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WEEKLY

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LAGNIAPPE

APRIL 27, 2017 - MAY 3, 2017 | www.lagniappemobile.com ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com JANE NICHOLES Reporter jane@lagniappemobile.com

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BAY BRIEFS

While the Mobile County Sheriff’s Office has arrested dozens on similar charges, a deputy remains free on recent drug charges.

COMMENTARY

Empty nest syndrome at the Trice household.

BUSINESS

Ft. Lauderdale, Florida-based Results Co. is opening a 10,000-square-foot telemarketing center on Dauphin Street.

CUISINE

The Book Cellar at Page & Palette in Fairhope has a handful of local drafts, as well as a stocked liquor bar.

KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net

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STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com J. MARK BRYANT Sports Writer sports@lagniappemobile.com STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA RASMUSSEN Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com

COVER

Local law enforcement agencies are attempting to maintain a civil forfeiture system where the burden of proof lies with defendants.

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BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com BETH WILLIAMS Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com ALEEN MOMBERGER Advertising Sales Executive aleen@lagniappemobile.com MELISSA EDGE Editorial Assistant events@lagniappemobile.com

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ARTS

Wilner Baptiste and Kevin Sylvester are Black Violin, a blend of classical and hip-hop nearly 20 years in the making.

MUSIC

Local favorite Paw Paw’s Medicine Cabinet is releasing a new single recorded at Rich Hirsch’s studio on Dog River.

ROSS PRITCHARD Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager jackie@lagniappemobile.com CONTRIBUTORS: Lee Hedgepeth, Ron Sivak, Jeff Poor, Asia Frey, Brian Holbert, Tom Ward, Judy Stout ON THE COVER: CIVIL FORFEITURES BY LAURA RASMUSSEN POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Editorial, advertising and production offices are located at 1100B Dauphin St. Mobile, AL 36604. Mailing address is P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Phone: 251.450.4466 Fax 251.450.4498. Email: ashleytoland@lagniappemobile.com or rholbert@lagniappemobile.com LAGNIAPPE is printed at Walton Press. All letters sent to Lagniappe are considered to be intended for publication. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and Alternative Weeklies Network All rights reserved. Something Extra Publishing, Inc. Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced without the expressed permission of the publishers. Individuals may take one copy of the paper free of charge from area businesses, racks or boxes. After that, papers are $3 per issue. Removal of more than one copy from these points constitutes theft. Violators are subject to prosecution.

For Lagniappe home delivery visit

www.lagniappemobile.com/lagniappehd

38 42 47 48 50 FILM

Jim Jarmusch’s beautiful film “Paterson” creates a universe of deep and lasting meaning.

GARDEN

The Gallery of Gardens aims to inspire.

SPORTS

Fairhope Yacht Club, Mobile Yacht Club and Buccaneer Yacht Club host summer sailing camps.

STYLE

A Flora-Bama patron gets a bit ‘loose’ while partying at the famed roadhouse.

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GOING POSTAL Republican primary when Bentley was running against Bradley Byrne. The AEA hated Mr. Byrne for his work cleaning up the corruption Editor: (legislators making ~$100K per year and not I’m sure I’m only one of many Mobilians really doing anything!) associated with the state sick and dang tired of AL.com throwing blue Community College system. This cost Byrne bags of unsolicited and very unwanted trash (aka advertising) on my yard weekly. I know we the primary. This entire fiasco would not have happened can recycle this junk, but why does it continue? with a closed primary system in this state. I Some advice given awhile back in Lathink Bradley would have made Alabama a gniappe suggested calling AL.com. But why tremendous governor and one day in the future would they stop this nonsense? It’s a profit he may get another chance. generator for them! Someone said call the city While not a fan of using the power of your of Mobile. Good luck with that. office to cover up an affair (can you remember The people we need to call are the advertisBill Clinton?), it is not nearly as bad as Obama ers who supply the innards of this bag. Cajole THEM to stop having their valuable ads thrown using the IRS. Now, that should be criminal. Greg Breland AT my house and all over Mobile! Certainly Fairhope we can convince them their advertising dollars could be spent in better ways. (How about P.S. Please tell the Zodiac Guy I love his advertising in our beloved Lagniappe?). Major work, it makes me chuckle every week. contributors to this mess are Shoe Station and most major Mobile grocery stores. Get them to STOP and maybe the blue bags would go away! CONGRESS MUST INCREASE FUNDING Speak to them in person locally, call (local or FOR ALZHEIMER’S RESEARCH corporate offices), email, start petitions, make some kind of racket! Editor: C’mon, Mobile, let’s get rid of these blue As one of the 303,000 residents of Alabags! bama who have or are caring for a person with Joseph J. Patterson Alzheimer’s disease, I am proud to support Mobile the Palliative Care and Hospice Education and Training Act (PCHETA) (S693 and HR1676). Recently reintroduced in Congress and supGO. BYRNE? ported by the Alzheimer’s Association, PCHETA would ensure America has an adequate, Editor: well-trained palliative care workforce through Concerning your “The woman who took down the ‘throne’” article, I would like to make workforce training, education and awareness, and enhanced research. Palliative care and what I think is a pertinent historical point. Robert Bentley would have never been gov- hospice are critical services for persons in the advanced stages of this terminal disease. In fact, ernor if the AEA had not told all its members not to vote in the Democratic primary but in the a number of studies have concluded hospitaliza-

STOP THE BLUE-BAGS

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tion is not recommended for individuals with advanced dementia given the life expectancy of the individual, the significant burdens of aggressive treatment and the difficulty of pain management for those who cannot communicate in the hospital setting. PCHETA will help ensure the millions of Americans living with Alzheimer’s, like my grandmothers, my aunt and my mother did, have access to quality care and end-of-life services, making a devastating diagnosis slightly more manageable. Conclusion: Please join me in thanking Rep. Bradley Byrne for his consideration of PCHETA and asking for his support. Beth Reinert Alzheimer’s Association Ambassador, AL/FL Chapter

ANY WHICH WAY THE BREEZE BLOWS Editor: A wonderfully, wonderfully blown breeze is a brilliant thing. A thing of bliss. What brought it here? Where did it begin? Where did it come from? Where is it going, even? As of right now in DeTonti Square, it is blowing out of the southwest and over my arms and legs, the hair now flecked with bits of gray. Possibly it is here solely as a godsend to combat the summer’s swelter. But alas, summer has not even reached Mobile as of yet, which my wife is quick to point out as she explained to me the inner workings of the summer solstice, which is Latin for something or other … maybe the boiling point! So the epic battle will go on. As I root loudly for the breeze. My Uncle Marion’s front porch in the OGD is a wonderful place to catch a breeze. His masterful stories and cooled, mellowed concoctions of the Eugene Walter variety do not hurt either.

Aah … Old Mobile breezes. This past Easter Sunday, as we retreated to the shade under my aunt’s covered porch in Wilmer, to escape the sun’s rays and the impending rotten-egg smell from the children’s earlier egg hunt, we were rewarded by a breeze that blew true and fast. I would pay cash for a breeze like that! Music rides well on the back of a breeze, especially reggae, for some reason. Perhaps because of the mental picture of a breeze lazily shaking the fronds of a tall palm. I even recall a Southern hip-hop artist from my high school days who answered to the name Cool Breeze. Although Mr. Breeze did not, that I recollect, rap much about his namesake. On the other hand, the legendary J.J. Cale knew a lot about a breeze as he and Eric Clapton played “easy come, easy go; any way the wind blows.” Eddie Stanky Field holds a secret, but not to those of us diehard South Alabama baseball fans who venture there often. Just the other night, the field revealed its secret to the rest. A breeze like no other. As we rallied for a win against our Mississippi neighbors, I engaged a Maroon fan on the pros and cons of said breeze. “How’s yours over at Dudy Noble Field?” He responded nonchalantly, with a slow Southern drawl, “Reeeaaal nice.” We went on to discuss baseball and breezes and how a breeze in the confines of a baseball diamond can become friend or foe by the simple swing of a bat. Whereas I, the home team alumnus, rooted for a righthanded batter with a stiff breeze blowing out to left … and him, being akin to the Bulldog, rooted otherwise. Faulkner once said, “Well, between Scotch and nothin’, I suppose I’d take Scotch.” For me, I suppose I’ll take the breeze. Russell W. Blount III Mobile


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE COUNTY

Preferential ‘treatment’ DOZENS OF DRUG ARRESTS WHILE FORMER DEPUTY REMAINS FREE BY JASON JOHNSON

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t’s been 30 days since arrest warrants for “possession of marijuana” and “illegal possession of prescription drugs” were written for former Mobile County deputy Chris Parsons. Though Parsons has yet to be arrested, his former employer took scores of other similarly nonviolent drug offenders to jail while his warrants remain unsigned — including more than two dozen charged with the exact same offenses. Jail records indicate the Mobile County Sheriff’s Office recorded 24 arrests for marijuana possession between March 27 — the day Parsons’ warrants were approved — through April 19. During the same period, four individuals were arrested by MCSO for illegal possession of prescription drugs. When asked about the data, Mobile County Sheriff Sam Cochran said, “there are several different ways every case is handled based on the circumstances in that case. “Most of those possession cases where we arrest someone are usually people that are dealing in drugs. This was a case where an employee had a drug addiction, and we, in essence, investigated and set up the scenario that led to him being caught in possession, and he’s going to suffer serious sanctions because he was a law officer,” Cochran said. “There are a number of companies that have employees with drug addictions — it’s a national epidemic. [Parsons] wasn’t dealing or selling, he was using, and we essentially set the circumstances up so we could catch and remove him from the department.” However, Lagniappe’s review of MCSO arrests intentionally excluded persons whose charges included an element of distribution or violence. In the department’s 43 recorded drug arrests from March 27 to April 19, 14 stemmed from possession of a controlled substance charges and 26 were for misdemeanor charges for possessing drug paraphernalia. All of those resulted in the suspect’s arrest. A database of those and similar charges recorded since is available at lagniappemobile.com. MCSO spokeswoman Lori Myles disputed some of the numbers, and said Parsons’ case differs from most because it was part of an “undercover narcotic” investigation, drawing a parallel to an MCSO operation on March 15 that led to the arrest of 23 people. “Theses arrests were part of an ongoing investigation that our undercover narcotic deputies and U.S. Marshals had been working on for six months,” Myles said. “When the investigation was complete, we made the arrest.” Notably, MCSO’s investigation into Parsons’ actions was completed March 27, the starting date of Lagniappe’s records review. Parsons was terminated after he was caught buying illegal drugs in a sting operation executed by the MCSO and the Saraland Police Department March 6. Marijuana and another “controlled substance” were later found in Parsons’ patrol car. When the MCSO turned its investigation over to Mobile County District Attorney Ashley Rich on March 27, it was accompanied by a request from Cochran that Parsons’ case go before a grand jury. Rich denied Cochran’s request,

claiming there was “no legitimate reason” for it to deviate from the “normal screening process” to present to a grand jury. There have been accusations of preferential treatment because of Parson’s former position with MCSO and because his father, Lonnie Parsons is the chief of support services for the office. However, MCSO continues to maintain it would be necessary to accelerate the process, protect the identity of undercover informants and prevent the agency from altering the investigation by making an arrest. “MCSO, with our undercover narcotics team, investigated this case, and we work very hard to protect their identity for any future investigations,” Myles said. “Because of the media exposure of the case, and the reasons stated above, we knew the case would be best presented to the grand jury. We also knew the subject being investigated.” This week, Cochran suggested any delay in Parsons’ arrest is the result of delays in Rich’s office, claiming MCSO’s role “started and ended” when it turned over its investigation last month. He also said he has recommended similar cases go to a grand jury “numerous times.” According to Cochran, the case against former deputy Clifton Wayne Holifield Jr. was also presented to a grand jury, adding he was “trying to be consistent, if anything.” However, Holifield also turned himself in and was arrested the day allegations against him were released. Cochran also again cited Parsons’ ongoing drug treatment as reason for delaying his arrest. “[Rich] knows that [Parsons] has since put him in a treatment program,” Cochran said. “She might have wanted him arrested at the time, but we didn’t feel like rushing out and arresting him while he’s checked himself into a treatment center.” Earlier this week, Rich rejected many of Cochran’s claims and said nothing changed in her office since the warrants for Parsons’ arrest were prepared a month ago. She also said she’s never seen a case handled this way since becoming the district attorney in 2012. “The warrants are ready to be signed in my office, but the sheriff instructed two of his employees not to come and sign them, and that’s where this case has been left,” she said. “He can send them over here at any point in time — it’s that plain and simple.” Lagniappe also reached out to the Saraland Police Department for a comment on its involvement, but no response was received from Public Information Officer Gary Cole in time for this report. Rich noted the employee needed to sign Parsons’ arrest warrant for Saraland has since become an MCSO employee. On Tuesday, Myles confirmed Greg O’Shea — a previous MCSO employee — had left SPD to rejoin the sheriff’s staff. Though O’Shea assisted with MCSO’s undercover narcotics operations during the time of its investigation into Parsons, Myles said he was employed by the city of Saraland and not MCSO at the time. He was officially sworn in as a MCSO employee April 25.

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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Helping hands COMMUNITY GROUPS ASSIST CITY OFFICIALS WITH NEIGHBORHOOD PROJECTS BY DALE LIESCH

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hether it’s completing a sidewalk project or arguing in favor of new zoning rules, a number of community groups have sprouted around Mobile to help accomplish neighborhood goals. Based on the success of the Village of Spring Hill, members of groups such as Mobile Midtown Movement, The Peninsula of Mobile and the Africatown Community Development Corp. have been active in recent years trying to make positive changes to their communities. Linda St. John, president of the Village of Spring Hill, said the group started about 11 years ago as a gathering of concerned citizens who wanted to do something about the abandoned commercial buildings in the area near their homes. “It all started as a grassroots effort of just a few people who felt the community was getting rundown,” she said. “It was just an effort from a small group of people who felt it could be better.” The group made some calls and placed signs advertising a meeting to discuss the issue. St. John said she was surprised by the turnout at that initial meeting, as more than 600 people showed up. “Everybody thought what we were thinking,” she said. “The timing was so right and everybody cared.” From there, St. John had members rank the top five things they’d like to see the group do and installing sidewalks was the top issue. The Village of Spring Hill has since tried to do a sidewalk project each year in order to better connect the community. Each year the group sponsors a sidewalk-a-thon, where children go door-to-door soliciting donations from residents. A program St. John admits she didn’t think would

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raise more than about $1,000 has been essential to placing sidewalks in the community. “The first year it raised $20,000,” she said. “It was unbelievable, so successful.” The program helps provide the 20 percent match needed for grants to place sidewalks and the roughly $18,000 or so needed for the engineering and design work each time. In addition to sidewalks, the Village of Spring Hill has been integral in moving the community forward through a neighborhood development plan with optional zoning regulations. “Thanks to [the Village of Spring Hill’s] efforts there are miles of new sidewalks and improved intersections, pocket parks, lighting, treescapes and much more,” Council President Gina Gregory, who represents the area, wrote in an email. “I have had the pleasure of partnering with [Spring Hill] since the beginning, helping with funding for projects and as an advocate.” Another group that has successfully developed its own plan is the Peninsula of Mobile, led by Debi Foster. The lack of sidewalks in and around Dauphin Island Parkway was a big issue for the group. Foster said the group recently got its own transportation grant, in cooperation with the city, to fill in gaps in the sidewalk coverage in front of two schools, Gilliard Elementary and B.C. Rain High School. Councilman C.J. Small provided the group with the $20,000 to $40,000 match through capital improvement money, while the entire grant provided $185,000 for sidewalks. “It’s called the ‘miracle mile’ in the master plan,” Foster said. “It’s like a central business district.”

For Foster, the proliferation of these community groups has fallen in line with budget issues and was highlighted by a tremendous backlog of capital improvement projects the council and Mayor Sandy Stimpson are currently working through. “I think at some point in time over the past 20 years, the general citizenry of Mobile has gotten tired of waiting,” she said. “We reached a point in time where we had to find another way and take matters into our own hands.” Foster said the groups in Mobile are becoming more popular at a time when there’s a movement toward nonprofits nationwide. “Government can’t be expected to do everything … solve everything,” she said. “I’ve been on that side of the table.” St. John said she’s noticed an increase in the number of community groups, as members of the Village of Spring Hill board have helped several move forward with plans of their own. “I believe it’s important every community has an interest in wanting to improve their place,” she said. “It can only make the city stronger.” It’s not just about infrastructure, either. Councilman Fred Richardson said if it hadn’t been for a community group in Crichton and Toulminville, the new fire station design wouldn’t have included a meeting room. “If I hadn’t had those voices, we wouldn’t be getting that meeting room,” RIchardson said. Councilman Levon Manzie said the myriad groups in his district are very helpful in accomplishing community-based goals. “I welcome it,” he said. “Any city that isn’t sensitive to the wants and desires of residents is a city destined to fail.” Change should start at the community level, Manzie said; it shouldn’t be a top-down approach. While some groups have gone so far as to actually provide grants or funding for infrastructure improvements, Manzie said even when the city has the money, as it does through its CIP program, all groups help advocate for their communities when it comes time to spend it. “They are helpful in shaping how we spend some of those resources,” Manzie said. On that same note, Councilman John Williams said various community groups can help councilors prioritize projects. The groups can also focus on projects in an individual neighborhood. “They are able to accomplish things that would take more time, or more money,” Williams said. “They are the same as a quasi-government facilitator. Really, that’s what they are. They may not be elected … but they are organized citizens and that’s all government is.”


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Smooth sailing

COUNCIL APPROVES MORE CIP SPENDING; CARNIVAL EXPANDS MOBILE CRUISES

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BY DALE LIESCH he Mobile City Council unanimously approved the 2018 Capital Improvement Plan, which continues to pump money from a nearly 20 percent sales tax increase into infrastructure projects. A focus on parks, drainage and roadways highlights the final official year of the plan, which began with spending in the 2016 fiscal year. Councilman John Williams said councilors had been discussing the project for months with a city-hired consultant from Hawksley to continue to put a dent in more than $100 million in needs. Focusing on parks, Williams said, councilors signed off on projects for new lighting, concession stands, restrooms and other projects at many of the city’s recreational facilities. In a statement, Mayor Sandy Stimpson’s office said the CIP looks to “address critical maintenance and repair needs in parks, including drinking fountains, tables, grills, bleachers and athletic fields.” The CIP also helps the city implement an Americans with Disabilities Act accessibility plan at local parks. In addition to parks, the 2018 CIP will begin reconstruction work on portions of St. Louis, Texas and Glenwood streets, according to the statement. “The Capital Improvement Plan has enabled us to attack the estimated $250 million backlog

revenue besides sales tax in the future. Rich was the council’s point person on a citizens’ ad hoc committee on taxation formed in 2015. The committee recommended the city replace the 20 percent sales tax increase with a 10 mil property tax rate. The committee made other recommendations, but nothing more has come out of those discussions. In other business, Stimpson’s acting Chief of Staff Paul Wesch told councilors Carnival Cruise Line plans to stay in Mobile through November 2018 and will experiment with longer cruises on the Fantasy to more ports of call. Wesch said Carnival is looking at expanding to 7-day and 11-day cruises to the Panama Canal and Key West next year. “We hope those cruises are successful,” he said. Carnival Fantasy will also sail from Mobile to Grand Cayman beginning next year, according to a statement from Visit Mobile. The city signed a 13-month contract with Carnival in September 2015 to allow the Fantasy ship to return to the city and sail from the Mobile, Alabama Cruise Terminal to ports in Mexico and the western Caribbean beginning in November 2016. The council, at Wesch’s request, delayed for another three weeks a vote on two contracts related to recycling. The first was a $125,000 contract with Emerald Coast Utilities Authority for the processing and sorting of recyclables and the second was a $900,000 contract with Amwaste for the transportation and rental of the equipment. Council President Gina Gregory said the city requested more time to discuss the issue with the Solid Waste Authority. At a previous meeting, members of the SWA had requested copies of the contracts for review. The SWA, which owns the city’s waste stream, was concerned Waste Management might view the new recycling program as a violation of a 1993 contract with the SWA. WM has previously won a multimillion-dollar lawsuit against the SWA for breach of contract. The new single-stream compactors are currently being picked up and transported to Cantonment, Florida, through a minor contract Stimpson signed with Amwaste. Williams initially questioned the mayor’s authority to agree to the contract without council approval, but Don Rose, the city’s procurement officer, said the city is allowed to agree to terms on a contract of less than $7,500. The city reached an agreement with Emerald Coast Utilities Authority to process the recycling without signing a contract. The agreement was on a trial basis, Rose said.

IN OTHER BUSINESS, STIMPSON’S ACTING CHIEF OF STAFF PAUL WESCH

TOLD COUNCILORS CARNIVAL CRUISE

LINE PLANS TO STAY IN MOBILE THROUGH NOVEMBER 2018 AND WILL EXPERIMENT

WITH LONGER CRUISES ON THE FANTASY TO MORE PORTS OF CALL. of infrastructure projects and position Mobile for a new era of growth and a higher quality of life,” Stimpson said in the statement. “Our commitment remains that we will listen to our citizens as we identify projects and that we will be transparent with every dollar we spend. The City Council and I hear every day how much our citizens appreciate the improvements in our sidewalks, streets and parks.” It’s unclear what will happen when budget negotiations take place after 2018, the final year of the three-year program. Several councilors have shown support for continuing the tax hike in order to keep funding the infrastructure projects. Councilwoman Bess Rich thanked the members of city staff who helped organize the projects for 2018, but said at the meeting she hoped the city could look to other forms of

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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE COUNTY

A personal question FEDERAL APPEALS COURT UPHOLDS HASTIE EMAIL CONVICTION BY JASON JOHNSON

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questions about during deliberation. “Ms. Hastie asked the district court to give the jury the statutory definition of ‘personal information’ and allow it to decide whether email addresses constitute ‘information that identifies an individual,’” Jordan wrote in his dissenting opinion. “The district court refused, and instead told the jury that, as a matter of law, the term ‘personal information’ includes email addresses. That, in my view, was reversible constitutional error.” Jordan felt that error entitled Hastie to a new trial, writing it had effectively let the judge and not the jury decide an important element of the her criminal conviction. Pryor and Ripple felt otherwise. In the majority opinion, Pryor wrote the trial court would have only violated Hastie’s constitutional rights had it told the jury the specific emails discussed in Hastie’s case were considered personal information under the law. Instead, Pryor said DuBose’s instructions simply “provided the jury a definition at a higher level of generality” by explaining “‘personal information’ means information that identifies an individual, including an individual’s email address.” While it’s unclear what might be next for Hastie and her defense team, the confirmation of her conviction won’t have much of an impact initially. Back in 2015, her attorney, Neil Hanley, said a conviction under the DPPA was “less than a misdemeanor,” and the only sentence imposed by the court was a $5,000 fine, which Hastie has already paid. However, if the decision isn’t appealed again, the resolution of Hastie’s criminal case would allow a civil lawsuit against her and the county to move forward for the first time since 2015. Anitra Diamond and Labarron Yates claim theirs were among the 30,000 email addresses Hastie released to the Stimpson campaign in 2013, and the appeals court’s

Photo | Lagniappe

fter more than a month of deliberation, the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals has upheld Mobile County Revenue Commissioner Kim Hastie’s 2015 conviction for illegally disseminating the email addresses of 30,000 local motorists to a political campaign. The conviction resulted from Hastie’s decision to turn over 30,000 email addresses from a database at the Mobile County License Commission to an employee of Mobile Mayor Sandy Stimpson’s 2013 campaign. The misdemeanor incident led to Hastie being convicted twice criminally, sued civilly and condemned by the Alabama Ethics Commission. In February, litigators from Hand Arendall and local attorney Stuart Hanley argued for a reversal of Hastie’s conviction under the Driver’s Privacy Protection Act (DPPA) before a panel of three judges, which included Alabama native William H. Pryor Jr., Adalberto Jordan and the 7th Circuit’s Kenneth F. Ripple. The panel agreed with the results of the trial court, which determined information protected under the DDPA — a federal law prohibiting employees of a department of motor vehicles from knowingly disclosing motorists’ personal information — would apply to email addresses even though they aren’t expressly written into the statute. Despite her attorney’s claims Hastie didn’t know email addresses were covered by the DPPA, the court pointed out the government has offered evidence at trial showing Hastie was aware of what she was doing “because she attempted to hide the source of the emails and later lied about her behavior” in an interview with a local television station. The most significant issue discussed was whether U.S. District Judge Kristi DuBose erred in her jury instructions in Hastie’s 2015 trial by including “email addresses” when describing personal information — a point jurors also raised

MOBILE COUNTY REVENUE COMMISSIONER KIM HASTIE REMAINS A DEFENDANT IN A CIVIL SUIT RELATED TO THE UNAUTHORIZED RELEASE OF PERSONAL INFORMATION. decision to uphold the former license commissioner’s conviction bodes well for their case. That lawsuit names Hastie as defendant as an individual and in her official capacity as the Mobile County License Commissioner and as a Mobile County employee when the offense occurred. Recently, Mobile County’s attorney, Jay Ross, told Lagniappe the Mobile County Commission was looking into what — in any — liability it might have in the lawsuit. However, he said many of those issues had not been vetted because the lawsuit was stayed throughout the course of Hastie’s two-year appeal. However, according to the lawsuit’s complaint, the DPPA assesses a $2,500-per-violation penalty for any personal information disseminated for unapproved reasons. If proved accurate, that fee could theoretically be applied to each of the 30,000 bits of information allegedly given to the Stimpson campaign, for a total penalty of as much as $75 million.


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Campaign year TIMOTHY HOLLIS WILL CHALLENGE FRED RICHARDSON IN DISTRICT 1 BY DALE LIESCH

Photos | Provided / Lagniappe

Tim Hollis (left) is campaigning against incumbent Fred Richardson for Mobile City Council.

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long-serving incumbent and a political newcomer are posturing for the District 1 seat on the Mobile City Council. Challenger Timothy Hollis has jumped into the race against incumbent Fred Richardson for the seat during this year’s municipal election Aug. 22. On the council since 1997, Richardson points to some recent successes as reasons he should be awarded another term. Richardson notes he was an early supporter of a nearly 20 percent sales tax increase used to fund infrastructure improvements throughout the city. A portion of that increase — an average of $3 million per year — given to each of the council’s seven districts has provided Richardson the funds to make muchneeded improvements. “I was finally able to get other council members to join me,” he said of voting in favor of the infrastructure money, now known as the capital improvement plan, or CIP. “The National League of Cities wants us to share [the idea] with other cities. That shows how bold it was.” Before the CIP, Richardson said “not a penny” of taxpayer money flowed into his district for ditch maintenance or street repair. Nonetheless, he said he always advocated for the residents. “I was there begging, but didn’t get a dime for 18 years,” he said. “We have now and I am so happy. I want to see that through.” While Richardson said he has worked on improving parks by adding benches to the park in Trinity Gardens and being an early supporter of the Three Mile Creek greenway initiative, among other things, he said there’s more to do. He said he’d also like to continue to resolve some of the drainage issues plaguing some neighborhoods in the district. Richardson also took credit for helping develop the Police Citizens Community Relations Advisory Council and claims he was the first councilor to bring community meetings to various neighborhoods. Also, Richardson noted his two decades of experience as a local civil rights advocate working through groups such as the Neighborhood Organized Workers of Mobile. “I’m living proof that it worked,” he said of his efforts. “I love what I do and I do what I love.” Hollis, a Mobile native, said in a statement he is running because of his “love and commitment to his hometown, his deeply held desire to revitalize Mobile, and because of the need to bridge the gap between politics and the community.” “A vote for Timothy Hollis is a vote to

establish sidewalks and trails where needed, implement pedestrian safety measures, repair stormwater systems, ensure code compliance and enhance safety in all parks and recreation facilities of the District 1 communities,” according to the statement. Hollis’ platform, which he calls the “Four Cornerstones,” focuses on community revitalization and economic development; strong parks, recreation facilities and programs; renewed engagement with public safety and giving a voice to the community. Hollis plans to use discretionary funds for infrastructure and drainage issues, as well as improving parks, according to the statement. In addition, he pledges to keep a “close and healthy relationship” with members of the Mobile Police Department and the Mobile Fire-Rescue Department. “I am not a politician,” the statement read. “I am a servant to the people … I am here to serve you, I am here to be your voice.” Hollis previously worked for Cumulus Broadcasting as a member of the promotions and public relations team, as well as the production team and as an over-the-air announcer. He also helped to form the Toulminville Titans Youth Football Club. Hollis, according to the statement, has been active in local, state and national issues as well. This includes questioning local leaders on the officer-involved shooting of Michael Moore; the cutting of funding for WAVE Transportation, which resulted in the elimination of several routes; and “standing up against” the appointment of former Sen. Jeff Sessions as U.S. Attorney General. Hollis has set up a GoFundMe account for his campaign. He appointed a principal campaign committee on April 11, according to Mobile County Probate Court records. There are no records yet of contributions to the campaign. Richardson began reporting contributions in early February with $600, to put his campaign coffers at $2,601 after the incumbent spent $269 the previous month. In the March report, Richardson received three separate $500 donations and a $200 donation. In the April report, there are no contributions listed but he spent $696.58. Hollis joins Robert Martin, who is running against incumbent John Williams, and Leola Chaney, who is running in District 3 against incumbent C.J. Small, as challengers for City Council seats in the August election. The last day to qualify is July 19. A p r i l 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 - M a y 3 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 9


BAYBRIEF | FAIRHOPE

Checking the scorecard

FAIRHOPE COUNCIL CALLS FOR UNITY, DOESN’T GET IT BY JANE NICHOLES

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fter many weeks of rhetoric and number crunching, here’s where things stand in Fairhope. The 2016-2017 budget is passed, about six months after it should have gone into effect. The hiring freeze put in place by the City Council is lifted. Mayor Karin Wilson says she’ll “likely” have to cut city services because the council’s hiring freeze left her short-staffed. Councilman Jay Anderson talked to the League of Municipalities and was told Wilson can’t do that without council approval. The new job created for Sherry-Lea Bloodworth Botop, Wilson’s most high-profile hire since taking office, has been eliminated. So has her department of community and economic development. Employees who have been with the city a year or more will receive 2 percent raises. That’s another defeat for Wilson, who wanted to give no raises this year while she implements a merit pay system. “I received a hard copy of council’s changes to my proposed budget on Thursday,” Wilson said. She provided copies at Monday’s council meeting and asked how council members could have done so much work in detail without consulting her. As for the elimination of Botop’s position, she said, “It’s not council’s role to determine the positions needed to run a city.” Botop herself was reported to be out of town at the time on city business. Council members said they all had experience in preparing budgets for their private businesses. Burrell said Wilson’s budget didn’t balance, so he and Councilman Robert Brown made changes in consultation with other city staffers and reviewed them among council members individually via email. As late as Monday morning they discovered there was a shortfall of more than $800,000 in the capital projects fund. They successfully rerouted money throughout the process by asking department heads what they could eliminate for another year. Cuts were made in heavy equipment and in personnel. Burrell noted Botop was welcome to apply for the community development director position, which has been vacant since Sherry Sullivan was abruptly fired by Wilson in late February. The firing without explanation of Sullivan and Jennifer Fidler, the longtime public works director, led the council to institute the hiring freeze that would have expired next week had it not been lifted Monday.

“The old paradigm is no longer sufficient,” Wilson said. “The new approach includes integrating Fairhope’s strategic growth and priorities with a regional comprehensive plan. “This must be done not to change the identity of Fairhope and its small-town charm, but to protect.” Wilson walked out of Monday’s meeting well before it ended. On the previous Thursday, April 20, Wilson posted on Facebook that the City Council’s hiring freeze will “likely” force cutbacks in services, while Council President Jack Burrell called Wilson “childish and unprofessional.” Despite public pleas from citizens in recent weeks to work together and be civil, the divide between mayor and council seemed to be widening. Wilson accused council members of dragging their feet on the hiring freeze and the

THE 2016-2017 BUDGET IS PASSED, ABOUT SIX MONTHS AFTER IT SHOULD HAVE GONE INTO EFFECT. THE HIRING FREEZE PUT IN PLACE BY THE CITY COUNCIL IS LIFTED.” then-unapproved budget. Burrell shot back, accusing Wilson of playing politics with city services. Some of the potential effects of reducing city services include closing the Recreation Center on Sundays, letting the city’s flowers die and halting wedding reservations at the Nix Center. “This is a ridiculous situation. But unfortunately it’s just come to the point now where even when the hiring freeze is lifted, we are so understaffed,” Wilson said. The process of advertising positions, reviewing applications, interviewing and hiring can’t all take place overnight, Wilson said. Overtime spending to maintain current service levels can’t continue. For example, the manager of the Nix Center left city government Friday, Wilson said. “If we weren’t under a hiring freeze, it would have been posted long before now.” Possible cutbacks were listed in a news release, including: • Decreased recycling to preserve regular garbage pickup.

• Flower services reductions to reassign landscaping workers. • Reduction in hours and tournaments at tennis courts. • Soccer field maintenance. • Closure of the Recreation Center on Sundays and two hours earlier (at 6 p.m.) on weekdays. • Closure of the water department for the lunch hour daily, and a shift to a four-day work week. • Ending multiple events at the Nix Center and taking no reservations for weddings. In addition, the moratorium on new single-family subdivision lots and multiple-occupancy plans may have to be extended because the Planning Department remains short-staffed, Wilson said. “Dragging their feet, which is what they’ve been doing — council — will have long-term effects on the city,” she said. “And this is what it looks like, when you try to, I guess, what I’d call a power grab. Unfortunately, this affects the citizens. It’s not about me. It’s about the citizens and the services they demand.” Wilson said the cuts she listed had been recommended by department heads and assistants. Burrell countered the council is not at fault, saying, “If [Wilson] chooses to cut off city services, it’s all on her. “I’m highly disappointed in the mayor doing this to use the city services for a political tool,” he said. “There are only five or six positions that are currently unfilled, none of which would affect the Nix Center, none of which would affect city services at all.” Those positions are a fire inspector, police dispatcher, two police officers, one parks maintenance worker and one person in the revenue department, though Burrell said some 30 other new positions were requested by Wilson in the new budget. Anderson said actions such as closing the Nix Center and reducing garbage service simply can’t happen without council approval. He said he didn’t know why Wilson acted as she did. “I do know one of the results was to divide the community,” he said. “We’ve got to stop the political posturing that has created division in this community. If there ever is a point where we are attempting to divide this community for political reasons, that is absolutely unacceptable and should not be tolerated by anybody.” According to Burrell, Wilson knew the freeze was near its end and the budget near passage before making her statements about cutbacks. “It’s unfortunate for the city of Fairhope that she tends to engage in such childish and unprofessional behavior,” he added. On Monday, Brown read a list of positions originally in the city budget. “I hardly believe the city of Fairhope is going to shut down if these positions weren’t budgeted,” he said. “They were all budgeted except for nine positions that were cut out of the budget.” Some positions were reduced from full-time to part-time, Brown said. Three positions had been in the budget for a couple of years but were never filled, so they were cut. Wilson, on the other hand, said she and her staff owed citizens an explanation for why cuts were necessary after receiving a growing number of complaints about city services. Yet Burrell claims the council wouldn’t have a way to get that information because Wilson has ordered city supervisors not to speak to council members without her permission. Wilson denied that, saying she only asked supervisors to inform her when contacted by a City Council member.

BAYBRIEF | FAIRHOPE

Overridden

WILSON VETOES FLY CREEK EXTENSION, COUNCIL OVERRIDES BY JANE NICHOLES

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espite a last-minute curveball thrown by Mayor Karin Wilson, the Fairhope City Council voted Monday to override her veto of an extension of time given to the property owner and developer of the Fly Creek apartment project. No one changed positions on the extension. Council members Jay Anderson, Jack Burrell, Robert Brown and Kevin Boone voted to override the mayor’s veto, while Jimmy Conyers voted against the override. Councilors did not seem affected by a presentation Wilson made before the vote in which she suggested something was amiss with the donation last fall of a piece of future apartment land to the city. The land was approximately four acres, of which about

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just over two were wetlands. The previous City Council accepted the land, but Wilson said the land was recorded as a gift to the city three days before the council’s vote. Meanwhile, she also said she could not find a copy of an attachment which may have been discussed that night. Wilson said the move would put the city at risk of liability for flooding in the area. But City Attorney Marion “Tut” Wynne said he didn’t think it affected the agreement between the city and developers to proceed with required items before construction could begin. Wilson said she would have the matter investigated and Burrell agreed it should be. On the Oct. 24, 2016, agenda there was an agreement to accept the lift station from Arthur Corte, routinely. Another

agenda was said to have been circulating that night, allegedly with an “Exhibit A” that didn’t exist. A deed of a gift of the land in question was recorded on Oct. 21 2016. Wilson said in part: “When this ordinance originally passed on April 11, 2016, the great majority of our citizens opposed the zoning change allowing the construction of this large apartment complex in an environmentally sensitive area. The developer of this project, to induce the prior council to approve the change, agreed to a more environmentally sensitive stormwater drainage plan as well as a one-year sunset provision.” Instead, she said, the developer used “a more conventional drainage system” that “already failed and damaged Fly Creek and is unacceptable.” In fact, the project has not begun. The Planning Commission denied site plan approval last fall. The extension gave property owner Corte and the Leaf River Group more time to submit a new site plan before the sunset provision expired last week. A majority of council members said the city needed to be fair to the developers because of a moratorium on new subdivision lots issued after Fly Creek was given a year to get its project underway. The moratorium reduced that time by four months. “The Planning Commission rightly denied approval of this plan and it is the developer who is at fault, not the city, if the sunset provision causes this apartment project to fail,” Wilson wrote.


A p r i l 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 - M a y 3 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 11


COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

Epilogue for ‘Scandal of the Century’ players ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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state. Luther Strange — Though he took a lot of heat for unethically meeting with Bentley to ask for an appointment to the U.S. Senate, Strange managed to squeak by Roy Moore and win a full six-year term as Alabama’s junior senator, a position he would hold for 24 years. He also immediately became the center for the Senate basketball team. Like any quality Alabama senator, he became known for graft and corruption and ended up with just one fewer building named after him than Richard Shelby. His legislative high point was passing “The Strange Act,” which offered federal protection from prosecution to elected officials when they do something grossly unethical and illegal in order to get a job they really, really, really want. Jon Mason — Rebekah’s husband went on to run the biggest call girl ring in the Southeast serving men over 70. Kay Ivey — Became Alabama’s second lady governor after Bentley’s resignation and was elected to two more terms because she reminded the entire state of their favorite grandma. The Love Bench — The Guv and Rebekah’s favorite spot to sit and fondle one another in public went on to a life of relative obscurity as a place where people would sit and eat lunch. The bench found itself briefly in the news again a few years later when State Sen. Chris Elliott had a couple of beers at a charity event and puked all over it.

THEGADFLY

Robert Bentley — The disgraced Luv Guv tried going back to his dermatology practice after leaving office but found very few women were willing to take off any article of clothing around him, so he tried his hand at melon farming and made a small fortune selling “Paw Paw’s Pre-Squeezed Melons.” Eventually he met a former Hooters girl on Bumble and they lived happily ever after. Rebekah Caldwell Mason — The femme fatale of our story saw her fortunes as a political consultant wane post-scandal. It took her a couple of years to burn through the fortune she made during her time with the Luv Guv, but once it was gone things got tough. The folks at ACEGOV wouldn’t return her calls. Rebekah moved to D.C. and stalked the halls of Congress trying to find one more aging politician she could befuddle with her fading beauty queen looks and faux political smarts. But there were no takers and she finally ended up working the lunch shift at a Tuscaloosa strip club. Dianne Bentley — The governor’s crafty ex-wife took her deductive skills to heart and became a private detective specializing in catching older men cheating on their wives. She also made a handsome pile of money later in life by endorsing a recording device shaped like a knitting needle called “Granny’s Hearing Aid” that helped thousands of older women nab their Viagra-charged husbands. Wanda’s Desk — The most famous piece of furniture in Alabama suffered miserably in the wake of the scandal. Future gubernatorial secretaries wanted nothing to do with the desk the Luv Guv had ordered moved out of moaning range of his office. Eventually the desk landed in the state’s surplus warehouse where it sat for several years until it was sold for $10 at auction. Its final day was spent as kindling for a pit fire at an Iron Bowl party in Bug Tussle. Spencer Collier — The former head of the Alabama

Law Enforcement Agency spent a good bit of his time following Bentley’s resignation basking in a media glow painting him as some kind of hero for publicly ratting out on his affair once Bentley canned him. When asked why he had followed Bentley’s order to go harass a government employee at home and interrogate her about possibly having a copy of the infamous tape, Collier would say it had something to do with Homeland Security and potential blackmail. That confusing excuse turned out to be good enough for Alabama and nobody ever investigated ALEA’s involvement in the scandal. Collier got to spend his golden years sitting at a bar in Bayou La Batre talking about how he brought down a governor. Robert Bentley’s Wallet — Ended up with the record for the most solo helicopter flights by a wallet in U.S. history and was retired to the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. Celine Dion — Spent years obsessed with the elderly Southern governor she’d met backstage in Las Vegas in 2015. The diva’s obsession grew to the point where she finally went to find him on his melon farm. Bentley’s girlfriend pointed a shotgun at her and said, “This is my meal ticket, Frenchy! Now git!” A dejected Celine would record “My Pacemaker Will Go On” in Bentley’s honor. It was not a hit. Bentley’s Burner Phone — Was shunned in the burner phone community and spent its final days in a Montgomery pawn shop periodically texting “I love you Rebekah” to random phones across the

Cartoon/Laura Rasmussen

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he kids are getting a little older now and have started to show interest in college and where they’ll go and study, etc. As we were talking about that the other night I figured it might be a good time to show them a classic college movie that best represents my memories of getting an education. By the end of “Animal House,” my son was extremely excited about college. My daughter, however, said she might change plans and become a long-haul trucker. I support her decision. Anyway, I’d forgotten about the neat part at the end of this particular movie where we find out what happens to each character later in life — known as the epilogue. I’ve always loved movie epilogues. It’s kind of comforting to know your favorite characters turned out OK, or that the bad guys eventually fell into a meat grinder. The problem with real-life dramas, of course, is we have to wait years and years to know exactly how things turned out for our favorite cast of characters and, frankly, by then we seldom care. The Luv Guv debacle is a great example of this. The scandal is still hot, and I know a lot of people have questions about what’s going to happen to the central characters in America’s most nauseating political scandal. So I’ve taken the liberty of writing epilogues for the players who have captivated us over the past year. If they ever do make “Luv Guv: The Movie,” it’ll most definitely have characters’ epilogues, so let’s consider this my first crack at screenwriting.

THE LEADERSHIP OF FAIRHOPE SEEMS SPLIT DOWN THE MIDDLE WHEN IT COMES TO RUNNING THE CITY.


COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

Suffering from empty nest syndrome ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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arlier this spring, a beautiful redbird husband and his slightly less red, less beautiful redbird wife showed up in our backyard. As other birds have in the past, the couple seemed to take a liking to a tall shrub right outside of our den window. It is the same shrub we hang our hummingbird feeder in, which has welcomed many tiny, fluttering visitors each fall. Though my husband, Frank, and I have not started wearing black knee-high socks with white tennis shoes or carrying around binoculars and bird books (yet), we do enjoy having an up-close-and-personal view of these various winged creatures from the comfort of our sofa and recliner. After a couple of weeks we noticed the ladybird began carrying twigs and pieces of grass up to one of the branches in the shrub. It soon became obvious she was beginning to build a nest. She would even get help from her husband from time to time, much to our surprise. At first, Frank and I started mom-shaming the mama bird. It seemed to be taking her an eternity to build the nest and it didn’t look to be a very good one. Plus, the branch she and her boo had chosen seemed a bit exposed. And they seemed to not even notice there were two fairly quiet adult humans and two really loud child humans watching their every move from behind a piece of glass only three feet away. Had we gotten a couple of crackhead bird parents? Should we report them to Bird Services? Or were they just really dumb? As the days wore on and the nest took more form, we determined we had judged our little birds too harshly. Mama was indeed building a fine nest. And it wasn’t as exposed as we initially thought it would be. It actually made me think back to my own “nesting” when I was pregnant with both of my children. How each of their rooms started out totally empty, but how I slowly filled them over the course of nine months with one piece at a time — crib, glider, rug, bedding — until they were complete. And I even had a little help from my non-feathered husband each time, too. I hope no birds were judging us from the outside. Shortly after they put the finishing touches on their nest, we were able to take a quick peek while they were away to discover there were three little eggs in it. Don’t worry, we didn’t touch or disturb it in any way. We certainly didn’t want to do anything to prevent us from seeing one of Mother Nature’s most spectacular shows. While waiting for the big day, Frank pulled up the foremost authority on birds — ahem, Wikipedia — and read out some Northern Cardinal (the kind of redbirds we guessed our pair to be) factoids. During courtship they sing together and the male will often feed the female beak to beak with grains or insects. Awwww! How romantic! They mate for life and stay together year round, having three to four “broods” of babies each year. So this wasn’t just some bootie bird call (the ol’ fertilize and fly) for our male bird hottie, the kind of playa I had originally pegged him to be. He really loves his girl, no matter how many times she complains he just isn’t bringing her the right materials for the nest. They are in it together for the long haul. A couple of weeks later, right around Easter, we noticed both of the birds bringing food back to the nest. Sure enough, three baby birds had

been born! We watched out our window as Mama and Daddy tended to their young’uns. We knew we wouldn’t have much time with our little birdies, as our crack research indicated they would leave the nest 9-11 days after hatching. But we could enjoy our limited time together. About four or five days after their birth, we were getting ready to leave on a Spring Break trip to the beach. I checked on them when I first woke up and they were up bright and early chirping away, waiting for breakfast. I got busy packing and didn’t pay much attention to them the rest of the morning. I got the kids and the bags loaded into the car. Frank was working and was going to join us later. As I walked back through the house to make sure I hadn’t forgotten anything, I stopped in the den because Mama Bird was sitting on the windowsill, a first for her. The bird who had never paid us any attention at all seemed to be looking in the window and staring at me straight in the eye. Were we having some sort of special mother-to-mother moment? Or was she trying to thank us for our hospitality? Whatever it was, I thought we had a connection for a brief moment — well, as much as a wild bird and a human can have. Or maybe I was the one smoking some sort of crack, metaphorically speaking, of course. Probably the latter, I determined. So I headed to the beach with the kiddos without giving it much more thought. Frank arrived a few hours after us. After he got settled in, he said, “I think something got the baby birds. When I went by the house to get my stuff, they weren’t in the nest anymore and the Mama and Daddy were flying around it like crazy.” Noooooooooooooo! All kinds of thoughts started flying through my head. What sort of wretched creature could have done this to those precious babies? Maybe our birds were just overachievers and left the nest early. Or maybe that was a really bad place for a nest after all. Or they were kind of dumb and this was a display of natural selection. Whatever the case, why does nature have to be so cruel? We traded our bird watching hats for our detective ones and pieced together the timeline, determining the multiple bird-icide must have occurred before I left. Though I had that moment with Mama, the last time I saw the baby birds alive and well was early that morning. I now think when she was staring at me, she wasn’t trying to have some sort of interspecies maternal moment. Nope. She was looking at me as a suspect! Which was also heartbreaking. I was genuinely saddened by this turn of events, as was Frank. We had grown quite attached to our little bird family. When we returned from our trip, the Mom and Dad were nowhere to be found. All that was left was the nest. I examined it CSI style for any clues. There was no murder weapon. No blood. No bodies. The crime scene looked mostly undisturbed. All that remained were a few leftover pieces of shell from the eggs. We learned, from further reading, the predators most likely responsible are snakes, cats, blue jays or squirrels. We’ve identified a few suspects in the backyard, but none of them are talking. Though I do have my eye on a particularly obese squirrel. The case remains unsolved. And the nest remains outside our window as empty as our hearts.

A p r i l 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 - M a y 3 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 13


COMMENTARY | THE MONTGOMERY MINUTE

Tinker Taylor soldier spectacle BY LEE HEDGEPETH/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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hen Gov. Kay Ivey ascended to the highest political office in Alabama, taking over the governor’s chair from the disgraced Robert Bentley, she promised she’d do her best to “steady the ship of state,” and so far she’s been true to her word. Ivey, in her first few days of office, made huge political and personnel strides to do just that. One recent action by Ivey, though, is putting that thus-far promising tenure in danger. Instead of “steadying the ship of state,” Gov. Ivey’s hiring of former state Sen. Bryan Taylor as her general counsel and legal adviser has the potential to rock the Capitol boat. Taylor isn’t new to Alabama politics. In fact, he’s old, bad news. Taylor, a Prattville Republican who serves in the Alabama National Guard, is a political relic of former Gov. Bob Riley’s administration, for which he unsuccessfully attempted to rout all gambling from the state, particularly by the Poarch Creek Indians. That legal failure, in and of itself, plus Taylor’s desire to be known as an “Indian fighter,” as Millbrook Mayor Al Kelley has pointed out, are enough to disqualify Taylor from a top position in the Ivey administration. A spokesperson for Ivey has said “[The governor] appointed Bryan because she feels he is an excellent lawyer, excellent.” It certainly doesn’t look that way to me. After his time as a Riley-appointed “Indian fighter,” Taylor was elected to the state Senate in 2010 in the “Storming of the State House,” which saw the GOP take control of state government for the first time in over a century. In his Senate tenure, Taylor had a decidedly mixed record. He was a major author of the ethics law that eventually led to the conviction of a few of his Republican colleagues, but the law had technical flaws that are still

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being worked out by state policymakers. And then there’s Taylor’s campaign finance fiasco, which is still hurting Alabama’s bottom line. Since Alabama first passed a campaign finance law in 1988, and particularly since the GOP took control of state politics in 2010, the Legislature has attempted to “solve” issues of enforcing the regulations on election fundraising and spending. In 2013, for example, Bryan Taylor and the Republican majority in Montgomery “fixed” the Fair Campaign Practices Act (FCPA) by amending it to remove the $500 cap on political donations from corporations. That 2013 update to the law — sponsored and spearheaded by then-Sen. Taylor — was also supposed to add stiff penalties for candidates for office who filed late or inaccurate reports of their campaign donations or expenditures. Emphasis on “supposed to.” Spoiler alert: As I outlined in a previous column, it didn’t work. Instead of clarifying and closing the details and loopholes of the original FCPA, the 2013 update muddied the waters even further. The December following the 2013 language’s passage, Attorney General Luther Strange issued an opinion advising then-Secretary of State Jim Bennett he (Bennett), despite serving as Alabama’s top election official, didn’t have legal standing to assess fees to candidates when they violated the campaign finance law. Essentially, the law as written by Taylor and his colleagues didn’t authorize anyone to collect these fees — a perfect storm for candidates across the state to bend and break the law at their own whim. Because of that inability to collect fees when politicians violate the law, Taylor’s statutory shortcomings have cost the state tens — if not hundreds — of thousands. Sadly, though, when it comes to

Taylor, not even his legislative blunders are his biggest problem. The real issue with Taylor and his new job as Gov. Ivey’s top lawyer is his disdain, dislike and outright legal opposition to the free press. Over time, Taylor has shown a penchant for stifling the press — even filing a defamation suit against one media outlet and sending a cease and desist letter to another. Following his Senate term, Taylor chose not to run for re-election, saying he would focus on his family and his private-sector career. Instead, Taylor would seek a job as the head of the state’s ethics commission and sue a media outlet when it stood in his way. After online news outlet Alabama Political Reporter, my former employer, wrote an article in 2014 headlined “Shadowy conduct of the man who would be ethics chief,” Taylor asked for a complete retraction of many of the story’s claims. When APR’s owners, Bill and Susan Britt, refused (the article is still up), Taylor eventually filed suit, beginning a legal battle that has cost the Britts tens of thousands in lawyer’s fees. Taylor’s suit claimed Alabama Political Reporter aimed to “[D]o substantial harm to Taylor’s personal, business, professional and political reputation in order to interfere with or undermine Taylor’s potential candidacy for the position of State Ethics Director and/or maliciously to impair his livelihood as an attorney or otherwise cause harm to his business or profession; and/or to inflict embarrassment, humiliation, and emotional distress on Taylor.” That wasn’t the first or last of Taylor’s clashes with the media, either. On another occasion, he sent a cease and desist letter to Rickey Stokes News, threatening legal action unless a full retraction was issued. “Please consider this email a demand that you pull down or correct your story,” Taylor wrote. “If you do not, I may consider exercising whatever legal rights I have to correct the record for your readers. I will give you until 3 p.m. today to send me your response.” Stokes, like APR, did not yield to Taylor’s unreasonable demands. As for Ivey’s hiring of Taylor — an ineffective lawyer and legislator, and an overeager litigant — according to Alabama Political Reporter a spokesperson for the governor has said she was not aware of the suit and plans to speak with the former senator about it. “Governor Ivey was not aware of the situation. However, she is now after making a commitment to him. She plans to have a conversation with him soon,” the spokesperson said. For Taylor’s part, he’s asked that the suit be sealed by a judge, and a gag order be issued so APR can no longer publicly comment on the topic. I hope the judge considering that request and Gov. Ivey both see through Taylor’s tempertantrum tactics and recognize him for what he is: a distraction from steadying the ship of state, a tinker Taylor soldier spectacle.


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COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

The cable news era of politics BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM

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ne of the peculiarities of the Donald Trump presidency is the amount of personal time Trump invests in watching cable news channels. Unlike his predecessors who scoffed at the idea of getting caught up in the play-by-play, blow-by-blow that fills cable news channels, Trump personally watches, and for better or for worse, he sometimes reacts on Twitter to what he sees on Fox News, CNN and MSNBC. What else would you expect from a reality television star who transitioned to politics? This is not a habit he picked up after inauguration, but one that goes back long before his presidential campaign, according to multiple press accounts. And as the most powerful man in the free world, it’s unlikely he will give up that habit. With the president as a major cable news consumer, those channels’ programming impacts the political climate more than ever. Cable news hasn’t always been influential. When CNN first came on the air in 1980, it was regarded as a novelty. Back then, only 22 percent of American households that owned a television had basic cable. The three broadcast evening news programs on ABC, CBS and NBC still dominated the TV news landscape. Not until 1991,11 years later, was CNN able to surpass the networks. At the launch of the first Gulf war, CNN was able to broadcast from inside Iraq during the initial bombing campaign, giving it a competitive advantage over the big three. Even with CNN nipping at the networks’ heels for influence, the early ‘90s largely saw consumers serious about current events continue to go to the networks and the major newspapers — such as The Washington Post and The New York Times — for political news. If you were really a news junkie, you might also watch CNN and CNBC, listen to NPR and read The Wall Street Journal. But that changed midway through the decade. In 1996, MSNBC and Fox News came along. It took both of those channels a few years to settle into the identities we know them as today — that is, MSNBC being a left-leaning outlet and Fox News being a right-leaning outlet. Although a viewer may perceive a liberal bias in CNN, it never overtly took on an ideological brand like its two competitors, but that seems to be changing in the Trump era. Twenty years later, cable news is bigger than ever in viewership. Even now, many still scoffed at cable news. Some — who are fooling themselves — believe outlets such as NPR’s “All Things Considered,” The New York Times editorial pages or CSPAN provide more erudite coverage of news. By extension, they believe listening to and reading those sources make them smarter and better informed than the general public. They don’t need pundits on Fox News, CNN or MSNBC telling them how or what to think, darn it! If you insist on taking that approach to news, however, you will be under-informed. Neglecting those news outlets, even though they approach silliness at times, will leave you without a barometer of where the mass news-consuming, hyper-partisan segment of the public is. The evening broadcast network news shows — CBS’s “Evening News,” NBC’s “Nightly News” and ABC’s “World News Tonight” — still have much larger viewerships than any

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cable news show. Fox News Channel’s highestrated program in 2016, the now-defunct “The O’Reilly Factor,” averaged 3.29 million that year. That’s about half what an ABC, NBC or CBS weeknight evening news broadcast draws. The difference is the cable news viewer is likely to be more active in the political process. These viewers are the ones who participate in primary elections. They are the ones who made Donald Trump the GOP’s nominee. They are the ones who even made something like Sen. Bernie Sanders’ (I-Vermont) presidential bid a possibility. To them, the national political news isn’t something to catch up on after the local news reports or something to watch while waiting for “Wheel of Fortune” and “Jeopardy” to come on. It’s a lifestyle. Yes, they may not have heard the clever analysis from the Harvard political science professor about Trump’s first 100 days on NPR or the speech the backbencher from Tennessee delivered on the floor of the House of Representatives about the turmoil in the Middle East. They did, however, see MSNBC make the repeated case Russia hacked the election or Fox News report the Obama administration may have spied on Trump during the campaign. Those are the people who tend to make their voices heard. It’s not the casual news consumer. It’s not the millennial who went to vote because Ludacris said to on MTV’s “Rock the Vote.” Yes, those people matter on Election Day. But there’s a lot that goes on the other 364 days a year. While (ironically) the media and Trump’s opponents mock the president for his hyper-focus on cable news given his access to information through intelligence reports, it is an advantage for him politically. There is a market system that guides the cable news channels. Each has their ideologically dedicated audience, and the executives at those networks tend to deliver what they think those audiences want. It’s beyond where Americans get their news. Once prime time rolls around, most people who watch those channels already know the basics. It is the point of view, through the eyes of a Sean Hannity or Rachel Maddow, which steers the takeaway from the basic facts. Where a lot of Republican presidential hopefuls went wrong is in trying to develop a campaign platform catering to the average likely GOP voter who maybe reads the local paper and is up on how the Associated Press covered an issue, but not the steaming hot takes on cable news. Look at the culmination of the GOP contest — in the end, it was a reportedly cable news-obsessed Trump versus Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas), who also is known to have shaped his image around being the Tea Partier’s Tea Partier. On the Democratic side, it was a little different. But if you had been a viewer of any of MSNBC’s prime-time lineup, you probably would have heard the channel echo a lot of Sanders’ policy positions ... the rich are getting richer while the poor are getting poorer, support socialized medicine, increase the minimum wage, etc. In the end, Sanders was not able to defeat the Clinton machine, but a self-proclaimed socialist went much farther than people expected him to. Dismiss cable news as hot air if you want. It can be difficult to watch. But a lot of what you see on those channels will be what politicians will use as guidance in their election campaigns and for the policies they support if elected.


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BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

Telemarketing center set to open BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

F

ort Lauderdale, Florida-based Results Co. is opening a 10,000-square-foot telemarketing center in Mobile at 3262 Dauphin St., directly behind the Waffle House and Wendy’s eateries. Plans are in place to hire upward of 500 local employees, with a job fair anticipated to be held sometime in June followed by with an expected opening date of early July, according to Matt Cummings with Cummings & Associates, who handled the transaction. For more information on positions to be filled and requirements, visit the Results Co. website. Two commercial buildings encompassing 9,000 square feet and located at 124 Industrial Parkway in Saraland were sold for $460,000. Mobile-based Nordan Contracting Co. Inc. will soon occupy both buildings. Paul Carter of the Paul Carter Agency represented both buyer and seller in the transaction. ACCEL recently leased an 18,777-square-foot section of the office park at 3100 Cottage Hill Road and inhabiting the entirety of Building Three in the office park complex. ITT Educational Services previously occupied the site. Marietta Urquhart of White-Spunner Realty represented ACCEL in the lease transaction. David Dexter with NAI-Mobile worked for the owner of the Bel Air office complex. ACCEL Day and Evening Academy — Alabama’s first public charter school — will serve high school students in grades 9-12 from Mobile, Baldwin and Washington counties. The school’s focus will be on providing nontraditional students with a college preparatory curriculum, individualized construction, small class sizes and access to up-todate educational technology. Dallas-based Wingstop recently leased a 1,360-squarefoot restaurant space in the Westgate Pavilion Shopping

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Center at 7450 Airport Blvd. in Mobile. The eatery was originally scheduled to open last fall, per Andrew Dickman with Stirling Properties, who managed the transaction. This marks the first Mobile location for the chicken wings chain. Bone-in, boneless and chicken tenders will be the primary fare served at the location, according to general manager Kevin Patel. Beer and wine will also be sold, pending approval from the city. According to Adam Metcalfe of Metcalfe & Co., some 10,000 square feet of office space located at 3490 Hurricane Drive in Mobile was recently leased by Hepaco, a full-service environmental contracting firm. 4 Hearts Flowers, a florist, has leased 1,400 square feet of retail space at 5546 Old Shell Road across from the post office, relocating from 5466 Old Shell Road. Olde Shell Square shopping center co-tenants include Papa John’s, Dog Days Barkery, Vanity Hair Salon, Boudreau Veterinary Clinic and Bubble Lounge.  According to general manager Jason Barje, new restaurant Big Wave Dave’s Beach Bar and Grill will be opening this summer. Located at 22073 Perdido Beach Blvd. in Orange Beach, directly next door to Ron Jon Surf Shop, the property will cover some 8,000 square feet of space with a seating capacity exceeding 300 and including two bars.  Front of the house positions including servers, bartenders, hosts, bussers and runners, as well as back of the house jobs such as line cooks and dishwashers are currently available. For more information on job requirements call 251-981-2340 or visit the restaurant’s Facebook page. The former 2,356-square-foot BB&T Bank property at 34023 U.S. 98 in Lillian was recently acquired for $320,000 by a local investor, according to Adam Metcalf with Metcalf & Co., who worked for the seller. Joe Steen

Real Estate and Development represented the buyer. Lillian Pharmacy presently occupies the building. Nikki Coker with NAI-Mobile represented an out-of-state buyer of the former Maestro’s restaurant, acquired for $880,000. The purchase included all furniture, fixtures and equipment within the property. The restaurant is 4,840 square feet and located in the Ogletree Village Shopping Center in Auburn. The vacant restaurant is considered a turnkey opportunity for investors, according to Coker. Philip Minor of Weichert Realtors — Porter Properties worked for the seller.

AIM Group invests $6.4 million in new venture

Mobile-based Angel Investor Management Group (AIM) joined with Fidelis Capital and Bonaventure Capital to complete an $8.9 million equity purchase in Deep Fiber Solutions of Atlanta, according to a news release. Leading the round with $6.4 million, this represents AIM Group’s largest investment to date. Deep Fiber Solutions is a cable engineering and construction company with patented technology to eject the core of a coaxial cable and install a fiber optic cable replacement into the conduit created by the coaxial removal. This solution comes at a substantially lower cost than traditional boring and trenching, and is completed quickly by industry standards. “This transaction will provide Deep Fiber Solutions with the expansion capital necessary to address the market demand for our unique core ejection/fiber optic installation service. Additionally, we are excited to have AIM Group, Fidelis and Bonaventure Fund as partners moving forward,” Mark Davis, CEO of Deep Fiber Solutions, said. “We were immediately blown away by the technology. Having been involved in constructing some of the early fiber optic networks in the 1980s, I fully appreciated the elegant solution that the Deep Fiber team created to enable old coaxial networks to be upgraded to fiber optic networks without all of the hassles of trenching and boring,” Jim Corman, managing partner of AIM Group, said. The funding will allow Deep Fiber Solutions to continue its work delivering solutions to the cable industry. AIM Group’s focus is on providing capital to early-stage and expansion-stage technology companies. It has completed almost 50 funding transactions since 2011, investing in 28 companies. Capital amounts have ranged from $500,000 to $6.4 million per round. The investment in Deep Fiber Solutions reflects a maturation of the investment strategy implemented by AIM Group managing partners Clay and Jim Corman. AIM Group has 265 active investing members with locations in Birmingham, Nashville, Huntsville, Pensacola, Mobile, Montgomery, Auburn and Dothan. For additional information, call 334-321-2872 or visit their website, www.aimgr.com.


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CUISINE | THE DISH

Get your butt over here! BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

I

’m a butt man. That’s right, I said it loud and proud. I am very fond of legs and find the perfectly sized breast a temptation from which I have a hard time turning, but I cannot resist the butt. Of course I am speaking of the Boston butt. The porkpuller. The part of the pig that fills my tamales, stuffs my barbecue sandwiches and occasionally gets sliced with carrots, potatoes and celery. The Boston butt was long dismissed as a less-desirable piece of meat that, in preRevolutionary War New England, was often packed for shipping into barrels called butts, hence the name. The name Boston butt, therefore, has nothing to do with the anatomy of the pig. It has in turn renamed another part of Porky’s body, steering clear of his hind end and finding its home as the moniker for the upper shoulder nearest his spine. This is called the shoulder butt or blade shoulder, which preferably contains the bone of the region. The lower part of the shoulder is called the arm shoulder or picnic cut. This piece should always feature the bone, as it is the front leg of the pig. For me the butt is the way to go. I think I have cooked it using just about every method. The smoker is a great way, low and slow for that rich flavor. I have an old Brinkman that gets fired up from time to time, but recently acquired an electric smoker that should get some action soon. This is the route if you have all day. A 4-pound butt will easily take 7-8 hours holding that 200 F temperature steady. Is it worth it? Yeah, I’d say so, but you will be close to home for a long time should the fire need stoking and so forth.

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Grilling is another great smoky option. You could even break that down into subcategories of gas, regular charcoal and lump charcoal like you would use in a Kamado Joe or Big Green Egg. If you are using gas it is best to cook over indirect heat, implementing a smoker box. These beautiful devices impart the smoke flavor from your wood chips of choice in the reusable $12 to $30 range. I’ve never spent more than $15 on one. Take care of it and it’ll last you a good while. Of course, with charcoal there are hickory- and mesquite-flavored coals. I’m not against it. There are also the pellets that must be wrapped in aluminum foil, the cheaper version of the smoker box. The problem with the grill is the work it takes to keep that low and slow temp regulated. For best results the ceramic grills with lump charcoal work the best. The Big Green Egg (I don’t have one but have used a friend’s) is the overachiever of grills. For Boston butts that statement still holds true. It’s so easy to keep it at your desired temperature for hours. I have cooked a 4-pounder at 300 F for a few hours and cranked it up at the end. I like the burnt ends and the crispy parts around the exterior of the bone. The slow cooker is an easy way to reach pulled pork tenderness. Basically you season the butt and toss it in there. For best results you should find a way to lift the butt so it doesn’t cook in the fat drippings. A butt-lift could be a modified cooling rack, a punctured pie tin or wadded up balls of aluminum foil. Any non-melting, nonpoisonous kitchen item could keep the fat rendering off

of the meat. It’s another low and slow process. So, I was in the mood for a nice butt. I picked a smallish one, about 3.6 pounds. But when I got home the rain set in. Hadn’t rained in weeks. Today there was a pretty good shower. Knowing the dodgy weather could delay my start time I canned the idea of the smokers. The boys and I simply fired up the oven. At 300 F I started my butt burning around 1:15 p.m. This was after a good dry rub at room temperature. Coating every side and edge is key. I set it on a rack in a roasting pan with about an inch of water in the bottom. You can read up, calculate, regulate and pontificate the best length of time it should cook. Some say 40 minutes per pound, and they are wrong. There is only one way to get it right and that’s with a meat thermometer. If you want a pork butt that is easy to pull then you must reach the magic internal temperature of 190 F You’ll see it get to 180 F and hold for a while. Once it climbs again, get ready to take it off the heat. At the 180 F point (which is what I was looking for this evening) you’ll have a tender cut of meat that is very sliceable. The fat on the outside will be nice and crispy while the fat on the inside will be succulent. In my oven this took me roughly 4 hours. I needed another 45 minutes or more for pulled pork. I don’t mean to brag but it was delicious. My almost vegan son tore into it. There was very little left at the end of the evening, and what was left will be gone by the end of breakfast. This was along with mashed potatoes, braised cabbage with green onion sausage, broccoli slaw with homemade dressing, deviled eggs and macadamia nut cookies for dessert. It wasn’t like we were just gorging ourselves on meat. But we couldn’t keep our hands out of it. The Boston butt is surely one of the most foolproof dinners anyone can make. Just start the oven and cook until the desired temp is reached. The only variable from one to the next is the dry rub. I’ll lend you my tested version below. Simply take it in your hands and rub it all over your butt.

DRY RUB INGREDIENTS:

½ cup brown sugar ¼ cup salt 1 tsp garlic powder 1 tsp paprika


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FIREHOUSE SUBS ($)

HOT SUBS, COLD SALADS & CATERING 6300 Grelot Rd. • 631-3730

FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES ($) $10/PERSON • $$ 10-25/PERSON • $$$ OVER 25/PERSON

COMPLETELY COMFORTABLE ALL SPORTS BAR & GRILL ($) 3408 Pleasant Valley Rd. • 345-9338

AL’S HOTDOGS ($)

CLASSIC HOTDOGS, GYROS & MILKSHAKES 4701 Airport Blvd. • 342-3243

ATLANTA BREAD COMPANY ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SALADS & MORE. 3680 Dauphin St. • 380-0444

BAKE MY DAY ($)

OLD-FASHIONED SOUTHERN BAKE SHOP 156 N. McGregor Ave. • 219-7261

BOB’S DINER ($)

GOOD OLD AMERICAN COOKING 263 St. Francis St. • 405-1497

BUCK’S DINER ($)

CLASSIC AMERICAN DINER 58 N. Secion St. Fairhope • 928-8521

CAFE 219 ($)

SALADS, SANDWICHES & POTATO SALAD 219 Conti St. • 438-5234

CAMELLIA CAFÉ ($-$$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FARE 61 Section St. • Fairhope • 928-4321

CAMMIE’S OLD DUTCH ($) MOBILE’S CLASSIC ICE CREAM SPOT 2511 Old Shell Rd. • 471-1710

CARPE DIEM ($)

DELI FOODS, PASTRIES & SPECIALTY DRINKS 4072 Old Shell Rd. • 304-0448

CLARK’S KITCHEN ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHERN CUISINE & CATERING 5817 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0200

CHAT-A-WAY CAFE ($)

QUICHES & SANDWICHES 4366 Old Shell Rd. • 343-9889

CHICK-FIL-A ($)

BURGERS, MILKSHAKES & FRIES 4401 Old Shell Rd. • 447-2394 4663 Airport Blvd. • 300-8425 5319 Hwy 90 • 661-0071 1225 Satchel Page Dr.• 378-8768

FOOSACKLY’S ($)

FAMOUS CHICKEN FINGERS 29181 US Hwy 98 • Daphne • 375-1104 7843 Moffett Rd. • 607-6196 1109 Shelton Beach Rd. • 287-1423 310 S. University Blvd. • 343-0047 2250 Airport Blvd. • 479-2922 7641 Airport Blvd. • 607-7667 2558 Schillinger Rd. • 219-7761 3249 Dauphin St. • 479-2000

1880 Industrial Pkwy. • 675-2999

CREAM AND SUGAR ($)

HOMEMADE SOUPS & SANDWICHES 65 Government St. • 208-6815

JIMMY JOHN’S ($)

SANDWICHES, CATERING & DELIVERY TOO 6920 Airport Blvd. • 414-5444 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-8694 62 B Royal St. • 432-0360

JOE CAIN CAFÉ ($)

PIZZAS, SANDWICHES, COCKTAILS 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

JONELLI’S ($)

1252 Govenment St.• 301-7556 HOME COOKING 4054 Government St. • 665-4557

LICKIN’ GOOD DONUTS ($) 3242 Dauphin St. • 471-2590

LODA BIER GARTEN ($) MAMA’S ($)

SLAP YOUR MAMA GOOD HOME COOKING 220 Dauphin St. • 432-6262

MARS HILL CAFE ($)

GREAT SANDWICHES, COFFEE & MORE 1087 Downtowner Blvd. • 643-1611

MARY’S SOUTHERN COOKING ($) 3011 Springhill Ave. • 476-2232

6358 Cottage Hill Rd. • 725-6917 AUTHENTIC IRISH PUB 101 N. Bancroft St.• 990-5100

D’ MICHAEL’S ($)

MIKO’S ITALIAN ICE ($)

D NU SPOT ($)

MOMMA GOLDBERG’S DELI ($)

GREAT DESSERTS & HOT LUNCH 23 Upham St. • 473-6115

DEW DROP INN ($)

CLASSIC BURGERS, HOTDOGS & SETTING 1808 Old Shell Rd. • 473-7872

DUNKIN DONUTS ($)

DONUTS, COFFEE & SANDWICHES 1976 Michigan Ave. • 442-4846 3876 Airport Blvd. • 219-7369 505 Schillinger Rd. S. • 442-4845 29160 US Hwy 98 • 621-2228

E WING HOUSE ($)

HOTDOGS SANDWICHES & COOL TREATS 3371 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 300–4015 SANDWICHES & MOMMA’S LOVE 3696 Airport Blvd. • 344-9500 5602 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6556

MONTEGO’S ($-$$)

FRESH CARIBBEAN-STYLE FOOD & CRAFT BEER 6601 Airport Blvd. • 634-3445 225 Dauphin St. • 375-1576

MOON PIE GENERAL STORE ($)

107 St Francis St #115 • RSA Bank Trust Building

MOSTLY MUFFINS ($) MUFFINS, COFFEE & WRAPS 105 Dauphin St. • 433-9855

NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE ($)

15 N Conception St. • 433-2299

OVEN-BAKED SANDWICHES & MORE 1335 Satchel Page Dr. Suite C. • 287-7356 7440 Airport Blvd. • 633-0096 30500 State Hwy 181 #132 • 625-6544

FATHOMS LOUNGE

O’DALYS HOLE IN THE WALL ($)

195 S University Blvd. Suite H • 662-1829

EUGENE’S MONKEY BAR ($) SMALL PLATES AND CREATIVE COCKTAILS 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

FLOUR GIRLS BAKERY ($) 809 Hillcrest Rd. • 634-2285

REGINA’S KITCHEN ($-$$) ROLY POLY ($)

ROSHELL’S CAFE ($)

2906 Springhill Ave. • 479-4614

ROYAL KNIGHT ($)

MCSHARRY’S ($-$$)

DELISH BAKERY AND EATERY ($)

R BISTRO ($-$$)

JERSEY MIKE’S ($)

DAUPHIN ST. CAFE ($)

22159 Halls Mill Rd. . • 648-6522

PUNTA CLARA KITCHEN ($)

ROSIE’S GRILL ($-$$)

COFFEE, BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DESSERT 351 George St #B • 405-0003

PHILLY CHEESE STEAKS, GYROS & MORE 7101-A Theodore Dawes Rd. • 653-2979

BAKERY, SANDWICHES & MORE 750 S. Broad St. • 438-1511 4464 Old Shell Rd. • 342-8546 107 St. Francis St. Suite 102 • 438-2261

JAMAICAN VIBE ($)

AUTHENTIC SUB SANDWICHES 7449 Airport Blvd. • 375-1820

562 Dauphin St.• 725-6429

OLD SHELL GROWLERS ($) GROWLER STATION AND BITES 1801 Old Shell Rd. • 345-4767

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WEDGIE’S ($)

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

THAI & SUSHI 5369 D Hwy 90 W • 661-5100

WILD WING STATION ($)

SAGE RESTAURANT ($$)

THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR 960 Schillinger Rd. S • 660-4470

GOURMET GRILLED CHEESE 5955 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6134 1500 Gov’t St. • 287-1526

YAK THE KATHMANDU KITCHEN ($-$$)

WRAPS & SALADS 3220 Dauphin St. • 479-2480

MIND-BLOWING ISLAND FOOD 3700 Gov’t Blvd. Ste A • 602-1973

312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-9077

POLLMAN’S BAKERY ($)

HOOTERS ($)

3869 Airport Blvd. • 345-9544 5470 Inn Rd. • 661-9117 28975 US 98 • Daphne • 625-3910

ROYAL SCAM ($$)

COFFEE AND DONUTS 759 Nichols Avenue, Fairhope • 928-7223

THE WINDMILL MARKET ($)

SANDWICHES, SUBS & SOUPS 2056 Gov’t St. • 476-2777

SEAFOOD & SANDWICHES 212 ½ Fairhope Ave •Fairhope • 928-4100

WAREHOUSE BAKERY & DONUTS ($)

CHICKEN FINGERS, SALAD & SANDWICHES. 1165 University Blvd. • 202-0959

GUMBO SHACK ($-$$)

MICHELI’S CAFE ($)

HOT LUNCH, DAILY MENU (INSIDE VIA) 1717 Dauphin St. • 470-5231

PDQ ($)

334 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope • 928-2399

PUB FOOD AND DRAFT BEERS 251 Dauphin St. • 287-6871

CONNECTION FROZEN YOGURT ($)

BAR FOOD 271 Dauphin St • 438-9585

GULF COAST EXPLOREUM CAFE ($)

119 Dauphin St.• 307-8997

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK ($)

CHICAGO STYLE EATERY 1222 Hillcrest Rd. • 461-6599

PAT’S DOWNTOWN GRILL ($)

FOY SUPERFOODS ($)

JUDY’S PLACE ($-$$)

CHI-TOWN DAWGZ ($)

ORIGINAL SANDWICH AND BAKE SHOP 42 ½ Section St. • Fairhope • 929-0122 102 Dauphin St. • 405-0031

FUDGE, PRALINES & MORE 17111 Scenic Hwy 98 • Fairhope • 928-8477

107 St. Francis St. • 415-1700 3244 Dauphin St. • 476-0320 3215 Bel Air Mall • 476-8361 4707 Airport Blvd. • 461-9933 435 Schillinger Rd. • 639-1163 1682 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 621-3215 30500 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-3020 CHICKEN SALAD, SALAD & SOUP 2370 S. Hillcrest Rd. Unit R • 660-0501 5753 Old Shell Rd. • 408-3236 1802 US Hwy 98 Suite F• 625-1092

PANINI PETE’S ($)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHWEST FARE, 7 DAYS 1203 Hwy 98 Ste. 3D • Daphne • 626-2440 LUNCH & DINNER 3004 Gov’t Blvd. • 287-1220

ROYAL STREET CAFE ($) HOMEMADE LUNCH & BREAKFAST 104 N. Royal St. • 434-0011

SALLY’S PIECE-A-CAKE ($) BAKERY 5638 Three Notch Rd.• 219-6379

85 N. Bancroft St. Fairhope • 990.8883

HOME COOKIN’ LIKE MOMMA MADE. 2804 Springhill Ave. • 473-4739

THE TRELLIS ROOM ($$$)

STEVIE’S KITCHEN ($)

SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS & MORE 41 West I-65 Service Rd. N Suite 150. • 287-2793

SEAFOOD, ASIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE 69 St. Michael St • 375-1113

BACKYARD CAFE & BBQ ($) BAR-B-QUING WITH MY HONEY ($$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE Battle House Hotel, Royal St. • 338-5493

A FAVORITE BARBECUE SPOT 5456 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0001

COTTON STATE BBQ ($)

DOWNTOWN LUNCH 101 N. Conception St. • 545-4682

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT ($-$$) BBQ AND MORE Jubilee Sq.Ctr. Hwy 90, Daphne • 210-2151 McGowin Park Ctr. Satchel Paige Dr. • 471-1050 7721 Airport Blvd. • 380-8957

DREAMLAND BBQ ($)

RIBS, SANDWICHES & GREAT SIDES 3314 Old Shell Rd. • 479-9898

MEAT BOSS ($)

5401 Cottage Hill Rd. • 591-4842

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE ($)

SAUCY Q BARBQUE ($)

CUPCAKE BOUTIQUE 6207 Cottage Hill Rd. Suite B • 665-3003

CUISINE OF INDIA ($$)

MODERN GASTROPUB INSPIRED BY JAPANESE KITCHEN 455 Dauphin St • 433-0376

CASUAL FINE DINING 104 N. Section St. • Fairhope • 929-2219

SERDA’S COFFEEHOUSE ($) SIMPLY SWEET ($)

SAISHO ($-$$)

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($$)

BRICK PIT ($)

AWARD-WINNING BARBQUE 1111 Gov’t Blvd. • 433-7427

SMOKEY DEMBO SMOKE HOUSE ($)

THE WASH HOUSE ($$)

FOOD PAK

FOOD, WINE & MORE 5150 Old Shell Rd. • 341-1497

POUR BABY

WINE BAR, CRAFT BEERS & BISTRO 6808 Airport Blvd. • 343-3555

FIREHOUSE WINE BAR & SHOP 216 St Francis St. • 421-2022

RED OR WHITE

323A De La Mare Ave, Fairhope • 990-0003 1104 Dauphin St.. • 478-9494

ROYAL STREET TAVERN

LIVE MUSIC, MARTINIS & DINNER MENU. 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

SOUTHERN NAPA

BISTRO PLATES, CRAFT BEERS & PANTRY 2304 Main St. • 375-2800

THE VINEYARD

FALAFEL? TRY SOME HUMMUS 7 SPICE ($-$$)

HEALTHY, DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 3762 Airport Blvd. • 725-1177

A PREMIER CATERER & COOKING CLASSES 1880-A Airport Blvd. • 450-9051

4861 Bit & Spur Rd. • 340-6464

BRIQUETTES STEAKHOUSE ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC TURKISH & MEDITERRANEAN 3702 Airport Blvd. • 461-6901

DAILY SPECIALS MADE FROM SCRATCH 57 N. Claiborne St. • 694-6853

ABBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE ($-$$) ISTANBUL GRILL ($)

JERUSALEM CAFE ($-$$)

THE GALLEY ($)

CHUCK’S FISH ($$)

MOBILE’S OLDEST MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE 5773 Airport Blvd. • 304-1155

THE HARBERDASHER ($)

CORNER 251 ($-$$)

MEDITERRANEAN FOOD AND HOOKAH 326 Azalea Rd • 229-4206

THE PIGEON HOLE ($)

DAUPHIN’S ($$-$$$)

OPEN FOR LUNCH, INSIDE GULFQUEST 155 S. Water St • 436-8901 113 Dauphin St.• 436-0989

SOUTHERN COOKING & THEN SOME 1716 Main St. Daphne • 222-4120

THE SUNFLOWER CAFE ($) INSIDE VIRGINIA’S HEALTH FOOD 3055 A Dauphin St • 479-3200

THYME BY THE BAY ($-$$)

33 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-5635

TIME TO EAT CAFE ($)

DOWN-HOME COUNTRY COOKIN 7351 Theodore Dawes Rd. • 654-0228 13665 N. Wintzell Ave. • 824-1119

TIN ROOF ($-$$)

SOUTHERN CASUAL FAMILY DINING 10800 US HWY 31 • Spanish Fort• 621-4995

TP CROCKMIERS ($)

AMERICAN RESTAURANT & BAR 250 Dauphin St. • 476-1890

THREE GEORGES CANDY SHOP ($) LIGHT LUNCH WITH SOUTHERN FLAIR. 226 Dauphin St. • 433-6725

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE ($)

GREAT SMOOTHIES, WRAPS & SANDWICHES. Du Rhu Dr. • 378-5648 570 Schillinger Road • 634-3454

UNCLE JIMMY’S DELICIOUS HOTDOGS ($)

2550 Dauphin Island Pkwy S. • 307-5328

SEAFOOD AND SUSHI 551 Dauphin St.• 219-7051 HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St • 460-3157 HIGH QUALITY FOOD WITH A VIEW 107 St. Francis St • 444-0200

DUMBWAITER ($$-$$$) 9 Du Rhu Dr. Suite 201 167 Dauphin St. • 445-3802

FIVE ($$)

GREAT FOOD AND COCKTAILS 609 Dauphin St. • 308-3105

KITCHEN ON GEORGE ($-$$)

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOOD 351A George & Savannah St. • 436-8890

LAUNCH ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St. • 432-8000

MAGHEE’S GRILL ON THE HILL ($-$$) GREAT LUNCH & DINNER 3607 Old Shell Rd. • 445-8700

NOBLE SOUTH ($$)

LOCAL INGREDIENTS 203 Dauphin St. • 690-6824

NOJA ($$-$$$)

INVENTIVE & VERY FRESH CUISINE 6 N. Jackson St. • 433-0377

OSMAN’S RESTAURANT ($$) SUPREME EUROPEAN CUISINE 2579 Halls Mill Rd. • 479-0006

HIBACHI GRILL & ASIAN CUISINE 309 Bel Air Blvd • 470-8033

HIBACHI 1 ($-$$)

2370 Hillcrest Rd. Unit B • 380-6062

ICHIBAN SUSHI ($)

LIQUID ($$)

TILMO’S BBQ ($)

GRILLED STEAKS, CHICKEN & SEAFOOD 720A Schillinger Rd. S. S2. • 607-7200 901 Montlimar Dr • 408-3133

GOLDEN BOWL ($)

WINE, BEER, GOURMET FOODS, & MORE. 720 Schillinger Rd. S. Unit 8 • 287-1851

SUNSET POINTE ($-$$) THE BLIND MULE ($)

THAI FARE AND SUSHI 2000 Airport Blvd. • 478-9888

KAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($-$$)

DOMKE MARKET

SUGAR RUSH DONUT CO. ($) AT FLU CREEK 831 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-7766

FUJI SAN ($)

A LITTLE VINO

UPSCALE WINE BAR 9 Du Rhu Dr. S 201 • 287-7135

BAY GOURMET ($$)

LUNCH BUFFET 3674 Airport Blvd. • 341-6171

JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE 3959 Cottage Hill Rd • 666-6266

DROP DEAD GOURMET

4701 Airport Blvd. • 408-3379

3966 Airport Blvd.• 343-5530

17111 Scenic HWY 98 • Point Clear • 928-4838

3758 Dauphin Island Pkwy. • 473-1401 FAST BBQ W/ DRIVE-THRU 3249 Dauphin St. • 652-3508

CHARM ($-$$)

CHINA DOLL ($)

‘CUE

BBQ, BURGERS, WINGS & SEAFOOD 19170 Hwy 43 Mt. Vernon. • 839-9927

BENJAS ($)

INSIDE THE MOBILE MARRIOTT 3101 Airport Blvd. • 476-6400

VON’S BISTRO ($-$$)

COFFEE, SMOOTHIES, LUNCH & BEERS. 5460 Old Shell Rd. • 344-4575 COFFEE, LUNCHES, LIVE MUSIC & GELATO 3 Royal St. S. • 415-3000

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE 271 Glenwood St. • 476-0516

AUTHENTIC FOODS FROM HIMALAYAN REGION 3210 Dauphin St. • 287-0115 400 Eastern Shore Center • 459-2862

BARBEQUE & MUSIC Bayfront Park Dr. • Daphne • 625-RIBS 701 Springhill Ave. • 410-7427 4672 Airport Blvd. • 300-8516

SATORI COFFEEHOUSE ($)

GUMBO, ANGUS BEEF & BAR 72. S. Royal St. • 432-SCAM (7226)

KAN ZAMAN ($-$$)

MEDITERRANEAN SANDWICH COMPANY ($)

GREAT & QUICK. 3702 Airport Blvd. • 308-2131 274 Dauphin St. • 545-3161 2502 Schillinger Rd. Ste. 2 • 725-0126 6890 US-90 • DAPHNE • 621-2271

MINT HOOKAH BISTRO ($) GREAT MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 5951 Old Shell Rd. • 450-9191

OLLIE’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL ($-$$) MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT & HOOKAH 1248 Hillcrest St • 634-9820

TAZIKI’S ($-$$)

MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 1539 US HWY 98• 273-3337

FAR EASTERN FARE ANG BAHAY KUBO ($$) 4513 Old Shell Rd.• 473-0007

BAMBOO STEAKHOUSE ($$) SUSHI BAR 650 Cody Rd. S • 300-8383

BANGKOK THAI ($-$$)

DELICIOUS, TRADITIONAL THAI CUISINE 28600 US 98 • Daphne • 626-5286 3821 Airport Blvd. • 344-9995

BANZAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($$) TRADITIONAL SUSHI & LUNCH.

QUALITY FOOD, EXCELLENT SERVICE 5045 Cottage Hill Rd. • 607-6454

AMAZING SUSHI & ASSORTMENT OF ROLLS. 661 Dauphin St. • 432-0109

RICE ASIAN GRILL & SUSHI BAR ($) 3964 Gov’t Blvd. • 378-8083

ROCK N ROLL SUSHI ($$)

273 S. McGregor Ave • 287-0445 6345 Airport Blvd. • 287-0555 940 Industrial Pkwy • 308-2158 6850 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 753-4367

SAISHO ($$)

6455 Dauphin St. • 433-0376

STIX ($$)

610240 Eastern Shore Blvd. • 621-9088

TASTE OF THAI ($$)

9091 US-90 Irvington • 957-1414

TOKYO JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE ($$) UPSCALE SUSHI & HIBACHI 364 Azalea Rd. • 343-6622

WASABI SUSHI ($$)

JAPANESE CUISINE 3654 Airport Blvd. S. C • 725-6078

FROM THE DEPTHS BAUDEAN’S ($$)

FRIED, GRILLED, STEAMED & ALWAYS FRESH 3300 River Rd. • 973-9070

THE BLUEGILL ($-$$)

A HISTORIC SEAFOOD DIVE W/ LIVE MUSIC 3775 Hwy. 98 • 625-1998

BONEFISH GRILL ($$)

ECLECTIC DINING & SPACE 6955 Airport Blvd. • 633-7196

BOUDREAUX’S CAJUN GRILL ($-$$) QUALITY CAJUN & NEW ORLEANS CUISINE 29249 US Highway 98 Daphne. • 621-1991

CRAVIN CAJUN/DIP SEAFOOD ($) PO-BOYS, SALADS & SEAFOOD 1870 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 287-1168

ED’S SEAFOOD SHED ($$)

FRIED SEAFOOD SERVED IN HEFTY PORTIONS 3382 Hwy. 98 • 625-1947

FELIX’S FISH CAMP ($$) UPSCALE DINING WITH A VIEW 1420 Hwy. 98 • 626-6710

FISHERMAN’S LEGACY ($) DELI, MARKET AND CATERING. 4380 Halls Mill Rd. • 665-2266

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($)

30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 206-8768 3654 Airport Blvd. • 338-9350

LUCY B. GOODE ($$)

GULF COAST CUISINE, REINVENTED 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

LULU’S ($$)

LIVE MUSIC & GREAT SEAFOOD 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

MUDBUGS AT THE LOOP ($) CAJUN KITCHEN & SEAFOOD MARKET 2005 Government St. • 478-9897

RALPH & KACOO’S ($-$$) THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1595 Battleship Pkwy. • 626-0045

R&R SEAFOOD ($-$$)

LAID-BACK EATERY & FISH MARKET 1477 Battleship Pkwy. • 621-8366


RIVER SHACK ($-$$)

SEAFOOD, BURGERS & STEAKS 6120 Marina Dr. • Dog River • 443-7318.

THE GRAND MARINER ($-$$) LOCAL SEAFOOD & PRODUCE 6036 Rock Point Rd. • 443-5700

THE HARBOR ROOM ($-$$) UNIQUE SEAFOOD 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

THE SEAFOOD HOUSE ($-$$)

HEROES SPORTS BAR & GRILLE ($) SANDWICHES & COLD BEER 273 Dauphin St. • 433-4376 Hillcrest & Old Shell Rd. • 341-9464

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS ($-$$) WINGS, SEAFOOD, BURGERS & BEER 7721 Airport Blvd. Suite E-180 • 639-6832

ISLAND WING CO ($)

EVERYTHING BAKED OR GRILLED 2617 Dauphin St. • 476-9464

751 Azalea Rd. • 301-7964

MANCIS ($)

TIN TOP RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR ($$)

MCSHARRY’S IRISH PUB ($)

SEAFOOD, STEAKS, & EXTENSIVE WINE LIST 6232 Bon Secour Hwy County Rd. 10. • 949-5086

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) FRESH SEAFOOD FOR OVER 75 YEARS 605 Dauphin St. • 432-4605 6700 Airport Blvd. • 341-1111 1208 Shelton Beach Rd. • Saraland • 442-3335 805 S. Mobile St. • 929-2322

IS THE GAME ON?

ASHLAND MIDTOWN PUB ($-$$) PIZZAS, PASTAS, & CALZONES 245-A Old Shell Rd. • 479-3278

BAUMHOWER’S ($)

WINGS, BURGERS & PUB GRUB 6880 US-90 #14 • Daphne • 625-4695

BISHOP’S ($)

A SOUTHERN GRILL & BAR 3673 Airport Blvd. • 344-2131

BUFFALO WILD WINGS ($) BEST WINGS & SPORTING EVENTS 6341 Airport Blvd. • 378-5955

BUTCH CASSIDY’S ($)

FAMOUS BURGERS, SANDWICHES & WINGS 60 N. Florida St. • 450-0690

CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB ($) BURGERS & BEER 916 Charleston St. • 433-9374

1715 Main St. • 375-0543 BRILLIANT REUBENS & FISH-N-CHIPS. 101 N. Brancroft St. Fairhope • 990-5100

MUG SHOTS ($$)

BAR & GRILL 29740 Urgent Care Dr. • Daphne • 662-9639 6255 Airport Blvd. • 447-2514

GRIMALDI’S ($)

ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL ($$)

QUAINT MEXICAN RESTAURANT 5556 Old Shell Rd. • 345-7484

GUIDO’S ($$)

TAMARA’S BAR & GRILL ($)

MARIA BONITA AGAVE BAR & GRILL ($-$$)

Bel Air Mall • 476-2063 FRESH CUISINE NIGHTLY ON MENU 1709 Main St. • Daphne • 626-6082

HOUSE OF PIZZA ($)

3958 Snow Rd C. • Semmes • 645-3400

LA ROSSO ($$)

COMFORT FOOD 1716 Main St. Ste. C • Daphne • 281-2982

MACARONI GRILL ($$)

SMALL PLATES, PIZZAS, PASTAS & WINE 3250 Airport Blvd. • 450-4556

MARCOS ($)

5055 Cottage Hill Rd. • 308-4888 2394 Dawes Rr. • 639-3535 2004 US 98 • Daphne • 265-6550

MELLOW MUSHROOM ($)

BURGERS, DOGS & 27 BEERS & WINES. 19992 Hwy.181 Old County Rd. Fairhope • 281-2663

PIES & AWESOME BEER SELECTION 2032 Airport Blvd. • 471-4700 5660 Old Shell Rd. • 380-1500 29698 Frederick Blvd.• Daphne • 621-3911

LUCKY’S IRISH PUB ($)

MIRKO ($$)

OLD 27 GRILL ($)

IRISH PUB FARE & MORE 3692 Airport Blvd • 414-3000

WEMOS ($)

WINGS, TENDERS, HOTDOGS & SANDWICHES 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-5877

MAMA MIA!

BUCK’S PIZZA ($$)

DELIVERY 350 Dauphin St. • 431-9444

CORTLAND’S PIZZA PUB ($-$$) GREAT PIZZA. LUNCH & DINNER 4356 Old Shell Rd. • 342-0024

GAMBINO BROTHERS ($) HOMEMADE PASTAS & SANDWICHES 873 Hillcrest Ave. • 344-8115

GAMBINO’S ITALIAN GRILL ($) ITALIAN, STEAKS & SEAFOOD 18 Laurel Ave. • Fairhope • 990-0995

PASTA & MORE 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-6611

NAVCO PIZZA ($$)

PIZZA, SUBS & PASTA 1368 ½ Navco Rd.• 479-0066

PAPA’S PLACE ($$)

A TASTE OF ITALY. BYOB. 28691 U.S. Highway 98 • 626-1999

PINZONE’S ITALIAN VILLAGE ($$) AUTHENTIC ITALIAN DISHES 312 Fairhope Ave. • Fairhope • 990-5535

RAVENITE ($)

PIZZA, PASTA, SALAD & MORE 102 N. Section St. •Fairhope• 929-2525

PIZZERIA DELFINA ($) PIZZA & PASTA 107 Dauphin St. • 375-1644

ROMA CAFE ($-$$)

PASTA, SALAD AND SANDWICHES 7143 Airport Blvd. • 341-7217

3250 Airport Blvd. Springdale Mall• 450-4556

WINGS, PO-BOYS, BURGERS 210 Eastern Shore Center, Hwy. 98 • 929-0002

TRATTORIA PIZZA & ITALIAN ($$) ITALIAN FOOD & PIZZAS 11311 US HIghway 31 Spanish Fort• 375-0076

VIA EMILIA ($$)

HOMEMADE PASTAS & PIZZAS MADE DAILY 5901 Old Shell Rd. • 342-3677

MEXICAN CUISINE 3977 Gov’t Blvd. • 660-4970

OLÉ MI AMIGO ($-$$)

HEARTY MEXICAN FARE 736 holcombe Ave.• 473-0413

POOR MEXICAN ($)

3050 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-7433

MAGNOLIA HOUSE ($$-$$$) FINE DINING, SEAFOOD AND STEAKS

FLAVORS BUFFET ($-$$) ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET

IP CASINO:

850 Bayview Ave. Bilox • 888-946-2847

THIRTY-TWO ($$$) SEAFOOD, STEAKS, WINE

TIEN ($-$$)

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

HIGH TIDE CAFÉ ($)

CASUAL & RELAXING, EXTENSIVE MENU

OLÉ MI AMIGO!

ROOSTER’S ($)

LATIN AMERICAN FOOD 211 Dauphin St. • 375-1076

ISLAND VIEW:

TASTE OF MEXICO 5452 Hwy 90 W • 661-5509

TAQUERIA MEXICO ($-$$)

BEACH BLVD STEAMER ($)

AZTECAS ($-$$)

CAFÉ DEL RIO ($-$$)

MOUTH WATERING MEXICAN FOOD 1175 Battleship Pkwy • 625-2722

CINCO DE MAYO ($) MEXICAN CUISINE 260 Azalea Rd. • 375-1095

DAUPHIN ST. TAQUERIA ($)

ENCHILADAS, TACOS, & AUTHENTIC FARE Ok Bicycle Shop • 661 Dauphin St. • 432-2453

EL MARIACHI ($)

763 Holcombe Ave • 473-0413

FUEGO ($-$$)

OUTSTANDING MEXICAN CUISINE 2066 Old Shell Rd. • 378-8621

HACIENDA SAN MIGUEL ($-$$) TASTE OF MEXICO 880 Schillinger Rd. S. • 633-6122 5805 US 90 • 653-9163

LA COCINA ($)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE 800 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-0783 830 W I65 Service Rd. S • 378-5837 4663 Airport Blvd. • 342-5553

LOS ARCOS ($)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FLAVOR 3733 Airport Blvd. • 414-4496

NO GAMBLING CASINO FARE BEAU RIVAGE:

875 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 888-952-2582

BR PRIME ($$-$$$)

3300 W. Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 877-774-8439 SEAFOOD

CARTER GREEN STEAKHOUSE ($$-$$$) RICH TRADITIONS, STEAK, SEAFOOD

C&G GRILLE ($)

LARGE BREAKFAST, LUNCH OR DINNER MENU

PALACE CASINO:

158 Howard Ave. Biloxi • 800-725-2239

FINE DINING ESTABLISHMENT.

MIGNON’S ($$$)

BURGER, WINGS, PIZZA

PLACE BUFFET ($-$$)

EXOTIC CUISINE AND SUSHI

STACKED GRILL ($-$$)

COAST RESTAURANT ($-$$) JIA ($-$$)

STALLA ($$)

ITALIAN COOKING

STEAKS, SEAFOOD, FINE WINE INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

BURGERS AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

TERRACE CAFE ($)

TREASURE BAY:

HARD ROCK CASINO:

THE DEN ($-$$)

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, LATE NIGHT

777 Beach Blvd.Biloxi • 877-877-6256

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) SEAFOOD

HARD ROCK CAFÉ ($)

AMERICAN FARE & ROCKIN’ MEMORABILIA

1980 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 800-747-2839 INTIMATE & CASUAL WITH DAILY SPECIALS

CQ ($$-$$$)

ELEGANT ATMOSPHERE & TANTALIZING ENTREES

BLU ($)

LOUNGE WITH COCKTAILS & TAPAS MENU

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

WIND CREEK CASINO:

SATISFACTION ($-$$)

FIRE ($$-$$$)

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE SOUTHERN FAVORITES BUFFET

HARRAH’S GULF COAST:

280 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 288-436-2946

303 Poarch Rd. Atmore • 866-946-3360 PRIME STEAKS, SEAFOOD & WINE

GRILL ($)

CONTEMPORARY & OLD-FASHIONED FAVORITES

SEND LISTINGS TO LISTINGS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

A p r i l 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 - M a y 3 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 23


CUISINE | THE BEER PROFESSOR

Brews and books BY TOM WARD/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

I

Windmill Market adds Ox Kitchen BY ANDY MACDONALD

Kitchen is where they come together.” Pork and greens sound great, smoked wings and the Ox Burger with oxtail gravy are but a few of the menu items. The most delicious sounding is the Fried Gulf Oyster BLT. Give me one now. Right now. Open Monday through Friday 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. and 5-9 p.m., you’ll have your choice of lunch or dinner. Keep up with the daily specials on Facebook and Instagram. In good company with Will Hughes Catering & Market, Mary Ann’s Deli, Naturally Strong with Nonie’s healthy superfoods and juices as well as Frio’s Gourmet Pops, the Windmill Market is in top shape right now.

Downtown Fairhope is ready for the Windmill Market’s latest addition, The Ox Kitchen, opening this week. The restaurant is owned and operated within the market by Bo Hamilton, a veteran of the restaurant industry who got his start in the business at the fine dining restaurant J. Williams in Auburn, followed by stints in Jackson Hole, Wyoming, restaurants. Now a resident of the Eastern Shore, Hamilton named his latest endeavor after his wife, Molly’s, hometown of Oxford, Mississippi. Describing it as “New South Casual,” Hamilton adds, “I am passionate about the food and people of the South and The Ox

Jonelli’s opens on Government

We’ve read the signs and watched the

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Photo | Facebook

to The Book Cellar one of my favorites, Hattiesburg’s Southern Prohibition Crowd Control, was on tap, as was AstroNut Brown Ale from Madison’s Rocket Republic Brewing Co. I had never tasted anything from that brewery and was really pleased with it, as it had a nice, deep color and a toasted malt flavor. My wife tried another northern Alabama beer, the Cheating Heart, a very good, strong IPA from Huntsville’s Yellowhammer Brewing. I’ll be looking out for more styles from both of those breweries, as they (hopefully) become more available in our area. The Book Cellar is a comfortable spot, opening into the back of Page & Palette. The small bar has room for about 10 stools, and there are a couple of tall tables with bar stools, as well as some soft chairs and a couch to lounge on as well. There is a space to host speakers, which they do regularly, and there is also live music on a regular basis. The Book Cellar is a great place to have a drink or two, meet some friends and listen to an author or musician. It promises to become as much a Fairhope staple as Page & Palette. Check it out when you get a chance. In the shameless promotion department, I’ll be signing copies of my new book (which, alas, has nothing to do with beer) at Page & Palette during Fairhope’s Art Walk on Friday, May 5, so grab a pint and say hello!

WORD OF MOUTH

have always thought books and beer — two of my favorite things — go together very well. After all, what is better than sitting on the beach with a good book and a cold beer on a sunny afternoon? It seems a number of independent bookstores — probably in order to attract more traffic in the age of Amazon — have begun selling beer, wine and even mixed drinks in their stores. The practice has become so popular publications as diverse as USA Today and Men’s Journal have recently run articles on some of the best bookstore bars. Even book behemoth Barnes & Noble has announced it plans to sell beer and wine, although at only four brand-new stores it is building, and none near us on the Gulf Coast. Perhaps if it gets more people to buy books, we will get a Barnes & Noble with a bar. Fortunately, we don’t have to wait for Barnes & Noble to open a new store here, as there is already a great bookstore in our area with a bar (and an ampersand) in it. Page & Palette is a Fairhope tradition and regionally well-respected independent bookstore. It already had a coffee shop (which, it seems, every bookstore now has), but last year it also opened a bar, The Book Cellar, as well. The Book Cellar has a nice selection of craft beers, including 10 on tap, which rotate regularly, many of them regional. On my last visit

THE BOOK CELLAR AT PAGE & PALETTE IN FAIRHOPE HAS A HANDFUL OF LOCAL DRAFTS, AS WELL AS A STOCKED LIQUOR BAR.

continuing construction, but the wait is finally over. Jonelli’s Chicago Style Fast Food recently opened at 1252 Government St., just east of Griffith Service Station. The early reports are looking good, with the Italian beef sandwich coming in as a winner, I am told, dripping with au jus. Of course a hot dog and a bratwurst made the list. There is also pizza by the slice. I am looking forward to French fries smothered in grilled onions. This isn’t the type of place I will wait to visit. Meet me there.

St. Mary’s Home Taste of Spring April 27 Thursday, April 27, St. Mary’s Home Young Leaders’ Society will be holding its Taste of Spring at Synovus-Coastal

Bank and Trust at 3704 Dauphin St. It’s an evening of heavy hors d’oeuvres from local restaurants and libations from the best distributors around. It starts at 6 p.m. and runs until 8 p.m. so you better get there on time. Proceeds from this event benefit St. Mary’s Home, Alabama’s oldest child welfare agency. The home serves as a residential treatment facility for boys and girls facing domestic abuse, neglect and abandonment. Ticket prices are $25 per person, available at www.brownpapertickets.com or by contacting Jill Chenoweth at 251-344-7733 or jillc@stmaryshomemobile.org. More information about this event can be found at www.stmaryshomemobile.org. Recycle!


A p r i l 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 - M a y 3 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 25


COVER STORY

Civil forfeiture reform gains momentum in Alabama JASON JOHNSON/REPORTER

W

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Illustration/Laura Rasmussen

hen Ming Tong Liu was pulled over for why or what it is worth. speeding by a Mobile County Sheriff’s In addition to cash, narcotics and paraphernalia, deputy in 2013, he was carrying $75,000 authorities can seize vehicles, boats, planes, computers, in cash he had saved to buy a restaurant in camera equipment, weapons, jewelry and real estate. Louisiana — money the officer seized because he didn’t While items taken during the execution of a search warbelieve Liu’s story. rant are typically pre-approved by a judge, other times — It took months of costly legal proceedings for Liu as with Liu’s $75,000 — they are not. to get his money back, but the window to purchase the Regardless of how it is acquired, though, agencies restaurant had closed. In the end, the only crime Liu was can’t keep seized property until it’s been approved by the ever accused of was going 10 mph over the speed limit judicial system, although they get to decide whether to on Interstate 10. take a forfeiture case through the state court system or the “He had the burden of proving his money wasn’t inDepartment of Justice’s “Equitable Sharing Program.” volved in criminal activity, and that just turns the entire There are a number of reasons a local or state agency notion of criminal justice on its head,” Shay Farley of might pursue a civil forfeiture through the federal the Southern Poverty Law Center system, but Mobile County Sheriff (SPLC) said. “Nobody is going Sam Cochran told Lagniappe the to argue that narcotics or drug amount of money the agency stands paraphernalia don’t need to be to receive is typically a factor in the taken off the streets, but it should decision. take criminal prosecution to forfeit “It’s changed over the years, but someone’s property, because propat one time, the state was taking a ALABAMA WAS erty is a fundamental right.” bigger chunk out of seizures than RECENTLY RANKED In a criminal proceeding, law enthe feds were, so you could maybe forcement has to prove an asset was get more money back by going ‘AMONG THE WORST IN connected to illegal activity in order through the federal system,” Coto seize it. Through civil forfeiture, THE NATION’ IN A REVIEW chran said. “Some of that is based however, agencies can seize assets on those ultimate results.” OF STATE FORFEITURE without charging a person with a A legal adviser for the Mobile crime, then require the individual to Police Department said there are POLICIES BY THE prove innocence in court. other times when forfeitures might Recently, the state has found critINSTITUTE FOR JUSTICE. go through federal court “due to ics of its forfeiture practices across the more rapid turnaround of their the political spectrum. Alabama was court proceedings,” though it isn’t recently ranked “among the worst something that occurs often with in the nation” in a review of state forfeiture policies by MPD cases. the Institute for Justice. The situation has also created While it was temporarily halted and then reinstated some unlikely allies pushing for reform in the lucrative during the final years of the Obama administration, the program many law enforcement agencies are eager to Equitable Sharing Program allows police to keep up to defend. 80 percent of seized assets — a better deal for law enforcement than many state policies, but not Alabama’s. Civil forfeiture in Alabama Here, 100 percent of forfeiture proceeds processed While civil forfeiture laws were originally intended in state court go to law enforcement unless otherto target ill-gotten gains associated with the drug trade, wise specified by a judge. When those state cases are Alabama has since expanded its reach to include any brought, district attorneys are required to argue on felony offense. There’s also no limitation on the type of behalf of the seizing agencies, often for a share of the property that can be seized. proceeds. Under the law, police in Alabama can seize “any “We’re responsible for any forfeiture being put property, proceeds or instrumentality of every kind.” It’s through the state court system. It’s a service we’re also one of 13 states where agencies aren’t required to required to provide to all law enforcement in Mobile keep public records showing what they’ve confiscated, County,” District Attorney Ashley Rich said. “We don’t

Local law enforcement agencies are attempting to maintain a civil forfeiture system where the burden of make any money off of forfeitures from the percentage we get, though.” Rich said her office doesn’t track individual assets from forfeiture cases, but does keep an accounting of the revenue it receives for handling them. Through an agreement with local agencies, the office receives 30 percent of any cash collected from a successful forfeiture. The office previously took a 10 percent cut, but Rich negotiated an increase with local agencies after the office lost $146,209 processing forfeitures between 2009 and 2014. However, even with an increased share of the proceeds and a higher case volume generating roughly $149,000 in revenue last year, Rich’s office still recorded a net loss in 2016. “We have a full-time staff member and a full-time lawyer who handle these cases,” she said. “When you take what we actually deposited from our 30 percent and subtract their salaries, we didn’t make any money last year. We actually lost $2,000.”

A “strong incentive to seize”

While some prosecutors might be losing money from handling civil forfeitures, local and state law enforcement agencies haven’t had the same problem. The DOJ reports the details of the equitable sharing program to Congress annually, and according to those reports dozens of agencies received more than $75 million in equitable sharing proceeds from 2000 to 2013 — ranking Alabama 31st in profits from federal forfeitures.


COVER STORY Locally, MPD seized $307,718 worth of cash and physical property between 2010 and 2015, while MCSO collected $1,675,606 in cash and assets during the same period. Those figures don’t include the tens of thousands of dollars received by the Mobile County Street Enforcement Narcotics Team in which both agencies participate. The data also doesn’t specify the cases those forfeitures came from or how the money was spent. However, a lack of reporting requirements for forfeiture proceeds secured in Alabama’s court system make it nearly impossible to determine how much agencies are collecting at the state level, let alone what they’re doing with it. Lagniappe requested lists of seized assets or monies collected by MPD and MCSO at the state level, but neither was able to produce one for inclusion in this report. However, MPD’s legal counsel did confirm “banking records are kept” for the department’s state and a federal “drug fund(s),” and a public information officer said seized physical assets are either “utilized by the department or auctioned, depending on [their] usability.” Asked whether MCSO keeps similar records, Cochran said, “Not really because it’s so convoluted. “It’d be really difficult to track because they all come from so many different sources,” he added. “We track some of it, but it’s not always everything. So, we don’t have the exact records, and we’d have to develop records to make them.” Even finding state cases in a court database can be difficult because the actual items police have seized are listed according to the defendant, such as “State of Alabama v. Two Hundred Six ($206.00) Dollars” or “State of Alabama v. One 2003 Toyota Corolla.” Last month, attorneys with the SPLC released an analysis of hundreds of civil forfeiture cases, and their report concluded that cases in dozens of Alabama counties were “styled (or named) in such a way that made it impossible” to analyze them. The SPLC found police in nine counties — representing nearly 30 percent of the state’s population –— seized more than $2 million in cash through civil forfeiture procedures in 2016. “Because of Alabama’s lack of a reporting requirement, there is no way to track the value of all property seized beyond cash — vehicles, computers, jewelry, weapons and more — but where it counted, the total value of seized property would almost certainly far exceed the roughly $2 million in cash seizures identified by the SPLC,” the report added. While Mobile County wasn’t included in the analysis, if the $149,000 Rich cited in her 2016 forfeiture deposits is truly 30 percent of the cash local agencies received from state forfeitures last year, the total collected in 2016 would be somewhere close to $500,000. There’s no way to determine how funds were divided among county and municipal agencies, but that number is greater than totals reported from seven of the nine counties analyzed by the SPLC — behind the $1,162,130 seized in Jefferson County and the $611,147 collected by agencies in Tuscaloosa County.

Existing accountability measures

While critics of Alabama’s civil forfeiture laws say they require “no transparency or public accountability,” most law enforcement agencies disagree, even those who do not benefit from it financially.

“There’s oversight by each individual judge that monitors these cases, and then we’re audited on a regular basis just like the individual agencies,” Rich said. “To have something forfeited, you have to prove it’s connected to illegal activity, and the judge decides whether you’ve met that burden. There are often times when we are not able to prove that, [and] the case is thrown out.” When officers confiscated thousands of dollars’ worth of pipes, bongs and other devices labeled “drug paraphernalia” from 10 local convenience stores last month, they also seized $508,537 in cash and frozen bank assets and video surveillance equipment. Rich said her office was prepared to argue “the vast majority of money” in those bank accounts had come from the illegal sale of drug paraphernalia, even though former MPD Chief James Barber said investigators were still evaluating what culpability the stores’ owners had. Hassan Arjmand is an owner of one of the convenience stores, and though one of his employees was arrested on a misdemeanor paraphernalia charge, Arjmand hasn’t been charged with a crime himself. Yet two of his business’ bank accounts containing roughly $35,000 were frozen and another $30,000 in was cash seized from a safe at his store. Attorney Skip Brutkiewicz, who filed a

WHEN OFFICERS CONFISCATED THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS’ WORTH OF PIPES, BONGS AND OTHER DEVICES LABELED ‘DRUG PARAPHERNALIA’ FROM 10 LOCAL CONVENIENCE STORES LAST MONTH, THEY ALSO SEIZED $508,537 IN CASH AND FROZEN BANK ASSETS AND VIDEO SURVEILLANCE EQUIPMENT.” civil complaint on Arjmand’s behalf the day after the raid, told Lagniappe he believes the officers who executed the search warrant “didn’t have any right” to seize those funds. It appears Mobile County Circuit Judge Roderick P. Stout at least partly shared this belief because he ordered authorities to unfreeze Arjmand’s bank accounts shortly thereafter. “There was no follow-up pleadings after the seizure to explain why it was they felt entitled to seize the cash and freeze those accounts,” Brutkiewicz said. “Certainly you can’t say almost $65,000 to $70,000 was the product of selling these less-than-five-dollar glass pipes, especially when they sell no telling how much fuel every day at one of the busiest intersections in town.” Another store owner, Nham Nguyen, has filed an identical complaint claiming MPD’s actions were “overbroad, willfully oppressive” and “and a misuse of the criminal process.” Two other owners also filed an unsuccessful motion to intervene in Arjmand’s case last week. Brutkiewicz also touched on another point forfeiture critics often bring up: the effect the process can have on a person even when the court returns their property. “It appears to me this was either not well thought out, as to

what it might do to a legitimate corporation, or an attempt to shut the business down,” he said. “That money was used to pay vendors. They were also unable to get any kind of account at other banks because word spread pretty quickly. It was basically putting these people out of business.”

Calls for reform, pushback

A bill filed by Alabama Sen. Arthur Orr could add some additional reporting requirements for agencies receiving forfeited property by requiring annual reports to the Alabama Attorney General’s office detailing those activities and authorizing the office to enforce compliance. “The state supports district attorneys’ offices in its budget to the tune of $30 million a year, and there’s a lot of forfeiture money that’s being collected out there, especially along the interstates in areas with a lucrative drug corridor,” Orr said. “But, you have other areas that don’t have that same off-the-grid revenue stream, and there needs to be more transparency.” However, Orr’s bill quickly met with opposition from the Alabama Sheriffs Association and the Alabama District Attorneys Association, which said it could reveal “equipment used for surveillance and undercover operations” that many agencies purchase with forfeited money. In a letter to all district attorneys, ADAA claimed even providing the circumstances and grounds upon which property is seized when no felony conviction is obtained could “give away tactics and strategies” used in drug “interdiction” — a military term for “delaying, disrupting or destroying enemy supplies.” In particular, Rich took issue with a provision that would require law enforcement to disclose where seized assets are located, even when the case surrounding them is pending. “We have an obligation to ensure the safety and security of those items, and we have to maintain them in our control and in their current condition at all times pending a forfeiture,” Rich said. “So, why in the world would we want to to disclose to the public where we’re housing those items?” With that said, even Orr has admitted there “may be some validity” behind claims from law enforcement that his bill is “too onerous, burdensome and bureaucratic.” However, with limited time in the remaining session, Orr said he’s still “committed to the principle of the bill.” Other than the additional red tape, Cochran criticized Orr’s bill as another attempt by the state “to identify something to put their hands on it and get it for themselves.” Yet, while some may write off Orr as a politician and the SPLC as a liberal organization, they aren’t the only ones calling for changes. The conservative Alabama Policy Institute has taken a similar position, and a study urging reforms by the Heritage Foundation, a conservative research group, specifically listed Liu as one of the “many innocent motorists” who’s been “stopped and harassed by authorities.” When asked about that case, which occurred during his tenure as sheriff, Cochran recently said Liu’s 2013 traffic stop appears to have been handled how it should have been under the law. “He may truly have been totally innocent or it may be that they lacked the the evidence to [prove it] was from drug proceeds, but it is unusual to be driving down the highway with $75,000 and not have any explanation for it other than, ‘I’ve been saving it,’” Cochran said. “It looked suspicious, but in the end, he had his day in court. That’s just the laws we work under.”

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ART ARTIFICE

Black Violin fusion’s of old, new shatters stereotypes BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

T

here may not be a checkroom in the Saenger Theatre anymore, but it might be best to leave something else before you see Black Violin: expectations. “I can tell people don’t know what to expect. We come onstage, two relatively big black guys with violins and there’s this DJ. And at the end of the show we get ‘em, we grab ‘em,” Wilner Baptiste said. Along with musical partner Kevin Sylvester, they don the stage names Wil B. and Kev Marcus and aim to shatter categories. Their blend of classical and hip-hop has been nearly 20 years in the making. They met at Miami’s Dillard High School in the 1990s when Sylvester took up the violin and Baptiste the viola. The strings weren’t Baptiste’s initial choice. “I used to beat on the table at lunchtime in middle school and the security guard used to get upset at me. He gave me a story about how he used to play the saxophone and make money on the weekends, so that’s what I wanted to do, was make money on the weekends. That was my sole purpose,” Baptiste said. He approached the music teacher with his intentions and signed up for a class. Apparently a string teacher overheard him and his apparent fervor spurred a wager. “I found out in 2012 they played a round of golf and decided, ‘Whoever wins this golf game gets this kid in their class,’” Baptiste revealed. The teacher’s instincts were keen. Baptiste was moved to the advanced class in a week. “I had a knack for it. I just took it and played. I would

watch the other students and ask questions and they would teach me. A year later I was better than them,” Baptiste said. Once in high school he crossed paths with Sylvester and the friendship, along with standard classical training, began. Sylvester left for Florida International University in 1999. Baptiste went to Florida State University in 2000. FIU professor Chauncey Patterson gave Sylvester a copy of jazz violinist Stuff Smith’s album “Black Violin.” Sylvester told talk show host Tavis Smiley it was like hearing “the violin on fire.” He sent it to Baptiste. “It showed us the violin wasn’t meant to be in this little box. It verified what we thought. We’d always dabbled in that, playing stuff we heard on the radio, and that album showed us how versatile the instrument is,” Baptiste said. They started shopping around their ideas, hip-hop beats paired with classically inspired instrumentation and melody. In the pre-YouTube and pre-social media days this took a lot of hustling. The duo showed up at clubs and fought through skepticism, even playing for promoters in parking lots. They would pop the car trunk to supply beats and play stringed accompaniment. In 2004, they accompanied Alicia Keys and went on to share bills with other industry giants. In 2005, they won the daunting talent contest at the Apollo Theater. In 2007, they cut their self-titled debut album. They have also worked as producers and writers with artists such as Kanye West, Tom Petty, Lupe Fiasco, Aerosmith

Spring Hill Chorale salutes the Mouse

Air conditioning: necessity or certain doom?

While energy in a closed system can’t be destroyed, it can certainly pass from one state into a lower one. It’s a law, after all. So the air conditioning that makes life on the Gulf Coast

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ALONG WITH MUSICAL PARTNER KEVIN SYLVESTER, THEY DON THE STAGE NAMES WIL B. AND KEV MARCUS AND AIM TO SHATTER CATEGORIES. THEIR BLEND OF CLASSICAL AND HIPHOP HAS BEEN NEARLY 20 YEARS IN THE MAKING.” nent’s long-noted embrace of the arts for the reception. “There have been people crying during the show, who come up later and give us hugs. Especially when we do kids’ shows and the kids are completely moved and transformed because of it,” Baptiste said. The communal experience breaching social classifications still touches Baptiste. Their emotions repay him. “You can see two individuals watching the show and one has their eyes closed and moving around as if they’re listening to something beautiful like opera and there’s another person next to them just banging their head with the beat. I never get over it,” Baptiste said.

tolerable for half the year — not to mention cutting down on mosquito-borne disease outbreaks — might be doing more than saving your belongings from mildew. Dr. Christy West will tell attendees at the next Science Café all about the price we pay for comfort in her presentation “The Second Law: How Your Air Conditioner is Trying to Kill You.” The Tuesday, May 2, 6 p.m. event at Moe’s Original Bar B Que (701 Springhill Ave.) is the last such offering for the season from the USA Archaeology Museum. The event is free. For more information, call 251-460-6106.

Mobile author in focus at Bernheim

Native Mobilian Albert Murray was inducted into the Alabama Writers Hall of Fame in 2015. Paul Devlin, the man who accepted the medal on his behalf, will be in Mobile to speak about the honored author. Murray passed away in 2013 and May 12 would have been his 101st birthday. Devlin is co-editor (with Henry Louis Gates Jr.) of the Li-

brary of America’s definitive edition of Murray’s work. Volume one, nonfiction and memoirs, was published in October 2016. Volume two, fiction and poetry, will be published next year. Jeanie Thompson, executive director of the Alabama Writers’ Forum, will moderate a public discussion with Devlin. The event takes place Thursday, May 4, 6:30 p.m. at Bernheim Hall in the Ben May Public Library (701 Government St.). Entrance is free. Following the presentation, attendees are invited to stay for birthday cake and punch in the Armbrecht/Briskman Meeting Room. The program is a collaboration of the Mobile Public Library, the Alabama Writers’ Hall of Fame and the Southern Literary Trail. It is funded by the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities, the Mobile Public Library and the Alabama Writers’ Forum, a partnership program of the Alabama State Council on the Arts. For more information, call 251-208-7097.

ARTSGALLERY

Spring Hill Chorale will join with the Greater Mobile Bay Area Choral Society for their spring concert entitled “Holy Disney.” It features selections of gospel and spiritual music transitioning into work from Walt Disney musicals. The Disney movie “The Princess and the Frog” will be prominently spotlighted as it features Creole-spiritual New Orleans sounds. There is also a review of Disney classic favorites. The concert is at Spring Hill College’s St. Joseph Chapel on Sunday, April 30, at 4 p.m. The concert is free and open to the public.   For more information, contact Terry D. Maddox at 251-4061454 or tmaddox@gspcmobile.org.

and others. It is fitting, then, they will play the home venue of the Mobile Symphony Orchestra on Saturday, May 6, at 7:30 p.m. Some components of their show will be familiar to MSO fans. “Our style is more baroque than anything. We don’t do a lot of slurs or anything. That element is definitely there, that Vivaldi type of movement on top of a hard-hitting beat. We do a lot of free-styling and making up stuff on stage,” Baptiste said. An appearance at Austin’s 2013 South by Southwest festival shows their fusion in full flower. They emerge to a recorded rendition of Bach’s allegro from Brandenburg Concerto No. 3 and as it fades they take up the melody. Within a few measures a drummer supplies a modern beat. Their DJ adds samples and before long they’re sailing through something Baptiste said last year’s tour of Europe was successful. He credits that conti-


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Band: USA Steel Band and World Music Ensemble Spring Concert featuring Luis Benetti Date: Friday, April 28, 7:30 p.m. Venue: Laidlaw Performing Arts Center, 5751 USA South Drive, www.southalabama.edu

S

Tickets: $8 general/$5 USA students and staff; available at the door focused on sports. His life revolved around ince ancient times, a number basketball, baseball and track and field. But his of musical storytellers have regular visits to the neighborhood basketball traversed the globe and used court helped bring music into his life. their mix of music and story to Benetti said a number of professional musientertain others. These musical cians lived in his neighborhood and provided folklorists act as artistic ambasa daily soundtrack. Eventually, the beats and sadors of their native cultures. rhythms bored their way into Benetti’s soul. Puerto Rican percussionist Luis Benetti travels the “I used to sit there and look at these guys with world, keeping this ancient tradition alive while the drums and their sounds,” educating others on the insepaBenetti said. “I was like, rable nature of Afro-Caribbean ‘Wow!’ I would come home sounds and stories. and play on the doors and This seasoned “conguero” tables. I drove my mother — one who plays congas crazy. It was a way to emu— will be using a residency I LIKE TO GO INTO AREAS late those guys, because I at the University of South AlaWHERE, EVEN THOUGH didn’t have the instruments.” bama to entertain and educate Benetti’s mother finally students and the broader comTHERE MAY BE LATINOS, realized her son’s love of munity. His residency begins music and bought him with a percussion clinic on [SOME] MAY NOT HAVE A some instruments from the April 26 and concludes on STRONG CONNECTION WITH Dominican Republic. Later, April 28 with a collaboration when Benetti found himself with the USA Steel Band and THEIR CULTURAL BACKin California, a friend asked World Music Ensemble. if he would like to come to While Benetti encourGROUNDS. SOME OF THEM a band rehearsal to sit in on ages everyone to attend, he HAVE NOT BEEN the congas. With no formal especially hopes to expose musical training, Benetti was local middle and high school EXPLORING OTHER apprehensive but willing to students from Mobile to PenAVENUES WITHIN THE give it a try. Afterward, he sacola to the symbiotic nature was confident he would be of both Latin and Afro-CaribMUSICAL SPECTRUM. cut from the lineup, but was bean music and folklore. mistaken. “For me, it’s kind of sad,” “They said, ‘Look, man, Benetti explained. “Somecome back to rehearsal next week. We’re playing times, they [middle and high school students] next week at a club,’” Benetti said. “I remember have to wait till college to get that exposure [to my heart was floating for a second. I didn’t think world music]. I think we need to educate the it could be possible. So I went to rehearsal the young guys. That’s one of the reasons why I’m next week.” trying to promote this event everywhere.” Benetti says his passion for Latin and AfroBenetti’s love for Latin and Afro-Caribbean Caribbean music has created a responsibility to percussion began in his childhood. However, keep the musical style alive through performance music was not his first passion. At first, he was

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MUSIC

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

FEATURE

Luis Benetti, conguero on a mission

and education. He described the Latin and Afro-Caribbean combination of music and folklore as an art form — part of Puerto Rico’s “idiosyncrasy as a Caribbean culture” — which pulls from Spanish, African and Indian influences. Benetti said the convergence of music and folklore is an essential facet of Cuban, Puerto Rican and Dominican culture. The merengue he compared to the Dominican national anthem. Cubans cherish the rumba. Puerto Rico is known for both salsa and bomba. The conguero said he is one of many people who have ventured into the modern world and acted as artistic “ambassadors and purveyors” to individuals unfamiliar with Latin and Afro-Caribbean musical styles. Benetti said some of these newcomers to the music and folklore are Latinos themselves, the demographic with which Benetti yearns to connect. “I like to go into areas where, even though there may be Latinos, [some] may not have a strong connection with their cultural backgrounds,” Benetti explained. “Some of them have not been exploring other avenues within the musical spectrum.” Benetti’s university residencies have allowed him to have a number of memorable experiences, particularly in 2009 at the University of Alabama. When he arrived, Benetti found the collegiate ensemble lacked singers. His impromptu recruitment process began with an “excellent trombone player” from Puerto Rico. After Benetti explained his dilemma, this player volunteered his vocals. Benetti then recruited a university instructor. Next, he picked a number of students from the university choir. Ultimately, Benetti was working with a group primarily composed of vocalists unfamiliar with Latin and Afro-Caribbean sounds. “When they first came to the rehearsal, they were lost,” Benetti said. “When we got to the show, I had those guys singing and dancing on stage. I remember them telling me that it was the greatest experience that they had ever had.” Benetti’s clinic will be a mix of conga and bongo techniques as well as folkloric traditions. Friday night’s performance promises to be just as colorful and eclectic. Benetti will take the stage with the USA Steel Band and World Music Ensemble as well as members of the USA Jazz Ensemble. The audience will experience a rumba complete with cajones. The collaborative performance will also feature a rumba Colombia. Benetti said the evening will be filled with a number of fusion movements. This collection of musicians will perform an Afro-Puerto Rican bomba and an Afro-Puerto Rican plena fused with jazz and folklore. “When you think about Latin jazz and being able to use folkloric traditions, it makes it more interesting and challenging at the same time,” Benetti said. “People who like jazz and know some Latin jazz artists, when they come to see this, they don’t know that you can actually make that fusion between Latin jazz and folkloric tradition.” Benetti said those in attendance at the clinic or the performance will ultimately discover Latin and Afro-Caribbean sounds have influenced “the musical landscape of the United States.” He cited the salsa and Latin jazz craze in New York City in the ‘70s as one of the most prolific pieces of evidence for this concept. Benetti also noted its acceptance outside the Caribbean has also led to the evolution of Latin and Afro-Caribbean music, recognizing many Europeans and North Americans have helped grow this musical style. For him, the cultivation of Latin and Afro-Caribbean music is a way for Latinos in other nations to not only maintain but also celebrate their music-centric cultural identity, and he wants the rest of the world to celebrate with them.


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MUSIC BRIEFS

‘Too High’

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

Band: Paw Paw’s Medicine Cabinet Date: Saturday, April 29, 6 p.m. Venue: Dority’s Bar & Grill, 1010 Bienville Blvd., Dauphin Island, 251-581-4634 Tickets: Free

Photo | Facebook | Paw Paw’s Medicine Cabinet

F

or two years, Paw Paw’s Medicine Cabinet has been gathering dedicated listeners who have fallen in love with this local band’s earthy, Southern-fried mix of jam and pop. Last Sunday, the group gathered a number of followers at an undisclosed location on Highway 181 for the creation of a new music video for its song “Old House,” one of several harbingers for two new albums from this local favorite. Paw Paw’s Medicine Cabinet has been spending much of its free time on Dog River at Rick Hirsch’s Studio H20, where they have been working together on two upcoming releases, “The Great Room” and “Somebody Else’s Dream.” The band recently released the single “Too High” on social media, a bouncing anthem that reflects the group’s sound and attitude. Lyrical flow rolls across lighthearted strums, taut rhythms and complementary keyboard work. While laptop speakers are satisfactory, these new songs are best experienced in full stereo, a testament to the warm richness conjured in Hirsch’s riverside studio.

Pony up

Band: Gov’t Mule, Eric Krasno Band Date: Thursday, April 27, with doors at 7 p.m. Venue: Saenger Theatre, 6 S. Joachim St., www.mobilesaenger.com Tickets: $29.50-$46.50, available through Ticketmaster

Gov’t Mule has no shortage of fans in the Azalea City. Over the years, this group led by guitar maestro Warren Haynes has brought its blues-infused Southern jam rock to Mobile on a regular basis. This visit from Haynes and his crew will feature crowd favorites as well as cuts from their upcoming album “Revolution Come … Revolution Go.” Gov’t Mule has previewed the new release with two singles. “Sarah Surrender” is set on a foundation of blue-eyed soul with Haynes adding a batch of smooth, complementary guitar licks. Raunchy, wailing slide dominates the progressive blues masterpiece “Stone Cold Rage.” The Eric Krasno Band will open for Gov’t Mule. With a background that includes playing guitar in the bands Soulive and Lettuce, Krasno’s solo work is a departure from his established bands. Krasno’s latest album, “Blood from a Stone,” includes nods to classic rock, blues, soul and funk. Combined with impressive production, it should appeal to a variety of musical tastes.

What it is

Band: Ben Harper & the Innocent Criminals, Little Mae Date: Saturday, April 29, with doors at 7 p.m. Venue: Soul Kitchen, 219 Dauphin St., www.soulkitchenmobile.com Tickets: $47.50 advance /$53 day of show, available at venue, its website, Mellow Mushroom (West and Midtown) or by calling 1-866-77-8932 Soul Kitchen has grown into a venue where music fans can experience arena/festival-level bands in a relatively small environment. Last week, Soul Kitchen debuted Spoon on its stage, and now this local music hall is preparing for Ben Harper & the Innocent Criminals’ Azalea City debut. Harper will be performing cuts from his catalog, including his latest album, “Call It What It Is.” This multi-instrumentalist and his band glide freely through a number of genres and even mix a few. From progressive blues to rock ‘n’ roll, Harper’s musical formula continues to be fresh and impressive. While the group sounds great in the studio, their recordings can’t compare to a live interpretation. From fiery lap-steel slides to adrenalized extended jams, Harper’s live show will provide a different context for newcomers.

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AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | April 27 - May 3

THUR. APRIL 27

Big Beach Brewing— Cowboys Blues Band, 6p Bluegill— Tim Kinsey Blues Tavern— Soul Shine, 8:30p Brickyard— Ben Jernigan and Company Callaghan’s— Lee Yankie Cockeyed Charlie’s— JJ Dority’s Bar and Grill— Lee Yankie Felix’s— Jimmy Lumpkin Duo Flora Bama— Al & Cathy, 1p// Bat, 2p/// Zachery Diedrich, 5p//// Dueling Pianos, 5:30p//// Kyle Wilson, 7p//// Mark Sherrill, Chris Newbury, Mel Knapp and James Daniel, 6p///// Davis Nix Band, 10p//// Albert Simpson and John Kulinich, 10:15p//// Whyte Caps, 10:30p Lulu’s— Bat, 5p Manci’s— Ross Newell, 7p McSharry’s— The String Slingers, 7p Old 27 Grill— Blind Dog Mike, 6:30p Saenger— Gov’t Mule Soul Kitchen— Spoon, Tennis, 8p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Hippy Jim, 6p Wind Creek Casino— Reckless, 8p

FRI. APRIL 28

All Sports Bar & Billiards— DJ Markie Mark, 10p Beau Rivage— Chaka Khan, 8p Big Beach Brewing— Christina Christian Bluegill— Cary Laine, 12p// Matt Neese Duo, 6p Blues Tavern— Ric McNaughton Band, 9p Brickyard— The Harrison McInnis Trio Callaghan’s— Alanna Royale Dority’s Bar and Grill— Lisa Mills Felix’s— David Chastang Duo Flora Bama— Jay Hawkins Trio, 1p// Bat, 2p/// Lucky Doggs, 2p//// David Dunn, 4p//// Jack Robertson Show, 5:30p//// Big Al and the Heavyweights, 6p//// Davis Nix Duo, 6p//// Tim Kinsey, 6p//// Brian Hill Duo, 9p//// Foxy Iguanas, 10p//// Logan Spicer and Tony Ray Thompson, 10:15p//// Adam Doleac Band, 10p//// Welcro Pygmies, 10:30p Hangout— Mario Mena Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Brandon Green, 9p IP Casino— Styx, 8p Listening Room— Marlow Boys

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Lulu’s— Jeri, 5p Main Street Cigar Lounge— Rock Bottom, 8p McSharry’s— DJ Boom, 10p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Category 4, 8p Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Lefty Collins, 6p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Tyler Tisdale Duo, 6:30p O’Daly’s— Gene Murrell, Tony Edwards and David White, 10p Old 27 Grill— Anna McElroy, 6:30p Soul Kitchen— Leela James, Daley, 8p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Alexa Burroughs, 5:30p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Lisa Christian, 6p Wind Creek Casino— Reckless, 9p Windmill Market— Excelsior Band

SAT. APRIL 29

Bluegill— Matt Bush, 12p// Journey 2 Mars, 6p Blues Tavern— Smokin’ Toasters, 9p Brickyard— Post Pulto Callaghan’s— Charlie Young Cockeyed Charlie’s— Jordan Bramblett Dority’s Bar and Grill— Paw Paws Medicine Cabinet Felix’s— Quintin Barry Duo Fin’s— Red House Flora Bama— Ja’Rhythm, 11a// Lea Anne Creswell Trio, 11a//// Hung Jury, 1p//// Logan Spicer, 1p//// JoJo Prez, 2p//// Rusty Tabor, 4p//// Brian Hill Duo, 5p//// Jack Robertson Show, 5:30p//// Foxy Iguanas, 6p//// Zachery Diedrich Duo, 6p//// Ryan Balthrop Duo, 6p//// Lee Yankie and the Hellz Yeah, 10p//// Brian Hill Trio, 10:15p//// Adam Doleac Band, 10:30p//// Lee Yankie and Hellz Yeah, 10:30p Hangout— Wavelength Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Brandon Green, 9p Listening Room— Lauren Murphy and the Psychedelics Lulu’s— Alvarado Road Show, 5p McSharry’s— DJ Chi, 10p Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Cary Laine, 6p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Phil and Foster, 6:30p Old 27 Grill— Leavin Brothers, 6:30p Pirates Cove— Perdido Brothers, 5p Saenger— LWVAL Transparency in Government Celebration Soul Kitchen— Ben Harper & The Innocent Criminals, Lillie Mae, 8p

Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Jimmy Lee, 12p// Three Bean Soup, 5:30p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Mac Walter, 12p// Beave and Cleave, 6p Top of the Bay— 12 Sharp Wind Creek Casino— Reckless, 9p

SUN. APRIL 30

Big Beach Brewing— Broken Down Car, 3p Bluegill— Matt Neese, 12p// U.S. Band, 6p Blues Tavern— John Hall Trio, 6p Brickyard— Jake Buford Callaghan’s— Caleb Caudle Dority’s Bar and Grill— The Joey Abruscato Trio Felix’s— Bobby Butchka Flora Bama— Beachbillys, 11a// Smoky Otis Trio, 12p/// Mario Mena Band, 1p//// Songs of Rusty, 1:30p//// David Chastang, 2p//// Oliver’s Twist, 2p//// Mel Knapp and Charlie Wilson, 5p//// Jay Williams Band, 5:30p//// Heritage, 6p//// Perdido Brothers, 6p//// Whyte Caps, 10p//// Rusty Tabor Duo, 10:15p Hard Rock (Live) — Morris Day and the Time, 8p Listening Room— Callaghan, 7p Lulu’s— Alvarado Road Show, 5p McSharry’s— Trad. Irish Music, 6:30p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Lisa Christian, 2p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Marty McIntosh, 11a

MON. MAY 1

Felix’s— Bobby Butchka Lulu’s— Brent Burns, 5p Old 27 Grill— Marty McIntosh, 6p

TUE. MAY 2

Bluegill— Quintin Berry Butch Cassidy’s— Andy MacDonald Cockeyed Charlie’s— Jordan Bramblett Felix’s— Lee Yankie Lulu’s— Ronnie Presley, 5p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Jimmy Lee Hannaford, 6p Soul Kitchen— The Pretty Reckless, Them Evils, 8p

WED. MAY 3

Bluegill— Matt Neese Callaghan’s— Phill and Foster Felix’s— Brandon Bailey Lulu’s— Justin Yawn, 5p Manci’s— Antique Roadshow, 6p


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Poetry in, and of, everyday life

A

FILMTHE REEL WORLD

BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

AREA THEATERS AMC MOBILE 16 785 Schillinger Rd. S. (251) 639-7373 CRESCENT THEATER 208 Dauphin Street (251) 438-2005 HOLLYWOOD STADIUM 18 1250 Satchel Paige Dr. (251) 473-9655

nchored by an intuitive Adam Driver as a man named Paterson who lives in the New Jersey town of the same name, Jim Jarmusch’s beautiful film “Paterson” is, in its quiet way, as inspiring and revolutionary a film as you will ever see. But this revolution is for poetry, and while Paterson is every inch a poet and an artist, his life is nothing like the usual swaggering artist’s story. Paterson is a bus driver who carries a notebook, and while he walks, waits and drives, he composes poetry in his head and writes it down. He observes the conversations of his passengers and co-workers, and writes poems about his wife and the minutiae of their lives — even a well-designed book of matches. Driver’s face shows us everything, and he misses nothing. What I found so revolutionary and so inspiring was the intersection between his non-artistic job and his inner life; he is a poet, not in spite of his bus driver job, but because of it, or at least in harmony with it. The artistic fantasy of quitting one’s proverbial day job is strong with many

would-be artists and writers, but Paterson and his wife don’t wait for the day when they can devote themselves to artistic pursuits. They live it already, and their life is wonderful to experience. Just as Paterson’s poems are written in the pattern of his daily life, so is the film organized in a day-by-day sequence of an average week. Each scene and line of the film has been crafted and presented meticulously by Jarmusch, and is as poetic as Paterson’s poems when they are written across the screen. Paterson often references New Jersey poet William Carlos Williams, another artist of the mundane beauty of everyday life. Paterson’s poems were written by real-life New York school poet Ron Padgett. Paterson talks with a little girl about their shared preference for poems that don’t rhyme, and he admires little internal rhymes within the structure of a poem she has written. The film has some wonderfully pleasing internal rhymes, too, like the recurrence of twins after Paterson’s wife dreams they will one day have twins. She seems to be a housewife, spending her days decorating their home in striking black and white patterns,

learning to play the guitar and imbuing her own life with art. “Paterson” is soothing and meditative; it captures the pleasing hum of domesticity and work, but doesn’t romanticize them. Adam Driver is too quiet a character for that. He is satisfied, but not overjoyed, and the only way we know how happy he is, is when he writes a love poem to his wife. The film is mostly uneventful, but one mishap threatens to end Paterson’s artistic calling. The film’s final scene, as Paterson sits once more in front of his favorite spot at the Great Falls of the Passaic River, is beautiful and triumphant. Jarmusch has created a mode for living, in a world as carefully constructed as those of his past films, from “Stranger than Paradise” through the vampire world of “Only Lovers Left Alive.” The filmmaker’s choices and the film’s subject’s choices are so carefully weighted and so perfectly chosen that the universe of “Paterson” is one of deep and lasting meaning, and the character of Paterson is unforgettable as portrayed by Adam Driver. “Paterson” is currently available to rent.

AMC JUBILEE SQUARE 12 6898 U.S. 90 Daphne, (251) 626- 6266 CARMIKE CINEMAS 23151 Wharf Ln. Orange Beach (251) 981-4444 COBB THEATRES PINNACLE 14 3780 Gulf Shores Pkwy Gulf Shores (251) 968-7444 EASTERN SHORE PREMIERE CINEMA 14 30500 Alabama 181 #500 Spanish Fort, Al (251) 626-0352 Information accurate at press time; please call theaters for showtimes.

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Photos | Mary Cybulsky / Neon

FROM LEFT: Adam Driver is a bus driver/poet in “Paterson,” a quiet observation of the triumphs and defeats of daily life, along with the poetry evident in its smallest details. In “Colossal,” Anne Hathaway is a woman who discovers severe catastrophic events are somehow connected to her own mental breakdown. NEW IN THEATERS COLOSSAL

Gloria (Anne Hathaway) is an out-of-work party girl who, after getting kicked out of her apartment by her boyfriend, is forced to leave her life in New York and move back to her hometown. When news reports surface that a giant creature is destroying Seoul, South Korea, Gloria gradually comes to the realization she is somehow connected to this far-off phenomenon. Crescent Theater

THE CIRCLE

Emma Watson and Tom Hanks star in a thriller from the novel by David Eggers about Mae Holland, who lands a job with

the world’s most powerful technology and social media company. Encouraged by the company’s founder, Mae joins a groundbreaking experiment that pushes the boundaries of privacy, ethics and personal freedom. AMC Mobile 16, Regal Mobile Stadium 18

SLEIGHT

A young street magician (Jacob Latimore) is left to care for his little sister after their parents’ passing and turns to illegal activities to keep a roof over their heads. When he gets in too deep, his sister is kidnapped. Regal Mobile Stadium 18, AMC Mobile 16

NOW PLAYING

GROW HOUSE Regal Mobile Stadium 18, AMC Mobile 16 PHOENIX FORGOTTEN Regal Mobile Stadium 18, AMC Mobile 16, AMC Jubilee Square 12 GIFTED AMC Jubilee Square 12, AMC Mobile 16, Regal Mobile Stadium 18 UNFORGETTABLE All listed multiplex theaters. BORN IN CHINA All listed multiplex theaters. T2: TRAINSPOTTING AMC Mobile 16 THE PROMISE AMC Jubilee Square 12, AMC Mobile 16 FATE OF THE FURIOUS All listed multiplex theaters.

THE CASE FOR CHRIST Regal Mobile Stadium 18 SMURFS: THE LOST VILLAGE All listed multiplex theaters. GOING IN STYLE All listed multiplex theaters. THE BOSS BABY All listed multiplex theaters. GHOST IN THE SHELL AMC Mobile 16 LIFE All listed multiplex theaters. POWER RANGERS All listed multiplex theaters. BEAUTY AND THE BEAST All listed multiplex theaters. KONG: SKULL ISLAND All listed multiplex theaters. LOGAN All listed multiplex theaters. GET OUT Regal Mobile Stadium 18


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CALENDAR OF EVENTS APRIL 27, 2017 - MAY 3, 2017

PUTTIN’ ON THE GRITZ THE EASTERN SHORE ART CENTER’S 3RD ANNUAL FUNDRAISER “PUTTIN’ ON THE GRITZ” WILL BE THURSDAY, APRIL 27 AT 7 P.M. LIVE MUSIC, FLEA MARKET ART AND DINNER PROVIDED BY LOCAL FOOD TRUCKS. VISIT ESARTCENTER.ORG. Photo | Courtesy of Eastern Shore Art Center

GENERAL INTEREST Pride Week In conjunction with Mobile Alabama’s Pride Fest, Pride Week runs May 1-6. For a full list of Pride Week festivities visit mobilealabamapride.com. Transparency gala The League of Women Voters Transparency in Government Celebration is Saturday, April 29, 6:30-8 p.m. at the Saenger Theatre. Featuring Mobile City Councilperson Bess Rich and Kyle Whitmire, state political commentator at Alabama Media Group. Visit lwvmobile. org. Rio Carnivale! St. Mary Catholic School’s casino night Saturday, May 6, starting at 6 p.m. Tickets $25 for seniors, $30 for others in advance; $35 at the door. Special dinner tickets ($100) admit two adults and include entry to win door prizes. Old Mobile Bus Tour A bus tour to French Colonial Old Mobile will leave Cooper Riverside Park on Saturday, April 29, at 9 a.m., returning around noon. Call 251-626-5581 for reservations.

Festival will be at Pirates Bar & Grill and Fins Bar (1600 Bienville Blvd.) on Saturday, April 29, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. Call 251-8612969. Fairhope Walking Tours Join Museum Director Donnie Barrett for a walking tour of Fairhope on Saturday, April 29, beginning at 10 a.m. at the Fairhope Colony Cemetery. Planning Equals Compassion Providence Presbyterian Church will be hosting speaker Kyla Kelim on Sunday, April 30, 4-5 p.m. Topic: “Educate, Prepare and Take Care of Yourself” regarding seniors and their caregivers. Call 251-6339701. Science Café “The Second Law: How Your Air Conditioner is Trying to Kill You,” presented by Dr. Christy West. Tuesday, May 2, 6-7 p.m. at Moe’s Original Bar B Que, 701 Springhill Ave. Call 251-4606106. Providence Farmers Market Shop the Farmers Market every Wednesday now through July 12, 2-5 p.m., in Lot F at Providence Hospital. Call 251-631-3501.

Market on the Park Formerly Market on the Square, this weekly farmers market will be Saturdays, April 29 through July 29 at Mardi Gras Park. 7:30 a.m. until noon. Sponsored by city of Mobile Special Events.

NDE Meeting International Association of Near Death Studies (IANDS) meets second Wednesday of every month at the West Regional Branch of the Mobile Public Library on Grelot Road at 6 p.m.

World Tai Chi Day Mobile’s World Tai Chi Day event will be Saturday, April 29, 9-11 a.m. at Mardi Gras Park downtown. Free lessons and demonstrations. Contact instituteshaolin@ gmail.com.

Brown Bag in Bienville Every Wednesday through May 5, join friends in Mobile’s Bienville Square from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. for lunch and live music.

Delta Woods and Waters Expo Annual event sponsored by the city of Spanish Fort and held at 5 Rivers Delta Resource Center will celebrate the beauty and diversity of the Mobile-Tensaw Delta. Saturday, April 29, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visit www.deltawoodsandwatersexpo.com. Dauphin Island Gumbo Festival The 8th annual Dauphin Island Gumbo

Dauphin Island Boardwalk Talks Boardwalk Talks are held the first and third Wednesday of each month at 11:15 a.m. at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab, 101 Bienville Blvd. Call 251-861-2141. Midtown Optimist Club Join Midtown Optimist Club every Wednesday at noon for lunch at Azalea City Golf Course. Call 251-348-3542.

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Toastmasters Do you want to deliver a speech like a pro or gain leadership skills to advance your career? Toastmasters International meets regularly at six locations in Mobile and Baldwin counties. Visit www.toastmasters. org for more information.

FUNDRAISERS Puttin’ on the Gritz The Eastern Shore Art Center’s 3rd annual fundraiser “Puttin’ on the Gritz” will be Thursday, April 27 at 7 p.m. Live music, flea market art and dinner provided by local food trucks. Visit esartcenter.org. Sidewalk-A-Thon The Village of Spring Hill will hold its sixth annual Sidewalk-A-Thon event on Friday, April 28, 3-6 p.m. Proceeds will be used as matching funds for competitive sidewalk grants to support additional sidewalk construction in Spring Hill. Visit www. tvosh.com. Dog Wash Dirty Dogs Dog Wash raises money for Delta Dogs. Saturday, April 29, from 2-4 p.m. $10, Callaghan’s Irish Social Club. Visit mobiledeltadogs.org. UMW Tablescapes United Methodist Women 3rd annual Tablescapes eventis April 29, 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. at FUMC’s Family Life Center, 120 W. Second St., Bay Minette. Tickets cost $20, available in advance from any UMW member. Call 251-937-8303. Crawfish for a Cause Benefiting USA Hospital Arnold Luterman Regional Burn Center, Saturday, April 29, 12-4 p.m. at The Grounds. Tickets are $25, presale only, for all you can eat crawfish and beverages. Call 251-343-0534 or visit Eventbrite online. Windmill Jamboree for IB Windmill Market will be hosting a fundraiser Saturday, April 29, 6-9 p.m., benefiting the Fairhope High School International Baccalaureate program. Dinner and live music. Visit www. brownpapertickets.com/event/2920854.

ARTS “Bye Bye Birdie” The Tony award-winning musical at Mobile’s Playhouse-in-the-Park, through May 14. Visit playhouseinthepark.org or call 251-602-0630. St. Francis Arts & Crafts Festival Saturday, April 29, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Dauphin Island (Key and Chaumont streets). Proceeds will support a variety of local charities. Call 318-548-4376 or 251391-4558. Last Friday Art Night Last Friday Art Night features local art and history, food, beverages, music and socializing at Dauphin Island Art Gallery, 918 Bienville Blvd. For more information call 251-861-3300.

MUSEUMS Tea for Two Tuesday afternoons at 2 p.m. the Fairhope Museum of History hosts a tea with a lecture on Fairhope history. The May 2 speaker will be Donna Esslinger. Call 251-929-1471. “Windows to the Sea” Dauphin Island Sea Lab announces a permanent exhibit at the Estuarium, “Windows to the Sea.” Visit disl.org. “Shipwreck! Pirates and Treasure” A new, highly interactive exhibit at GulfQuest features more than 500 authentic artifacts recovered from deepocean shipwrecks. Visit www.gulfquest. org. “Christenberry: In Alabama” On the occasion of Alabama’s Bicentennial Celebration, this exhibit honors artist William Christenberry’s exploration of themes related to his native state. Mobile Museum of Art, 4850 Museum Drive. Through June 4. Call 251208-5200. “Faces of Africa” The History Museum of Mobile exhibit “Faces of Africa: A Mystical View of Tribal Heritage” runs through Monday, July 31. Call 251-208-7420.


“Drugs: Costs and Consequences” The Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration team up to present a powerful interactive exhibit of the effects of drugs on individuals and society. Through August. Visit exploreum.com. Fairhope’s founding There is quite a story behind Fairhope’s founding in 1894. Learn more at the Fairhope Museum of History, 24 N. Section St. The museum is open daily (except Sunday and Monday) from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 251-929-1471. Little Discoveries “Outside the Box,” aimed at children age 6 and under, explores how innovation and creativity can lead to a world of possibilities, starting with a simple cardboard box. Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Call 251-208-6893 or email jholland@ exploreum.com. Thursdays at MMoA Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., the Mobile Museum of Art offers free admission to all visitors. No reservations are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive. Call 251-208-5200.

SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES Dauphin Island Regatta The 59th annual Dauphin Island Race will be held April 29 on Mobile Bay. Three days of events are online at bucyc.com. Jubilee Jog The Junior League of Mobile’s Jubilee Jog 5K and 1K fun run is at The Grounds Saturday, April 29, 5 p.m. Call 251-4713348 or visit juinorleaguemobile.org.

Society hosts dances the first and third Monday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Hot Wheels Skating Rink in Daphne. Email cassief13@aol.com.

WORKSHOPS Legal Financial Blitz Saturday, April 29, 10 a.m. join West Regional Library on Grelot Road to learn about foreclosure prevention and bankruptcies. Call 251-602-0011. Genealogy class Genealogy for beginners is offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School. Call 251-463-7980 or visit communityactivitiesprogram.com.

PUBLIC MEETINGS Baldwin County Commission: First and third Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., 322 Courthouse Square, Bay Minette. Work sessions are the second and fourth Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. rotating between Bay Minette, the Foley Satellite Courthouse, the Fairhope Satellite Courthouse and the Baldwin County Central Annex Building in Robertsdale. www.baldwincountyal.gov Baldwin County Planning Commission: First Thursday at 6 p.m., 22251 Palmer St., Robertsdale, www.baldwincountyal. gov. Bayou La Batre City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 13785 S. Wintzell Ave., www.cityofbayoulabatre. com. Chickasaw City Council: Second and fourth Tuesday at 7 p.m., 224 N. Craft Highway, 251-452-6450.

Weekly 1K/5K Every Thursday evening at 6 p.m., join Red Bread Outfitters and Cortlandt’s Pub in the Spring Hill Village Shopping Center for a 1K or 5K run and walk. No cost to participate.

Citronelle City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6:30 p.m., 19135 Main St., 251-866-7973.

Bridge lessons The Mobile Bridge Center offers free bridge lessons each Tuesday at 6 p.m. at 1510 University Blvd. Arrive a few minutes early to register. Call the Bridge Center at 251-666-2147, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Daphne City Council: First and third Monday at 6:30 p.m., 1705 Main St. Work sessions are the second Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m., www.daphneal.com.

Fitness and athletics classes New fitness classes are in progress at Palmer Pillans Middle School. To register or for more information on classes offered, call 251-463-7980 or go tocommunityactivitiesprogram.com. Dance and art classes New dance and art classes are in progress at Palmer Pillans Middle School. To register or for more information on classes offered, Call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com. Ballroom dance Azalea Ballroom Dance Club hosts dances the second and fourth Tuesday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Via Health, Fitness & Enrichment Center, 1717 Dauphin St. Call 251-623-9183 or visit azaleaballroomdanceclub.com. Ballroom dance The Moonlight Chasse Ballroom Dance

Creola City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6 p.m., 190 Dead Lake Road, #A, 251-675-8142.

Dauphin Island Town Council: First and third Tuesdays at 7 p.m., 1011 Bienville Blvd., www.townofdauphinisland.org. Elberta Town Council: Third Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m. in the town hall. Workshop meeting on the second Tuesday. townofelberta.com. Fairhope City Council: Second and fourth Monday at 6 p.m., 161 N. Section St. Work sessions are held before each council meeting at 4:30 p.m., www. cofairhope.com. Fairhope Planning Commission: First Monday at 5 p.m., 161 N. Section St. For more information visit www.cofairhope.com. Foley City Council: First and third Monday at 5:30 p.m., 407 E. Laurel Ave. Work sessions begin at 4 p.m., www. cityoffoley.org. Gulf Shores City Council: Second and fourth Mondays at 4 p.m., 1905 W. First St., www.gulfshoresal.gov.

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THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE SADDLE UP! BY TIMOTHY POLIN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Tripartite commerce pact 6 Nickname for Angel Stadium, with “the” 10 Inspiration 14 They might pop up in the morning 19 “Juno” actress Page 20 Visa alternatives 22 Figure seen on [circled letters below] 23 Most wanted 24 1976 blaxploitation film that was a sequel to “Dolemite” 26 Fascinated 27 Is overcome with emotion, with “up” 28 It has two poles 29 Shelter 31 Tinder, for one 33 Boor 34 “Poppycock!” 35 Figure seen on [circled letters below] 38 Marquis’s subordinate 41 Like flowers’ stamens 42 Made-for-TV western costarring Travis Tritt 44 ____ king 45 Moriarty, to Holmes 47 Asked a lot of questions, say 48 Vittles 50 Figure seen on [circled letters below] 55 Homes by churches 57 “I’ll pass” 58 Detroit-area stadium that hosted Super Bowl XVI 59 Down in front? 61 Disseminate 63 “Evidently” 64 French greeting 68 Part of a set 70 & 72 “If ever, oh ever a ____ there ____” (classic song lyric) 73 Exam with a readingcomprehension sect. 74 Figure seen on [circled letters below] 77 Hoedown partner 79 Pester 81 Setting off 83 [Right in the kisser!] 85 Lament of the defeated 90 Job-search time, maybe 91 Go postal 93 Figure seen on [circled letters below] 94 Dreyer’s ice cream partner 95 Go on a run? 96 Brownie, e.g. 98 Emails discreetly 101 Check 102 Overdo the criticism, say

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103 It may be brown or blond 104 Santa Fe summer hrs. 106 Many a Wall St. recruit 108 Like a goner 110 Figure seen on [circled letters below] 114 Many a B.Y.U. attendee 117 “Pick me! Pick me!” 119 Rich breakfast item 121 Played out 122 Fiat 123 Collides hard with 124 48th vice president 125 Modern-day problem solvers 126 Meyers of late-night 127 In a foul mood 128 Interjected DOWN 1 Close 2 Prayer figure 3 Decide somehow by chance 4 Offers at motorcycle dealerships 5 Pharaoh ____ 6 Luxury-hotel amenity 7 “Here’s what I think,” briefly 8 Poindexter 9 Something getting stuck in a trunk? 10 Answer to “Are you …?” 11 Grayish 12 “Hairspray” matriarch

13 Kind of plane 14 Vox co-founder Klein and others 15 Signal for dinner 16 White-bearded sort 17 Hell week, e.g. 18 Assuage 21 Point of transition 25 Meditation syllables 27 South American cash crop 30 Cuts on the back? 32 Wedding rings? 36 Group lampooned in “Django Unchained” 37 Is Greek? 39 Arnold Schwarzenegger’s middle name 40 Needed resupplying 41 Pea nut? 42 Phonograph stat 43 Inits. in some portfolios 45 Woodworking tool 46 Crew crew 49 Evince 51 Aquafina rival 52 Attends 53 Austen matchmaker 54 Breather 56 It may leave you in stitches 60 Drunk 62 Top secret? 64 Creative field 65 It’s passed down 66 “____ Eyes” (Eagles hit) 67 Bacchanalia

69 Mass leader 71 Electrocutes 75 Hymn starter 76 Wind this way and that 78 Repeated part of a fivemile hike? 80 Aggravates 82 Either of a pair of brothers in folklore 84 Act like a baby, maybe 86 Moved, jocularly 87 How you can count things up to five 88 “Rugrats” father 89 Rug rat 92 One looking to grab a bite? 97 Sphinx, in part 98 Probable money loser 99 Composer Debussy 100 Boston athlete 101 Philatelist’s collection 102 Vernacular 104 Satisfies 105 TiVo, for one 107 Amigos 109 Sweetly, on a score 111 Mark indelibly 112 River through ancient Nubia 113 Casino opening 115 365 giorni 116 Native Rwandan 118 Mind 120 Electric-bill unit: Abbr. 121 Place for a bachelorette party

ANSWERS ON PAGE 49


STYLE GARDENING

Find your inspiration at the Gallery of Gardens BY DR. JUDY STOUT, MOBILE MASTER GARDENER

Photos/ MBG / Vaughn Drinkard

A fundraiser for Mobile Botanical Gardens (left), Vaughn Drinkard’s garden on Government Street near downtown Mobile (right) is part of the upcoming Gallery of Gardens.

Q: I recently enjoyed the Historic Homes Tour and remem-

bered something similar Master Gardeners offered, visiting various gardens around Mobile. Do you still do that and will you please provide details?

A: Perfect timing! You are remembering the Gallery of Gar-

dens, a wonderful event which is a fundraiser offered by Mobile Botanical Gardens. As a partner organization, Mobile County Master Gardeners supports MBG, providing docent guides in each garden on the tour, answering questions and identifying featured plants at each site. A fantastic selection of home gardens will be on the tour this year. Dates of the 2017 Gallery of Gardens are May 19 and 20, with gardens open for viewing from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. each day. Unique to this year’s tour is the focus on charming private gardens in three historic neighborhoods. These gardens have been designed and are maintained by their owners. There are three gardens each in the De Tonti Square District, the Oakleigh Garden District and the Church Street East District. Within each district, gardens are within easy walking distance. The more adventurous among you may want to walk or bicycle to all since they are within a two-mile radius of each other! Seven of the nine gardens on the tour are in courtyards, and each exhibits its own unique personality. Two larger gardens offer broader, more extensive landscape combinations. Specific

plantings are the result of many owner experiments and represent the broad variety of plants well adapted to Mobile settings. Many are varieties obtained at Mobile Botanical Gardens plant sales. Just a sampling of what you may expect to experience on tour is reflected in some owner descriptions of their gardens: “You are standing in an artist’s garden. I am much more a designer than a gardener. I like to use old doors, gates and discarded ‘Mobile lace’ ironwork to play house! I use plants as a backdrop to create fun and sacred spaces in the garden.” A mindfulness garden ... “As you enter my garden, there is a wall! But it is not there to keep anyone out. This wall, shared with the Church Street Cemetery, adds a sense of solemnity. Close your eyes and breathe, but don’t keep them closed for long! Come snip and sniff. Time to relax and see clearly what matters. Your garden. Easy to create. I did!” In addition to the private gardens on tour, it is also suggested visitors take advantage of the proximity of other gardens open to the public in each district and walk by some of them. These might include the Oakleigh Mansion and Gardens, the Richardson DAR House, the De Tonti Community Garden, Spanish Plaza and the courtyard of the Malaga Inn. Those interested in historic Mobile homes will note each neighborhood on the tour contains a separate historic home museum worth a visit. The Mobile Botanical Gardens and Marketplace at 5151 Museum Drive will also be open for shopping immediately following inspiring visits to gallery homes.

Tickets for Gallery of Gardens 2017 are $25 in advance and $30 during the tours. They may be purchased online at www.mobilebotanicalgardens.org, at ticket locations listed on the website or at each tour home the days of tours. Plan to explore nine private gardens and discover new ideas for your own. Meet Master Gardeners and “Ask a Master Gardener” writers in person! Hope to see you there. You are Invited to These Upcoming Gardening Events What: Mobile Master Gardeners Monthly Meeting When: Thursday, May 11, 10-11:30 a.m. Where: Jon Archer Center, 1070 Schillinger Road N., Mobile Topic: Creating a Backyard Bird Habitat by Martha Terry What: Mobile Master Gardeners Lunch & Learn When: Monday, May 15, noon to 1 p.m. Where: Jon Archer Center, 1070 Schillinger Road N., Mobile Topic: Grocery Store Botany by Dr. Judy Stout What: MBG’s Gallery of Gardens When: May 19-20, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Where: Gardens in Oakleigh, Church Street East and DeTonti Square Information: www.mobilebotanicalgardens.org Tickets: $25 in advance, $30 during tours

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SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

Summer sailing camp registration is a breeze BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

S

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Photo | Mobile Bay Sailing School

ome of the nation’s best sailors will display who are not MYC members can visit the facilities during their skills this weekend during the 59th annual the camps, see the boats and have a meal. Dauphin Island Race. These participants did not “All of our instructors are certified,” Spaulding said. get to this point of their careers without lots of “Safety is the number-one thing we teach and stress. It is practice and training. more important to know how to be a safe sailor than just To help prepare the next generation of mariners, lessons being a sailor. This is the reason all students must have life are being offered throughout the summer for those wishing jackets, sunscreen and proper footwear.” to learn more about the art of sailing. Classes will be ofIn case of foul weather on the bay, instructors will fered on both sides of the bay. bring the students back to the yacht club to be trained The Mobile Bay Sailing School (MBSS) is marking onshore concerning theoretical aspects of sailing, knots its 35th season of summer classes. While the MBSS is and rigging. separate from Mobile Yacht Club (MYC), the classes are Spaulding said there are some MYC members now in offered on its property near Dog River. their 40s who first learned to sail in the summer program, “We use their facilities as our home base,” said Rick and now their children are taking the classes. Spaulding, who serves as president of the MBSS. “This For anyone wishing to learn more about MBSS, there summer, we have moved the operations from the bayfront will be an open house on May 13 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. side to the MYC harbor, where we can launch from a float- The staff will be present at MYC to discuss the sailing ing dock that just opened. Now we can get the sails set and school, the boats and the new floating dock. For additional launch without having to deal with dollies and ramps.” information, call 251-709-4102 or visit www.mobilebayStudents will have an impressive fleet on which to train. sailingschool.com. Three years ago, MBSS updated the C420 boats, which • For those in Baldwin County, the Fairhope Yacht Club enable young sailors to learn teamis following a different schedule. work and spinnaker techniques. This There will be four sessions offered, year, new single-handed Optimist June 5-16, June 19-30, July 10-21 sailboats join the fun. MBSS now and July 24-Aug. 4. There will be a has seven C420s and five Optimists morning class (8 a.m.-noon) or an SOME OF THE NATION’S BEST for training. afternoon class (1-5 p.m.) in each “Our classes are open to anyone two-week session. SAILORS WILL DISPLAY THEIR in the area,” Spaulding said. “They Participants are not required to SKILLS THIS WEEKEND DURdo not have to be a member of a be yacht club members. The fees are yacht club. It doesn’t matter if they $300 for FYC members or $325 for ING THE 59TH ANNUAL DAUhave any experience, as we can non-members. PHIN ISLAND RACE. THESE tailor the program around the popuThe same types of boats will lation that comes to class. In fact, be used. FYC said the Optimist PARTICIPANTS DID NOT GET our experienced kids like to help the fleet learns points of sail, how to new students.” determine wind direction, sailing TO THIS POINT OF THEIR There will be eight sessions, each terminology and on-the-water safety. CAREERS WITHOUT LOTS OF lasting one week. Classes begin June It is recommended children between 5 and go through July 24. Times are the ages of 7 and 12, and weighing PRACTICE AND TRAINING. from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., and the age up to 125 pounds, should register for range is from 8 to 18. The C420 this class. boats will be used for these groups. The C420 fleet will learn From June 19-23, there will be special half-day classes weather basics, on-the-water safety, points of sail and using the Optimist boats and targeted at younger sailors. sail trim. In addition, the C420 sailor will learn how to The sessions will be either morning (9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.) work in a skipper/crew team. Campers more than 12 or afternoon (1:30 to 5 p.m.). years old and weighing more than 105 pounds should The cost for the regular week-long class is $250 per register for this class. child. The half-day class is $125 per child. New this year is the Bay Buddies program, which has Students may be dropped off as early as 8:30 a.m. and been designed to introduce the smallest campers to sailing picked up as late as 5:30 p.m. As a special perk, parents in a playful environment, according to FYC. Bay Buddies

LOCAL SAILING SCHOOLS TYPICALLY OFFER INSTRUCTION ON C420 OR OPTIMIST BOATS. will swim, play beach games, throw cast nets and go for sailboat and powerboat rides with counselors while learning about Mobile Bay. The cost is $150 for members and $170 for non-members. Sailors need a U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jacket in their size, sunscreen, closed-toe shoes, towel, change of clothes, sunglasses, bathing suit and a bag to keep their belongings organized. To learn more, visit www.fyc-junior-sailing.com/2017-summer-sailing. You may also contact Holly Murray, FYC waterfront director, at 228-363-0073 or holly@fairhopeyachtclub.com; or Elizabeth McGriff, junior advisor, at fairhopeycsailing@gmail.com. • Buccaneer Yacht Club is not offering a summer sailing school, but will still be busy this weekend serving as host for the 2017 Dauphin Island Race. The skippers’ meeting is Friday at 8 p.m. On Saturday, the Division 1 race begins at 9:30 a.m., while Divisions 2 and 3 will follow 15 minutes later. The race party at Dauphin Island Rodeo Site gets underway at 3 p.m. The trophy presentation will follow at 7:30 p.m. For more information, visit www. bucyc.com.

La Russa receives honor

The Mobile BayBears announced Tony La Russa has been named to the Southern League’s 2017 Hall of Fame. During the 1966 baseball season, LaRussa was a member of the then-Mobile Athletics. He batted .294 to help the minor league club win the Southern League championship. La Russa is best known for his coaching career. He led the Oakland Athletics to a World Series title in 1989, and won rings for the 2005 and 2011 St. Louis Cardinals before retiring from managing. He was inducted into the Major League Baseball Hall of Fame in 2014. The Southern League inductees will be recognized at the 2017 All-Star Game in Pensacola in June.


STYLE HOROSCOPES LUMINEERS SING AN HOMAGE TO CANCER TAURUS (4/20-5/20) — Ignoring a “final notice” to add a street-facing mailbox to your property, you’ll underestimate the U.S. Mail Mafia. While you won’t immediately notice your bills being routinely delivered late, it will be hard to miss the overtly phallic-shaped packages suddenly appearing on your doorstep. GEMINI (5/21-6/21) — After buying the biggest TV you’ve ever owned, you’ll make the mistake of continuing the viewing habits of an averaged-size television owner. While your neighbors will be envious of your new investment, they’ll be less excited about the way you utilize your Cinemax subscription. CANCER (6/22-7/22) — You’ll settle into a comfortable new environment that only remains clean for approximately four hours. Someone will impress upon you that seaweed is actually made out of people. The Lumineers will record a demo song about you called “Please, Go the F*ck to Sleep Now, Charmin’ Darlin’.” LEO (7/23-8/23) — You’ll announce your candidacy for mayor by holding a press conference where you wrestle a bear. Sure, you’ll end up in the hospital for related injuries, but you’ll have that sweet, sweet internet fame, which will garner at least six and a half votes. VIRGO (8/24-9/22) — You’ll get arrested for breaking into the Old Dutch creamery after its grand opening. You’ll be found in diabetic shock after trying to eat your way out of an ice cream vat. You’ll also suffer brain-freeze symptoms for weeks. LIBRA (9/23-10/22) — You’ll announce next week a new plan to build an underwater industrial park. Despite the lack of feasibility, engineers and environmental groups alike will be against the plan. Something had to finally bring those groups together. It just happened to be your dumb idea. SCORPIO (10/23-11/21) — You’ll develop aggressive diabetes after drinking one of the last Starbucks unicorn lattes left in Mobile. While you won’t find the drink appealing beforehand, and certainly not during, you’ll drink it anyway because you’re a slave to trends and deserve to lose a foot. SAGITTARIUS (11/22-12/22) — After making a very public spectacle about boycotting United Airlines and feeling pressured to include American Airlines as well, Qatar Airways will soon be the only flight option you have left. When somebody finally points out how Qatar sustains its wealth, you’ll start stowing away on transcontinental freightliners. CAPRICORN (12/23-1/19) — You’ll be laughed out of the Dauphin Island Gumbo Festival looking for a vegan broth. Later, having eaten only saltines, you’ll concede crabs, because of their hard outer shells, are actually a variety of coastal nut. AQUARIUS (1/20-2/18) — You’ll create Mobile’s first pilgrim festival next week. Known as “April Showers Bring Mayflowers,” it’ll go great until guests realize you know nothing about history. It will still be one of the city’s most popular events. PISCES (2/19-3/20) — You’ll celebrate World Tai Chi Day by driving incredibly slowly and deliberately. You won’t relieve any physical tension, but you’ll spur what the DOT notes is the most chill traffic jam in recent history. ARIES (3/21-4/19) — You’ll nearly win Pride Week’s Karaoke Idol with your ambitious choice of Whitney Houston’s “How Will I Know?” Unfortunately your voice will crack at the thought of some leftover pizza at home, and you’ll lose to the dude who hit all the high notes in “Take On Me.”

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STYLE BOOZIE

Wedding and crawfish season in full swing

it sounded delish! My spy said he requested salmon poke, pickled cucumbers, pickled ginger and a side of Sriracha. Move over, tuna martini, we want the salmon poke like Bob! We hear Mr. Weir was very “grateful” that the Scam could accommodate his special request.

What a wedding

BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

W

hat a crazy couple of days it has been. I’m back to partying like I’m 21 years old, and let’s just say I might be able to party like that but the next day it isn’t a quick rebound like it used to be! Everything is swollen and hurts. This past weekend I somehow managed to stay out until 4 a.m., then decided I should have Sunday Funday and drink all day. Let’s just say those two make for a bad Monday. But no worries, guys, I got it together enough to put together this week’s gossip! Enjoy!

Crawfish coma

Now that Lent has ended, crawfish season is in full swing! Once again, the Exploreum’s Junior Advisory Board hosted its annual Crawfish in the Courtyard last week. The weather was beautiful, the crawfish were delish and the beer was cold! Each year the board hosts the all-you-can-eat crawfish event to raise money for the Discover Science Program, and every year it is a hit! My spy said this year’s event ran a lot more smoothly than last year’s, with crawfish pre-bagged and ready to be eaten — and they were! One thousand pounds of crawfish were consumed and everyone was talking about how good they were! The crawfish were so good that Sean Sullivan of FM Talk consumed more than 70 crawfish in three minutes’ time, winning the crawfish eating contest

once again and, of course, bragging rights! WKSJ’s Shelby Mitchell didn’t do quite as well in the crawfish eating contest as she was only able to finish a few in the given time. My spy said she did seem to finally get the hang of it though. Practice makes perfect, Shelby! Perhaps she can make a comeback next year. I was also informed people were wearing gloves while eating crawfish. And the gloves were not provided, so this means multiple people brought their own gloves to wear while eating crawfish. Maybe I am the strange one, but I have never eaten crawfish with gloves on. Though there might be something to it, as no one wants gross stinky hands! But still.

Sh*t happens

Food for the stars

I don’t know what it is about celebrities and the Royal Scam, but there must be some secret website or code they all speak so that when they’re in Mobile they know to visit the Royal Street eaterie! Once again another celebrity ordered up from the Royal Scam. This one didn’t get carded like Haley Joel Osment did, but he did have a special request. Last Wednesday night Bob Weir of Grateful Dead fame played at the Saenger and Boozie hears it was an awesome show! Before the show he requested a meal from the Royal Scam, and while it was on the lighter side

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It’s wedding season! This past Saturday night there was a wedding at almost every event venue Mobile has to offer. With so many weddings going on, one of Boozie’s spies said she got confused about which wedding was which, and ran out on the dance floor ready to party when she realized she didn’t know anyone and was at the wrong wedding! The one she was supposed to be attending was a block over. Oops! The wedding everyone’s talking about was at the Bragg-Mitchell Mansion. Boozie had multiple people tell her they drove by a few times looking. I was told people even put on their hazard lights so they could slow down and get a better look! And no wonder they wanted to get a better look, everything was beautiful! The Bragg-Mitchell’s lawn was spaced with tents and lights cascading down from the trees. Apparently it looked like a picture from a magazine. Boozie had a spy in attendance who said it was the most beautiful wedding they had ever been invited to. They also mentioned the food was amazing and the drinks flowed like rivers! Her favorite part was ending the night with Chrissy’s (aka adult) milkshakes, Dew Drop hot dogs and beignets! Umm yumm!

My Flora-Bama spy was back at it again this weekend but this time with some stinky news. While in the ladies room, she began to smell something very foul… Once out of the stall she noticed a lady skipping the line because she’d had an accident! Not just a little tee tee accident but a messy one. I’ll keep it as clean as possible but think poop down to her shoes. Yikes. I feel anyone in that situation would run down to the gift shop, buy some clothes and get the heck out of there! But not this lady. Instead she ran down to the dance floor and resumed her partying. Can’t stop, won’t stop! Well, kids, that’s all I’ve got this week. Just remember, whether rain or shine, dramatic or scandalous, or just some plain ol’ crawfish lovin’, I will be there. Ciao!


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com FORECLOSURES FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made by the herein referenced Grantee in the terms of that certain Corrected Vendor’s Lien Deed executed on March 29, 2004, by Robert N. Chambliss and Katherine A. Chambliss, as Grantees to Iras Development Company, Inc., a Alabama corporation, as Grantor which said Vendor’s Lien Deed was recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book 5547, Page 1839 and as corrected in Real Property Book 5570, Page 0732, and said vendor’s lien having been last assigned to McAleer Properties II, L.P., which assignment was recorded in the office of the Judge of Probate Mobile County Alabama in Real Property Book LR7062, Page 267, and default continuing under said Vendor’s Lien Deed, by virtue of and pursuant to the power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, the following described real property will be sold at public outcry, for cash, to the highest bidder, in front of the North entrance of the Courthouse of said County, located at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama 36644, during the legal hours of sale, on June 1, 2017. Lot 27, as per plat of TIMBERLAND, Unit II as recorded in Map Book 89, Page 60, Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama; Said sale is made for the purpose of paying said Vendor’s Lien debt and costs of foreclosure. McAleer Properties II, L.P. Holder of said Vendor’s Lien WILLIAM B. JACKSON, II STOKES & CLINTON, P.C. Attorneys for Lienholder Post Office Box 991801 Mobile, Alabama 36691 251-460-2400 Lagniappe HD April 27, May 4, 11, 2017

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made by the herein referenced Grantee in the terms of that certain Vendor’s Lien Deed executed on July 2, 2012, by Aric L. Vertrees as Grantee to Iras Development Company, Inc. , as Grantor which said Vendor’s Lien Deed was recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book 6911, Page 708; and last assigned to McAleer Properties II, L.P. in Real Property Book 7290, Page 130; and default continuing under said Vendor’s Lien Deed, by virtue of and pursuant to the power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, the following described real property will be sold at public outcry, for cash, to the highest bidder, in front of the North entrance of the Courthouse of said County, located at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama 36644, during the legal hours of sale, on June 1, 2017. Lot 100, as per plat of TIMBERLAND, UNIT IV as recorded in Map Book 98, Page 41, Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama Said sale is made for the purpose of paying said Vendor’s Lien debt and costs of foreclosure. McAleer Properties II, L.P. Holder of said Vendor’s Lien WILLIAM B. JACKSON, II STOKES & CLINTON, P.C. Attorneys for Lienholder Post Office Box 991801 Mobile, Alabama 36691 (251) 460-2400 Lagniappe HD April 27, May 4, 11, 2017

PROBATE NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: THERESA WILLIAMS HARRISON, Deceased Case No. 2017-0241 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 12th day of April, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. PETER G. HARRISON JR as Executor under the last will and testament of THERESA WILLIAMS HARRISON, Deceased. Attorney of Record: PRO SE

granted to the below named party on the 3rd day of April, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. JANELL P. JAMES as Executrix under the last will and testament of, ANNA H. DIXON, Deceased. Attorney of Record: JEROME C. CARTER Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 27, 2017.

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: OLIVETTE ANITA BEATON Case No. 2016-0858 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 4th day of April, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. REGINA BEATON GREEN as Administratrix of the estate of OLIVETTE ANITA BEATON, deceased. Attorney of Record: SANDRA RANDER, Esq. Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 27, 2017.

HELP WANTED LANDSCAPE & FOREMAN WORKERS NEEDED FOR FULL TIME POSITIONS IN MOBILE COUNTY. EXPERIENCE PREFERRED. PAY WILL DEPEND ON EXPERIENCE. CONTACT TURFMASTER LANDSCAPE 251-645-5811. Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 27, May 4, 2017

NOTICE OF SALE The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 02, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 4763 Lott Rd., Eight Mile, AL 36613. 2001 Ford Taurus 1FAFP53U21G124092 2007 Pontiac G6 1G2ZH58NX74230634 1999 Dodge Dakota 1B7FL26X5XS252312 2009 Carolina Skiff EKHG52891809 Lagniappe HD April 27, May 4, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 02, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 11820 Celeste Highland Dr. W., Saraland, AL 36571. 2002 Chevrolet Tahoe 1GNEK13Z42R247432 Lagniappe HD April 27, May 4, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 02, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3916 St. Stephens Rd., Eight Mile, AL 36613. 2000 Dodge Intrepid 2B3HD46R7YH219194 Lagniappe HD April 27, May 4, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 02, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 608 Houston St., Mobile, AL 36605. 2003 Honda Accord 1HGCM72203A035338 Lagniappe HD April 27, May 4, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 02, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 5713 Three Notch Rd., Mobile, AL 36619. 2007 Chevrolet Tahoe 1GNFC13J67R394158 Lagniappe HD April 27, May 4, 2017

PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: ANNA H. DIXON, Deceased Case No. 2017-0181 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 02, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION

Lagniappe HD April 27, May 4, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 02, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  5471 A Hwy. 43, Satsuma, AL 36572. 2008 GMC Sierra 1GTEK19J18Z109916 Lagniappe HD April 27, May 4, 2017

The following vehicle will be sold on 05/26/17 at 5781 Three Notch Road Mobile Al. 36619 Dodge  2B3LJ54T49H503004 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed at 1100 S US Hwy. 31, Bay Minette, AL 36507. 1999 Nissan Frontier 1N6ED26Y0XC319696 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 3091 Western Hills Dr. East, Mobile, AL 36618. 2011 Toyota Tundra 5TFEM5F10BX030150 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on June 02, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed at 1015 E I-65 Service Rd.S., Mobile, AL 36606. 2004 Nissan Maxima 1N4BA41E04C815767

Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, May 4, 2017.

15591 Juniper Lane, Summerdale, AL 36580. 1997 BMW 528I WBADD632XVBW19963

Lagniappe HD April 27, May 4, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed at 712 Jaycee Rd., Bay Minette, AL 36507. 2007 Chevrolet Silverado 1GCEC19V37Z189573 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed at 654 Holcomb Ave., Mobile, AL 36605. 2003 Lexus SC430 JTHFN48Y130035680 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2003 Buick Century 2G4WS52J631250709 1993 Buick Century 1G4AG55N6P6430345 2000 Kia Sportage KNDJB723XY5668160 1996 Toyota Camry 4T1BF12K3TU140645 2010 Toyota Yaris JTDJT4K36A5323337 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 4763 Lott Rd., Eight Mile, AL 36613. 2001 Dodge Ram Truck 1B7HC13YX1J292219 2003 Ford Taurus 1FAFP53U83A231086 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed at 308 Lexington Ave., Mobile, AL 36603. 2006 Chrysler 300 2C3KA63HX6H209622 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 24092 Hwy. 98, Montrose, AL 36532. 1998 Lincoln Town Car 1LNFM83WXWY713460 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 3055 Springhill Ave., Mobile, AL 36607. 2004 Ford F150 1FTPW12564KD47239 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed at 19360 St Stephens Rd., Mt. Vernon, AL 36560. 1996 Cadillac Eldorado 1G6EL12Y3TU620525 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed at 4129 C Government Blvd., Mobile, AL 36693. 2003 Chrysler Sebring 1C3EL65R43N525002

Deadline for legal advertising in Lagniappe HD is every Monday at 3 p.m. Lagniappe HD is distributed each Thursday.

Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed at 1621 West Main St., Prichard, AL 36610. 1993 Chevrolet GMT-400 1GCDC14Z0PE110387 1995 Lexus LS400 JT8UF22E5S0034098 2000 Chevrolet Tahoe 1GNEC13R2YR141843

Lagniappe HD offices are located at 1100B Dauphin St. Mobile, AL 36604.

Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed at 7401 Half Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2006 Mitsubishi Galant 4A3AB36F86E047717 2013 Yamaha YZFR6DR JYARJ16E0DA029989 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

For more information or to place your ad call Jackie at 251-450-4466. Or email at legals@lagniappemobile.com

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 18211 Greeno Rd.,Fairhope, AL 36532. 1988 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme 1G3GR11Y5JP320499 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

A p r i l 2 7 , 2 0 1 7 - M a y 3 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 51


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Lagniappe: April 27 - May 3, 2017  

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