED THE IMPORT OF SLAVES.” That is no doubt good news for Memphis-based Heritage Land & Development Co. In May, the company purchased an entire city block downtown, which includes the Trustmark building at 106 St. Francis Street. That building has suffered from low occupancy and some of the other buildings within the block are in dire need of rehab. The company seems to have an affinity for historic

bank buildings in particular. It redeveloped the First National Bank Building in Tuscaloosa and the Federal Land Bank Building in Columbia, South Carolina, and is currently working on the First Tennessee Bank Building in Chattanooga. All three are mixed-used projects. The company invested $14 million in the Tuscaloosa project, which opened as The Tower Apartments in 2015. It used historic tax credits to help offset the cost of rehabbing the building into 69 luxury apartments. A bank and law office occupy the first floor. In June, the focus will be on the historic community of Africatown with the inaugural Africatown Bridge Challenge on June 24. It includes a 5K route over the bridge and back — the first ever — and a 1-mile fun run/walk followed by awards, music and food. If you do the 5K, you’ll be rewarded with a breathtaking view from the bridge. Proceeds from the event will benefit the Africatown community gardens and the creation of a new marketplace offering fresh produce and arts and crafts. Even if you’re not a runner/walker, it’s a good excuse to check out the historic African-American community. A few years ago, Kevin and I joined a bike tour that took us out Bay Bridge Road (renamed Africatown Boulevard in 2016) to the Old Plateau Cemetery where we learned about its fascinating history. Founded in 1876, the cemetery is the final resting place of many of the 110 men, women and child slaves who arrived in Mobile in 1860 aboard the schooner Clotilde — 52 years after the U.S. abolished the import of slaves. This was the last recorded landing of a slave ship in the country. After the Civil War, the freed slaves established the community of Africatown. Many of the current residents are their descendants. Efforts are underway to highlight the history of Africatown and revitalize the community. It was designated as part of the Dora Franklin Findley AfricanAmerican Heritage Trail in 2009 and listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2012. The city of Mobile developed a neighborhood plan in 2016 which includes development of a museum next to the cemetery. In February, a bust of Cudjoe Kazoola Lewis was unveiled in the courtyard of Union Missionary Baptist Church on its 148th anniversary. Lewis, who died in 1935, is considered the last survivor of the Clotilde and a symbol of the group of former slaves, who triumphed over adversity to create one of the first free African-American communities in the U.S. Artist April Livingston created the sculpture to replace one that was stolen in 2002. Another artist, Labarron Lewis, was commissioned by the community to create a mural of the Clotilde on a siding near the bridge. The huge mural may be complete by the time you read this. Don’t miss it. It’s stunning.


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STYLE BOOZIE

Rain doesn’t stop the music ... or star sightings

R

BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

ain, rain, go away, come again another day — or some other month! Do we even know what the sun looks like anymore? Luckily, the forecast predicts sunshiny days to come, but I’ll believe it when I see it. After all this rain, my midtown house became waterfront property and I don’t think that’s a good thing. Speaking of good things, apparently if it rains on your wedding day it is said to bring good luck. So to all the brides who got married this past weekend: Looks like you have a lot of good luck on your hands! And Boozie readers, you’re in luck too — because I’m about to make it rain this week’s gossip! Enjoy!

Singin’ in the rain

This past Saturday night Brantley Gilbert gave a concert at The Wharf in Orange Beach, with Tyler Farr and Luke Comb as the opening acts. Brantley often visits the Gulf Coast — remember he played at BayFest and let a couple get engaged on stage before the show. Anyways, with him in town you know it will be a party, rain or shine. My concert-going spy said Brantley opened with a song that said “let it rain,” and boy, did it. It rained so much that guys were taking off their shirts, people were dancing or grinding, whatever you want to call it, and just singing along like nothing was going on. My spy said she laughed a little because so many girls were taking pictures in the rain, thinking they looked really cute. But my spy said that wasn’t the case — many had makeup running down their faces and their hair stuck to their heads. So much for all those hours of prepping. My spy said the best part of the night was when everyone turned on their phone’s flashlight — or I guess if you are old school, got out a lighter — and lit the crowd up as Brantley played “Hell of an Amen.” Overall, my spy thought the concert was amazing even if it was a little soggy.

Will play for gumbo

Jimmy Buffett is home! Well, he was for a little bit. After his show in Tampa, Jimmy headed to the Gulf Coast for a little down time before his concert Tuesday night at The Wharf. (Side note: At the time this was written Jimmy hadn’t played, so check back next week for the concert rundown.) His time was spent boating with sister LuLu, paddleboarding, and lots of eating. We heard rumors he was spotted at Flora-Bama Yacht Club, and chowing down on some gumbo at The Original Point Restaurant in Pensacola. Ugh, work ... getting in the way of running into Jimmy Buffett in his natural habitat. Boozie still wonders after all these years if

F U T U R E S H O C K 54 | L AG N I A P P E | J u n e 8 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 1 4 , 2 0 1 7

Jimmy will share the details on where we can find THE “Cheeseburger in Paradise.” Yeah, sure, everyone likes to think it is their burger but Boozie wants the truth! Is it Pirates Cove’s, Pink Pony, or where?! Then, if that wasn’t enough mystery, is the “Bama Breeze” the Flora-Bama? The two bars sound a lot alike and obviously Jimmy likes Flora-Bama, as he made sure to visit while he was in town. Or is it all just made up to keep us wondering and attending his concerts in hopes he will reveal his secrets?

Spotted

If spotting Jimmy Buffett wasn’t enough for you, U.S. Attorney General and former Alabama AG and native Jeff Sessions was spotted shopping in Mobile at men’s clothing store G. Harvell. I am guessing Sessions heard G. Harvell was up for a Nappie for Best Men’s Clothing Store and had to check it out for himself. Maybe those folks up in D.C. tried to put him in some tacky Beltway suit and he wasn’t having it. Either way, welcome home. And though there was no word on what our former U.S. senator bought, it’s said he has two of G. Harvell’s Mobile ties! Way to represent!

Goodbye, Water Street

Not to get too newsy, but I am sure you have heard ALDOT closed the Water Street ramp onto Interstate 10 right at the entrance to the Wallace Tunnel, aka the big tunnel. They claim it will make traffic flow better, but Boozie’s spies think summer was the wrong time to do that. They’re wondering how they’ll get to the beach quicker if the Bankhead Tunnel is backed up, or if they can’t cut over at the last minute. Boozie thinks all those vacation days have gone to ALDOT’s head! Oh well, I still have the ol’ Joachim to Bankhead trick, if you know what I mean. Wink, wink!

New bar

Well guys, there is a new bar at the beach. It isn’t the typical bar I’d normally report on, but I had to check out this place because everyone is talking about it! It is milkshake bar called The Yard. If you haven’t been or heard about it, get ready to make a trip to Gulf Shores. This place makes milkshakes like you’ve never seen before! The shakes are topped with things like cupcakes, slices of cheesecake, donuts, and globs of cookie dough! Do I need to say anything else? The best part is, it’s a bar the whole family can visit! Well, kids, that’s all I’ve got this week. Just remember, whether rain or shine, dramatic or scandalous or just some plain ol’ Jimmy Buffett lovin’, I will be there. Ciao!


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness described in and secured by that certain Vendors Lien Deed from Sheila Coleman to Derrick Mosley and Tioka Zenaida Mosley, dated the 19th day of August , 2013, and recorded in Book LR7065, page 1964, of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, said default continuing, notice is hereby given that the undersigned will, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said Vendors Lien Deed, sell at public outcry for cash to the highest bidder during the legal hours of sale on the 29th day of June, 2017, the following described property located in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, to-wit: Lot 4, First Addition to Cecelia Court, as recorded in Map Book 6, Pages 423-4, in the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama. Address: 752 Stanton Road, Mobile, AL 36617. Said sale will be made for the purpose of paying said indebtedness and the expenses incident to this sale, including a reasonable Attorney’s fee, and the other purposes set out in said Vendors Lien Deed. Sheila Coleman Lienholder. William E. Case, Attorney for Lienholder. Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 22, 2017

PROBATE NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING CASE NO. 2017-0943 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Notice of the filing of petition for Summary Distribution in the estate of Regina Foster, Deceased. Notice is hereby given that a Petition for Summary Distribution has been filed by Roger Foster, Sr. on May 18, 2017, and that 30 days after the notice of publication hereof and pursuant to law the Court shall be requested to enter an order directing summary distribution of the estate of said decedent. Don Davis, Judge of Probate. Attorney: Hendrik S. Snow, Esq. 50 Saint Emanuel Street Mobile, AL 36602 Lagniappe HD June 8, 2017

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: MARGARET T HOHEIM Case No. 2016-2353 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 30th day of May, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. BRANDON CHAYCE HOHEIM as Administrator of the estate of MARGARET T HOHEIM, deceased. Attorney of Record: GERALD C. BROOKS LAGNIAPPE HD June 8, 15, 22, 2017.

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: WYATT JAMES SHELBORNE JR Case No. 2017-0499 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 26th day of May, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. LORI DUBOSE as Administratrix of the estate of WYATT JAMES SHELBORNE JR, deceased. Attorney of Record: HENDRIK S. SNOW, Esq. LAGNIAPPE HD June 8, 15, 22, 2017.

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: GLADYS S. ONEAL, Deceased Case No. 2017-0983 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 26th day of May, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. WILLIAM WORTH ONEAL JR as Executor under the last will and testament of GLADYS S. ONEAL, Deceased. Attorney of Record: MICHAEL E. MARK LAGNIAPPE HD June 1, 8, 15, 2017.

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: MARY ANN HERRING, Deceased Case No. 2017-0908 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 16th day of May, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. MARY HERRING POWNALL as Executrix under the last will and testament of MARY

ANN HERRING, Deceased. Attorney of Record: MICHAEL S. MCNAIR

Lagniappe HD May 25, June 1, 8, 2017.

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: DE’LAUNA KION ANDERSON Case No. 2017-0267 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 16th day of May, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. ZOLIA C. ANDERSON as Administratrix of the estate of DE’LAUNA KION ANDERSON, deceased. Attorney of Record: JAMES D. WILSON, Esq. Lagniappe HD May 25, June 1, 8, 2017. NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING May 18, 2017 Case No. 2016-1595 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA CHANGE OF NAME FOR MINOR On to-wit the 31st day of July, 2017 at 9:30 AM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the CHANGE OF NAME FOR MINOR as filed by CHRISTINA L. WILLIAMS. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest, specifically RONALD GOINS, JR. who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate. Attorney Name and Address: MICHAEL S. MCNAIR, 2151 GOVERNMENT STREET, MOBILE, AL 36606 Lagniappe HD May 25, June 1, 8, 15, 2017.

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING April 18, 2017 Case No. 2015-0200-3 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of JAMES E. KNIGHT, Deceased On to-wit the 24th day of July, 2017 at 2:00 PM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the FINAL SETTLEMENT as filed by TERESA KNIGHT. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate. Attorney: HENDRIK S. SNOW 50 ST. EMANUEL ST, MOBILE, ALABAMA 36602. Lagniappe HD May 18, 25, June 1, 8, 2017

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that the University of South Alabama (Owner) will accept sealed Bids for the following Work: YEARLY BID - FLOOR COATING SYSTEMS University of South Alabama Mobile, Alabama USA JOB NO. 17-47 USA BID NO.7060101 Bids will be received and clocked in at 2:00 p.m. local time on Tuesday, June 27, 2017, in Room AD245 of the USA Administration Building, on the Main Campus of the University of South Alabama. Bids will not be accepted after the time indicated herein and will be returned unopened. A cashier’s check or bid bond payable to the University of South Alabama in an amount not less than five (5) percent of the amount of the bid, but in no event more than $10,000 must accompany the bidder’s proposal. Bid Documents shall be available only through the USA Purchasing Office. Contact as follows: University of South Alabama Purchasing Department 307 University Blvd, N., AD245 PH# (251) 460-6151 FX# (251) 414-8291(rbrown@southalabama. edu)Bids must be submitted on Proposal Forms furnished in the Bid Documents or copies thereof. The preceding is an abbreviated advertisement. The complete advertisement may be obtained from the location listed above. All questions concerning the Projects should be submitted in writing to the Project Manager at the address listed below. 307 University Blvd. N., AD001 Mobile, AL 36688 PH# (251) 460-6601FX# (251) 461-1370 mmayberry@ southalabama.edu Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 22, 2017

NOTICE OF SALE

Oak Inn Apt. 82, Theodore, AL 36582. 1993 Chevrolet GMT-400 1GCFC24K2PE102809

Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2000 Halls Mill Rd., Mobile, AL 36606. 2009 Pontiac G6 1G2ZJ58K494236413  Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 12450 Dailey Rd., Grand Bay, AL 36541. 1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee 1J4G268S2XC668810  Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3940 Moffett Rd., Mobile, AL 36618. 2007 Lexus RX350 2T2GK31U67C026772 Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 121 Schillinger Rd. N., Mobile, AL 36608. 1998 Nissan Pathfinder JN8AR05S7WW240418 Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1107 Lower St., Bay Minette, AL 36507. 2014 Chevrolet Silverado 3GCPCPEH5EG527001 Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 37957 Hwy. 59, Bay Minette, AL 36507. 2005 Ford F150 1FTRF14555KC57393 Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1408 Montlimar Dr., Mobile, AL 36609. 2006 Chevrolet Cobalt 1G1AL15F067631032 Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1100 S US Hwy. 31, Bay Minette, AL 36507. 2007 Chrysler PT Cruiser 3A4FY48B87T546696 Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3180 Springhill Ave., Mobile, AL 36607. 2004 Chevrolet Silverado 1GCEC14X14Z114259 Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1304 Melrose St., Mobile, AL 36605. 2013 Chevrolet Malibu 1G11B5SA5DF170884 Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 106 Martin Luther King Dr., Prichard, AL 36610. 2006 Dodge Charger 2B3KA543G06H213736 Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 4955 Albert Evans Rd. S., Wilmer, AL 36587. 1999 Mercury Sable 1MEFM58U3XA618838  Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 4763 Lott Rd., Eight Mile, AL 36613 2011 Chevrolet Traverse 1GNKRLED5BJ386897 2003 Ford Expedition 1FMRU15W93LB56180 2016 Toyota Camry 4T1BF1FK1GU607335 2000 Bayl Boat BIYB40BZI001

These abandoned vehicles will be sold on 07/13/2017 at 5781 Three Notch Rd. Mobile, AL 36619 at 9am  BUIC    1G4AG55N6P6487970 PONT   1G2NE12T01M501585 HOND  1HGCG66511A120708 TOY     JT3AC12R1M0070646 FORD   1FTCR10UXNTA49613 CHRY   3C8FY78G95T583903 HOND  1HGEM22913L062125 CHEV   1G1AK55F467774317 GMC      1GKCS13W2V2515241

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 6232 Spanish

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 4763 Lott Rd.,

Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

Eight Mile, AL 36613. 2007 Nissan Murano JN8AZ08W17W610813 2004 GMC Yukon 1GKEC13Z54R100100 2002 Nissan Frontier 1N6DD26S32C318137

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2516 Whistler St., Prichard, AL 36610. 2007 BMW 328I WBAVA33587KX80952

Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3101 Davey Allison Blvd., Hueytown, AL 35023. 2000 Chevrolet C1500 3GNEC16T4YG203783 2016 Kia Sorento 5XYPG4A37GG090990 2017 Honda Civic 19XFC2F65HE015251 2002 Hyundai Accent KMHCG35C32U177534 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2865 Government Blvd., Mobile, AL 36606. 2013 Dodge Avenger 1C3CDZAB6DN661633 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

CLASSIFIEDS Designated space in Pinecrest’s Cremation Gardens, open/close of site and bronze memorial. All for $3,300; for a total savings of nearly $2,000. Call 251-210-4427.

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3150 Dauphin St., Mobile, AL 36606. 2001 Buick LeSabre 1G4HP54K71U275281 1995 Cadillac Seville 1G6KS52YXSU809684 2009 Saturn Outlook 5GZER23D59J137849 2006 GMC Envoy 1GKES16S966146745 2008 Pontiac Grand Prix 2G2WP552181118303

Deadline for legal advertising in Lagniappe HD is every Monday at 3 p.m. Lagniappe HD is distributed each Thursday.

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 6205 Waringwood Dr. S., Mobile, AL 36608. 2010 Dodge Journey 3D4PG5FVXAT150604

Lagniappe HD offices are located at 1100B Dauphin St. Mobile, AL 36604.

Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7741 Old Pascagoula Rd. Lot 45, Theodore, AL 36582. 2000 Hyundai Elantra KMHJF35F4YU905343 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

For more information or to place your ad call Jackie at 251-450-4466. Or email at legals@lagniappemobile.com

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 8085 Brunson Ave., Semmes, AL 36575. 1992 Chevrolet Corvette 1G1YY23P8N5108000 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 112 East 21st Ave.  Apt 7, Gulf Shores, AL 36542. 2005 VW New Beetle 3VWBK31C65M416150 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1147 E I-65 Service Rd. S., Mobile, AL 36606. 2002 Infiniti I35 JNKDA31A72T019751 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1207 Hercules St., Mobile, AL 36603. 1992 Ford Crown Vic 2FACP74WXNX111346 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2008 Hathcox St., Mobile, AL 36617. 2004 GMC Sierra 2GTEC13T241369638 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 305 Martin Luther King Jr Dr. N., Prichard, AL 36610. 2007 Chevrolet Tahoe 1GNFK13067J336947 2010 Dodge Challenger 2B3CJ4DVXAH121897 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 14, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 1999 Honda Civic 2HGEJ661XXH511647 2001 Chevrolet Impala 2G1WF52E319223261 Lagniappe HD June 8, 15, 2017

J u n e 8 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 1 4 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 55


Lagniappe: June 8 - 14, 2017  
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