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WEEKLY

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LAGNIAPPE

JUNE 1, 2017 - JUNE 7, 2017 | www.lagniappemobile.com

ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com STEVE HALL Marketing/Sales Director shall@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com JANE NICHOLES Reporter jane@lagniappemobile.com

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BAY BRIEFS

With an “antiquated” law now off the books, expectant Alabamians may legally choose to deliver babies with a midwife.

COMMENTARY

Ashley takes a look at the hot political summer that lies ahead.

BUSINESS

Wal-Mart recently released a summary of its economic impact in Alabama.

CUISINE

KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net

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STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com J. MARK BRYANT Sports Writer sports@lagniappemobile.com STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA RASMUSSEN Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com

With offerings such as Chicago-style hot dogs and deep-dish pizza, Jonelli’s is bringing a taste of the Windy City to Mobile.

COVER

Amid growing disapproval of the death penalty nationwide, Alabama carried out its latest execution last week.

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BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com BETH WILLIAMS Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com ASHLEY KILLIAN Advertising Sales Executive akillian@lagniappemobile.com ALEEN MOMBERGER Advertising Sales Executive aleen@lagniappemobile.com MELISSA EDGE Editorial Assistant events@lagniappemobile.com

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ARTS

Pull out your tight leather pants and Aqua Net, the Joe Jefferson Players present “Rock of Ages.”

MUSIC

ROSS PRITCHARD Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager jackie@lagniappemobile.com CONTRIBUTORS: Lee Hedgepeth, Ron Sivak, Jeff Poor, Asia Frey, Brian Holbert, Ken Robinson, W. Perry Hall ON THE COVER: LETHAL INJECTION BY LAURA RASMUSSEN POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Editorial, advertising and production offices are located at 1100B Dauphin St. Mobile, AL 36604. Mailing address is P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Phone: 251.450.4466 Fax 251.450.4498. Email: ashleytoland@lagniappemobile.com or rholbert@lagniappemobile.com LAGNIAPPE is printed at Walton Press. All letters sent to Lagniappe are considered to be intended for publication. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and Alternative Weeklies Network All rights reserved. Something Extra Publishing, Inc. Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced without the expressed permission of the publishers. Individuals may take one copy of the paper free of charge from area businesses, racks or boxes. After that, papers are $3 per issue. Removal of more than one copy from these points constitutes theft. Violators are subject to prosecution.

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Saving Abel’s Scott Bartlett says the band has endured lineup changes and shakeups in the music industry through constant touring and direct contact with fans.

FILM

Stars Debra Winger and Tracy Letts give a master class in subtle performance in “The Lovers.”

MEDIA

Lagniappe takes home four awards in the Alabama Press Association’s Better Newspaper Contest.

SPORTS

University of Mobile baseball coach Mike Jacobs recently celebrated his 900th career win.

STYLE

Boozie has Memorial Day gossip and was looking for fame on the small screen.

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GOING POSTAL History, not hate Editor: I must take issue with everything Ken Robinson wrote in his article, “The power of a story” in your May 18-24 issue, which extolled the removal of Confederate monuments in New Orleans. My family is from New Orleans; my great grandparents immigrated there from Ireland and Germany in the 1840s. My great grandfather and my great uncles fought in Irish regiments raised in New Orleans. They followed Gen. Robert E. Lee as private soldiers in the Army of Northern Virginia. Not all of them returned; they left their remains in some unmarked Virginia grave. Those who returned never asked for a pardon after the war. My grandparents were born in New Orleans, as was my father, aunts, uncles and cousins. They all are now in various cemeteries in New Orleans. I have bones there. My ancestors who fought for the Southern Confederacy were not dupes of wealthy slaveholders. They were free men and knew what they were fighting for, their liberty, and what they were fighting against, their subjugation. To tear down memorials to their leaders in New Orleans is not noble or inspiring. It is a hollow victory to destroy monuments that have stood more than 100 years. It is nothing more than ISIS in America. In truth it is pandering to the uneducated and the leftist nihilists that know nothing of the lives of those they scorn and defile. It is race politics, the politics of power, not inclusion and certainly not diversity. Mr. Robinson does not share with your readers the other targets of the group that the

POLICE DISPATCH mayor of New Orleans manipulates in this noble cause of freeing our minds from the evil of Lee, Davis and the greatest Creole from Louisiana, Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard. Why not tell the readers that this is only their phase one? Next they want to take down Andrew Jackson, whose equestrian statue graces Jackson Square; the statue of Joan of Arc, a gift from Orleans, France; the statue of Bienville, the founder of New Orleans; Father Ryan, and the list goes on. If these people are so pure of spirit and noble of purpose, why not share their Antifa slogans spray-painted on these monuments, or the crude and vile chants they aim at anyone who dares to disagree with them? This is nothing more than the politics of hate played out against dead men used to cover an agenda of cultural destruction. Lee was no slaveholder and hated the institution. He stated over and over again that the end of slavery was the only good to come of the war. What was he to do, go to war against his sons, daughters, family and neighbors? Was he to lead an invading army to burn the homes of his own family, their towns and cities? Is this what would make him worthy to Mr. Robinson? He took the only course a man of honor could take. He defended his children, his home and his neighbors. Mr. Robinson asked, should we admire Lee? Yes, without reservation, for what a great example his is for any American regardless of color. As another confederate honored with a statue on a pedestal in our city once said, “Live asses only kick at dead lions.” David Toifel Mobile

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Jockisch appeal rejected by 11th circuit By Jason Johnson A federal appeals court has ruled the jurors who convicted former Mobile County Commissioner Freeman Jockisch of attempting to lure a child into unlawful sexual activity in 2014 didn’t have to agree on what manner of sexual contact Jockisch might have preferred. Their opinion, which was published May 26, shot down an appeal Jockisch himself filed from prison after being tried and convicted on charges of child enticement originating from a 2013 sting conducted by federal agents and the Saraland Police Department. Jockisch, now 72, was arrested after driving to an apartment in Saraland in order to meet a person he believed to be a 15-year-old girl named “Sara” — one he’d communicated with on Craigslist. “Sara” was actually an undercover police officer, and Jockisch wrote statements such as, “I want to make love to you” and “I want to make you feel good.” In his appeal, Jockisch and his attorneys contended those sorts of phrases weren’t specific enough to give an indication of exactly what he might have done had there actually been an underage girl at that apartment complex in 2013 instead of several armed police officers. While a peculiar argument, it has some merit in the context of how Jockisch was charged under what’s commonly referred to as the “child enticement” statute. The law prohibits “use of the internet to attempt to persuade a minor to engage in sexual activity that, had it been consummated, could have resulted in

criminal charges under state or federal law.” Typically in these cases, statements perpetrators believe they are making to an underaged child are used against them, and if a specific sex act is referenced, applicable state charges are listed to show the intent of the perpetrator, regardless of whether there was an actual victim. In Jockisch’s indictment, prosecutors listed three Alabama crimes that he could have been charged with violating — rape, sodomy and sexual abuse, all in the second degree. Last week’s ruling states those charges “seemingly capture the range of illicit sexual conduct that could be covered by the phrase, ‘I want to make love to you,’ when those words are uttered by an adult male who is trying to get a 15-year-old girl to meet with him.” The three judges who heard Jockisch’s appeal — Julie E. Carnes, Adalberto Jordan and Eduardo C. Robreno — unanimously agreed the court in Mobile made the correct decision. In her affirmation of his conviction, Carnes wrote that “the only evidence concerning the sexual activity [Jockisch] had in mind was his own words.” More importantly, she concluded that as long as the jury found Jockisch has “attempted to persuade “Sara” to perform some unlawful sex act — whichever one of the three it might have turned out to be — the jury could properly find [him] guilty” of child enticement. Jockisch, who spent more than a decade as a Mobile County Commissioner, has served two years of a 10-year prison sentence. He’s currently being housed in a low-security facility in Sumterville, Florida, and is scheduled to be released in December 2022.


BAYBRIEF | MONTGOMERY

Grassroots effort

ALABAMA MIDWIVES WIN LONG-FOUGHT VICTORY BY JASON JOHNSON

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gainst some of the state’s biggest medical associations, a grassroots coalition of mothers and advocates successfully overturned a 40-year prohibition of midwifery in Alabama, but for certified working midwives and those who wish to become one, there’s still work to be done. Last week, Gov. Kay Ivey signed House Bill 315 into law, calling it “a perfect example of the people of Alabama playing an active and effective role in lobbying their government.” “I signed the midwifery bill because it gives mothers more options to choose how to deliver their baby, while simultaneously ensuring that those midwives who practice in Alabama are qualified to do so,” Ivey said. “[It] strikes the appropriate balance of removing regulations to allow midwives to practice, while also making sure offered services are safe for and in the best interests of mothers and children.” For Courtney Gordon, a certified doula in Mobile who is training to become a midwife, the signing of the law was welcome news — not only for herself, but for mothers across the state. “I’ve been working as doula for a little more than three years now, and it’s been such a hassle for moms and families who want to have a home birth,” Gordon said. “Some do, but they have had to cross the Mississippi border.” While most women choose midwifery to give birth at home or to receive consistent care from the same person throughout their pregnancy, some do so out of necessity as hospitals in rural areas continue to go out of business or close their labor and delivery units to cut costs. In 2014, only 29 of Alabama’s 67 counties had hospitals offering obstetrical services, and Gordon said extending service to mothers in those areas is big plus of HB 315’s passage. “There are also a lot of rural counties where mothers have to drive two and three hours every time they have a prenatal appointment and when they finally do go into labor,” she said. “We’re hoping those areas will be able to benefit from this.” According to those who followed it, though, House Bill 315 was a bit of a dark horse. Colleen Tullis, a Mobile resident, has been a certified midwife for more than a decade. Certified in Louisiana and practicing in Mississippi, she’s provided out-of-hospital care for hundreds of mothers even as her profession remained a crime at home. After 13 years of striking out in Montgomery with legislation that hasn’t been able to make it out of committee, Tullis said there was no indication the 2017 regular session would be different. “We’ve presented this bill or some form of it for years, and we’d always get shot down,” Tullis said. “This year, it just started flying though, especially compared to our previous experiences.” While the bill cleared the House with few issues, it moved more slowly through the Senate, where, despite passing 30-0, supporters had to make some concessions to keep it alive. Provisions requiring midwives to carry liability insurance were added along with controversial prohibitions on certain “high-risk” pregnan-

cies, such as those with multiple children and mothers who have previously had a cesarean section. Another requires midwives to collect and record the number of births, deaths and transfers to hospitals that occur in their work. In the waning hours of the session, a regulatory board was also established to “approve, renew, suspend or revoke” midwifery licenses. Its seven members will be appointed by the governor, affirmed by the senate and comprise four certified midwives, a nurse midwife [or registered nurse], a nurse practitioner and a consumer who’s used the services of a midwife. Initial nominees will be submitted to the governor’s office by a consensus between the Alabama Birthing Coalition, which helped push HB 315, and the Alabama Midwives Alliance, of which Tullis is a member. Tullis said she’s actually pleased with the board’s format, though. With a majority of midwives, she called the setup “excellent,” adding that “many states would like [Alabama’s] arrangement.” One of the last hurdles for HB 315 was Sen. Slade Blackwell, R-Montevallo, who turned a 10-minute discussion on the final day of the session into something resembling a filibuster. However, Sen. Vivian Davis Figures, DMobile, became somewhat of a last-minute champion for advocates in her defense of the bill on the Senate floor — at one point openly asking Blackwell, “Who are you working for? Who has you at the mic trying to kill this bill?” Tullis seemed agreed with Figures, telling Lagniappe she believes the bill’s opposition “pulled out all the stops” on the session’s final day when they realized it might actually pass. “It was very frustrating,” she added. “So much of what they started trying to tack on, we’d been asking for for years.” A key opponent of HB 315 and similar legislation has been the Medical Association of the State of Alabama, which has not responded to Lagniappe’s requests for comment. Despite that pushback, though, Gordon said she’d like to see a community of OB-GYNs and midwives working together to achieve better outcomes for mothers and babies. “Other places around the country have that, and we’d like to see that model of care that supports families and women by giving them the choices they desire,” she said. “When we do that, there are better maternal and fetal outcomes and lower rates of postpartum depression.” With a board to be seated, regulations to be written and a shortage of midwives to make it all happen, Tullis said it could be a year before anyone is legally practicing in Alabama. Yet, with the door open for the first time in four decades, she is hopeful others like Gordon can ultimately meet the demand that already exists for a service that was a crime last month. “We will put a board together and have all these rules and regulations in place. This will all come to fruition,” she said. “After 13 years, we’ve proven that perseverance pays off. If people speak loud enough, you can make the government listen. It’s not easy, but you can do it.”

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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Get a job COUNCIL APPROVES CONTRACT TO BEGIN MAYOR’S YOUTH EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM

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BY DALE LIESCH

he Mobile City Council unanimously approved an agreement with Personnel Staffing Services for payroll management for roughly 80 summer employees hired as part of Mayor Sandy Stimpson’s Youth Empowered for Success (YES) Initiative. The company will manage payroll services, but the city will pay the employees minimum wage for work in 17 departments. Councilman Fred Richardson had requested more information on the prospective employees to learn if any had come from the district he represents, but “let it go” when he learned more than 2,000 individuals ages 16 to 24 had applied for jobs. Following a pre-conference meeting on Tuesday, Richardson said he was supportive of the measure. Anitra Henderson, director of civic engagement, said the youth who applied had to live in the city or attend a Mobile County school. “What we wanted to do was give every young person who wanted to apply ... the opportunity to apply no matter what age or socioeconomic background,” Henderson said. “We wanted to make sure it was as easy as possible.” The program will run for six weeks, starting in June, Henderson said. The program includes two weeks of job skills training and four weeks inside the city departments. The applicants not chosen to work in the city departments can participate in a program supported by private businesses in Gulf Shores, Henderson said. Young people ages 17-24 can work in Gulf Shores during the summer season as part of a pilot program. The program helps provide employees near the beach at a time when there is typically a shortage, Henderson said. Those chosen for the program will receive two weeks’ job

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readiness training from the University of South Alabama’s Hospitality and Tourism Department. The city will provide transportation to Baldwin County through Mobile County Public School System and then to Gulf Shores through Baldwin Rural Area Transportation Services. The individual businesses will pay the wages, Henderson said. Roughly 100 employees will be hired through the city and another 100 or so will be hired in Gulf Shores, Henderson said. Another 200 to 500 will go through the training. The city also encouraged local businesses to hire at least two employees for the summer through established internship programs at the Mobile Housing Board and Mobile County Public Schools. If a business hires two interns, the city can provide funding for one, Henderson said. Of the 2,775 young people who showed initial interest, 753 officially applied and were screened by the city, Henderson said. The city then pared that number down to 100 to work in the city departments. Henderson said the employees are from every council district in the city and from all walks of life. Councilman Levon Manzie, who had initially asked the city to develop a youth employment program, said he expects to see a large number of employees from east of Interstate 65. “My expectation is that the young people who are most in need will come from east of I-65,” he said. Manzie said he thinks the administration’s effort will be a “huge success.” “I am very appreciative of the administration responding to my call last year to deal with summer employment,”

he said. “They’ve set the groundwork for what I hope will be an even greater program in the future.” Manzie said he would like to see an increase in funding for the program. The large number of applicants, he said, validated what he’d been hearing in meetings with youth — that the No. 1 issue in the city is employment. “I knew there would be a great level of interest in this program,” he said. “I don’t think this is the tip of the iceberg. I’m hopeful we can build on this level of support.” In other business, the council voted to deny the request of Blackwell Towing’s removal from the city’s wrecker company rotation. Executive Director of

THE MOBILE CITY COUNCIL UNANIMOUSLY APPROVED AN AGREEMENT WITH PERSONNEL STAFFING SERVICES FOR PAYROLL MANAGEMENT FOR ROUGHLY 80 SUMMER EMPLOYEES HIRED AS PART OF MAYOR SANDY STIMPSON’S YOUTH EMPOWERED FOR SUCCESS (YES) INITIATIVE. ” Public Safety James Barber said Blackwell wouldn’t allow Mobile Police Department access to its business records in order to conduct an audit. An attorney for owner DeWayne Blackwell told councilors officers can come by and look at the records anytime they want. The council approved a master agreement with McCrory & Williams worth $90,000 for engineering and construction services to complete multiple drainage repairs throughout the city. The council approved a $63,345 contract with Aiker Construction Corp. for Rickarby Park basketball court. The council approved a $158,980 contract to re-roof 850 St. Anthony St. and authorized a Transportation Alternative Program grant to include Americans With Disabilities Act-compliant sidewalks along Dauphin Island Parkway from the south side of Interstate 10 to Old Military Road. The TAP grant is worth a total of $199,891, which includes $159,912 in grant funds and a $39,978 match from CIP funds.


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Reduce, reuse, rewarded COUNTY RECEIVES STATEWIDE AWARD BY JASON JOHNSON Photo | Daniel Anderson

Mobile County’s Recycling Center received the 2017 Excellence in County Administration award.

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pproaching its third full year in operation, the Mobile County Recycling Center in West Mobile is gaining statewide attention for its three-pronged approach to environmental stewardship, jobs training and education. In May, the center received the 2017 Excellence in County Administration award, which is given out by the Association of County Administrators of Alabama (ACAA) at its annual conference. The center opened in 2014 and is currently on track to have recycled seven million pounds of material by the end of the year. Mobile County Commissioner Connie Hudson, who spearheaded the project, said she was proud of the acknowledgement from ACAA, but also proud of the support the recycling center has continued to see from the community. “We’re seeing an average of around 375 cars a day and up to 500 on Saturdays,” Hudson said. “There’s a support in the community for recycling. I think there’s also a lot of people who didn’t recycle in the past who’ve started to recycle when this became accessible because the city’s existing recycling center on Government Street hasn’t really reported a decrease in their levels.” The roughly $3 million project was almost entirely funded with grants from the Coastal Impact Assistance Project and the Alabama Department of Environmental Management. But while the county owns the facility, its operation, employees, long-term maintenance and repairs are managed by Goodwill Easterseals of the Gulf Coast. Part of that responsibility is overseeing the recycling center’s jobs training mission, which has always been planned to utilize individuals with “mental and/or physical disabilities” who “need job training to enter or reenter the job market.” Since its opening, students and adults with special needs have logged more than 1,450 training hours at the facility. Through other volunteers and the county’s community corrections program, the center has seen as many as 400 hours of community service logged in a single month. The educational component was met with programs that bring in students from local schools for hands-on experience in the recycling and sorting process and specialized classroom components. So far, Mobile County students have spent more than 900 hours at the center. One of the goals of those programs was to spread the knowledge about recycling to those who visit the center. Frank Harkins, CEO of Goodwill Easterseals of the Gulf Coast, has pre-

viously said he’s routinely seen that play out. “Sunday is my drop-off day, and I’m always amazed at how many times I see a child out here showing their grandparents or their parents where things go and saying, ‘No, that doesn’t go there, it goes here,’” Harkins said. “I remember before seat belts were standard in everything you had kids who’d grown up with them reminding parents to wear them. That’s kind of what this reminds me of.” Last fall, dips in commodity prices for much of what the center accepts to resell — glass, paper, plastic, aluminum — led to overall losses for Goodwill Easterseals. However, the county covered those losses with a $50,000 allocation last December taken from oil revenues generated by the Gulf of Mexico Energy Security Act (GOMESA). While the secondary markets for many of those commodities haven’t rallied, Hudson said she’s not concerned, adding that the county is prepared to use GOMESA again if the need arises. “Commodity prices, they fluctuate greatly within a given period of time, and it was never our intent that Goodwill Easterseals would have a deficit operating the center. They’re really doing us a service,” she said. “GOMESA funds have to be used in the context of conservation, and could be a source of funding to help when those commodity prices are down to keep [Goodwill Easterseals] from shouldering any type of deficit.” As Hudson noted, the county could likely see a “very substantial influx of funding” from GOMESA as early as March 2018, as oil leases closer to coastal Alabama become active in the Gulf of Mexico. Mobile County generated more than $1.2 million from 79 active leases between 2009 and 2016, but the number of active leases — and expected royalties — is projected to quadruple within the next year. In December, Harkins also told Lagniappe that Goodwill Easterseals was supportive of its role at the recycling center. Even though he acknowledged the cost of labor had been “a struggle,” he called the facility and its programs “a good thing” the organization is “proud to be a part of.” “We want to do things that make the community better, and we want to partner with people who see that. We have a number of entities that help us in different ways,” he said. “This is a reflection of how well we take care of our community, and we are going to work together. Planet Earth only has so much place to put this stuff, and I think people want to help. I really do.”

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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Taking the oath

Stimpson said. “ … I’m grateful to be a part of it.” Sealy was selected after a weeks-long search where 13 local candidates — who each submitted a comprehensive plan for the department — were whittled down to five finalists. The five finalists were interviewed by a panel that included a local management consultant Dan Lumpkin, Montgomery Fire Chief Miford Jordan, Executive Director of Public Safety James Barber and Bloomberg I-Team Director and former EMS driver Jeff Carter. Stimpson said Jordan was brought on to consult during the hiring process because his department in Montgomery had achieved an Insurance Service Office rating of 1, which is the highest possible score. Mobile Fire-Rescue Department’s current ISO score is 3. “Montgomery set a new standard,” Stimpson said. “The aspiration is we want to be the very best …. “I am convinced we too will achieve a rating of 1.” When he was initially asked to consult on the hiring, Barber said Jordan

MARK SEALY OFFICIALLY BECOMES MFRD CHIEF BY DALE LIESCH

MARK SEALY OFFICIALLY BECAME CHIEF TUESDAY, AFTER THE DEPARTMENT HAD GONE NEARLY FOUR YEARS WITHOUT A CONFIRMED LEADER.”

a Mobile Fire-Rescue Department chief. Mark Sealy officially became chief Tuesday, after the department had gone nearly four years without a confirmed leader. “It’s a new day and I’m looking forward to it … ,”

human resources, marketing and advertising. The new online shopping platform, called Greer’s Groceries To Go, officially went live on Mother’s Day Weekend. “We encourage people to register,” Endfinger said. “It keeps up with past orders, payment information, your pantry and shopping lists.” The platform is “really, really easy to navigate,” she

said, as most of the listed items have corresponding photos. When a customer arrives at the Dauphin Street location to pick up an order, a store employee will bring it out to the customer’s vehicle and check to make sure the order is correct, Endfinger said. “If we don’t have an item we’ll substitute,” she said. “If you asked for Best Choice brand and we don’t have it, we’ll give you the national brand at the same price. We’ll always substitute up.” Everything that’s available in the store is available on the online platform, except for alcohol and tobacco products. There is also a $30 minimum purchase requirement to use the platform. There’s no additional fee to pick up an order. Endfinger said the platform should help busy parents save time at the grocery store. She added this is something people have been asking for, and said it should appeal to the needs of the next generation of shoppers. “We wanted to make it more convenient to shop with us and save,” Endfinger said.

Photo | Lagniappe

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embers of the administration, City Council and the general public gathered Tuesday in Government Plaza’s ceremonial courtroom for something that hadn’t happened since Mayor Sandy Stimpson took office; the swearing-in ceremony for

asked him what he should look for. Barber casually told him that with his experience he’d know. When Sealy walked out of the room as the last applicant to interview, Jordan said ‘there’s your fire chief,’ Barber said. In addition to bringing Jordan in to consult, Mobile borrowed more from Montgomery’s department, including a similar command structure. Three of the four candidates not chosen for chief were given new titles within the department, which mirrors Montgomery pretty closely. District Chief Doug Cooper as chief of operations, District Chief Jeremy Lami as chief of staff and Deputy Chief Myron King will assume the position of chief of support. The two remaining deputy chiefs will be retained, but the other deputy chief and assistant chief positions will not be filled. Barber said the city looked at best practices in other fire departments as well, including in Auburn and Huntsville. City spokeswoman Laura Byrne confirmed Tuesday that Mobile was trying to mirror Montgomery’s command structure. During remarks on Tuesday, Council President Gina Gregory called Sealy the “ideal person to lead the department” due to his experience in fire suppression and EMS, as well as his education. Sealy was sworn in by retired Circuit Court Judge Charles Graddick.

Groceries to go GREER’S INTRODUCES ONLINE SHOPPING BY STAFF REPORT

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ocal grocery store chain Greer’s has found another way to compete with larger national chains in the area by offering online shopping. Greer’s shoppers in Mobile can now log on to the store’s website at greers.com, shop for items in all departments and pick up their orders at the chain’s CashSaver location on Dauphin Street, said Jan Greer Endfinger, director of

‘Most Desperate Landscape’ MOBILE FAMILY FEATURED ON DIY NETWORK SHOW BY DALE LIESCH

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t the end of a long day, Melissa and David Laster looked at their West Mobile yard and saw nothing but dirt. Everything had been removed. It was time to start over. It’s not like what had been there before was much better. Melissa Laster said she wouldn’t let her kids play in the backyard because it was “dangerous.” There are not too many backyards with exposed rebar, for instance. Less than a week later, with the help of a TV production company, that very same yard became one of the family’s favorite places, complete with palms, azaleas, a new swimming pool and an outdoor cooking area. The transformation was the result of the show “Ameri-

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ca’s Most Desperate Landscape” on DIY Network. DIYers themselves and fans of the show, Laster said she decided to answer a casting call on the show’s website. The family made a video, despite their pessimism. “I never dreamed I’d hear anything, but I got an email a week later that asked more questions,” Laster said. “That started the ball rolling.” The show asked her “a lot of questions” during a months-long back-and-forth full of emails and phone calls. A crew visited in December when the family became finalists — although they had already been selected at the time — and visited again in February for a camera test and Skyped with the host, Laster said.

It was then up to the family to secure a crew of eight from among their family and friends to help with the on-screen transformation, which would film over four days in April. “We agreed to get a crew of eight,” Laster said. “It was a bunch of good friends who agreed to spend days working hard in our yard.” The family worked alongside the crew in what were really long days, she said. “We worked from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Some of the work crew worked even longer than that,” she said. The Lasters’ two fourth graders and 2-year-old love the new landscaping, Laster said, especially the pool and a fort. “They absolutely love it,” she said. “The two oldest love the water. They’re like fish.” The 2-year-old has severe allergies, but the new yard includes an area with artificial turf so he can play without being affected by grass. The transformation also included a grill, dining area, a double-sided fireplace and a television, she said. “We’re big college football fans,” Laster said. “We wanted a place where we could watch football, grill out and entertain friends.” The Lasters’ episode aired on Memorial Day, but will be re-run several times on the network.


BAYBRIEF | GOVERNMENT

Shipshape TRUMP BUDGET ‘SHORTCHANGES’ MOBILE-BASED LCS PROGRAM BY LEE HEDGEPETH Photo | Lagniappe

Austal USA’s Expeditionary Fast Transport 8 (EPF 8), USNS Yuma, completed the U.S. Navy’s acceptance trials in February.

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or the second time since his inauguration, President Donald Trump has drawn the ire of political leaders here on the Gulf Coast. Less than a year after an initial draft of the administration’s priority transportation projects excluded the much-needed Interstate 10 bridge in Mobile, another federal budget proposal has local officials on edge. While Trump’s budget, released just over a week ago, calls for a sizable overall increase in military spending, the Mobile-based Littoral Combat Ship program is not one of the clear beneficiaries of the funding bump — a reality Port City politicos are already working to correct. As originally released just over a week ago, the budget — titled “A new foundation for American greatness” — contains funding for only one additional LCS, the same number scheduled under former President Barack Obama’s last plan. “Like President Trump, I want to see us rebuild our nation’s military, but this budget proposal shortchanges our national defense,” U.S. Rep. Bradley Byrne said. “Specifically, the budget does not get us any closer to building up a 350 ship Navy fleet, and it lacks the full funding necessary to reverse our military readiness crisis.” Throughout his presidential campaign, Trump emphasized not just his support for defense, but for creating jobs, saying he would be “the greatest jobs producer that God ever created.” Austal USA, the Mobile company that would benefit from an expanded LCS program, employs thousands in South Alabama. Sen. Richard Shelby also had a lukewarm response to the proposal. “It is vital that we prioritize our nation’s defense, particularly with the evolving threats we face today,” Shelby said of Trump’s plan. “President Trump has discussed the importance of rebuilding our military and increasing our Navy’s fleet after eight years of insufficient funding. That should include our Navy’s critical warfighting ships. As a senior member on the Senate Appropriations Committee, I will work to ensure that our armed forces receive the resources and equipment necessary to promote and protect our nation’s interests.” These subdued criticisms of Trump’s budget may be working. Last week, during a congressional hearing on military spending, Navy

official Allison Stiller testified that despite the spending outlined by the budget, “The administration recognizes the criticality of our industrial base and supports funding a second LCS,” seemingly reversing the Trump position in one fell swoop. After the hearing, Shelby released a statement saying he was “pleased to see that the Navy is working to address the industrial base concerns that I raised related to the FY18 budget and the LCS program.” Shelby’s critique is likely only part of the reason a second LCS was added to the budget proposal, though. “It was just an unorthodox process,” one inside source told CNN, speaking about the late addition of a second LCS to the budget. “Ultimately the decision to include two ships was made after the budget went to print so it had to be announced outside the normal budget document.” According to CNN, those same inside sources said that the change was spearheaded by Rick Dearborn, a Trump adviser who was former Alabama Sen. Jeff Sessions’ chief of staff for years. An official from the Office of Management and Budget, which oversees the budget, put the change in a broader context, saying another LCS would be added because “the facts and need for a second came to us so late in the process.” “Had we known about this need that far back we would have put it in the request,” the OMB official told CNN. Despite the LCS program’s popularity here in Mobile, there is no shortage of critics of the last-minute change, including Sen. John McCain, chairman of the Senate Armed Services Committee. “I’ve never seen anything like it,” McCain told CNN. Rep. Adam Smith, the top Democrat on the House’s equivalent committee, was even more critical of the last-minute move: “They pulled that ship out of their asses.” The change is also an about-face for OMB, whose director, Mick Mulvaney, said of LCS ships: “The Navy doesn’t want them.” Trump’s budget is only a guideline for spending and will eventually need approval from both the House and Senate before being signed into law.

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BAYBRIEF | COURTS

Dose of their own PAIN DOCTORS SENTENCED TO DECADES IN PRISON

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BY JASON JOHNSON

fter two years of legal filings and a seven-week criminal trial, the doctors who operated Physicians Pain Specialists of Alabama (PPSA) have been sentenced to two decades behind bars and ordered to pay restitution fines exceeding $25 million. Xiulu Ruan and John Patrick Couch were sentenced, respectively, to 21 and 20 years in federal prison last week by U.S. District Court Judge Ginny Granade after being convicted in February of 19 charges ranging from distributing controlled substances to violating the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) Act. Both sentences were a variance from set guidelines and significantly less than prosecutors initially sought, as Granade said it was an “unusual case,” as PPSA was “not a typical pill mill.” Of the doctors, Granade suggested Couch’s practice “had gotten away from him,” and though possibly unintentional it “certainly was illegal.” She called Ruan the more educated of the pair — a better doctor, but one who “could not control his desire to make the most money he could.” For prosecutors, it was a landmark victory as the first case in U.S. history to see any medical professional successfully tried and convicted of RICO violations. Acting U.S. Attorney Steve Butler called the case “groundbreaking,” saying it could likely have nationwide implications. “What happened with these two doctors could happen in any other situation,” he said. “However, their conduct in this case, which led to their conviction and these two long sentences, is not indicative of the vast majority of medical professionals or their motivations, and we know that.” Despite the end of the two-year legal battle, there are still several things factors in the case that have yet to be resolved, in addition to appeals already initiated by both of the defendants. From the beginning, money has been a focus of the public discourse surrounding the PPSA case. That’s partially due to some of the assets that were seized the day the doctors’ clinics were raided, including Ruan’s multimillion-dollar exotic car collection, which the government has already liquidated. Granade has also ordered Ruan and Couch to pay $12.5 million and $14 million, respectively, in restitution to a handful of public and private insurance providers, along with an additional $2.7 million in restitution shared by both doctors. Yet, there’s still millions of dollars in assets to be sorted, including more high-end cars, multiple properties and numerous six-digit bank accounts associated with Ruan, Couch and PPSA. Though a preliminary order of forfeiture has been filed, a litany of intervening parties claiming an interest in those assets has complicated the process. At sentencing, Assistant U.S. Attorney Deborah Griffin said it could be weeks before those matters are resolved. Some of those parties include former business partners and family members. Others

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are banks and lenders holding mortgages and leases on some of the assets the government is seeking. One of the more interesting claims, though, was filed by an individual named Lori Carver, who claims to have been the “whistleblower” that initially put PPSA on federal authorities’ radar. Though prosecutors dispute her influence on their investigation, Carver did file a civil lawsuit two years before Ruan and Couch were indicted that makes several of the same allegations that later became charges in the government’s criminal case. Carver — a former clinical supervisor at PPSA —  claimed in 2013 the doctors were knowingly overbilling Medicare, Medicaid, TRICARE and private insurers in a number of ways, including coding examinations performed by a nurse practitioner to make it appear patients had been seen by a doctor. Some of Carver’s allegations never arose in their criminal case, including one suggesting PPSA was regularly sanitizing and reusing disposable needles. However, other claims — including routine kickbacks from drug companies and staff members forging prescriptions — became key components of the doctors’ indictment, trial and conviction. Carver claims she warned Couch in 2011 about an increase in patients questioning why their insurance had been billed for a doctor’s visit when they’d seen a nurse practitioner. Couch allegedly responded by saying, “I don’t give a damn. These people will do whatever I say. They are addicted to their medications, and if they don’t like it, they won’t get their prescriptions.” According to the lawsuit, Carver had multiple meetings with local prosecutors before her civil suit was halted so the government could begin the investigation that ultimately led to Ruan and Couch’s criminal indictment — the same prosecutors who are downplaying her role in the case. Now, the government is asking Granade to dismiss a motion Carver filed to intervene in the pending forfeiture actions. In fact, when a relative of a deceased PPSA patient referenced Carver as a “whistleblower” while addressing Granade, prosecutors made an oral objection, saying the “government [disagreed] with statements made about the origins of this case.” While Griffin says Carver’s civil suit remains “viable and pending,” her attorneys contend the four-year freeze on the case — one the government petitioned for — hampered it from moving forward, and there likely won’t be anything left to collect when the government is finished. Prior to sentencing, both sides were able to agree Carver could have an “arguable claim” under the False Claims Act to a portion of any restitution awarded to federal insurance programs like Medicare or TRICARE, though at the time there had been no ruling on any restitution amounts. Now, with restitution figures set in the millions, it’s likely even a small share could be substantial if Carver’s claims are proven in court and her motion to intervene is granted by Granade.


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COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

Helpful advice for the Jones Campaign ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

THOSE IN THE POLITICAL KNOW LOCALLY CLAIM SAM IS JUST GOING TO COME RUNNING OUT OF THE WOODWORK IN JULY AND TRY A BLITZKRIEG CAMPAIGN OF SORTS RIGHT BEFORE ELECTION DAY. ”

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official act as mayor, after hiring back Larry Wettermark as city attorney to get the money rolling again, will be to put a double-reinforced, soundproof door with multiple locks back in the doorway into the mayor’s office. It’ll be a symbolic gesture to let voters know the secret deal is back! Also go ahead and book your favorite table back at your favorite steakhouse. Voters admire raw political power served with medium-rare filet mignon. It might also be a good time to promise voters you’ll get Clarence Ball and your other cronies who ran the Mobile Housing Board in such a flim-flam manner back in charge. These HUD investigations need to be shut down and there’s no finer group of people to make that happen. And don’t forget to promise you’ll get friends, relatives and acquaintances city jobs if they vote for you. I mean, who wants to vote for a mayor who can’t grow jobs? So what if no roads get paved or every garbage truck falls apart. Sam, I’m not saying even these brilliant ideas will help you. Let’s face it, you really haven’t spent the past four years out in the community rehabbing your image. Sitting on the water board and going to work for your buddy Ball hardly has people thinking you’ve really changed considerably since you lost to Stimpson. Hopefully you’ll go ahead and get out there and tell us why you deserve another chance. And if you do get GulfQuest as your HQ, you’ll at least have some cool games to entertain yourself with on the night of your victory party.

THEGADFLY

if you want to get elected to an office you should go out and talk to people about your ideas and also raise money to advertise. But maybe Politics 102 says it’s smarter to just keep people wondering and act like you have some clever strategy nobody else is smart enough to understand. And maybe that might even make sense if you had a good record and people had warm feelings about you, but Jones was a flop as mayor, left the city on the verge of bankruptcy and treated running the city like it was no one else’s business what he did. As a political dog he’s got a lot of fleas, so you’d think Candidate Jones would need to do a little explaining about why things were so woefully off track when he was running the show. But from what I can gather that’s not his plan. Those in the political know locally claim Sam is just going to come running out of the woodwork in July and try a blitzkrieg campaign of sorts right before Election Day. I don’t really see how that’s going to work, but maybe there’s genius I’m missing. Still, in the name of seeing a more competitive race, I’d like to offer a few suggestions that might help Jones in his quest to regain the mayor’s seat. • First, let’s forget all about the sneaky stuff, Sam, and go bold. Let’s face it, your campaign is about someone who has failed miserably telling the public “I’d like to fail again, please.” One of the best ways to draw attention to any political campaign is to have a high-profile headquarters that projects exactly what your leadership style is all about. With that in mind, there’s really only one building that could house the Sam Jones for Mayor campaign — GulfQuest. I’d imagine the city would rent it to you cheap. What says more about your past and future than this expensive debacle? And if I might be so bold as to offer

a campaign slogan that would also serve as a fitting catchphrase for your new HQ — “Sam Jones: Nothing Going on Here.” See how it captures the building’s relative inactivity while also incorporating a classic response from those involved in unscrupulous activity? Perfect. • Now let’s get to the meat of the matter. You’re black and Sandy’s white, and that’s what’s wrong with this city. In the last election you played the race card well, but not well enough. The allusions to him looking down from Spring Hill upon the poor, black sections of town were good, but they were kind of undermined by the fact that you didn’t do anything at all to help those sections of town while you were in office. This time around it might be better to steer clear of comparisons that accidentally remind people you weren’t exactly looking out for your own constituents. Keep it simple. Let’s see some posters of Sandy Stimpson and Donald Trump together, for instance. (Nobody has any pictures of you and Trump, right?) • And while you’re trying to paint Stimpson as a closet racist, let’s not forget about some of the issues he’s had with trees while in office. Stimpson’s poll numbers with trees is dismal — the man ran a lumber company! You should go out and meet with groups of trees and assure them they won’t be cut down in a Jones administration. Be sure to kiss a sapling. It’d make a nice commercial. • Now it’s time for a few campaign promises. Let everyone know your first

Cartoon/Laura Rasmussen

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ver the past few days I’ve been sent a few pictures of Facebook posts showing former Mobile Mayor Sam Jones sitting at a big conference table with some of his confidants and a bowl full of Starlight mints. The gist of the posts is that Silent Sam is coming back to take over as mayor. And that, folks, is about as much actual campaigning as we’ve seen from Jones. For months and months he’s hung it out there that he is going to challenge Sandy Stimpson for the mayor’s seat this summer, but so far Jones hasn’t done anything a political scientist might identify as “campaigning.” Other than some bumper stickers and Facebook posts, the campaign he’s allegedly running is about as underground as it gets. I say “allegedly,” but I’ve heard from enough knowledgeable people to believe Jones really is running, even if he looks like he’s sitting still. It’s hard to know what to think of such a strategy — if it really even is a strategy and not just a product of a lack of money, energy and support. Politics 101 says

RED SNAPPER IN FEDERAL WATERS BEYOND THE NINE-MILE LIMIT REJOICE AT THE HISTORICALLY SHORT FISHING SEASON.


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COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

Summer brings hot political races

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ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM t’s hot. In Mobile, Alabama, in June. Big surprise! But if you think June is hot, just wait until we get to August. We will be sweating by 9 a.m AND we have two political races guaranteed to make things even steamier around here. Time to get our ACs as well as our BS detectors serviced, y’all. It’s going to be a long, hot summer.

Strange times

The field is now set for the special election for the U.S. Senate seat vacated when Jeff Sessions was confirmed as our nation’s attorney general. The crowded field of eight Democrats and 11 Republicans will battle it out in their primaries on Aug. 15. If a runoff is necessary it will take place Sept. 26. The general will be on Dec. 12. Though stranger things have happened in this world, conventional wisdom would suggest that whoever wins the Republican primary/runoff in a bright red state like Alabama will be our next senator. The four Republican candidates with the most name recognition — and who probably have the best shot — are: former Alabama AG Luther Strange, who currently holds the spot; State Sen. Trip Pittman; U.S. Rep. Mo Brooks; and suspended Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore. Of course, we all know now the Luv Guv took the opportunity to appoint the man whose office was investigating said Lovernor, but then conveniently was not necessarily investigating him, but then was investigating him after all. Keeping up? Good. I know it’s complicated. That large man would, of course, be former Alabama Attorney General Big Luther Strange, who thought he would get to hold on to his super shady Bentley appointment for a little longer, but that dream was shattered when Gov. Kay Ivey moved the special election up from the date Bentley originally chose to save his own skin, I mean, save the state money in November 2018. I never thought this would be possible, but Strange’s first TV ad is even more infuriating than listening to that horrible “fightin’ Obama/drivin’ the back roads” ad of Richard Shelby’s. And it’s just chock-full of lies, using fake headlines from a totally fictional newspaper. (And I don’t mean that in the sense of calling a real newspaper fake a la Trump style. It’s totally made up. When did that become acceptable? What a total fraud!) Anyway, BL claims to have investigated Bentley, which he never confirmed while he was trying to get the gig he so desperately wanted from Bentley. He also takes credit for prosecuting Mike Hubbard, a case from which he recused himself. BL seems really adept at peddling the BS. While he was making up headlines for the “Valley Times” he might as well have taken credit for Alabama and Auburn’s national championships. That probably would have garnered him more votes than his other blatant misrepresentations. Since he has the national Republican Party behind him he is probably still the odds-on favorite. But the unethical way in which he secured his appointment with Bentley coupled with this intentionally misleading ad leaves me having BIG problems with BIG Luther. Roy Moore? Just no. The man clearly has no respect for the principles our nation was founded on, particularly the ones about three branches of government and checks and balances. Fool me once, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. Fool me three times, well then we should expect to get the government we deserve — one led by a professional kickboxing autocrat. Tell me, Mo, where are Larry and Curly? U.S. Rep Mo Brooks represents the 5th district of Alabama. This district is in the northern part of the state and includes Huntsville, Florence and

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Decatur. Brooks is not very well known down here in coastal Alabama and that could be his main problem … although he did make some statements recently that could pose an even bigger one. In an interview with CNN’s Jake Tapper about changes to the Affordable Care Act, he said “people who lead good lives” don’t have to worry about dealing with pre-existing conditions. He went on to say, “My understanding is that [the new health care proposal] will allow insurance companies to require people who have higher health care costs to contribute more to the insurance pool. That helps offset all these costs, thereby reducing the cost to those people who lead good lives, they’re healthy, they’ve done the things to keep their bodies healthy. And right now, those are the people — who’ve done things the right way — that are seeing their costs skyrocketing.” I think it’s clear it was just clumsy wording. He didn’t mean people who go to church every Sunday don’t have to worry about getting asthma or arthritis, as the headlines suggested he did. He meant if you smoke five packs a day you may have to pay a little more than someone who doesn’t, the same way life insurance works. He probably should have said people who don’t engage in behaviors that are known to cause long-term health problems, like smoking, can reduce their costs. But in one of the unhealthiest states in the nation those clumsy words could still hurt him.

Just Trippin’

Known better around these parts, State Sen. Trip Pittman of Montrose may have a shot at capturing coastal Alabama’s vote, but getting his message across statewide, much like Brooks, may be a challenge. Questions about his ethics were raised back during the BP oil spill after his company got a hefty chunk of funds ($639,000) for boom deployment. Though he was investigated, no criminal charges were ever brought. Pittman always maintained his company did nothing wrong and that the vast majority of that money was paid out to another company that actually did most of the work. He is running on the popular “drain the swamp” platform. And he does have experience with swamps, as he survived a plane crash into a Florida one 10 years ago, which prompted him to run for office. We still have time to get to know the other less-well-known candidates, so we shall see what happens. I am anxiously awaiting the first polling data obtained exclusively by The Valley Times.

Can we keep Mobile’s mayoral race on the high road?

Exactly one week after we head to the polls to vote in the Senate primary, Mobilians will return to vote for mayor on August 22. Right now, only current Mayor Sandy Stimpson has officially announced he is running. Though it has been rumored for months, it now seems almost certain former mayor Sam Jones will once again run against Stimpson. Stimpson bested Jones in the last mayoral election in 2013. Political movers and shakers speculate Jones will wait and jump in at the end. The last day to qualify is July 19. That would not give the former mayor much time to articulate his new vision for the city or for him to make the case that he should get his former job back, which would seem to suggest he will go negative. The last race got very divisive along racial and class lines. It was not good for our city. I really hope this will not be a repeat performance.


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COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

Journalists throw out old rulebook in age of Trump BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM

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ust as Donald Trump has revolutionized national political campaigns, journalists have similarly changed how they cover the White House. Since Trump’s election victory in November, the media has subjected the new administration to a level of coverage and hysterical scrutiny that we have never seen before for an United States president. We are in an unchartered territory of media hyperventilation at and antipathy toward this president, unseen in previous eras — and notably distinct from the drooling coverage the Obama administration received during its early years (and later). Case in point: Every night, cable news subjects viewers to a “Brady Bunch” panel discussion on the latest alleged indiscretion or faux pas committed by Trump or a member of his team. This includes, but is not limited to, a screaming chyron alleging ominous presidential wrongdoings. As mentioned, this is EVERY night. Taking the Trump administration to the woodshed for a nightly beating is now the news media’s bread and butter. For example, as news of the terrorist attack in Manchester, England, unfolded, networks grappled with whether or not the incident — which resulted in at least 23 deaths and 116 injuries — warranted interrupting a previously scheduled barrage of anti-Trump analysis. Yes, there was a massive terror attack targeting young people, but the Washington Post had just released another claim about the Trump campaign’s alleged Russia connections. And it was time for Trump’s nightly beating! Eventually, MSNBC and CNN relented and went live with the terror attack. However, it was not but two hours later that both channels were back on Russia-Trump connections. That is one of the more egregious examples, but over the last six months there have been countless others. How did we get to this point? You cannot deny Trump is facing a more critical and engaged news media than Obama or any of his other predecessors in today’s 24/7 news culture. Perhaps it is warranted. Perhaps the heads of news outlets believe President Trump is so bad, so awful. A vulgarian from Queens is running the country, and they are not so good with that. He’s not worthy of the public trust. No to mention he puts ketchup on steak. Ketchup! Therefore, the media must keep a more watchful eye on this White House. It is clear this is their thought process. Just look at the catchy new slogans The Washington Post and The New York Times adopted slogans after the presidential election. “Democracy Dies in Darkness” The Washington Post now declares under its logo. “The truth is more important now than ever” The New York Times claims in its advertising campaign. Of course, one would hope both outlets were abiding by these axioms during the Obama administration. Back then, however,

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these papers were not actively pushing these mottos. It could be that those are just clever marketing gimmicks to get a wary public more engaged with the news. A new standard for covering Trump has accompanied this new attitude. For example, take the “scandal” and “palace intrigue” pieces Time and the Post have released focused on the inner — and always dysfunctional — workings of the Trump administration. The pieces are invariably informed by anonymous sources. In one Post story, 30 different unnamed sources said Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein threatened to resign over being the impetus of FBI Director James Comey’s firing. Rosenstein denied threatening to resign. The number of leaks from this administration is unprecedented. Of course, the media is readily granting all the negative leaks the cloak of anonymity. Once upon a time, newsrooms sought to avoid anonymous sources. Editors and style guides cautioned the strategy should only be used as a last resort. From “The New York Times Manual of Style and Usage”: “[Anonymity] is a last resort, for situations in which The Times could not otherwise publish information it considers newsworthy and reliable. Reporters should not offer a news source anonymity without first pressing to use a name or other helpful identification. If concealment proves necessary, writers should tell readers as much as possible — without violating the promise of confidentiality — to help them assess the source’s credibility.” “Anonymity should not be used as a cloak for personal attacks. The vivid language of direct question confers an unfair advantage on an unnamed speaker, and turns of phrase are valueless to a reader who cannot assess the source.” Other style guides and journalism organizations offer the same guidance on anonymous sourcing. The Society of Professional Journalists urges reporters to “identify sources whenever feasible” and “to question sources’ motives before promising anonymity.” In the era of Trump, anonymity is no longer an exception, but the rule. Would this liberal use of anonymous sourcing, as the Post and the Times have done, have passed muster with Trump’s predecessors? Probably not. And it is clear that anonymous sources’ motivations, in many of the cases, has been to damage the Trump presidency. That may not be the motivation of news outlets and reporters, but it is at least in some cases the motivation of the anonymous sources themselves. This is a new reality and there is not much Trump’s supporters can do about it. But it is probably a reason America’s trust in the media has dropped to its lowest level in history, according to a Gallup poll. Only 32 percent of respondents said they have a great deal or fair amount of trust in the media. That is just above Congress, coming in at 19 percent, and Trump himself, who has a 41 percent approval rating, according to the same polling firm.


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COMMENTARY | THE GRIOT’S CORNER

Discretion versus decriminalization BY KEN ROBINSON/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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t comes with the job: pulling out the metal wristwear no one likes to wear. It’s a process often glamorized by Hollywood. A tireless and clever detective or group of detectives have put the pieces together and nabbed a dangerous criminal. Normally the cinematic climax is when a detective dramatically utters some version of the phrase “cuff ‘em and get ‘em outta here.” An expressionless uniformed officer, generally a patrol officer, places the handcuffed criminal into the back seat of the patrol vehicle for transport. Justice has been served. Most arrests, however, are not that dramatic. More times than not, the handcuffs come out not for high-profile, dangerous offenders, but for minor, nonviolent ones. Consider a routine example. A patrol officer in one of Mobile’s western precincts (the 2nd or 4th, which both got more than 50,000 calls for service last year) gets dispatched to a call in the farthest part of their precinct in West Mobile. It’s pertaining to the “unauthorized use of a motor vehicle.” The officer arrives, and it is determined such a criminal offense has indeed been committed. It’s a misdemeanor, nonviolent offense, for which the offender’s punishment, if convicted, will probably not include any jail time. Nevertheless, the offense necessitates a custodial arrest. The handcuffs must come out. The officer places the arrested individual in the back seat of the patrol vehicle, completes the paperwork and notifies the MPD dispatcher that she or he is enroute downtown to Metro Jail with one in custody. The officer is now out of service (can no longer respond to calls or patrol his or her beat) and begins the journey from the edge of West Mobile to Metro Jail. However, they don’t go straight to Metro Jail. First,

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they have to stop at the magistrate’s to initiate and complete more paperwork. Afterward, they are able to proceed to Metro Jail. Once the arrested individual is cleared through Metro Jail’s intake unit, the officer can leave and place themselves “10-8,” or back in service. If it sounds like a lot, it is, and depending on where in Mobile an officer is coming from, along with the time of day and traffic, not to mention any paperwork complications, this whole process can take a patrol officer off the street for a considerable length of time. Again, not for a

IT COMES WITH THE JOB: PULLING OUT THE METAL WRIST-WEAR NO ONE LIKES TO WEAR. IT’S A PROCESS OFTEN GLAMORIZED BY HOLLYWOOD.” dangerous offender, not for someone who is a threat to the community or themselves, but for an individual and an offense that will carry some type of punishment (a fine, community service, probation) but generally no jail time. This scenario plays out day after day for Mobile’s patrol officers. Is this an effective use of the city’s resources? Even more important, is this enhancing the safety of Mobile’s citizens? The reasonable response would be no. Following the lead of other areas, Mayor Sandy Stimpson and his top public safety officials put forth the

UNTCC (Uniform Non Traffic Citation and Complaint) ordinance. UNTCC is a fancy acronym for a ticket, and this ordinance would give patrol officers in Mobile the latitude to issue a ticket for certain categories of nonviolent misdemeanor offenses in lieu of arresting an offender and going through the process outlined above. The punishment or penalty for committing one of these crimes isn’t removed, just the empowerment of the officer to not have to make an arrest and be tangled up in the administrative and logistical process that comes with a custodial arrest. The National Conference of State Legislatures noted this about the subject: “A citation in lieu of arrest is permitted in most states for certain low-level crimes. … Citations establish the recipient as a suspect in a criminal matter, and like a full custody arrest it involves charging someone with a crime. … The use of citations can contribute to lower jail populations and local cost savings by diverting from detention arrestees who pose little risk to public safety.” POLICE Magazine noted in an April 2016 article: “While calls to increase citation use may seem like a change in practices, research found that 87 percent of law enforcement agencies use citation, with almost 81 percent of those agencies using the practice for 10 or more years. This data is significant in showing that the law enforcement profession has long supported alternatives to arrest.” What the mayor and local public safety officials are calling for is nothing new. Nor is it being soft on crime. The UNTCC ordinance DOES NOT eliminate the criminal penalties for or remove the legal restriction against the misdemeanor offenses covered — which is what decriminalization would do. This is why it’s so unfortunate some media outlets hyped this as a “decriminalization” effort. If that were the case, no citation would be issued at all! Whether it’s our City Council or the community at large, hopefully wiser, more prudent and perceptive heads will prevail on this very important issue. It shouldn’t be an issue that sparks any kind of metaphorical fireworks. It’s good public policy. It’s good policy because, regardless of the offense, the ordinance would cover — unauthorized use of a motor vehicle, misdemeanor possession of marijuana, minor in possession, etc. — a citation being issued and a later conviction in court will still result in an offender having a criminal record for that offense. The offender will have to deal with the consequences of that criminal record and any punishment given by the court. Violating any of the ordinance’s misdemeanor offenses will still carry the same cost. The only difference is that we would be placing greater trust in our police officers and their discretion and judgment in how best to handle these routine minor offenses. That’s not being soft, that’s just being smart.


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BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

Wal-Mart’s 2017 global, state, local investment recap BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

W

al-Mart announced Alabama results from its Global Responsibility Report indicating continued momentum in domestic sales, according to a news release. Front and center locally in the media has been the construction of a $135 million distribution center in Mobile, announced last March. The 2.5-million-square-foot facility will support approximately 800 Wal-Mart stores in Alabama, Mississippi and areas to the north. Once fully operational, the Mobile distribution center will employ 550 full-time local workers, with plans to add more. Wages for full-time hourly, non-exempt associates will average at least $16.50 per hour, with salaried, exempt employees expected to earn $50,000 or more per year with opportunities for additional annual bonus incentives. “2017 is going to be an exciting year for Wal-Mart in Alabama as we continue to focus on innovation and investments so our customers can save both time and money,” said John Tow, Wal-Mart’s regional general manager for Alabama. Last year’s highlights included opening five new stores and remodeling nine existing locations across the state; opening a new training academy; and launching an online grocery pickup service in the Mobile, Montgomery and Birmingham service markets. Addressed in the report was an increased focus on human capital investment to the tune of $2.7 billion around U.S. workers in such areas as training, education and higher wages. The trickle-down impact in Alabama markets has resulted in over $18 million in quarterly bonuses paid out to associates across the state to date in 2017. Additionally, 4,750 veterans have been hired in Alabama since the company launched its “Veterans Welcome Home” program in May 2013. The big-box retailer also has donated nearly $190,000 to Feeding the Gulf Coast, an Alabama Feeding America-affiliated food bank nonprofit partner.

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In total the retailer currently employs 38,041 associates statewide and spent $1.1 billion with Alabama suppliers in 2016, which supported 25,796 supplier jobs.

Commercial real estate moves

The former Merchants National Bank/Regions Bank buildings located in downtown Mobile, which encompass six buildings covering approximately 225,000 square feet of property, were recently purchased by Memphis-based Heritage Land & Development. The property encompasses the entire city block at the northeast corner of St. Francis and St. Joseph streets. Dean Nix of Harbert Realty Services from Birmingham and Allan Cameron of NAI Mobile represented the purchasers in the transaction. Plans are in place for the buyers to construct mixed-use redevelopment on the site, a concept they have previously completed in Tuscaloosa and in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Columbia, South Carolina. Additional details on the redevelopment should be forthcoming, per Nikki Coker, director of marketing at NAI Mobile.  Birmingham-based CPA consulting firm Warren Averett, which has multiple offices in the Southeast, has signed a three-year lease to occupy the entire 3,200-square-foot second floor space at 3 S. Royal St. — directly above Serda’s Coffee — for office use in downtown Mobile. Pete Riehm of NAI Mobile represented the landlord. Gaines Zarzour of Monarch Group worked for the tenant.  John Delchamps with Merrill P. Thomas Co. represented Vancouver, Washington-based franchise Papa Murphy’s Take ‘N’ Bake Pizza with the lease of a 2,000-square-foot restaurant space at 705 Highway 43 S. (Bowdoin Square) in Saraland. Nathan Handmacher with Stirling Properties worked for the landlord.

Austal supports POTUS’ proposed budget According to a recent news release from Mobile-based Austal USA, the submission of President Donald Trump’s 2018 fiscal year budget plan to Congress is an early step in a positive direction to fund the U.S. Navy and military. “Austal remains encouraged by the feedback and support we’re receiving from the Navy and Congress on our highly capable and cost-effective ships. Austal will continue focusing on what we can control to put us in the best position possible to meet the increasing demands of the Navy, and that is continuing to build great ships safely, on cost and on schedule,” the statement read. The statement went on to say Austal delivered two littoral combat ships (LCS) in 2016, with two more scheduled for 2017 under the congressional cost cap. The Trump budget included language expressing the desire to increase the total size of the U.S. Navy fleet to 350 deployable combat vessels (up from 274, according to most recent reports), language and sentiment apparently fully endorsed by Austal USA executives. A key contractor for the U.S. Navy, the shipyard has delivered five Independence e-variant class LCS ships (LCS 2, 4, 6, 8, 10) with seven more (even number LCS 12-22) in various phases of construction and an eighth vessel (LCS 26) under contract for development. Austal has also delivered eight expeditionary fast transports (T-EPF 1-8) to the Navy, has three EPFs (EPF 9, 10, 11) in various phases of construction and one more (EPF 12) on contract.

AARP Alabama hires Dorothy Dorton

AARP Alabama, with more than 430,000 members statewide, announced in a news release the appointment of Dorothy Dorton to the position of associate state director for outreach. Dorton, a Mobile native, will provide outreach and support for AARP programs and initiatives in lower Alabama, working with volunteers and maintaining AARP’s relationships with residents and community leaders in that part of the state.  “Dorothy Dorton brings a wealth of experience and a strong commitment to community service in Mobile to her new role with AARP Alabama. We are looking forward to the continuing development of a strong presence for AARP in this important area of our state,” Candi Williams, AARP Alabama state director, said. Most recently Dorton served as executive director for Via Health, Fitness and Enrichment Center & Senior Citizens Services Inc. Her experience includes working as an assisted living administrator, an activities director, a program director for ARC of Baldwin County and a hall director for Alabama School of Mathematics and Science. Dorton earned a bachelor’s degree in psychology from Spring Hill College and a master’s in therapeutic recreation with a focus on adults with dementia. Washington, D.C., headquartered AARP is the nation’s largest nonprofit organization focused on Americans 50 and older. The nonprofit has nearly 38 million members and offices in every state, the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands.


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CUISINE THE REVIEW

Chicago finds its home on Government Street

JONELLI’S 1252 GOVERNMENT ST. MOBILE 36604 251-301-7556

BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

THE OWNER IS REPORTEDLY FROM CHICAGO AND THE FOOD REFLECTS IT. SANDWICHES, PEPPERS, DOGS AND DEEPDISH PIZZA FILL THE CHALKBOARDS, SAVING ONE SPOT FOR THE ODD QUESADILLA.” dilla. Facebook posts about this place are through the roof. The funny thing is the guy doesn’t have a Facebook page. They haven’t been open long but I figured I better jump on the bandwagon before I miss out on what everyone is making a big deal over. It was Calamity Courtney’s birthday but she was nowhere to be found. I offered to buy her a sandwich, even to pick her up and drop her off at her house, but the message went unanswered. So I walked into Jonelli’s solo and ordered enough food for an army so I could take it home and sample bit by bit. The first thing I notice is that this place is clean as a whistle. The bathrooms are spotless. The floor is immaculate. The outdoor seating is somehow cool. It’s bright and open with indoor dining at counters that line the walls where I sat patiently waiting for my grub as I dug the playlist coming from the overhead speakers. “Well the moon is broken and the sky is cracked … come on up to the house,” belted Mr. Tom Waits. He’s my favorite, so I had a feeling this joint and I would get along fine. Stellar music seemed to shorten my wait for the food. The first to come out was the Italian beef sandwich ($7). There has been a bit of a love/hate relationship with this sandwich in the grapevine chatter ever since they opened the doors. Some complain it is far too soggy. The soft bread and the overstuffed meat are dipped in au jus and for many it is off-

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Photos | Daniel Anderson

I

’m always looking for the buzz around here. The latest talk going down in the MiMo scene is Government Street’s Jonelli’s. Located next to Griffith’s Service Station between Ann and Georgia streets, this spot has breathed new life into a long-vacant building. The owner is reportedly from Chicago and the food reflects it. Sandwiches, peppers, dogs and deep-dish pizza fill the chalkboards, saving one spot for the odd quesa-

With offerings such as Chicago-style hot dogs and deep-dish pizza, Jonelli’s is bringing a taste of the Windy City to Mobile. onion and peppers, relish and a pickle spear on a poppy seed putting. I wanted it exactly as it was intended and I tell you, hot dog bun. Yes, I’m of the persuasion that ketchup does not dear brothers, the sandwich is perfect. If you don’t like that belong on a hotdog. I was pleased to see this one was topped sort of thing, simply order the au jus on the side. with all the things I enjoy. If my kids were along for the ride Don’t expect the crunch of onions and peppers or the gooithey would definitely have some special requests, but this dog ness of cheese you may find in a Philly cheese steak. This is suits me to a “T.” no Philly. The juice and the bread make the meat a little more So we are fully involved with the Chicago thing. This is palatable but I added the crunch by ordering a side of hot where I take a moment to tell those of you who don’t know giardiniera ($0.75). The mix of peppers, carrots, celery and (many of you do) that I’m of the minority who don’t like more was pretty hot and the perfect complement. Next time pizza. I don’t hate pizza. I just don’t like I will order the combo of beef and Italian a lot of bread and cheese in place of meat sausage for a buck more. and veggies. So it is with a good deal of So here is a side item new to the Mobile honesty that I say I am not the world’s scene. Garlic fries ($2) are exactly what you greatest judge of pizza. I, however, think. Crinkle-cut fries topped with buttery THE SOFT BREAD AND THE couldn’t try a Chicago-style restaurant minced garlic are too weird to not enjoy. without a sampling of a deep-dish pizza The boss man said they began with hand-cut OVERSTUFFED MEAT ARE ($16) with black olives ($1.50). fries but the result was too soggy. They’ve DIPPED IN AU JUS AND FOR I am uncertain of the depth that classirecently made the change to pre-cut. fies it a pizza as “deep-dish,” but I can tell I asked if they could do the same with the MANY IT IS OFF-PUTTING. I you this one is not some thin crust. When onion rings. “Well, I’ve never been asked the pie comes out of the million-degree F. that.” Perhaps a new menu item is born. WANTED IT EXACTLY AS IT oven, even a pizza doubter like myself can About the time I finished the sandwich, WAS INTENDED AND I TELL say it is a very delicious thing to knock in walked Calamity Courtney. She vowed back on a Tuesday night. she wanted no part of any birthday dinner YOU, DEAR BROTHERS, THE I was instantly a fan of Jonelli’s. All but couldn’t resist trying a Chicago-style of the social media noise was true, and mushroom quesadilla ($6) and a Mellow SANDWICH IS PERFECT. I could see why people were quick to Yellow in a can. It was really good. The recommend it. I have but one complaint: mushrooms and the cheese were nothing there is no dessert. Girls love dessert. to sneeze at but the salsa that accompanied And when it’s a girl’s birthday she expects some kind of it was stellar. Courtney offered up this description: “A cheesy sugary treat at the end of a meal. Throw some ice cream in amalgamation of troops of tender, mellifluent mushrooms the freezer or some cookies on the counter and this place swaddled in a supple tortilla with handcrafted piquant salsa.” will be gold. I’m not so sure, but I think that means she likes it … showoff. It’s good, it’s cheap, it’s Chicago, and it’s just what Mobile Back at the crib I was finally able to try the Chicago hot needed at that spot. I’ll be back soon. Happy Birthday, Courtney! dog ($4), which came with the perfect amount of mustard, raw


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FIREHOUSE SUBS ($)

HOT SUBS, COLD SALADS & CATERING 6300 Grelot Rd. • 631-3730

FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES ($) $10/PERSON • $$ 10-25/PERSON • $$$ OVER 25/PERSON

COMPLETELY COMFORTABLE ALL SPORTS BAR & GRILL ($) 3408 Pleasant Valley Rd. • 345-9338

AL’S HOTDOGS ($)

CLASSIC HOTDOGS, GYROS & MILKSHAKES 4701 Airport Blvd. • 342-3243

ATLANTA BREAD COMPANY ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SALADS & MORE. 3680 Dauphin St. • 380-0444

BAKE MY DAY ($)

OLD-FASHIONED SOUTHERN BAKE SHOP 156 N. McGregor Ave. • 219-7261

BOB’S DINER ($)

GOOD OLD AMERICAN COOKING 263 St. Francis St. • 405-1497

BUCK’S DINER ($)

CLASSIC AMERICAN DINER 58 N. Secion St. Fairhope • 928-8521

CAFE 219 ($)

SALADS, SANDWICHES & POTATO SALAD 219 Conti St. • 438-5234

CAMELLIA CAFÉ ($-$$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FARE 61 Section St. • Fairhope • 928-4321

CAMMIE’S OLD DUTCH ($) MOBILE’S CLASSIC ICE CREAM SPOT 2511 Old Shell Rd. • 471-1710

CARPE DIEM ($)

DELI FOODS, PASTRIES & SPECIALTY DRINKS 4072 Old Shell Rd. • 304-0448

CLARK’S KITCHEN ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHERN CUISINE & CATERING 5817 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0200

CHAT-A-WAY CAFE ($)

QUICHES & SANDWICHES 4366 Old Shell Rd. • 343-9889

CHICK-FIL-A ($)

BURGERS, MILKSHAKES & FRIES 4401 Old Shell Rd. • 447-2394 4663 Airport Blvd. • 300-8425 5319 Hwy 90 • 661-0071 1225 Satchel Page Dr.• 378-8768

FOOSACKLY’S ($)

FAMOUS CHICKEN FINGERS 29181 US Hwy 98 • Daphne • 375-1104 7843 Moffett Rd. • 607-6196 1109 Shelton Beach Rd. • 287-1423 310 S. University Blvd. • 343-0047 2250 Airport Blvd. • 479-2922 7641 Airport Blvd. • 607-7667 2558 Schillinger Rd. • 219-7761 3249 Dauphin St. • 479-2000

1880 Industrial Pkwy. • 675-2999

CREAM AND SUGAR ($)

HOMEMADE SOUPS & SANDWICHES 65 Government St. • 208-6815

JIMMY JOHN’S ($)

SANDWICHES, CATERING & DELIVERY TOO 6920 Airport Blvd. • 414-5444 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-8694 62 B Royal St. • 432-0360

JOE CAIN CAFÉ ($)

PIZZAS, SANDWICHES, COCKTAILS 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

JONELLI’S ($)

1252 Govenment St.• 301-7556 HOME COOKING 4054 Government St. • 665-4557

LICKIN’ GOOD DONUTS ($) 3242 Dauphin St. • 471-2590

LODA BIER GARTEN ($) MAMA’S ($)

SLAP YOUR MAMA GOOD HOME COOKING 220 Dauphin St. • 432-6262

MARS HILL CAFE ($)

GREAT SANDWICHES, COFFEE & MORE 1087 Downtowner Blvd. • 643-1611

MARY’S SOUTHERN COOKING ($) 3011 Springhill Ave. • 476-2232

6358 Cottage Hill Rd. • 725-6917 AUTHENTIC IRISH PUB 101 N. Bancroft St.• 990-5100

D’ MICHAEL’S ($)

MIKO’S ITALIAN ICE ($)

D NU SPOT ($)

MOMMA GOLDBERG’S DELI ($)

GREAT DESSERTS & HOT LUNCH 23 Upham St. • 473-6115

DEW DROP INN ($)

CLASSIC BURGERS, HOTDOGS & SETTING 1808 Old Shell Rd. • 473-7872

DUNKIN DONUTS ($)

DONUTS, COFFEE & SANDWICHES 1976 Michigan Ave. • 442-4846 3876 Airport Blvd. • 219-7369 505 Schillinger Rd. S. • 442-4845 29160 US Hwy 98 • 621-2228

E WING HOUSE ($)

HOTDOGS SANDWICHES & COOL TREATS 3371 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 300–4015 SANDWICHES & MOMMA’S LOVE 3696 Airport Blvd. • 344-9500 5602 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6556

MONTEGO’S ($-$$)

FRESH CARIBBEAN-STYLE FOOD & CRAFT BEER 6601 Airport Blvd. • 634-3445 225 Dauphin St. • 375-1576

MOON PIE GENERAL STORE ($)

107 St Francis St #115 • RSA Bank Trust Building

MOSTLY MUFFINS ($) MUFFINS, COFFEE & WRAPS 105 Dauphin St. • 433-9855

NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE ($)

15 N Conception St. • 433-2299

OVEN-BAKED SANDWICHES & MORE 1335 Satchel Page Dr. Suite C. • 287-7356 7440 Airport Blvd. • 633-0096 30500 State Hwy 181 #132 • 625-6544

FATHOMS LOUNGE

O’DALYS HOLE IN THE WALL ($)

195 S University Blvd. Suite H • 662-1829

EUGENE’S MONKEY BAR ($) SMALL PLATES AND CREATIVE COCKTAILS 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

FLOUR GIRLS BAKERY ($) 809 Hillcrest Rd. • 634-2285

REGINA’S KITCHEN ($-$$) ROLY POLY ($)

ROSHELL’S CAFE ($)

2906 Springhill Ave. • 479-4614

ROYAL KNIGHT ($)

MCSHARRY’S ($-$$)

DELISH BAKERY AND EATERY ($)

R BISTRO ($-$$)

JERSEY MIKE’S ($)

DAUPHIN ST. CAFE ($)

22159 Halls Mill Rd. . • 648-6522

PUNTA CLARA KITCHEN ($)

ROSIE’S GRILL ($-$$)

COFFEE, BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DESSERT 351 George St #B • 405-0003

PHILLY CHEESE STEAKS, GYROS & MORE 7101-A Theodore Dawes Rd. • 653-2979

BAKERY, SANDWICHES & MORE 750 S. Broad St. • 438-1511 4464 Old Shell Rd. • 342-8546 107 St. Francis St. Suite 102 • 438-2261

JAMAICAN VIBE ($)

AUTHENTIC SUB SANDWICHES 7449 Airport Blvd. • 375-1820

562 Dauphin St.• 725-6429

OLD SHELL GROWLERS ($) GROWLER STATION AND BITES 1801 Old Shell Rd. • 345-4767

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WEDGIE’S ($)

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

THAI & SUSHI 5369 D Hwy 90 W • 661-5100

WILD WING STATION ($)

SAGE RESTAURANT ($$)

THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR 960 Schillinger Rd. S • 660-4470

GOURMET GRILLED CHEESE 5955 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6134 1500 Gov’t St. • 287-1526

YAK THE KATHMANDU KITCHEN ($-$$)

WRAPS & SALADS 3220 Dauphin St. • 479-2480

MIND-BLOWING ISLAND FOOD 3700 Gov’t Blvd. Ste A • 602-1973

312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-9077

POLLMAN’S BAKERY ($)

HOOTERS ($)

3869 Airport Blvd. • 345-9544 5470 Inn Rd. • 661-9117 28975 US 98 • Daphne • 625-3910

ROYAL SCAM ($$)

COFFEE AND DONUTS 759 Nichols Avenue, Fairhope • 928-7223

THE WINDMILL MARKET ($)

SANDWICHES, SUBS & SOUPS 2056 Gov’t St. • 476-2777

SEAFOOD & SANDWICHES 212 ½ Fairhope Ave •Fairhope • 928-4100

WAREHOUSE BAKERY & DONUTS ($)

CHICKEN FINGERS, SALAD & SANDWICHES. 1165 University Blvd. • 202-0959

GUMBO SHACK ($-$$)

MICHELI’S CAFE ($)

HOT LUNCH, DAILY MENU (INSIDE VIA) 1717 Dauphin St. • 470-5231

PDQ ($)

334 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope • 928-2399

PUB FOOD AND DRAFT BEERS 251 Dauphin St. • 287-6871

CONNECTION FROZEN YOGURT ($)

BAR FOOD 271 Dauphin St • 438-9585

GULF COAST EXPLOREUM CAFE ($)

119 Dauphin St.• 307-8997

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK ($)

CHICAGO STYLE EATERY 1222 Hillcrest Rd. • 461-6599

PAT’S DOWNTOWN GRILL ($)

FOY SUPERFOODS ($)

JUDY’S PLACE ($-$$)

CHI-TOWN DAWGZ ($)

ORIGINAL SANDWICH AND BAKE SHOP 42 ½ Section St. • Fairhope • 929-0122 102 Dauphin St. • 405-0031

FUDGE, PRALINES & MORE 17111 Scenic Hwy 98 • Fairhope • 928-8477

107 St. Francis St. • 415-1700 3244 Dauphin St. • 476-0320 3215 Bel Air Mall • 476-8361 4707 Airport Blvd. • 461-9933 435 Schillinger Rd. • 639-1163 1682 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 621-3215 30500 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-3020 CHICKEN SALAD, SALAD & SOUP 2370 S. Hillcrest Rd. Unit R • 660-0501 5753 Old Shell Rd. • 408-3236 1802 US Hwy 98 Suite F• 625-1092

PANINI PETE’S ($)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHWEST FARE, 7 DAYS 1203 Hwy 98 Ste. 3D • Daphne • 626-2440 LUNCH & DINNER 3004 Gov’t Blvd. • 287-1220

ROYAL STREET CAFE ($) HOMEMADE LUNCH & BREAKFAST 104 N. Royal St. • 434-0011

SALLY’S PIECE-A-CAKE ($) BAKERY 5638 Three Notch Rd.• 219-6379

85 N. Bancroft St. Fairhope • 990.8883

HOME COOKIN’ LIKE MOMMA MADE. 2804 Springhill Ave. • 473-4739

THE TRELLIS ROOM ($$$)

STEVIE’S KITCHEN ($)

SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS & MORE 41 West I-65 Service Rd. N Suite 150. • 287-2793

SEAFOOD, ASIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE 69 St. Michael St • 375-1113

BACKYARD CAFE & BBQ ($) BAR-B-QUING WITH MY HONEY ($$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE Battle House Hotel, Royal St. • 338-5493

A FAVORITE BARBECUE SPOT 5456 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0001

COTTON STATE BBQ ($)

DOWNTOWN LUNCH 101 N. Conception St. • 545-4682

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT ($-$$) BBQ AND MORE Jubilee Sq.Ctr. Hwy 90, Daphne • 210-2151 McGowin Park Ctr. Satchel Paige Dr. • 471-1050 7721 Airport Blvd. • 380-8957

DREAMLAND BBQ ($)

RIBS, SANDWICHES & GREAT SIDES 3314 Old Shell Rd. • 479-9898

MEAT BOSS ($)

5401 Cottage Hill Rd. • 591-4842

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE ($)

SAUCY Q BARBQUE ($)

CUPCAKE BOUTIQUE 6207 Cottage Hill Rd. Suite B • 665-3003

CUISINE OF INDIA ($$)

MODERN GASTROPUB INSPIRED BY JAPANESE KITCHEN 455 Dauphin St • 433-0376

CASUAL FINE DINING 104 N. Section St. • Fairhope • 929-2219

SERDA’S COFFEEHOUSE ($) SIMPLY SWEET ($)

SAISHO ($-$$)

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($$)

BRICK PIT ($)

AWARD-WINNING BARBQUE 1111 Gov’t Blvd. • 433-7427

SMOKEY DEMBO SMOKE HOUSE ($)

THE WASH HOUSE ($$)

FOOD PAK

FOOD, WINE & MORE 5150 Old Shell Rd. • 341-1497

POUR BABY

WINE BAR, CRAFT BEERS & BISTRO 6808 Airport Blvd. • 343-3555

FIREHOUSE WINE BAR & SHOP 216 St Francis St. • 421-2022

RED OR WHITE

323A De La Mare Ave, Fairhope • 990-0003 1104 Dauphin St.. • 478-9494

ROYAL STREET TAVERN

LIVE MUSIC, MARTINIS & DINNER MENU. 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

SOUTHERN NAPA

BISTRO PLATES, CRAFT BEERS & PANTRY 2304 Main St. • 375-2800

THE VINEYARD

FALAFEL? TRY SOME HUMMUS 7 SPICE ($-$$)

HEALTHY, DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 3762 Airport Blvd. • 725-1177

A PREMIER CATERER & COOKING CLASSES 1880-A Airport Blvd. • 450-9051

4861 Bit & Spur Rd. • 340-6464

BRIQUETTES STEAKHOUSE ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC TURKISH & MEDITERRANEAN 3702 Airport Blvd. • 461-6901

DAILY SPECIALS MADE FROM SCRATCH 57 N. Claiborne St. • 694-6853

ABBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE ($-$$) ISTANBUL GRILL ($)

JERUSALEM CAFE ($-$$)

THE GALLEY ($)

CHUCK’S FISH ($$)

MOBILE’S OLDEST MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE 5773 Airport Blvd. • 304-1155

THE HARBERDASHER ($)

CORNER 251 ($-$$)

MEDITERRANEAN FOOD AND HOOKAH 326 Azalea Rd • 229-4206

THE PIGEON HOLE ($)

DAUPHIN’S ($$-$$$)

OPEN FOR LUNCH, INSIDE GULFQUEST 155 S. Water St • 436-8901 113 Dauphin St.• 436-0989

SOUTHERN COOKING & THEN SOME 1716 Main St. Daphne • 222-4120

THE SUNFLOWER CAFE ($) INSIDE VIRGINIA’S HEALTH FOOD 3055 A Dauphin St • 479-3200

THYME BY THE BAY ($-$$)

33 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-5635

TIME TO EAT CAFE ($)

DOWN-HOME COUNTRY COOKIN 7351 Theodore Dawes Rd. • 654-0228 13665 N. Wintzell Ave. • 824-1119

TIN ROOF ($-$$)

SOUTHERN CASUAL FAMILY DINING 10800 US HWY 31 • Spanish Fort• 621-4995

TP CROCKMIERS ($)

AMERICAN RESTAURANT & BAR 250 Dauphin St. • 476-1890

THREE GEORGES CANDY SHOP ($) LIGHT LUNCH WITH SOUTHERN FLAIR. 226 Dauphin St. • 433-6725

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE ($)

GREAT SMOOTHIES, WRAPS & SANDWICHES. Du Rhu Dr. • 378-5648 570 Schillinger Road • 634-3454

UNCLE JIMMY’S DELICIOUS HOTDOGS ($)

2550 Dauphin Island Pkwy S. • 307-5328

SEAFOOD AND SUSHI 551 Dauphin St.• 219-7051 HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St • 460-3157 HIGH QUALITY FOOD WITH A VIEW 107 St. Francis St • 444-0200

DUMBWAITER ($$-$$$) 9 Du Rhu Dr. Suite 201 167 Dauphin St. • 445-3802

FIVE ($$)

GREAT FOOD AND COCKTAILS 609 Dauphin St. • 308-3105

KITCHEN ON GEORGE ($-$$)

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOOD 351A George & Savannah St. • 436-8890

LAUNCH ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St. • 432-8000

MAGHEE’S GRILL ON THE HILL ($-$$) GREAT LUNCH & DINNER 3607 Old Shell Rd. • 445-8700

NOBLE SOUTH ($$)

LOCAL INGREDIENTS 203 Dauphin St. • 690-6824

NOJA ($$-$$$)

INVENTIVE & VERY FRESH CUISINE 6 N. Jackson St. • 433-0377

OSMAN’S RESTAURANT ($$) SUPREME EUROPEAN CUISINE 2579 Halls Mill Rd. • 479-0006

HIBACHI GRILL & ASIAN CUISINE 309 Bel Air Blvd • 470-8033

HIBACHI 1 ($-$$)

2370 Hillcrest Rd. Unit B • 380-6062

ICHIBAN SUSHI ($)

LIQUID ($$)

TILMO’S BBQ ($)

GRILLED STEAKS, CHICKEN & SEAFOOD 720A Schillinger Rd. S. S2. • 607-7200 901 Montlimar Dr • 408-3133

GOLDEN BOWL ($)

WINE, BEER, GOURMET FOODS, & MORE. 720 Schillinger Rd. S. Unit 8 • 287-1851

SUNSET POINTE ($-$$) THE BLIND MULE ($)

THAI FARE AND SUSHI 2000 Airport Blvd. • 478-9888

KAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($-$$)

DOMKE MARKET

SUGAR RUSH DONUT CO. ($) AT FLU CREEK 831 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-7766

FUJI SAN ($)

A LITTLE VINO

UPSCALE WINE BAR 9 Du Rhu Dr. S 201 • 287-7135

BAY GOURMET ($$)

LUNCH BUFFET 3674 Airport Blvd. • 341-6171

JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE 3959 Cottage Hill Rd • 666-6266

DROP DEAD GOURMET

4701 Airport Blvd. • 408-3379

3966 Airport Blvd.• 343-5530

17111 Scenic HWY 98 • Point Clear • 928-4838

3758 Dauphin Island Pkwy. • 473-1401 FAST BBQ W/ DRIVE-THRU 3249 Dauphin St. • 652-3508

CHARM ($-$$)

CHINA DOLL ($)

‘CUE

BBQ, BURGERS, WINGS & SEAFOOD 19170 Hwy 43 Mt. Vernon. • 839-9927

BENJAS ($)

INSIDE THE MOBILE MARRIOTT 3101 Airport Blvd. • 476-6400

VON’S BISTRO ($-$$)

COFFEE, SMOOTHIES, LUNCH & BEERS. 5460 Old Shell Rd. • 344-4575 COFFEE, LUNCHES, LIVE MUSIC & GELATO 3 Royal St. S. • 415-3000

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE 271 Glenwood St. • 476-0516

AUTHENTIC FOODS FROM HIMALAYAN REGION 3210 Dauphin St. • 287-0115 400 Eastern Shore Center • 459-2862

BARBEQUE & MUSIC Bayfront Park Dr. • Daphne • 625-RIBS 701 Springhill Ave. • 410-7427 4672 Airport Blvd. • 300-8516

SATORI COFFEEHOUSE ($)

GUMBO, ANGUS BEEF & BAR 72. S. Royal St. • 432-SCAM (7226)

KAN ZAMAN ($-$$)

MEDITERRANEAN SANDWICH COMPANY ($)

GREAT & QUICK. 3702 Airport Blvd. • 308-2131 274 Dauphin St. • 545-3161 2502 Schillinger Rd. Ste. 2 • 725-0126 6890 US-90 • DAPHNE • 621-2271

MINT HOOKAH BISTRO ($) GREAT MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 5951 Old Shell Rd. • 450-9191

OLLIE’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL ($-$$) MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT & HOOKAH 1248 Hillcrest St • 634-9820

TAZIKI’S ($-$$)

MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 1539 US HWY 98• 273-3337

FAR EASTERN FARE ANG BAHAY KUBO ($$) 4513 Old Shell Rd.• 473-0007

BAMBOO STEAKHOUSE ($$) SUSHI BAR 650 Cody Rd. S • 300-8383

BANGKOK THAI ($-$$)

DELICIOUS, TRADITIONAL THAI CUISINE 28600 US 98 • Daphne • 626-5286 3821 Airport Blvd. • 344-9995

BANZAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($$) TRADITIONAL SUSHI & LUNCH.

QUALITY FOOD, EXCELLENT SERVICE 5045 Cottage Hill Rd. • 607-6454

AMAZING SUSHI & ASSORTMENT OF ROLLS. 661 Dauphin St. • 432-0109

RICE ASIAN GRILL & SUSHI BAR ($) 3964 Gov’t Blvd. • 378-8083

ROCK N ROLL SUSHI ($$)

273 S. McGregor Ave • 287-0445 6345 Airport Blvd. • 287-0555 940 Industrial Pkwy • 308-2158 6850 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 753-4367

SAISHO ($$)

6455 Dauphin St. • 433-0376

STIX ($$)

610240 Eastern Shore Blvd. • 621-9088

TASTE OF THAI ($$)

9091 US-90 Irvington • 957-1414

TOKYO JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE ($$) UPSCALE SUSHI & HIBACHI 364 Azalea Rd. • 343-6622

WASABI SUSHI ($$)

JAPANESE CUISINE 3654 Airport Blvd. S. C • 725-6078

FROM THE DEPTHS BAUDEAN’S ($$)

FRIED, GRILLED, STEAMED & ALWAYS FRESH 3300 River Rd. • 973-9070

THE BLUEGILL ($-$$)

A HISTORIC SEAFOOD DIVE W/ LIVE MUSIC 3775 Hwy. 98 • 625-1998

BONEFISH GRILL ($$)

ECLECTIC DINING & SPACE 6955 Airport Blvd. • 633-7196

BOUDREAUX’S CAJUN GRILL ($-$$) QUALITY CAJUN & NEW ORLEANS CUISINE 29249 US Highway 98 Daphne. • 621-1991

CRAVIN CAJUN/DIP SEAFOOD ($) PO-BOYS, SALADS & SEAFOOD 1870 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 287-1168

ED’S SEAFOOD SHED ($$)

FRIED SEAFOOD SERVED IN HEFTY PORTIONS 3382 Hwy. 98 • 625-1947

FELIX’S FISH CAMP ($$) UPSCALE DINING WITH A VIEW 1420 Hwy. 98 • 626-6710

FISHERMAN’S LEGACY ($) DELI, MARKET AND CATERING. 4380 Halls Mill Rd. • 665-2266

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($)

30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 206-8768 3654 Airport Blvd. • 338-9350

LUCY B. GOODE ($$)

GULF COAST CUISINE, REINVENTED 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

LULU’S ($$)

LIVE MUSIC & GREAT SEAFOOD 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

MUDBUGS AT THE LOOP ($) CAJUN KITCHEN & SEAFOOD MARKET 2005 Government St. • 478-9897

RALPH & KACOO’S ($-$$) THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1595 Battleship Pkwy. • 626-0045

R&R SEAFOOD ($-$$)

LAID-BACK EATERY & FISH MARKET 1477 Battleship Pkwy. • 621-8366


RIVER SHACK ($-$$)

SEAFOOD, BURGERS & STEAKS 6120 Marina Dr. • Dog River • 443-7318.

THE GRAND MARINER ($-$$) LOCAL SEAFOOD & PRODUCE 6036 Rock Point Rd. • 443-5700

THE HARBOR ROOM ($-$$) UNIQUE SEAFOOD 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

THE SEAFOOD HOUSE ($-$$)

HEROES SPORTS BAR & GRILLE ($) SANDWICHES & COLD BEER 273 Dauphin St. • 433-4376 Hillcrest & Old Shell Rd. • 341-9464

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS ($-$$) WINGS, SEAFOOD, BURGERS & BEER 7721 Airport Blvd. Suite E-180 • 639-6832

ISLAND WING CO ($)

EVERYTHING BAKED OR GRILLED 2617 Dauphin St. • 476-9464

751 Azalea Rd. • 301-7964

MANCIS ($)

TIN TOP RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR ($$)

MCSHARRY’S IRISH PUB ($)

SEAFOOD, STEAKS, & EXTENSIVE WINE LIST 6232 Bon Secour Hwy County Rd. 10. • 949-5086

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) FRESH SEAFOOD FOR OVER 75 YEARS 605 Dauphin St. • 432-4605 6700 Airport Blvd. • 341-1111 1208 Shelton Beach Rd. • Saraland • 442-3335 805 S. Mobile St. • 929-2322

IS THE GAME ON?

ASHLAND MIDTOWN PUB ($-$$) PIZZAS, PASTAS, & CALZONES 245-A Old Shell Rd. • 479-3278

BAUMHOWER’S ($)

WINGS, BURGERS & PUB GRUB 6880 US-90 #14 • Daphne • 625-4695

BISHOP’S ($)

A SOUTHERN GRILL & BAR 3673 Airport Blvd. • 344-2131

BUFFALO WILD WINGS ($) BEST WINGS & SPORTING EVENTS 6341 Airport Blvd. • 378-5955

BUTCH CASSIDY’S ($)

FAMOUS BURGERS, SANDWICHES & WINGS 60 N. Florida St. • 450-0690

CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB ($) BURGERS & BEER 916 Charleston St. • 433-9374

1715 Main St. • 375-0543 BRILLIANT REUBENS & FISH-N-CHIPS. 101 N. Brancroft St. Fairhope • 990-5100

MUG SHOTS ($$)

BAR & GRILL 29740 Urgent Care Dr. • Daphne • 662-9639 6255 Airport Blvd. • 447-2514

GRIMALDI’S ($)

Bel Air Mall • 476-2063

GUIDO’S ($$)

FRESH CUISINE NIGHTLY ON MENU 1709 Main St. • Daphne • 626-6082

HOUSE OF PIZZA ($)

3958 Snow Rd C. • Semmes • 645-3400

LA ROSSO ($$)

COMFORT FOOD 1716 Main St. Ste. C • Daphne • 281-2982

MACARONI GRILL ($$)

SMALL PLATES, PIZZAS, PASTAS & WINE 3250 Airport Blvd. • 450-4556

MARCOS ($)

5055 Cottage Hill Rd. • 308-4888 2394 Dawes Rr. • 639-3535 2004 US 98 • Daphne • 265-6550

MELLOW MUSHROOM ($)

BURGERS, DOGS & 27 BEERS & WINES. 19992 Hwy.181 Old County Rd. Fairhope • 281-2663

PIES & AWESOME BEER SELECTION 2032 Airport Blvd. • 471-4700 5660 Old Shell Rd. • 380-1500 29698 Frederick Blvd.• Daphne • 621-3911

LUCKY’S IRISH PUB ($)

MIRKO ($$)

OLD 27 GRILL ($)

IRISH PUB FARE & MORE 3692 Airport Blvd • 414-3000

WEMOS ($)

WINGS, TENDERS, HOTDOGS & SANDWICHES 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-5877

MAMA MIA!

BUCK’S PIZZA ($$)

DELIVERY 350 Dauphin St. • 431-9444

CORTLAND’S PIZZA PUB ($-$$) GREAT PIZZA. LUNCH & DINNER 4356 Old Shell Rd. • 342-0024

GAMBINO BROTHERS ($) HOMEMADE PASTAS & SANDWICHES 873 Hillcrest Ave. • 344-8115

GAMBINO’S ITALIAN GRILL ($) ITALIAN, STEAKS & SEAFOOD 18 Laurel Ave. • Fairhope • 990-0995

PASTA & MORE 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-6611

NAVCO PIZZA ($$)

PIZZA, SUBS & PASTA 1368 ½ Navco Rd.• 479-0066

PAPA’S PLACE ($$)

A TASTE OF ITALY. BYOB. 28691 U.S. Highway 98 • 626-1999

PINZONE’S ITALIAN VILLAGE ($$) AUTHENTIC ITALIAN DISHES 312 Fairhope Ave. • Fairhope • 990-5535

RAVENITE ($)

PIZZA, PASTA, SALAD & MORE 102 N. Section St. •Fairhope• 929-2525

PIZZERIA DELFINA ($) PIZZA & PASTA 107 Dauphin St. • 375-1644

ROMA CAFE ($-$$)

PASTA, SALAD AND SANDWICHES 7143 Airport Blvd. • 341-7217

ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL ($$)

QUAINT MEXICAN RESTAURANT 5556 Old Shell Rd. • 345-7484

TAMARA’S BAR & GRILL ($)

MARIA BONITA AGAVE BAR & GRILL ($-$$)

3250 Airport Blvd. Springdale Mall• 450-4556

WINGS, PO-BOYS, BURGERS 210 Eastern Shore Center, Hwy. 98 • 929-0002

TRATTORIA PIZZA & ITALIAN ($$) ITALIAN FOOD & PIZZAS 11311 US HIghway 31 Spanish Fort• 375-0076

VIA EMILIA ($$)

HOMEMADE PASTAS & PIZZAS MADE DAILY 5901 Old Shell Rd. • 342-3677

MEXICAN CUISINE 3977 Gov’t Blvd. • 660-4970

OLÉ MI AMIGO ($-$$)

HEARTY MEXICAN FARE 736 holcombe Ave.• 473-0413

POOR MEXICAN ($)

3050 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-7433

MAGNOLIA HOUSE ($$-$$$) FINE DINING, SEAFOOD AND STEAKS

FLAVORS BUFFET ($-$$) ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET

IP CASINO:

850 Bayview Ave. Bilox • 888-946-2847

THIRTY-TWO ($$$) SEAFOOD, STEAKS, WINE

TIEN ($-$$)

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

HIGH TIDE CAFÉ ($)

CASUAL & RELAXING, EXTENSIVE MENU

OLÉ MI AMIGO!

ROOSTER’S ($)

ISLAND VIEW:

TASTE OF MEXICO 5452 Hwy 90 W • 661-5509

LATIN AMERICAN FOOD 211 Dauphin St. • 375-1076

TAQUERIA MEXICO ($-$$)

BEACH BLVD STEAMER ($)

AZTECAS ($-$$)

CAFÉ DEL RIO ($-$$)

MOUTH WATERING MEXICAN FOOD 1175 Battleship Pkwy • 625-2722

CINCO DE MAYO ($) MEXICAN CUISINE 260 Azalea Rd. • 375-1095

DAUPHIN ST. TAQUERIA ($)

ENCHILADAS, TACOS, & AUTHENTIC FARE Ok Bicycle Shop • 661 Dauphin St. • 432-2453

EL MARIACHI ($)

763 Holcombe Ave • 473-0413

FUEGO ($-$$)

OUTSTANDING MEXICAN CUISINE 2066 Old Shell Rd. • 378-8621

HACIENDA SAN MIGUEL ($-$$) TASTE OF MEXICO 880 Schillinger Rd. S. • 633-6122 5805 US 90 • 653-9163

LA COCINA ($)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE 800 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-0783 830 W I65 Service Rd. S • 378-5837 4663 Airport Blvd. • 342-5553

LOS ARCOS ($)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FLAVOR 3733 Airport Blvd. • 414-4496

NO GAMBLING CASINO FARE BEAU RIVAGE:

875 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 888-952-2582

BR PRIME ($$-$$$)

3300 W. Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 877-774-8439 SEAFOOD

CARTER GREEN STEAKHOUSE ($$-$$$) RICH TRADITIONS, STEAK, SEAFOOD

C&G GRILLE ($)

LARGE BREAKFAST, LUNCH OR DINNER MENU

PALACE CASINO:

158 Howard Ave. Biloxi • 800-725-2239

FINE DINING ESTABLISHMENT.

MIGNON’S ($$$)

BURGER, WINGS, PIZZA

PLACE BUFFET ($-$$)

EXOTIC CUISINE AND SUSHI

STACKED GRILL ($-$$)

COAST RESTAURANT ($-$$) JIA ($-$$)

STALLA ($$)

ITALIAN COOKING

STEAKS, SEAFOOD, FINE WINE INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

BURGERS AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

TERRACE CAFE ($)

TREASURE BAY:

HARD ROCK CASINO:

THE DEN ($-$$)

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, LATE NIGHT

777 Beach Blvd.Biloxi • 877-877-6256

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) SEAFOOD

HARD ROCK CAFÉ ($)

AMERICAN FARE & ROCKIN’ MEMORABILIA

1980 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 800-747-2839 INTIMATE & CASUAL WITH DAILY SPECIALS

CQ ($$-$$$)

ELEGANT ATMOSPHERE & TANTALIZING ENTREES

BLU ($)

LOUNGE WITH COCKTAILS & TAPAS MENU

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

WIND CREEK CASINO:

SATISFACTION ($-$$)

FIRE ($$-$$$)

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE SOUTHERN FAVORITES BUFFET

HARRAH’S GULF COAST:

280 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 288-436-2946

303 Poarch Rd. Atmore • 866-946-3360 PRIME STEAKS, SEAFOOD & WINE

GRILL ($)

CONTEMPORARY & OLD-FASHIONED FAVORITES

SEND LISTINGS TO LISTINGS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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CUISINE | WORD OF MOUTH

Crepe Crusader benefit for MPD’s Captain Dorsey BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR

W

hen a 26-year veteran of the Mobile Police Department and father of five is in need, the Crepe Crusader swings in to help. Capt. Chris Dorsey, sadly, recently suffered a brain aneurysm, which prompted Jared Hurvitz, owner of Crepe Crusader, to put together a fundraising event to help the man in blue. Monday, June 5, from 11 a.m. until 3 p.m. at the Mobile Police Headquarters on Government Street you can enjoy gourmet crepes and waffles as well as live music and gift basket raffles. All proceeds will go toward helping Capt. Dorsey in his recovery. Learn more about one of Mobile’s latest food trucks by visiting www.crepecrusadermobile.com, but on Monday, come eat like you have something to prove.

Chaleur coffee shop finding its niche

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Big Wave Dave’s hits OBA

By the time you read this, Big Wave Dave’s at 22703 Perdido Beach Blvd. in Orange Beach will have had its soft opening. Founder Dave grew up on Long Island in New York and surfed his way around the world, eventually landing a restaurant on the Gulf Coast. This island-themed eatery adheres to the belief that “cold beer is better than warm, all drinks taste better frozen and seafood should be fresh or don’t serve it at all.” The menu is seafood heavy but also includes pizzas, a bit of Mexican street fare and sandwiches. But it’s the lobster rolls that are the talk.

Eugene’s serves heck of a breakfast

I finally had a chance to make it to Eugene’s Monkey Bar at 15 N. Conception St. for breakfast. It was a pre-work meeting with comedian Joe Carlisle. Joe is a funnyman who is famous in three states, but on this blessed morning he was famous for his hangover. A little coffee was all he could handle, but I gorged on eggs, bacon, fruit, grits and potatoes. I left my biscuit for the squirrels and pigeons in Bienville Square. If you have any doubts as to whether this place could be a contender, you should set them aside. I think they are getting their act together over there. I’ll try dinner soon. Recycle!

Photo | Facebook

On a recent run (I’m a bit of a health nut, you know) I found my way into the open doors of Chaleur Method Brew and Espresso at 2100 Airport Blvd. on the corner of Glenwood. Owners Christian and Courtney Hilley are carving their niche in the craft-coffee circles, offering specialty lightroasted coffees via method brewing and espresso drinks. After a bit of research the couple decided to engage Warehouse Bakery of Fairhope as a partner, bringing their unmatched French pastries to the Western Shore. Chaleur (meaning “warmth” in French) officially opened in April and is finding its legs. The new coffeehouse is also home to Saturday workshops and plans to host at least one per month as well as a concert

series. For more on this, visit www.chaleur.coffee and monitor their progress on social media. For the time being, they open at 8 a.m. but expect an earlier start in the near future.

CHALEUR METHOD BREW AND EXPRESSO OPENED EARLIER THIS YEAR AT 2100 AIRPORT BLVD., NEXT TO RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE.


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COVER STORY

Alabama carries out latest execution amid controversy BY LEE HEDGEPETH/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

L

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Illustration/Laura Rasmussen

ast week, minutes before his death warrant was “He was a big, caring, handsome, bear of a man,” set to expire, the State of Alabama executed Wilkerson wrote in an email to the media of her late inmate Tommy Arthur for the 1982 contract killing uncle, who was often called Junior. “The comedian of the of Troy Wicker in Colbert County. family. My other two uncles were quiet and kind of shy, “I’m sorry I failed you as a father,” Arthur said when but not Junior. He was the life of the party.” asked for his final remarks, according to those who All of those memories, though, were at times eclipsed were present. One of his children, daughter Sherrie by the reality of Arthur’s ever-changing execution date. Stone, watched from the witness room. “I love you more “There are no words to describe the living hell that than anything on earth,” he finished, gesturing Stone a this has been for the Wicker family,” Wilkerson went thumbs-up and again mouthing “I love you.” on. “We are hoping and praying that the execution is Arthur, age 75, maintained his innocence in the 1982 not delayed any further. Although this statement may be murder that landed him a place on death row. After deperceived by others as not a very Christian statement, cades of appeals, though, this, Arthur’s eighth scheduled please do not judge, because you haven’t lived through execution date, would be his last. this tragedy. Our family deserves closure and justice for At about 11:45 p.m., officials began the lethal injecthe loss of Junior and the nightmare that we have lived tion process by administering midazolam, a controversial through. Tommy Arthur placed our family through a livsedative some experts say does not work effectively in ing hell for a pathetic $10,000 payout.” “high-stress situations.” Then, after multiple consciousEven on the day of the scheduled execution, delays ness tests, Arthur was administered the two other drugs were the norm. Scheduled originally for 6 p.m., the execuin Alabama’s three-drug lethal tion was delayed a final time by a injection protocol. For the next few temporary stay granted by the U.S. minutes, Arthur’s breathing grew Supreme Court, which often reviews more shallow, his skin whitened last-minute death penalty cases. and his fingertips turned blue. He Later in the night, just over an was pronounced dead at 12:15 a.m., hour before the warrant authorizing CURRENTLY, 31 STATES Arthur’s execution expired, the proaccording to prison spokesman Bob Horton. HAVE LAWS THAT MAY cess lurched forward. Select memArthur’s execution stemmed bers of the press chosen by lottery from his 1982 murder-for-hire of were moved in a van from a haphazIMPOSE THE DEATH Troy Wicker in Muscle Shoals. Acard media center a few minutes from cording to her testimony at one of PENALTY ON DEFENthe prison to just outside death row his three trials, Wicker’s wife Judy while final preparations were being DANTS CONVICTED OF paid Tommy Arthur $10,000 from made. From the van, members of the her husband’s life insurance policy media could hear yelling from death CAPITAL MURDER. for the murder. Originally, Judy row, which currently holds just Wicker claimed she had been raped under 200 inmates. and her husband murdered by black “We did that not knowing if the men, but later, after being sentenced condemned man had a family or to life in prison, Wicker admitted Arthur’s involvement anybody back there in his support,” said Anthony Ray in the murder. Wicker was later released on parole, Hinton, an exonerated former death row inmate, explainsomething Arthur has always pointed to as the reason for ing the probable reason for the screaming coming from her claims. the prison. “We were just trying to let him know that we Prior to Arthur’s execution, which had initially been were still with him to the very end.” scheduled for 6 p.m., Alabama Prison Commissioner Jeff Prison spokesman Bob Horton said that on his last Dunn and Holman Correctional Facility Warden Cynthia day, Arthur had had no visitors but made calls to a friend, Stewart met with Troy Wicker’s two sons, who later wita son and a daughter, and his attorneys. Arthur refused nessed the execution, according to officials. They chose both breakfast and a final meal, but requested that a not to make a statement, but Vicki Wilkerson, the vicphoto of his family be present in the execution chamber, tim’s niece, has previously spoken out about the person a request prison officials say was granted. Troy Wicker was and about the hardship the execution’s In the hours leading up to his final breath, Arthur’s delay had caused their family. defense team worked to challenge the execution’s con-

stitutionality with two main arguments. First, Arthur’s lawyers argued that midazolam, the sedative used in Alabama’s lethal injection protocol, has caused “botched” executions in the past, including here in Alabama, inflicting cruel and unusual punishment on those subjected to it. “Such an ‘intentional infliction of gratuitous pain’ is the very ‘evil the Eighth Amendment targets’ with its prohibition on cruel and unusual punishments,” one of Arthur’s final appeals read. “And because the ADOC [Alabama Department of Corrections] injected agonizingly painful execution drugs into Ronald Bert Smith Jr. knowing that Mr. Smith was conscious and sensate, the ADOC ran afoul of the Eighth Amendment’s absolute prohibition on methods of execution that ‘involve torture or a lingering death.’ The ADOC plans to do the same to Mr. Arthur in a matter of days.” The state’s last execution — that of Ronald Smith in December 2016 — indeed encountered complications. Smith coughed and heaved for around 13 minutes after being injected with the initial sedative, which is supposed to render the inmate “insensate.” According to media witnesses, Smith was visibly moving, even clenching a fist, as officials conducted consciousness tests. Prisons commissioner Jeff Dunn later said of the execution that “from where I was seated I didn’t see any reaction to the consciousness assessment,” although eyewitness accounts contradict that claim. Arthur’s defense team also presented a second argument supporting a delay in execution: that without access to a phone, lawyers would be helpless to ask a court for intervention if problems occurred, as they did in the Smith execution. ADOC policy bars the use of any electronic devices inside the execution chamber. Both of these arguments were heard, and eventually rejected, by the U.S. Supreme Court when it lifted its temporary stay of execution, allowing the


COVER STORY process to move forward. Only one judge — Justice Sonia Sotomayor — dissented, writing that she would have granted the stay of execution based on the strength of both arguments. “Alabama plans to execute Thomas Arthur tonight using a three-drug lethal-injection protocol that uses midazolam as a sedative,” Justice Sotomayor wrote. “I continue to doubt whether midazolam is capable of rendering prisoners insensate to the excruciating pain of lethal injection and thus whether midazolam may be constitutionally used in lethal injection protocols. Here, the state has — with the blessing of the courts below — compounded the risks inherent in the use of midazolam by denying Arthur’s counsel access to a phone through which to seek legal relief if the execution fails to proceed as planned. [The court’s] action means that when Thomas Arthur enters the execution chamber tonight, he will leave his constitutional rights at the door.” The execution was the first presided over by Gov. Kay Ivey, who received a handwritten letter from Arthur asking for clemency. “How to proceed when faced with a potential execution is one of the most difficult decisions I will ever have to make as governor,” Ivey said in a statement. “After much prayer and careful and deliberate consideration, I thought it best to allow the decision of a jury of Tommy Arthur’s peers to stand. In allowing the execution to proceed this evening, the rule of law was upheld, and Mr. Wicker’s family can finally rest knowing that his murderer has faced justice. Three times Tommy Arthur was tried, convicted and sentenced to death … No governor covets the responsibility of weighing the merits of life or death; but it is a burden I accept as part of my pledge to uphold the laws of this state. Mr. Arthur was rightfully convicted and sentenced, and tonight, that sentence was rightfully and justly carried out.” Ivey also received hundreds of requests from the public to halt Arthur’s execution, according to her office. The execution was also the first for state Attorney General Steven Marshall in his new position as the state’s top law enforcement officer. “Thirty-four years after he was first sentenced to death for the murder of a Colbert County man, Thomas Arthur’s protracted attempt to escape justice is finally at an end,” Marshall said in a statement. “Most importantly, tonight the family of Troy Wicker can begin the long-delayed process of recovery from a painful loss.” After the execution, Sherrie Stone, Arthur’s daughter, met with members of the media at a hotel in Atmore to discuss her point of view.

“First of all, I would like to express my deepest sympathy for the family of Troy Wicker,” Stone began. “I hope what has transpired today will allow them to have some peace and closure. I’ve never known for certain whether my father killed Troy Wicker. At times I was convinced he did. At times I believed he was innocent. Over decades you go through a roller coaster. Now I’ll never know the truth because the evidence that could prove if my father was innocent or guilty has not been tested using the latest DNA testing procedure.” Stone went on to call for mandatory DNA testing in every capital case. A nationwide Gallup poll released last October indicated a 60 percent approval rating for the death penalty in the U.S., its lowest level of support since 1972. The same poll suggested only 50 percent of Americans believed it was “applied fairly.” According to the nonprofit Death Penalty Information Center, more than 155 people have been released from death row with evidence of their innocence since 1973. Six have been in Alabama. Locally, after initially being convicted of capital murder in 2000, William Ziegler introduced new evidence in his case on appeal and pleaded guilty to murder in 2015, securing his release from death row. Last March, former Alabama State Trooper George Martin was exonerated from a death penalty and released from prison after Mobile County Circuit Court Judge Robert Smith found his prosecution to be “riddled with impropriety and missteps.” Martin is currently suing a litany of local and state investigators and prosecutors over his conviction. Currently, 31 states have laws that may impose the death penalty on defendants convicted of capital murder, but since 2007, New York, New Jersey, New Mexico, Maryland, Delaware, Illinois and Connecticut have passed measures to abolish the punishment. In the same time, Colorado, Pennsylvania, Washington and Oregon have imposed gubernatorial moratoria on executions. But Arthur’s execution won’t be the state’s last for long. Robert Melson is scheduled to be executed Thursday, June 8, at 6 p.m. for the 1994 murder of three people — ages 17, 18 and 23 — during a robbery of an Etowah County Popeye’s restaurant. Meanwhile, in Mobile County, capital murder defendant Jamal Jackson is scheduled to be sentenced for the murder of Satori Richardson on June 15. If he receives the death penalty, he’ll join 183 other convicts currently on Alabama’s death row — 16 of whom were sentenced in Mobile County.

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S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

NIGHTLIFE BEST ALL AROUND BAR A B C D E F

B-Bob’s Brickyard Callaghan’s Five Bar Haberdasher O’Daly’s

BEST BARTENDER A Adam Yunker, Royal Street Tavern B Alex Daniels, Boo Radley’s/Brickyard C Leon Weekley, B-Bob’s D Ricky Havens, Pour Baby E Robert Delmarter, Five Bar F Roy Clark, Haberdasher

BEST BARTENDERESS A Courtney Anthony, Butch Cassidy’s B Kara Bexley, Macaroni Grill C Sarah Smiley, Buffalo Wild Wing D Rachael Norris, Hayley’s E Susan Richardson, Pelican Pub F Tasha Tupa, Haberdasher

HOTTEST BARTENDER A Hunter Vanderlinde, Boo Radley’s/Brickyard B Jerry Grady, B-Bob’s C Michael Rashard Andrews, Buffalo Wild Wings D Rickey Havens, Pour Baby E Ricky Slayton, B-Bobs F Ross Fuentes, Tongue & Groove

HOTTEST BARTENDERESS A Gina Jo Previto, Veet’s B Jaimie Ramsey, O’Daly’s C Jana Padgett Dunn, Brickyard D Lindsey Bembry, Garage E Tori Caldwell, Haberdasher F Whitney Bealer, Butch Cassidy’s

BEST NEW BAR A B C D E F

Dority’s Eugene’s Monkey Bar Haberdasher Kazoola Le Bouchon Old Shell Growlers

BEST DIVE BAR A B C D E F

Garage Hayley’s Industry Pappa Buddha’s Veet’s Traders

BEST E-SHO BAR A B C D E F

Bone & Barrel Flybar Le Bouchon McSharry’s Pour Nelson’s Tongue & Groove

BEST WEMO BAR A B C D E F

Boondocks Cockeyed Charlies Crooked Martini Key West Lounge Patches Pour Baby

BEST MIMO BAR A B C D E F

Ashland Midtown Pub Butch Cassidy’s Mellow Mushroom - Midtown Old Shell Growlers Red or White Silverhorse Pub

BEST LODA BAR A B C D E F

Alchemy Tavern Garage Haberdasher LoDa Biergarten O’Daly’s OK Bike Shop

BEST SOMO BAR A B C D E F

Dority’s Fins Pelican Pub Pelican Reef The River Shack Zebra Lounge

BEST BEACH BAR A B C D E F

Anchor Bar & Grill FloraBama LuLu’s Pink Pony Pirate’s Cove The Hangout

BEST WINE BAR A B C D E F

Domke Market Firehouse Le Bouchon Pour Baby Red or White The Vineyard

BEST FANCY DRINK BAR A B C D E F

Five Bar Flybar Haberdasher Royal Street Tavern Sidecar Lounge Tongue & Groove

BEST AFTER-HOURS BAR A B C D

Alchemy Tavern Boo Radley’s Cockeyed Charlies Gabriel’s

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E Hayley’s F OK Bike Shop

BEST HAPPY HOUR BAR A B C D E F

Five Bar Flipside Garage LoDa Biergarten Merry Widow Wintzell’s

FAVORITE CRAFT BEER

THE PERFECT MARTINI

A Abita Andygator B Avondale Spring Street Saison C Fairhope Brewing Take the Causeway IPA D Fairhope Brewing Judge Roy Bean E Fat Tire F Haint Blue Brewing

A B C D E F

BEST E-SHO HAPPY HOUR FAVORITE IMPORT BEER A B C D E F

California Dreaming Manci’s McSharry’s Pour Nelson’s Sunset Pointe Top of the Bay

BEST SPORTS BAR A B C D E F

Baumhower’s Buffalo Wild Wings Heroes Hooters Island Wing Company Joe Cain Café

BEST COLLEGE BAR A B C D E F

Boo Radley’s Buffalo Wild Wings Heroes USA O’Daly’s Pat’s The Bar

BEST WATERFRONT BAR A B C D E F

Bluegill Pelican Pub Pirate’s Cove Sunset Pointe The Gulf Traders

BAR WHERE YOU ARE MOST LIKELY TO GET LUCKY A B C D E F

B-Bob’s Boo Radley’s Gabriel’s Hayley’s Saddle Up Saloon Tongue & Groove

BEST PLACE TO SHAKE YOUR BOOTY A B C D E F

B-Bob’s Boo Radley’s Brickyard Midnight Rodeo Saddle Up Saloon Veet’s

BEST GAY BAR A B C D

B-Bob’s Flipside Gabriel’s Midtown Pub

A B C D E F

Corona Dos Equis Guinness Modelo Red Stripe Stella Artois

FAVORITE DOMESTIC BEER A B C D E F

Bud Light Budweiser Coors Light Mich Ultra Miller Lite Yuengling

BAR WITH BEST TAP BEER SELECTION A B C D E F

Buffalo Wild Wings Draft Picks LoDa Biergarten Mellow Mushroom Montegos Old Shell Growlers

FAVORITE CASINO A B C D E F

Beau Rivage Golden Nugget Hard Rock IP Casino Palace Casino Wind Creek

BEST BAR BATHROOM A B C D E F

Haberdasher O’Daly’s OK Bike Shop Pour Baby Royal Street Tavern Tongue & Groove

BEST MARGARITA A Five Bar B Fuego C Fuzzy’s D OK Bike Shop (Dauphin St. Taqueria) E Taqueria Mexico F Tongue & Groove

BEST BLOODY MARY A B C D E F

Ashland Midtown Pub Brick & Spoon Five Bar Moe’s BBQ Pelican Pub Wintzell’s

Bonefish Grill Crooked Martini Haberdasher Royal Street Tavern Ruth’s Chris Sidecar Lounge

BEST BUSHWACKER A B C D E F

Fins FloraBama Moe’s BBQ Pelican Pub Pirate’s Cove Tacky Jack’s

BEST SPECIALTY COCKTAIL A Bordeaux Bourbon at Five Bar B Mexican Mule at Eugene’s Monkey Bar C Mississippi Old Fashioned at Haberdasher D Pineapple Jalapeno Margarita at Five Bar E Old Fashioned at Tongue & Groove F Weekend at Fernies at the Haberdasher

BEST BAR TRIVIA A B C D E F

Alchemy Tavern Blind Mule Buffalo Wild Wings Moe’s BBQ OK Bike Shop Tongue & Groove

BEST GENTLEMAN’S CLUB A B C D

Cookies-n-Cream Diamonds Lionz Den The Candy Store

SHOPPING AND SERVICES BEST OVERALL STYLIST A Amy Worley - Estetica B Holly Fountain - Salon DMH C Jason Chambers - Head Dress D Julia Liller - Salon West 5400 E Julie Burrus - Inspire F Taylor Westwood – Inspire

BEST SALON A B C D E F

Estetica Harlow Inspire Salon & Gallery Salon West 5400 Studio Bliss Tami’s Mask & Mirror

BEST COLORIST A Ashton Shirley - Solid Rock Salon

B Charlene Lindvink - Bliss Salon & Day Spa C Phrankey Lowery - Studio PH D Ryan Lawrence - Estetica E Tami Williams - Tami’s Mask & Mirror F Destiny Andress – Vanity

SCISSOR WIZARD A Ryan Amacker - Salon West 5400 B Chasity Gray Largay Estetica C Laura Vendetti D Brandi Hoover - Sanctuary Salon E Becca Maherg - Vanity F Lauren Holmquist - Salons by JC

BEST BARBER A Mike Edwards- Mike’s Barber Shop B Avis - Mayo’s Barber Shop C Charlene - Mayo’s Barber Shop D Dallas Jones Barber Shop E The Corner Barber Shop F Hillcrest Barbers

BEST MAKEUP ARTIST A Elizabeth Spence - Tami’s Mask & Mirror B Valerie Floore C Carla Dames - Bliss Salon & Day Spa D Alexandrea West - Salon West 5400 E Ashley West F Lauren Kelly

BEST HOOHA WAXER A Anna Bishop - LA Bikini B Crystal Quattrone, Primp C LA Bikini D Elizabeth Spence - Tami’s Mask & Mirror E Tera Shade - Bliss Salon & Day Spa F Jessica Stewart - Wax’d

BEST PLACE TO GET A MANI A B C D E F

Bliss Salon & Day Spa Estetica Lily’s Nails Royal Day Spa Vivian’s Old Shell Nails

BEST PLACE TO GET A PEDI A The Spa at the Battlehouse B Maria’s Nails C Lily’s Nails D Venetian Nails E Royal Day Spa F Vivian’s


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

BEST ESTHETICIAN A Ashley Maynard- Spa at the BattleHouse B Tera Shade - Bliss Salon & Day Spa C Hanna Hogle - Sunrise Dermatology D Sarah Sheffield - Massage Envy E Amberjoy McLean- Medspa at the Park F Katie Davidson

BEST DAY SPA A B C D E F

Spa at the BattleHouse LumaLife Therapy Massage Envy Medspa at the Park Lyons Elite Day Spa Nouvea

BEST MASSAGE THERAPIST

D Dr. Christopher Park E Dr. Randy Proffitt F Dr. Stephen Sheppard

BEST FACELIFT DOC A B C D E F

Dr. Henry Barber Dr. James Koehler Dr. Michael Lyons Dr. Steve Martin Dr. Kitti Outlaw Dr. Christopher Park

BEST DERMATOLOGIST A B C D E F

Dr. Thomas Bender Dr. Kathryn Dempsey Dr. Dena Howell Dr. Amy Morris Dr. Ryan Ramagosa Dr. Scott VanLoock

BEST WEIGHT LOSS DOC

A Elements B Hannah Boltz C Heidi Pritchett - Above and Beyond Hot Yoga D Kelsea Tupa - Epione Massage & Bodywork E Massage Envy F Roderick Gibbs - Dynamic Orthopedic

A Dr. Lawrence Carpenter B Slim & Trim Medical Weight Loss C Dr. Quint Jardine D Dr. Patrick McGuire E Dr. Ruth Shields F Dr. William T. Urquhart

BEST TANNING SALON

BEST “DOC IN THE BOX” CLINIC

A B C D E F

LA Bikini Palm Beach Tan Soliel Nu Tiffany Tans Brush of Bronze Ultra Tanz

MOBILE’S BEST DOCTOR A B C D E F

Dr. Gamil Dawood Dr. Charla Evans Dr. Frank Hall Dr. Elizabeth Mathison Dr. Richard Oyler Dr. Jacob Webster

MOBILE’S BEST SPECIALIST A Dr. Daniel Cameron B Dr. Michael Do C Dr. John Hinton D Dr. Ron O’ Gorman E Rihner, Gupta, Grosz, Cardiology P.C. F Dr. K. Scott Saucier

BEST HOOHA DOCTOR A B C D E F

Dr. Quin A. Bixler Dr. Glenn T. Gallaspy III Dr. Lauren Lambrecht Dr. Patton Morrison Barton Dr. Max Rogers Dr. John Val-Gallas

BEST BOOB DOC A Dr. Charles Dyas B Dr. James Koehler C Dr. Kitti Outlaw

A Compass Urgent Care B Eastern Shore Urgent Care C Greater Mobile Urgent Care D Hillcrest Urgent Care E Immediate Care of the South F Urgent Care by the Bay

BEST BACK CRACKER (CHIROPRACTOR) A Dr. Ken Bishop B Dr. Cevin Cormier C Dr. Chris Corsentino D Liberation Chiropractic Clinic E Dr. Troy Lofton F Dr. Clarke Pradat

BEST DENTIST A Alabama Family Dental B Grelot Dental C Mobile Comprehensive Dentistry D Noblet Family Dental E Dr. Kristopher Portacci F Skyline Family Dental

BEST ORAL SURGEON A B C D E F

Dr. Charles Black III Dr. David Lairmore Dr. Rick Morgan Dr. Chris Mullenix Dr. Robert Pfeffle Dr. Greg Zieman

BEST GYM A B C D E F

Crew Ftness Hillcrest Fitbody Bootcamp Moorer YMCA Planet Fitness ProHealth Thomas Fitness Center

BEST CROSSFIT BOX A B C D E F

CrossFit Saraland CrossFit Spanish Fort JH CrossFit Mobtown Crossfit CrossFit Roadhouse CrossFit Jacked

BEST PERSONAL TRAINER A Emily Powell - ProHealth B Jennifer Savell - Thomas Fitness Center C John Seddon - Life Plus D Josh Foster- Josh the Trainer E LaJuan Black - Moorer YMCA F Braxton Gilbert

BEST VETERIANRIAN A Dr. Christopher Boudreau - Boudreau Veterinary Clinic B Dr. Jennifer Carney Rehm Animal Clinic Tillman’s Corner C Dr. Mary Katherine Cross - Old Shell Road Animal Hospital D Dr. Albert S. Gaston, Jr. E Dr. Roxy Leslie, Village Animal Clinic F Dr. Carl Myers, Theodore Veterinary Hospital

BEST PET GROOMER A Adorable Dos B Bella and Bows C Lola Bells D Glamour Paws E Dapper Dogs F Jeremy Henderson at The Waggy Tail

BEST FLORIST A All A Bloom B Lush C Flowers Etc. Daphne D Julia Greer Fobes Fashion Art Flowers E Belle Bouquet F Sarah Beth’s Florist

BEST WEDDING PHOTOGRAPHER A 3 Words Photography B Baylee Rae Photography C Katherine Thomason KatCo D SLR Photography E Elizabeth Gelineau F One Fine Day Photography

BEST YOGA STUDIO

BEST REAL ESTATE FIRM

A Above and Beyond Hot Yoga B Soul Shine Yoga C Sterling Hot Yoga D Synergy Yoga & Pilates E CORE Studio F Glow Yoga

A Roberts Brothers B Better Home & Gardens Real Estate Generations C Berkshire Hathaway D LLB&B E Port City Realty F The Cummings Company

BEST YOGA INSTRUCTOR BEST REALTOR A Shoshana Treichel, Above & Beyond Hot Yoga B Teddy Ward, Bikram Yoga C Jamie Yullock, Yoga Alliance D Annette Porter Hamm, Yoga Alliance E Jennifer Guthrie, Glow Yoga F Sprite Wood, Sterling Hot Yoga

A Angela Locklier, Berkshire Hathaway B Kevin Loper, Roberts Brothers C Sam Calderone, ReMax D Matt McAllister, Realty Executives E Marcile Sims & Karen Singleton, Synergy Realty Group F Catherine Mackey, LLB&B

BEST MECHANIC/AUTO SHOP

BEST INSURANCE AGENT OR AGENCY

A Foreign & Domestic Autocare B Baehr’s Automotive C Advanced Collision D Buddy’s Service Center E Griffith Service Center F Mark McGugin

A Bradley Flowers, Alfa B Donna Gatlin, State Farm C Advanced Insurance Company D Allison Horner, State Farm E Morgan Bradley, Alfa F Jonah Dismukes, Worthy Insurance Agency

BEST CARWASH/DETAIL A B C D E F

Rich’s Bebo’s Down South Detail Ultra Carwash Zippy’s Alabama Auto Clean

BEST LAWYER IF YOUR SPOUSE IS A HO (DIVORCE) A B C D E F

Josh Boone Alison Herlihy Jerry Pilgrim Donald Briskman The Mims Firm Jessica Pilgrim

BEST LAWYER TO KEEP YOU OUT OF PRISON (CRIMINAL) A B C D E F

Art Powell Tom Walsh Donald Friedlander Jeff Deen Grant Gibson Buzz Jordan

BEST LAWYER TO SUE THE PANTS OFF SOMEONE (TRIAL) A Long & Long B John Leech, Warhust Law C David J. Maloney, Maloney Frost D Greene & Phillips E Dean Waite F Rod Cate, Hand Arendall

BEST MORTGAGE BROKER/FIRM A Mortgage Team One B Craig Anderton, Bank Of England C Vince Hughes, Bryant Bank D New Horizons Credit Union E Jana Williston, Community Bank F Sharon Thompson, SWBC Mortgage

BEST INVESTMENT BANKER/FINANCIAL PLANNER A Ryan Mahtani, BB&T Investments B James Eddins, Morgan Stanley C Coldsmith Ryder & Associates D Joseph Lomax, Morgan Stanley E Eric Rickey, Edward Jones F 5 Rivers Group, Morgan Stanley

BEST NEW CAR DEALER A B C D E F

Mullinax Bay Chevrolet Joe Bullard Palmer’s Toyota UJ Chevrolet Tameron Honda

BEST USED CAR DEALER

A B C D E F

Keith Kingan MCD Motors Premier Motorsports Andrew’s Imports Carfinders Auto Outlet Tameron Honda

BEST CPA A Alison Richardson B Andy Cook, R. Andrew Cook, CPA C BJ Gilbert, Gibbons Company D Karen Simmons, Karen Simmons, PC E John Bedsole, Kalifeh, Bedsole, Adams PC F Pat Bessonen, Wilkins Miller

BEST LANDSCAPER A Bay Landscaping B Sexton Lawn & Landscaping C Southern Landscape Solutions D Brian Griffin Landscape Co. E Barry Vittor Landscape Medic F Matt VanGieson

BEST CONTRACTOR/ HOMEBUILDER A B C D E F

Batten Builders Bo Wilder Contracting Robert Dueitt Construction Heritage Homes David Burks Fulcrum Construction

BEST INTERIOR DESIGNER A Augusta Tapia B Mary Jo Matranga C Randi Wilson D Pat O’Neal E Kade Laws Interior Design F Catherine Arensberg

BEST HARDWARE STORE A Blankenship’s B Andrews Ace Hardware C Eastern Shore Ace Hardware D Springhill Ace Hardware E Wigman’s Ace Hardware F Dawes Ace Hardware

BEST PEST CONTROL A B C D E F

Aegis Pest Control BugMaster Cook’s Pest Control Kelly’s Pest Control Semmes Pest Control Xtreme Xterminating

BEST PET STORE A B C D

B&B Pet Store Bella and Bows Dog Days Barkery PetSmart

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S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T. E Pet Supplies Plus F The Waggy Tail

BEST ANTIQUE STORE A B C D E F

Antiques at The Loop Backflash Antiques Charles Phillips To Arms Antiques The Brother’s Gallery Whitehouse Antiques

BEST MEN’S CLOTHING STORE A B C D E F

Alabama Outdoors D&K G Harvell Jos A Bank McCoy’s Metzger’s

BEST LINGERIE/ NAUGHTY SHOP A B C D

Gift Spot NT Video The Little Drawer Victoria’s Secret

BEST WOMEN’S BOUTIQUE A B C D E F

Ashbrook Hemline Lotus Kenzlee Grace Pink Post Office Boutique Sweet Tea Boutique

BEST CLOTHING CONSIGNMENT STORE A B C D E F

Best Kept Secret Consignology Hertha’s Plato’s Closet Rave Reviews Second Edition

BEST DEPARTMENT STORE A B C D E F

Belk Dillards JC Penney Kohl’s Steinmart TJ Maxx

BEST FORMAL WEAR A B C D E F

Bella Bridesmaid D&K Fancy That Francia’s I Do Putting on the Rtiz

BEST ACCESSORIES/ AFFORDABLE JEWELRY A B C D

Emmaleah Boutique Francesca’s Gaudy Galz Knot Just Beads

E Private Gallery F Versona

BEST FINE JEWELRY A B C D E F

Claude Moore Friedman’s Goldstein’s Goldart Karat Patch Zundel’s

BEST DRY CLEANERS A B C D E F

Dixie Cleaners Gulf City Cleaners Jaguar Cleaners Master Cleaners Paragon Waite’s

BEST HOME CLEANING SERVICE A 2 Gals & A Mop B Conde Cleaners C Helping Hands Cleaners D Maids A la Mode E Southern Style Quality Cleans F The Maids

BEST STATIONERY STORE A B C D E F

Gwin’s It’s Inviting JO Acree Paper Jubilee Soiree Signatures The Paper Menu

BEST OUTDOORS STORE A B C D E F

Academy Alabama Outdoors Bass Pro McCoy’s Quint’s Red Beard Outfitters

BEST LOCAL PHARMACY A B C D E F

Christopher Pharmacy Conwell Pharmacy Dawes Point Pharmacy Grand Bay Pharmacy Midtown Pharmacy Saraland Pharmacy

BEST SHOE STORE A B C D E F

Dillards DSW Fleet Feet Shoefly Shoe Station The Gallery

BEST GIFT SHOP A Bellingrath Gardens Gift Shop B Cypress Gift Shop at Five Rivers C Gaillard’s D Marcie N Me

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E Meggie B’s F Oak Ridge

BEST HOME FURNISHINGS STORE A B C D E F

Atchison’s Designer Collection J&J Lush Sarah B. Atchison’s Villa Décor

BEST FURNITURE CONSIGNMENT SHOP A B C D E F

All Around the House Best Kept Secret Divine Consignment High Cotton Kaglen’s Something Special

BEST VAPE SHOP A B C D E F

Cloud 9 Vapes Deep South Vape Parlor Vapes Vapor’s Smoke Shop Vapor’s Outpost Vapor Hut

BEST BANK OR CREDIT UNION A Army Aviation Federal Credit Union B BB&T Bank C Coastal Bank D Community Bank E New Horizons Credit Union F Regions

BEST TATTOO ARTIST/ SHOP A B C D E F

AJ Ludlow CW Neese Kelly Pony Stephenson Kevin Black Sean Herman Suzette Callahan

BEST HOME SECURITY COMPANY A B C D E F

ADT Alert Protection Systems Allied Alarm Avid Home Security Hunter Security TSI Alarms

BEST BODY PIERCER A Chelsea Brown at Medusa’s B Keith Collins at Kaoz C Brett Garrick at Kaoz D Matt Hewett at Kaoz E Chad Reisenweber at Tattoo Town F Aaron Victory at The Bell Rose

KIDS

BEST KIDS’ CLOTHING STORE- NEW A B C D E F

Carter’s GiGi & Jay’s H&M Little Monkey Toes The Holiday Tiny Town

BEST KIDS’ CONSIGNMENT STORE A B C D E F

Carousel Kids Kids Klozet Kidz Kottage Kids Wearhouse Savvy Mom Sale Sweet Seconds

BEST KIDS’ ROOM FURNISHINGS A Just Baby Designs B Polka Tot Designs C Siegel’s Baby Room

BEST SUMMER CAMP A Bayside Academy Summer Camp B Gulf Coast Exploreum Summer Camps C Mobile Museum of Art Summer Art Camp D St. Luke’s Summer Camps E SunnySide Theater F USA Rec Center Summer Camp

BEST DAYCARE

RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Buffalo Wild Wings Chick Fil A Chuck E Cheese Island Wing Company Mellow Mushroom Moe’s Southwest Grill

BEST BIRTHDAY PARTY PLACE A Gulf Coast Exploreum B Get Air C Pete’s Party Castle D Pump It Up E Sunshine Sue’s Play Garden F White Gates Farm

BEST PARK/PLAYGROUND A Daphne Centennial Park B Fairhope Community Park C Langan Municipal Park D Lavretta Park E Medal of Honor Park F Spanish Fort Town Center Park

MOST KID-FRIENDLY NEIGHBORHOOD A B C D E F

Inverness Jackson Heights Llanfair Ravine Woods Rosswood Sky Ranch

BEST KID-FRIENDLY LOCAL ATTRACTION

A Beck’s B Christ United Methodist Church Kidz Crossing C Dauphin Way Baptist D Springhill Baptist CDC E St. Mark’s F West Mobile Baptist CDC

A 5 Rivers Delta Resource Center B Bellingrath Gardens C Estaurium at Dauphin Island Sea Lab D Gulf Coast Exploreum E Gulf Coast Zoo F USS Alabama

BEST PRESCHOOL

BEST DANCE STUDIO

A Bridgeway Academy B Corpus Christi Catholic Preschool C St. Dominic Preschool D St. Luke’s Preschool E St. Paul’s EEC F Westminster Presbyterian Preschool

A Broadway South B Dance without Limits C Debbie’s School of Dance D Grace Dance Center E Sheffield School of the Dance F Turning Pointe Dance Academy

BEST MOTHER’S DAY OUT

BEST PEDIATRIC DENTIST

A Ashland Place B Christ United Methodist Church C Springhill Baptist MDO D St. Ignatius MDO E St. Mary MDO F Westminster MDO

MOST KID-FRIENDLY

A Dr. Leslie Buckley B Dr. Gaines Thomas & Dr. Lauren Moore C Dr. Stephen Greenleaf D Dr. Kelly Jones, Malbis Pediatric Dentistry E Dr. Joel Welford and Dr. Marion McMurphy F Dr. Trey Fellers

BEST ORTHODONTIST A B C D E F

Hicks & McMurphy Pickett Orthodontics Dr. Rosalyn Salter Dr. James Donaghey Dr. Brian Oliver Glass Orthodontics

BEST PEDIATRICIAN A B C D E F

Dr. Alfred Shearer Dr. Faye Roberts Dr. Karen Calametti Dr. Mary Wells Dr. Matthew Cepeda Dr. Robin McNair

BEST KID PHOTOGRAPHER A B C D E F

Cornerstone Photography Janie Long Photography Laura Cantrell Samantha Vickers Shane Rice Susanna Womack

BEST PUBLIC SCHOOL A Baker High School B Collier Elementary School C Eichold Mertz Magnet School D Mary B. Austin Elementary School E Phillips Preparatory School F Saraland City Schools

BEST PRIVATE SCHOOL A McGill-Toolen B Mobile Christian School C St. Luke’s Episcopal School D St. Paul’s Episcopal School E St. Dominic’s Catholic School F St. Mary’s Catholic School

COOLEST ELEMENTARY SCHOOL TEACHER A Carey Arensberg, Hall Elementary B Elizabeth Partsch, ER Dickson C Laura Brand, St. Paul’s D Lisa Large, Collier Elementary E Nicole Baranov, Hutchens F Jessica Cassady, Gilliard Elementary

COOLEST MIDDLE SCHOOL TEACHER A Jacqueline Richardson, Foley Middle School B La Toya Barnes, Phillips Preparatory School C Rosalie Hyatt, Grand Bay Middle D Peter Stoyka, Corpus Christi Catholic E Melanie Fromdahl, St.


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T. Dominic’s F Hope Herren, Phillips Preparatory

E Regency F Rosswood

COOLEST HIGH SCHOOL TEACHER

COOLEST NEIGHBORHOOD – EASTERN SHORE

A Brandi Richardson, St. Luke’s B Jeremiah Quattrone, Citronelle High School C Joe Arensberg, McGill D Margaret Delaney, UMS E Mike Stratas, Theodore High F Nathan Adams, Rain High School

CITY LIFE BEST MOBILIAN EVER A B C D E F

Eugene Walter Hank Aaron Jimmy Buffett Joe Cain The Peanut Man Uncle Henry

BEST MOBILIAN RIGHT NOW A B C D E F

Chief Slac IV Greg Jones, FTZC Jake Peavy Jonathan Frye Mayor Sandy Stimpson Ralph Hargrove

QUINTESSENTIAL MOBILIAN A B C D E F

Gary Cooper Herndon Inge Preston Griffith Reggie Copeland, Sr. Suzanne Cleveland Vivian Figures

MOST ELIGIBLE BACHELOR A B C D E F

Bennie Henderson Charles Matranga Eric Browne Jonathan Friedlander Mike Scalese Vaughan Blacksher

MOST ELIGIBLE BACHELORETTE A B C D E F

Hanna Hogle Liz Bush Morgan Mitchell Sable Williams Sarah-John Smith Suzanne Donaghey

COOLEST NEIGHBORHOOD - MOBILE A B C D

Copeland Island Florence Place Midtown Oakleigh Garden District

A B C D E F

Bellaton Cambron Fruit and Nut District Historic Malbis Olde Towne Daphne Osprey Ridge

BEST ANNUAL EVENT A Bellingrath Magic Christmas in Lights B Dauphin Street Beer Festival C Greater Gulf State Fair D Mardi Gras E MoonPie Drop F Senior Bowl

BEST ANNUAL FUNDRAISING EVENT A Fuse Project Dragon Boat Races B Junior League Christmas Jubilee C Little Black Dress - Ronald McDonald House D Salvation Army Mother Daughter Tea E St. Mary’s Crawfish and Bluegrass Extravaganza F Woofstock

BEST PLACE TO HOLD A RECEPTION/SPECIAL EVENT A B C D E F

23 East 5 Rivers BattleHouse Hotel Fort Conde Inn The Steeple Venue at Dawes

BEST HOTEL A B C D E F

BattleHouse Hotel Berney Fly Grand Hotel Hampton Inn Malaga The Admiral

BEST HIGH SCHOOL MARCHING BAND A B C D E F

Baker Davidson LeFlore McGill Mobile Christian Murphy High School

BEST MARDI GRAS PARADING SOCIETY A Conde Cavaliers B Crewe of Columbus

C D E F

Infant Mystics LaShes Mystics of Time Polka Dots

BEST MARDI GRAS MARCHING SOCIETY A B C D

Dauphin Street Drunks Skeleton Krewe Society of Bums Wild Mauvillians

BEST MARDI GRAS BALL A B C D E F

Crewe of Columbus Fifty Funny Fellows Mobile Mystics Mystics of Time Polka Dots Osiris

BEST GOLF COURSE A B C D E F

Azalea City Golf Course Country Club Mobile Heron Lakes Magnolia Grove Spring Hill College Steelwood

MOBILE’S BUMPIEST STREET A B C D

Ann Street Glenwood Street Little Flower Avenue Old Government Street

COOLEST CHURCH OR HOUSE OF WORSHIP A B C D E F

Christian Life Church City Hope Gospel Way Church Grace Lutheran Harvest Church Wesminster Presbyterian

BEST CLERGYMAN/PASTOR/SPIRITUAL LEADER A Dr. Brett Burleson - Dayspring Baptist B David Mauldin - Westminster Presbyterian C Fr. John Lynes - Little Flower Catholic D Fr. Mark Neske - Holy Family Catholic E Patrick Casey - Christian Life Church F Wayne Miller - Grace Lutheran

BEST PLACE TO TAKE OUT-OF-TOWNERS (ATTRACTION) A B C D E F

5 Rivers Battleship Bellingrath Gardens Gulf Coast Ducks History Museum of Mobile Mobile Carnival Museum

BEST PLACE TO TAKE OUT-OF-TOWNERS (RESTAURANT) A B C D E F

Bluegill Callaghan’s Dauphin’s Felix’s NoJa Wintzell’s

BEST COLLEGE OR UNIVERSITY A Spring Hill College B University of Mobile C University of South Alabama

BEST JUNIOR COLLEGE/ TRADE/TECHNICAL SCHOOL A Bishop State B Blue Cliff College C Charles Academy of Beauty D Coastal Alabama Community College E Remington College F Virginia College

COOLEST APARTMENT COMPLEX - MOBILE

A B C D E F

Caribe Holiday Isle Phoenix on the Bay Phoenix West The Wharf Turquoise Place

MUSIC BEST LOCAL BAND A Infant Richard & The Delta Stones B Jimmy Lumpkin & The Revival C Paw Paw’s Medicine Cabinet D Stereo Dogs E The Mulligan Brothers F Underhill Family Orchestra

BEST NEW LOCAL BAND A Camm Lewis & The Live Oaks B Red Clay Strays C The Disco Rednecks D Slide Bayou E The Marlow Boys F Yeah, Probably

BEST COUNTRY BAND/ PERFORMER

Four Seasons Marine Street Lofts Old Shell Lofts Stoneridge Tower on Ryan Park Village at Midtown

A Bruce Smelley B Camm Lewis & The Live Oaks C Hannah McFarland D Holli Mosley E Last Call Rodeo F Muscadine Bloodline

COOLEST APARTMENT COMPLEX – EASTERN SHORE

BEST METAL/PUNK/UNDERGROUND BAND

A B C D E F

A Arlington at Eastern Shore B Bay Breeze Apartments C The Colonnade

BEST MOVIE THEATER A Cobb Gulf Shores B Crescent Theater C IMAX at Gulf Coast Exploreum D Premiere Cinema 14 Spanish Fort E Wynnsong 16

A B C D

A Sunday Fire Black Titan Curse the Flesh Hibachi Stranglers

BEST CLUB TO SEE LIVE MUSIC A B C D E F

Brickyard Callaghan’s O’Daly’s Soul Kitchen The Blind Mule The Merry Widow

BEST LOCAL COMPANY TO WORK FOR

BEST OUTDOOR BAR TO SEE LIVE MUSIC

A Employee Fiduciary, LLC B Express Employment Professionals C FTZC D Rihner, Gupta & Grosz Cardiology, P.C. E Televox F UJ Chevrolet

A B C D E F

BEST BEACH RESORT/ CONDO

Bluegill Dority’s Flora Bama Hangout OK Bike Shop The Frog Pond

BEST VENUE TO SEE LIVE MUSIC (NON-BAR) A IP Casino B Saenger Theatre

C D E F

The Frog Pond The Listening Room The Steeple The Wharf

BEST BLUES BAND/ARTIST A Jamell Richardson B Lisa Mills C Ric McNaughton

BEST SOLO MUSICIAN A B C D E F

Andrew Ayers Eric Erdman John Anthony Laurie Anne Armour Ryan Balthrop Phil Proctor

BEST JAZZ MUSICIAN A B C D E

Blake Nolte Chip Herrington John Cochran Roman Street The Bodhi Trio

BEST RAP/HIP HOP ARTIST A Beamin’ B Clint ”Smitty” Smith C Derek “Truthseekah” Grosskurth D Mr. 88 E Phillip Baggins, Jr. F Pluto & Kid Kembi

BEST MUSIC/RECORD STORE A B C D E

Andy’s Music Bay Sound Dr. Music Mobile Records Picker’s Paradise

BEST LOCAL RECORDING STUDIO A B C D E F

Admiral Bean Dauphin Street Sound Day 6 Dogwood Grave Danger Studio H20

BEST GUITAR PLAYER A B C D E F

Chad Parker Corky Hughes Jimmy Gray Mike Jernigan Patrick Ramsey Phil Proctor

BEST AREA SINGER/ VOICE A B C D E F

Holli Mosley Jimmy Lumpkin Mike Jernigan Ross Newell Ryan Balthrop Symone French

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S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

BEST AREA DRUMMER

BEST MUSEUM

A B C D E F

Bryan Ayers Cameron Alidor Chico McCollum Ethan Snedigar Tyler Goodwin Zach Lynd

A Bellingrath Gardens Museum B Eastern Shore Art Center C Gulf Coast Exploreum D History Museum of Mobile E Mobile Carnival Museum F Mobile Museum of Art

A B C D E F

Gabriel Willis Greg Crabtree Jamie Newsome Marc Hendrix Mario Rivera Owen Finley

BEST THEATRE GROUP

BEST AREA BASSIST

BEST PIANO PLAYER/ KEYBOARDIST A B C D E F

Alan Anderson Andrew Ayers Chris Spies Gene Murrell John Anthony Scott Morlock

BEST DRAG QUEEN PERFORMER A B C D E F

Amber Douglas Champagne Munroe Jawakatema Davenport Miss Cie Miss Loretta Venus Shante DaVis

BEST DJ (MIXIN’, MASHIN’UP KIND) A DJ Amanda Dean B DJ Blayze C DJ Leroy D DJ Lynch E DJ Mbezzle F DJ Mellly Mell (Melvin Sledge)

BEST AREA MUSIC FESTIVAL A 1065 Music Festival B Hangout Music Festival C SouthSounds Music Festival

ARTS BEST LOCAL PAINTER A B C D E F

Adam Underwood Ardith Goodwin Ben Kaiser Bonnie Fuchs Devlin Wilson Faye Earnest

BEST LOCAL SCULPTOR A B C D E F

April Livingston Bruce Larsen Casey Downing Bertice McPherson Lebaron Heathcoe Shawn Berdux

BEST LOCAL GRAPHIC DESIGN ARTIST A B C D E F

Amanda Pritchard Carl Norman Colby Jackson Hadley Binion Josh Holland Tripp Gustin

BEST MIXED MEDIA ARTIST A B C D E F

Ardith Goodwin Chris Cumbie Julia Greer Fobes Lucy Gafford Mateo Shawn Berdux

BEST ART GALLERY A Alabama Contemporary Art Center B Artology C Cathedral Square Gallery D CATS (Creative Artistic Treasures Studio) E Gallery 450 F Inspire

A Chickasaw Civic Theatre B Eastern Shore Repertory Theatre C Joe Jefferson Players D Mobile Theatre Guild E Playhouse in the Park F Sunnyside Theatre

BEST PLAY OR PERFORMANCE OF THE YEAR A A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum - JJP B Beauty and the Beast - St. Paul’s Players C Complete Works of William Shakespeare - Chickasaw Civic Theatre D Sordid Lives - Mobile Theatre Guild E Sweeney Todd - JJP F The Producers – JJP

BEST LOCAL ACTOR A B C D E F

Chandler Smith Cory Olson Gene Murrell Griffin Hood Jason McKenzie Lisa Costa

BEST THEATRICAL SINGER A B C D E F

Chandler Smith Cory Olson Gene Murrell Jessica Head Terri Jackson Stacey Driskell

BEST ARTS EVENT A Artys B Eastern Shore Repertory Theatre on the Bluff C Fairhope Arts & Crafts Festival D LoDa Artwalk E Mobile Symphony Orchestra F Mobile Arts Council Throwdown

EATS & DRINKS BEST OVERALL RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Butch Cassidy’s Dauphin’s Dumbwaiter Felix’s Kitchen on George Ruth’s Chris

BEST LOCALLY OWNED RESTAURANT A Bayley’s Seafood Restaurant B Butch Cassidy’s C Felix’s D Osman’s E Pour Baby F The Noble South

BEST NEW RESTAURANT FINE DINING A Chuck’s Fish B Dumbwaiter on the Hill C Le Bouchon

BEST NEW RESTAURANT CASUAL A B C D

BJ’s Brewhouse FOY Fuzzy’s Taco Shop Nourish

34 | L AG N I A P P E | J u n e 1 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 7 , 2 0 1 7

E Roosters F Taziki’s

BEST CHAIN RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Chicken Salad Chick Foosackly’s Half Shell Oyster House Moe’s BBQ PF Changs Romano’s Macaroni Grill

BEST EASTERN SHORE RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Boudreaux’s Camellia Cafe Dragonfly Fairhope Inn R Bistro Sunset Pointe

BEST BEACH RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Cobalt Cosmo’s Fisher’s Flora Bama Yacht Club LuLu’s Miguel’s Beach’n Baja

BEST CHEF A Arwen Rice, Red or White B Bill Briand, Fisher’s C Bryan Cates, Kitchen on George D Chris Rainosek, The Noble South E Cortlandt Inge, Cortlandt’s F Weston Simpson, Pour Baby

BEST ATMOSPHERE A B C D E F

Bluegill Chuck’s Fish Dauphin’s NoJa Pour Baby Sunset Pointe

MOST INNOVATIVE MENU A B C D E F

Dragonfly Kitchen on George NoJa Saisho The Noble South Von’s

BEST OUTDOOR DINING A B C D E F

Bluegill Ed’s OK Bike Shop Sunset Pointe The Gulf The River Shack

BEST SWEET TEA A B C D E F

Chick Fil A Cream and Sugar Foosackly’s McAlister’s Raising Cane’s Spot of Tea

BEST BISCUITS A B C D E F

Biscuit King Briquette’s Cracker Barrel Cream and Sugar Dick Russell’s Hardee’s

BEST APPETIZER A Baked Avocado - Five Bar B Brussells Sprouts - Dumbwaiter C Crawfish & Spinach Dip Heroes D Dave’s Pimiento Cheese LeBouchon E Tuna Martini - Royal Scam F Uptown Shrimp - Chuck’s Fish

BEST ENTRÉE IN MOBILE A Chicken & Grits - Pour Baby

B Donkey on Crack Roll Chuck’s Fish C Hangar Steak - NoJa D LA Burger – Callaghan’s E Lamb Chops Gorgonzola - Osman’s F Shrimp & Grits - The Noble South

BEST HOME COOKIN’/ SOUL FOOD A B C D E F

Buck’s Diner Cozy Brown’s Judy’s Place Mama’s Mary’s Southern Cooking Redeemer Community Café

BEST FARM TO TABLE A B C D E F

FOY Kitchen on George Nourish Pour Baby Red or White The Noble South

BEST SERVER A Dominique Kline - Sunflower Café B Jocelyn Phillips - Pour Baby C Megan Baker - Butch Cassidy’s D Pat Ramsey - Felix’s E Robin Trainor - Cream and Sugar F Tommy Watts - Felix’s

BEST OVERALL SERVICE A B C D E F

Briquette’s Dauphin’s Felix’s Kitchen On George Ruth’s Chris Sunflower Café

BEST DESSERT A Blondie at Chuck’s Fish B Buttermilk Pie at Pour Baby C Chocolates at Fairhope Chocolate D Desserts at Cream & Sugar E Desserts at Delish’s Desserts F Key Lime Curd at Sunset Pointe

BEST RESTAURANT WINE LIST A B C D E F

Chuck’s Fish Kitchen on George Pour Baby Red or White Ruth’s Chris The Trellis Room

BEST WINGS A B C D E F

Baumhower’s Buffalo Wild Wings Butch Cassidy’s Island Wing Company Moe’s BBQ WeMo’s

BEST CHICKEN FINGERS A B C D E F

Buffalo Wild Wings Butch Cassidy’s Foosackly’s PDQ Raising Cane’s Zaxby’s

BEST ICE CREAM/ YOGURT/GELATO A B C D E F

Cammie’s Old Dutch Chill Dippin’ Dots Marble Slab Mr. Gene’s Beans Serda’s

BEST LUNCH SPOT A B C D E

Ashland Midtown Pub Café 219 Chicken Salad Chick Honey Baked Ham Regina’s Kitchen

F Rice Asian Grill & Sushi Bar

BEST EASTERN SHORE LUNCH SPOT A B C D E F

East Shore Café Panini Pete’s R Bistro Sandra’s Sunflower Café Windmill Market

BEST WINE/GOURMET SHOP A B C D E F

A la Cork Domke Market Firehouse Wine Red or White Le Bouchon Southern Napa

BEST BEER SELECTION RETAIL A B C D E F

Cottage Hill Package Store Domke Market Kathy’s Package Store Old Shell Growlers Rouse’s Southern Napa

BEST ANNUAL FOOD EVENT OR COOK-OFF A American Cancer Society Chili Cook-off B Bay Bites Food Truck Festival C Downtown Cajun Cook-off D Feeding the Gulf Coast Annual Chef Challenge E Greek Fest F Shrimp Festival

BEST FOOD TRUCK A B C D E F

Benjamin’s Crepe Crusaders Kracken Catering Company Smokin’ Gringos Von’s Will Hughes

BEST GUMBO A B C D E F

Chuck’s Fish Cream and Sugar Felix’s Mudbugs at the Loop Original Oyster House Wintzell’s

BEST PO-BOY A B C D E F

Ashland Midtown Pub Market by the Bay Mudbugs at the Loop R&R The Boiling Pot Wintzell’s

BEST SUSHI A B C D E F

Chuck’s Fish Fuji San Master Joe’s Liquid Lounge Rice Rock-n-Roll Sushi

BEST BAKERY A B C D E F

Bake My Day ellenJay Flour Girls Pollman’s Sally’s Piece of Cake Sugar Rush

BEST WEDDING CAKES A B C D E F

Cakes by Judi Couture Cakes ellenJay Flour Girls Pollman’s The Pastry Shop

BEST CATERER A B C D

Bay Gourmet Clifton Morrissette Creative Catering Georgia Roussos

E Naman’s F Tyners

BEST BURGER A B C D E F

Butch Cassidy’s Callaghan’s Five Guys LoDa Biergarten Mugshots Pirate’s Cove

BEST STEAK A B C D E F

Briquette’s Jessie’s Judy’s Place Osman’s Outback Ruth’s Chris

BEST SEAFOOD A B C D E F

Ed’s Felix’s Half Shell Oyster House JT’s Sunset Grill Ralph & Kacoo’s Wintzell’s

BEST BRUNCH A B C D E F

Ashland Midtown Pub Dauphin’s Five Grand Hotel Kitchen on George The Noble South

BEST ETHNIC RESTAURANT A 7 Spice B Ang Bahay Kubo C Mediterranean Sandwich Company D Rice E Sage Lebanese Cuisine F The Yak

BEST MEXICAN RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Fuego Hacienda San Miguel La Cocina Rio Roosters Taqueria Mexico

BEST ITALIAN RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Café Grazie Carrabba’s Gambino’s Mirko Roma Via Emilia

BEST PIZZA A B C D E F

Ashland Midtown Pub Cortlandt’s Marco’s Mellow Mushroom Pizzeria Delphina Red or White

BEST COFFEEHOUSE A B C D E F

Carpe Diem Chaleur Cream and Sugar RedBar Satori Serda’s

BEST EASTERN SHORE COFFEEHOUSE A B C D E F

Fairhope Roasting Mr. Gene’s Beans Refuge Serda’s Soul Caffeine The Coffee Loft

BEST LOCAL GROCERY STORE A B C D E F

Cain’s Piggly Wiggly Fairhope Health Foods Food Pak Greer’s Old Shell Market Virginia’s Health Foods


S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O P A P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

BEST GROCERY CHAIN A Costco B Publix C Rouse’s D Super Target E Walmart Neighborhood Market F Winn-Dixie

BEST GOURMET GROCERY A B C D

Andree’s Domke Market Fresh Market Whole Foods

BEST PLACE TO GET LOCAL PRODUCE/ FOODS- MOBILE A B C D E F

Lil Brian’s Market on the Square Old Shell Market Sessions Farm Market Ted & Nancy’s Victory Teaching Farm

BEST PLACE TO GET LOCAL PRODUCE/FOODS – BALDWIN A B C D E F

Allegri Bee Natural Burris Country Wagon Hazel’s Seasons in the Sun

BEST BARBECUE RESTAURANT A B C D E F

Brick Pit Cotton State BBQ Dick Russell’s Dreamland Meat Boss Moe’s BBQ

BEST BARBECUE SAUCE A B C D E F

Brick Pit Cotton State BBQ Dreamland Meat Boss Moe’s BBQ Sonny’s

BEST RIBS A B C D E F

Brick Pit Dreamland Hickory Pit Too Meat Boss Moe’s BBQ Saucy Q

BEST RAW OYSTERS A B C D E F

Bluegill Felix’s Half Shell Oyster House Original Oyster House Ralph & Kacoo’s Wintzell’s

BEST TAKE AND BAKE

A B C D E F

Bay Gourmet Clark’s Kitchen Dream Dinners Jamie Roussos Papa Murphy’s Rae’s

BEST CUPCAKE A ellenJay B Flour Girls C Pollman’s D Sally’s Piece of Cake E Simply Sweet Cupcake Boutique F Something Sweet Bake Shop

BEST SEAFOOD MARKET A B C D E F

Mudbugs DIP Seafood Market by the Bay Mudbugs at the Loop Skinner’s Seafood Southern Fish & Oyster Springhill Avenue Seafood

BEST DRUNK FOOD A Buffalo Wild Wings B LoDa Biergarten C Mediterranean Sandwich Company D O’Daly’s Hole in the Wall E OK Bike Shop F Waffle House

BEST HANGOVER FOOD A B C D E F

Blind Mule Butch Cassidy’s Five Bar Foosackly’s Heroes Waffle House

MEDIA FAVORITE RADIO STATION FM A B C D E F

92 ZEW 92.1 95KSJ 94.9 FM Talk 106.5 K Love 98.3 WABD 97.5 WNSP 105.5

FAVORITE RADIO STATION AM A B C D

WNTM 710 WNGL Archangel 1410 WKTD 1440 WERM Gospel 1220

BEST LOCAL DJ A B C D E F

DJ Blayze - 93 WBLX Gene Murrell - WZEW Matt McCoy - 107.3 KISS FM Sean Sullivan - FM TALK Shelby Mitchell - WKSJ Tony Plosczynski – WZEW

BEST DJ TEAM A Dan & Shelby - WKSJ B Matt McCoy & Gossip

Greg - 107.3 KISS FM C Mark Heim and Lee Shrivanian - WNSP D Mobile Mornings - Sean Sullivan, Dalton Orwin, Kelly Jones FM TALK 106.5 E Murphy, Sam and Jodi Lite Mix 99.9 F Tim Camp & LeeAnn Camp TLC in the Morning

Kennedy & Craig Stephenson F Tee Time on the Gulf Coast - FM Talk 106.5

BEST LOCAL EVENING TV NEWSCAST A WALA FOX 10 B WKRG 5 C WPMI 15

BEST MORNING SHOW/DJ BEST LOCAL MORNING TV NEWSCAST A Mobile Mornings - Sean Sullivan, Dalton Orwin, Kelly Jones FM TALK 106.5 B Bobby Bones - WKSJ C Elvis Duran - 107.3 KISS FM D Opening Kickoff with Mark Heim and Lee Shrivanian - WNSP E TLC in the morning with Tim & LeeAnn Camp WZEW F Uncle Henry – WNTM

DJ WHOSE VOICE LEADS YOU TO BELIEVE YOU MAY WANT TO SEE HIM NAKED A Dalton Orwig- FM Talk 106.5 B DJ Blayze - 93 WBLX C Gossip Greg - 107.3 KISS FM D Tony Plosczynski - WZEW E Tres Wiggins - WABD F Uncle Henry – WNTM

DJ WHOSE VOICE LEADS YOU TO BELIEVE YOU MAY WANT TO SEE HER NAKED A B C D E

Jolene Roxbury - FM TALK 106.5 Kelly Jones - FM TALK 106.5 LeeAnn Camp - WZEW Mystic Marge WZEW Shelby Mitchell – WKSJ

BEST TALK RADIO HOST/ SHOW A Afternoon Drive - WNSP B Armed Alabama Radio FM TALK 106.5 C Midday Mobile - FM TALK 106.5 D Mobile Mornings - Sean Sullivan, Dalton Orwin, Kelly Jones FM TALK 106.5 E Today’s Homeowner - FM TALK 106.5 F Uncle Henry – WNTM

BEST SPORTS RADIO HOST/SHOW A Armed Alabama Radio FM TALK 106.5 B John Raciatti Golf Show - WNSP C Opening Kickoff with Mark Heim and Lee Shrivanian - WNSP D Paul Feinbaum - FM TALK 106.5 E Sports Drive with Randy

A WALA FOX 10 B WKRG 5 C WPMI 15

BEST ANCHOR A B C D E F

Bob Grip - WALA Devon Walsh - WKRG Kelly Foster - WPMI Lenise Ligon - WALA Mel Showers - WKRG Sarah Wall – WALA

BEST METEOROLOGIST A B C D E F

Alan Sealls - WKRG Chris Dunn - WPMI Jaosn Smith - WALA John Nodar - WKRG Kelly Foster - WPMI Michael White – WALA

BEST TV INVESTIGATIVE REPORTER A B C D E F

Andrea Ramey - WPMI Chad Petri - WKRG Christian Jennings - WPMI Kati Weis - WALA Peter Albrecht - WKRG Renee Dials – WALA

FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE WRITER A B C D E F

Andy MacDonald, Cuisine Dale Liesch, Reporter Jason Johnson, Reporter Jeff Poor, Beltway Beat Kevin Lee, Arts Mark Bryant, Sports

FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE COVER STORY A Dethroned by Lee Hedgepeth B Hooked by Jason Johnson C One Mobile by Jason Johnson and Dale Liesch D That’s a Wrap by Dale Liesch E Shell Game by Jason Johnson F Arty Awards by Kevin Lee

FAVORITE LAGNIAPPE COVER IMAGE A Nappies 2016 By Dan Anderson B Dethroned by Dan Anderson C Hooked by Laura Rasmussen D Belt Tightening by Laura Rasmussen E 1065 Illustration by Laura Rasmussen F Shell Game by Dan Anderson

FAVORITE AL.COM CONTENT CREATOR A B C D E F

John Archibald JD Crowe Jared Boyd Kyle Whitmire Michelle Irvin John Sharp

BEST SPORTS COVERAGE FAVORITE GLOSSY MAGAZINE A Joe Emer - WALA B Lance Crawford - WPMI C Randy Patrick - WKRG

BEST WEEKEND TV NEWS TEAM A WALA FOX 10 B WKRG 5 C WPMI 15

HOTTEST LOCAL TV NEWSMAN A B C D E F

Greg Peterson - WPMI Darwin Singleton - WPMI Jason Smith - WALA JB Biunno - WKRG Michael White - WALA Peter Albrecht – WKRG

HOTTEST LOCAL TV NEWSWOMAN A B C D E F

Alexa Knowles - WALA Chasity Byrd - WALA Devan Coffaro - WALA Devon Walsh - WKRG Jessica Taloney - WKRG Kelly Foster – WPMI

A B C D E F

Access Due South Exalte Mobile Bay Monthly Mobile Bay Parents Mobile Mask

FAVORITE LOCAL WEBSITE OR BLOG A Arrested in Mobile B Lemon Baby by Amanda Gibson C Mod Mobilian D Refresh Restyle by Debbie Westbrook E Southern Rambler F When Life Hand You Grapes by Michelle Murrill

BEST LOCAL TV AD A American Carpet B David J. Maloney C Greer’s D Joe Bullard E Mike Slocumb, Alabama Hammer F Wind Creek Casino

POLITICOS HARDEST WORKING OFFICIAL MOBILE A City Attorney Ricardo Woods B Executive Director or Planning & Development Dianne Irby C Finance Director Paul Wesch D Mayor Sandy Stimpson E MPD Chief Lawrence Battiste F Public Safety Director James Barber

HARDEST WORKING MOBILE CITY COUNCILPERSON A Bess Rich B Gina Gregory C Levon Manzie

HARDEST WORKING ELECTED OFFICIAL MOBILE COUNTY A Commissioner Connie Hudson B Commissioner Jerry Carl C Commissioner Merceria Ludgood D District Attorney Ashley Rich E Judge Jill Phillips F Sherriff Sam Cochran

HARDEST WORKING ELECTED OFFICIAL BALDWIN COUNTY A Daphne Mayor Dane Haygood B Fairhope Mayor Karin Wilson C Spanish Fort Mayor Mike McMillan D Commissioner Frank Burt E Commissioner Tucker Dorsey F Sherriff Hoss Mack

HARDEST WORKING LOCAL STATE LEGISLATOR A B C D E F

Rep. Bill Hightower Rep. David Sessions Rep. Napoleon Bracy Rep. Victor Gaston Sen. Rusty Glover Sen. Vivian Figures

WHO WILL BE THE NEXT GOVERNOR OF ALABAMA? A B C D E F

Bradley Byrne Kay Ivey Roy Moore Rusty Glover Twinkle Cavanaugh Walt Maddox

J u n e 1 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 7 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 35


ART ARTIFICE

Hair metal comes to JJP in ‘Rock of Ages’ BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

B

reak out the spandex and Aqua Net! Hair metal is hitting midtown. Joe Jefferson Players (11 S. Carlen St.) are bringing the Tony Award-winning “Rock of Ages” to the Azalea City for the first time starting June 2. There’s little doubt the big ‘80s homage will play to packed houses for three weekends. That’s because the boy-meets-girl tale on the Sunset Strip is mostly framework for a soundtrack bursting with more than 30 of the best-remembered power ballads and barn burners of the Reagan era. Mobile and classic rock go together like power chords and synthesizer. For Kate Arrington, who plays female lead and smalltown girl Sherrie, the toughest part wasn’t mental or musical. It was physical. “It’s really hard to do pole dancing. I had no idea how much arm and leg strength was needed. The girls who do it are covered in bruises, called ‘pole kisses’ in the business. Apparently that’s why so many strippers wear thigh-high boots — to cover them,” Arrington said. She and two other actresses signed up for pole dancing lessons as soon as they were cast in February. Rehearsals ran five days a week, but they spent extra days learning to twirl at a downtown fitness center. “I was going to wear a wig but with all the pole dancing and upside downs I have to do, I ended up not doing it and just dying my hair. Next are some extensions,” Arrington said. Though older than the character she plays, Arrington wasn’t quite a teen during the musical’s era. She knows the

ESAC honors volunteer efforts

tunes thanks to older siblings who drenched her childhood with them. “The hardest song in the show for me is [Damn Yankees’] ‘High Enough.’ You can’t use your falsetto, your head voice. You have to belt the entire song, so every time you have to belt the chorus, which feels like 30 times, you’re way out there,” Arrington said. For Jake Coleman, who plays Drew, a boy born and raised in South Detroit, the hardest part about the soundtrack has been learning lyrics. Or maybe we should say “the correct lyrics.” “The hardest part has been these songs I’ve known for three and a half decades and the words I thought were there aren’t the actual words. You have to relearn a whole lot,” Coleman said. Mondegreens aside, he said a couple of tunes have been the most challenging. “Well, there’s ‘I Want to Rock’ by Twisted Sister, because the actual chorus I didn’t really know. And Survivor’s ‘The Search Is Over’ — I didn’t know because it wasn’t in a Rocky movie,” Coleman said. Both actors pointed to some of the bare bones accompaniment of rehearsal as tough. For efficiency’s sake, a full band wasn’t on hand. “Singing Quiet Riot with just a piano doesn’t seem right,” Arrington said. The full quintet — two guitars, bass, keyboards, drums — finally arrived for the last week of rehearsals and it boosted the cast. Coleman said when he heard an unnamed bass riff from the pit it hit home.

36 | L AG N I A P P E | J u n e 1 , 2 0 1 7 - J u n e 7 , 2 0 1 7

BREAK OUT THE SPANDEX AND AQUA NET! HAIR METAL IS HITTING MIDTOWN. JOE JEFFERSON PLAYERS (11 S. CARLEN ST.) ARE BRINGING THE TONY AWARD-WINNING ‘ROCK OF AGES’ TO THE AZALEA CITY FOR THE FIRST TIME STARTING JUNE 2. THERE’S LITTLE DOUBT THE BIG ‘80S HOMAGE WILL PLAY TO PACKED HOUSES FOR THREE WEEKENDS.” Arrington even found some of her own costumes. She said a resurgence in ‘80s fashions landed her some crucial pleather adornments. While he’s wailing out Night Ranger, Foreigner, Poison, Whitesnake, Styx and Warrant, Coleman’s got one more challenge before him. “I have to keep my wig hair out of my mouth,” he quipped.

Azalea City summer drama camps

The Azalea City Center for the Arts (63 Midtown Park E., Mobile) is ready to begin its Super Summer Drama Camp, which runs in two-week sessions through June and July. Each camp is for third graders and up and concludes with a full-length play. Campers will have lines, costumes, help with set painting, play games and learn about acting and singing. Session One is June 5-16. Session Two is June 19-30. Session Three is July 3-14. Session Four is July 17-28. Camps are from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Cost is $260. For more information, go to sunnysidedrama.com.

Coastal summer arrives at MAC

The summer has already begun on the Central Gulf Coast, and the Mobile Arts Council (318 Dauphin St.) is embracing

it. Our longest season is featured in one of three shows to adorn MAC’s galleries in June. Painter Cat Pope’s show “Endless Summer” looks at the mercury’s peak through a romanticized lens. The nostalgia she feels “never grows old” washes through her canvases. Karen McGahagin has organized a unique hat show focused on public service and first responders. It will be in the Danielle Juzan Gallery. Contemporary artist Conz8000 has a series about a fictional character residing in a version of Mobile rocked by unknown disaster. His exhibit unfolds in paintings, illustrations and other works. An opening reception will take place during the Friday, June 9, LoDa Artwalk, 6-9 p.m. The gallery is open Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Entrance is free. For more information, call 251-432-9796 or go to mobilearts.org.

ARTSGALLERY

Like most cultural institutions around Mobile Bay, the Eastern Shore Art Center relies on the efforts of those who value their community as much as their individual wants. In an effort to honor their diligence, ESAC has tapped a few of its diligent altruists with special notice as Volunteers of the Year. The winners: • Ben Gall and Larry Sims for work on the ESAC Hanging Committee; • Myra Koch for the hours spent with ESAC Art Walks and Outdoor Art Show; • Margie Gewirtz for organizing front-desk volunteers and her willingness to serve as needed; and • Malia and Bob Mullican for work on the Outdoor Art Show. Congratulations to the winners, and thank you!

“We rocked that sucker out. I’m a little worse for wear today because we did it without microphones, and so we’re trying to match the band and there’s no way, but it brought a whole new element of energy,” Coleman said. Both actors had ample experience to hone their instincts. Coleman estimated he’s been in around 100 plays since 2000. This is his first lead at JJP — “my white whale” — but thinks it’s ideal for him. “While I’m the male lead a lot of times I come in, sing the songs I know, have one or two lines of dialogue and then I leave. So if that’s the male lead, I’ll take that all day,” Coleman said. Arrington started on stage in her native New England long before relocating to Mobile. “My first show was ‘Sound of Music’ when I was itty-bitty and my first lead role was Little Orphan Annie when I was 10 and then I’ve just never stopped since,” Arrington said. Those roles included leads in “Cabaret,” “Cats” and “Gypsy” among others. Both she and Coleman said rehearsals for “Rock of Ages” have been a blast. “You can’t complain when the director is getting up there jamming out with you at rehearsal. He’ll get up in front and start dancing,” Arrington laughed.


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MUSIC

FEATURE

Photo | Facebook

PUDDLE OF MUDD PLUS SAVING ABEL SATURDAY, JUNE 3, 8 P.M. MIDNIGHT RODEO, 7790 TANNER WILLIAMS ROAD, 251-639-2222 TICKETS: $23-$55, AVAILABLE THROUGH TICKETFLY Saving Abel’s Scott Bartlett (second from left) says the band has endured lineup changes and shakeups in the music industry through constant touring and direct contact with fans.

Saving Abel and the business of music

M

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

idnight Rodeo is bringing two BayFest veterans back to perform for an army of local fans. Before Puddle of Mudd takes the stage, Saving Abel will warm up the crowd with a set of edgy neo-Southern rock. Known for such hit songs as “Addicted” and “The Sex Is Good,” Saving Abel has spent the past few years enduring changes in both its lineup and the music industry. All the while, founding members Scott Bartlett (rhythm guitar) and Jason Null (lead guitar) have remained passionate about their music. Bartlett chatted with Lagniappe about growing up in a doctor’s household, surviving in the modern music industry and creating the next effort from Saving Abel. Stephen Centanni: Your father recently had a clinic at Johns Hopkins named after him.

In my experience, sons of doctors or lawyers tend to grow up to be doctors and lawyers. How did you end up in the world of rock ‘n’ roll? Scott Bartlett: It’s funny. I went to an all-guys prep school, and went back to give one of those prototypical “follow your dreams” speeches. Like they say, the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree. In my situation, the apple fell off the tree and rolled off a hill into a murky pond or something. I definitely went the other route. Science is interesting to me, and it always had been. Nothing ever made me tick like music, and my parents always encouraged me to do what I love. My dad’s passion for medicine is like my passion for music. Centanni: What kind of reaction did you get from the kids? Bartlett: It had been so long. I was so far removed. It wasn’t like I knew anybody. I knew a lot of the professors, but it had been 15 damn years. I was well-received, which was good. I was nervous about that. I remember going to those talks. We were a bunch of bratty kids at a chapel service. We just made fun of everybody. We were relentless and ruthless. I was probably more nervous of that speech than playing festivals, news shows or “[Late Show with] David Letterman.” I was nervous, because I was one of those kids who made fun of these people. I had a jam session afterward and played some blues. It was real cool. Centanni: Saving Abel has gone through some lineup changes over the years. You and Jason Null have pretty much stuck with it. What’s kept you going? Bartlett: He and I had a long talk the other day ... catching up and not talking business. We were reminding each other that we’re brothers-in-arms. He was like, “I’m just so glad that I’m not greeting people at Wal-Mart.” With this music thing that we do, I don’t even think we chose it. I think it chose us. The state of the music business has gotten so difficult. Bands that I grew up listening to are broke. They’re doing pledge campaigns to get money from their fans, and their fans are complying as well as they can, because they don’t want the music to go away. The thing is that if people like us quit doing

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it, then it’s going to go away. So, it doesn’t matter how discouraged we get, because it chose us. We’re like the ambassadors of music that have gotta be there and putting it out there. We were blessed. Anybody can write a good song. We wrote a bunch of good songs, then we had a label that really supported us and blasted it out there for our fans. We got on a platform where people listened. Basically, lightning struck three times for us. Even though times have gotten hard, we still have those hits. Are we working on more? Of course, we are. We should have a new album out for y’all soon. For now, we’ll just try to remind everybody that they can still go out after a hard day’s work and listen to some good ol’ Southern rock ‘n’ roll. Centanni: You know, you bring up a good point. You guys started hitting big right on the cusp of the big shift in the way the music industry is run. Now, all the up and coming bands tend to concentrate on EPs and singles when it comes to studio work. What’s it been like making that music industry transition? Bartlett: It’s been very interesting. I tell you what got really frustrating for me is that there’s this whole generation that doesn’t know what it’s like to stand in line and wait for Guns N’ Roses’ new record to drop. They don’t know what that is, but it’s not their fault. I’ve had people look at me appalled when I’ve asked them to go to iTunes. I’ve got a solo EP, and I’ll be like, “Yeah, if you want to scoop it up, and if you hate it, then I’ll pay you back the $1.29. Since we’re talking music and you brought something up relevant to it, check it out.” They look at me like, “Are you crazy? I’m not paying for music!” To answer your question in a more abridged way, I’ll say this. “Addicted” has been downloaded legally a couple million times. So, that song was able to make us enough to be able to live comfortably for five years. Unfortunately, that well runs dry. We watched it go from buying records to buying songs off iTunes to watching people start ripping them off. We’ve watched record labels fold, because people quit buying music. That’s just technology or progress, I guess. I think it’s more of a regression, to be completely honest, but I’m skewed and biased,

because I’m the artist putting it out there and not getting compensated for it. What do bands do? They start touring more. We’ve made money three ways: the music that people bought, the touring and the merchandise. The music that people bought is gone. You don’t make money off that anymore. So, you’ve got two revenue streams. You’ve got the merchandise and the touring. The merchandise is contingent on the touring. You’re only going to see the merch if you’re on the road. When we brought the new lineup in, we played 300 shows that year. We weren’t 18 anymore. In order for us to do what we want to do, then we have to basically kill ourselves. That’s what the song “Love Like Suicide” is about. We’re conscious of it, but we’re still going to do it anyway. It’s what we like to do. If we’re going to make our ends meet, then we’re going to slowly kill ourselves with rock ‘n’ roll. Centanni: So, let’s talk about that new album. Bartlett: I don’t want to tease anybody too much. We’ve got a ton of song ideas, but in true Saving Abel fashion, we’ve learned that we shouldn’t finish songs without each other, if it’s going to be Saving Abel. We get into the studio with a bunch of ideas and get the right producer. Then, we get a fresh perspective from whoever that producer is. I’m happy to say that I can go public with this and say that we’re going back with the producer who started everything, Skidd Mills (Skillet, Pop Evil, Saliva). He’s the one that produced “18 Days,” “Drowning,” “Sex Is Good” and “Addicted.” He understands us, and he’s happy to be working with us again. We haven’t had time yet to get into a room and show him our ideas. I’ve emailed him a few, and he’s over the moon about them. Here in the next couple of weeks, we’re going to get in a room with him and get it started. We’ve never really been the band to drop a single before we have an album. I think that more than likely we’re going to cut about three or four songs. From there, we’ll pick the next single, so you should have some music from Saving Abel by the end of the summer.


AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | June 1 - June 7

THUR. JUNE 1

Bluegill— Matt Neese Blues Tavern— Biscuit Miller and The Mixx, 8:30p Felix’s— Jeri Flora Bama— MOL, 2p// Davis Nix, 5p/// Dueling Pianos, 5:30p//// Mark Sherill, James Daniel, Chris Newbury, 6p//// Red Clay Strays, 6p//// Ja Rhythm, 10p//// Brian Hill Duo, 10:15p//// Jerry Jacobs Band, 10:30p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Brent and Steve, 8p Listening Room— Will Payne Harrison w/ Adrian and Meredith June, 8p Live Bait— Brandon Styles, 8p Lulu’s— Lefty Collins, 5p Manci’s— Andrew Duhon McSharry’s— Jimmy Lumpkin Duo, 7:30p Old 27 Grill— Songwriter’s Night, 6:30p SanBar— Jim Andrews Wind Creek Casino— G-Funk, 8p

Shores)— Damien Lamb, 6p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Soul Food Junkie, 6p Wind Creek Casino— G-Funk, 9p Windmill Market— Ryan Balthrop, 11:30a

SAT. JUNE 3

Alchemy— Tinderbox Circus Sideshow, 10p Blind Mule— Doc Holiday// A Sunday Fire Bluegill— Bruce Smelley, 12p// Jeff Johnson Duo, 6p Blues Tavern— Pack Rat Smokehouse Blues, 9p Callaghan’s— Motel Radio Felix’s— Grits N Pieces Flora Bama— Sam Glass Duo, 11a// Big Muddy, 1p/// Rebecca Barry and Bust, 2p//// Ja Rhythm, 3p//// Lefty Collins, 4p//// Jack Robertson Show, 5:30p//// Al and Cathy, 6p//// Kim Carson and the Real Deal, 6p//// Destiny Brown, 7p//// Davis Nix Duo, 9p//// River Dan Band, 10p//// Brian Hill FRI. JUNE 2 Trio, 10:15p//// Foxy Iguanas, Alchemy— Hotbed w/ The 10:30p Hallers, 10p Hard Rock (Center Bar) All Sports Bar & — Sing A Song Band, 9:30p Billiards— DJ Markie Mark, Hard Rock (Live) — Toto, 10p 8p Beau Rivage— Maxwell w/ IP Casino— Darren Knight’s Ledisi and Leela James, 8p Southern Momma Bluegill— Quintin Berry, Listening Room— Spencer 12p// Slideshow, 6p Bohren, 8p Blues Tavern— Ric Live Bait— Brandon Styles, 8p McNaughton Band, 9p Lulu’s— Webb Dalton Band, 5p Felix’s— Blind Dog Mike Manci’s— Rondale and the Flora Bama— Jay Hawkins Kit Katz Trio, 1p// MOL, 2p/// 100 McSharry’s— DJ Carter, Dollar Car, 3p//// Christina 10p Christian, 4p//// Jack Robertson Old 27 Grill— Mudbug Slim, Show, 5:30p//// Hung Jury, 6:30p 6p//// Lucky Doggs, 6p//// Dave Pirates Cove— The Whyte Chastang, 7p//// Dave and Joe, Caps, 11a// River Dan Band, 9p//// Lee Yankie and the Hellz 3p/// Rhythm Intervention, 7p Yeah, 10p//// Davis Nix Duo, SanBar— Krissta Allen 10:15p//// Jerry Jacobs Band, Tacky Jacks (Gulf 10:30p Shores)— Three Bean Soup, Hard Rock (Center Bar) 6p — Sing A Song Band, 9:30p Tacky Jacks (Orange IP Casino— The O’Jays, 8p Beach) — Damien Lamb, Listening Room— The 12p// Jimmie Lee Hannaford, Confessions of Jonny, 8p 6p Live Bait— Brandon Styles, 8p The Wharf— Brantley Lulu’s— Grits N Pieces, 5p Gilbert Manci’s— Matt and Sherry Wind Creek Casino— Neese G-Funk, 9p McSharry’s— DJ Chi, 10p O’Daly’s— Gene Murrell, SUN. JUNE 4 Tony Edwards and David Alchemy— The Red Organ White, 10p Trio, 3p Old 27 Grill— Carol Bluegill— Jamie Anderson, Bachman, 6p 12p// Fly By Radio, 6p Pirates Cove— Foxy Blues Tavern— John Hall Iguanas, 7p Trio, 6p Tacky Jacks (Gulf

Callaghan’s— Sugarcane Jane Felix’s— Brandon Bailey Flora Bama— Kim Carson and the Real Deal, 1p// Songs of Rusty, 1:30p/// Al and Cathy, 2p//// David Dunn, 2p//// Adam Brown, 5p//// Southern Drawl Band, 5:30p//// Jezebel’s Chilln’, 6p//// Perdido Brothers, 6p//// Rollin in the Hay, 10p//// Alabama Lighting, 10:15p Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Ty Taylor, 8p IP Casino— Darren Knight’s Southern Momma Lulu’s— Cadillac Attack, 5p Manci’s— Lisa Mills McSharry’s— Trad Irish Music, 6:30p Old 27 Grill— Barry Gibson, 11:30p Pirates Cove— Candy Randall and Kristen Long, 11a// Elvis and The Promise Land Band, 3p SanBar— David Jones Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Lisa Christian, 2p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Jerry Gambino, 11a// Pierce Parker, 6p

MON. JUNE 5

Felix’s— Bryant Gilley Flora Bama— Founders and Friends, 2p// Lee Yankie, 5p/// Rowdy Johnson, 5:30p//// Cathy Pace, 6p//// Jo Jo Pres, 10p//// Petty and Pace, 10:15p Lulu’s— Brent Burns, 5p

TUE. JUNE 6

Bluegill— Matt Neese Butch Cassidy’s— Andy MacDonald Felix’s— Bobby Butchka Flora Bama— T. Bone Montgomery, 2p// Gary Story, 5p//// Jay Hawkins Duo, 5:30p//// Perdido Brothers, 6p//// Lee Yankie and the Hellz Yeah, 10p//// Al and Cathy, 10:15p The Wharf— Jimmy Buffett and The Coral Reefer Band

WED. JUNE 7

Bluegill— Ross Newell Callaghan’s— Phil and Foster Felix’s— Tropic Flyer Flora Bama— Neil Dover, 2p// Mel Knapp, 5p//// Logan Spicer, 5:30p//// Rhonda Hart and Jonathan Newton, 6p//// Ja Rhythm, 10p//// Alabama Lightning, 10:15p Golden Nugget— The Molly Ringwalds, 8p Lulu’s— The Groovinators, 5p

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Fins up

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

W

ith a multitude of people drenched in saltwater and suntan lotion already flocking to the Alabama Gulf Coast, The Amphitheater at The Wharf is adding to the long list of reasons to visit the area: One of the region’s favorite musical sons, Jimmy Buffett, is returning home.

Photo | Wikimedia Commons | Jimmy Buffett

JIMMY BUFFETT & THE CORAL REEFER BAND TUESDAY, JUNE 6; LOT OPENS AT NOON THE AMPHITHEATER AT THE WHARF, 23325 AMPHITHEATER DRIVE (ORANGE BEACH), WWW.ALWHARF.COM TICKETS: $91.50-$134.50, AVAILABLE THROUGH TICKETMASTER

In recent years, musician/actor/author/businessman Buffett has thrilled regular Parrotheads by making this beach-side venue a regular stop. Once again, a legion of fans sporting brightly colored tropical garb will fill The Wharf in the hopes of catching performances of timeless trop rock tunes such as “A Pirate Looks at Forty,” “Fins,” “Cheeseburger in Paradise” and the Parrothead national anthem, “Margaritaville.” Over the years, Buffett has expanded Margaritaville beyond his albums with resorts,

Haller back

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

casinos, restaurants and apparel. Parrotheads now have a chance to get a behind-thescenes tour of Margaritaville. On May 9, music critic Ryan White released “Jimmy Buffet: A Good Life All the Way.” According to a recent press release, this book is a “definitive, comprehensive account of Jimmy Buffett’s long-wayaround road to success.” The book takes the reader from Buffett’s humble musical beginnings on the Gulf Coast to the development of his billion-dollar Margaritaville brand.

‘Hold the Line’

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM When the band Toto claims it has had a large “imprint on pop culture,” it’s not exaggerating. New generations have become familiar with Toto through its animated appearance on Comedy Central’s “South Park,” as well as the use of its hit song “Africa” in the animated TV series “Family Guy.” (In fact, actors Dax Shepard and Kristen Bell used “Africa” to create a widely popular video of their honeymoon.) In a more serious vein, Toto has spent nearly four decades spreading its jazz-infused, West Coast rock sounds around the world, earning six Grammys along the way. Toto has added to its legacy with the release of its 13th studio album, “Toto XIV.” This album — in particular the first two tracks — proves Toto has the talent and ability to keep pace with contemporary music. Other tracks such as “Unknown Soldier (For Jeffrey)” and “The Little Things” serve as sonic flashbacks to Toto’s past. The band also has released a “Live At Montreux” Blu-ray/DVD and is planning a grand celebration for its 40th anniversary in 2018.

Photo | Facebook | The Hallers

BAND: TOTO • DATE: SATURDAY, JUNE 3, WITH DOORS AT 6:30 P.M. VENUE: HARD ROCK HOTEL & CASINO, 777 BEACH BLVD. (BILOXI), WWW.HRHCBILOXI.COM TICKETS: $29.99-$49.99, AVAILABLE THROUGH TICKETMASTER BANDS: HOTBED, THE HALLERS DATE: FRIDAY, JUNE 2, 10 P.M. VENUE: ALCHEMY TAVERN, 7 S. JOACHIM ST., 251-441-7741 TICKETS: CALL FOR MORE INFO

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Photo | totoofficial.com | Toto

Alchemy Tavern is bringing to its stage a sampling of Alabama’s current indie rock scene. Providing local support will be The Hallers, an Azalea City band specializing in a driving rock style influenced by some of the edgier sounds of ‘90s alt. rock. The Hallers have been spending their free time in the studio with engineer Curry Weber. Before moving to the area Weber lived in Memphis, where he spent time behind the mixing boards at Sun Studio and Ardent Studio. The public can expect The Hallers’ new album to drop soon. HotBed will travel from Birmingham to feature songs from their debut album “Heart Beats Strange.” This release showcases a band focusing on an energetic indie rock style that skirts the edge of power pop. “Heart Beats Strange” finds power in its well-thoughtout rock arrangements, and the band’s perpetual charisma. Even when the meter eases, HotBed manages to maintain its vigorous rock vibe.


MUSIC BRIEF

Huka partner cancels festival in British Columbia

T

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

Photo | pembertonmusicfestival.com

he Pemberton Music Festival promised headliners such as Chance the Rapper, Muse and A Tribe Called Quest would perform in British Columbia, Canada, for four days of music in a beautiful natural setting. But those who planned to attend this event are not seeing anything beautiful these days. On Thursday, May 18, the Pemberton Music Festival announced it had filed for bankruptcy and was canceling the festival. While this announcement disappointed fans, it paled in comparison to the news ticket holders might not receive refunds. In the wake of the Fyre Festival’s three days of scandal in April and subsequent cancellation, Pemberton’s cancellation and iffy refund status brought anger to not only festival enthusiasts, but also industry figures such as Marc Geiger of William Morris Entertainment. This company’s roster includes such notable artists as Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue and Arctic Monkeys. In a recent Billboard article, Geiger stated he was “personally” going after organizers “to the full extent of the law.” Geiger included Huka Entertainment heads A.J. Niland and Evan Harrison on his hit list. Huka Entertainment was instrumental in the creation of the Hangout Music Festival as well as many other large music festivals, such as Tortuga Music Festival and Buku Music & Art Project. In addition, their Huka South division is responsible for bringing shows to local venues, such as The Steeple and the Saenger Theatre. Lagniappe contacted Niland for comment on Pemberton’s cancellation and Geiger’s threats, as well as the future of Huka’s presence in Mobile. Concerning Pemberton, Niland directed Lagniappe to the statement posted on Huka Entertainment’s website, which expressed their disappointment and distanced the company from the decision to cancel the festival. “For the past four years, Huka Entertainment has worked to create a one-of-a-kind experience in the most beautiful place on earth. We are heartbroken to see the 2017 Pemberton Music Fes-

On Thursday, May 18, the Pemberton Music Festival announced it had filed for bankruptcy and was canceling the festival. tival canceled. As a contract producer, Huka did not make the decision to cancel the festival. That decision was made by the Pemberton Music Festival LP. We are extremely disappointed for our fans, artists and all of our partners who have supported the festival over the years.” While Pemberton is far from the Gulf Coast, many local concert-goers may wonder about the status of upcoming Huka events in Mobile, which include the Legendary Coaches Tour

(feat. Pat Dye and Gene Stallings) and JJ Grey & Mofro at The Steeple, as well as Jason Isbell & the 400 Unit and Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue at the Saenger. Niland said he wanted to assure local concert-goers their issues with Pemberton would not affect Huka’s upcoming events in Mobile. “As far as it [Pemberton fallout] affecting shows in Mobile, no, there is no effect,” Niland said. “That’s a separate line of our business.”

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‘The Lovers’ will knock your socks off

S

FILMTHE REEL WORLD

BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

AREA THEATERS CARMIKE CINEMA’S Wynnsong 16 785 Schillinger Rd. S. (251) 639-7373 CRESCENT THEATER 208 Dauphin Street (251) 438-2005 HOLLYWOOD STADIUM 18 1250 Satchel Paige Dr. (251) 473-9655

tars Debra Winger and Tracy Letts give a master class in subtle performance in “The Lovers.” As an unhappy husband and wife, each planning to end the marriage in favor of their respective lovers, they tell so much of their stories through their faces in close-up. Summer blockbusters have their place, but this one will knock your socks off — quietly, because it feels so real. Mary (Winger) is having an affair with a chain-smoking writer, played by Aidan Gillen (Littlefinger in “Game of Thrones”) and her husband Michael (Letts) is having an affair with a volatile ballerina (Really, is there any other kind?), played by Melora Walters. While both of these illicit partners have more romantic careers and are younger, Mary and Michael spend their days chained to their respective cubicles. “The Lovers” takes its time showing us their lives, but rather than a scathing indictment of the much-maligned suburbs, it’s a matterof-fact view of life that isn’t played for bitter laughs, merely shown realistically. Even the affairs are shown in the cold light of day, not as stolen moments of

pure bliss. Both the writer and the ballerina are demanding and petulant, and at one point Michael pretends to meet a friend for drinks and lies about it to both his wife and his girlfriend. The film and the performances are dramatic but not showy; it’s a story of middle class boredom we’ve heard before, but through a lens of reality that dignifies rather than mocks it. As the married couple awaits a visit from their touchy college-age son, they assure their longtime lovers his visit will be the turning point, after which they will be free from their marriage. He is the only thing keeping the couple together, and placating him is their stated goal. Meanwhile, the son simmers with resentment over his parents’ loveless union. Then one morning, in the week of preparations for his visit, the marriage stops being loveless. Again, Winger’s face in close-up, registering a range of emotions, beats any special effect you will see this summer. While the thrill of the illicit ignites their feelings for one another, you also get the sense that it is the familiarity between Mary and Michael that has suddenly been remembered to be a huge part of their connec-

tion. The film’s most touching scene is in the grocery store, when Michael is made to realize what he would really be losing in giving up his marriage. Slowly, the stakes in their marriage become high; their divorce, once a foregone conclusion, is now something to mourn, or avoid. The rage in their already insecure and impatient lovers when they realize what’s going on causes them to strike out. Any histrionics come from these long-suffering sideline affairs, or from the son himself. The greatest contrast the film makes ends up being between the older couple, and the younger people they upset. Bittersweet and truly suspenseful, “The Lovers” is a story almost like a Nancy Meyers romantic comedy, but the romance is almost painfully real, and the comedy far more measured. Even while the setup of their story is unusual, the scenes from a marriage are realistic, and will probably hit home with anyone who has been married, however happily, for any length of time. These actors have vividly made a normal life a complex and unpredictable thing to see onscreen. “The Lovers” is now playing at the Crescent Theater.

RAVE MOTION PICTURE JUBILEE SQUARE 12 6898 U.S. 90 Daphne, (251) 626- 6266 CARMIKE CINEMAS 23151 Wharf Ln. Orange Beach (251) 981-4444 COBB THEATRES PINNACLE 14 3780 Gulf Shores Pkwy Gulf Shores (251) 968-7444 EASTERN SHORE PREMIERE CINEMA 14 30500 Alabama 181 #500 Spanish Fort, Al (251) 626-0352 Information accurate at press time; please call theaters for showtimes.

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Photos | Robb Rosenfeld / Clay Enos

FROM LEFT: Debra Winger and Tracy Letts play a long-married, dispassionate couple who are both in the midst of serious affairs. But on the brink of calling it quits, a spark between them suddenly reignites, leading them into an impulsive romance. Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman when she was Diana, princess of the Amazons, trained warrior. When a pilot crashes and tells of conflict in the outside world, she leaves home to fight a war to end all wars, discovering her full powers and true destiny. NEW IN THEATERS WONDER WOMAN

Wonder Woman (Gal Gadot), princess of the Amazons, is trained to be an unconquerable warrior on a sheltered island paradise. An American pilot (Chris Pine) tells her about the massive conflict that’s raging in the outside world. Convinced she can stop the threat, Diana leaves her home for the first time to fight alongside men. All

listed multiplex theaters.

CAPTAIN UNDERPANTS: THE FIRST EPIC MOVIE

Two imaginative pranksters who spend hours in a treehouse creating comic books accidentally hypnotize their school principal into thinking he’s a ridiculously enthusiastic, incredibly dimwitted superhero named Captain Underpants. All listed multiplex theaters.

NOW PLAYING

GUARDIANS OF THE GALAXY, VOL. 2 All listed multiplex theaters. THE CIRCLE PIRATES OF THE CARIBBEAN: DEAD AMC Classic Wharf MEN TELL NO TALES GIFTED All listed multiplex theaters. AMC Jubilee Square 12, AMC Mobile 16, BAYWATCH Regal Mobile Stadium 18 All listed multiplex theaters. UNFORGETTABLE ALIEN: COVENANT Regal Mobile Stadium 18 All listed multiplex theaters. BORN IN CHINA COLOSSAL AMC Classic Wharf AMC Wharf FATE OF THE FURIOUS THE WALL All listed multiplex theaters. AMC Mobile 16 GOING IN STYLE EVERYTHING, EVERYTHING AMC Classic Wharf Cobb Pinnacle 14, Regal Mobile Stadium THE BOSS BABY 18, AMC Mobile 16, AMC Jubilee Square 12 All listed multiplex theaters. DIARY OF A WIMPY KID: THE LONG HAUL BEAUTY AND THE BEAST Regal Mobile Stadium 18, AMC Mobile 16 All listed multiplex theaters. KING ARTHUR: LEGEND OF THE SWORD SMURFS: THE LOST VILLAGE All listed multiplex theaters. AMC Mobile 16 SNATCHED GET OUT Crescent Theater, all listed multiplex theaters. AMC Classic Wharf


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8TH ANNUAL DUAL ON DAUPHIN JOIN US SATURDAY, JUNE 3, 2-6 P.M. FOR THE 8TH ANNUAL DUEL ON DAUPHIN BENEFITING FEEDING THE GULF COAST! SAMPLE DELICIOUS CRAWFISH AT HAYLEY’S, LODA BIER GARTEN, BRICKYARD, & ALCHEMY. THERE WILL BE CELEBRITY JUDGING AT 4 P.M. SO MAKE SURE YOU PUT A BUG (PUN INTENDED) IN THEIR EAR FOR YOUR FAVORITE! PLUS, PURCHASE RAFFLE TICKETS FOR A CHANCE TO WIN SPECTACULAR PRIZES FROM ABITA BREWEING (RIGHT), DRAGONFLY FOOD BAR, RUTH’S CHRIS, THE BLIND MULE AND MORE! $10 OR 10 NONPERISHABLE FOOD ITEMS GETS YOU IN ALL FOUR LOCATIONS. PRIZE DRAWING TICKET INFO: ONE FOR $2, SIX FOR $10, 20 FOR $20.

Photo | Hayley’s

CALENDAR OF EVENTS JUNE 1, 2017 - JUNE 7, 2017

GENERAL INTEREST Glow in the Park The city of Fairhope returns with “Glow in the Park Summer Movie Series,” three free family movies at Fairhopers Community Park on the first Thursdays in June, July and August. The Thursday, June 1, film is “Moana.” Call 251-929-1466. Fairhope farmer’s market The city of Fairhope hosts an outdoor farmer’s market Thursdays, 3-6 p.m., through Nov. 2, behind the Fairhope Public Library downtown on Bancroft Street. Call 251-929-1466. Flora-Bama Fishing Rodeo Flora-Bama Family Fun Fishing Rodeo is June 2-4. Boat not required for this “everyman’s” tournament. Portion of proceeds go to “Operation ReConnect.” Visit florabamafishingrodeo.com. Free family movie night Join Dauphin Island on the West End Beach for a free movie at dusk on Thursday and Friday. Thursday: “Sing”; Friday: “Ice Age.” Market in the Square Mobile’s downtown farmer’s market is now held in Cathedral Square on Saturdays, 7:30 a.m. until noon. Come enjoy, music, food, beverages and more. “Explore Mobile” “Explore Mobile” is Sunday, June 4, 2-7 p.m. in downtown Mobile on the corner of South Royal and Church streets. Enjoy music, food, activities and free admission to the city’s tourist attractions. Part of the Alabama Bicentinnial celebration. Call 251301-0273. National Cancer Survivors Day Mitchell Cancer Institute is proud to host National Cancer Survivors Day on Sunday, June 4, at 3:30 p.m. at Mobile Convention Center. The event includes recognition

activities, resources for cancer survivors and their families, and refreshments.

Mammoth Hunter: Dangerous Beasts You’d Rather Not Encounter!” Call 251-460-6106.

shopping fun with great food, drink and live music. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive.

Teen reading program Area teens are invited to participate in “Build a Better World!” teen summer reading program, June 5-30. The official kickoff will be Monday, June 5, 10 a.m. at the Daphne Civic Center. Call 251-6212818, ext. 203.

Providence Farmer’s Market Shop the farmer’s market every Wednesday through July 12, 2-5 p.m., in Lot F at Providence Hospital. Call 251-631-3501.

First Friday Art Walk The Eastern Shore Art Center returns with new art and music the first Friday of every month. Friday, June 2, at 6 p.m. at the Eastern Shore Art Center, 401 Oak St., Fairhope. For more information, contact Adrienne at 251-928-2228, ext. 103.

CPR training With a goal of training residents of the Alabama Gulf Coast in life-saving HandsOnly CPR, the American Heart Association and its partners are hosting a CPR Week training session in Bienville Square on Monday, June 5 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Visit heart.org. Happy Hour Hard Hat Tour Tour five exciting projects underway in downtown Mobile on Tuesday, June 6. Trolleys depart from Serda Brewing Co. at 600 Government St. at 3 p.m. You’ll return to Serda’s for a reception featuring some of the craft beer that will soon be available to the public. Call 251-434-8498. Summer garden walk Wednesday, June 7, 10:30-11:30 a.m., summer garden walk at Bellingrath Gardens and Home. Join our Horticultural Staff on a guided tour of the Gardens to see our summer plantings and new arrangements. Visit bellingrath.org, call 251-459-8864 or email bellingrath@ bellingrath.org. West Mobile Farmer’s Market This farmer’s market, sponsored by Christ United Methodist Church, is held every Tuesday, 3-6 p.m., on the west side of church property, 6101 Grelot Road, Mobile. Call 251-342-0462. Storytime June 7, at 9 a.m. at the University of South Alabama Archaeology Museum, we present, “You Wouldn’t Want to be a

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Dauphin Island Boardwalk Talks Boardwalk Talks are held the first and third Wednesday of each month at 11:15 a.m. at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab, 101 Bienville Blvd. Call 251-861-2141. Midtown Optimist Club Join Midtown Optimist Club every Wednesday at noon for lunch at Azalea City Golf Course. Call 251-348-3542. Toastmasters Do you want to deliver a speech like a pro or gain leadership skills to advance your career? Toastmasters International meets regularly at six locations in Mobile and Baldwin counties. Visit www.toastmasters. org for more information.

FUNDRAISERS Benefit for MPD captain Join the Crepe Crusader food truck for a benefit for MPD Capt. Chris Dorsey on Monday, June 5, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Mobile Police headquarters, 2460 Government Blvd. Visit crepecrusadermobile.com. “Bids, Brews & Beats” The third annual Bids, Brews & Beats Concert and Silent Auction benefiting Secret Meals will take place Saturday, June 3, at the Flora-Bama from 1-5 p.m. Visit secretmeals.org/fundraisers.

ARTS Night Market Mobile Museum of Art hosts Night Market on Thursday, June 1, 5-9 p.m. featuring wares by artists and artisans. Support your local artists and join the party and

MUSEUMS “Windows to the Sea” “Windows to the Sea” is a new permanent exhibit at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab Estuarium. Visit disl.org. “Shipwreck! Pirates and Treasure” A new, highly interactive exhibit at GulfQuest features more than 500 authentic artifacts recovered from deepocean shipwrecks. Visit www.gulfquest.org. “Christenberry: In Alabama” On the occasion of Alabama’s Bicentennial Celebration, this exhibit honors artist William Christenberry’s exploration of themes related to his native state. Mobile Museum of Art, 4850 Museum Drive. Extended through July 9. Call 251-208-5200. “Faces of Africa” The History Museum of Mobile exhibit “Faces of Africa: A Mystical View of Tribal Heritage” runs through Monday, July 31. Call 251-208-7420. “Drugs: Costs and Consequences” The Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration team up to present a powerful interactive exhibit of the effects of drugs on individuals and society. Through August. Visit exploreum.com. Fairhope’s founding Learn more about the 1894 founding of Fairhope at the Fairhope Museum of History, 24 N. Section St. The museum is open daily (except Sunday and Monday) from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 251-929-1471.


Little Discoveries “Outside the Box,” aimed at children age 6 and under, explores how innovation and creativity can lead to a world of possibilities, starting with a simple cardboard box. Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Call 251-208-6893 or email jholland@exploreum.com. Thursdays at MMoA Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., the Mobile Museum of Art offers free admission to all visitors. No reservations are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive. Call 251-208-5200.

SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES Publix Grandman Triathlon Saturday, June 3, at 7 a.m. racers will begin the triathlon by jumping off Fairhope Pier preceding the bike and run portions of the triathlon that will bring them back to Mobile Bay. Call 251-433-4229. Mobile BayBears The Mobile BayBears are back in action at Mobile’s Hank Aaron Stadium. The team returns from Biloxi to host Pensacola for a five-game home stand June 4-8. Call 251479-BEAR. Weekly 1K/5K Every Thursday evening at 6 p.m., join Red Beard’s Outfitter and Cortlandt’s Pub in the Spring Hill Village Shopping Center for a 1K or 5K run and walk. No cost to participate. Bridge lessons The Mobile Bridge Center offers free bridge lessons each Tuesday at 6 p.m. at

1510 University Blvd. Arrive a few minutes early to register. Call the Bridge Center at 251-666-2147, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fitness and athletics classes New fitness classes are in progress at Palmer Pillans Middle School. To register or for more information on classes offered, call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com. Dance and art classes New dance and art classes are in progress at Palmer Pillans Middle School. To register or for more information on classes offered, call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com.

held at Palmer Pillans Middle School. Visit communityactivitiesprogram.com.

PUBLIC MEETINGS Baldwin County Commission: First and third Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., 322 Courthouse Square, Bay Minette. Work sessions are the second and fourth Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. rotating between Bay Minette, the Foley Satellite Courthouse, the Fairhope Satellite Courthouse and the Baldwin County Central Annex Building in Robertsdale. www. baldwincountyal.gov Baldwin County Planning Commission: First Thursday at 6 p.m., 22251 Palmer St., Robertsdale, www.baldwincountyal.gov.

Blvd., www.townofdauphinisland.org. Elberta Town Council: Third Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m. in the town hall. Workshop meeting on the second Tuesday. townofelberta.com. Fairhope City Council: Second and fourth Monday at 6 p.m., 161 N. Section St. Work sessions are held before each council meeting at 4:30 p.m., www.cofairhope.com. Fairhope Planning Commission: First Monday at 5 p.m., 161 N. Section St. For more information visit www.cofairhope.com. Foley City Council: First and third Monday at 5:30 p.m., 407 E. Laurel Ave. Work sessions begin at 4 p.m., www.cityoffoley. org.

Ballroom dance Azalea Ballroom Dance Club hosts dances the second and fourth Tuesday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Via Health, Fitness & Enrichment Center, 1717 Dauphin St. Call 251-623-9183 or visit azaleaballroomdanceclub.com.

Bayou La Batre City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 13785 S. Wintzell Ave., www.cityofbayoulabatre.com.

Ballroom dance The Moonlight Chassé Ballroom Dance Society hosts dances the first and third Monday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Hot Wheels Skating Rink in Daphne. Email cassief13@aol.com.

Citronelle City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6:30 p.m., 19135 Main St., 251-866-7973.

Mobile City Council: Tuesdays at Government Plaza, 205 Government St. Pre-council meeting begins at 9 a.m.; council meeting begins at 10:30 a.m., www. cityofmobile.org.

Creola City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6 p.m., 190 Dead Lake Road, #A, 251-675-8142.

Mobile Planning Commission: First and third Thursdays at 2 p.m., 205 Government St., www.urban.cityofmobile.org.

WORKSHOPS

Daphne City Council: First and third Monday at 6:30 p.m., 1705 Main St. Work sessions are the second Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m., www.daphneal.com.

Orange Beach City Council: First and third Tuesdays at 5 p.m., 4099 Orange Beach Blvd., www.cityoforangebeach.com.

ACT tutoring Get to really know the ACT and learn tips, tricks and valuable test-taking skills. Classes meet the four Saturdays leading up to the June 10 ACT exam. Classes are

Chickasaw City Council: Second and fourth Tuesday at 7 p.m., 224 N. Craft Highway, 251-452-6450.

Dauphin Island Town Council: First and third Tuesdays at 7 p.m., 1011 Bienville

Gulf Shores City Council: Second and fourth Mondays at 4 p.m., 1905 W. First St., www.gulfshoresal.gov.

Prichard City Council: Every Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 216 E. Prichard Ave., www. thecityofprichard.org.

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SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

Rams’ baseball coach reaches impressive milestone BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

M

Mc-T girls win soccer title

For four straight years, the girls’ soccer team at McGill-Toolen Catholic High School were eliminated in the semifinal round of the Class 7A playoffs. That all changed this season, as the Lady Jackets won their first state title following a 2-0 victory over defending champion Vestavia Hills.

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After a scoreless first half, Angelina Piccini and Chloe Martin got the decisive goals. Eva Knapstein then sealed the deal by making eight saves. The senior goalkeeper was named the tournament’s Most Valuable Player. Mc-T, which beat Fairhope 3-2 in the semifinals, finishes with a 23-2 record.

Bulldogs defend baseball trophy

UMS-Wright captured its second straight Class 4A baseball title after defeating Madison Academy 5-1 in the final game of a best-of-three series. Sam Plash was 4-for-4 at the plate (double, 3 singles, 2 RBIs) to be named the tournament’s Most Valuable Player. Brant Dixon got the final victory on the mound. This was the Bulldogs’ 10th overall baseball title. UMS-Wright finished with a 28-13 record. Madison Academy had won the previous three Class 3A titles before moving up in classification this year.

Photo | University of Mobile

ike Jacobs has been a fixture on the local college baseball scene for many years. A four-year letterman under the legendary Eddie Stanky at the University of South Alabama, he got his first coaching notice in the high school ranks after leading UMS-Wright to the 1988 state championship. His skills were soon recognized by the University of Mobile administration. Jacobs has now been at the helm of the Rams’ baseball team for 28 years. During that stretch, his squad has won seven conference titles. In 2001, UM advanced to the NAIA World Series. Along the way, 35 of his former players have signed professional contracts. In 2011, the school named the baseball field after Jacobs. The latest highlight to his resume came toward the end of the current season. After the Rams defeated Martin Methodist 6-1, it marked the 900th career coaching victory for Jacobs since beginning the baseball program in 1990. “Nine hundred wins is a testament of how quality of a coach he is,” UM Athletic Director Joe Niland said. “Being able to win at that consistency over a long period of time and at the same university is unique.” Prior to a three-game set versus Faulkner University, UM President Dr. Tim Smith and Niland presented Jacobs with a plaque honoring the achievement. “I was very surprised, humbled and honored by the presentation of the beautiful plaque from Joe Niland and Dr. Smith,” Jacobs said after the victory. “Nine hundred wins only come if you have athletes and coaches that buy into your philosophy of winning. I have been truly blessed with both, as well as the support of the university itself and our biggest fan, Joy, my wife. Hopefully we will continue on for many more.” Steven Kelley, a UM alumni and founder of Love Builds custom carpentry, created the unique plaque for Jacobs. “This university is blessed to have a great coach and a great man,” Niland said. “I’ve enjoyed close to 20 years working with him. Coach Jacobs represents everything that UM represents.” The Rams finished their latest season 37-21 overall and 13-11 in Southern States Athletic Conference action.

Championships just out of reach

• The boys’ soccer team from Davidson High School tried to bring home another trophy to Mobile County. However, the squad lost 2-1 to Oak Mountain in the Class 7A final. After Griffin Tucker’s goal with two minutes left in regulation tied the game, the teams were scoreless through two overtimes. Oak Mountain decided the contest by a 3-0 edge in penalty kicks. This marks the third straight state title for Oak Mountain. • The Class 5A baseball finals went to a decisive third game. The results were not favorable as Faith Academy lost 7-4 to Russellville. It was a rematch of last year’s final, as Russellville has now won three consecutive championships. Faith Academy ends the year with a 30-8 record. • In the Class 6A softball title game, Hazel Green defeated Daphne 4-2. Daphne had lost to Gardendale in the second round before winning four straight games — including a 4-0 win over Hazel Green — to force the final showdown. The Lady Trojans ended the year with a 50-7 record. • Gulf Shores hosted the Class 7A to 4A outdoor track and field championships. Local schools finishing among the top 10 in the final standings were Baker (boys 10th in Class 7A), Blount (boys 7th in Class 6A), McGill-Toolen (boys 3rd and girls 4th in Class 7A), St. Paul’s Episcopal (boys and girls 2nd in Class 5A), Spanish Fort (girls 4th in Class 6A) and UMS-Wright (girls 4th in Class 4A). • Cullman hosted the track meet for Class 3A to 1A. Local teams competing were Bayside Academy (girls 3rd and boys 9th in Class 3A), Mobile Christian (boys 3rd and

UNIVERSITY OF MOBILE BASEBALL COACH MIKE JACOBS RECENTLY CELEBRATED HIS 900TH CAREER WIN. girls 6th in Class 3A) and St. Luke’s (girls 8th in Class 2A). The list of individual winners from Class 7A to 1A is too long for this column. To see these names, visit www.ahsaa.com/Sports/Outdoor-Track-Field.

Free fishing day June 10

As part of National Fishing and Boating Week (June 3-11), Alabama residents and visitors will have the opportunity to fish for free in most public waters — both freshwater and saltwater — without a license. “Free Fishing Day is the perfect opportunity for non-anglers to test the fishing waters and to remind former anglers of all the fun they’ve been missing,” said Nick Nichols, fisheries section chief for the Alabama Division of Wildlife and Freshwater Fisheries. To find a fishing spot, visit http://outdooralabama.com/where-fish-alabama.

Jaguars represented in NFL

A third member of the University of South Alabama football team has signed a contract with the National Football League. Defensive end/linebacker Randy Allen inked a deal with the Baltimore Ravens following a tryout. Allen was first-team all-Sun Belt Conference after leading USA with 19 tackles for loss and 12 sacks. He joins former teammates Gerald Everett (drafted by Los Angeles Rams) and Josh Magee (free agent with Atlanta Falcons) in the NFL. Hoping to join them are Roman Buchanan (Falcons) and Kalen Jackson (Rams), both of whom have been offered tryouts.


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MEDIA MEDIA FRENZY

Lagniappe takes four awards in Press Association contest BY ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

L THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE MISQUOTING SCRIPTURE BY RANDOLPH ROSS / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Purchase via Charles Schwab: Abbr. 4 “Unfinished” Symphony composer 12 Commercial success? 18 Expose 19 Its slogan is “Family City U.S.A.” 20 Final bit 22 The Bible on political horse trading? 24 One of the original Mouseketeers 25 Approaches aggressively 26 Cries at unveilings 28 Part of a chorus line? 29 The Bible on camera problems? 35 1987 Best Actress winner 36 Water carrier 37 Square dance group, e.g. 38 Rave review 42 The Bible on an alien invasion? 46 Went on an African hunting expedition 50 Without exception 51 Losing ground? 52 A hill of beans? 56 Pass carefully 58 The Bible on where Prince Harry learned horticulture? 60 Perceive 61 Spacewalk, for short 63 Arafat’s successor as P.L.O. chairman 64 Nursery-rhyme boy 66 Forum farewells 68 Number of weeks per annum? 69 Those with clout 71 The Bible on bad business practices? 74 Item near a stereo 77 Buc or Bronco 78 Newport event 79 Long, long time 81 Like all official football games 82 The Bible on directions to hell? 88 Weasel out of 89 “Take me ____” 90 Sportswear brand 94 Bozos 95 The Bible on a climactic part of a baseball game? 100 Blood-work report abbr. 101 In la-la land 104 Skilled banker? 105 Bungle 107 The Bible on ruined sugar crops?

113 ____ Mill (California gold-rush site) 114 Parent vis-à-vis a child’s loan, maybe 115 “Would ____?” 116 Conical construction 117 Avoid boredom, say 118 Safety device

27 Japanese relative of a husky 30 Two-time Wimbledon winner Lew 31 Destination from the E.R. 32 Cardinal letters 33 Anti-Prohibitionist 34 W.W. II zone, for short 35 One doing heavy lifting DOWN 39 A wee hour 1 Don Quixote’s squire 40 French assembly 2 Vestiges 41 Storms of the 1990s 3 Setting for spring in Vivaldi’s 42 Sign of spring “The Four Seasons” 43 Ireland’s ____ Fein 4 Vowel sound in “hard” and 44 Western lily “start” 45 Runners behind O-lines 5 Betray 46 Erich who wrote “Love 6 Film in which Scarlett Johans- Story” son is heard but not seen 47 Like our numerals 7 Actress Thurman 48 The Bible on a taboo musi8 Rear half? cal instrument? 9 LAX listing 49 Start of many recipe steps 10 Something poking through 52 Wrangler alternative the clouds 53 Words after hit or knock 11 Symbol in trigonometry 54 Fable finale 12 Just slightly 55 Perspective 13 Perino of Fox News 57 Mrs. Michael Jordan 14 Confessor’s confessions 59 OT enders, sometimes 15 Sierra Nevada, e.g. 60 “Oh wow!” 16 The Bible on diet food? 62 Putin ally 17 Beseech 65 United Nations entrant of 18 62-Down’s political party 1949: Abbr. 21 Scarcity 66 Political writer Kenneth 23 Night-school subj. 67 A long way off

69 Matter of debate 70 “Keen!” 72 Before: Abbr. 73 Mortgage deal, for short 75 Essential parts 76 Bug-eyed 77 Prefix with con 80 Photo finish? 81 Scale sequence 82 Online mischief-makers 83 Get going 84 Falstaffian 85 Pompeii problem 86 Golfer’s concern 87 Test site 90 Motrin alternative 91 Sportscaster Dick 92 Being part of a secret 93 Match 96 New York town on the Hudson 97 Reacts to an awesome sight 98 Shade of white 99 “Children of the Albatross” author 101 Escape slowly 102 100% 103 Quiet place to pray 106 ____-Foy, Que. 108 Stooge with a bowl cut 109 “Peer Gynt” character 110 Upholstery problem 111 Org. in a le Carré novel 112 Burma’s first P.M.

ANSWERS ON PAGE 52

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agniappe won four awards in the 2017 Alabama Press Association’s Better Newspaper Contest, which were announced last Friday. Editor and co-publisher Ashley Trice’s “Hidden Agenda” column took first place in the Best Editorial Column or Commentary category for Division C newspapers — the state’s largest weeklies. Rob Holbert took second place in that category as well for “Damn the Torpedoes.” Baldwin County reporter Jane Nicholes was awarded first place in the Best Feature Story Coverage category for her story “Baldwin County Cancer Clusters.” Reporter Jason Johnson’s coverage of the proposed Mobile County soccer complex placed third in the Best In-Depth News Coverage category. Fifteen categories remain to be announced at the annual APA Summer Convention in Orange Beach July 8. Those include categories such as General Excellence, FOI – First Amendment Award and Public Service. This is Lagniappe’s first year competing in the APA contest.

Making USA Today

The “Nation’s Newspaper” and others may have unintentionally made Mayor Sandy Stimpson’s case for him in the recent kerfuffle between hizzoner and local television stations regarding their use of the word “decriminalize” to describe Stimpson’s attempt to change city regulations to give police officers more discretion in handling certain types of crimes. One of those crimes in particular caught lots of media attention, and that was marijuana possession. The mayor’s proposal would allow officers to ticket offenders caught with a small amount of pot, rather than hauling them to jail, a process Stimp-

son says takes cops off the streets to process a very minor offense. This led all three local TV stations to either broadcast or post stories online claiming Stimpson was attempting to “decriminalize” marijuana in Mobile. The mayor says he had nothing of the sort in mind and that penalties would remain the same. Only the matter requiring mandatory arrest would change. Stimpson’s political campaign blasted WKRG-TV in particular for an insistence on sticking with the term “decriminalization” and said the term was misleading. But the term gained more steam as other media outlets followed the TV stations’ leads. Last week USA Today carried a small item in its state-by-state roundup declaring Mobile was seeking to “decriminalize” marijuana. “Mayor Sandy Stimpson is proposing to decriminalize several minor offenses, including possession of marijuana for personal use,” it read. Likewise, iHeart Radio now carries a report from WKSJ saying the mayor’s proposed ordinance would decriminalize pot possession. And conservative website Yellowhammer also published a story claiming decriminalization is in the works, as did Alabama Public Radio. The mayor can take solace in the fact that www.marijuana.com at least got things right.

WKRG departures

Reporter/producer Cassie Fambro Byrd has announced her departure from WKRGTV, becoming one of the latest in a string of employees to leave since Nexstar Broadcasting Group acquired the station in a merger with Media General. Fambro says she will start reporting in early June at Spectrum News in Charlotte, North Carolina. Fambro had been at the station for 18 months.


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STYLE BOOK REVIEW

‘White Tears’ takes reader inside blues music’s painful origins BY W. PERRY HALL/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

“White Tears” Hari Kunzru Random House “

W

hite folks hear the blues come out, but they don’t know how it got there,” said Son House, a Mississippi blues singer who made his start in the 1920s. The blues got there, it is generally acknowledged, via the adapted rhythms and methods of West African natives enslaved in the American South. One of the blues’ most customary components came from the group work songs of the plantation slaves, who used the African practice of “call and response,” which bluesmen have most often transformed into a conversation between the singer and his guitar. It is no coincidence the Mississippi delta region, so rich in fertile soil for large plantations, is the birthplace of a veritable blues “who’s who,” including Muddy Waters, B.B. King, Bo Diddley, Robert Johnson and Howlin’ Wolf. In “White Tears” (Random House), novelist Hari Kunzru cleverly and ambitiously lays bare the wounds from which the blues bled, journeying from Manhattan to the Mississippi Delta and from the present to the late 1950s and again to the late 1920s. With sinister strains threaded throughout, his novel scrutinizes white exploitation of black culture, the forced labor of black convicts through convict leasing to white farms (which some call “slavery by another name”) and related issues of race, class, pov-

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erty and musical authenticity. The novel begins in Manhattan with Seth and Carter, best college buddies rooming together after bonding over a mutual love of black music. Seth recalls how “Carter taught me to worship — it’s not too strong a word — what he worshipped. He listened exclusively to black music because ... it was more intense and authentic than anything made by white people.” According to Carter’s sister, he ”feels guilty for being a rich boy. That’s why his heroes are always poor or black.” As it happens, Carter lives off a trust funded by his family, which owns a conglomerate of construction, energy and private prison businesses. So when the pair decides to open a recording studio, Carter has little problem bankrolling it with Seth, a sound engineering whiz, managing the business. The talents of these “audio craftsmen, artisans of analog” have thrust them to the mat of success with a contract to record a successful white hip-hop artist. Seth often adds a variety of sounds to his audio bank by strolling about Manhattan with his parabolic mic and recorder. One afternoon upon playing back the sounds he recorded of nothing in particular near chess players in Washington Square, Seth is shocked to hear a haunting voice singing a blues song: “Believe I buy me a graveyard of my own “Believe I buy me a graveyard of my own “Put my enemies all down in the ground “Put me under a man they call Captain Jack “Put me under a man they call Captain Jack

“Wrote his name all down my back” Carter pounces upon hearing the recording, and they stay up until six in the morning, cleaning up the recording and deciphering the words … Carter cooks up a guitar track over which to lay the mystifying voice and asks Seth to “Make it dirty. Drown it in hiss. I want it to sound like a record that’s been sitting under someone’s porch for fifty years.” Carter fakes a “scuffed and faded” recording label for a 1928 recording of what he labels “Charlie Shaw’s Graveyard Blues,” a “rarity” that he uploads to the internet. The collector trolls instantly trill. One going by the name “JumpJim” drills them about the song and pushes to know what is on side B, saying he has not heard Charlie Shaw’s voice since 1959. A suspicious hit-and-run leaves Carter comatose a third of the way into the novel and the buddy-centric thriller seems, in hindsight, like a bluesy vamp to the main numbers. The story takes an ominous turn into the territory of noir mystery when Seth seeks out the collector to learn about his 1959 trip to Mississippi with an unscrupulous older collector who plucked Charlie Shaw’s only recording from Shaw’s voodoo-ish sister, and of the ominous events leading to that man’s shrieking end ablaze among his collection of authentic blues recordings.  Seth convinces Carter’s sister to accompany him on a trek to the Mississippi Delta to sleuth a possible link between the real Charlie Shaw, the counterfeit recording and the hit-and-run. This nightmare-like journey to the soul of the blues thrums with tension and a droning dread that calamity lurks around the corner. As they approach the delta, the menace intensifies and time starts to tilt. In the novel’s final, spectral phase, the past and present merge into a sort of discordant call and response. Time ultimately comes undone. Without giving too much away, readers will learn of Captain Jack and how Charlie Shaw never made any more records when all he wanted was “to pass something on … to reach forward, to obey the urge of life.” Seth becomes alienated by circumstance and is shunned by Carter’s family. The story pounds with the profane nature of a payback tinged with aspects of the supernatural and voodoo, and the novel ends with a shockingly unforgettable judder. “White Tears” is a bold, formidable novel that is not for everyone. Yet, the venturesome reader will be rewarded as Kunzru explores the corrupted nature of “blaxploitation,” dredges the sordid past of the music from which “all … American music derives its most distinctive characteristics” (James Weldon Johnson), pays tribute to the music’s legacy infusing much of our culture today, and vilifies the vinyl hipsters and their obsession with authenticity in the blues while disregarding the pain integral to the end product.


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STYLE HOROSCOPES CAPRICORN GOES CRAZY ON THE CRAWFISH

F U T U R E S H O C K

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ANSWERS FROM PAGE 48

GEMINI (5/21-6/21) — Your attempts to watch Major League Baseball will be derailed after one of the first games you decide to take in features a gentleman named Buster Posey. Though you found it hard to take America’s pastime seriously before, it will be insurmountable going forward. CANCER (6/22-7/22) — Now that school is out and you’re contemplating summer’s endless possibilities, you’ll feel higher than Tiger Woods on a pharmaceutical cocktail. You’ll pass out on the beach and awaken with a third-degree sunburn. You’ll recover on Dauphin Island’s Aloe Bay. LEO (7/23-8/23) — You’ll start a war with your neighbors when you refuse to fight the rezoning request of a neighborhood doughnut shop. Unfortunately for your neighbors, you love doughnuts and hate being inconvenienced. You’ll support the rezoning. VIRGO (8/24-9/22) — After bingeing on a popular Netflix show, you’ll change the affectation of your voice and try to lead your household with an iron fist. You’ll change your mind when you’re forced outside in the rain, along with the family dog, who chewed up the carpet. LIBRA (9/23-10/22) — You’ll help develop a plan to begin construction on an underground city below Mobile. You’ll immediately run into a problem, as digging crews are inundated with water. You’ll scrap those plans and instead create a floating city. It’ll open in 2021. SCORPIO (10/23-11/21) — You’ll start planning a new bicycle race in Mobile. Everything will go great until the day of the event, when you forget to have the street barricaded. The event will then become less of a bike race and more of a test of wills. SAGITTARIUS (11/22-12/22) — You’ll take advantage of a $4-off admission coupon in Lagniappe to reacquaint yourself with Waterville’s “Screamin’ Demon” slide. Later, in an online review, you’ll liken it to a cross between a kamikaze dive and an excessively overpowered bidet. CAPRICORN (12/23-1/19) — You’ll overindulge in crawfish again at the 8th annual Duel on Dauphin. At your resulting gastroenterology appointment, they’ll explain it’s not blood in your urine, but a painful mix of Zatarain’s crab boil and Tony Chachere’s Original Creole Seasoning. AQUARIUS (1/20-2/18) — Inspired by a local couple whose yard was transformed as part of a reality TV show, you’ll finally get out and mow your damn lawn. Hours later, soaked in sweat and covered in mosquito bites, you’ll allow nature to reclaim your house. You’ll eventually be entombed in popcorn tree roots and kudzu. PISCES (2/19-3/20) — After your neighbors continue to walk into your yard and speak with you without an invitation, you’ll begin traversing your own lawn disguised as shrubbery. Things will get hairy, though, when a dog catches your scent, but you’ll ultimately remain undetected. ARIES (3/21-4/19) — Though you aren’t personally affected, you’ll make plans to join fishermen protesting the shortened red snapper season next week. Despite a strong effort, your lack of knowledge on the subject will be on full display as you start chanting “No justice! No reefs!” TAURUS (4/20-5/20) — You’ll become the scourge of the city after a waitress blasts you on social media for leaving an insufficient tip. You’ll report the public chastising to her employer, but after seeing the $5 tip on your $150 meal, the owner’s only response will be reblogging her original post.


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STYLE BOOZIE

Three-day weekend to the max BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

C

an every day be a three-day weekend? I think of this often and wonder which would be better, every Monday off or every Friday? Both have pros and cons. Mondays could be the new Sunday and hello, Monday wouldn’t suck anymore, but Thirsty Thursday could be more fun. Either way, I’d be happy. But let’s be honest, a three-day weekend would be dangerous … a whole extra day for shenanigans? Probably not a great idea. Although it would be good for my line of work, so let’s call our congressmen and get to work on this!

Having Monday off means Sunday funday can be taken to a whole new level, so that’s what Boozie did. Sunday didn’t exactly start off as fun as it ended. I might have been a little hungover from Saturday’s sunset booze cruise but I got it together for the boat trip to Pirate’s Cove. Upon arriving, we realized everyone’s hungover-ness made us a little late to the party. The place was packed! Once we finally found a spot, we ran straight for the line for burgers and bushwackers! While waiting for food, Boozie’s sunglasses managed to fall off my head, fold up and slip through an inch-wide crack. Like I said, my Sunday didn’t start off well. Luckily I was able to get them back but I sure was nervous. After a little food, the day made a shift, the sun came out and it was time to party! Out on the dock was where the party was, boats and people were everywhere. More strappy swimsuits were spotted like the ones at Hangout. I just don’t get it, those tan lines are not worth it. There were also some guys spotted climbing the poles and jumping into the water. That was impressive. I’m not sure I could have even held onto

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Move over, movies

While Mobile has had its fair share of movies filmed here, TV shows have recently been stealing the spotlight. Monday night, the show “America’s Most Desperate Landscape” on the DIY Network featured Mobile couple Melissa and David Laster! Boozie had forgotten she’d heard about the show’s date in advance and, of course, happened to be watching HGTV instead of DIY Network. But no worries, I recorded the rerun and watched it just so I could give you the scoop. It was the first time “America’s Most Desperate Landscape” tackled a backyard, and let’s just say this backyard needed it. It had all kinds of rotting wood, rusty nails and murky water. The crew got right to work with the help of friends. DIY Network’s Pool Kings showed up to take over the pool work, and of course it rained, making the liner installation difficult. Once the yard was all finished, it was unrecognizable. Of course all the friends who helped them were the first to be invited over for a party, but Boozie thinks the Lasters need to invite us all over! I could take a swim in the pool or watch a football game on their new patio. I will be waiting for the invitation.

Photo/Boozie Spy

Sunday funday

the pole, much less climb to the top. Adults weren’t the only ones partying. One little girl informed me she was drinking soft drinks when she was supposed to be drinking water, but no worries, her mom didn’t know! The soft drinks must have kicked in because later her friend tried to push me in the water, not cool. Maybe Pirate’s Cove needs to start a leash law for kids, not dogs. Regardless, I’m ready for another trip!

If you missed the two episodes on Monday night, no worries, you can catch the Lasters on Friday, June 9, at 8 a.m. and Monday, June 19, at noon. While one Mobile couple made their TV debut Monday, a local eatery was its their chance at fame. Food Network was in town filming at LoDa Bier Garten. Unfortunately my usual Bier Garten spies had to “work” (insert eyeroll). But this is what I know: Josh Denny from “Ginormous Food” was in town trying out LoDa’s burgers. If I had to guess, the burger did not disappoint. It was a massive burger, too, so no word yet as to whether Josh was able to finish it. Only time will tell. There’s no air date yet, but I will try to keep you up to date. Until then, go enjoy your own burger and beer! Well, kids, that’s all I’ve got this week. Just remember, whether rain or shine, dramatic or scandalous or just some plain ol’ three-day-weekend lovin’, I will be there. Ciao!


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com PROBATE NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: GLADYS S. ONEAL, Deceased Case No. 2017-0983 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 26th day of May, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. WILLIAM WORTH ONEAL JR as Executor under the last will and testament of GLADYS S. ONEAL, Deceased. Attorney of Record: MICHAEL E. MARK LAGNIAPPE HD June 1, 8, 15, 2017.

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: MARY ANN HERRING, Deceased Case No. 2017-0908 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 16th day of May, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. MARY HERRING POWNALL as Executrix under the last will and testament of MARY ANN HERRING, Deceased. Attorney of Record: MICHAEL S. MCNAIR Lagniappe HD May 25, June 1, 8, 2017.

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: DE’LAUNA KION ANDERSON Case No. 2017-0267

Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 16th day of May, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. ZOLIA C. ANDERSON as Administratrix of the estate of DE’LAUNA KION ANDERSON, deceased. Attorney of Record: JAMES D. WILSON, Esq. Lagniappe HD May 25, June 1, 8, 2017.

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING May 18, 2017 Case No. 2016-1595 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA CHANGE OF NAME FOR MINOR On to-wit the 31st day of July, 2017 at 9:30 AM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the CHANGE OF NAME FOR MINOR as filed by CHRISTINA L. WILLIAMS. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest, specifically RONALD GOINS, JR. who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate. Attorney Name and Address: MICHAEL S. MCNAIR, 2151 GOVERNMENT STREET, MOBILE, AL 36606 Lagniappe HD May 25, June 1, 8, 15, 2017.

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: GLADYS EZELL ROBINSON, Deceased Case No. 2017-0304 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 8th day of May, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. JANICE ROBINSON THOMAS and GREEN THOMAS JR. as Co-Executors under the last will and testament of GLADYS EZELL ROBINSON, Deceased. Attorney of Record: JEROME C. CARTER Lagniappe HD May 18, 25, June 1, 2017.

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: PEARLIE D. JOHNSON, Deceased Case No. 2017-0188 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 8th day of May, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. MECHELE JOHNSON PICHON as Executrix under the last will and testament of PEARLIE D.

JOHNSON, Deceased. Attorney of Record: PRO SE Lagniappe HD May 18, 25, June 1, 2017.

IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA CASE NO. CV-2017-000083 ESTATE OF BERNIE LEON NEWBERRY Letters Testamentary on the estate of said deceased having been granted to the undersigned on the 5th day of May 2017, by the Honorable James C. Wood, Circuit Court Judge of Mobile County, notice is hereby given that all persons having claims against said estate are hereby required to present the same within time allowed by law or the same will be barred. Ginny Newberry Personal Representative. Deena R. Tyler P. O. Box 6 Mobile, AL  36601 Lagniappe HD May 18, 25, June 1, 2017

NOTICE OF COURT PROCEEDING April 18, 2017 Case No. 2015-0200-3 IN THE PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of JAMES E. KNIGHT, Deceased On to-wit the 24th day of July, 2017 at 2:00 PM in COURTROOM 1, THIRD FLOOR, Mobile County Government Center Annex, 151 Government Street the court will proceed to consider the FINAL SETTLEMENT as filed by TERESA KNIGHT. NOTICE is hereby given to all parties in interest who may appear and contest same or file a proper responsive pleading thereto if they then think proper. DON DAVIS, Judge of Probate. Attorney: HENDRIK S. SNOW 50 ST. EMANUEL ST, MOBILE, ALABAMA 36602. Lagniappe HD May 18, 25, June 1, 8, 2017

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that the University of South Alabama (Owner) will accept sealed Bids for the following Work: HOT WATER PIPING REPLACEMENT TO STUDENT HOUSING PHASE III University of South Alabama Mobile, Alabama USA JOB NO. 17-36 USA BID NO. 7042801 Bids will be received and clocked in at 2:00 p.m. local time on Tuesday, June 6, 2017, in Room AD245 of the USA Administration Building, on the Main Campus of the University of South Alabama. Bids will not be accepted after the time indicated herein and will be returned unopened. A cashier’s check or bid bond payable to the University of South Alabama in an amount not less than five (5) percent of the amount of the bid, but in no event more than $10,000 must accompany the bidder’s proposal. Bid Documents shall be available only through the USA Purchasing Office. Contact as follows: University of South Alabama Purchasing Department 307 University Blvd, N., AD245 PH# (251) 460-6151 FX# (251) 414-8291 (rbrown@southalabama. edu) Bids must be submitted on Proposal Forms furnished in the Bid Documents or copies thereof. The preceding is an abbreviated advertisement. The complete advertisement may be obtained from the location listed above. A Pre-Bid Conference will be held at 10:00 a.m. local time on Tuesday, May 30, 2017, in Room AD023 of the Administration Building. Those in attendance will include the Owner, Engineer, and Consultants. Contract bidders, subcontractors and suppliers are encouraged to attend. A tour of the Project site is scheduled immediately after the conference All questions concerning the Project should be submitted in writing to the Project Manager at the address listed below. 307 University Blvd. N., AD001 Mobile, AL 36688 PH# (251) 460-6165 FX# (251) 461-1370 dstrain@ southalabama.edu Lagniappe HD May 18, 25, June 1, 2017

NOTICE OF SALE The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 30, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 4763 Lott Rd., Eight Mile, AL 36613. 2003 Chevrolet Impala 2G1WF52E239399673 2011 GMC Terrain 2CTALMEC5B6379808 Lagniappe HD May 25, June 1, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 30, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at13908 Hwy 90, Loxley, AL 36551. 2002 Toyota Tacoma 5TEGM92NX2Z070561 Lagniappe HD May 25, June 1, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 30, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 16840 Lancaster Lane, Bay Minette, AL 36507. 2001 Chevrolet Silverado 1GCHC29G51E299558 2009 Pontiac G6 1G2ZH57N594102936 Lagniappe HD May 25, June 1, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 30, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 751 Schillinger Rd. N., Mobile, AL 36608.

2012 Hyundai Sonata 5NPEC4AC4CH402852

Lagniappe HD May 25, June 1, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 30, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  6425 Spanish Fort Blvd., Spanish Fort, AL 36527. 2001 Ford LGT Convt 1FTRW07W61KD78846 1998 Mercury Sable 1MEFM50U8WA652736 Lagniappe HD May 25, June 1, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 30, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 608 South Wilson Ave., Prichard, AL 36610. 2004 Kia Sedona KNDUP131X46525559 2007 Hyundai Accent KMHCN46C07U117163 Lagniappe HD May 25, June 1, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 30, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2550 Masters Ct., Mobile, AL 36618. 2009 Toyota Camry 4T4BE46K19R123243 Lagniappe HD May 25, June 1, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 30, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 1713 Marengo Dr., Mobile, AL 36605. 1992 Volvo 240 YV1AS8810N1473984 Lagniappe HD May 25, June 1, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 4763 Lott Rd., Eight Mile, AL 36613 2011 Chevrolet Traverse 1GNKRLED5BJ386897 2003 Ford Expedition 1FMRU15W93LB56180 2016 Toyota Camry 4T1BF1FK1GU607335 2000 Bayl Boat BIYB40BZI001

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 1408 Montlimar Dr., Mobile, AL 36609. 2006 Chevrolet Cobalt 1G1AL15F067631032 Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 1100 S US Hwy. 31, Bay Minette, AL 36507. 2007 Chrysler PT Cruiser 3A4FY48B87T546696

Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 3180 Springhill Ave., Mobile, AL 36607. 2004 Chevrolet Silverado 1GCEC14X14Z114259

Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 1304 Melrose St., Mobile, AL 36605. 2013 Chevrolet Malibu 1G11B5SA5DF170884 Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 106 Martin Luther King Dr., Prichard, AL 36610. 2006 Dodge Charger 2B3KA543G06H213736 Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 4955 Albert Evans Rd. S., Wilmer, AL 36587. 1999 Mercury Sable 1MEFM58U3XA618838  Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 6232 Spanish Oak Inn Apt. 82, Theodore, AL 36582. 1993 Chevrolet GMT-400 1GCFC24K2PE102809  Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2000 Halls Mill Rd., Mobile, AL 36606. 2009 Pontiac G6 1G2ZJ58K494236413  Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 12450 Dailey Rd., Grand Bay, AL 36541. 1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee 1J4G268S2XC668810

Deadline for legal advertising in Lagniappe HD is every Monday at 3 p.m. Lagniappe HD is distributed each Thursday.

Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3940 Moffett Rd., Mobile, AL 36618. 2007 Lexus RX350 2T2GK31U67C026772 Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 121 Schillinger Rd. N., Mobile, AL 36608. 1998 Nissan Pathfinder JN8AR05S7WW240418 Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 1107 Lower St., Bay Minette, AL 36507. 2014 Chevrolet Silverado 3GCPCPEH5EG527001 Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on July 07, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 37957 Hwy. 59, Bay Minette, AL 36507. 2005 Ford F150 1FTRF14555KC57393

Lagniappe HD offices are located at 1100B Dauphin St. Mobile, AL 36604. For more information or to place your ad call Jackie at 251-450-4466. Or email at legals@lagniappemobile. com

Lagniappe HD June 1, 8, 2017

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Lagniappe: June 1 - June 7, 2017  
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