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WEEKLY

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LAGNIAPPE

APRIL 20, 2017 - APRIL 26, 2017 | www.lagniappemobile.com ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com

ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com JANE NICHOLES Reporter jane@lagniappemobile.com

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BAY BRIEFS

Dauphin Island often lacks standby emergency responders.

COMMENTARY

Gov. Kay Ivey restores integrity to office by calling for special Senate election.

BUSINESS

The latest location for Taziki’s Mediterranean Café and other real estate transactions.

CUISINE

KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net

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STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com J. MARK BRYANT Sports Writer sports@lagniappemobile.com STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA RASMUSSEN Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com BETH WILLIAMS Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com ALEEN MOMBERGER Advertising Sales Executive aleen@lagniappemobile.com MELISSA EDGE Editorial Assistant events@lagniappemobile.com

CONTRIBUTORS: Lee Hedgepeth, Ron Sivak, Jeff Poor, Asia Frey, Brian Holbert, Ken Robinson ON THE COVER: FILM PRODUCTION BY DANIEL ANDERSON POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Editorial, advertising and production offices are located at 1100B Dauphin St. Mobile, AL 36604. Mailing address is P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Phone: 251.450.4466 Fax 251.450.4498. Email: ashleytoland@lagniappemobile.com or rholbert@lagniappemobile.com LAGNIAPPE is printed at Walton Press. All letters sent to Lagniappe are considered to be intended for publication. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and Alternative Weeklies Network All rights reserved. Something Extra Publishing, Inc. Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced without the expressed permission of the publishers. Individuals may take one copy of the paper free of charge from area businesses, racks or boxes. After that, papers are $3 per issue. Removal of more than one copy from these points constitutes theft. Violators are subject to prosecution.

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COVER

Even after the commercial success of “Get Out,” local advocates of Alabama’s fledgling film industry are concerned about the possible loss of state financial incentives.

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ARTS

Updates from the world of William March, the Mobile Ballet lawsuit and playwright Leigh Fondakowski.

MUSIC

Austin-based rock band Spoon is kicking off its North American tour at Soul Kitchen April 27.

ROSS PRITCHARD Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager jackie@lagniappemobile.com

Our reviewer steps in to Rooster’s downtown, where he can’t stop crowing about the excellent Latin American cuisine.

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The characters portrayed by Annette Bening, Elle Fanning and others in “20th Century Women” are richly drawn and beautifully portrayed.

MEDIA

Kelly Jones joins the morning lineup at FM-Talk 106.5.

SPORTS

AFC Mobile brings minor league soccer to The Lip.

STYLE

Boozie dishes on egg hunts, wedding bells and life well-lived.

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GOING POSTAL

SOMEONE SHOULD BE ACCOUNTABLE Editor: My husband still talks about when he was in high school, he and a few friends managed to get a six-pack of beer and drove to his friend’s house to watch TV. A policeman stopped them for something minor like a broken tail light. When he looked in the car he discovered the beer. They were all taken down to the police station, booked and kept until a fine was paid. My husband’s father made him spend the night. Now, we can look at the high school fraternity party at the Elks Club. You are correct, the fraternities and sororities at St. Paul’s and UMS-Wright have been doing this for many years. I remember an article in the Azalea City News about a rush party at a house in Spring Hill where drunken 8th graders were throwing up in neighbors’ bushes. At other times there were house parties at Gulf Shores where many were arrested and others ran away. A few years ago at Mardi Gras, a friend and her husband were staying at Holiday Inn Express. In the room next door some young people arrived with parents bringing coolers of shrimp and adult beverages. The young people were wearing sweatshirts from our “elite” private schools. The parents left and the students started to party. After many calls to the front desk things quieted down, but when the kids started dropping shrimp on people below, the hotel made them call their parents to pick them up and leave. With the incident at the Elks Club, there should be a signed contract and credit card with the name of the adult who rented the venue. The police should charge that person.

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They also should get the names of the chaperones who left. I think the Elks Club should have grounds for a lawsuit. The two men who thought the chaperones were still there should not be hung out to dry for the misbehavior of members of a high school fraternity and their parents. If St. Paul’s and UMS-Wright want to get serious about the problem, they could say that if a student joins a high school fraternity or sorority they will be expelled. As former Police Chief Harold Johnson used to say, they are “gangs in blazers.” Bea Ishler Mobile

WHY THE NATIONAL ENDOWMENT FOR THE HUMANITIES MATTERS Editor: Here in Alabama we care deeply about our heritage. We celebrate our culture, and we know that to be worthy of our future we must honor the best of our past. This is why it troubles us that the National Endowment for the Humanities has been slated for elimination. The NEH, which supports museums, archives, libraries, colleges and universities, favors projects that reach the widest possible public for widest possible impact. For example, NEH funding has supported scholars across the country in putting presidential papers online. Thanks to NEH, educators here in Mobile and throughout Alabama can share with our students material that was once packed away in dusty boxes, accessible only to experts.

In addition to preserving our American heritage, the NEH helps expand our knowledge of regions of the world vital to U.S. interests. For example, University of South Alabama scholars with the Center for the Study of War and Memory have asked the NEH to fund a project to translate and publish key documents of Russian military history that give Americans and policymakers critical context for understanding Russian military thinking today. Some have asked, “Why should the American people pay for the NEH?” We would answer that we have a duty to the past to preserve our heritage and a duty to the future to teach our children about our history and culture. Moreover, it is in our interest today to understand other world cultures in order to make informed global policy decisions. Supporting the study and celebration of American history and culture is a civic responsibility and an act of patriotism. Supporting the study of the world is essential to national security. These are the core missions of the NEH and they accomplish them for very little money in comparison to the overall budget. NEH receives .003 percent of our national budget, or about 47 cents per American annually. It has been suggested private networks can fund the kinds of programs supported by the NEH, and they can help, but public support is essential. Think about it: Should Thomas Jefferson’s papers belong to Princeton University or to all Americans? From our small investment in the NEH, we reap a huge reward: ownership of our rich national heritage. Susan McCready and Steven Trout Mobile


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE COUNTY

Miles away

RESCUES ON DAUPHIN ISLAND ‘CHALLENGING’ FOR FIRST RESPONDERS BY JASON JOHNSON

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hough there have been efforts throughout the years to improve emergency services on Dauphin Island, overcoming the distance from facilities on the mainland is still an issue for first responders. The island recorded a population of roughly 1,200 in the 2010 census, but those numbers can quadruple during peak vacation times or large events. Yet, like most of the smaller cities and towns in the area, Dauphin Island is reliant on Mobile County EMS for its ambulance services. Mayor Jeff Collier told Lagniappe during those big events,such as the Alabama Deep Sea Fishing Rodeo, the town works with Mobile County EMS to station ambulances on the island, but on most days the closest ambulance is 23 miles away in Bayou La Batre. Even once an ambulance arrives on the scene of a medical emergency, the nearest hospitals are still 34 miles north in Mobile or 40 miles east in Pascagoula, meaning more than an hour and a half can pass from the time a call is dispatched to the time a patient arrives at the emergency room. “It’s very challenging to provide that service to Dauphin Island for sure,” Mobile County EMS Director Mark Turner said. “The distance and the geography of where they are, plus the low call volume due to the population — both of those things create a challenge for first responders.” Dauphin Island isn’t alone in this situation, though. Providing and funding emergency medical services is a challenge for most rural communities with small tax bases, but for the past several years the island has been able to fill some of that service gap by using public safety officers. Collier said the town currently employs some half dozen public safety officers, who are certified as emergency medical technicians (EMTs) or paramedics. They are also qualified to operate equipment used by the Dauphin Island Volunteer Fire Department (DIVFD). As paid city employees of the Dauphin Island Police Department, the public safety officers perform routine patrol duties such as writing tickets and directing traffic. However, Collier said, at least one of the officers is on call for medical emergencies “24 hours a day, seven days a week.” “In the summer months and on weekends, when things are busy, we’ll typically have two officers in two separate vehicles so they can respond quickly, which they do,” Collier added. “One of the good things about being on an island is that it is somewhat of a small area to cover.” The current system hasn’t always been the way emergency medical services were handled on Dauphin Island, though. Fire Chief Brad Cox said the town has previously tried subsidizing the cost of stationing a county ambulance on the island 12 hours a day. However, that approach proved costly and there was still a possibility the ambulance

could be dispatched elsewhere at any time. Even further back, EMTs with the volunteer fire department would transport patients, but Cox said that was stressful on volunteers even when the department had twice the manpower it does now. “If you’re like I was — dropping off my 5-year-old son at my mom’s house in the middle of the night for two and half hours — it stressed a lot of families,” he said. “That’s why doing a transport service as a volunteer is very hard to do.” Though there used to be more than 20 EMTs volunteering for DIVFD, Cox said the number has dropped to about eight. Notably, Cox said the department saw a decrease in membership shortly after Hurricane Ivan in 2004, which covered nearly a fourth of the island in a storm surge. After researching how other departments handle similar challenges, Cox said the town moved toward the use of public safety officers — a system he says is ultimately better for the remaining volunteers and helps Dauphin Island get the most out of its limited funding. “I hate to throw out finances when we’re talking about people’s lives, but we have to look at it that way. Everything can be solved with money,” Cox said. “We’re building things up and seeing tax revenues increase. Not enough to transport yet, but it could increase our ability to respond.” Cox said he would ideally like to see the town man its own ambulance again or work with the county to have one of its units stationed closer to the island. While Turner said Mobile County EMS would like to do the same, he added the agency also has its own funding limitations. “We’re always evaluating how our ambulances move throughout the county, and we are hoping to get something shifted further south than the Bayou eventually,” he said. “In the meantime, we’re responding as best we can.” Collier said providing emergency medical service is just one way living on a barrier island “presents its own set of challenges.” While he believes the current system is “working pretty well,” he said the town is always looking to “react and supplement” those services where it can. As for Cox, he said he, like everyone else, wishes ambulance response times to Dauphin Island could be a little quicker. However, he also said he understands it’s one of the downsides of living in a rural community, adding “there’s no magic wand” to fix the problem. And, like leaders at most every smalltown volunteer fire department, Cox said he’s beyond grateful for the help he has, but could always use more. “These volunteers, I can’t stress to you how important they are. My gosh, when a house blew up on me seven years ago, they’re the ones who kicked a door down and saved my life,” he added. “These are good people with good hearts that are risking their lives and busting their butts through every circumstance you can imagine to help people.”

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BAYBRIEF | FAIRHOPE

A legal wicket OPPOSITION TO BATTLES WHARF DEVELOPMENT REMAINS STRONG BY JANE NICHOLES

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ongstanding litigation between developer Charles “Buddy” Breland and the city of Fairhope over a tract of land in Battles Wharf is again generating controversy as neighbors and environmental groups renew the fight over whether wetlands there should be filled in. In a normal executive session to discuss pending litigation, a city council is not obliged to name the case or cases that might be discussed. The logic is such sessions are closed to the public under same rules that apply to attorney-client privilege. But as the April 10 Fairhope City Council meeting carried on, it became clear most of the spectators knew well which case was up for a legal discussion that night, and a lot of them wanted to say their piece before officials and lawyers went behind closed doors. They wanted the council to know they’re still opposed to the idea of filling in about 10.5 acres of wetlands, regardless of who approved it 10 years ago or how much money it might cost the city to keep the litigation going. Breland, a well-known local developer, bought 65 acres just south of Nelson Road in 1999 for a little over $500,000. Some suggest the tract is more like a swamp acting as a valuable stormwater retention pond. Neighbors worry about regular stormwater flooding in the area. But Breland received appropriate permits to fill in the 10.5 acres from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Alabama Department of Environmental Management. Breland has maintained for years he did everything required by the permits, including buying wetland mitigation

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credits that went to the Weeks Bay Watershed Protective Association. Meanwhile, Fairhope was passing ordinances Breland claimed were intended to block the development. Several stop-work orders also were issued. The city’s insurer refused to defend Fairhope in an ensuing lawsuit, leading the city to file another. Breland sued Fairhope, claiming he was being targeted with new laws designed to prevent him from developing the land. In October of last year, however, the Alabama Supreme Court ruled in favor of Breland. “Under the circumstances of this case, each time Fairhope enforced its ordinances to stop Breland from filling activity on his property, Fairhope committed a new act that serves as a basis for a new claim,” the court said. In November, new Mayor Karin Wilson took office. Among her many campaign pledges was one to cut legal fees in part by reviewing long-pending cases to see if they could or couldn’t be resolved. She is no longer using the law firm of Hand Arendall, which had been representing the city in this case. Matt McDonald now represents the city. Residents said they feared Wilson would settle the lawsuit and would allow Breland to open the tract for development. Nevermind that Wilson doesn’t have that kind of authority as mayor. “This lawsuit has been going on for 10 years. Ordinances have been placed during that 10 years that can’t apply to someone that had an application in 10 years ago,” Wilson said. “We have spent hundreds of thousands of dollars on this lawsuit. That is a fact.”

Nor will she make a recommendation on how to dispose of the case, she said. Burt Sonenstein, a resident, said neighbors of the property have not been invited to meetings with the developer or the city, nor have they been briefed about the value of the wetlands. “I also feel that the environmental damage is incalculable,” he said. Council President Jack Burrell was presented with a petition against the development containing 113 signatures. Also against filling in the wetlands are two environmental groups, Mobile Baykeeper and the Weeks Bay Foundation. “I understand that you have to consider lawsuits [and] consider the tax dollars of the citizens of Fairhope,” said Cade Kistler, program director for Baykeeper. “But I also understand that it’s going to be critical to protect those wetlands, and that Fairhope is in a very strong position based on the ordinances

THIS LAWSUIT HAS BEEN GOING ON FOR 10 YEARS. ORDINANCES HAVE BEEN PLACED DURING THE 10 YEARS THAT CAN’T APPLY TO SOMEONE WHO HAD AN APPLICATION IN 10 YEARS AGO. WE HAVE SPENT HUNDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF DOLLARS ON THIS LAWSUIT. THAT IS A FACT. that are in place.” Yael Girard, executive director of Weeks Bay Foundation, said the 21-member board of directors for the foundation had unanimously voted to oppose any attempt to fill in the wetlands. Whatever was discussed in the closed executive session, Burrell told the crowd ahead of time no action would be taken that night. Under Alabama’s open meetings law, government bodies may not reach decisions in closed session and must come into open session for any vote on what was discussed. Baldwin County Circuit Court records show that on Monday, April 17, Circuit Judge Joseph Norton granted a motion by Breland and Breland Corp. to continue the case and set trial for the Sept. 5-15 term of court.


BAYBRIEF | BALDWIN COUNTY

‘Room for improvement’ DAPHNE FORMING EDUCATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE BY JANE NICHOLES

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s public education becomes a greater source of concern along the rapidly developing Eastern Shore, Daphne is forming an education advisory committee to work with its own local schools. Daphne also wants to do a feasibility study for an entirely separate school system, but that has nothing to do with the advisory committee, said Councilwoman Tommie Conaway. Rather, the advisory committee would work with individual school administrators to improve academic performance. “It doesn’t have anything to do with the feasibility study,” Conaway said. “It’s just something we need to do, and we should have done it before now. How can we help to improve education in schools?” Conaway was the first principal at Daphne Elementary East, which opened in 2004 and is now so crowded that a major addition is underway. She said she has thought for some time the city should be be more involved with the local schools. At one time, she said, Daphne had a similar type of education advisory committee but it faded away. Councilman Pat Rudicell is also working to form the new committee. “We’re just getting organized. We’re working on a draft ordinance. That should be out very soon. Once we’ve done that, then we’re going to accept resumes,” she said. In recent weeks public talk about a separate system and the possibility of a large-scale residential development being constructed southeast of town have unsettled residents who are already concerned overcrowding might push their children into other schools outside of Daphne.

Likewise, the Baldwin County school board has complained of being left out of conversations that might affect how it draws up future new schools and feeder patterns. The council is proceeding with the feasibility study but no vendor has yet replied to the city’s request for proposals. Mayor Dane Haygood and some council members have not been enthusiastic about the undertaking. Conaway, for one, voted against letting one of the necessary contracts. Fairhope has kept an advisory committee in place for several years. It divides a pot of money contributed by that city’s council among projects, positions or other programs applied for by teachers and administrators. Fairhope’s most recent commitment has been to pay for full-time resource officer coverage by the police department. While Conaway emphasizes Daphne’s committee is in the formative stage, she said it will be academically oriented and serve as a liaison between the City Council and the individual Daphne schools rather than the school board. She has not discussed the proposal with the school board, she said. It is likely to start with five members appointed by the council. According to the minutes of a recent council work session, the committee would not have a funding source but could bring individual requests for funding to the council. The committee would report to the council. The committee should be operating within a few months. “There’s always room for improvement, and we want to be there to provide some assistance,” Conaway said.

Family friendly ALCOHOL RESTRICTIONS TAME BALDWIN COUNTY SPRING BREAK BY JANE NICHOLES

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pring break doesn’t start and end in Baldwin County so much as it starts up and winds down. While there may be some families or groups of college kids out on the beaches this week, the days when nearby universities and local high schools were all out on break at once are over for the year. Gulf Shores’ infamous spring break alcohol ban on the beaches ended Monday, though we don’t recommend throwing a keg party there in celebration. Gulf Shores plans to review the need for the ban every year, but these numbers make a strong argument for the future: • Arrests in Gulf Shores last year from March 3 through April 16: 633; • Arrests this year: 370. “I think it was a lesser crowd,” Gulf Shores Police Lt. Bill Cowan said. “There were still plenty of people here, but I think the alcohol ban for the weeks of spring break had the effect of letting people know that we’re not going to be the college party town. We’re not interested in being the college party town. I think that helped.” When Panama City Beach got so out of control authorities there had to take steps to make it less attractive for the hard-partying college crowd, Pleasure Island leaders feared they would move west. And when some of them did migrate last year, the underage drinking and trashing of some local beaches resulted in Gulf Shores’ temporary alcohol ban as well as a general crackdown on less-than-family-friendly behavior. While Orange Beach didn’t implement an alcohol ban, Mayor Tony Kennon saw great improvement this year.

“From our perspective it was better than last year,” Kennon said. “We had fewer numbers of unsupervised or unchaperoned spring breakers, which I think is a good thing, or we had a lot more kids who came down here who knew how to behave.” Kennon also thinks private condo owners and property managers are doing a better job of screening renters. “Our owners and the folks who rent were very responsible in vetting who was coming,” he said. “They understand how detrimental turning into a no-holds-barred college spring break is to our brand and to our overall business model. So they did a really good job of making sure that these kids were either supervised or they were older and behaved.” Cowan said a couple of weeks of chilly, rainy weather may also have reduced beach crowds simply by keeping people indoors regardless of what they doing. The scariest incident occurred late on the night of April 1, when someone fired shots near The Hangout in the area of the public beach in Gulf Shores. No one was injured and Cowan said Monday police have a warrant out for a suspect’s arrest. “Obviously, anytime something like that happens in such a high-profile place, it puts a bad spin on things,” Cowan said. But the incident also let police show they mean business in identifying a suspect. “We’re going to find whoever you are and we’re going to put you in jail for behaving like that on our very prime beachfront. Our beachfront is special to us, and we’re not going to tolerate that.” A p r i l 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - A p r i l 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 7


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Reduce, reuse, defer

MOBILE CITY COUNCIL DELAYS VOTE ON RECYCLING CHANGES

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BY DALE LIESCH

$3 million judgment against the city’s Solid Waste Authority for breach of contract could have an impact on a new recycling policy being pushed by Mayor Sandy Stimpson’s administration. Earlier this month, Stimpson announced changes to the city’s recycling and litter policies. He said the city’s recycling program would now be single stream and more convenient. The Mobile City Council on Tuesday delayed a vote on two contracts related to the change in policy. While most items introduced for the first time are held over, per council rules, councilors specifically asked about the legal ramifications of approving the contracts after attorneys for Waste Management had successfully argued twice that the city’s Solid Waste Authority breached a 1993 contract by sending yard debris to a landfill not management by WM. Members of the Solid Waste Authority Board, namely Chairman Pete Riehm and Michael Druhan, asked the council for copies of the proposed contracts for review. Council President Gina Gregory said the council would grant their request. “We are sensitive to that,” Riehm said of a possible lawsuit. “We already have a $3 million bill we can’t pay.” City Attorney Ricardo Woods argued recycling has diverted from the WM-managed Chastang landfill for years and the company “missed the boat.”

Riehm told councilors the SWA had been sending yard debris to the Dirt Inc. landfill for 20 years before WM hit them with a lawsuit in federal court, claiming their contract stipulated all waste was to go to Chastang. The city hopes the new policy will increase its “abysmal” landfill diversion rate of 6 percent, Stimpson said. Both Gregory and Councilman John Williams were concerned that if the diversion rate increases, WM might begin to take notice of the city’s recycling program. Williams said Waste Management could change its mind. “When they see it hurt their bottom line, they’re going to start raising their heads,” he said. Complicating the issue is the current lease of the Government Street recycling center, which expires in July. It is the administration’s goal to move the compactors to city-owned property at that point, possibly at the Mobile Police Department’s first precinct on Virginia Street. The city will also have a drop-off location at the Western Administration Complex near Langan Park. The goal is to have a dropoff spot in every council district. Councilmen Joel Daves and Levon Manzie both said they wanted the council to act quickly on the administration’s recommendation. “I’m reluctant to be frozen into inaction on something as impactful as this,” Daves said, acknowledging there were good arguments on both sides. “There is tremendous room for improvement in recycling.”

Shift change IVEY AIMS TO ‘STEADY SHIP OF STATE’

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BY LEE HEDGEPETH

ov. Kay Ivey took office just over a week ago, and while the former lieutenant governor still hasn’t settled into the Governor’s Mansion, she’s already made significant changes in the state. Ivey ascended to the governor’s chair after its former occupant, Robert Bentley, pleaded guilty to misdemeanor campaign finance violations in an agreement ending what was nearly the state’s first impeachment of a top politician. Upon taking office, Ivey alluded to Bentley’s fall from power, but said the “dark day” was also an opportunity for the state. “Today is both a dark day for Alabama yet also one of opportunity. I ask for your help and patience as we together steady the ship of state and improve Alabama’s image. Those are my first priorities as your 54th governor,” Ivey said. “When I took the oath of office in 2011 and then again in 2015, I was prepared for this day, but never desired or expected it. The people of Alabama should know that there will be no disruption in the function of your state government.” On her first full day as governor, Ivey’s office confirmed the termination of Jon Mason from his position as director of Serve Alabama, the governor’s Office of Faith-Based and Volunteer Service, a position that paid $91,400 annually. Mason is the husband of Rebekah Mason, with whom former Gov. Bentley admitted to having an inappropriate relationship, although he continues to deny any physical relationship. Mason’s termination wasn’t the only staff change made by the new governor, either. In

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addition to asking, as is custom, for the resignation letters of all top appointed administration officials, on her second day in office Gov. Ivey abolished the Office of Rural Development, which was headed up by former gubernatorial candidate Ron Sparks. Sparks, who was the Democratic runner-up to Bentley in the 2010 governor’s race, said the move is a blow to rural Alabama. “You all learned of this decision in the same manner as I did, through news media,” he said in a social media post on the matter. “I am deeply saddened that politics came before protecting the people of rural Alabama, and especially before saving the lives of babies.” In response, Ivey said in a statement the office’s purposes will be better served by integrating them into the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs. “Rural Alabama is near and dear to my heart. Don’t forget I’m from rural Wilcox County,” Ivey said. “My decision to shutter the Office of Rural Development will refocus rural development efforts into existing agencies.” In another capital shake-up, Ivey announced she has changed the date for the special election to replace Jeff Sessions in the United States Senate to comply with state law, which says an election must be held immediately following a vacancy if it occurs more than four months from the regularly scheduled election. Previously, Bentley had set an election for November 2018, a move criticized by many, including Republican Secretary of State John Merrill.


BAYBRIEF | COURTS

Prosecutorial misconduct

EXONERATED DEATH ROW INMATE FILES SUIT AGAINST PROSECUTORS BY GABRIEL TYNES

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eorge Martin, a former Alabama State Trooper who spent 15 years on death row for the capital murder of his wife before he was exonerated last year, has filed a federal civil suit against the state, the city of Mobile, Mobile County and a handful of law enforcement officers he claims are responsible for his wrongful conviction. In the 59-page complaint dated April 6 — just over a year after his exoneration — Martin argues his conviction was the result of “multiple instances of intentional and willful misconduct” by the defendants, who include former investigators with the Mobile Police Department and prosecutors in the state’s Attorney General’s office. Martin was convicted by the AG’s office in 2000, five years after the body of his wife, Hammoleketh, was found in a burned-out car in west Mobile. While the Mobile County District Attorney’s Office declined to prosecute, the AG’s office — namely assistant attorneys general Donald Valeska, William Dill and Gerrilyn Grant — picked up the case originally investigated by the Mobile Police Department and persuaded a jury to find him guilty of capital murder. After exhausting his direct appeals, Martin and a team of pro-bono attorneys fought a nearly decade-long battle to introduce new evidence to the case in a process known as a Rule 32 appeal. When Circuit Court Judge Robert Smith ultimately dismissed the case during a retrial last year, he noted it was “riddled with impropriety and missteps brought about during the prosecution,” and said “substantial prejudice has been demonstrated and is such that the simple use of prior transcribed testimony would

not accommodate the confrontation required by the Constitution …” Smith determined Martin’s prosecutors deliberately withheld exculpatory evidence, including an eyewitness statement placing someone other than Martin near the scene, as well as the fact Hammoleketh was known to carry a can of gasoline in the trunk of her car. “The affirmative use by the prosecutors of partial truths and untruths with knowledge satisfy the prosecution’s willful misconduct in this case,” Smith concluded. The state of Alabama has no legislative mechanism for compensating individuals wrongfully convicted of crimes. Earlier this week, defense attorney John Sharer wouldn’t specify what damages Martin was seeking, noting he prefers not to litigate his cases in the press. “[The complaint] contains everything we are claiming,” Sharer said. “The Rule 32 procedure went on for approximately 10 years and there was a great deal of discovery. There were affidavits and depositions and we had one extremely long evidentiary hearing with witnesses and documents. After the new trial was granted and affirmed, we had a further evidentiary hearing on the motion to dismiss. I suspect a lot of that material is a matter of public record.” Sharer said Martin is currently living with relatives and searching for job, although he’s been unsuccessful. “Of course it’s difficult after being cooped up on death row for 15 years,” he said. “I’m sure I can’t anticipate what it would be like; I think you’d have to have been through it to know.” Individuals named as defendants in the complaint include:

• Thomas Calhoun, who led the investigation as a commander in the MPD. According to the complaint, Calhoun “was given the sole responsibility over deciding what to produce and what not to produce to [the] plaintiff’s criminal trial counsel … and the open-file discovery order issued by the trial judge in [the] plaintiff’s criminal case.” It goes on to allege Calhoun “intentionally withheld the multiple pieces of material, exculpatory evidence that later formed the basis of the New Trial Order and the Dismissal Order (‘Brady Material’) and, in at least one case, edited a document to remove the material, exculpatory evidence contained therein and then produced only the edited version to [the] plaintiff’s criminal trial counsel.” • Wilbur Wiliams, who was MPD’s chief of detectives. According to the complaint, Williams knew about the remains of a gas can found in the trunk of Hammoleketh’s car but decided to keep the information confidential. Allegedly, he also provided statements in an evidentiary hearing contradictory to those he made prior. • Donald Pears, the lead MPD investigator. The complaint states Pears also omitted evidence of the gas can from his reports, but also accuses him of contaminating evidence and failing to collect exculpatory evidence and making contradictory statements on the record. • Charles Bailey, a former MPD officer who collected physical evidence in the case. Bailey is accused of failing to collect exculpatory evidence and making contradictory statements on the record. • Mark Neno, a former MPD officer who helped build the evidentiary case against Martin, is accused of colluding with Calhoun to suppress exculpatory evidence and fabricate incriminating evidence, primarily the testimony of a “jailhouse snitch” who claimed Martin confessed to him behind bars. • Donald Valeska, former Alabama assistant attorney general and lead prosecutor. In the complaint, Valeska is accused of manufacturing witness statements and withholding exculpatory evidence, while it also suggests he has a documented history of malicious courtroom tactics in other cases. • William Dill, an assistant prosecutor, is accused of colluding with Valeska to withhold the findings of an exculpatory FBI report. It also claims, along with Valeska, Dill has an “extensive history of prosecutorial misconduct.” • Gerrilyn Grant, a third prosecutor, is also accused of falsifying witness statements in regard to the “jailhouse snitch.” Defendants were unable to be reached for comment prior to press time. The case has been assigned to U.S. District Court Judge Ginny Grenade. The entire complaint accompanies this story on lagniappemobile.com.

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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE COUNTY — a known “wandering risk” — was able to leave the hotel room and walk unaccompanied into the streets of downtown Mobile. However, Agape House isn’t the only target of the lawsuit. Among the defendants is the parent company of the hotel where the residents were staying, as well as Volunteers of America Southeast Inc. [VOA] and AltaPointe Health Systems Inc. LAWSUIT: GROUP HOME RESIDENT RAPED AS STAFF ATTENDED MARDI GRAS According to the suit, VOA was contracted by the victim’s case manager, AltaPointe, to provide administration, oversight, training and supervision of the Chastangs and the group homes they operate. BY JASON JOHNSON Attorneys for the plaintiffs wrote that AltaPointe was “ultimately responsible” for ensuring the other defendants met their contractual and legal obligations to lawsuit has been filed accusing a local group assault case, though its investigation is still open. However, residents, and that both AltaPointe and VOA approved of Agape House’s decision home of creating a situation that led to the rape of a if some of the civil allegations against Agape House prove to relocate residents to the downtown hotel Feb. 28. 25-year-old special needs woman after residents at to be true, the facility and its owners may be facing potential Even before that incident, though, the complaint suggests AltaPointe and VOA the facility were transferred to a hotel in downtown criminal liability as well. “had plenty of evidence” the Chastangs and Agape House “were incompetent, Mobile so their caregivers could enjoy Mardi Gras festivities. Mobile County District Attorney Ashley Rich told poorly managed, and unfit to care” for the victim and other residents, adding that The business at the center of the case is Agape House. Lagniappe Friday her office has already launched a criminal the group home has previously “violated multiple safety standards and protocols.” Located in the Axis area of Mobile County, it’s one of sevinvestigation into “the entire situation” including “the care“VOA and AltaPointe did nothing to address the problems even though they eral residential care facilities operated under the umbrella of givers and whether there’s criminal liability based on their were well equipped with information to alert them that violations of their stanAgape Ministries Inc. — a nonprofit organization operated duty to provide for these individuals.” dards and protocols were occurring,” it continues. by Rodney and Shetecia Chastang. The lawsuit claims Agape House displayed “negligence Both VOA and AltaPointe have declined or failed to respond to opportunities According to the Mobile Police Department, the sexual and wantonness” by failing to supervise the victim after seeking comment on this report. A spokeswoman with AltaPointe also declined assault was reported after officers responded to reports of a she and other residents were “uprooted from [their] isolated to elaborate on the corporation’s relationship with VOA or Agape House. Calls to naked female walking around the area of Bienville Square. residence in Axis” and moved into hotel rooms “so the Agape House have also gone unreturned. Unable to communicate with officers, she was transported to Chastangs and the [Agape House] staff could party during According to its website, “AltaPointe owns, operates and staffs several group the hospital and evaluated for sexual assault. Mardi Gras.” homes,” though it also monitors a number of adult foster homes operated by The victim, who Lagniappe is choosing not to iden“Upon moving [the victim] from her isolated and familprivate contractors. Given that Agape House and Agape Ministries are both indetify, suffers from Phelan-McDermid syndrome, a rare iar surroundings to the noise and chaos of downtown Mobile pendently owned by the Chastangs, they likely fit into the latter category, though chromosomal disorder “generally thought of as a severe during Mardi Gras, [the caregivers] had a heightened duty to this has not been confirmed by AltaPointe. form of autism.” ensure [she] received twenty-four-hour, one-on-one care and In a previous interview with Lagniappe, AltaPointe’s performance improveAt the time, police said she had been staying with her supervision,” the complaint reads. “And, the existing duty to ment director, Sherrill Alexander, said AltaPointe does not contract with unlicaretakers at the Candlewood Suites on Feb. 28 (the evening protect [the victim] from her ‘wandering risk’ became even censed group homes, of which there are roughly 20 in Mobile County. She said of Fat Tuesday) but left her room. However, the lawsuit greater because of the deliberate decision to place [her] in an any facility housing AltaPointe patients would be certified through the Alabama claims she was only able to leave her room because she’d unfamiliar setting surrounded by the cacophony and chaos Department of Mental Health. been left alone “while her so-called caregivers were out of Mardi Gras.” According to the ADMH website, Agape House LLC was previously listed celebrating Mardi Gras.” The lawsuit suggests that in the hours before the victim among the certified sites reported by the agency, though they’ve not been certified “[She] could not even tell the officer who she was or was sexually assaulted, the task of supervising her was as of April 4, 2017 — just over a month after the Fat Tuesday incident. what had happened to her,” the complaint reads. “Later, repeatedly redelegated to different people. Two sisters Agape House has previously been certified through VOA which, according to officers found [her] pajamas and her soiled adult diaper. “closely related to the Chastangs” were initially supervising ADMH, was previously certified through the Council on Quality and Leadership. Doctors at [a local hospital] concluded she had been forcethe victim and another resident, who were sharing a one-bed Using this “deemed” method of certification, “DMH accepts a certification, fully raped.” She was administered prophylactic antibiotics hotel room. license or accreditation issued by other recognized state or national organizain an effort to protect her from sexually transmitted diseases, Ultimately, their care was left up to people who were tions in lieu of an additional review through the DMH certification process” — according to the complaint. “not trained or employed” by Agape House in any way. It meaning the usual 24-month site visits DMH normally conducts are “waived” So far, MPD has not identified a suspect in the sexual was at that point, according to the lawsuit, that the victim at those facilities.

‘So-called caregivers’

A

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COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

Ivey moves to break up slimy Bentley-Strange alliance ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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ven the best-laid plans of mice and giant men can run aground. At least that seems to be the lesson we can take from newly minted Gov. Kay Ivey’s decision to shorten the timeline on “Big Luther” Strange’s election for the senate seat he swiped. The Luv Guv and Big Luther seem to have had it all worked out — Luther diddled around on investigating Gov. Bentley, then Bentley gave Luther the United States Senate seat he coveted and set an election date far enough away to theoretically give Strange a leg up on retaining the seat. But Gov. Ivey threw a monkey wrench into the machinery when she announced Tuesday the law requires a special election this year for the seat formerly occupied by Jeff Sessions. “I promised to steady our ship of state. This means following the law, which clearly states the people should vote for a replacement U.S. Senator a soon as possible. The new U.S. Senate special election dates this year are a victory for the rule of law,” Ivey said in a statement issued as the election change was announced. So now things have moved up a whole year, with a primary set for Aug. 15, a runoff Sept. 26 and gen-

STRANGE HAS RENDERED HIMSELF UNWORTHY OF HOLDING PUBLIC OFFICE, EVEN IN A STATE CONSTANTLY SETTING NEW LOWS FOR ETHICAL BEHAVIOR IN OFFICE. ”

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dig his heels into the position. There are lots of variables at play here. Luther has to know the sense of outrage over what he did is real. Obviously he was playing the hunch that enough voters won’t really care or understand what he did, otherwise he would have just restrained himself and run for the position in the next election. So now Luther has to wonder if the outrage and a qualified opponent or two will put him out on his butt. I’ve already been hearing radio ads by third-party groups that sound an awful lot like campaign ads for Luther’s election. The wheels are spinning for sure. Strange showed us just exactly what he is willing to do for this senate seat, so don’t expect anything less than a full-throttle effort to keep what he believes to be his. Much will depend upon who else decides to run for Sessions’ stolen seat. The state’s highly embarrassed Republican hierarchy should really get behind a candidate with a little integrity and find a way to dislodge Luther Strange from the government teat. Big Luther has shown himself to have no ethics and already proven his own aggrandizement is job No. 1. He has rendered himself unworthy of holding public office, even in a state constantly setting new lows for ethical behavior in office. Hopefully Gov. Kay Ivey’s efforts to undo the slimy Bentley-Strange alliance will be successful. A man who has already done the things Big Luther has just to get into office seems pretty likely to end up as just another embarrassment to the state down the line.

THEGADFLY

eral election Dec. 12, all this year. Bentley had tried to claim he was doing taxpayers a favor by allowing Strange to squat in the seat for another year until the 2018 general elections take place because a special election will cost more money. That’s a point Gov. Ivey made, but at this time the special election expense takes a back seat to possibly rectifying the clear injustice foisted upon Alabama by Robert Bentley and Luther Strange. If the leadership of this state had any credibility, we might say Ivey is trying to restore it. But with a governor who just resigned in disgrace, a chief justice removed from office for the second time and a speaker of the house convicted of felonies, Ivey is in the unenviable position of trying to establish at least a modicum of credibility. The “Politicos Gone Wild!” routine has worn all the way through. There’s little doubt Ivey is at the very least letting voters know she doesn’t intend to get sucked into the Bentley-Strange vortex. In not so many words she told the state exactly what most of us already thought: Bentley’s appointment of Strange to the U.S. Senate smells like a week-old dead catfish lying on the banks of the filthiest bayou in Alabama. Strange got the appointment through deception and flatly unethical means, probably violating the law in the process. Making his road to keeping that ill-gotten position for six more years more difficult is exactly what Ivey should have done. Of course Big Luther is putting on a brave face and acting like he couldn’t care less whether the election is today, tomorrow or 30 years from now. But, as the punditry goes, the longer he’s in office before an election, the more he digs in like a big, fat tick in a fancy suit. Of course Big Luther knows if he can weather that first election, chances are he’ll be senator for as long as his

heart continues beating. Alabamians aren’t known for fickleness in re-electing their U.S. Senators. And while I’m sure Big Luther has known this possibility existed, his preference has to be getting another year further away from the smoldering ashes of the Bentley regime meltdown. Right now things are still nuclear hot. When Luther stands up in front of the media he’s certainly going to be asked why he met with Bentley to ask for a job while his office was investigating the governor. The scenario is only going to be run over again and again. Strange asked the House of Representatives to stop impeachment proceedings because his office was working on something related. Then he started playing coy about whether there was any investigation at all when it looked like Jeff Sessions might be appointed U.S. Attorney General. Next we were treated to the almost unimaginable spectacle of the state’s attorney general going to meet with the subject of an investigation in order to ask for an appointment to Sessions’ seat. That’s politics so raw it’ll give you E. coli. It all broke the best possible way for the two men in the room that day. Bentley was super screwed already and heading for the slammer. But he ended up getting to cut a deal, pleaded some misdemeanors and walked a free man, even after using law enforcement as his personal thug crew and clearly misusing state funds to hide his affair. Meanwhile Big Luther gets the job he’s craved like nicotine for years with an election date that gives him time to really

Cartoon/Laura Rasmussen

ALABAMA LOSES FILM INCENTIVE, BECOMES D-LIST CAPITAL OF THE WORLD.


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COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

The return of Kudos and Kooties ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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t’s time for another somewhat exciting edition of “Kudos and Kooties,” the Hidden Agenda column gimmick which heaps praise and poo-poo on all of the good and god-awful things going on in our community, respectively speaking, of course. (If you say the previous sentence in a game show announcer voice, it takes this from somewhat exciting to marginally exciting. Or wait, maybe it’s the other way around. Strike that, reverse it!) Anyway, we have lots of things to get to this week, so let’s get started. Kudos go to … Gov. Kay Ivey In her one-week tenure, our new governor fired our former governor’s mistress’ husband, Jon Mason, who was given a job by said former “Lover-nor” Robert Bentley. A sweet-paying gig, which looked more like a payment to a pimp than anything else. She “accepted the resignation” of the top law enforcement officer in the state, ALEA Secretary Stan Stabler, who clearly stood up and lied to our faces when he knew the governor was having an affair and then took a promotion to boot. And, most importantly, Ivey set the special election to fill the U.S. Senate seat vacated by Jeff Sessions for later this year. Bentley conveniently filled this seat with former Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange, a man whose office was supposedly investigating him at the time, and then also very conveniently set the special election designed to fill the spot for more than a year later, when he would have been been leaving office if he hadn’t resigned. The primary will now take place on Aug. 15, with a runoff on Sept. 26, if needed. The general election will be on Dec. 12. “I promised to steady our ship of state,” Ivey said in a press release earlier this week. “This means following the law, which clearly states the people should vote for a replacement U.S. Senator as soon as possible.” The optics of Bentley’s appointment of Strange could not have looked shadier. Even though it is going to cost the state a pretty penny to do this, it will restore integrity back to this important office. Keep on steadying that ship, Gov. Ivey! So far, so good! Rep. Bradley Byrne As other Republican lawmakers across the country have completely avoided town hall meetings due to sometimes hostile left-leaning

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attendees who are opposed to Trump and his policies, Byrne has held 11 in the last four days. Even if you don’t agree with Byrne’s politics, you have to respect his willingness to get out there and hear from constituents on both sides of the aisle. Granted, he should be willing to do this, as it is his job and every other member of Congress’. But there have been many who have fallen down on their duties of late. And those members who have canceled events, held telephone town halls or filled their rooms with friendly faces by design could not look like bigger cowards. It’s nice to know our congressman is not of that ilk. Kooties go to … U.S. Sen. Luther Strange When former Alabama Attorney General Luther Strange accepted the appointment by (now former) Gov. Robert Bentley to fill the U.S. Senate seat vacated by Jeff Sessions, he had to have known even if he wasn’t making a deal with the devil, it would surely look like it. Strange, who was the odds-on favorite for the position anyway, may be the most honorable giant to ever hold this office, but the circumstances under which he obtained his fancy new title will forever taint the office as long as he holds it. His own ambition outweighed his obligation to the citizens of Alabama. And now it just may cost him the seat he now holds and probably would have held if he had only come out and honorably declined that horny little devil’s offer. All of us, if … We don’t pay attention to our elections and vote! Though Alabama politics may now be far less sexy, or at least filled with less geriatric sexy talk (we hope), it is incumbent upon all of us to stay just as focused on what’s going on as we were when we were devouring the seedy details of clandestine breast holding and Wanda’s desk. We will soon be voting for one of our two U.S. senators, a position that does not often come up. Special elections have historically low turnouts. If we let that history keep repeating, we are going to end up with yet another clown in one of our most important offices. Also in 2018, we will be voting for governor, lieutenant governor and other statewide offices. Most of us don’t even know who our state reps and senators are, but then we act completely dumbfounded when they do something asinine in Montgomery. Pay attention, educate yourself on the choices, and then show up at the polls and vote for a decent human being. Otherwise, accept these Kooties and the government you deserve.


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COMMENTARY | THE MONTGOMERY MINUTE

Gubernatorial leadership, forthwith BY LEE HEDGEPETH/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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or Alabama’s political leaders, it’s crunch time. For newly seated Gov. Kay Ivey, it’s a time of governmental transition and transformation: an opportunity to seize, while she can, the leadership vacuum on Goat Hill left in the wake of Robert Bentley’s fall from power, and so far she seems to be doing a pretty good job. Real leadership, though, is a choice she’s had to actively make, and it has come at a price. Before Bentley’s resignation — before he knew the drip, drip, drip of scandal, cover-ups and eventual investigations would drown him — the ex-governor tried to make all his worries disappear. Even though the Republican governor had refused to endorse Donald Trump in his run for president, then-Gov. Bentley hit the jackpot when the New York businessman upset the political establishment and successfully took the White House. That jackpot came in the form of then-Sen. Jeff Sessions’ ascendancy to the office of United States Attorney General, leaving an empty U.S. Senate seat for Bentley to fill. Bentley’s pick to replace Sessions in the nation’s most exclusive club? The Alabama attorney general we now know was charged with investigating and prosecuting the scandal-ensnared executive: Luther Strange. After the Blagojevich-style appointment, Bentley did what hadn’t even been considered a possibility: he ignored state law to allow Strange to avoid an election. Alabama law says if a vacancy in the U.S. Senate occurs more than four months out from the regular election cycle, the governor can appoint only a temporary replacement and call a special election to fill the seat “forthwith,” as in “without delay,” according to Merriam-Webster. Bentley chose instead to set the election for November 2018, during the

regular cycle. That’s well over a year of delay any way you look at it, and it’s a clear violation of the law. Fortunately, though, it seems to be a violation Bentley’s successor is unwilling to let stand. Gov. Ivey has made some very positive changes since becoming governor — particularly in signing legislation affirming the role of the jury in death penalty cases, and ridding the state payrolls of Bentley spoils appointments. The new election date just set for the U.S. Senate seat now held by Bentley appointee Strange — a year earlier than the disgraced ex-governor had called for — is certainly one of them. The new schedule sets the primary on Aug. 15, with a runoff on Sept. 26, and a general election to be held on Dec. 12. “There’s a limited time available to make a reasonable decision on that,” Ivey had previously said of the Senate election date. “If we moved the date, it would cost about $15 million that will come straight out of the general fund. So while I have some concerns about the whole situation, I have to also be very mindful of the impact that it would have.” After those early signals from Ivey, Alabama House Rep. Chris England, a lawyer and Democrat who has long advocated an immediate election, called for the new governor to do the right thing and call the election “forthwith.” “Interesting quote to the say the least from the person that can fix this problem with a stroke of her pen,” England wrote on social media. “So, to recap, you don’t have to follow the law if you feel like it is too expensive. Following the law is now somehow optional if there is some sort

COMMENTARY | THE GRIOT’S CORNER

Doing the possible BY KEN ROBINSON/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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tto von Bismarck — the man considered most responsible for making Germany a unified, modern nation by melding together 39 independent German states in the late 1800s, thus turning Germany into one of the most formidable powers of its day — once noted, “Politics is the art of the possible, the attainable — the art of the next best.” This master strategist and statesman also observed, “Politics is not a science … but an art.” An art that when practiced well moves a society forward. These wise words sum up well the process of governing in a democratic state. Politics — the actions or activities concerned with achieving and using power in a country or society — is not, as Bismarck noted, an exact science. There are no firm rules or laws, such as those found in the sciences, governing its operation or use in a society. In order to exercise such power artfully, those who hold political power in a society must: 1) have a keen interest in advancing the interest of the people; 2) have some degree of moral authority — not necessarily being saintly, but their lives and person should communicate they can be trusted and their word means something; 3) understand he or she will not always get everything they want — therefore, to some degree compromise is necessary. This list is no way exhaustive, but taken together these elements, when embodied by a political leader(s), allow politics in a democratic society to become, in Bismarck’s words, “the art of the possible, the attainable — the art of the next best.” The exercise of this art is what has allowed the United States to ascend to political primacy over the

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past century; the lack of it of late has mired our nation in political dysfunction. Closer to home, things politically now seem much more possible. Achieving the politically possible is difficult when your political leaders are serious problems themselves. Exercising the art of politics becomes impossible when a political craftsperson is profoundly flawed. This is precisely the position Alabama was in. Though the art of politics has never been exercised particularly well in Alabama, over the last year or so it has been especially enfeebled. The grandfatherly figure that led the executive branch of state government, far from being the Mayberry character he presented himself to be, turned out to be more like Robert De Niro’s “dirty” grandpa character from the movie “Bad Grandpa.” The former leader of the legislative branch, who promised in 2010 to usher in and lead one of the most ethical, efficient and fiscally conservative governments Alabama has ever had became the leader of just the opposite. Now in prison, Mike Hubbard, who oversaw the Republican takeover of the Alabama State House, personally became mired in a slew of unethical and illegal conduct. Hubbard oversaw a legislature that caused Claire Austin, a longtime Republican and Montgomery lobbyist, to declare, “Instead of tax-and-spend Democrats, [we got] borrow-and-spend Republicans.” The former head of Alabama’s judicial branch, Roy Moore, who has twice now confused the position of

of price.” England had a similar response when then-Gov. Bentley also cited cost as a reason to delay the election. State law governing special elections for senate vacancies does not mention cost. It wasn’t just Democrats and state law calling for an immediate election, either. Republican Secretary of State John Merrill says he believes state law requires an election sooner than November 2018. The state’s Legislative Reference Service, which helps lawmakers draft legislation, also issued a memo concluding the state law requires an election sooner than the date scheduled by Bentley. “It is a practical and reasonable interpretation of the statute to conclude that the Legislature intended for the governor to call a special election immediately or without delay if the vacancy occurred more than four months from the next general election,” the LRS memo says. Perry Hooper Jr., who was considered by Bentley to replace Sessions and ran Trump’s Alabama campaign, said he also believed Ivey should call the election without delay. “I hope Kay will take a hard look at that and do what, in my opinion, would be responsible and that’s designate this election at an earlier part of the year,” he said. Rep. England’s comments on the issue ended with a clear call to action for Gov. Ivey: “I urge our new governor to stop with the excuses and go ahead and give the people what we deserve and also what the law requires, set the special election this year, and let’s move toward closing the chapter on one of the worst incidents of corruption in Alabama history,” Rep. England wrote. Apparently Governor Ivey heard those calls — from both sides of the aisle — and made the right decision. On Tuesday, Ivey ordered the election be held without delay: a good decision by our new governor. “I promised to steady our ship of state,” Ivery said in a statement about the new election date. “This means following the law, which clearly states the people should vote for a replacement U.S. Senator as soon as possible. The new U.S. Senate special election dates this year are a victory for the rule of law.” The decision to move up the election up — which, again, carries a significant cost to the state — came a week after Ivey entered office. “This is not a hastily made decision. I consulted legal counsel, the finance director, Speaker [Mac] McCutcheon, Senate President Del Marsh and both budget chairmen since the cost to the General Fund could be great. However, following the law trumps the expense of a special election,” Ivey added. Now that Gov. Ivey has done her part, it’s time for us to do ours. Ivey has finally given Alabamians the opportunity to get rid of one of the last vestiges of the Bentley debacle: Luther Strange. It’s time for an election: an example of gubernatorial leadership, forthwith.

Chief Justice of the Alabama Supreme Court with that of Charleston Heston’s character Moses from the classic film “The Ten Commandments,” made a mockery of a state judicial system that has been too long overlooked, underfunded and understaffed. Serious barriers to making the art of politics possible have been removed. This doesn’t mean that in a state like Alabama others don’t exist, but if there was ever a time for public optimism, it is now. Already the state has gotten rid of an odorous practice we were the last in the nation to eradicate. Called Judicial Override, in one of her first acts as the state’s new governor, Kay Ivey signed a bill eradicating the practice. With this power, judges had the ability to override a jury’s decision on death penalty cases. The practice led, during election time in Alabama, to a surge in death penalty sentences when judges up for re-election tried to look tough on crime by going against a jury verdict. Justice was often perverted to garner votes. As a former school teacher, our new governor has spoken of a keen interest in making education a real top priority, not just offering lip service. With only several weeks left in the legislative session, Gov. Ivey and state legislative leaders seem more on the same page concerning criminal justice reform. They appear to recognize reform is more than just about building new prisons, it’s also about addressing issues such as mental health and staffing in our prison system. Following the lead of 26 other states, the Senate Judiciary Committee recently sent to the full Senate SB200, a measure that would, according to the bill’s own language, “[increase] employment opportunities for people with [criminal] records, will reduce recidivism and improve economic stability in our communities.” The “Ban the Box” bill, as it is known, would remove the criminal history check-box from applications for many local and state government jobs. It has been a proven method for allowing applicants with a criminal history to be considered based on merit and not immediately excluded due to a box they had to check on a job application. Other very pressing issues must be addressed, for sure, but at least for now politics, that art of the possible, of the attainable, seems within reach. This past weekend Christians celebrated Easter. It’s the observance of a holiday that has at its heart the message of possibility. At its core, it’s a celebration of darkness giving way to light, to hope, to newness. For a state in need of it, may our leaders allow themselves to be infused with this spirit — that of the possible — for the good of all.


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COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

The art of the liberal dog whistle BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM

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or the last several years, the American left has decried the use of certain words and phrases they say convey coded messages. While those words mean one thing to most people, they mean something completely different to a certain segment people. During the 2008 presidential campaign and for the eight years of President Barack Obama’s presidency, the left claimed calling the president by his full name “Barack Hussein Obama” was a dog whistle. Why? Because the name “Hussein” sounded Islamic and like former Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein. So, for some people, it was just a name. But to the unwashed with their racist tendencies, they all knew what “Hussein” was meant to convey. In a time when terms like “microaggression” and “safe space” have entered our vernacular, the media and the left analyze our use of the English language to an extreme degree. It is no longer enough just to be aware of the literal meaning words have; now people need to

is he was named for Davis to promote the legacy of the Old South. It seems those who decry the dog whistle are also very good at using their own versions of the dog whistle. Just as Obama did not select his middle name, Sessions did not choose his. Are we supposed to apply different standards to both? This left wing dog whistle syndrome extends to other things. The mere mention of the word “Alabama” in some circles is meant to conjure up negative connotations — trailer parks, incest, Trump voters, poor dental hygiene, etc. In 2008, the Washington City Paper offered an entire article on the phenomenon of calling someone “Bama,” as in, “He’s so Bama.” The City Paper’s thesis was that calling somebody “Bama” was borderline derogatory because no person in Washington, D.C., should be likened to the state of Alabama. Compare that to comments from then-presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz, Republican of Texas. He characterized his opponent Donald Trump as a candidate with “New York values.” That took on many interpretations. New York values? How could you possibly attack an entire state in such a way? Some interpreted it as an anti-Semitic dog whistle. At the time, it was pretty clear Cruz was referencing the state’s liberal-leaning politics and elite tastes. But why let that get in the way of so many other possible interpretations that could disparage a political candidate and his supporters? The fact is, conservatives do not spend a lot of time thinking about this stuff. Sure, there are those in the business of Republican politics who do, but when have we ever heard of a college Republicans meeting being a forum for those in fear of microaggressions? The left claims it is the right that engages in so-called dog whistle politics. However, they seem blind to their own stealthy, race-baiting messaging. “LOL. Let’s keep repeating ‘Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III’ because it makes him seem like a racist, Old South aristocracy nitwit.” But saying “Barack Hussein Obama” — “That’s nothing but a racist dog whistle meant to stir up Islamophobic emotions because most people that hear it are too dumb to know it is a secret literary device.” There are two sets of rules, but it’s nothing new. We’ve known that for some time now. Those on the right will be called out for their dog whistles, but those on the left rarely ever will be. What we can glean is the self-proclaimed experts on detecting these code words also have the uncanny ability to use their own version of those words themselves.

IT IS NO LONGER ENOUGH JUST TO BE AWARE OF THE LITERAL MEANING WORDS HAVE; NOW PEOPLE NEED TO CONSIDER WHAT THOSE WORDS MIGHT MEAN TO SOMEONE ELSE … consider what those words might mean to someone else … or even what someone else might think those words suggest to a third party. “Don’t tell me words don’t matter,” Obama said in a 2008 speech in Wisconsin. He was right. They matter more than most of us thought they could. Given this standard the media and left have demanded — where we need to consider every facet of words and language to avoid offense — doesn’t it stand to reason that they do the same? Consider the tactics Trump opponents have used to attack Mobile’s own Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Sessions, whose full name is “Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III,” is one of the left’s favorite targets in the Trump administration. Left-leaning show hosts and pundits on MSNBC seething with smugness and contempt pronounce “Jefferson Beauregard Sessions III” in such a way as to suggest to their audience that this a Southerner with antebellum baggage or worse — conjuring images of white, slave-driving plantation owners, or at a minimum, guys parading around in Ku Klux Klan robes. The first Jefferson Beauregard Sessions was Sessions’ grandfather, Jefferson Beauregard Sessions Sr., born in 1860. Obviously, this was a common name at the time. Jefferson Davis, who was a U.S. Senator from Mississippi at the time of the eldest Sessions’ birth and would go on to be the president of the Confederacy, had the same name. The suggestion by some of Sessions’ critics

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BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

Taziki’s Mediterranean Café opens in Mobile BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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irmingham-based Taziki’s Mediterranean Café opened its first Mobile-based location inside Legacy Village, located at 9 Du Rhu Drive in Spring Hill. Buff Teague and Allen Garstecki of JLL handled the transaction. Plans are in place to possibly open a third restaurant in Pensacola over the next few years, according to local Baldwin County-based Taziki’s franchise owner Mark Hemby. Lela’s Gourmet Catering is relocating to 4456 Old Shell Road in Mobile, down the street from its former site at 4507 Old Shell Road. Buff Teague with JLL handled the transaction. According to Cameron Weavil, vice president of the Weavil Co., Warren Railroad Services has leased 255 N. Broad St., formerly Midtown Auto Service. The property has a 5,700-square-foot building on site. The tenant contracts with the railroad to maintain its fleet of rail trucks. The company is based in Bay St. Louis, Mississippi; this is its second location. Hummingbird Ziplines will be opening a new addition to the entertainment options at The Wharf in Orange Beach this summer. The new attraction will feature six towers strategically positioned for a zipline experience over the mixed-use property. As reported earlier, ticket sales will be handled from new office space on Main Street at The Wharf. Jeff Barnes with Stirling Properties handled the lease transaction. Cricket Wireless has opened a new location in the area. The national retailer recently leased 1,750 square feet of retail space at 18520-B Media Drive, adjacent to Dollar Tree in Robertsdale. Andrew Dickman with Stirling Properties handled the transaction. The Leukemia & Lymphoma Society Inc. is leasing 1,313 square feet of office space in the Hillcrest Office Building at 1111 Hillcrest Road in Mobile. Jill Meeks

with Stirling Properties represented the property owner. Niki Coker with NAI-Mobile LLC worked for the tenant. Pratt Thomas with The Merrill P. Thomas Co. Inc. recently reported selling the property at 3213 Dauphin St. formerly occupied by the Dermatology Center. The building is approximately 7,000 square feet. The buyer plans to demolish the structure to build a Bojangles Famous Chicken ‘n’ Biscuits. The property sits on approximately 1.2 acres and sold for $782,000. Mike Reid with WhiteSpunner Realty worked for the buyer. Kids Kount Therapy Services, which provides speech, occupational and physical therapy for children, has leased 1,200 square feet of space at 3512 Godwin Court in Mobile and is now open for business. This is the second office location for the company. Jill Meeks with Stirling Properties managed the transaction. GRGI Inc. Physical Therapy is leasing 2,400 square feet of office space at 9948 Airport Blvd. in Mobile, with plans to open later this month. Angie McArthur with Stirling Properties handled the transaction. An out-of-state investor recently purchased two buildings at 8630 Bellingrath Road for $250,000. The first building encompasses 9,000 square feet and has been leased for three years. The leasing tenant is Chatawa Management, a dumpster refurbishing company. The second building is 3,000 square feet and is available for lease, according to Pete Riehm of NAI-Mobile, who represented the buyers. Joey Betbeeze of Betbeeze Realty Company worked for the sellers, who are also out of state. Painting With a Twist has leased a 2,100-square-foot store in Eastern Shore Plaza located at 10200 Eastern Shore Blvd. in Spanish Fort. The art studio chain plans to open in late summer. Angie McArthur with Stirling Properties worked for the landlord. Jones Lang LaSalle worked

on behalf of the tenant. Roughly 1.13 acres of property located at 5810 U.S. Hwy 90 in Theodore was acquired for $1.95 million by Regions Bank, as reported by Andrew Chason with Marcus & Millichap in Fairhope. Regions Bank currently occupies the property. Burger King is opening a new location at 659 Government Blvd. in downtown Mobile. The fast-food chain will occupy 3,481 square feet of restaurant space in the former Arby’s location, and is expected to open this fall. Angie McArthur with Stirling Properties represented the landlord. The Shopping Center Group worked for the tenant. Ahead of a grand opening for the general public, Grimaldi’s Pizzeria will hold a soft opening for select guests in a public relations event to be held at its newest location inside The Shoppes at Bel Air in Mobile on Wednesday, April 19, 6-8 p.m. A tasting event will include complimentary samplings of chef’s selection pizzas, freshly tossed salads and house-made desserts, as well as Grimaldi’s signature red wine blend, Mille Gradi.

AHA awards Providence “Gold” status

Providence Hospital recently earned “Gold” status in the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s “Get with the Guidelines — Heart Failure” program. Per a news release, this award recognizes facilities that achieve at least two years of 85 percent or higher adherence to the program measures that are demonstrated to improve the quality of patient care and outcomes. Three years ago, more than 15 percent of all patients with congestive heart failure at Providence were readmitted within a month of being discharged. Readmissions are often the result of inconsistent follow-up by patients who do not have a good understanding of their illness, are non-compliant with medication and other aspects of their needed care, and often involve high costs. To decrease the number of readmissions, the hospital’s Caring Hearts Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) Clinic Program was expanded to include daily rounds by a CHF nurse educator, who visits all hospitalized patients with heart failure to make sure they have a primary care physician and their medications. Home health services are also secured for those who need them and education is provided about CHF. After discharge, every CHF patient is contacted to make sure they understand and remember what they’ve been told about their follow-up care. Later the discharge team calls patients regularly to confirm appointments, make sure they have their medication and simply check to see how they’re feeling. As a result, about three times as many patients are now seen in the clinic, and the number of readmissions has fallen from 15.31 percent in fiscal year 2014 to 12.3 percent in fiscal year 2017.

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FIREHOUSE SUBS ($)

HOT SUBS, COLD SALADS & CATERING 6300 Grelot Rd. • 631-3730

FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES ($) $10/PERSON • $$ 10-25/PERSON • $$$ OVER 25/PERSON

COMPLETELY COMFORTABLE ALL SPORTS BAR & GRILL ($) 3408 Pleasant Valley Rd. • 345-9338

AL’S HOTDOGS ($)

CLASSIC HOTDOGS, GYROS & MILKSHAKES 4701 Airport Blvd. • 342-3243

ATLANTA BREAD COMPANY ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SALADS & MORE. 3680 Dauphin St. • 380-0444

BAKE MY DAY ($)

OLD-FASHIONED SOUTHERN BAKE SHOP 156 N. McGregor Ave. • 219-7261

BOB’S DINER ($)

GOOD OLD AMERICAN COOKING 263 St. Francis St. • 405-1497

BUCK’S DINER ($)

CLASSIC AMERICAN DINER 58 N. Secion St. Fairhope • 928-8521

CAFE 219 ($)

SALADS, SANDWICHES & POTATO SALAD 219 Conti St. • 438-5234

CAMELLIA CAFÉ ($-$$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FARE 61 Section St. • Fairhope • 928-4321

CAMMIE’S OLD DUTCH ($) MOBILE’S CLASSIC ICE CREAM SPOT 2511 Old Shell Rd. • 471-1710

CARPE DIEM ($)

DELI FOODS, PASTRIES & SPECIALTY DRINKS 4072 Old Shell Rd. • 304-0448

CLARK’S KITCHEN ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHERN CUISINE & CATERING 5817 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0200

CHAT-A-WAY CAFE ($)

QUICHES & SANDWICHES 4366 Old Shell Rd. • 343-9889

CHICK-FIL-A ($)

107 St. Francis St. • 415-1700 3244 Dauphin St. • 476-0320 3215 Bel Air Mall • 476-8361 4707 Airport Blvd. • 461-9933 435 Schillinger Rd. • 639-1163 1682 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 621-3215 30500 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-3020

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK ($)

CHICKEN SALAD, SALAD & SOUP 2370 S. Hillcrest Rd. Unit R • 660-0501 5753 Old Shell Rd. • 408-3236 1802 US Hwy 98 Suite F• 625-1092

CHI-TOWN DAWGZ ($) CHICAGO STYLE EATERY 1222 Hillcrest Rd. • 461-6599

CONNECTION FROZEN YOGURT ($) 1880 Industrial Pkwy. • 675-2999

CREAM AND SUGAR ($)

COFFEE, BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DESSERT 351 George St #B • 405-0003

DAUPHIN ST. CAFE ($)

HOT LUNCH, DAILY MENU (INSIDE VIA) 1717 Dauphin St. • 470-5231

D’ MICHAEL’S ($)

PHILLY CHEESE STEAKS, GYROS & MORE 7101-A Theodore Dawes Rd. • 653-2979

D NU SPOT ($)

22159 Halls Mill Rd. . • 648-6522

BURGERS, MILKSHAKES & FRIES 4401 Old Shell Rd. • 447-2394 4663 Airport Blvd. • 300-8425 5319 Hwy 90 • 661-0071 1225 Satchel Page Dr.• 378-8768

FOOSACKLY’S ($)

FAMOUS CHICKEN FINGERS 29181 US Hwy 98 • Daphne • 375-1104 7843 Moffett Rd. • 607-6196 1109 Shelton Beach Rd. • 287-1423 310 S. University Blvd. • 343-0047 2250 Airport Blvd. • 479-2922 7641 Airport Blvd. • 607-7667 2558 Schillinger Rd. • 219-7761 3249 Dauphin St. • 479-2000

FOY SUPERFOODS ($) 119 Dauphin St.• 307-8997

GULF COAST EXPLOREUM CAFE ($)

E WING HOUSE ($)

195 S University Blvd. Suite H • 662-1829

EUGENE’S MONKEY BAR ($) 15 N Conception St. • 433-2299

FATHOMS LOUNGE

SMALL PLATES AND CREATIVE COCKTAILS 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

FLOUR GIRLS BAKERY ($) 809 Hillcrest Rd. • 634-2285

BAR FOOD 271 Dauphin St • 438-9585

PDQ ($)

CHICKEN FINGERS, SALAD & SANDWICHES. 1165 University Blvd. • 202-0959

POLLMAN’S BAKERY ($)

BAKERY, SANDWICHES & MORE 750 S. Broad St. • 438-1511 4464 Old Shell Rd. • 342-8546 107 St. Francis St. Suite 102 • 438-2261

PUNTA CLARA KITCHEN ($)

FUDGE, PRALINES & MORE 17111 Scenic Hwy 98 • Fairhope • 928-8477

R BISTRO ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SUBS & SOUPS 2056 Gov’t St. • 476-2777

SEAFOOD & SANDWICHES 212 ½ Fairhope Ave •Fairhope • 928-4100

HOOTERS ($)

3869 Airport Blvd. • 345-9544 5470 Inn Rd. • 661-9117 28975 US 98 • Daphne • 625-3910

JAMAICAN VIBE ($)

MIND-BLOWING ISLAND FOOD 3700 Gov’t Blvd. Ste A • 602-1973

JERSEY MIKE’S ($)

AUTHENTIC SUB SANDWICHES 7449 Airport Blvd. • 375-1820

JIMMY JOHN’S ($)

SANDWICHES, CATERING & DELIVERY TOO 6920 Airport Blvd. • 414-5444 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-8694 62 B Royal St. • 432-0360

JOE CAIN CAFÉ ($)

PIZZAS, SANDWICHES, COCKTAILS 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

JONELLI’S ($)

1252 Govenment St.• 301-7556

JUDY’S PLACE ($-$$)

HOME COOKING 4054 Government St. • 665-4557

LICKIN’ GOOD DONUTS ($) 3242 Dauphin St. • 471-2590

LODA BIER GARTEN ($) PUB FOOD AND DRAFT BEERS 251 Dauphin St. • 287-6871

MAMA’S ($)

SLAP YOUR MAMA GOOD HOME COOKING 220 Dauphin St. • 432-6262

REGINA’S KITCHEN ($-$$) ROLY POLY ($)

WRAPS & SALADS 3220 Dauphin St. • 479-2480

ROSHELL’S CAFE ($)

2906 Springhill Ave. • 479-4614

ROSIE’S GRILL ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHWEST FARE, 7 DAYS 1203 Hwy 98 Ste. 3D • Daphne • 626-2440

ROYAL KNIGHT ($)

LUNCH & DINNER 3004 Gov’t Blvd. • 287-1220

ROYAL STREET CAFE ($)

DELICIOUS HOTDOGS ($)

2550 Dauphin Island Pkwy S. • 307-5328

WAREHOUSE BAKERY & DONUTS ($) COFFEE AND DONUTS 759 Nichols Avenue, Fairhope • 928-7223

WEDGIE’S ($)

GOURMET GRILLED CHEESE 5955 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6134

WILD WING STATION ($) 1500 Gov’t St. • 287-1526

YAK THE KATHMANDU KITCHEN ($-$$)

SERDA’S COFFEEHOUSE ($)

COFFEE, LUNCHES, LIVE MUSIC & GELATO 3 Royal St. S. • 415-3000

SIMPLY SWEET ($)

CUPCAKE BOUTIQUE 6207 Cottage Hill Rd. Suite B • 665-3003

STEVIE’S KITCHEN ($)

SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS & MORE 41 West I-65 Service Rd. N Suite 150. • 287-2793

SUGAR RUSH DONUT CO. ($) 4701 Airport Blvd. • 408-3379

SUNSET POINTE ($-$$)

AT FLU CREEK 831 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-7766

MARY’S SOUTHERN COOKING ($)

DAILY SPECIALS MADE FROM SCRATCH 57 N. Claiborne St. • 694-6853

A FAVORITE BARBECUE SPOT 5456 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0001

COTTON STATE BBQ ($)

DOWNTOWN LUNCH 101 N. Conception St. • 545-4682

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT ($-$$) BBQ AND MORE Jubilee Sq.Ctr. Hwy 90, Daphne • 210-2151 McGowin Park Ctr. Satchel Paige Dr. • 471-1050 7721 Airport Blvd. • 380-8957

DREAMLAND BBQ ($)

RIBS, SANDWICHES & GREAT SIDES 3314 Old Shell Rd. • 479-9898 5401 Cottage Hill Rd. • 591-4842 BARBEQUE & MUSIC Bayfront Park Dr. • Daphne • 625-RIBS 701 Springhill Ave. • 410-7427 4672 Airport Blvd. • 300-8516

SAUCY Q BARBQUE ($) AWARD-WINNING BARBQUE 1111 Gov’t Blvd. • 433-7427

SMOKEY DEMBO SMOKE HOUSE ($)

DROP DEAD GOURMET BAY GOURMET ($$)

HOTDOGS SANDWICHES & COOL TREATS 3371 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 300–4015

MOMMA GOLDBERG’S DELI ($)

FRESH CARIBBEAN-STYLE FOOD & CRAFT BEER 6601 Airport Blvd. • 634-3445 225 Dauphin St. • 375-1576

MOON PIE GENERAL STORE ($)

107 St Francis St #115 • RSA Bank Trust Building

MOSTLY MUFFINS ($) MUFFINS, COFFEE & WRAPS 105 Dauphin St. • 433-9855

NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE ($)

OVEN-BAKED SANDWICHES & MORE 1335 Satchel Page Dr. Suite C. • 287-7356 7440 Airport Blvd. • 633-0096 30500 State Hwy 181 #132 • 625-6544

O’DALYS HOLE IN THE WALL ($) 562 Dauphin St.• 725-6429

OLD SHELL GROWLERS ($) GROWLER STATION AND BITES

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SOUTHERN COOKING & THEN SOME 1716 Main St. Daphne • 222-4120

THE SUNFLOWER CAFE ($) INSIDE VIRGINIA’S HEALTH FOOD 3055 A Dauphin St • 479-3200

THYME BY THE BAY ($-$$)

33 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-5635

TIME TO EAT CAFE ($)

9 Du Rhu Dr. Suite 201 167 Dauphin St. • 445-3802

FIVE ($$)

GREAT FOOD AND COCKTAILS 609 Dauphin St. • 308-3105

KITCHEN ON GEORGE ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St. • 432-8000

THREE GEORGES CANDY SHOP ($) LIGHT LUNCH WITH SOUTHERN FLAIR. 226 Dauphin St. • 433-6725

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE ($)

GREAT SMOOTHIES, WRAPS & SANDWICHES. Du Rhu Dr. • 378-5648 570 Schillinger Road • 634-3454

UNCLE JIMMY’S

WINE BAR, CRAFT BEERS & BISTRO 6808 Airport Blvd. • 343-3555

FIREHOUSE WINE BAR & SHOP 216 St Francis St. • 421-2022

RED OR WHITE

323A De La Mare Ave, Fairhope • 990-0003 1104 Dauphin St.. • 478-9494

ROYAL STREET TAVERN

LIVE MUSIC, MARTINIS & DINNER MENU. 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

SOUTHERN NAPA

BISTRO PLATES, CRAFT BEERS & PANTRY 2304 Main St. • 375-2800

THE VINEYARD

7 SPICE ($-$$)

HEALTHY, DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 3762 Airport Blvd. • 725-1177

ABBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE ($-$$) ISTANBUL GRILL ($)

JERUSALEM CAFE ($-$$)

MEDITERRANEAN FOOD AND HOOKAH 326 Azalea Rd • 229-4206

TIN ROOF ($-$$)

AMERICAN RESTAURANT & BAR 250 Dauphin St. • 476-1890

POUR BABY

CORNER 251 ($-$$)

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOOD 351A George & Savannah St. • 436-8890

TP CROCKMIERS ($)

FOOD, WINE & MORE 5150 Old Shell Rd. • 341-1497

MOBILE’S OLDEST MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE 5773 Airport Blvd. • 304-1155

DOWN-HOME COUNTRY COOKIN 7351 Theodore Dawes Rd. • 654-0228 13665 N. Wintzell Ave. • 824-1119 SOUTHERN CASUAL FAMILY DINING 10800 US HWY 31 • Spanish Fort• 621-4995

FOOD PAK

CHUCK’S FISH ($$)

DUMBWAITER ($$-$$$)

LAUNCH ($-$$)

MAGHEE’S GRILL ON THE HILL ($-$$) GREAT LUNCH & DINNER 3607 Old Shell Rd. • 445-8700

NOBLE SOUTH ($$)

LOCAL INGREDIENTS 203 Dauphin St. • 690-6824

NOJA ($$-$$$)

INVENTIVE & VERY FRESH CUISINE 6 N. Jackson St. • 433-0377

OSMAN’S RESTAURANT ($$) SUPREME EUROPEAN CUISINE 2579 Halls Mill Rd. • 479-0006

HIBACHI GRILL & ASIAN CUISINE 309 Bel Air Blvd • 470-8033

HIBACHI 1 ($-$$)

2370 Hillcrest Rd. Unit B • 380-6062

ICHIBAN SUSHI ($)

LIQUID ($$)

BRIQUETTES STEAKHOUSE ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD WITH A VIEW 107 St. Francis St • 444-0200

GOLDEN BOWL ($)

WINE, BEER, GOURMET FOODS, & MORE. 720 Schillinger Rd. S. Unit 8 • 287-1851

DOMKE MARKET

AUTHENTIC TURKISH & MEDITERRANEAN 3702 Airport Blvd. • 461-6901

DAUPHIN’S ($$-$$$)

THAI FARE AND SUSHI 2000 Airport Blvd. • 478-9888

KAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($-$$)

4861 Bit & Spur Rd. • 340-6464

THE HARBERDASHER ($)

FUJI SAN ($)

A LITTLE VINO

A PREMIER CATERER & COOKING CLASSES 1880-A Airport Blvd. • 450-9051

MCSHARRY’S ($-$$)

LUNCH BUFFET 3674 Airport Blvd. • 341-6171

JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE 3959 Cottage Hill Rd • 666-6266

FALAFEL? TRY SOME HUMMUS

FAST BBQ W/ DRIVE-THRU 3249 Dauphin St. • 652-3508

3966 Airport Blvd.• 343-5530

17111 Scenic HWY 98 • Point Clear • 928-4838

TILMO’S BBQ ($)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St • 460-3157

MIKO’S ITALIAN ICE ($)

THE WASH HOUSE ($$)

UPSCALE WINE BAR 9 Du Rhu Dr. S 201 • 287-7135

6358 Cottage Hill Rd. • 725-6917

THE PIGEON HOLE ($)

SEAFOOD, ASIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE 69 St. Michael St • 375-1113

3758 Dauphin Island Pkwy. • 473-1401

OPEN FOR LUNCH, INSIDE GULFQUEST 155 S. Water St • 436-8901 113 Dauphin St.• 436-0989

CUISINE OF INDIA ($$)

MODERN GASTROPUB INSPIRED BY JAPANESE KITCHEN 455 Dauphin St • 433-0376

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE Battle House Hotel, Royal St. • 338-5493

THE GALLEY ($)

AUTHENTIC IRISH PUB 101 N. Bancroft St.• 990-5100

SAISHO ($-$$)

BAR-B-QUING WITH MY HONEY ($$) BRICK PIT ($)

CHARM ($-$$)

CHINA DOLL ($)

THE TRELLIS ROOM ($$$)

BBQ, BURGERS, WINGS & SEAFOOD 19170 Hwy 43 Mt. Vernon. • 839-9927

BENJAS ($)

INSIDE THE MOBILE MARRIOTT 3101 Airport Blvd. • 476-6400

HOME COOKIN’ LIKE MOMMA MADE. 2804 Springhill Ave. • 473-4739

SEAFOOD AND SUSHI 551 Dauphin St.• 219-7051

MICHELI’S CAFE ($)

THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR 960 Schillinger Rd. S • 660-4470

BACKYARD CAFE & BBQ ($)

THE BLIND MULE ($)

3011 Springhill Ave. • 476-2232

SAGE RESTAURANT ($$)

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE 271 Glenwood St. • 476-0516

CASUAL FINE DINING 104 N. Section St. • Fairhope • 929-2219

GRILLED STEAKS, CHICKEN & SEAFOOD 720A Schillinger Rd. S. S2. • 607-7200 901 Montlimar Dr • 408-3133

GREAT SANDWICHES, COFFEE & MORE 1087 Downtowner Blvd. • 643-1611

THAI & SUSHI 5369 D Hwy 90 W • 661-5100

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($$)

SALLY’S PIECE-A-CAKE ($)

COFFEE, SMOOTHIES, LUNCH & BEERS. 5460 Old Shell Rd. • 344-4575

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

‘CUE

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE ($)

SATORI COFFEEHOUSE ($)

312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-9077

GUMBO, ANGUS BEEF & BAR 72. S. Royal St. • 432-SCAM (7226)

VON’S BISTRO ($-$$)

MEAT BOSS ($)

BAKERY 5638 Three Notch Rd.• 219-6379

ROYAL SCAM ($$)

AUTHENTIC FOODS FROM HIMALAYAN REGION 3210 Dauphin St. • 287-0115 400 Eastern Shore Center • 459-2862

HOMEMADE LUNCH & BREAKFAST 104 N. Royal St. • 434-0011

MARS HILL CAFE ($)

MONTEGO’S ($-$$)

DONUTS, COFFEE & SANDWICHES 1976 Michigan Ave. • 442-4846 3876 Airport Blvd. • 219-7369 505 Schillinger Rd. S. • 442-4845 29160 US Hwy 98 • 621-2228

PAT’S DOWNTOWN GRILL ($)

GUMBO SHACK ($-$$)

DEW DROP INN ($)

DUNKIN DONUTS ($)

ORIGINAL SANDWICH AND BAKE SHOP 42 ½ Section St. • Fairhope • 929-0122 102 Dauphin St. • 405-0031

334 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope • 928-2399

SANDWICHES & MOMMA’S LOVE 3696 Airport Blvd. • 344-9500 5602 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6556

CLASSIC BURGERS, HOTDOGS & SETTING 1808 Old Shell Rd. • 473-7872

PANINI PETE’S ($)

HOMEMADE SOUPS & SANDWICHES 65 Government St. • 208-6815

DELISH BAKERY AND EATERY ($) GREAT DESSERTS & HOT LUNCH 23 Upham St. • 473-6115

1801 Old Shell Rd. • 345-4767

KAN ZAMAN ($-$$)

MEDITERRANEAN SANDWICH COMPANY ($)

GREAT & QUICK. 3702 Airport Blvd. • 308-2131 274 Dauphin St. • 545-3161 2502 Schillinger Rd. Ste. 2 • 725-0126 6890 US-90 • DAPHNE • 621-2271

MINT HOOKAH BISTRO ($) GREAT MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 5951 Old Shell Rd. • 450-9191

OLLIE’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL ($-$$) MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT & HOOKAH 1248 Hillcrest St • 634-9820

TAZIKI’S ($-$$)

MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 1539 US HWY 98• 273-3337

FAR EASTERN FARE ANG BAHAY KUBO ($$) 4513 Old Shell Rd.• 473-0007

BAMBOO STEAKHOUSE ($$) SUSHI BAR 650 Cody Rd. S • 300-8383

BANGKOK THAI ($-$$)

DELICIOUS, TRADITIONAL THAI CUISINE 28600 US 98 • Daphne • 626-5286 3821 Airport Blvd. • 344-9995

BANZAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($$) TRADITIONAL SUSHI & LUNCH.

QUALITY FOOD, EXCELLENT SERVICE 5045 Cottage Hill Rd. • 607-6454

AMAZING SUSHI & ASSORTMENT OF ROLLS. 661 Dauphin St. • 432-0109

RICE ASIAN GRILL & SUSHI BAR ($) 3964 Gov’t Blvd. • 378-8083

ROCK N ROLL SUSHI ($$)

273 S. McGregor Ave • 287-0445 6345 Airport Blvd. • 287-0555 940 Industrial Pkwy • 308-2158 6850 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 753-4367

SAISHO ($$)

6455 Dauphin St. • 433-0376

STIX ($$)

610240 Eastern Shore Blvd. • 621-9088

TASTE OF THAI ($$)

9091 US-90 Irvington • 957-1414

TOKYO JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE ($$) UPSCALE SUSHI & HIBACHI 364 Azalea Rd. • 343-6622

WASABI SUSHI ($$)

JAPANESE CUISINE 3654 Airport Blvd. S. C • 725-6078

FROM THE DEPTHS BAUDEAN’S ($$)

FRIED, GRILLED, STEAMED & ALWAYS FRESH 3300 River Rd. • 973-9070

THE BLUEGILL ($-$$)

A HISTORIC SEAFOOD DIVE W/ LIVE MUSIC 3775 Hwy. 98 • 625-1998

BONEFISH GRILL ($$)

ECLECTIC DINING & SPACE 6955 Airport Blvd. • 633-7196

BOUDREAUX’S CAJUN GRILL ($-$$) QUALITY CAJUN & NEW ORLEANS CUISINE 29249 US Highway 98 Daphne. • 621-1991

CRAVIN CAJUN/DIP SEAFOOD ($) PO-BOYS, SALADS & SEAFOOD 1870 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 287-1168

ED’S SEAFOOD SHED ($$)

FRIED SEAFOOD SERVED IN HEFTY PORTIONS 3382 Hwy. 98 • 625-1947

FELIX’S FISH CAMP ($$) UPSCALE DINING WITH A VIEW 1420 Hwy. 98 • 626-6710

FISHERMAN’S LEGACY ($) DELI, MARKET AND CATERING. 4380 Halls Mill Rd. • 665-2266

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($)

30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 206-8768 3654 Airport Blvd. • 338-9350

LUCY B. GOODE ($$)

GULF COAST CUISINE, REINVENTED 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

LULU’S ($$)

LIVE MUSIC & GREAT SEAFOOD 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

MUDBUGS AT THE LOOP ($) CAJUN KITCHEN & SEAFOOD MARKET 2005 Government St. • 478-9897

RALPH & KACOO’S ($-$$) THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1595 Battleship Pkwy. • 626-0045

R&R SEAFOOD ($-$$)

LAID-BACK EATERY & FISH MARKET 1477 Battleship Pkwy. • 621-8366


RIVER SHACK ($-$$)

SEAFOOD, BURGERS & STEAKS 6120 Marina Dr. • Dog River • 443-7318.

THE GRAND MARINER ($-$$) LOCAL SEAFOOD & PRODUCE 6036 Rock Point Rd. • 443-5700

THE HARBOR ROOM ($-$$) UNIQUE SEAFOOD 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

THE SEAFOOD HOUSE ($-$$)

HEROES SPORTS BAR & GRILLE ($) SANDWICHES & COLD BEER 273 Dauphin St. • 433-4376 Hillcrest & Old Shell Rd. • 341-9464

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS ($-$$) WINGS, SEAFOOD, BURGERS & BEER 7721 Airport Blvd. Suite E-180 • 639-6832

ISLAND WING CO ($)

EVERYTHING BAKED OR GRILLED 2617 Dauphin St. • 476-9464

751 Azalea Rd. • 301-7964

MANCIS ($)

TIN TOP RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR ($$)

MCSHARRY’S IRISH PUB ($)

SEAFOOD, STEAKS, & EXTENSIVE WINE LIST 6232 Bon Secour Hwy County Rd. 10. • 949-5086

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) FRESH SEAFOOD FOR OVER 75 YEARS 605 Dauphin St. • 432-4605 6700 Airport Blvd. • 341-1111 1208 Shelton Beach Rd. • Saraland • 442-3335 805 S. Mobile St. • 929-2322

IS THE GAME ON?

ASHLAND MIDTOWN PUB ($-$$) PIZZAS, PASTAS, & CALZONES 245-A Old Shell Rd. • 479-3278

BAUMHOWER’S ($)

WINGS, BURGERS & PUB GRUB 6880 US-90 #14 • Daphne • 625-4695

BISHOP’S ($)

A SOUTHERN GRILL & BAR 3673 Airport Blvd. • 344-2131

BUFFALO WILD WINGS ($) BEST WINGS & SPORTING EVENTS 6341 Airport Blvd. • 378-5955

BUTCH CASSIDY’S ($)

FAMOUS BURGERS, SANDWICHES & WINGS 60 N. Florida St. • 450-0690

CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB ($) BURGERS & BEER 916 Charleston St. • 433-9374

1715 Main St. • 375-0543 BRILLIANT REUBENS & FISH-N-CHIPS. 101 N. Brancroft St. Fairhope • 990-5100

MUG SHOTS ($$)

BAR & GRILL 29740 Urgent Care Dr. • Daphne • 662-9639 6255 Airport Blvd. • 447-2514

GRIMALDI’S ($)

ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL ($$)

GUIDO’S ($$)

TAMARA’S BAR & GRILL ($)

HOUSE OF PIZZA ($)

TRATTORIA PIZZA & ITALIAN ($$)

Bel Air Mall • 476-2063 FRESH CUISINE NIGHTLY ON MENU 1709 Main St. • Daphne • 626-6082 3958 Snow Rd C. • Semmes • 645-3400

LA ROSSO ($$)

COMFORT FOOD 1716 Main St. Ste. C • Daphne • 281-2982

MACARONI GRILL ($$)

SMALL PLATES, PIZZAS, PASTAS & WINE 3250 Airport Blvd. • 450-4556

MARCOS ($)

5055 Cottage Hill Rd. • 308-4888 2394 Dawes Rr. • 639-3535 2004 US 98 • Daphne • 265-6550

MELLOW MUSHROOM ($)

BURGERS, DOGS & 27 BEERS & WINES. 19992 Hwy.181 Old County Rd. Fairhope • 281-2663

PIES & AWESOME BEER SELECTION 2032 Airport Blvd. • 471-4700 5660 Old Shell Rd. • 380-1500 29698 Frederick Blvd.• Daphne • 621-3911

LUCKY’S IRISH PUB ($)

MIRKO ($$)

OLD 27 GRILL ($)

IRISH PUB FARE & MORE 3692 Airport Blvd • 414-3000

WEMOS ($)

WINGS, TENDERS, HOTDOGS & SANDWICHES 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-5877

MAMA MIA!

BUCK’S PIZZA ($$)

DELIVERY 350 Dauphin St. • 431-9444

CORTLAND’S PIZZA PUB ($-$$) GREAT PIZZA. LUNCH & DINNER 4356 Old Shell Rd. • 342-0024

GAMBINO BROTHERS ($) HOMEMADE PASTAS & SANDWICHES 873 Hillcrest Ave. • 344-8115

GAMBINO’S ITALIAN GRILL ($) ITALIAN, STEAKS & SEAFOOD 18 Laurel Ave. • Fairhope • 990-0995

PASTA & MORE 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-6611

NAVCO PIZZA ($$)

PIZZA, SUBS & PASTA 1368 ½ Navco Rd.• 479-0066

PAPA’S PLACE ($$)

A TASTE OF ITALY. BYOB. 28691 U.S. Highway 98 • 626-1999

PINZONE’S ITALIAN VILLAGE ($$) AUTHENTIC ITALIAN DISHES 312 Fairhope Ave. • Fairhope • 990-5535

RAVENITE ($)

PIZZA, PASTA, SALAD & MORE 102 N. Section St. •Fairhope• 929-2525

PIZZERIA DELFINA ($) PIZZA & PASTA 107 Dauphin St. • 375-1644

ROMA CAFE ($-$$)

PASTA, SALAD AND SANDWICHES 7143 Airport Blvd. • 341-7217

3250 Airport Blvd. Springdale Mall• 450-4556

WINGS, PO-BOYS, BURGERS 210 Eastern Shore Center, Hwy. 98 • 929-0002 ITALIAN FOOD & PIZZAS 11311 US HIghway 31 Spanish Fort• 375-0076

VIA EMILIA ($$)

HOMEMADE PASTAS & PIZZAS MADE DAILY 5901 Old Shell Rd. • 342-3677

OLÉ MI AMIGO! AZTECAS ($-$$)

TASTE OF MEXICO 5452 Hwy 90 W • 661-5509

CAFÉ DEL RIO ($-$$)

MOUTH WATERING MEXICAN FOOD 1175 Battleship Pkwy • 625-2722

CINCO DE MAYO ($) MEXICAN CUISINE 260 Azalea Rd. • 375-1095

DAUPHIN ST. TAQUERIA ($)

ENCHILADAS, TACOS, & AUTHENTIC FARE Ok Bicycle Shop • 661 Dauphin St. • 432-2453

EL MARIACHI ($)

LOS ARCOS ($)

QUAINT MEXICAN RESTAURANT 5556 Old Shell Rd. • 345-7484

MARIA BONITA AGAVE BAR & GRILL ($-$$) MEXICAN CUISINE 3977 Gov’t Blvd. • 660-4970

OLÉ MI AMIGO ($-$$)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE 800 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-0783 830 W I65 Service Rd. S • 378-5837 4663 Airport Blvd. • 342-5553

850 Bayview Ave. Bilox • 888-946-2847

THIRTY-TWO ($$$) SEAFOOD, STEAKS, WINE

HIGH TIDE CAFÉ ($)

ROOSTER’S ($)

ISLAND VIEW:

3050 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-7433 LATIN AMERICAN FOOD 211 Dauphin St. • 375-1076

TAQUERIA MEXICO ($-$$) AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FLAVOR 3733 Airport Blvd. • 414-4496

NO GAMBLING CASINO FARE

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

CASUAL & RELAXING, EXTENSIVE MENU

3300 W. Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 877-774-8439

BEACH BLVD STEAMER ($) SEAFOOD

CARTER GREEN STEAKHOUSE ($$-$$$) RICH TRADITIONS, STEAK, SEAFOOD

C&G GRILLE ($)

LARGE BREAKFAST, LUNCH OR DINNER MENU

BEAU RIVAGE:

PALACE CASINO:

BR PRIME ($$-$$$)

MIGNON’S ($$$)

COAST RESTAURANT ($-$$)

PLACE BUFFET ($-$$)

JIA ($-$$)

STACKED GRILL ($-$$)

875 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 888-952-2582 FINE DINING ESTABLISHMENT. BURGER, WINGS, PIZZA

EXOTIC CUISINE AND SUSHI

TERRACE CAFE ($)

LA COCINA ($)

IP CASINO:

POOR MEXICAN ($)

FUEGO ($-$$)

TASTE OF MEXICO 880 Schillinger Rd. S. • 633-6122 5805 US 90 • 653-9163

ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET

TIEN ($-$$)

STALLA ($$)

HACIENDA SAN MIGUEL ($-$$)

FINE DINING, SEAFOOD AND STEAKS

FLAVORS BUFFET ($-$$)

HEARTY MEXICAN FARE 736 holcombe Ave.• 473-0413

763 Holcombe Ave • 473-0413 OUTSTANDING MEXICAN CUISINE 2066 Old Shell Rd. • 378-8621

MAGNOLIA HOUSE ($$-$$$)

158 Howard Ave. Biloxi • 800-725-2239 STEAKS, SEAFOOD, FINE WINE INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

BURGERS AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

ITALIAN COOKING

TREASURE BAY:

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, LATE NIGHT

THE DEN ($-$$)

HARD ROCK CASINO:

1980 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 800-747-2839 INTIMATE & CASUAL WITH DAILY SPECIALS

777 Beach Blvd.Biloxi • 877-877-6256

CQ ($$-$$$)

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$)

BLU ($)

SEAFOOD

HARD ROCK CAFÉ ($)

ELEGANT ATMOSPHERE & TANTALIZING ENTREES LOUNGE WITH COCKTAILS & TAPAS MENU

AMERICAN FARE & ROCKIN’ MEMORABILIA

WIND CREEK CASINO:

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE

FIRE ($$-$$$)

SOUTHERN FAVORITES BUFFET

GRILL ($)

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$) SATISFACTION ($-$$)

HARRAH’S GULF COAST:

303 Poarch Rd. Atmore • 866-946-3360 PRIME STEAKS, SEAFOOD & WINE CONTEMPORARY & OLD-FASHIONED FAVORITES

280 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 288-436-2946

SEND LISTINGS TO LISTINGS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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CUISINE THE REVIEW

Rooster’s does Latin American food right

BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

LITTLE NEVER GOES INTO ANYTHING HALF-COCKED, SO THE RESEARCH BEHIND THIS MENU WAS THE STUFF DREAMS ARE MADE OF.” Rooster’s. I cannot believe I waited this long to review this place, but I usually try to give the new spots some breathing room before I pop in. You may remember Rooster’s Latin American Food was the brainchild of restaurant mainstay Frankie Little. Little never goes into anything half-cocked, so the research behind this menu was the stuff dreams are made of. Frankie and friend Roy Clark (of Haberdasher fame) headed west in search of the best Latin American food they could find. This “taco tour” of sorts led them from our fair city to the Big Easy followed by a run in Houston, a less-notable stay in San Antonio and a final stop in Austin. One can only imagine two skinny dudes on vacation chasing their tequila with nothing but tacos, tortas and burritos. Out of this journey the menu was born. I waited a good while before darkening the doorstep of this downtown eatery across from the Crescent Theater. But after I tasted my first taco I was hooked. It has become a regular stop for me and whatever company I am keeping, and on this night it happened to be the Holbert family. Rob’s kids are very well-behaved, way more so than their father. Ulysses is pretty good with the yes-sir and no-sir routine, but has the quick wit of the son of a newspaper writer. On this evening he was being ribbed by the adults because he was dressed in basketball attire with school dress shoes, unable to locate his sneakers. Ursula is sweet as can be and always takes other people’s feelings into account. It’s almost

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Photo | Daniel Anderson / Lagniappe

I

t was cause for celebration. I got word from Rob his daughter, Ursula, made the McGill volleyball team for her eighth-grade year. Apparently she’s got quite the vertical leap and powerful arms that can really hammer when needed, physical skills that, when paired with her stellar attitude, should take her far. This was perfect timing for a review so I moseyed on over to pick up the Holberts to treat them to a downtown meal. It didn’t take long for our conversation to lead toward

ROOSTER’S LATIN AMERICAN FOOD 211 DAUPHIN ST. MOBILE 36602 251-375-1076

Owner Frankie Little traveled west on I-10 to Austin and beyond to find inspiration for the Latin American menu at Rooster’s. impossible to give her a hard time about anything. shared our dishes but for the most part Ulysses handled that one We all joked and laughed through the streets of downtown, solo. No leftovers were taken home. but when we made it to the restaurant everything became seriRob had another steak taco ($4), similar to Ursula’s but ous. No more messing around. No more funny business. These without sour cream, and a chicken taco ($3.25). What can guys took their eating seriously, so we began our meal with you expect? There were no complaints coming from his side steak nachos ($10). of the table. Now, I know any of you who pay attention to this column I’ve had every taco offered in my multiple visits to Roostare thinking, “Wait a sec, didn’t Andy give up chips for Lent?” er’s. I knew it would be a shame if I didn’t write about the Well, I gave up chips in my personal life for Lent. This is my veggie taco ($3.25). As much a carnivore as I am, I plead you professional life. If you told me I was allergic to oysters but do not ignore this menu item. Just do it. I had to review a seafood restaurant I promise I would show A solo taco was nowhere near enough for me. I’d never tried up to the counter with a dozen raw and an one of their tortas ($9.25), so our waiter, Epi-pen. So back off on the chip deal. The Jimmy, helped me decide what version other side of that story is that these nachos would be best and steered me toward the are good enough to make someone with chorizo, with ciabatta bread and all the more fragile willpower break their Lenten trimmings. Perfect! The greasiness of the promises. THIS PLACE IS DOING IT sausage was soaked up by the bread and the They were soaked with cheese (in a good whole table agreed I’d hit the jackpot. RIGHT. AMAZING FOOD, way) and eventually our greedy hands and Everyone was ready to throw in the utensils forced this cheesy deliciousness towel, right? Wrong. Dessert was in order. CHEAP PRICE POINT, through the paper and basket and onto the The other three at my table had ellenJAY table. What a waste. I could have licked that GOOD ATMOSPHERE, Ice Cream Sandwiches ($5.25). If you paper clean. know Frankie you know he’s fanatical MARGARITAS AND Our guest of honor was the first to order about buying local. These are locally proand didn’t hesitate when asking for a steak duced ellenJAY cookies hugging Cammie’s BEER. WHAT ARE YOU taco ($4.75) with sour cream. Volleyball Old Dutch Ice Cream. There was a fight must really get an appetite going. This WAITING FOR? over who got the last cookies-and-cream dainty little friend of mine took the manice cream between a chocolate chocolate sized taco down in a flash. chip. Ursula won, of course, and the two Up next was Ulysses. How this young boys had chocolate chip with vanilla. man can eat so much is beyond average I was treated to a fantastic version of tres leche ($6). This comprehension, but I recall my days of being an athlete capable cake was phenomenal, but I did miss the ice cream. Next time of consuming a horse. His chicken burrito ($9.75) may not I’ll have the Rooster’s sundae. have been the size of a horse, but it was almost as big as a Here’s the scoop: You order a taco, burrito or torta, pick miniature horse. your meat (or veggies) and choose your sauce. I’m a fan of the Our well-coiffed sportsman cut a seam down the middle of cilantro lime, but have had success mixing a bit of all of the the burrito and proceeded to pour in the hot sauce. Along with sauces. This place is doing it right. Amazing food, cheap price Cholula he sacrificed a small cup of El Gallo del Diablo, the point, good atmosphere, margaritas and beer. What are you hottest of the house sauces aka rooster of the devil, and turned waiting for? this open-faced burrito into a wall of fire. Granted, we all


A p r i l 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - A p r i l 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 23


CUISINE | WORD OF MOUTH

Taziki’s opens in Spring Hill BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

H

eadquartered in Birmingham, Taziki’s Mediterranean Café has 71 locations spread throughout 16 states, but the latest one is right here in Mobile. Legacy Village is now home to Alabama’s 15th Taziki’s, at 9 Du Rhu Drive and in good company with Dumbwaiter, Mirko, Tropical Smoothie and Williams Sonoma. “The Mobile location will offer a fresh, healthy, diverse and affordable food option to residents,” said Brent Marshall of Taziki’s. Adds Mark Hemby: “We have a chef-driven approach using made-from-scratch recipes. All meals are prepared from raw ingredients much like you would use in your own home. Taziki’s never uses fryers or microwaves while preparing meals for our customers.” The 3,000-square-foot restaurant (formerly Zoe’s Kitchen) can seat 90 and boasts a spacious patio area. Open for lunch and dinner, the menu features freshly grilled meats, original sauces and healthy side items. There is even a “dinner for four” option for families on the go. Check out www.tazikiscafe.com for more details as well as nutritional information.

Restaurant Week a blast

99 Bottles of Beer

Southern Napa at 2304 Main St. in Olde Towne Daphne really knows how to throw a party. Between wine dinners, tasting events and specials, it’s hard to keep up with all that goes on at the Eastern Shore hotspot. But the whole area is buzzing about the upcoming 5th annual 99 Bottles of Beer on the Lawn to be held Saturday, May 6, 1-4 p.m. It’s a true lawn party/craft beer festival featuring live music, food and, of course, 99 craft beers. Tickets are $45.01 per person and include a commemorative tasting glass plus a six-pack sampler of craft beer. Of course the night before is nothing to sneeze at. Friday, May 5, Southern Napa will have its Live on the Lawn concert featuring Willie Sugarcapps cranking out the tunes. The show begins at 7 p.m. Proceeds from these events benefit Dale’s Den Rescue, which helps dogs in the Gulf Coast area by adopting out locally as well as working with out-ofstate rescues. Tickets are available in person at Southern Napa or online at www.southernnapa.com, as well as at the Ruff House and Dale’s Den Rescue, located at 6937 U.S. Highway 90 in Daphne. Recycle!

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Photos | Lagniappe

Being a part of Mobile’s very own restaurant week was an experience I won’t soon forget. Every time I turned around I was dining in another restaurant. We were fortunate enough to try old favorites like Heroes’ crawfish dip and an unbelievable chicken dish from Taqueria Mexico at discounted prices. Other places we visited, like SaiSho and Five, had specials we’d never

tasted before, so it was great to see these places branching out. I could definitely see this becoming a huge event, as it has in larger cities. It was great meeting people and comparing notes on who had eaten what. Get ready. Next year will be huge.

Mirko Pasta (top) and Royal Scam were among the popular eateries taking part in Mobile Restaurant Week.


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COVER STORY

Lawmakers could say ‘Get Out’ to film credits despite recent success DALE LIESCH/REPORTER

E

va Golson, director of the Mobile Film Office, found herself out one night at a series of downtown bars with actor and director Mario Van Peebles. She was helping the director known for “New Jack City” scout locations for a new film, but to family hearing it third-person, it appeared Golson was out on the town. “I went and scouted with him on a Friday night and he wanted to see all the bars in action downtown,” she recalled with a laugh. “The next week my daughter calls me and said ‘mama, I hear you were bar-hopping Friday night.’ What he wanted to see were the bars in action. I said, ‘well, we didn’t stop for a drink.’” Golson said she’s gotten other requests as well — both mundane and unique — as she works to keep producers, directors and actors happy filming in Mobile. She and Film Office and Location Coordinator Diane Hall always have their cell phones on them. “You never know what kind of thing is going to be needed for a movie or if they are having trouble,” Golson said. “Now that we have so many people who have worked with us so long, we’re not having as many problems getting things because the people on set, the [production assistants], they know where stuff is. They’ve worked with us so long.”

Tax incentives

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Photos Daniel Anderson / Lagniappe | The state has awarded roughly $40 million in incentives to 53 film productions from 2009 to 2016.

The celebrity encounters and requests have only grown for the local film office as the budding local motion picture industry has developed around it. One tool in that growth has been tax rebates given to production companies that decide to film on location in Alabama and use local employees. Despite local benefits, a study commissioned by the state Legislature threatens to end the program eight years after the rebates were enacted. The incentives in question give production companies a 25 percent rebate on all goods and services above a $500,000 spending threshold. That threshold is the same for television and movies, but decreases for a motion picture soundtrack or a music video. The incentives also allow a 35 percent rebate on Alabama labor. The spending threshold is $500,000 on Alabama resident crew and talent and $50,000 to $300,000 for a soundtrack. The incentives also include no state sales taxes and no state lodging taxes. But local taxes are paid, Golson said. The biggest film to be shot locally recently was the Jordan Peele horror movie “Get Out,” which has grossed more than $160 million since its release in February, becoming the first debut film from a black director to do so. The movie, filmed in Mobile and Fairhope, has many in the local industry hopeful there could be similar successes to come. “Everything you make here helps us through the industry because it’s like a family and they spread the word,” Golson

said. “They’ll see the success of this movie and when they start to see, they’ll say ‘tell us what it’s like filming down there.’” One film’s success may not help the area or the state retain competitive incentives, though. Members of the Legislature have vowed to re-examine the film incentives and others after a study by two University of Tennessee professors found Alabama’s entertainment industry incentive program gave the state a bad return on investment. The findings of Dr. Matthew Murray and Dr. Donald Bruce suggested the film incentives program had a negative impact on statewide revenues and only a slight benefit to employment, not one that would justify the existence of the rebates. Specifically, the study points to marginal growth in the local film industry and roughly a $40 million price tag for the incentives from 2009 to 2016. Fifty-three projects took advantage of the incentives during that time. Meanwhile, while the program has been in effect the state has enjoyed about a 3 percent increase in film industry employment, while the country as a whole has seen a 26 percent increase during the same period. “These descriptive data, while certainly not conclusive, offer no support for the case that the credit significantly increased film production activity in Alabama,” the study states.


COVER STORY

The study calls local benefits, such as those experienced in the Mobile area, “relatively small and short-lived,” while big production companies with out-of-state employees benefit the most. “The state could almost certainly generate larger and more enduring economic benefits to the state with an alternative use of these taxpayer dollars that is more closely linked to stated economic development goals,” the study states. When the film office was initially fighting for the incentives, Golson said, the idea of using money many thought could go to schools was a tough sell in Montgomery. She said she never could quite wrap her head around that argument because film crews have to spend the money upfront before being reimbursed. “So, when you say ‘you don’t want to give them money,’ what money?” she asked. “You don’t have the money in the first place. You’re only giving them a percentage of what they spent. “So, when you think about it that way — a lot of people say, ‘look at the money they gave that could be going to schools,’” she added. “There was no money there for schools until they spent it and you’re getting a percentage.” Golson also had her own economic development figure. As of 2013, the movies filmed in Mobile had combined budgets of $116 million and also contribute to hotel room nights. For a recent example, the Jean-Claude Van Damme movie “Black Water” contributed to a total of 1,345 hotel room nights in Mobile and Baldwin counties. That breaks down to 672 at the Admiral Hotel, 626 nights at the Extended Stay America, 14 nights at Days Inn and 33 nights at Courtyard by Marriott, according to information provided by Golson. “That was a quick shoot,” she said. “On big movies we’ll have 2,500 room nights.” The importance of the film credits is not lost on Kent Blackinton, president of the Mobile County Lodging Association. He said the group recently voted in support of the incentives. “They produce room nights,” he said of the incentives. “When they’re here, we’ve been a part of it.” While film crews don’t make up a huge percentage of clientele for local hotels, any motion picture business can help during a lull, Blackinton said, adding there is typically plenty of space in the Mobile market, which averages about a 62 percent occupancy rate. “We like business,” he said. “Mobile needs business all the time.” In addition to local hotels, restaurants and retail shops, the incentives boost employment, Golson said. She said she feels responsible for keeping local film industry employees working. “As our film industry has grown, [Hall] and I feel we have to work hard to keep the film industry here to keep them working,” Golson said. The fear is if the incentives go away, it will get harder and harder for those who live in the area and work full-time in the industry to find work, especially given the expansion of credits to many other states in the country. Scott Lumpkin, a local producer, said killing the incentives will take away workers and the movie-making infrastructure as

well. Taking away the incentives would hurt local businesses, he added. Lumpkin said a movie is like a city. Not only does a crew of about 300 have to work each and every day, but they also have to buy supplies, like lumber for sets. He said that’s all done locally. Despite the reaction from locals, it appears the Legislature is preparing to take a closer look at the incentives program, although it’s unclear if legislation related to it will come out of the current session. Will Califf, communications director in state Sen. Del Marsh’s office, said the senator wants to “take a broad look” at incentives and “see what’s working and what’s not working.” “With the grade being so bad, we’re looking at all options to see what can be done,” Califf said. “It’s possible it could be this session.” Members of the local delegation appear to be split on the issue. State Rep. Chris Pringle (R-Mobile) said something would have to be done with the many tax credits the state

EVERYTHING YOU MAKE HERE HELPS US THROUGH THE INDUSTRY BECAUSE IT’S LIKE A FAMILY AND THEY SPREAD THE WORD. THEY’LL SEE THE SUCCESS OF THIS MOVIE AND WHEN THEY START TO SEE, THEY’LL SAY ‘TELL US WHAT IT’S LIKE FILMING DOWN THERE.’

awards, but doubts anything would be done this session. State Sen. Bill Hightower (R-Mobile) said he hopes the credits could be saved while State Sen. Trip Pittman (RFairhope) said the billions of dollars in various credits in the state would have to be evaluated.

‘Get Out’

The horror film “Get Out” used a variety of locations throughout the area, including Barton Academy downtown, the Ashland Place neighborhood in midtown and a house in Fairhope, Golson said. In addition to the locations and a squad of off-screen talent, the film also used local actors and actresses, including the two youngest — Caiden Vaughn of Fairhope and Adalyn Jones of Mobile. While Vaughn plays the younger version of Caleb Landry Jones’ character, Jeremy Armitage, in the film, Adalyn Jones

plays the younger version of his sister, Rose Armitage, in a small part. Adalyn Jones, who will feature as a principal in the upcoming Netflix movie “Gerald’s Game” — also filmed in Mobile — said she was on set for a day filming “Get Out” and really enjoyed interacting with other members of the cast, especially Catherine Keener, who played her mom, Missy Armitage, in the film. Adalyn said Keener would play games with her young co-stars. “She was really funny,” Adalyn said. “Every time we’d take a little break we’d play hopscotch on the porch. We’d see who could go the longest without getting dizzy because you can get dizzy jumping up and down, up and down …” Kimberly Neno Jones, Adalyn’s mother, said having Keener on set was very nice for parents who couldn’t get too close to the action. “She was awesome with Adalyn,” Kimberly Jones said. “She kept the kids occupied during takes.” Also getting the seal of approval from the 8-year-old actress was Peele, her director. “He was really, really funny,” Adalyn said. “He was nice and he took pictures with us.”

Other films

Mobile has seen its fair share of films over the years. In fact, since 1976, the Port City and the surrounding area has been home to iconic titles including “Close Encounters of the Third Kind” and “Friday the 13th.” “The Insider” and “Under Siege” were also filmed in Mobile. Golson said “Under Siege” used the USS Alabama as a set. At one point, the centerpiece of Battleship Park was one of only two battleships in the United States where a film could shoot and the only one that allowed for “at-sea” shots, she said. The other was a landlocked vessel in North Carolina. “U.S.S. Indianapolis: Men of Courage” starring Nicolas Cage also used the battleship during filming. While filming in South Alabama was sporadic before, it picked up in 2010 with the incentives. Since 2009, 132 projects, including movies, television shows and commercials, have filmed in the Mobile area. Not all of those had a large enough budget to take advantage of the credits. The process for picking locations is pretty standard across the board for Golson and Hall. Hall is usually contacted by a producer, who tells her a little about a project. She is then sent a script and gets to work. “I read their script and write down every location,” Hall said. “Then I go to my film photo library and I immediately email them what I have on file. The next day, I’ll pick up a car in the motor pool and I’ll go out and scout for that particular project. Then I get the photos back to them as soon as possible.” She said she tries to be as quick as possible because she understands she’s competing with other offices in other states with similar incentives. As of Tuesday the Legislature had met for 18 days of its 30-day regular session. The General Fund Budget had been passed by the House, but was pending in the Senate Finance & Taxation General Fund Committee.

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S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O PA P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

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ART ARTIFICE

Turning tragedy into local art BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

S

ince the daily highs are in the 80s now and the humidity is climbing, it’s best to get some spring cleaning done before it’s too late. Here are a few things to clear out of the Artifice bin. Mobilians had ample recent chances to reconnect with a forgotten son. Filmmaker Robert Clem’s latest work, “The Two Worlds of William March,” appeared on Alabama Public Television last week, just seven days after it was screened at the Ben May Public Library. Artifice spoke with Clem in spring 2015 as he was completing the film. His appreciation of the namesake author was foremost. “His style was modernist, with a fractured point of view,” Clem told Artifice. “Like Hemingway, he was economical with words.” Cognoscenti shared Clem’s view. Famed journalist Alistair Cooke called March “the most underrated of all contemporary American writers of fiction” and “the unrecognized genius of our time.” Clem’s film showed March’s matriculation and slow birth from the life of William Campbell, his non nom de plume. The template was author Roy Simmonds’ 1984 book, “The Story of William March.” Clem does it service. He implemented footage from his previous film on March and though the acting is a tad uneven, it is worth watching. Be on guard for a character

from Jim Garrison’s widely cast JFK conspiracy theories. After a hardscrabble youth in rural towns, March was thrown into World War I’s worst meat grinders. The darkness it stirred forever haunted his psyche, then poured into the pages of “Company K,” considered the equal of “All Quiet on the Western Front.” His most popular work is unquestionably “The Bad Seed,” about a murderous child. Rumors still permeate Mobile about which local kid was the inspiration. So why is March overlooked at home? I think the answer easy: his subject matter. March explored the human psyche’s recesses, dark corners obscuring parts of ourselves and our societies we ignore and deny. He didn’t tell readers what they wanted to hear. There were no “moonlight and magnolias,” no romantic rhapsodies for Spanish moss, bay breezes and front porches. He didn’t gild street markets in fairy dust or elevate myth to history. March’s characters were the victims of gossip and driven mad by the cruelties of small-town mores. Their hypocrisies and delusions showed the true complexity of the human animal. Artifice has fielded inquiries as to the lawsuit filed against Mobile Ballet by a group of its directors. Plaintiffs’ attorney Ray Thompson previously said he hoped to make

Archaeology Museum profiles Holocaust survivor

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The Mystic Order of the Jazz Obsessed will hand out their second annual Jazzalea Award to acknowledge years spent furthering the genre in Mobile. This year’s recipient, longtime WKRG sales director Bob Spielmann, spent a quarter-century helping the Mobile Jazz Festival, most of the time as its president. Add another 15 years on the MOJO board of directors and that’s 40 years of service to Mobile jazz. Combined with his continuing volunteer efforts, he also earned a nomination for a 2017 Arty Award. Spielmann favorites the Mobile Big Band Society will perform on Monday, April 24, 6:30 p.m. at Gulf City Lodge (601 State St.). A variety of speakers will honor the award winner during an event just days after his 91st birthday. Entrance is $15, $12 for students and military and $10 for MOJO members. A light jambalaya dinner is included and a cash bar will be available.

For more information, phone 251-459-2298, email mobilejazz@bellsouth.net or go to mojojazz.org.

“Birdie” launches at Playhouse

When Uncle Sam drafts heartthrob crooner Conrad Birdie in 1958, the pop music world goes nuts. His management team exploits the public relations opportunity with a contest for a lucky teeny-bopper to win “one last kiss” from the departing idol. “Bye Bye Birdie,” the 1950s satire, is replete with musical numbers, which earned it a 1961 Tony award and a 1963 translation to the silver screen. Mobile’s Playhouse in the Park (4851 Museum Drive) will stage this mostly innocent musical through the efforts of managing director Danny Mollise and the triple-threat talents of about 50 young Mobilians. It runs three weekends, April 28 through May 14, with performances on Friday and Saturday evenings at 7:30 p.m. and Sundays at 2:30 p.m. Tickets cost $16, $14 for students and seniors. For more information, go to playhouseinthepark.org.

ARTSGALLERY

Agnes Tennenbaum was born in 1922 Hungary and a lifetime of hardship met her first decades. Her husband disappeared into a tuberculosis sanitarium. After the Germans occupied Hungary, she was sent to a ghetto, then a brick factory, and to Auschwitz then Allendorf labor camps. After liberation, Tennenbaum moved across Europe, then to America and finally to Mobile where she lived until she died on May 30, 2016. She freely shared her stories in spreading firsthand knowledge of a harrowing history. On April 20 at 6 p.m. Patricia Silverman will relay Tennenbaum’s life story at the USA Archaeology Museum (6052 USA Drive S.) on the west Mobile campus. The presentation features clips from a 2015 interview and samples of Tennenbaum’s prose and poetry. This talk accompanies the Archaeology Museum’s temporary exhibit “Darkness into Life” and is co-sponsored by the USA Common Read/Common World program. Admission is free. For more information, call 251-460-6106.

MOJO awards Spielmann

a court docket by last month. That’s not been the case. Thompson said while there has been one appearance it was a preliminary hearing called when Judge Jay York initially thought he might have to recuse himself due to a conflict of interest. It has since been settled and discounted. Thompson had no further insight on future matters. This issue’s publication date is the seventh anniversary of the Deepwater Horizon explosion and the resulting largest oil spill in U.S. waters. For everyone on the central Gulf Coast, its impact remains fresh. For Emmy-nominated playwright Leigh Fondakowski it became a revelation. She was initially fascinated by the Gulf Coast’s natural beauty, then by something else. “I was very struck how industry could become part of a culture of a place, an identity of a place and I knew there was an American story to be told there,” Fondakowski said in an interview. Her related stageplay, “Spill,” has made the rounds across the nation and recently finished a heralded New York City run. She spent years in research and interviews with the survivors, locals and the families of the 11 workers who died in the accident. “Spill” boasts a cast of eight in a minimalist presentation. The stage setting has some benches and a blue rectangle on the floor surrounded by platforms. It’s been noted how the actors use extensions cords whipped and scraped across the floor for a remarkable sonic suggestion of lapping waves. The New York Times review called it “zealously researched and intellectually rangy … This is a play to make you clutch at your program.” Though it premiered in Baton Rouge in 2014, Artifice found no indication it has been back this way since. This columnist thinks it ripe for regional return and few places could be more appropriate than Mobile, the place that became the hub for the response. The stark set dressing and lighting would make it easy to stage. We have numerous venues in most any size, from Alabama Contemporary Art Center, to USA’s Laidlaw Performing Arts Center, to the Saenger Theatre. Any of them could handle it. Now all we need are some motivated locals with the power and purse strings to make it happen. Any takers?


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FEATURE

MUSIC

SPOON, TENNIS THURSDAY, APRIL 27, WITH DOORS AT 7 P.M. SOUL KITCHEN, 219 DAUPHIN ST., WWW.SOULKITCHENMOBILE.COM TICKETS: $30 ADVANCE/$33 DAY OF SHOW/ Photo | Facebook

$50 RISER SEAT; AVAILABLE AT SOUL KITCHEN, ITS WEBSITE, MELLOW MUSHROOM (WEST AND MIDTOWN) OR BY CALLING 1-866-777-8932

Spoon serving up a dish of ‘Hot Thoughts’

E

Spoon opens its North American tour in Mobile April 27.

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

ach year, South by Southwest (SXSW) attracts throngs of musical acts and industry figures to Austin, the music mecca in the Lone Star State. In addition to scores of outof-towners, a legion of Austinbased bands with dreams of fortune and glory participate in the numerous showcases held around town. Once upon a time, Spoon was one. After a decade of hard work, Spoon gained traction on the national scene with its 2005 release, “Gimme Fiction.” Two years later, Spoon followed with the highly successful “Ga Ga Ga Ga,” an album featuring catchy rock anthems such as “Underdog” and “Don’t You Evah.” A devoted worldwide listening audience was forged. When the group returned to Austin for this year’s SXSW, Spoon was on the cusp of releasing its latest album “Hot Thoughts.” With

a three-night stint scheduled for the week, Spoon entertained audiences with the new material and found themselves the masters of their own showcase. Throughout their showcase, Spoon loaded each evening with a number of nationally known and up-and-coming bands, including A Giant Dog, Sweet Spirit, The New Pornographers and Hamilton Leithauser. “We knew the record would be coming out that same week,” bassist Rob Pope said. “So, we wanted to do something very special, and do something that will be a cool opportunity for us. We’re in the same venue every night for three nights in a row, which is awesome.” Even though “Hot Thoughts” was released just last month, Spoon’s fans had already been enjoying the album’s lead singles, “Can I Sit Next to You” and the title track. As far as Spoon’s choice of singles to introduce this release, Pope says the decision was left up to the “bigwigs,” who thought these songs would make for a good first impression. Personally, Pope had no argument with their decision. “They’re both kind of cerebral, weird songs,” Pope said. “They’ve also got some really good pop elements and stick in your head.” The track “Hot Thoughts,” which has been receiving ample airplay in the Azalea City, was the first tease. Reflecting Spoon’s clean, trademark

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brand of modern American rock, this single was inspired by frontman/guitarist Britt Daniel’s girlfriend. As the story goes, while staying in Shibuya, Tokyo, she was approached late one night by a horde of drunk businessmen who began hitting on her. Their flirtatious exchange led one of the men to comment on the whiteness of her teeth, which gave birth to lyrics such as “Your teeth shining so white/ Light up this side street in Shibuya tonight.”

studio versions of songs are just one interpretation brought on by the sterile and divided studio environment. Before SXSW, Pope says, Spoon had only played the new material live at a couple of previous shows. At that point, he says, they were just getting comfortable performing these songs together as a band, as opposed to recording separate tracks in the studio. Pope also notes the band’s satisfaction receiving instant feedback on the new songs from their audiences. “It’s been fun for me to get the real-time reaction of people hearing them for the very first time,” Pope said. “So far, that’s been really good. Seeing us melt some people’s brains right in front of me is great.” The last time Spoon was in the area, it played Hangout Fest. Soul Kitchen will provide a more intimate locale for fans to experience the band’s live show. Pope says he would not have it any other way. While the band’s tour itinerary has a number of festival dates, Pope says the band prefers “ceilings and walls” and the absence of competition with a band performing on another stage. “We just played a show in London,” Pope said. “All of the reviews that we’ve heard are that people were talking about the show the next day. I think people were shocked at how active and loud and aggressive we were. I think for whatever reason that they thought that we would be this indie rock band, but we played loud and hard.”

[‘Hot Thoughts’] jumped out as an immediate song and one everyone kept going back to, which is why I

think it ended up being the first song on the record. It was a statement. After Daniel brought a rough demo to the band, the group began shaping the songs into a final product. “We had a lot of fun putting a lot of other stuff that Britt brought in as the demo,” Pope said. “It jumped out as an immediate song and one everyone kept going back to, which is why I think it ended up being the first song on the record. It was a statement.” Pope says performing the new material live has generated quite a bit of excitement. For some bands,


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BAND: YEAH, PROBABLY DATE: SATURDAY, APRIL 22, 9 P.M. VENUE: TOP OF THE BAY, 28971 U.S. HIGHWAY 98 (DAPHNE), 251-621-1177 TICKETS: CALL FOR MORE INFORMATION

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agniappe’s Mobile Bay and New Southern Music showcases at SouthSounds brought together an assortment of music from around the Southeast. Based on each band’s talent and performance, the showcases’ panel of judges had their work cut out for them. A vast array of musical styles and genres were represented, including punk, blues, Southern rock, jam and soul. After rating the bands on everything from originality to stage presence, the judges chose one band to receive a prize package including of three days of studio time at Rick Hirsch’s Studio H20 (with accommodations), a $500 gift card to Andy’s Music, a $200 gift card to Callaghan’s, a $100 gas gift card and an opportunity to play at the Hard Rock Hotel & Casino in Biloxi. One of the newer bands on the scene — Azalea City trio Yeah, Probably — overtook the competition with some of the most original sounds of the weekend. Shea White’s plucky guitar grooves met with Quintin Ayers’ grooving bass work and Phillip Baggins’ tight drum rhythms to produce a funky mélange of jazz, pop and modern soul.

Yeah, Probably’s sonic mixture is at once unfamiliar and refreshing. Throughout the showcases, Baggins said this trademark style built his confidence. “I already knew that we won, not being proud or anything, but nobody has our sound,” Baggins said. “It was a surreal feeling. We just looked at each other and it was like, ‘What just happened?’” White said. “It was definitely cool, because a few of the bands we knew, and I’ve looked up to these people as musicians. It was nice to be on the same stage and same playing field … ” “It was nice having judges from out of town,” Ayers added. “There were no politics.” The band members agree the foundation of their sound is built on several concepts. First, there is a mutual attraction to “good music.” Also, White says, the group’s sound is an exercise in balancing the technical aspects of the jazz world with soulful pop overtones that are popular these days. From Kazoola to Dauphin Street Blues Company, this winning musical formula has made them quickly grow into one of the area’s favorite groups. “From my writing standpoint, I like using cool melodies that go with cool chords,” White said. “That’s the jazz influence of it. We find weird ways

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MUSIC

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

FEATURE

Fame in the future? Yeah, Probably

to put weird melodies to cool, different chords. We also have a pop influence that is more pleasing to the layperson. We try to combine the two to find something that we like to do and what we like to hear.” One important facet that makes this band so popular is the chemistry shared between the members, one that began to form five years ago when they started performing in Faulkner State Community College’s “The Sun Chief Sound.” The musical bond between White, Baggins and Ayers grew, even as they were performing with other projects. Four months ago, the trio decided to set aside other bands and day jobs and replace them with Yeah, Probably. Baggins says this chemistry is best witnessed during their live performances, where he says the band tends to experiment. White adds this practice gives the audience the opportunity to never hear any song played the same way twice. “We listen to each other,” White explained. “If he’s doing something cool, then we’ll catch on. I can’t do that with other people that I play with like I can with them.” Those who witnessed the band’s SouthSounds showcase received a sneak preview of their upcoming, self-titled EP. They recruited Greg DeLuca (The Mulligan Brothers) to assist in capturing their original music. Currently, the band is waiting patiently as the album is mixed and mastered in Nashville by former Gulf Coast resident/musician Steven Van Etten. “We’re just kind of waiting,” White said. “As soon as we get it in our hands, we’re going to start the process of getting it out. Hopefully, we’ll have it in our hands in two or three weeks.” As far as what they plan to do with their prize package, Yeah, Probably has already put some of the perks to use. White and Ayers have upgraded the pedal boards for their guitars. Baggins says he has a metronome and new drumsticks on the way. The band has also been in touch with Rick Hirsch and will enter Studio H2O with this local music legend as soon as the two entities are available. Until then, they plan to write as much music as possible and nurture their audience. “Hopefully, we’ll be expanding our reach, as far as fan base and playing different places and more festivals and bigger venues,” White said. “That’s our short-term goal. Our long-term goal is to be rich and famous. I’m hoping that these four songs on our EP will identify our genre. I feel like it could go a little further.”


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‘Still no good’

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

BEER, BANDS & BINGO FEATURING EMILY STUCKEY TUESDAY, APRIL 25, 6 P.M. MOE’S ORIGINAL BBQ (DAPHNE), 6423 BAYFRONT PARK DRIVE, WWW.MOESORIGINALBBQ.COM

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TICKETS: FREE

eer, Bands & Bingo is not only an offbeat version of the classic game, it also provides an opportunity to catch performances by a plethora of local talent. This installment of 92ZEW’s event will highlight a member of one of the Gulf Coast’s newest and most popular groups, The Krickets. While the band has charmed audiences with their lovely harmonies and exquisite Americana, each member has her own side project. Emily Stuckey balances solo work with her role in The Krickets. This Gulf Coast native has spent several years entertaining fans with her homegrown sounds. Many have only experienced Stuckey armed solely with acoustic guitar and voice, but the single “You’re Still No Good” reveals a different aspect of her music, complete with the support of a full band. “You’re Still No Good” is a powerful track full of emotional intensity, translated through her poetry and vocal work.

Photo | Facebook | Emily Stuckey

School’s out

Roman Street’s ‘Bohemia’

Ever since Screamin’ Jay Hawkins emerged from his coffin, “Shock Rock” has been a staple in the world of rock ‘n’ roll. From GWAR to Marilyn Manson, a number of rockers have brought horrific theatrics and subject matter to their live shows. Alice Cooper is one of the most prolific in history. Cooper and his classic lineup began gathering disciples with their 1971 album “Love It to Death,” which featured the classic tracks “I’m Eighteen” and “Long Way to Go.” The youth of America quickly fell in love with the band’s hybrid of glam and garage rock. As the decades passed, Alice Cooper’s sound quickly shifted to more of a metal focus. Five decades of performing have only strengthened this legend’s following. Cooper’s stage show should be quite memorable. He has perfected a shock-rock show at its finest. Over the years Cooper has used his shows to escape the hangman’s noose, the guillotine and the electric chair. His Beau Rivage crowd can expect to see ghouls and monsters of all shapes and sizes parade across the stage.

Mobile’s Roman Street is bringing its exotic acoustic sounds to The Steeple on St. Francis, which has emerged as one of the Azalea City’s most unique and inviting venues. Its beautiful surroundings are matched by its great acoustics, ideal for this kind of show. Each Roman Street performance is a musical journey taking the mind across European landscapes. The group has used its carefree mix of flamenco, gypsy jazz and classic styles — one of the most refreshing on the Gulf Coast — to establish a worldwide audience. The latest addition to the band’s catalog is “Bohemia,” which also features the co-billed producer/multi-instrumentalist Vincent Ingala on the track “Mr. Morris.” Since the release of his 2010 debut “North End Soul,” Ingala has become one the smooth jazz scene’s most notable musicians. He has been enjoying the success of his 2015 release “Coast to Coast,” filled with smooth grooves and sultry work on saxophone. “Coast to Coast” produced two singles that hit No. 1 on Billboard’s Contemporary Jazz Chart.

Band: Alice Cooper Date: Friday, April 21, 8 p.m. Venue: Beau Rivage Resort & Casino, 875 Beach Blvd. (Biloxi), www.beaurivage.com Tickets: $49.95-$69.95, available through Ticketmaster

Photo | alicecooper.com | Alice Cooper

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Band: Roman Street, Vincent Ingala Date: Thursday, April 27, with doors at 6:30 p.m. Venue: The Steeple on St. Francis, 251 St. Francis St., www.thesteeplemobile.com Tickets: $27.50-$39.50, available through The Steeple’s website


AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | April 20 - April 26

THUR. APRIL 20

Bluegill— Cary Laine Blues Tavern— Doobious, 8:30p Brickyard— Ben Jernigan and Company Callaghan’s— Chris and Timmy from Peek Dority’s Bar and Grill— Ryan Balthrop Fairhope Brewing— Bluegrass Jam, 6p Felix’s— Soulshine Flora Bama— Dave McCormick, 2p// Johnny Barbato, 5p/// Dueling Pianos, 5:30p//// Mark Sherrill, John Joiner, Chris Newbury, 6p//// JoJo Prez, 9:30p//// Braxton Calhoun, 10p//// Zachery Diedrich Duo, 10:15p The Intracostal— Brent Burns and Bill Whyte Listening Room— Marcy Chatelain, Joshua Stephen Ward, Laurie Anne Armour Lulu’s— Lefty Collins, 5p Manci’s— Eric Erdman McSharry’s— The Lite Travelers, 7:30p Old 27 Grill— Songwriter’s Night, 6:30p Soul Kitchen— Elements: Hip-hop showcase, 9p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Jason Justice, 6p Wind Creek Casino— Mickey Utley, 8p

FRI. APRIL 21

All Sports Bar & Billiards— DJ Markie Mark, 10p Beau Rivage— Alice Cooper, 8p Big Beach Brewing— Johnny No, 6:30p Bluegill— Lee Yankie, 12p// Jeri, 6p Blues Tavern— Disciples of the Crow, 9p Brickyard— Josh Ewing Dority’s Bar and Grill— Brandon Bailey Felix’s— Blind Dog Mike Flora Bama— Sassfras, 11a// Jay Hawkins Duo, 1p/// Lea Anne Creswell Duo, 2p//// Brittany Grimes, 4p//// Jack Robertson Show, 5:30p//// Dave Chastang, 6p//// Johnny Barbato Trio, 6p//// Phin Addicts, 6p//// David Dunn, 9p//// Braxton Calhoun, 10p//// Logan Spicer and Tony Ray Thompson, 10:15p//// Brian Hill Band, 10:30p Hangout— Wavelength Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Me Too, 9p IP Casino— Air Supply Listening Room— Eric Erdman Live Bait— Brandon Styles Impressions, 8p Lulu’s— CoConut Radio, 5p Main Street Cigar Lounge— The Tree Oh, 8p

Manci’s— Robert Sully McSharry’s— DJ Chi, 10p The Merry Widow— Name Sayers, Lady Legs, The Volks, 9p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Stephen Sylvester Band, 8p Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Jason Justice Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Double Shot, 6:30p O’Daly’s— Gene Murrell, Tony Edwards and David White, 10p Old 27 Grill— Jim St. James, 6:30p Saenger— Boston Soul Kitchen— Starlito, Don Trip, Scotty Atl, Red Dot, 9:30p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Alexa Burroughs, 5:30p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Damien Lamb, 6p Wind Creek Casino— MoJiles, 9p

SAT. APRIL 22

Big Beach Brewing— Mac Walter, 6:30p Bluegill— David Chastang, 12p// Matthew Davis Band, 6p Blues Tavern— Jay B Elston Band, 9p Brickyard— Permagroove Callaghan’s— Slide Bayou Dority’s Bar and Grill— The Modern El Dorados Felix’s— Grits N Pieces Fin’s— The Perry Wall, 8p Flora Bama— Big Muddy, 1p// Mario Mena Duo, 1p/// Jay Hawkins Trio, 2p//// Destiny Brown, 4p//// Mason Henderson, 5p//// Jack Robertson Show, 5:30p//// Al and Cathy, 6p//// Stonewall Broussard, 6p//// Foxy Iguanas, 10p//// Brian Hill Trio, 10:15p//// Yellowhammer, 10:30p Golden Nugget— Little River Band, 8p Hangout— Luke Langford & 331 South Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Me Too, 9p Hard Rock (Live) — Brandon Bennett, 8p IP Casino— Air Supply Listening Room— Lisa Mills Lulu’s— Lee Yankie, 5p Manci’s— Paw Paw’s Medicine Cabinet McSharry’s— DJ Lewis, 10p The Merry Widow— Boyfriend, 10p Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Kim Carson Trio, 6p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Andrew and Bryan Ayers, 6p Old 27 Grill— Retrobution with Kris Stoltz, 6:30p Pirates Cove— Rhythm Intervention, 5p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Jimmy Lee, 12p// Lefty Collins, 5:30p Tacky Jacks (Orange

Beach) — Beave and Cleave, 12p// Jimmy Lee Hannaford, 6p Top of the Bay— Yeah Probably Wind Creek Casino— MoJiles, 9p

SUN. APRIL 23

Bluegill— Matt Bush, 12p// Grayson Capps Band, 6p Blues Tavern— John Hall Trio, 6p Brickyard— Jake Buford Callaghan’s— Belle Adair Dority’s Bar and Grill— Yea Probably Felix’s— Brandon Bailey Flora Bama— Smoky Otis Trio, 12p// Songs of Rusty, 1p/// Beachbilly’s, 2p//// Mel Knapp, 5p//// Lucky Doggs, 5:30p//// Perdido Brothers, 6p//// Mario Mena Duo, 10p//// Dallas Moore, 10:15p Lulu’s— Cadillac Attack, 5p Manci’s— Lisa Mills McSharry’s— Trad. Irish Music, 6:30p Old 27 Grill— Lisa Zanghi, 11:30a Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Lisa Christian, 2p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Gerry Gambino, 11a

MON. APRIL 24

Callaghan’s— Luke Winslow Felix’s— Matt Bush Flora Bama— Founders and Friends, 2p// Cathy Pace, 6p/// Al and Cathy, 8p//// Petty and Pace, 10:15p Lulu’s— Webb Dalton, 5p Old 27 Grill— Marty Mcintosh, 6p

TUE. APRIL 25

Bluegill— David Chastang Butch Cassidy’s— Pete Young Felix’s— Lee Yankie Flora Bama— T. Bone Montgomery, 2p// Perdido Brothers, 6p//// Logan Spicer, 8p//// Zachery Diedrich, 10:15p Lulu’s— Jimmy Lumpkin, 5p Soul Kitchen— Highly Suspect, DJ Redbees, Slothrust, 8p

WED. APRIL 26

Bluegill— Ross Newell Brickyard— Nick and the Ovorols Callaghan’s— Marlow Boys Felix’s— Bobby Butchka Flora Bama— Neil Dover, 2p// Albert Simpson and John Kulinich, 5:30p/// Rhonda Hart and Jonathan Newton, 6p//// A Thousand Horses, 9p//// Hung Jury, 10p//// Kyle Wilson Trio, 10:15p Lulu’s— Sugarcane Jane, 5p Soul Kitchen— T.I. – Hustle Gang Tour w/ Young Dro, 8p

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That ‘70s film, ‘20th Century Women’

I

FILMTHE REEL WORLD

BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

AREA THEATERS AMC MOBILE 16 785 Schillinger Rd. S. (251) 639-7373 CRESCENT THEATER 208 Dauphin Street (251) 438-2005 HOLLYWOOD STADIUM 18 1250 Satchel Paige Dr. (251) 473-9655

t takes an incredible performance to stand out in the terrific cast of Mike Mills’ “20th Century Women,” but Annette Bening is that good as Dorothea, a single older mom raising her teenage son, Jamie, in California in 1979. Like Mills’ other, wonderful film “Beginners” (2011), this film is autobiographical, and surely that helps give the characters their incredibly watchable, endlessly fascinating feel of authenticity. As the title suggests, many of the characters are, in fact, women. Dorothea rents a room in their large, dilapidated house to Abbie (Greta Gerwig), a confident but damaged photographer recovering from the aftermath of cervical cancer. Elle Fanning plays Julie, the unhappy best friend to protagonist Jamie, who is suffering unrequited love for the girl whose home life is so unhappy she sleeps over, in a sisterly fashion, every night. Jamie and Dorothea both revel and wallow in their open-house lifestyle, and when Dorothea begins to fear for her son’s mono-parental upbringing, she enlists the help of the aforementioned females to add their perspective. This casual plan is the closest the film comes

to a plot, and is really just an excuse for a series of perceptive, well-written anecdotal scenes. Abbie takes Jamie to a punk club and gives him tips on dancing and picking up girls; Julie tries to teach him how to look confident smoking. These can’t have been exactly what Dorothea had in mind, but what makes her so wonderful is that she isn’t overly upset about it either. Bening exudes curiosity and intelligence, and is open to most experiences for herself and her son, yet their extra-wide generation gap always adds a layer of complexity to their relationship. It’s interesting Dorothea feels it is her age, but not her gender, limiting her parenting point of view. One of her boarders is male, yet she asks the women to pitch in with Jamie. The guy is the truly wonderful Billy Crudup, who looks more at home in the 1970s, in this and most films, than he does in his own time. He’s a sweet, helpful hippie, casually espousing meditation and other practices from his commune days. He’s a gentle love interest to various characters, and fully realized despite his relatively short screen time. This is a novelistic movie in its struc-

ture, as characters reach into their pasts and even describe their futures, stretching the film’s perfectly rendered moments in both directions. Since “20th Century Women” is based in the writer-director’s own life, this makes sense; he knows the entire story. The film’s characters are richly drawn and beautifully portrayed. They are individuals, and the small moments depicted here illume the lives we’re told they will have in the future. Mike Mills places his characters meaningfully in a larger historic context, given the benefit of hindsight, and there are moments that echo the times we are in now. A group gathers around the TV watching Jimmy Carter giving his plaintively emotional “crisis of confidence” speech about the hollow heart of consumerism, and the resonance for modern viewers has probably grown with each day. From the pivotal pre-Reagan moment in history, to the deeply personal moments in the filmmaker’s’ own remembered youth, “20th Century Women” will leave you feeling as though you were there, too. “20th Century Women” is currently available to rent.

AMC JUBILEE SQUARE 12 6898 U.S. 90 Daphne, (251) 626- 6266 CARMIKE CINEMAS 23151 Wharf Ln. Orange Beach (251) 981-4444 COBB THEATRES PINNACLE 14 3780 Gulf Shores Pkwy Gulf Shores (251) 968-7444

Photos | A24 / CTMG, Inc.

FROM LEFT — Annette Bening, Greta Gerwig and Elle Fanning in “20th Century Women,” the story of a teenage boy, his mother and two other women who help raise him amid the love and freedom of Southern California of 1979. Ewan McGregor returns to his breakout role 20 years later in “T2 Trainspotting.” NEW IN THEATERS

EASTERN SHORE PREMIERE CINEMA 14 30500 Alabama 181 #500 Spanish Fort, Al (251) 626-0352

Twenty years later, Mark Renton (Ewan McGregor) returns to the only place he can ever call home. There waiting for him are old buddies Spud (Ewen Bremner), Sick Boy (Jonny Lee Miller) and Begbie (Robert Carlyle). AMC Mobile 16

Information accurate at press time; please call theaters for showtimes.

THE PROMISE

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T2: TRAINSPOTTING

BORN IN CHINA

A Disney documentary looks at the wildlife in China, including endangered animals. Premiering for Earth Day. All listed multiplex theaters. When Michael (Oscar Isaac), a brilliant medical student, meets Ana, their shared Armenian heritage sparks an attraction that explodes into a romantic rivalry between Michael and Ana’s boyfriend, Chris (Christian Bale), a photojournalist dedicated to exposing political truth. AMC Jubilee Square 12, AMC Mobile 16

NOW PLAYING FATE OF THE FURIOUS All listed multiplex theaters. THE CASE FOR CHRIST Cobb Pinnacle 14, Regal Mobile Stadium 18, AMC Mobile 16, AMC Jubilee Square 12 SMURFS: THE LOST VILLAGE All listed multiplex theaters. GOING IN STYLE Crescent Theater, all listed multiplex theaters. THE BOSS BABY All listed multiplex theaters. GHOST IN THE SHELL All listed multiplex theaters.

LIFE All listed multiplex theaters. POWER RANGERS All listed multiplex theaters. BEAUTY AND THE BEAST All listed multiplex theaters. KONG: SKULL ISLAND All listed multiplex theaters. LOGAN All listed multiplex theaters. THE SHACK All listed multiplex theaters. GET OUT All listed multiplex theaters. CHIPS Carmike Wharf 15 JOHN WICK: CHAPTER 2 Regal Mobile Stadium 18, Carmike Wharf 15


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CALENDAR OF EVENTS APRIL 20, 2017 - APRIL 26, 2017

GENERAL INTEREST Small Business Resource Fair Councilman C.J. Small will join several organizations in hosting a Small Business Resource Fair on Thursday, April 20, 4-6 p.m. at Gilliard Elementary School. Call 251-208-7441. Rape Crisis Center Luncheon Luncheon in commemoration of Sexual Assault Awareness Month will feature guest speaker Becca Stevens of Thistle Farms. Thursday, April 20, 11:20 a.m. at Spring Hill College. Call 251-602-0909. Earth Day Mobile Bay The state’s largest Earth Day festival. Saturday, April 22, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. at Fairhope Municipal Pier. Visit www. earthdaymobilebay.org. Earth Day at Blakeley Park Celebrate Earth Day with a two-hour nature boat tour of the Mobile-Tensaw Delta. Saturday, April 22, at 9:30 a.m. Visit blakeleypark.com. Crewmen’s Reunion Join the USS Alabama for a crewmen’s reunion Saturday, April 22, at 11 a.m. for a day of living history! Call 251-433-2703. Fairhope Walking Tours Join Museum Director Donnie Barrett for a walking tour of Fairhope on Saturday, April 22, beginning at 10 a.m. at the Fairhope Colony Cemetery. Great Drift Paddle Dog River Clean Water Revival hosts its 7th annual free paddle event at McNally Park, 4380 Park Road in Mobile, on Saturday, April 22, 1-3 p.m. Bring your own canoe, kayak or SUP, or rent one from Sunshine Canoes at 251-367-4144. A.C.C.W. Spring Celebration The Archdiocesan Council of Catholic Women’s Spring Celebration/Card Party and Luncheon is Tuesday, April 25, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at St. Catherine of Siena Parish, 2605 Springhill Ave. Call 251-6664960. Providence Farmers Market Shop the Farmers Market every Wednesday now through July 12, 2-5 p.m. in Lot F at Providence Hospital. Call 251631-3501. NDE Meeting International Association of Near Death Studies (IANDS) meets second Wednesday of every month at the West Regional Branch of the Mobile Public Library on Grelot Road at 6 p.m. Brown Bag in Bienville Every Wednesday through May 5, join friends in Mobile’s Bienville Square from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. for lunch and live music. Dauphin Island Boardwalk Talks Boardwalk Talks are held the first and third Wednesday of each month at 11:15 a.m. at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab, 101 Bienville Blvd. Call 251-861-2141. Midtown Optimist Club Join Midtown Optimist Club every

Wednesday at noon for lunch at Azalea City Golf Course. Call 251-348-3542. Toastmasters Do you want to deliver a speech like a pro or gain leadership skills to advance your career? Toastmasters International meets regularly at six locations in Mobile and Baldwin counties. Visit www.toastmasters. org for more information.

FUNDRAISERS Bald Eagle Bash The Weeks Bay Foundation will hold its Bald Eagle Bash on the shores of Weeks Bay. Saturday, April 22, 4-7 p.m. under the U.S. Highway 98 bridge over Fish River. Call 251-990-5004 or visit baldeaglebash. com. Krawfish for Kids The USA Physician Assistant Class of 2018 is hosting a crawfish boil and silent auction benefiting UCP’s Camp SMILE on Saturday, April 22, 4-7 p.m. at O’Daly’s Irish Pub. Visit dlb1002.wixsite.com/ krawfishforkids. Corks in the Courtyard Corks in the Courtyard will be Thursday, April 20, at 5:30 p.m. at Via Health, Fitness and Enrichment Center, 1717 Dauphin St., to raise funds for Via. Call 251-470-5229 or email viacenter1717@gmail.com.

MUSEUMS Tea for Two Tuesday afternoons at 2 p.m. the Fairhope Museum of History hosts a tea with a lecture on Fairhope history. The April 25 speaker will be Donnie Barrett. Call 251929-1471. “Windows to the Sea” Dauphin Island Sea Lab announces a permanent exhibit at the Estuarium, “Windows to the Sea.” Visit disl.org. “Shipwreck! Pirates and Treasure” A new, highly interactive exhibit at GulfQuest features more than 500 authentic artifacts recovered from deepocean shipwrecks. Visit www.gulfquest.org. “Christenberry: In Alabama” On the occasion of Alabama’s Bicentennial Celebration, this exhibit honors artist William Christenberry’s exploration of themes related to his native state. Mobile Museum of Art, 4850 Museum Drive. Through June 4. Call 251208-5200.

Fairhope Museum of History, 24 N. Section St. The museum is open daily (except Sunday and Monday) from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 251-929-1471.

Society hosts dances the first and third Monday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Hot Wheels Skating Rink in Daphne. Email cassief13@aol.com.

Little Discoveries “Outside the Box,” aimed at children age 6 and under, explores how innovation and creativity can lead to a world of possibilities, starting with a simple cardboard box. Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Call 251-208-6893 or email jholland@ exploreum.com.

WORKSHOPS

Thursdays at MMoA Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., the Mobile Museum of Art offers free admission to all visitors. No reservations are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive. Call 251-208-5200.

Banking, Savings & Credit Blitz April 22, 10 – 11 a.m. Jim Doucette will host a workshop on basic savings and checking accounts at Ben May Library on Government Street. Call 251-602-0011.

SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES

Drone workshop On Thursday, April 20, the Daphne Library will offer a free drone workshop for teens. The workshop will begin at 4 p.m. in the library community room. Call 251-6212818, ext. 211.

Infirmary Duathlon Professional and amateur athletes throughout the area will gather at 8 a.m. Saturday, April 22, at Mobile Infirmary for the annual Infirmary Duathlon. The race begins at 8 a.m. Visit infirmaryduathlon. com or call 251-435-4447. 1st Bite on Fowl Join area fishermen to raise money for the Salvation Army on Saturday, April 22, for an inshore fishing tournament at Fowl River Marina. Call 251-438-1625. Night with Nick Saban Team Focus presents the 10th annual Night with Nick Saban, April 25 at 5:30 p.m. at the Mobile Convention Center. Call 251-635-1515 or visit teamfocusuas.org. Tai Chi Beginner Tai Chi classes are being offered in Stirling Hall (behind All Saints Episcopal Church, 151 S. Ann St., Mobile) every Saturday from 10 a.m. to noon. Classes may be joined at any time. Email rjvarley@ comcast.net. Bridge lessons The Mobile Bridge Center offers free bridge lessons each Tuesday at 6 p.m. at 1510 University Blvd. Arrive a few minutes early to register. Call the Bridge Center at 251-666-2147, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fitness and athletics classes New fitness classes are in progress at Palmer Pillans Middle School. To register or for more information on classes offered, call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com.

“Faces of Africa” The History Museum of Mobile exhibit “Faces of Africa: A Mystical View of Tribal Heritage” runs through Monday, July 31. Call 251-208-7420.

Dance and art classes New dance and art classes are in progress at Palmer Pillans Middle School. To register or for more information on classes offered, Call 251-463-7980 or go to: communityactivitiesprogram.com.

“Drugs: Costs and Consequences” The Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration team up to present a powerful interactive exhibit of the effects of drugs on individuals and society. Through August. Visit exploreum.com.

Ballroom dance Azalea Ballroom Dance Club hosts dances the second and fourth Tuesday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Via Health, Fitness & Enrichment Center, 1717 Dauphin St. Email cyoungblood9278@ gmail.com, call 251-623-9183 or visit azaleaballroomdanceclub.com.

Fairhope’s founding There is quite a story behind Fairhope’s founding in 1894. Learn more at the

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Ballroom dance The Moonlight Chasse Ballroom Dance

Bullying prevention workshop Mobile County Coalition Against Bullying presents Real Solutions for Bullying workshop on Tuesday, April 25, at 8:30 a.m. at Goodwill Easter Seals, 2440 Gordon Smith Drive. Call 251-639-0004.

Genealogy class Genealogy for beginners is offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School. Call 251-463-7980 or visit communityactivitiesprogram.com.

PUBLIC MEETINGS Baldwin County Commission: First and third Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., 322 Courthouse Square, Bay Minette. Work sessions are the second and fourth Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. rotating between Bay Minette, the Foley Satellite Courthouse, the Fairhope Satellite Courthouse and the Baldwin County Central Annex Building in Robertsdale. www.baldwincountyal.gov Baldwin County Planning Commission: First Thursday at 6 p.m., 22251 Palmer St., Robertsdale, www.baldwincountyal.gov. Bayou La Batre City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 13785 S. Wintzell Ave., www.cityofbayoulabatre.com. Chickasaw City Council: Second and fourth Tuesday at 7 p.m., 224 N. Craft Highway, 251-452-6450. Citronelle City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6:30 p.m., 19135 Main St., 251-866-7973. Creola City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6 p.m., 190 Dead Lake Road, #A, 251-675-8142. Daphne City Council: First and third Monday at 6:30 p.m., 1705 Main St. Work sessions are the second Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m., www.daphneal.com. Dauphin Island Town Council: First and third Tuesdays at 7 p.m., 1011 Bienville Blvd., www.townofdauphinisland.org. Elberta Town Council: Third Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m. in the town hall. Workshop meeting on the second Tuesday. townofelberta.com. Fairhope City Council: Second and fourth Monday at 6 p.m., 161 N. Section St. Work sessions are held before each council meeting at 4:30 p.m., www. cofairhope.com. Fairhope Planning Commission: First Monday at 5 p.m., 161 N. Section St. For more information visit www.cofairhope.com. Foley City Council: First and third Monday at 5:30 p.m., 407 E. Laurel Ave. Work sessions begin at 4 p.m., www. cityoffoley.org. Gulf Shores City Council: Second and fourth Mondays at 4 p.m., 1905 W. First St., www.gulfshoresal.gov.


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MEDIA MEDIA FRENZY

Kelly Jones joins FMTALK’s morning show BY ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

F THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE HAVING NOTHING ON BY BYRON WALDEN / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Ecclesiastical leader 6 “Get out!” 10 Blood enemy 14 Aussie critters 18 Diaper option 19 Bridge shape 20 French director Clément 21 Martial art whose name means “sword way” 22 Home for Bilbo Baggins 24 West Wing worker 25 A lot 26 A.L. East team: Abbr. 27 Contemptible sorts 28 The ladies-only Westernthemed bar I own? 30 Inspector Clouseau or Borat? 33 Peevish 34 Most contemptible 35 Blowup: Abbr. 36 See 9-Down 37 Like some quilt blocks 39 Decoration in a deli case? 45 Tony who managed two World Series championships for the Cardinals 47 Setting for Cardinals home games, briefly 48 Vivacity 49 Neutral tone 50 Parliamentary proceedings, e.g. 51 Romeo or Juliet 53 ____ booster 55 Drained of color 56 “Indubitably” 57 Product of a stable of comic-strip artists? 62 Kentucky college 63 Communication system pioneered by Thomas Gallaudet, for short 64 Greek city where Perseus was born 65 Scaled-down woodwind? 70 Ice-cream container 73 Calendar model 74 Suffix with blast75 Eight-time Olympic medalist Apolo Anton ____ 76 Condo V.I.P. 77 Art Deco artist 78 Belgradian, e.g. 81 Audiophile’s collection 83 Elizabeth with the memoir “Saving Graces” 85 Audibly upset Belgian francophone? 89 Words after “Sure!” 90 Mournful work 91 MSN alternative 92 Musician in the woodwind section 94 Runs through 97 Satirical depiction of the story of Noah? 100 Most important mounted

14 They can provoke knee-jerk reactions 15 Reaching new heights in ballet? 16 Ancient theater 17 Little lad 21 Aussie critters 23 Quick series of social-media posts 28 Something seen at Frankenstein’s birthday party? 29 Shopping ____ 31 Empty spaces 32 Rhubarb with deep roots? 36 Welcoming necklace 37 DVD remote button 38 Go a mile a minute 40 Woe for some 51-Acrosses 41 Shine 42 Tres + cinco 43 Two-tone treat DOWN 44 Georgia senator who 1 Drei + fünf helped establish “don’t ask, 2 Sign of spring don’t tell” 3 1992 Tim Robbins mockumentary 46 Correo ____ (words on 4 Horse picker’s hangout, for foreign correspondence) short 52 Hairy hunter of Genesis 5 Melodramatic NBC hit start- 54 Big do ing in 2016 55 Elvis ____ Presley 6 Indian “masters” 57 Pitch in 7 Hybrid bakery treats 58 “The BFG” author 8 Roman ____ 59 Automaker that introduced 9 With 36-Across, a Dr. Seuss book the Rambler 10 Marker maker 60 Witch 11 Time on the throne 61 2004 Scarlett Johansson 12 “____ Club” (No. 1 hit film adapted from “Lady for 50 Cent) Windermere’s Fan” 13 Removes, as a sticker 62 Apt to go Democratic cavalryman? 102 Opposite corner in a romantic triangle 103 Bush league, for short? 105 Jean who played Aunt Martha in “Arsenic and Old Lace” 106 Important positions 107 Alphas 109 Son of Gloria on “Modern Family” 110 Food thickener 111 Big name among radio shock jocks 112 So-called “Butterfly Capital of Alabama” 113 Environmental bane 114 Hand (out) 115 Study of the heavens: Abbr. 116 Attacked

65 Spit out 66 Actress Sorvino 67 One opposed 68 Big brass 69 Middling 70 Work out spectacularly 71 Beehive, for one 72 Overcome 76 Authority 78 Villainous visage 79 Vegetarian sandwich filling 80 Train syst. 82 Quarters : basketball :: chukkers : ____ 84 Abrupt, disconcerting reaction 86 After-dinner volunteer’s words 87 Pays de ____ (Nantes’s region) 88 Variety of hold ’em 93 Frances who played TV’s Aunt Bee 94 Religious leaders 95 ____ President 96 Baldwin offering 97 Central 98 Gets ready to do push-ups, say 99 Title opera heroine who is a Druidic high priestess 101 Kind of boots 104 ETS offering 107 Going nowhere, metaphorically 108 Women’sclub event

F U T U R E

ANSWERS ON PAGE 49

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ans of FMTALK 106.5’s “Mobile Mornings” show started hearing a familiar voice delivering the news at the beginning of this week. Kelly Jones, who served as a morning anchor at WPMI-TV until last September, has joined the ranks of one of Mobile’s most popular radio talk shows. She joins hosts Sean Sullivan and Dalton Orwig weekday mornings from 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. “I’m doing news and headlines in the mornings. It’s my first week and I’m loving it!” Jones said. She says her job is to bring a news component to the program, pulling trending stories from the news wire to keep listeners up to date. “I’m providing that news presence while Dalton and Sean do what they’re doing,” she explained. Sullivan said the opportunity to have Jones join his station was one he didn’t want to pass up. “I asked Kelly Jones to be a part of ‘Mobile Mornings’ to have a real journalist in the mix to step up our news game and deliver a local news product on the radio,” he said. “I really appreciate her news chops, but her energy and creativity really adds a lot as well.” Though “Mobile Mornings” is known as a place to hear thoughtful opinion and debate about local, state, national and international

S H O C K

issues, Jones maintains she isn’t there to opine about the issues, but to provide the type of objective, professional news delivery she was known for during her three years at WPMI. Although she left Local15 in September, Jones was bound by a six-month non-compete contract. With the non-compete period over, she says she was free to take on a new broadcasting job. Radio isn’t new for Jones, and she says she finds it to be a lot of fun to get back behind the mic and believes it helps further her goals of being a positive influence in the Mobile community. “It’s been years since I’ve done it. You can really pull from the positive energy in radio and let the story breathe. Sean and Dalton have such great chemistry. I consider it a huge honor to be a part of the team,” she said. Jones says a lot of people have asked why she has taken another morning job when the early hours were a major part of her leaving WPMI. She explained she’s able to tape a portion of the show from home so she can spend breakfast with her children and get them off to school, then work in-studio from 7-9. “When you compare this to leaving my home at 3 a.m. to get to my former job by 3:30 a.m., it was an easy decision. I’m grateful and excited to contribute to the news cycle in Mobile,” she said.


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SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

AFC Mobile brings minor league soccer to The Lip BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

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Photo | Courtesy Alyssa Newton

A

s it is throughout most of the world, soccer is a The grassroots-based organization started a Go Fund very popular sport along the Alabama Gulf Coast. Me account, which has surpassed $3,000. This money will High school championships have been captured be used for equipment and travel costs. by Bayside, Fairhope, McGill-Toolen, St. Paul’s, Haint Blue Brewing Co. has signed on as the major Spanish Fort and UMS-Wright. Outstanding programs can sponsor. “We could not do this without them,” Kahalley also be found at the local college level. said. “By raising money through the internet to start brewHoping to expand on this success is a new squad, AFC ing in Mobile, they are doing with beer what we are doing Mobile. The minor league Association Football Club opens with soccer.” its first season May 14, hosting the Gulf Coast Texans. The next job was to find a coach. They scored in getTwo members of the organization — Abram Chamber- ting Nate Nicholas to lead the way. The current coach at lain, president of AFC Mobile, and Mitchell Kahalley, the McGill-Toolen, he previously directed UMS-Wright to a team’s director of communications — recently sat down pair of state titles. with Lagniappe to discuss how the team came together. “Our regular season and playoffs run from May through Chamberlain played soccer as a youth in MassachuJuly, so it will not interfere with the high school teams,” setts and with a club team while attending Tuskegee Uni- Chamberlain said. versity. A few years ago, he went to Pensacola to watch Then began the search for a home field. The final choice some soccer action. was the Archbishop Lipscomb Athletic Complex — also “I joked and said, we could do this in Mobile,” Chamknown as The Lip — located on Michael Boulevard. berlain said. “We took that idea and said, let’s see what “It was the best facility for what we wanted to do,” happens. It kept growing from there.” Chamberlain said. “McGill-Toolen and the Archdiocese AFC Mobile first started supporting a youth team in the have been fantastic. I believe we’ll have a really great city league. They also backed the atmosphere there.” Mobile American Outlaws, one of Team tryouts took place April 1 at the oldest fan clubs in Alabama for Sage Park. A preliminary roster was the men and women’s U.S. National released April 15, but the final roster Soccer Teams. will include 22 players, and another When the Gulf Coast Premier four to five players will be placed on CHAMBERLAIN PLAYED SOCLeague (GCPL) added a franchise in a practice squad. Biloxi, the idea of forming a men’s “Players must be at least 18 years CER AS A YOUTH IN MASteam began to take shape. “League old and be done with high school SACHUSETTS AND WITH A officials called and asked what was eligibility,” Chamberlain said. “A lot our ultimate goal,” Chamberlain of the guys are home from college, CLUB TEAM WHILE ATTENDsaid. “They felt a team in Mobile who want to play during the summer. was a good fit.” Others have played some profesING TUSKEGEE UNIVERSITY. A “The GCPL is what would be sional ball. FEW YEARS AGO, HE WENT TO considered a fourth-tier level,” said “There is no pay, since many still Kahalley, who got hooked on soccer have NCAA eligibility. This league is PENSACOLA TO WATCH SOME while watching the European Chamfor those guys who love the game and pionships in 2008 during a family trip want the exposure. We hope to play SOCCER ACTION. to Italy. “Major League Soccer is the in front of some decent-size crowds. top tier. If you compared it to baseThis league will help to not let their ball, the GCPL would be Single A.” skills diminish over the summer.” In January, the league officially expanded to Mobile, All home games will begin at 7 p.m. After opening Pensacola and Baton Rouge. Since that time, the effort to with the Pensacola club, the remaining home schedule build a club has been snowballing. will include Biloxi City FC on June 10, Louisiana Fire SC The Birmingham Hammers are members of the Naon June 24, Gaffa FC on July 1 and CD Motagua of New tional Premier Soccer League. Chamberlain knows their Orleans on July 7. Admission is $5 for those 13 years and founders, who have given AFC Mobile much guidance older, while season tickets are $20. on how to get the ball rolling. Clubs in New Orleans and “We really want to give the people of Mobile a place to Biloxi have also offered advice. play and a place to be seen,” Kahalley said. “In this area,

AFC MOBILE COACH NATE NICHOLAS ALSO LEADS THE SQUAD AT MCGILL-TOOLEN. PREVIOUSLY, HE DIRECTED UMS-WRIGHT TO TWO STATE TITLES. we have three colleges and a lot of high schools that play soccer. “In the past, we have been on different sides cheering against each other. Now we can give them a team they can all rally behind.” For additional information, visit www.afcmobile.net or call 251-272-9507. The team’s Facebook page is AFCMobile.

Tornados fall just short

The Mobile Bay Tornados entered the ABA national basketball playoffs in Baltimore, Maryland, as the No. 5 seed. They quickly opened with an upset, knocking off the fourth-seeded Austin Bats 122-102. Next up was a semifinal showdown with defending champions the Jacksonville Giants. It went down to the wire, but the Giants hung on for a 109-107 victory. The title game was a rout as Jacksonville blew past the Windy City Groove 120-102. The Tornados qualified for the national tournament by winning the Gulf Coast Division and the Southeast Regional. They finished with a 15-2 record. Erick Thrash was named an ABA all-star after averaging 30 points, 10 assists and 3 rebounds per game.

Gymnasts tumble into Mobile

The 2017 USA Gymnastics Region 8 Championships for Levels 6, 7 and 8 take place Friday through Sunday (April 21-23) at the Mobile Convention Center. More than 1,000 young athletes from 250 gyms across the Southeast will compete in beam, bars, floor and vault. The meet is presented by the Mobile Sports Authority in conjunction with Mobile-based Planet Gymnastics and Visit Mobile. Daily admission is $15 for adults and $10 for seniors and children (5 and under are free); a two-day pass costs $25 for adults and $20 for seniors and children; a three-day pass costs $35 for adults and $30 for seniors and children (ages 6-18 for children, 62 and over for seniors). For more information, visit www.usagym.org or www.region8gymnastics.org.


STYLE HOROSCOPES THE FUTURE SMELLS LIKE NAG CHAMPA TAURUS (4/20-5/20) — When you injure your hand during a DIY project, you’ll make a valiant effort to type with your feet. Sadly, your response time will have a significant impact on your troll game. Your lucky 4/20 head shop purchase is a “totally legal tobacco pipe.” GEMINI (5/21-6/21) — After a third major interstate is damaged in the Atlanta area, you’ll begin frantically making calls to Mayor Kasim Reed to warn about the growing threat from “Graboids.” Your lucky 4/20 head shop purchase is a pair of hemp jeans. CANCER (6/22-7/22) — You’ll binge on sugar after Lent, packing your palate with everything from chocolate to colas. The sweet feast will upset your stomach and you’ll swear it all off again. Your lucky 4/20 head shop purchase is a package of “medicated” gummy bears. LEO (7/23-8/23) — Your significant other, being warm natured, will blast the AC at bedtime while simultaneously hogging the warm covers. Your only solution, of course, will be to end it all. Your lucky 4/20 head shop purchase is a hemp blanket. VIRGO (8/24-9/22) — Like “Ants Marching,” you’ll make your way to a local watering hole in a couple of days to see a band perform a song featuring shouting at a pet bird. Your lucky 4/20 head shop purchase is a Dave Matthews Band greatest hits album. LIBRA (9/23-10/22) — After being kept awake by a neighbor’s dog, you’ll find a way to make Rover disappear. Your neighbor will suspect you’re responsible and send the cops to your door. Your lucky 4/20 head shop purchase is a printed sun dress. SCORPIO (10/23-11/21) — You’ll celebrate Earth Day by preparing for your ninemonth emigration to Mars. In addition to stocking up on the heartiest potato seeds, you’ll load your iPod with spacey favorites from David Bowie, Elton John and Bruno … Mars. Your lucky 4/20 head shop purchase is tie-dyed tampons. SAGITTARIUS (11/22-12/22) — In an effort to save Alabama’s film industry, you’ll propose a plan to make it the “soft-core capital of the world.” Investment will flood in on the heels of such titles as “Heavy Petting Cemetery,” “Groping Private Ryan” and “Girls Gone Mild.” Your lucky 4/20 head shop purchase is the 20th anniversary “Friday” DVD. CAPRICORN (12/23-1/19) — In a case of cruel coincidence, you learn Taco Bell is serving 89 cent tacos on April 20. A mad case of the munchies will have you emptying your wallet and, yes, this time you will have the Cinnamon Twists. Your lucky 4/20 head shop purchase is a baja jacket. AQUARIUS (1/20-2/18) — Encouraged by the warmer weather, you’ll take your first plunge of 2017 into the Gulf of Mexico. Afterward, in an effort to treat your hypothermia, you’ll sit in a hot car with the windows rolled up. Your lucky 4/20 head shop purchase is patchouli-scented wet wipes. PISCES (2/19-3/20) — As tensions with North Korea escalate, you’ll dust off a book called “How to Survive a Nuclear Bomb” you put away in the late ‘70s. Even worse, you’ll dust off a pair of disco pants from the same era. Your lucky 4/20 head shop purchase is a basket of elderberries. ARIES (3/21-4/19) — You’ll turn down a lucrative job offer in the PR office at United Airlines after the company’s third tumultuous news week. Instead, you’ll take a lessstressful gig as an active combat soldier. Your lucky 4/20 head shop purchase is a rubber chicken stashbox.

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STYLE BOOZIE

The circle of life continues BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

A

lleluia, Lent is over! I don’t know about y’all, but I’m so glad! All you crazies that gave up drinking for Lent, welcome back, we are glad you survived but you missed out on some fun times! Of course, you don’t have to drink to have fun, but man, if it doesn’t make activities more enjoyable! Speaking of drinking and having fun, why is it that when Boozie takes a vacay my spies think they get one too? Someone needs to be busy working; after this weekend it sounds as if everyone took a break and did some relaxing! Luckily for us, though, some folks did some relaxing and partying. So grab a cocktail and get to reading!

Hoppy Easter

Wedding bells

Hearts are breaking all over the city, as one of Mobile’s

A life well lived

Billy Kimbrough, former U.S. Attorney during the Carter Administration and a well-respected attorney, died recently. He was also the father of well-known musician Will Kimbrough and artist Mary Elizabeth Kimbrough. The funeral saw many notable federal and state judges, politicians and friends. My spy tells me the family also received condolence calls from Emmylou Harris (Will is about to join her on tour) and U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Billy was active in politics, and at the service Rev. Stephen Dill revealed Billy cast the deciding vote allowing African-Americans to join the Democratic Party. Family and friends gathered afterward to celebrate as only a Kimbrough would — with a big party. Will sang his song “Life,” which was his father’s favorite. The party lasted well into the evening, and I hear a lively group of outof-town family made it to the drag show at B-Bob’s. Well, kids, that’s all I’ve got this week. Just remember, whether rain or shine, dramatic or scandalous, or just some plain ol’ bushwacker bunny lovin’, I will be there. Ciao!

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Flora-Bama featured Easter Bunny bushwackers.

Photo | Boozie Spy

Ahh, Easter weekend ... I feel like it is so much family time that there should be more drinking, and instead of candy in the eggs there should be miniatures and I am not talking about the kind made by Hershey’s! I need to remember that for next year, host a “miniature” egg hunt! Anyways, one of Boozie’s spies got to do both: she spent her weekend at Flora-Bama. My spy said on Saturday night Flora-Bama was pretty crowded and it was the typical shenanigans, besides a few folks dancing on top of picnic tables. After partying all night, my spy somehow was able to return to Flora-Bama on Easter Sunday for their church service, Worship on the Water. She said it was nice and the weather was beautiful, but it was even nicer after the service, when they celebrated with bushwackers turned into Easter bunnies with marshmallows! If these aren’t the cutest things, then I don’t know what is! I need that Easter bunny to stop at my house, and I expect these to be served next Easter, Flora-Bama!

most eligible bachelorettes, FOX 10’s Chasity Byrd, got hitched to her beau, Robbie Riddick, on Saturday, April 8. My spy said the bride looked stunning. And the junior bridesmaids were “adorable.” It was a “short Methodist ceremony” and then everyone was off to the Bragg-Mitchell mansion for the fun part – the reception. All of the FOX 10 crew was there including her Studio 10 co-host, Joe Emer, and evening anchors Bob Grip and Lenise Ligon, among others. Proving rivals can be friends, WPMI’s Andrea Ramey was also in attendance. I’m told the food by Alec Naman was spot on and included chargrilled oysters and oyster shooters. Yum! After a honeymoon in Jamaica, Chasity will be right back on your TV screens. We wish the happy couple all the best!


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com PROBATE NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: THERESA WILLIAMS HARRISON, Deceased Case No. 2017-0241 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 12th day of April, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. PETER G. HARRISON JR as Executor under the last will and testament of THERESA WILLIAMS HARRISON, Deceased. Attorney of Record: PRO SE Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, May 4, 2017.

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: ANNA H. DIXON, Deceased Case No. 2017-0181 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 3rd day of April, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. JANELL P. JAMES as Executrix under the last will and testament of, ANNA H. DIXON, Deceased. Attorney of Record: JEROME C. CARTER Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 27, 2017.

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: OLIVETTE ANITA BEATON Case No. 2016-0858 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 4th day of April, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. REGINA BEATON GREEN as Administratrix of the estate of OLIVETTE ANITA BEATON, deceased. Attorney of Record: SANDRA RANDER, Esq. Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 27, 2017.

PUBLIC NOTICE - STORAGE DISPOSAL Notice is hereby given pursuant to AL statue that the contents of the following units will be sold at public sale by Delta Self Storage located at 5500 Schillinger Rd S, Mobile, AL 36619 on APR 26, 2017 at 12 p.m. Steven Selmon 538 6232 Spanish Trl Dr Theodore, AL Enos Edwards 745 6128 Sperry Road Theodore, AL Paula Tiller 636 & 819 9440 Lexington Dr Mobile, AL Red Squirrel Group 638 & 641 128 E Hargett St Raleigh, NC Teresa Carrier 645 7050 Joyce Ln Theodore, AL Joan Climpa 109 1754 W. Kings Rd Defuniak Springs, FL Lauren Davis 712 9395 Burnt Ash Ct Mobile, AL Deborah Webber 57412 Burgen Ct Redding, PA bedroom furnishings, totes, tools, gym equipment, furniture, lawn care equipment, desks, paintings, mirrors, household goods, bags, metal decorations, camping accessories, tables, chairs, antiques Lagniappe HD April 20, 2017

HELP WANTED LANDSCAPE & FOREMAN WORKERS NEEDED FOR FULL TIME POSITIONS IN MOBILE COUNTY. EXPERIENCE PREFERRED. PAY WILL DEPEND ON EXPERIENCE. CONTACT TURFMASTER LANDSCAPE 251-645-5811. Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 27, May 4, 2017

NOTICE OF SALE The following vehicle will be sold on 05/26/17 at 5781 Three Notch Road Mobile Al. 36619 Dodge  2B3LJ54T49H503004 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 1100 S US Hwy. 31, Bay Minette, AL 36507. 1999 Nissan Frontier 1N6ED26Y0XC319696 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 3091 Western Hills Dr. East, Mobile, AL 36618. 2011 Toyota Tundra 5TFEM5F10BX030150

Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 712 Jaycee Rd., Bay Minette, AL 36507. 2007 Chevrolet Silverado 1GCEC19V37Z189573

Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 24092 Hwy. 98, Montrose, AL 36532. 1998 Lincoln Town Car 1LNFM83WXWY713460

Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 3055 Springhill Ave., Mobile, AL 36607. 2004 Ford F150 1FTPW12564KD47239 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 19360 St Stephens Rd., Mt. Vernon, AL 36560. 1996 Cadillac Eldorado 1G6EL12Y3TU620525 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 4129 C Government Blvd., Mobile, AL 36693. 2003 Chrysler Sebring 1C3EL65R43N525002 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 1621 West Main St., Prichard, AL 36610. 1993 Chevrolet GMT-400 1GCDC14Z0PE110387 1995 Lexus LS400 JT8UF22E5S0034098 2000 Chevrolet Tahoe 1GNEC13R2YR141843 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 7401 Half Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2006 Mitsubishi Galant 4A3AB36F86E047717 2013 Yamaha YZFR6DR JYARJ16E0DA029989 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 18211 Greeno Rd.,Fairhope, AL 36532. 1988 Oldsmobile Cutlass Supreme 1G3GR11Y5JP320499

Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 654 Holcomb

Ave., Mobile, AL 36605. 2003 Lexus SC430 JTHFN48Y130035680

Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2003 Buick Century 2G4WS52J631250709 1993 Buick Century 1G4AG55N6P6430345 2000 Kia Sportage KNDJB723XY5668160 1996 Toyota Camry 4T1BF12K3TU140645 2010 Toyota Yaris JTDJT4K36A5323337 Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 4763 Lott Rd., Eight Mile, AL 36613. 2001 Dodge Ram Truck 1B7HC13YX1J292219 2003 Ford Taurus 1FAFP53U83A231086

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1015 N Craft Hwy., Prichard, AL 36610. 2001 Honda Accord 1HGCG56671A113166 Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7401 Half Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2015 Kia Forte KNAFK4A61F5342693 Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 1997 Honda Accord 1HGCD5689VA169058 Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3158 Emogene St., Mobile, AL 36606. 2006 Jeep Commander 1J8HH48K06C229612

Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 26, 2017 - Time -12pm, if not claimed - at 308 Lexington Ave., Mobile, AL 36603. 2006 Chrysler 300 2C3KA63HX6H209622

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1621 Cedar Downs Dr., Mobile, AL 36605. 2007 Chevrolet Impala 2G1WT55K279109061

Lagniappe HD April 20, 27, 2017

Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 662 Chin St., Mobile, AL 36610. 2008 Lexus IS250 JTHBK262285059040

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 8390 Zeigler Blvd., Mobile, AL 36608. 2000 Chevrolet S10 1GCCS1959YK280982 2005 Cadillac CTS 1G6DP567950111915

Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  4763 Lott Rd., Eight Mile, AL 36613. 2000 Chevrolet Silverado 1GCEC14W3YE291450 2004 Nissan Altima 1N4AL11D44C176448 2007 Mercury Marquis 2MEFM75V57X627864 2010 Ford Fusion 3FAHP0HA7AR322136 2009 Toyota Prius JTDKB20U997883702 2003 Hyundai Santa Fe KM8SC13E53U527831 2008 Mitsubishi Galant 4A3AB56F08E010949 Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 634 West Main St., Prichard, AL 36610. 2009 Dodge Ram Truck 1D3HB13T19J527469 Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 5891 Sunshine Lane, Mobile, AL 36619. 2006 Chevrolet Silverado 1GCHC29U86E290706 Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2311 East Dr., Mobile, AL 36693. 1988 Toyota PU DL JT4RN70D4J0055248 Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1113-B I-65 Service Rd. N., Mobile, AL 36618. 2000 Ford F750 3FDXF75N5YMA02776

Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1308 Bay Ave., Mobile, AL 36605. 1997 Honda Accord 1HGCD5638VA037574 2009 Lexus ES350 JTHBJ46G292295054 Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 4129 Government Blvd., Mobile, AL 36693. 1997 Toyota 4Runner JT3GN86R4V0052733 Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

Deadline for legal advertising in Lagniappe HD is every Monday at 3 p.m. Lagniappe HD is distributed each Thursday. Lagniappe HD offices are located at 1100B Dauphin St. Mobile, AL 36604. For more information or to place your ad call Jackie at 251-450-4466. Or email at legals@lagniappemobile.com

Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

A p r i l 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - A p r i l 2 6 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 51


52 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 2 0 , 2 0 1 7 - A p r i l 2 6 , 2 0 1 7

Lagniappe: April 20 - April 26, 2017  
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