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WEEKLY

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LAGNIAPPE

APRIL 13, 2017 - APRIL 19, 2017 | www.lagniappemobile.com ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com

ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com JANE NICHOLES Reporter jane@lagniappemobile.com

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BAY BRIEFS

No arrests have been made after underage students of St. Paul’s held an off-site drinking party.

COMMENTARY

RIP Luv Gov: A salute to Robert Bentley.

BUSINESS

The Wharf in Orange Beach is expanding after attracting nearly two million visitors last year.

CUISINE

Egg-cellent recommendations for your Easter egg leftovers.

KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net

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STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com J. MARK BRYANT Sports Writer sports@lagniappemobile.com STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA RASMUSSEN Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com BETH WILLIAMS Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com ALEEN MOMBERGER Advertising Sales Executive aleen@lagniappemobile.com MELISSA EDGE Editorial Assistant events@lagniappemobile.com

COVER

Robert Bentley pleaded guilty to two misdemeanors Monday and resigned from the governor’s office. According to an Ethics Commission report released last week, his personal and professional failures were to blame.

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ARTS

According to the Alabama State Council on the Arts, federal budget cuts are likely to affect local arts agencies.

MUSIC

M.C. Taylor of Hiss Golden Messenger will make an appearance at Soul Kitchen with Drive-By Truckers April 13.

ROSS PRITCHARD Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager jackie@lagniappemobile.com CONTRIBUTORS: Lee Hedgepeth, Ron Sivak, Jeff Poor, Asia Frey, Brian Holbert, Tom Ward, Peggy Wright ON THE COVER: ROBERT BENTLEY BY DANIEL ANDERSON POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Editorial, advertising and production offices are located at 1100B Dauphin St. Mobile, AL 36604. Mailing address is P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Phone: 251.450.4466 Fax 251.450.4498. Email: ashleytoland@lagniappemobile.com or rholbert@lagniappemobile.com LAGNIAPPE is printed at Walton Press. All letters sent to Lagniappe are considered to be intended for publication. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and Alternative Weeklies Network All rights reserved. Something Extra Publishing, Inc. Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced without the expressed permission of the publishers. Individuals may take one copy of the paper free of charge from area businesses, racks or boxes. After that, papers are $3 per issue. Removal of more than one copy from these points constitutes theft. Violators are subject to prosecution.

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38 44 48 50 53 FILM

“Queen of the Desert” is a lovely, beautifully shot and costumed but dull film.

MEDIA

Local TV news stations received prestigious Abby awards from the Alabama Broadcasters Association.

SPORTS

New seats, a new scoreboard and other stadium updates welcome the BayBears for the 2017 season.

STYLE

SouthSounds sightings and a serial highway twerk artist are captured in Mobile Magnified!

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GOING POSTAL

Zzzz-quill Mr. Holbert, Thanks a lot. I read your column about insomnia yesterday and now it’s 2:45 a.m., and for the last several hours I’ve been thinking about insomnia and its causes. I got rid of my bedside table LED clock several months ago after I woke up very early one morning and looked at that clock. The display said 1:11, but in my bleary-eyed condition, I didn’t see the colon between the first “1” and the second “1” and spent several minutes wondering what time Roman Numeral III was. I’ve thought about former Gov. Bentley and his troubles for awhile but, frankly, I wish they would either impeach him or not — just stop talking about him and concentrate on something else. The birds aren’t awake yet (what do birds who suffer from insomnia do?) but I’ve been waiting for them to start their un-rhythmic chants and wondering if their chants are really rhythmic and I’m just too impatient to hear it. Now my sleeping companion, Dottie the cat, who usually sleeps at my feet or on my back or on my head (depending on her mood), has looked at me with disgust and left. Now it’s 2:56 and I have a full day tomorrow. So, again, thanks a lot. Bob Allen, Mobile

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POLICE DISPATCH

Fairhope man arrested in federal drug conspiracy BY JASON JOHNSON

Following a long-term drug investigation focused on the Eastern Shore, federal prosecutors arrested a seventh defendant connected to a local conspiracy to distribute cocaine last week. Acting United States Attorney Steve Butler of the Southern District of Alabama made the announcement last week that Jeffrey Lavone Shaw, a resident of Fairhope, had been arrested on charges that were returned by a federal grand Jury back in February 2017. Those charges include conspiracy to possess with intent to distribute cocaine as well as the use of a cell phone in furtherance of the drug activity. The conspiracy charge alone comes with a statutory maximum penalty of 20 years’ imprisonment, so it’s likely Shaw could be facing serious time in federal prison. However, he’s not the first to be arrested as a result of the investigation, conducted by the FBI’s Safe Street Task Force. The same investigation has already led to the indictment of six other defendants, all of whom have pleaded guilty to drug conspiracy charges in federal court. Robert Lasky, the FBI Special Agent in charge of the operation, said Shaw’s indictment along with the other six already processed were “a direct result of the continued cooperation between the FBI Safe Street Task Force and state and local partners.” Like his predecessors, Butler also said that type of partnership with local agencies is key to accomplishing the shared goals of law enforcement at any level of government. “The goal of law enforcement — be it federal, state or local — is to make our communities safer for all citizens,” Butler said. “The FBI’s Safe Street Task Force and all its members work diligently to accomplish this mission.”

Fairhope restaurant settles ADA complaint

According to a Justice Department news release, the United States Attorney’s Office in Mobile recently entered into a settlement agreement with the owner and operator of Old 27 Grill in Fairhope. The office opened its investigation after receiving complaints people with mobility disabilities were unable to access the restaurant. As a result of the settlement, the restaurant agreed to add an ADA-compliant bathroom, accessible parking, tables and routes throughout the restaurant. The restaurant also adopted policies requiring the provision of dining assistance to persons who are deaf, hard of hearing or blind and people with mobility disabilities. Service dog policies were also adopted and staff training is required by the agreement. Acting U.S. Attorney Steve Butler said, “After being notified of the investigation, the owner of Old 27 Grill eventually chose to do the appropriate thing, removing the barriers which prevented persons with disabilities from enjoying the restaurant. Not only is this required by law, but it’s also great for business. With more than 55 million persons with disabilities in our country, the restaurant has the potential for much more business.” This complaint was handled by Assistant U.S. Attorney Holly L. Wiseman.


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Catch and release

STILL NO CHARGES FROM TEENAGE ‘DRINKING PARTY’ BY JASON JOHNSON

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t’s been more than a week since a widely attended drinking party hosted by a high school fraternity was raided by local police, yet so far only two employees from the venue have been arrested and the charges against those men were almost immediately dropped. The party, held at the Elks Lodge on Dauphin Island Parkway March 31, was organized as a “dance,” according to an agreement renting the venue for the event. It was purportedly hosted by “St. Paul’s [Episcopal School] Fraternity, Phi Kappa,” as stated on a form filled out to rent the Lodge. After receiving a complaint about underage drinking, the Mobile Police Department responded to the Elks Lodge where, according to police reports, “50 to 60 juveniles and young adults were seen running from the scene” as officers arrived around 10 p.m. Many scattered, some hid in ditches to avoid police, but in all, “approximately 51 juveniles were detained for questioning.” None were charged or taken into police custody and no petitions related to underage possession of alcohol were filed with the Strickland Youth Center. Two of the lodge’s members were arrested, though. Alfred Nix, 74, and Vincent Lyons, 58, were taken to the Mobile County Metro Jail and charged with hosting an “open house party” after they were found in a back room of the lodge. Both men’s mugshots were featured on local news broadcasts after MPD included the arrests in a “weekend recap” sent to the media. Elks Lodge manager Frank Rohe initially told reporters Lyons and Nix had “expected chaperones to be present” and were “unaware of what was happening” — claims a public information officer with MPD called “far fetched” at the time. However, a day later, local prosecutors and police themselves were saying “the facts didn’t support” the charges against Nix and Lyons. “We know they didn’t bring the alcohol,” Mobile County District Attorney Ashley Rich said. “[The students] brought it in from their cars after the chaperones left. These men were in the back room watching TV.” According to MPD, the charges didn’t stick because an “open house party” is defined under the law as a “social gathering at a residence,” which the Elks Lodge is not. Neither Lyons nor Nix has a criminal history, though Lyons was also charged with “failure to show vehicle registration” on the night of the party. Reached by phone, he declined to comment, only saying an attorney had instructed him not to discuss his arrest publicly. He didn’t specify whether the attorney was representing him in a criminal or civil capacity. MPD spokeswoman Charlette Solis said the department is reviewing the way it handles minors who are caught drinking, though she also said changes are “not likely.” She said currently “if we can prove” a minor is in possession of alcohol, “it is the police officer’s discretion” to release them to a parent or responsible family member. If the person is under age 17, the officer also has the ability to “document and sign a petition with the juvenile court,” though, unless there are other factors, minors aren’t typically arrested. “The police officer doesn’t have to make

an arrest,” Solis added. “Utilizing a ‘warn and release’ procedure notifies the child and his or her parents that any subsequent offense will be referred to the juvenile court.” According to Interim Headmaster Dr. Mark Foley, St. Paul’s has “a longstanding policy of not endorsing any fraternal organization of any kind.” He said the group that rented the Elks Lodge isn’t affiliated with St. Paul’s and the event “wasn’t endorsed by the school in any way.” According to the school handbook, though, “St. Paul’s does not prohibit membership in private organizations.” It is also well known that some of its students, like those at other private schools in Mobile, participate in social groups that mimic the collegiate Greek system. In a letter to parents, Foley said he and the administration were currently “fact finding” to determine how St. Paul’s “became identified as a sponsor.” However, he said he couldn’t comment on “discipline of any kind that may or may not be exercised” by the school. “St. Paul’s takes a position on and enforces activities that are related to the school,” he said. “To try to come to terms with what anyone may or may not do when they’re not on school business gets to be a difficult thing to police.” Lagniappe was contacted by parents of current and former St. Paul’s students who said these parties aren’t anything new. They also claimed some parents likely knew about the event at the Elks Lodge beforehand, though MPD has not released any evidence to corroborate that. However, Rich herself said she believes the parents of some partygoers “obviously knew what they were doing” — something she chalked up to a “prevailing mentality” that underage drinking is “perfectly acceptable.” “There were adult chaperones at the party until a certain time period, and that’s when the kids went out to the car, got their already-iced-down adult beverages and got the party started,” Rich said. “Someone is going to end up dying. That’s what it’s going to take for parents to realize, ‘It’s not OK to let my teenage kids drink alcohol.’ I don’t want it to get to that point.” Virginia Guy of the Drug Education Council said similar events have been seen across Mobile in recent months. She believes teenage drinking is on the rise locally, which she pinned partially on the normal “societal pressures” teens face, but also on an increasingly cavalier attitude toward alcohol use that’s becoming prevalent among students and even some parents. According to Guy, introducing alcohol to a teenage brain can stifle development and greatly increase a child’s risk of addiction. The narrative of “oh well, I did it and I’m fine” is something Guy thinks should change among parents. With popular opinion drastically shifting on things like sun protection and tobacco use over the past 30 years, Guy thinks alcohol should be next. “The message on teenage drinking has really gotten watered down. Every year that goes by, kids are aging out of the schools, and the parents are aging with them,” she added. “We really need parents to to have each other’s back. It’s hard for one to say no to their child when all of the other parents say, “this is OK.”

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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Curtains closing CRESCENT THEATER SHUTTERING CURRENT LOCATION, CONSIDERING MOVE DOWN DAUPHIN BY DALE LIESCH

Photo/Courtesy of Crescent Theater

A conceptual drawing of a proposed relocation of the Crescent Theater at 450 Dauphin St. on the corner of North Hamilton Street.

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hile it appears the Crescent Theater’s lease at its current location will end in May at the latest, a possible new deal might allow it to open in a new location on Dauphin Street. Noting it’s very speculative at this point, Crescent Theater Film Society board member Carol Hunter confirmed Tuesday morning the group is working on a deal to move the singlescreen theater to 450 Dauphin St. Hunter emphasized the situation remained fluid and many factors would have to be considered before the move could be considered a done deal. “It’s going to be very, very hard,” Hunter said. “I’m reluctant to say it’s a done deal.” If a lease agreement can be reached, hurdles for the move would remain, Hunter said. The society and the theater operator, Max Morey, would have to raise money in order to build out the theater at a new location. Hunter said Morey would set up a crowdfunding account to raise the money needed for a conversion. “He could sign a lease tomorrow, but would still need to raise somewhere north of $250,000 to build out a theater,” she said of Morey. “Max will launch a GoFundMe account.” In order to raise the needed money, Hunter said, donations would have to come in from individuals and corporations. She

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said she hoped the community’s passion for the theater would result in the needed donations. Hunter said the layout of the proposed new location would be nearly identical to the building at 208 Dauphin, with maybe a few more seats. “It’s very conceptual; it’s very speculative,” she said of the plans. “If all the things work out, this is what it will be.” Morey confirmed the announcement shared on social media April 5. He said the closure at 208 Dauphin St. comes after negotiations with the building’s landlord broke down over an increase in rent. Hunter said John Switzer, the landlord, was set to raise the rent to $2,200 per month and add an additional $500 per month in building expenses. The theater society paid for rent last year with grant money, while Morey was responsible for utilities, Hunter said. She said the society applied for grants last year after fundraising attempts — which have supplied money for rent since 2010 — proved fruitless. In a phone interview with Lagniappe, Switzer said he’d “been taking a loss on the building for the last eight years,” “I can’t afford to take a loss with the cost of the building,” he added. However, Morey said Switzer had also asked, during discus-

sions about a new lease deal, that he step down as theater operator. While Switzer confirmed that had been discussed, he said it was Morey who initially offered to step down. According to Hunter, Morey stepping down was part of a proposed lease agreement, though she said the society had no appetite to move on without him, even if money for rent was available. “I don’t know how successful it would be without Max,” Hunter said. Despite the setback, Morey seemed confident the theater would be able to move to another location since he owns everything inside the building. “We’ll have to pack it all in a tractor-trailer and go to another building,” Morey said. “We don’t know where that’ll be.” The society is less confident the theater will be able to move, Hunter said, although they are willing to consider all options. Right now, Hunter said, there is no money available to move it. As for Switzer, he seemed to hold out hope an agreement could be reached. He said he loved the film society, adding there was “always room for negotiations.” The last dates for the theater at its current location are still up in the air, Morey said, but would likely be sometime in May or June. “This is very upsetting,” Morey said. “We don’t want to move …”


BAYBRIEF | BUSINESS

Foreign exchange

BUSINESSES ‘ANXIOUS’ OVER POSSIBLE H-1B CHANGES BY JASON JOHNSON

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s businesses began applying for H-1B visas this month, President Donald Trump’s administration sent out a warning: The popular program will see heavier scrutiny going forward. Like other visas, H-1Bs allow domestic companies to bring foreign laborers into the country. For years, the program has been extremely popular among companies in the tech industry. Those who use the program claim it fills a measurable skills gap among domestic workers in the United States, while critics say it’s often abused and allows companies to bypass American workers in favor of foreign laborers who will do the same work for lower wages. Each year, 85,000 new, highly skilled workers enter the U.S. as part of the H-1B program through what is essentially a lottery. The application process began in April and, according to recent data, companies in Alabama and Mobile are continuing to increase the number of applications they submit every year. “I wouldn’t say there’s a dependence, but we do have several major industries in the area that need foreign labor from time to time for a variety of reasons,” Anna L. Scully, a Mobile immigration and employment attorney, said. “Most international companies in the area need to transfer employees from their home countries because those employees have specialized skills.” As an example, Scully said if a company like Airbus needed to bring an employee from the United Kingdom to the U.S. to fix an issue on an assembly line at its facility in Mobile, the H-1B program would be one of the company’s easiest and fastest options. According to data compiled by myvisajobs.com, more than 100 Alabama companies reported employing four or more H-1B workers in 2016. The most state’s most prolific user has routinely been the University of Alabama at Birmingham, which employed 217 H-1B workers last year. Locally, H-1B visa holders are employed at companies like VT Mobile Aerospace Engineering, Evonik, Infirmary Health Group, Odemkumpu, MAAS Aviation Brookley, Thyssenkrupp, the University of South Alabama and many others. However, U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions has been a vocal critic of the program. Sessions has sponsored unsuccessful legislation aimed at reducing the annual number of H-1B applicants, and during the Trump campaign even alluded to scrapping the program entirely. “We shouldn’t be bringing in people where we’ve got workers,” Sessions said at a stop in Iowa. “There are a number of ways to fix it. I don’t think the republic would collapse if it was totally eliminated.” According to Scully, the Trump administration addressed possible changes to the H-1B program in a batch of early memos that leaked from the oval office in January. While at least least two of those have since become signed executive orders, Trump has taken little to no official action that would drastically change the popular visa program. However, on April 3 — the day the 2017 application process began — two federal agencies gave notice to businesses that the H-1B program

is still very much on the administration’s radar. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS), which manages the program, announced a series of new measures to “deter and detect H-1B visa fraud and abuse.” “The H-1B visa program should help U.S. companies recruit highly skilled foreign nationals when there is a shortage of qualified workers in the country,” the agency wrote in a press release. “Yet, too many American workers who are as qualified, willing and deserving to work in these fields have been ignored or unfairly disadvantaged.” While USCIS has conducted inspections of businesses that employ H-1B workers since 2009, it now plans to more closely scrutinize certain businesses, including those “with information that can’t be verified through commercially available data,” those who have a “high ratio of H-1B workers,” and those whose H-1B employees “work off-site at another company or location.” The same day, the Department of Justice said there would be an enhanced focus on detecting and prosecuting visa fraud within the H-1B program and cautioned businesses that the laws protecting foreign workers from discrimination can and would be used to prosecute those discriminating against U.S. workers. Those announcements shouldn’t have too much impact on Scully and the businesses she represents locally. Earlier this year, though, she told Lagniappe there was anxiety in the business community over the changes to H-1B mentioned in those draft executive orders. “There are real enemies of several of these visa programs in Washington. Because, right or wrong, they’ve gotten the reputation of depressing wages and depriving U.S. workers of lucrative jobs,” she said. “There’s been talks about increasing the scrutiny on these types programs to find ways to throw up more roadblocks, but it’s difficult for most employers to plan around the visa process as it is.” Even if businesses in Mobile aren’t directly affected, Scully said implementing changes to the H-1B program elsewhere might slow down the application process across the board, adding that a one- or two-month delay could have a “gigantic impact on production” for a company. As one of the “least stressful” visa options available to international businesses, Scully said, adding too many hurdles could negatively impact the foreign investment Mobile has enjoyed over the past decade — something the Mobile Area Chamber of Commerce also is concerned about. In February, Chamber President Bill Sisson told Lagniappe the “H-1B, H-2B and L-1 visas [were] so important to a number of professionals” locally, whether they’re a highly skilled worker employed by a global company or part of the seasonal foreign labor many hotels and restaurants rely on in heavy-tourism areas. “We have such an international business presence here. In many cases, they’re bringing foreign nationals to these facilities for a certain amount for time — especially when they’re getting a new business established,” Sisson said. “It’s important for them to be able to do so legally and relatively quickly.”

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BAYBRIEF | FAIRHOPE

A little more time CONTROVERSIAL FLY CREEK APARTMENTS GET EXTENSION BY JANE NICHOLES

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With another controversial and long-standing project in Battles Wharf also on the agenda, City Council President Jack Burrell was obliged to ensure everyone in the lobby had an opportunity to speak as well. Recently, before meetings begin the city’s rules regarding public participation and good conduct at meetings have been posted on the video monitors. When Paul Ripp, a local blogger, commented Monday he hoped the same rules applied to Burrell, Police Chief Joe Petties strode to the microphone to say that he, not Burrell, was responsible for posting the rules. “We’ve been having people coming in here and act like they’re children,” Petties said. It’s his responsibility to keep the meetings safe and orderly, he said, and doing so would be easier if everyone acted like adults. Many of the people who spoke against the extension had been heard from before. Judy Bond said she had been pleased with the new council and administration until now. “I really don’t want to have to change my mind,” she said. “Do the right thing.” Riley Murphy, one of the plaintiffs in the lawsuit, said a similar luxury apartment project in Daphne opened in July and occupancy had yet to reach 50 percent. He said the market could be saturated on the Eastern Shore. Bay Minette Mayor Bob Wills is also an attorney representing property owner Arthur Corte and the Leaf River Group. He said the developer has met and exceeded all city requirements. Opponents do not have all the facts, he said. Council members were conflicted about the Fly Creek project despite the strong majority vote. Burrell, for example, said he originally voted against it, but the ques-

Photo/City of Fairhope

he Fly Creek upscale apartment development was a key issue in last year’s Fairhope municipal elections, costing some city leaders their offices. At least some voters hoped with a new mayor and three new council members the controversial apartments to be built behind Publix would go away. That’s not what happened Monday when a crucial extension of time to get the project moving was approved on a 4-1 vote. Only Councilman Jimmy Conyers voted to deny the extension. Other councilors said regardless of their personal opinions on the project, the city’s own temporary moratorium on new subdivisions blocked the developer from getting a multiple occupancy site plan approved before the 12-month deadline of Tuesday, April 11. A site plan submitted last year was denied by the Planning and Zoning Commission in the fall. When the council subsequently approved the subdivision moratorium, it took four months off the 12 months the developer originally had to present a new plan. The Fly Creek project has been staunchly opposed by residents of nearby residential subdivisions as well as residents who live along Fly Creek and worry the apartments will increase the chances of flood or siltation in an environmentally sensitive area. A group of residents filed a lawsuit in Baldwin County Circuit Court to try to stop the projects. As is usual when the Leaf River Group project comes up in a public setting, the City Council meeting was standing room only. The jump in attendance and public participation since Mayor Karin Wilson took office in November has led to an on-screen monitor being set up in the lobby to accommodate the overflow of citizens.

Plans for The Retreat at Fairhope Village. tion they were voting on Monday was the fairness of giving it an extension on site-plan approval. Whether the project itself should exist was a question that had been settled, he said. Councilman Jay Robinson said the group also had to consider the possibility of a second lawsuit, this time by Corte and the developer, if no extension was granted. Or they could check on whether Daphne would take on the development and annex it, in which case Fairhope would get none of the tax revenue but residents would still have to live with its drawbacks. Voting either way on giving an extension to the Fly Creek planned unit development carries legal and political risks. The project may well have cost former Mayor Tim Kant his sea. Will the new council members and mayor face similar fallout?


BAYBRIEF | BALDWIN COUNTY

Living history FOLEY STUDENTS GET CIVIL RIGHTS HISTORY LESSON FROM EYEWITNESS BY JANE NICHOLES

Photo/YouTube

Joanne Bland was know as “Selma’s youngest protestor” for joining the march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge at the age of 11.

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oanne Bland uses oral history to get African-American history straight. Her appearance in Foley last week encompassed school students, a luncheon with community leaders and a late-afternoon meeting with Baldwin County teachers. Bland is a civil rights and human rights activist who grew up in Selma. She owns Journeys for the Soul, a touring agency focusing on civil rights history and Selma. Bland’s message: As a matter of self-worth, children descended from slaves need to know the truth, however ugly, about the days of slavery and the fight for civil rights. White children need to know the truth, too, and they don’t necessarily get it in school. “Ain’t no such thing as a happy slave,” she told the teachers. “Slavery happened. It happened. It’s a part of our history. It wasn’t a good part of our history, I don’t think, but it happened. You cannot deny it happened. But you cannot sugarcoat it and act like it was right.” Teachers need to be creative to overcome sugarcoated standard curriculums. Young children, who often idolize their teachers, learn self-esteem from their own history. For example, blacks were civil rights heroes, and slaves built the homes and infrastructure in the early years of this nation. “When you talk about World War II, you need to mention some Negroes; you need to mention some brown people. You need to mention some yellow people, because a rainbow fought that war. But it’s taught like only white people did everything. And our children grow up with no self worth,” Bland said. “If we don’t teach them where we’ve been as a nation, how are they going to take us to where we need to be?” Blands’ own involvement in the Civil Rights movement started with Carter’s Drug Store. Her grandmother told her she could not sit at the counter where the white children were eating ice cream.

“Every time I passed that store I saw white kids sitting at that counter, licking those ice creams, drinking those milkshakes from those beautiful glasses, and I’d wish it was me,” Bland said. As the movement escalated in Selma, one day her grandmother said, “When we get our freedom you can do that, too. I became a freedom fighter that day, at that exact moment.” Still a child, Bland became involved with the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. She remembers being rounded up, loaded onto a yellow school bus and crammed into jail cells with 40 or 50 people and one toilet. “By the time I was 11 years old I had been in jail 13 documented times. And I was not the youngest.” Then came the marches over the Edmund Pettus Bridge. Bland marched on “Bloody Sunday,” “Turn Around Tuesday” and the first leg of the march from Selma to Montgomery. From the rear of the crowd, she saw leaders ask permission to cross the bridge that was lined with law enforcement officers. Denied, they would kneel to pray and then retreat. “I was standing there waiting for the front to go down, when suddenly I heard gunshots and screams,” Bland recalled. The shots turned out to be not bullets but tear-gas canisters. Police began beating the marchers. She remembers a mounted officer trampling a woman with his horse, and the sound the woman’s head made when it hit the ground. The next thing Bland remembers is waking up in the lap of her 14-year-old sister, who was bleeding and needed 28 stitches. Bland urges parents to share oral history with their children, even if their own history is not as dramatic as hers. Her visit to Foley was sponsored by Frances Holk-Jones State Farm, Wolf Bay Restaurant and Catering, and the Jennifer Claire Moore Foundation.

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BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

‘Making progress’ STIMPSON’S SECOND POLICE CHIEF SWORN IN BEFORE FIRST OFFICIAL FIRE CHIEF BY DALE LIESCH

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she said. “I look forward to them giving us a name.” When he assumed office, Stimpson nominated Randy Smith as chief of the Mobile Fire Rescue Department. Smith was never confirmed by the council and eventually Stimpson replaced him with Billy Pappas, who is currently serving in the chief’s role. Members of Stimpson’s administration have previously stated they don’t believe there are enough council votes to confirm Pappas either. Battiste was sworn in by Mobile County Circuit Court Judge Edmund G. Naman in the ceremonial courtroom at Government Plaza on Tuesday. Battiste repeated the oath while his wife, Angela Battiste, and his mother, Patricia Battiste, looked on. Stimpson said Battiste has the ability to get things done as police chief and has respect for everyone. “He is the perfect person at this time in the history of Mobile to be police chief,” Stimpson said at the swearingin ceremony. “We’re fortunate to have him.” During Tuesday’s council meeting, the body unanimously approved an ordinance that would require any new signs placed in parks or on buildings display the city’s official seal. Gregory said the ordinance would prevent the turnover of logos on signs on more permanent structures, such as park signs and buildings, whenever the government changes hands. The council and Stimpson have been somewhat at odds over an official city logo in the past. Stimpson opted for a green “M” with half of an upside-down fleur-de-lis, while councilors approved a confetti blast with the slogan “Born to Celebrate” underneath. The council Tuesday also approved two contracts and

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Photo/Lagniappe

f you’re keeping score at home, Mobile has had two police chiefs and zero fire chiefs during Mayor Sandy Stimpson’s first term in office. Newly minted Mobile Police Chief Lawrence Battiste officially became Stimpson’s second police chief in nearly four years. Former Chief James Barber was recently named the city’s new executive director of public safety. Despite the issue’s slow movement, the administration does expect to have a list of fire chief candidates ready soon, Barber said following a Mobile City Council pre-conference meeting Tuesday. Barber said he received resumes from 11 internal candidates and one retiree by the April 10 deadline. Each candidate will also submit a strategic plan by Friday, April 14. At that point, candidates will be considered by a screening committee made up of Barber, Montgomery Fire Chief Milton Jordan, Dan Lumpkin, a strategic consultant and one other member, Barber said. Barber said the committee will be reviewing the resumes and strategic plans of the candidates, looking for a prospective chief whose vision fits in well with the department’s resources. Council President Gina Gregory said she was encouraged the administration was making progress in choosing a fire chief. She said she knows it has been an ongoing issue within the department. “I’m glad it’s on the fast track,” she said. “The sooner we get someone in place, the better.” Councilwoman Bess Rich, chairwoman of the body’s public safety committee, said a chief is a critical component to running the department. “A department our size requires a chief at the helm,”

Police Chief Lawrence Battiste is sworn in inside the ceremonial courtroom of Government Plaza, while Battiste’s wife, Angela, and mother, Patricia, look on. gave Stimpson the authority to accept a grant to begin construction on the first phase of the Three Mile Creek Greenway Initiative. Construction would begin near Tricentennial Park and continue to West Ridge Road. The cost of the first phase is roughly $1.2 million, although $386,000 of the money comes in the form of a matching grant from the Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs. The contracts for the project will pay $447,647 to James H. Adams & Son Construction and $40,000 to Dorsey and Dorsey Engineering.


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Help in crisis

RAPE CRISIS CENTER HOLDING ANNUAL LUNCHEON APRIL 20 BY DALE LIESCH

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ttendees of this year’s fundraiser luncheon for the Rape Crisis Center will hear from a woman who is doing her part to help heal survivors of prostitution, trafficking and addiction. Becca Stevens will be the keynote speaker at the event on Thursday, April 20, 11:30 a.m. at Byrne Hall at Spring Hill College. Jan Preslar, division manager of the Rape Crisis Center, said Stevens will do a great job raising awareness of the struggle these survivors face and the good organizations like the Rape Crisis Center are doing in the community. “Sometimes we’re not aware of what’s going on,” Preslar said. “You don’t hear about us until you need us.” Stevens is founder and president of Thistle Farms, a community of female survivors in Nashville. It provides a two-year residency program, social enterprises employing survivors as well as an education and outreach program for the public. “She is doing such great work both in Nashville and internationally,” Preslar said of Stevens. “She brings a message of hope.” Preslar said Stevens will bring two Thistle Farms residents with her as part of the program. The women will be part of the program and also sell goods they’ve made on the farm, Preslar said.

Currently, Stevens is in Europe attempting to set up safe zones in refugee camps where sexual assaults have been prevalent, Preslar said. “She is developing programs for women to take care of themselves,” she said. The Rape Crisis Center, a program of Lifelines Counseling Service, is celebrating its 41st anniversary this year, Preslar said. The center provides a 24-hour crisis line and hospital accompaniment to sexual assault victims and others. The center also offers counseling and law enforcement interviews, as well as accompaniment to court dates for as long as they are needed, Preslar said. They are also assisting the Mobile Police Department in testing a backlog of rape kits. The center provides outreach as well to local public and private schools on bullying, boundaries and safe relationships, she added. Preslar said the Rape Crisis Center helps women, children and men. Of their clients, about 10 percent are male. Last year, the center saw 186 clients in local hospitals. The luncheon represents the center’s largest fundraiser of the year. Tickets are still available; they cost $40 and can be purchased by calling 251-602-0909. The money raised will help the Rape Crisis Center secure matching funds for grants, Preslar said, and help cover its operations.

Closing the gap

COMMUNITY FOUNDATION SEEKS TO HELP DISADVANTAGED CHILDREN BY JANE NICHOLES

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bout a dozen people are sitting around a table at the Baldwin County Commission’s annex in Robertsdale. They represent several agencies trying to make a difference in the lives of children. They speak of the effects of poverty, drug addiction, alcohol abuse, parents who don’t care, even lack of transportation as keeping at-risk children from reaching their potential. Many agency representatives don’t have immediate solutions to what are difficult societal problems. But they keep trying. They’re getting some help from the Community Foundation of South Alabama, which is sponsoring a series of “deliberative forums” in its eight-county service area. In conjunction with the David Mathews Center for Civic Life, based in Montevallo, the meeting is an opportunity to brainstorm and work together to solve problems through the foundation’s “Closing the Opportunity Gap Initiative.” Many of the social services representatives noted while Baldwin County is known as an affluent, growing, economically strong county, poverty is a reality in many areas. Affordable housing is a real problem in central Baldwin and along the coast, where many people work in tourism industry service jobs. Statistics provided to the forum confirm not everyone is living well. Infant mortality, low birthweights and teen pregnancies are slightly higher than the national average. Three percent of Baldwin households don’t have a vehicle. Nearly 20 percent of children live below the

poverty line. Nearly 42 percent of Baldwin school students are eligible for the free lunch program. Some 26.8 percent live in singleparent homes. “A lot of families are not strong,” said Keshia Boltz, prevent coordinator for the Baldwin County Child Advocacy Center; children don’t get the support, guidance or discipline they need at home, and those issues are thrown back to the schools. Drug abuse is a growing problem, she said. The center has dealt with 500 drug abuse cases this year alone. Ed Stephens, senior district executive for the Boy Scouts of America Mobile Area Council, said it’s too easy for some children to get lost in the shuffle. “Every child can make a difference,” he said. “Every child is important.” Juvenile Probation Officer Danny Criswell said if a child reaches him, that means someone else has failed. But he noted spring break arrest numbers for juveniles were down considerably this year. Criswell thinks rising rental prices may have discouraged young people who try to cram into condos, but they are still drinking somewhere else. Participants in the forum said it was good for them to meet each other and start thinking of how they can collaborate. Another forum was held in Daphne last week. Over the next several months, the information gathered at the forums will be used to bolster the foundation’s grantmaking strategy and engage the community in helping what it describes as “fragile families.” A p r i l 1 3 , 2 0 1 7 - A p r i l 1 9 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 11


COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

Bentley deserved more than he got ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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rom Ardmore, Alabama’s most northern settlement, to The Bayou in the south and all the way to state lines east and west, a giant flushing sound could be heard Monday afternoon as the tired, pathetic saga of the Luv Guv ended the way we all knew it had to — with him leaving office. This unlikely, gawky, churchy dermatologist came out of nowhere to take the governor’s office six years ago and for the most part he delivered what can best be described as a slow-speed train full of kittens crashing into a school bus loaded with baby seals. We’ve had to endure the most stomach-turning affair in political history, replete with text messages and recorded conversations that made illicit sex about as racy as a mole removal. We the citizens were bludgeoned with more than a year of the most obvious lies from Gov. Robert Bentley and his indignant anger at being asked over and over about his affair with cherished adviser Rebekah Caldwell Mason. The “Flush Heard ‘Round the State” was as needed in Alabama as more book learnin’ and another football championship or two. The biggest disservice Bentley did — among the army of disservices he unloaded upon

HE WAS NOT ONLY THE WORST GOVERNOR IN AMERICA, HE WAS THE WORST CHEATER IN AMERICA AND THE WORST LIAR.”

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enforcement officials, including former Alabama Law Enforcement Agency Secretary Spencer Collier, to illegally engage in trying to cover up his affair. Why the state’s top cop jumped in a car and drove to Greenville in order to harass a state employee about whether she had a tape of the governor and Mason is a question Collier still hasn’t answered, but it is one of a few examples of Bentley’s misuse of law enforcement. That alone ought to net him some jail time. Personally, I’d place using state cops as a thug squad way ahead of the crimes that landed ex-Gov. Don Siegelman years in the slammer. So Bentley’s tenure has swirled down the pipe, but it leaves behind an as-yet-unsanitized mess. There are the aforementioned actions of Collier and other law enforcement officers, possibly including current ALEA Secretary Stan Stabler, that need to be examined. U.S. Sen. Luther Strange’s elevation to his current position deserves nothing less than a full-blown criminal investigation. As it appears evident the Attorney General’s office was investigating Bentley, it would seem to be a violation of ethical and criminal law for Strange to have interviewed with Bentley to be appointed senator. The Alabama Bar Association ought to look at it as well. Despite the fact Jon Mason was fired by noon Tuesday and shortly afterward road crews were removing Robert Bentley’s name from welcome signs at the state line, it’s not going to be that easy to forget this debacle. More is bound to bob to the surface in the coming days. I imagine we’ll be wanting another flush soon.

THEGADFLY

the people of this state — was to fight the inevitable for more than a year once the jig was up. His act was like a Monty Python routine where someone caught in the midst of a crime denies doing it even while continuing its commission. Sometimes over the past year it’s been soothing to think perhaps Bentley had “lost it” while in office and honestly couldn’t remember groping Mason’s boobies or sending his wife texts meant for his girlfriend. He was not only the worst governor in America, he was the worst cheater in America and the worst liar. Maybe someone somewhere in this great state would be sorry to see him go if he’d just been any good at any of the three endeavors he clearly spent the most time in office pursuing. I lived in Louisiana when Edwin Edwards had his last run in office, and people there at least appreciated the skill with which Edwards lied, chased women and brokered illegal deals. The man had worked at his craft. Bentley, by comparison, was out of his element. He was a bumbler pretending to be a slick, fully aware, insidiously corrupt politician — the kind who never has to face the music. In the pantheon of disgraced governors nationwide, he is certainly a joke. Edwards, Blagojevich and others of their ilk must be having a good laugh at Alabama’s would-be evil emperor. They all know Bentley got his head turned by the grifter Rebekah Mason and her accomplice husband — people who played him for the rube he was. They soaked the love-starved Bentley for hundreds of thousands, got Jon a job he didn’t deserve and soon were essentially running the state. All she had to do was flirt a little and (guessing here) close her eyes and think of somewhere far away for five minutes every once in awhile. I’m convinced one of the reasons Bentley hung on so long is because in his heart of hearts he feared Rebekah’s phone would start going straight to message about five minutes after he resigned or was impeached. She’s left

him as little more than a smoldering pile of burned liver spots. He’s disgraced, his family is gone, his beloved beach house has been sold off and he’s had to admit to crimes. It’s too bad for Alabama Mason hadn’t just met Bentley as a rich doctor at the Tuscaloosa Country Club and quietly taken him for everything. Please don’t take this as an effort to exonerate the Luv Guv in any way. He’s a grown man and clearly let the job get the best of his ego. In reality even his resignation was one more slap in the face for the people of Alabama. We deserve to see his hide hung on the wall and his head mounted above the prison gate as a lesson (which one no one will ever heed) to current and future officeholders about the dangers of hubris. But right now it looks like Bentley is going to be allowed to slink off into the sunset without ever having to really account. The State Ethics Commission found cause to believe he had committed several felonies, but in cutting his deal to leave, Bentley’s lawyers seem to have gotten him a chance to avoid prison by just pleading to a couple of misdemeanors. He wasn’t even forced to stand up and tell the voters the truth before he left. Some might think a forced resignation, probation and some time popping zits for public service is punishment enough. But some would be wrong. This man — whether led by his “Li’l Governor” or his girlfriend — grossly misused his power. He flouted campaign law, cooked up complex schemes by which to have third parties pay both Mason and his former chief of staff Seth Hammett, and, by all accounts, abused his staff. Worst, though, is that he ordered law

Cartoon/Laura Rasmussen

TOO BAD FORMER GOV. BENTLEY’S DIVORCE AGREEMENT DIDN’T INCLUDE THE DOGHOUSE.


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COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

The women who took down the ‘throne’ ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

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pril 10, 2017. The day our state’s year-long soap opera finally came to an end with a mug shot and the resignation of Alabama’s 53rd governor, Robert Julian Bentley, otherwise known as the “Luv Guv.” If you had lined up all of the candidates who were running for governor back when Bentley first ran in 2010 and said pick the one you think is most likely to leave office in disgrace because of a sex scandal, Bentley would have been the absolute last one any of us would have chosen. He was elected primarily because he didn’t seem like your garden-variety sleazeball politician. He was a small-town, folksy, churchgoing doctor whose wife of 40-something years made him chicken and dumplings and drove him around the state to all of his campaign stops. He seemed like everyone’s grandpa and exactly like the kind of guy who would bring honor to Alabama’s highest office. But then along came a temptress. Rebekah Caldwell Mason had met Bentley in their church, First Baptist of Tuscaloosa, which she and her husband, Jon, attended. She joined his campaign in 2010 and then transitioned into his administration. She worked out a sweet gig for her husband in the administration, too. Bentley, a goofy-looking old man who had married young, was probably not accustomed to much outside female attention. He was an easy mark. Mason lusted for power and money. Bentley lusted for Mason. Though they seemed like the most unlikely of couples, in hindsight what happened was probably not all that much of a surprise, given the weaknesses and desires of the players involved. We have all ravenously consumed many of the intimate details of their affair over the last year. The now infamous recording, the bileinducing, sugary-sweet text messages, the trip to see Celine Dion, the boxer shorts incident, Wanda’s desk and the crazy and, yes, very scary lengths to which the governor went to carry on and conceal his affair with his “love.” As one of their many text messages read, “We are pitiful.” Yes, indeed, y’all are. You have to wonder, as officers took his fingerprints earlier this week and he penned the last speech he would deliver as governor, if he truly regretted any of his actions or just regretted getting caught. This man has lost his office in disgrace, his home, his children and grandchildren, his church and much of his personal wealth, not to mention becoming a national laughing stock. As he spent his last night all alone in the governor’s mansion, did he ever question whether losing all of this was worth it? Was she worth it? I imagine he will have much time to soul search in the coming months. As will the Masons. Rebekah had already resigned her post last year after word of this first came out. But Jon kept collecting a paycheck up until this week when our new governor, Kay Ivey, fired

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him — a paycheck that looked far more like a payment to a pimp than a check for services rendered as the director of SERVE Alabama. I doubt any of the Masons’ church friends will be lining up to help them out this time, nor will anyone require the services of their marketing firm. They are essentially ruined, too. Was being Alabama’s “de facto governor” for a brief period of time worth it? I also have to wonder how Dianne Bentley feels about all of this. She is the only person in this sordid affair who deserves our sympathy and should be credited with making sure these people will never serve in public office again. How devastating it must have been when her technologically challenged husband accidentally texted her “I love you Rebekah.” Not to mention having to read every single text her husband was sending to his paramour because he didn’t realize his iPhone was connected to her iPad. He even asked her not to post pictures to Facebook of his birthday party because it would upset his mistress. Ick. A self-described shy woman who hated public speaking, she said the governor emotionally abused her and knew she had low self-esteem. A terrible governor, husband and adulterer. He really is a triple threat. But hell hath no fury like a woman scorned. Even a “shy” one. With the help of her chief of staff Heather Hannah, who refused to bow to Bentley’s throne, as he put it, Dianne methodically took screenshots of all her husband’s text messages to Mason and captured not just the talk of her husband describing how he loved touching Mason’s breasts, but also a recording of him singing to her. Ick. Ick. Ick. It must have been devastating for Mrs. Bentley. But she did it and this evidence is ultimately what caused her husband to lose it and abuse the power of his office by ordering state law enforcement officials to track these recordings down, among many other questionable things. Bravo, Mrs. Bentley. And you too, Heather Hannah. You ladies didn’t bow down to his throne, you took it away from him. And it needed to be taken. No, he isn’t the first person to have an affair. But when he started ordering law enforcement officials to do unethical things to cover it up and intimidating people like Ms. Hannah himself, well, that goes far beyond just breaking your marriage vows. But in addition to misusing the office, this has been a huge embarrassment, distraction and costly investigation for our state to endure. But thankfully we can all finally move on. Gov. Ivey has pledged to run her office with openness and transparency, things we haven’t seen from the office of the governor in quite some time. Let’s hope she keeps her word. And she remembers, the governor bows down to the people of Alabama, not the other way around.


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COMMENTARY | THE MONTGOMERY MINUTE

These magic moments: 10 nuggets from the Bentley scandal BY LEE HEDGEPETH/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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uch of the report released by Jack Sharman, special counsel to the House Judiciary Committee, which considered former Gov. Robert Bentley’s impeachment, has been widely reported. It’s 131 pages, and the thousands of pages of accompanying evidence have been required reading for Alabama’s political press over the last week. Still, though, there’s plenty of material — lots of magic moments — that haven’t yet been brought to the public’s attention. Here are 12 you should know about from the report. You may want to sit down. 1. In one of the recordings handed over to the impeachment committee by former First Lady Dianne Bentley, the disgraced governor begins singing to Rebekah Caldwell Mason. If you’re a fan of the Drifters, you may want to move on to the next item in this list. For the rest of you, I’ll quote then-Gov. Bentley for you, although he didn’t get the lyrics quite right: “The magic moment …” 2. After her inappropriate relationship with Bentley became public, ABC’s “The View,” my preferred daytime talk show, invited Mason on the show. “As a heads up,” a top Bentley aide wrote to Mason via text message, “The View (the show in NYC) wants to have you on as a guest. They requested your email they will be contacting you.” “Please tell me you are joking,” Mason responded. “No I’m serious,” the staffer replied. “I asked twice to make sure I heard her correctly.” 3. The impeachment report says many times she was in

part because he didn’t know his iPhone text messages were synced to an iPad he had given the First Lady’s staff. The iPad was a gift from Golden Dragon Copper, a tubing company that opened a facility in Wilcox County under Bentley’s tenure. 6. The Former First Lady — or Dianne “Badass” Bentley, as my wife affectionately calls her — didn’t let Rebekah Mason get ahead of her: “One of the conversations that Mrs. Bentley overheard but did not record,” Dianne Bentley’s former executive assistant testified, “… was the governor telling Rebekah Mason that the reason that he was building the second beach house was for her, so he would never have to be away from her.” Montgomery, Mason would park her minivan in the First Dianne Bentley’s solution? “[That’s why] Mrs. Bentley sold it immediately Lady’s reserved spot at the Capitol and go to an elevator when she got it in the divorce.” If you can’t beat ‘em, sell their beach house. ascending directly to the governor’s office — an elevator 7. Group text messages between top Bentley staffers including Mason installed for Gov. George Wallace after he was shot. many times bordered on inappropriate. Staffers — particularly top aide Zach 4. According to testimony included in the report’s Lee — were fond of sharing photos of State Auditor Jim Zeigler with text like exhibits, Pastor Gil McKee at First Baptist Tuscaloosa, “Night Night!” (a photo of Zeigler’s head bowed) and “I don’t always poopy attended by both the Bentleys and the Masons, delivered in my pants, but when I do, it’s Robert Bentley’s fault.” an entire sermon aimed at the state’s First Affair. In another text, in reaction to the death of Supreme Court Justice Antonin Sca“Pastor McKee at First Baptist Tuscaloosa gave a big lia, Lee sent a photo of a man bowing his head, with the caption “gee willikers.” sermon, and it was pretty obvious that it was targeted at 8. Another text message to Gov. Bentley released as part of the Sharman Rebekah and Jon and Gov. Bentley,” a Dianne Bentley report seems like a very random offer, even when read in context with the staffer told the impeachment committee’s special counsel messages around it. “Governor,” wrote Randy Wilhelm, a top Montgomery under oath. “And the governor was really upset about it, politico, “do you have 10 minutes on Wednesday when I can introduce you but Pastor McKee kind of talked to Jon Mason about it. to my client who wants to buy Tutwiler (prison) for $50 million?” We don’t But then ultimately he ended up calling all four of them know whether the governor took him up on that offer, but I’d certainly like to into the office, or three of them with Mrs. Bentley to sit get that introduction. down and just kind of say, ‘OK, is this affair happening’ 9. The handwritten notes of Ray Lewis, Bentley’s longtime body man, also and made everybody admit to the fact that they knew. contain interesting claims. In one note written in 2015, Lewis said then-Gov. “And then he asked the governor to no longer be a Bentley dropped an interesting nugget about then-President Barack Obama: member of the church. Asked the Masons no longer to “[The governor] went on to say that the president is being accused of attend the church, and removed the governor from his having a girlfriend,” Lewis wrote, “and that people close to him call her his position as deacon and Sunday school teacher.” ‘whisper.’” Sounds more like projection than a legitimate claim on the part of The report also says two of the Bentleys’ sons traveled the disgraced governor, if you ask me. to Rebekah Mason’s parents’ home in an effort to draft 10. There could be much more to come — someday. According to the their help in ending the affair. report, Dianne Bentley kept a diary of the administration containing even Neither of those interventions, nor the many others more information about the governor and his actions. “[Dianne Bentley] kept recounted in the report, had any effect. journals of every, every single day she served as First Lady.” There’s a book 5. Gov. Bentley’s texting turmoil happened in large I’d pay good money to read.

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COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

Time for GOP to learn to fight like Democrats BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM

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emocrats play for power. Republicans play for survival. And conservatives have been complaining about the imbalance for decades. When Democrats are playing from behind, be it lacking the control of Congress or control of the White House, they throw out the rulebook. From hyped-up claims of Russians hacking an election or a man who looks like Paul Ryan pushing grandma off a cliff, nothing is out of bounds when the left is in attack mode. Sure, the right had some Tea Party protests with a few clever signs. But the difference between liberal and conservative movements is liberals seem to have the unanimous support of the Democratic Party. It has been a long time since Republicans have used dirty tricks against Democrats. Not since the height of political strategist Lee Atwater’s time have Republicans played a game of no-holds-barred politics. Atwater was credited with making Willie Horton an issue during the 1988 presidential election between Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis and Vice President George H.W. Bush. Horton, a convicted killer and rapist, was released as part of a weekend furlough program Dukakis supported. Horton never returned from that furlough. Instead, he left Massachusetts and raped a woman in Maryland after attacking and tying up her fiancé. Horton later stole the man’s car. Horton was eventually captured, but many blamed Dukakis for vetoing legislation that would have prevented Horton’s release. Atwater reportedly said on many occasions during the

1988 campaign, “By the time we’re finished, they’re going to wonder whether Willie Horton is Dukakis’ running mate.” Bush would go on to defeat Dukakis handily. Some dispute whether the Horton episode had much to do with the outcome. However, it did show a willingness by the GOP to take the gloves off to secure an electoral victory. Now the Republicans find themselves in a place they have not been since 2006 — in control of the White House and both chambers of Congress. A year ago, few thought this was a possibility as it appeared Donald Trump was going to win the GOP nomination and, it was thought, the apparent Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton would trounce him. Many Republican elected officials, especially those in Congress, gave Trump lukewarm endorsements, fearing his presence on the ticket would impact their re-election chances. The name of the game was survival. Try to maintain control of Congress and do your best to hold onto your seat. Sure, Clinton had her vulnerabilities. But there did not seem to be a magic bullet to end her candidacy. And even if there had been, it might have been viewed as uncouth to use. Besides, the GOP had already thrown a lot at her — Benghazi, deleted emails. Nothing seemed to stick. It was not until 9 p.m. ET on election night that a Trump victory became a real possibility to many people. Five months later, it is clear the Democratic Party is starting to come to terms with Trump’s presidency and is fighting him tooth and nail — despite no meaningful election until November 2018. We have heard calls for impeachment proceedings, claims

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of improper associations with the Russian government, accusations of conflicts of interest — anything it takes to get people riled up and angry at Trump. In Congress, Democratic Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer has not only opposed everything associated with Trump, but has also employed every parliamentary tactic to obstruct the Trump agenda — including blocking Neil Gorsuch’s Supreme Court confirmation and nearly every one of Trump’s Cabinet nominees. Compare that to how Republicans handled President Barack Obama when they were in the minority in the House and Senate, from 2008-2010. Sure, they voiced their opposition and issued press releases. They did not, however, use every opportunity to obstruct, short of pitching temper tantrums on the floor of the U.S. House of Representatives. The previous administration has handed the Republicans a gift. It is obvious some Obama administration officials snooped on the Trump transition team. Even if it was inadvertent, which just defies logic, the federal government spied on political opponents and leaked information about it to the press. We know this because the conversations of former Trump National Security Adviser Michael Flynn with the Russian ambassador ended up in the newspaper. Yeah, sure — it did not look good because he was talking to the Russian ambassador. But Republicans should not be focused on that. No, instead they need to promote slogans like “Obama spied, and Susan Rice lied.” They should attack Democrats for being dismissive of the Fourth Amendment and spying on American citizens. After all, if they will brazenly spy on an incoming president, why wouldn’t they spy on you and me as well? Instead, Republicans and their leaders in the House and Senate are allowing Trump’s opponents to control the narrative. Even after Trump ordered a strike against an airbase in Syria, an ally of the Russian government, they are still allowing a heavy focus on the congressional investigations into alleged Russia and Trump collusion during the election. The point is, both these issues may be much ado about nothing. But in politics, if you want to win it does matter. Certainly, it is harder to do so without the complicity of an undeniably anti-Trump media. Keep in mind, however, Trump not only has the most prominent bully pulpit in the world, he also has a Twitter account with 27.6 million followers. If Chuck Schumer and Nancy Pelosi are willing to emphasize and exaggerate to slow down Trump’s momentum, there ought to be some similar countertactics in place. But for now, Republicans don’t seem to have the fire in the belly to do so.


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BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

The Wharf expands occupancy BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

T

he Wharf at Orange Beach has reached 84 percent occupancy with 12 new tenants moving in and three expansions by existing occupants, according to a news release. The property also hosted nearly 2 million visitors in 2016, making a significant economic impact on the city and surrounding region.  “The Wharf is thrilled to see attendance growth year over year,” Kristen Guenther, management team leader at The Wharf, said. “Each of these new tenants along with current partnership developments will help continue to diversify our property offerings, making it an all-inclusive destination.” New tenants include: • Moxie, November 2016 — a cardio fitness space focusing on creating health and wellness by strengthening mind and body in unison; • World Food Championship, November 2016 — occupies office space after its on-property event last year; • Flowers by the Shore, January 2017 — a local floral retailer with over a 20-year footprint in the area; • Carney Realty, February 2017, in the office suites — a Realtor offering home buying and selling services; • The Intracoastal, March 2017 — previously known as The Hot Spot Music & Grub, a waterfront venue providing musical entertainment from regional musicians; • Gulf Shores Power Sports, April 2017 — a powersports dealership now open off Wharf Parkway on the second floor; • First Cahawba Bank, April 2017, in the office suites — a new business space that will serve as a loan production office; • Sawgrass Consulting LLC, April 2017, in the office suites — providing engineering, surveying and construction management services throughout the Southeast; • Gulf Coast Brokers, April 2017, in the office suites — a full-service real estate brokerage firm specializing in resi-

dential, second homes, commercial and vacation rentals; • Orange Beach Lifestyle & Performance Medicine, spring 2017 — relocating from its Canal Road location, medical professionals provide preventative healthrelated care; • Blue Water BBQ Co., May 2017 — a new eatery slated to occupy the previous Hot Spot Music & Grub space, offering a full selection of Southern barbeque; • Burris Farm Market, May 2017 — permanent setup for open-air farmers market with full line of locally grown fruit and produce. New expansions encompass: • Sea la Vie Boudoir, October 2016 — design store for home and office décor expanded floor plan to offer broader selection of bedding, mattresses, accessories and more; • The Southern Grind, March 2017 — local coffee house has doubled in size and now sells art, home décor and gifts; • High Seas Design House, summer 2017 — opened in 2012, company provides digital solutions. The Wharf has also made many infrastructure updates including new light fixtures, professional landscaping and expanded seating at the Amphitheater. “Our goal is to provide the best possible on-property experience for visitors and locals alike, and to do that, we are in a constant state of improvement,” Guenther said.  Jeff Barnes with Stirling Properties managed the new tenant arrivals at The Wharf.

Mobile Cryotherapy recognized by BCA

Mobile Cryotherapy, located on 6345 Airport Blvd. in West Mobile, was named the recipient of the Business Council of Alabama’s “University of South Alabama’s Small Business Game Changer” award. Mobile Cryotherapy was awarded a complimentary full slate of corporate partner benefits for the 2017 football regular season, including game tickets and parking, in-venue

20 | L AG N I A P P E | A p r i l 1 3 , 2 0 1 7 - A p r i l 1 9 , 2 0 1 7

logo recognition and exposure through both game day publications and radio. The award was presented at last weekend’s South Alabama Jaguar college football spring game at Ladd-Peebles Stadium. “Small businesses are the economic engines of Alabama,” BCA president and CEO William J. Canary said. “The BCA recognizes that small businesses provide a majority of jobs for Alabamians.” Cryotherapy is the brief exposure in a cryogenic chamber to extreme cold for medical treatment of injuries and inflammation, according to owner Samantha Bloodworth, who applied on behalf of the company, which employs about five people. “The core purpose of our business is targeted towards the recovery and wellness of athletes,” she said. “Our efforts focus to reach these individuals through team sports in the community such as local high schools, colleges and regional teams.” Last summer the BCA and the USA’s Department of Athletics partnered to announce the opportunity for a state-based business with 50 or fewer employees to explain why a 2017 Jaguars football sponsorship would be game-changer for them. A panel of judges reviewed the submitted applications blindly based on the creativity, originality and principles expressed in each 150-word entry. The competition was open only to small businesses in Alabama with good-standing BCA membership status. Additional eligibility restrictions applied. The BCA is a nonpartisan statewide business association representing the interests and concerns of nearly 1 million working Alabamians through its member companies and partnership with the Chamber of Commerce Association of Alabama. The BCA is Alabama’s exclusive affiliate to the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Association of Manufacturers.

Southern Light’s McGriff tapped by FCC

Mobile-based Southern Light, a regional provider of fiber optic infrastructure solutions in the Southeast, recently announced the appointment of General Counsel Kelly McGriff to the Federal Communications Commission Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee. The committee was recently formed by FCC Chairman Ajit Pai to explore solutions for broadband deployment across the country. “The committee will focus on developing specific recommendations on how the FCC can encourage broadband deployment across America,” Pai said. “Southern Light is thrilled by the appointment of Kelly McGriff to the Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee,” Andy Newton, president and CEO of Southern Light, said. “Kelly has worked on deployment issues for years, and he will pull on frontline experience to offer progressive solutions.” “It is my great honor to serve on the Broadband Deployment Advisory Committee,” McGriff said. “For years, we have encountered regulations and misperceptions that have hindered the deployment of fiber optic networks. We are ready to tap our real-world experience and work with other committee members to offer free-market solutions.”


A p r i l 1 3 , 2 0 1 7 - A p r i l 1 9 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 21


FIREHOUSE SUBS ($)

HOT SUBS, COLD SALADS & CATERING 6300 Grelot Rd. • 631-3730

FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES ($) $10/PERSON • $$ 10-25/PERSON • $$$ OVER 25/PERSON

COMPLETELY COMFORTABLE ALL SPORTS BAR & GRILL ($) 3408 Pleasant Valley Rd. • 345-9338

AL’S HOTDOGS ($)

CLASSIC HOTDOGS, GYROS & MILKSHAKES 4701 Airport Blvd. • 342-3243

ATLANTA BREAD COMPANY ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SALADS & MORE. 3680 Dauphin St. • 380-0444

BAKE MY DAY ($)

OLD-FASHIONED SOUTHERN BAKE SHOP 156 N. McGregor Ave. • 219-7261

BOB’S DINER ($)

GOOD OLD AMERICAN COOKING 263 St. Francis St. • 405-1497

BUCK’S DINER ($)

CLASSIC AMERICAN DINER 58 N. Secion St. Fairhope • 928-8521

CAFE 219 ($)

SALADS, SANDWICHES & POTATO SALAD 219 Conti St. • 438-5234

CAMELLIA CAFÉ ($-$$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FARE 61 Section St. • Fairhope • 928-4321

CAMMIE’S OLD DUTCH ($) MOBILE’S CLASSIC ICE CREAM SPOT 2511 Old Shell Rd. • 471-1710

CARPE DIEM ($)

DELI FOODS, PASTRIES & SPECIALTY DRINKS 4072 Old Shell Rd. • 304-0448

CLARK’S KITCHEN ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHERN CUISINE & CATERING 5817 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0200

CHAT-A-WAY CAFE ($)

QUICHES & SANDWICHES 4366 Old Shell Rd. • 343-9889

CHICK-FIL-A ($)

107 St. Francis St. • 415-1700 3244 Dauphin St. • 476-0320 3215 Bel Air Mall • 476-8361 4707 Airport Blvd. • 461-9933 435 Schillinger Rd. • 639-1163 1682 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 621-3215 30500 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-3020

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK ($)

CHICKEN SALAD, SALAD & SOUP 2370 S. Hillcrest Rd. Unit R • 660-0501 5753 Old Shell Rd. • 408-3236 1802 US Hwy 98 Suite F• 625-1092

CHI-TOWN DAWGZ ($) CHICAGO STYLE EATERY 1222 Hillcrest Rd. • 461-6599

CONNECTION FROZEN YOGURT ($) 1880 Industrial Pkwy. • 675-2999

CREAM AND SUGAR ($)

COFFEE, BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DESSERT 351 George St #B • 405-0003

DAUPHIN ST. CAFE ($)

HOT LUNCH, DAILY MENU (INSIDE VIA) 1717 Dauphin St. • 470-5231

D’ MICHAEL’S ($)

PHILLY CHEESE STEAKS, GYROS & MORE 7101-A Theodore Dawes Rd. • 653-2979

D NU SPOT ($)

22159 Halls Mill Rd. . • 648-6522

DELISH BAKERY AND EATERY ($) GREAT DESSERTS & HOT LUNCH 23 Upham St. • 473-6115

DEW DROP INN ($)

CLASSIC BURGERS, HOTDOGS & SETTING 1808 Old Shell Rd. • 473-7872

DUNKIN DONUTS ($)

DONUTS, COFFEE & SANDWICHES 1976 Michigan Ave. • 442-4846 3876 Airport Blvd. • 219-7369 505 Schillinger Rd. S. • 442-4845 29160 US Hwy 98 • 621-2228

E WING HOUSE ($)

195 S University Blvd. Suite H • 662-1829

EUGENE’S MONKEY BAR ($) 15 N Conception St. • 433-2299

FATHOMS LOUNGE

SMALL PLATES AND CREATIVE COCKTAILS 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

FLOUR GIRLS BAKERY ($) 809 Hillcrest Rd. • 634-2285

BURGERS, MILKSHAKES & FRIES 4401 Old Shell Rd. • 447-2394 4663 Airport Blvd. • 300-8425 5319 Hwy 90 • 661-0071 1225 Satchel Page Dr.• 378-8768

FOOSACKLY’S ($)

FAMOUS CHICKEN FINGERS 29181 US Hwy 98 • Daphne • 375-1104 7843 Moffett Rd. • 607-6196 1109 Shelton Beach Rd. • 287-1423 310 S. University Blvd. • 343-0047 2250 Airport Blvd. • 479-2922 7641 Airport Blvd. • 607-7667 2558 Schillinger Rd. • 219-7761 3249 Dauphin St. • 479-2000

FOY SUPERFOODS ($) 119 Dauphin St.• 307-8997

GULF COAST EXPLOREUM CAFE ($)

1801 Old Shell Rd. • 345-4767

PANINI PETE’S ($)

ORIGINAL SANDWICH AND BAKE SHOP 42 ½ Section St. • Fairhope • 929-0122 102 Dauphin St. • 405-0031

PAT’S DOWNTOWN GRILL ($) BAR FOOD 271 Dauphin St • 438-9585

PDQ ($)

CHICKEN FINGERS, SALAD & SANDWICHES. 1165 University Blvd. • 202-0959

POLLMAN’S BAKERY ($)

BAKERY, SANDWICHES & MORE 750 S. Broad St. • 438-1511 4464 Old Shell Rd. • 342-8546 107 St. Francis St. Suite 102 • 438-2261

PUNTA CLARA KITCHEN ($)

FUDGE, PRALINES & MORE 17111 Scenic Hwy 98 • Fairhope • 928-8477

R BISTRO ($-$$)

HOMEMADE SOUPS & SANDWICHES 65 Government St. • 208-6815

334 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope • 928-2399

GUMBO SHACK ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SUBS & SOUPS 2056 Gov’t St. • 476-2777

SEAFOOD & SANDWICHES 212 ½ Fairhope Ave •Fairhope • 928-4100

HOOTERS ($)

3869 Airport Blvd. • 345-9544 5470 Inn Rd. • 661-9117 28975 US 98 • Daphne • 625-3910

JAMAICAN VIBE ($)

MIND-BLOWING ISLAND FOOD 3700 Gov’t Blvd. Ste A • 602-1973

JERSEY MIKE’S ($)

AUTHENTIC SUB SANDWICHES 7449 Airport Blvd. • 375-1820

JIMMY JOHN’S ($)

SANDWICHES, CATERING & DELIVERY TOO 6920 Airport Blvd. • 414-5444 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-8694 62 B Royal St. • 432-0360

JOE CAIN CAFÉ ($)

PIZZAS, SANDWICHES, COCKTAILS 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

JONELLI’S ($)

1252 Govenment St.• 301-7556

JUDY’S PLACE ($-$$)

HOME COOKING 4054 Government St. • 665-4557

LICKIN’ GOOD DONUTS ($) 3242 Dauphin St. • 471-2590

LODA BIER GARTEN ($) PUB FOOD AND DRAFT BEERS 251 Dauphin St. • 287-6871

MAMA’S ($)

SLAP YOUR MAMA GOOD HOME COOKING 220 Dauphin St. • 432-6262

REGINA’S KITCHEN ($-$$) ROLY POLY ($)

WRAPS & SALADS 3220 Dauphin St. • 479-2480

ROSHELL’S CAFE ($)

2906 Springhill Ave. • 479-4614

ROSIE’S GRILL ($-$$)

SANDWICHES, SOUTHWEST FARE, 7 DAYS 1203 Hwy 98 Ste. 3D • Daphne • 626-2440

ROYAL KNIGHT ($)

LUNCH & DINNER 3004 Gov’t Blvd. • 287-1220

ROYAL STREET CAFE ($)

DELICIOUS HOTDOGS ($)

2550 Dauphin Island Pkwy S. • 307-5328

WAREHOUSE BAKERY & DONUTS ($) COFFEE AND DONUTS 759 Nichols Avenue, Fairhope • 928-7223

WEDGIE’S ($)

GOURMET GRILLED CHEESE 5955 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6134

WILD WING STATION ($) 1500 Gov’t St. • 287-1526

YAK THE KATHMANDU KITCHEN ($-$$)

COFFEE, LUNCHES, LIVE MUSIC & GELATO 3 Royal St. S. • 415-3000

SIMPLY SWEET ($)

CUPCAKE BOUTIQUE 6207 Cottage Hill Rd. Suite B • 665-3003

STEVIE’S KITCHEN ($)

SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS & MORE 41 West I-65 Service Rd. N Suite 150. • 287-2793

SUGAR RUSH DONUT CO. ($) 4701 Airport Blvd. • 408-3379

SUNSET POINTE ($-$$)

MARS HILL CAFE ($)

AT FLU CREEK 831 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-7766

MARY’S SOUTHERN COOKING ($)

DAILY SPECIALS MADE FROM SCRATCH 57 N. Claiborne St. • 694-6853

A FAVORITE BARBECUE SPOT 5456 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0001

COTTON STATE BBQ ($)

DOWNTOWN LUNCH 101 N. Conception St. • 545-4682

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT ($-$$) BBQ AND MORE Jubilee Sq.Ctr. Hwy 90, Daphne • 210-2151 McGowin Park Ctr. Satchel Paige Dr. • 471-1050 7721 Airport Blvd. • 380-8957

DREAMLAND BBQ ($)

RIBS, SANDWICHES & GREAT SIDES 3314 Old Shell Rd. • 479-9898 5401 Cottage Hill Rd. • 591-4842 BARBEQUE & MUSIC Bayfront Park Dr. • Daphne • 625-RIBS 701 Springhill Ave. • 410-7427 4672 Airport Blvd. • 300-8516

SAUCY Q BARBQUE ($) AWARD-WINNING BARBQUE 1111 Gov’t Blvd. • 433-7427

SMOKEY DEMBO SMOKE HOUSE ($)

BAY GOURMET ($$)

MIKO’S ITALIAN ICE ($)

HOTDOGS SANDWICHES & COOL TREATS 3371 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 300–4015

MOMMA GOLDBERG’S DELI ($) SANDWICHES & MOMMA’S LOVE 3696 Airport Blvd. • 344-9500 5602 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6556

MONTEGO’S ($-$$)

FRESH CARIBBEAN-STYLE FOOD & CRAFT BEER 6601 Airport Blvd. • 634-3445 225 Dauphin St. • 375-1576

MOON PIE GENERAL STORE ($)

107 St Francis St #115 • RSA Bank Trust Building

MOSTLY MUFFINS ($) MUFFINS, COFFEE & WRAPS 105 Dauphin St. • 433-9855

NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE ($)

OVEN-BAKED SANDWICHES & MORE 1335 Satchel Page Dr. Suite C. • 287-7356 7440 Airport Blvd. • 633-0096 30500 State Hwy 181 #132 • 625-6544

O’DALYS HOLE IN THE WALL ($) 562 Dauphin St.• 725-6429

OLD SHELL GROWLERS ($) GROWLER STATION AND BITES

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SOUTHERN COOKING & THEN SOME 1716 Main St. Daphne • 222-4120

THE SUNFLOWER CAFE ($) INSIDE VIRGINIA’S HEALTH FOOD 3055 A Dauphin St • 479-3200

THYME BY THE BAY ($-$$)

33 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-5635

TIME TO EAT CAFE ($)

LIGHT LUNCH WITH SOUTHERN FLAIR. 226 Dauphin St. • 433-6725

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE ($)

GREAT SMOOTHIES, WRAPS & SANDWICHES. Du Rhu Dr. • 378-5648 570 Schillinger Road • 634-3454

UNCLE JIMMY’S

216 St Francis St. • 421-2022

RED OR WHITE

323A De La Mare Ave, Fairhope • 990-0003 1104 Dauphin St.. • 478-9494

ROYAL STREET TAVERN

LIVE MUSIC, MARTINIS & DINNER MENU. 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

SOUTHERN NAPA

BISTRO PLATES, CRAFT BEERS & PANTRY 2304 Main St. • 375-2800

THE VINEYARD

7 SPICE ($-$$)

HEALTHY, DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 3762 Airport Blvd. • 725-1177

ABBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE ($-$$) ISTANBUL GRILL ($)

JERUSALEM CAFE ($-$$)

CORNER 251 ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD WITH A VIEW 107 St. Francis St • 444-0200

DUMBWAITER ($$-$$$) 9 Du Rhu Dr. Suite 201 167 Dauphin St. • 445-3802

FIVE ($$)

GREAT FOOD AND COCKTAILS 609 Dauphin St. • 308-3105

KITCHEN ON GEORGE ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St. • 432-8000

THREE GEORGES CANDY SHOP ($)

FIREHOUSE WINE BAR & SHOP

MEDITERRANEAN FOOD AND HOOKAH 326 Azalea Rd • 229-4206

TIN ROOF ($-$$)

AMERICAN RESTAURANT & BAR 250 Dauphin St. • 476-1890

WINE BAR, CRAFT BEERS & BISTRO 6808 Airport Blvd. • 343-3555

MOBILE’S OLDEST MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE 5773 Airport Blvd. • 304-1155

CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOOD 351A George & Savannah St. • 436-8890

TP CROCKMIERS ($)

POUR BABY

CHUCK’S FISH ($$)

DOWN-HOME COUNTRY COOKIN 7351 Theodore Dawes Rd. • 654-0228 13665 N. Wintzell Ave. • 824-1119 SOUTHERN CASUAL FAMILY DINING 10800 US HWY 31 • Spanish Fort• 621-4995

FOOD, WINE & MORE 5150 Old Shell Rd. • 341-1497

AUTHENTIC TURKISH & MEDITERRANEAN 3702 Airport Blvd. • 461-6901

DAUPHIN’S ($$-$$$)

LAUNCH ($-$$)

MAGHEE’S GRILL ON THE HILL ($-$$) GREAT LUNCH & DINNER 3607 Old Shell Rd. • 445-8700

NOBLE SOUTH ($$)

LOCAL INGREDIENTS 203 Dauphin St. • 690-6824

NOJA ($$-$$$)

INVENTIVE & VERY FRESH CUISINE 6 N. Jackson St. • 433-0377

OSMAN’S RESTAURANT ($$) SUPREME EUROPEAN CUISINE 2579 Halls Mill Rd. • 479-0006

HIBACHI GRILL & ASIAN CUISINE 309 Bel Air Blvd • 470-8033

HIBACHI 1 ($-$$)

2370 Hillcrest Rd. Unit B • 380-6062

ICHIBAN SUSHI ($)

LIQUID ($$)

FOOD PAK

BRIQUETTES STEAKHOUSE ($-$$)

THE HARBERDASHER ($)

GOLDEN BOWL ($)

WINE, BEER, GOURMET FOODS, & MORE. 720 Schillinger Rd. S. Unit 8 • 287-1851

DOMKE MARKET

4861 Bit & Spur Rd. • 340-6464

MCSHARRY’S ($-$$)

THAI FARE AND SUSHI 2000 Airport Blvd. • 478-9888

KAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($-$$)

A PREMIER CATERER & COOKING CLASSES 1880-A Airport Blvd. • 450-9051

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St • 460-3157

FUJI SAN ($)

A LITTLE VINO

FALAFEL? TRY SOME HUMMUS

DROP DEAD GOURMET

LUNCH BUFFET 3674 Airport Blvd. • 341-6171

JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE 3959 Cottage Hill Rd • 666-6266

TILMO’S BBQ ($)

FAST BBQ W/ DRIVE-THRU 3249 Dauphin St. • 652-3508

3966 Airport Blvd.• 343-5530

17111 Scenic HWY 98 • Point Clear • 928-4838

UPSCALE WINE BAR 9 Du Rhu Dr. S 201 • 287-7135

OPEN FOR LUNCH, INSIDE GULFQUEST 155 S. Water St • 436-8901

THE PIGEON HOLE ($)

THE WASH HOUSE ($$)

3758 Dauphin Island Pkwy. • 473-1401

6358 Cottage Hill Rd. • 725-6917

113 Dauphin St.• 436-0989

SEAFOOD, ASIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE 69 St. Michael St • 375-1113

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE Battle House Hotel, Royal St. • 338-5493

THE GALLEY ($)

AUTHENTIC IRISH PUB 101 N. Bancroft St.• 990-5100

CUISINE OF INDIA ($$)

MODERN GASTROPUB INSPIRED BY JAPANESE KITCHEN 455 Dauphin St • 433-0376

BAR-B-QUING WITH MY HONEY ($$)

SEAFOOD AND SUSHI 551 Dauphin St.• 219-7051

MICHELI’S CAFE ($)

SAISHO ($-$$)

THE TRELLIS ROOM ($$$)

BRICK PIT ($)

CHARM ($-$$)

CHINA DOLL ($)

HOME COOKIN’ LIKE MOMMA MADE. 2804 Springhill Ave. • 473-4739

BBQ, BURGERS, WINGS & SEAFOOD 19170 Hwy 43 Mt. Vernon. • 839-9927

BENJAS ($)

INSIDE THE MOBILE MARRIOTT 3101 Airport Blvd. • 476-6400

CASUAL FINE DINING 104 N. Section St. • Fairhope • 929-2219

THE BLIND MULE ($)

3011 Springhill Ave. • 476-2232

THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR 960 Schillinger Rd. S • 660-4470

BACKYARD CAFE & BBQ ($)

GRILLED STEAKS, CHICKEN & SEAFOOD 720A Schillinger Rd. S. S2. • 607-7200 901 Montlimar Dr • 408-3133

GREAT SANDWICHES, COFFEE & MORE 1087 Downtowner Blvd. • 643-1611

SAGE RESTAURANT ($$)

EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE 271 Glenwood St. • 476-0516

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($$)

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE ($)

SERDA’S COFFEEHOUSE ($)

THAI & SUSHI 5369 D Hwy 90 W • 661-5100

‘CUE

SALLY’S PIECE-A-CAKE ($)

COFFEE, SMOOTHIES, LUNCH & BEERS. 5460 Old Shell Rd. • 344-4575

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

VON’S BISTRO ($-$$)

HOMEMADE LUNCH & BREAKFAST 104 N. Royal St. • 434-0011

SATORI COFFEEHOUSE ($)

312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-9077

GUMBO, ANGUS BEEF & BAR 72. S. Royal St. • 432-SCAM (7226)

AUTHENTIC FOODS FROM HIMALAYAN REGION 3210 Dauphin St. • 287-0115 400 Eastern Shore Center • 459-2862

MEAT BOSS ($)

BAKERY 5638 Three Notch Rd.• 219-6379

ROYAL SCAM ($$)

KAN ZAMAN ($-$$)

MEDITERRANEAN SANDWICH COMPANY ($)

GREAT & QUICK. 3702 Airport Blvd. • 308-2131 274 Dauphin St. • 545-3161 2502 Schillinger Rd. Ste. 2 • 725-0126 6890 US-90 • DAPHNE • 621-2271

MINT HOOKAH BISTRO ($) GREAT MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 5951 Old Shell Rd. • 450-9191

OLLIE’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL ($-$$) MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT & HOOKAH 1248 Hillcrest St • 634-9820

TAZIKI’S ($-$$)

MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 1539 US HWY 98• 273-3337

FAR EASTERN FARE ANG BAHAY KUBO ($$) 4513 Old Shell Rd.• 473-0007

BAMBOO STEAKHOUSE ($$) SUSHI BAR 650 Cody Rd. S • 300-8383

BANGKOK THAI ($-$$)

DELICIOUS, TRADITIONAL THAI CUISINE 28600 US 98 • Daphne • 626-5286 3821 Airport Blvd. • 344-9995

BANZAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($$) TRADITIONAL SUSHI & LUNCH.

QUALITY FOOD, EXCELLENT SERVICE 5045 Cottage Hill Rd. • 607-6454

AMAZING SUSHI & ASSORTMENT OF ROLLS. 661 Dauphin St. • 432-0109

RICE ASIAN GRILL & SUSHI BAR ($) 3964 Gov’t Blvd. • 378-8083

ROCK N ROLL SUSHI ($$)

273 S. McGregor Ave • 287-0445 6345 Airport Blvd. • 287-0555 940 Industrial Pkwy • 308-2158 6850 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 753-4367

SAISHO ($$)

6455 Dauphin St. • 433-0376

STIX ($$)

610240 Eastern Shore Blvd. • 621-9088

TASTE OF THAI ($$)

9091 US-90 Irvington • 957-1414

TOKYO JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE ($$) UPSCALE SUSHI & HIBACHI 364 Azalea Rd. • 343-6622

WASABI SUSHI ($$)

JAPANESE CUISINE 3654 Airport Blvd. S. C • 725-6078

FROM THE DEPTHS BAUDEAN’S ($$)

FRIED, GRILLED, STEAMED & ALWAYS FRESH 3300 River Rd. • 973-9070

THE BLUEGILL ($-$$)

A HISTORIC SEAFOOD DIVE W/ LIVE MUSIC 3775 Hwy. 98 • 625-1998

BONEFISH GRILL ($$)

ECLECTIC DINING & SPACE 6955 Airport Blvd. • 633-7196

BOUDREAUX’S CAJUN GRILL ($-$$) QUALITY CAJUN & NEW ORLEANS CUISINE 29249 US Highway 98 Daphne. • 621-1991

CRAVIN CAJUN/DIP SEAFOOD ($) PO-BOYS, SALADS & SEAFOOD 1870 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 287-1168

ED’S SEAFOOD SHED ($$)

FRIED SEAFOOD SERVED IN HEFTY PORTIONS 3382 Hwy. 98 • 625-1947

FELIX’S FISH CAMP ($$) UPSCALE DINING WITH A VIEW 1420 Hwy. 98 • 626-6710

FISHERMAN’S LEGACY ($) DELI, MARKET AND CATERING. 4380 Halls Mill Rd. • 665-2266

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($)

30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 206-8768 3654 Airport Blvd. • 338-9350

LUCY B. GOODE ($$)

GULF COAST CUISINE, REINVENTED 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

LULU’S ($$)

LIVE MUSIC & GREAT SEAFOOD 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

MUDBUGS AT THE LOOP ($) CAJUN KITCHEN & SEAFOOD MARKET 2005 Government St. • 478-9897

RALPH & KACOO’S ($-$$) THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1595 Battleship Pkwy. • 626-0045

R&R SEAFOOD ($-$$)

LAID-BACK EATERY & FISH MARKET 1477 Battleship Pkwy. • 621-8366


RIVER SHACK ($-$$)

SEAFOOD, BURGERS & STEAKS 6120 Marina Dr. • Dog River • 443-7318.

THE GRAND MARINER ($-$$) LOCAL SEAFOOD & PRODUCE 6036 Rock Point Rd. • 443-5700

THE HARBOR ROOM ($-$$) UNIQUE SEAFOOD 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

THE SEAFOOD HOUSE ($-$$)

HEROES SPORTS BAR & GRILLE ($) SANDWICHES & COLD BEER 273 Dauphin St. • 433-4376 Hillcrest & Old Shell Rd. • 341-9464

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS ($-$$) WINGS, SEAFOOD, BURGERS & BEER 7721 Airport Blvd. Suite E-180 • 639-6832

ISLAND WING CO ($)

EVERYTHING BAKED OR GRILLED 2617 Dauphin St. • 476-9464

751 Azalea Rd. • 301-7964

MANCIS ($)

TIN TOP RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR ($$)

MCSHARRY’S IRISH PUB ($)

SEAFOOD, STEAKS, & EXTENSIVE WINE LIST 6232 Bon Secour Hwy County Rd. 10. • 949-5086

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) FRESH SEAFOOD FOR OVER 75 YEARS 605 Dauphin St. • 432-4605 6700 Airport Blvd. • 341-1111 1208 Shelton Beach Rd. • Saraland • 442-3335 805 S. Mobile St. • 929-2322

IS THE GAME ON?

ASHLAND MIDTOWN PUB ($-$$) PIZZAS, PASTAS, & CALZONES 245-A Old Shell Rd. • 479-3278

BAUMHOWER’S ($)

WINGS, BURGERS & PUB GRUB 6880 US-90 #14 • Daphne • 625-4695

BISHOP’S ($)

A SOUTHERN GRILL & BAR 3673 Airport Blvd. • 344-2131

BUFFALO WILD WINGS ($) BEST WINGS & SPORTING EVENTS 6341 Airport Blvd. • 378-5955

BUTCH CASSIDY’S ($)

FAMOUS BURGERS, SANDWICHES & WINGS 60 N. Florida St. • 450-0690

CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB ($) BURGERS & BEER 916 Charleston St. • 433-9374

1715 Main St. • 375-0543 BRILLIANT REUBENS & FISH-N-CHIPS. 101 N. Brancroft St. Fairhope • 990-5100

MUG SHOTS ($$)

BAR & GRILL 29740 Urgent Care Dr. • Daphne • 662-9639 6255 Airport Blvd. • 447-2514

GRIMALDI’S ($)

Bel Air Mall • 476-2063

GUIDO’S ($$)

FRESH CUISINE NIGHTLY ON MENU 1709 Main St. • Daphne • 626-6082

HOUSE OF PIZZA ($)

3958 Snow Rd C. • Semmes • 645-3400

LA ROSSO ($$)

COMFORT FOOD 1716 Main St. Ste. C • Daphne • 281-2982

MACARONI GRILL ($$)

SMALL PLATES, PIZZAS, PASTAS & WINE 3250 Airport Blvd. • 450-4556

MARCOS ($)

5055 Cottage Hill Rd. • 308-4888 2394 Dawes Rr. • 639-3535 2004 US 98 • Daphne • 265-6550

MELLOW MUSHROOM ($)

BURGERS, DOGS & 27 BEERS & WINES. 19992 Hwy.181 Old County Rd. Fairhope • 281-2663

PIES & AWESOME BEER SELECTION 2032 Airport Blvd. • 471-4700 5660 Old Shell Rd. • 380-1500 29698 Frederick Blvd.• Daphne • 621-3911

LUCKY’S IRISH PUB ($)

MIRKO ($$)

OLD 27 GRILL ($)

IRISH PUB FARE & MORE 3692 Airport Blvd • 414-3000

WEMOS ($)

WINGS, TENDERS, HOTDOGS & SANDWICHES 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-5877

MAMA MIA!

BUCK’S PIZZA ($$)

DELIVERY 350 Dauphin St. • 431-9444

CORTLAND’S PIZZA PUB ($-$$) GREAT PIZZA. LUNCH & DINNER 4356 Old Shell Rd. • 342-0024

GAMBINO BROTHERS ($) HOMEMADE PASTAS & SANDWICHES 873 Hillcrest Ave. • 344-8115

GAMBINO’S ITALIAN GRILL ($) ITALIAN, STEAKS & SEAFOOD 18 Laurel Ave. • Fairhope • 990-0995

PASTA & MORE 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-6611

NAVCO PIZZA ($$)

PIZZA, SUBS & PASTA 1368 ½ Navco Rd.• 479-0066

PAPA’S PLACE ($$)

A TASTE OF ITALY. BYOB. 28691 U.S. Highway 98 • 626-1999

PINZONE’S ITALIAN VILLAGE ($$) AUTHENTIC ITALIAN DISHES 312 Fairhope Ave. • Fairhope • 990-5535

RAVENITE ($)

PIZZA, PASTA, SALAD & MORE 102 N. Section St. •Fairhope• 929-2525

PIZZERIA DELFINA ($) PIZZA & PASTA 107 Dauphin St. • 375-1644

ROMA CAFE ($-$$)

PASTA, SALAD AND SANDWICHES 7143 Airport Blvd. • 341-7217

ROMANO’S MACARONI GRILL ($$)

QUAINT MEXICAN RESTAURANT 5556 Old Shell Rd. • 345-7484

TAMARA’S BAR & GRILL ($)

MARIA BONITA AGAVE BAR & GRILL ($-$$)

3250 Airport Blvd. Springdale Mall• 450-4556

WINGS, PO-BOYS, BURGERS 210 Eastern Shore Center, Hwy. 98 • 929-0002

TRATTORIA PIZZA & ITALIAN ($$) ITALIAN FOOD & PIZZAS 11311 US HIghway 31 Spanish Fort• 375-0076

VIA EMILIA ($$)

HOMEMADE PASTAS & PIZZAS MADE DAILY 5901 Old Shell Rd. • 342-3677

MEXICAN CUISINE 3977 Gov’t Blvd. • 660-4970

OLÉ MI AMIGO ($-$$)

HEARTY MEXICAN FARE 736 holcombe Ave.• 473-0413

POOR MEXICAN ($)

3050 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-7433

MAGNOLIA HOUSE ($$-$$$) FINE DINING, SEAFOOD AND STEAKS

FLAVORS BUFFET ($-$$) ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET

IP CASINO:

850 Bayview Ave. Bilox • 888-946-2847

THIRTY-TWO ($$$) SEAFOOD, STEAKS, WINE

TIEN ($-$$)

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

HIGH TIDE CAFÉ ($)

CASUAL & RELAXING, EXTENSIVE MENU

OLÉ MI AMIGO!

ROOSTER’S ($)

ISLAND VIEW:

TASTE OF MEXICO 5452 Hwy 90 W • 661-5509

LATIN AMERICAN FOOD 211 Dauphin St. • 375-1076

TAQUERIA MEXICO ($-$$)

BEACH BLVD STEAMER ($)

AZTECAS ($-$$)

CAFÉ DEL RIO ($-$$)

MOUTH WATERING MEXICAN FOOD 1175 Battleship Pkwy • 625-2722

CINCO DE MAYO ($) MEXICAN CUISINE 260 Azalea Rd. • 375-1095

DAUPHIN ST. TAQUERIA ($)

ENCHILADAS, TACOS, & AUTHENTIC FARE Ok Bicycle Shop • 661 Dauphin St. • 432-2453

EL MARIACHI ($)

763 Holcombe Ave • 473-0413

FUEGO ($-$$)

OUTSTANDING MEXICAN CUISINE 2066 Old Shell Rd. • 378-8621

HACIENDA SAN MIGUEL ($-$$) TASTE OF MEXICO 880 Schillinger Rd. S. • 633-6122 5805 US 90 • 653-9163

LA COCINA ($)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE 800 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-0783 830 W I65 Service Rd. S • 378-5837 4663 Airport Blvd. • 342-5553

LOS ARCOS ($)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FLAVOR 3733 Airport Blvd. • 414-4496

NO GAMBLING CASINO FARE BEAU RIVAGE:

875 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 888-952-2582

BR PRIME ($$-$$$)

3300 W. Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 877-774-8439 SEAFOOD

CARTER GREEN STEAKHOUSE ($$-$$$) RICH TRADITIONS, STEAK, SEAFOOD

C&G GRILLE ($)

LARGE BREAKFAST, LUNCH OR DINNER MENU

PALACE CASINO:

158 Howard Ave. Biloxi • 800-725-2239

FINE DINING ESTABLISHMENT.

MIGNON’S ($$$)

BURGER, WINGS, PIZZA

PLACE BUFFET ($-$$)

EXOTIC CUISINE AND SUSHI

STACKED GRILL ($-$$)

COAST RESTAURANT ($-$$) JIA ($-$$)

STALLA ($$)

ITALIAN COOKING

STEAKS, SEAFOOD, FINE WINE INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

BURGERS AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

TERRACE CAFE ($)

TREASURE BAY:

HARD ROCK CASINO:

THE DEN ($-$$)

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, LATE NIGHT

777 Beach Blvd.Biloxi • 877-877-6256

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) SEAFOOD

HARD ROCK CAFÉ ($)

AMERICAN FARE & ROCKIN’ MEMORABILIA

1980 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 800-747-2839 INTIMATE & CASUAL WITH DAILY SPECIALS

CQ ($$-$$$)

ELEGANT ATMOSPHERE & TANTALIZING ENTREES

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LOUNGE WITH COCKTAILS & TAPAS MENU

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EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE SOUTHERN FAVORITES BUFFET

HARRAH’S GULF COAST:

280 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 288-436-2946

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SEND LISTINGS TO LISTINGS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

A p r i l 1 3 , 2 0 1 7 - A p r i l 1 9 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 23


CUISINE THE DISH

Egg-xactly what you need to do with Easter eggs BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

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SOME FANCYPANTS CLAIM STEAMING YOUR EGGS WILL MAKE THEM EASIER TO PEEL. I’VE NEVER DONE IT, BUT I RECKON YOU’D HAVE TO CHANGE THE NAME FROM HARD-BOILED.” argument over vinegar and tablets versus muddled foliage, but I will say my mom, Khaki, makes the prettiest Easter eggs by using one simple trick. For a fantastic look she buys brown eggs. All the colors Paas can ever dream up look so much better a little darker and slightly subdued on the brown shell. There’s a certain Easter basket on a specific table that is full of these classic-looking beauties. I will miss them this year. Growing up we always got to write our names on the white eggs with white crayon before dyeing. It felt special having my personal touch, and these are things that keep kids in the kitchen. We also went through that phase of plastic sleeves. Those shrink-wrap egg huggers were cool in the 1980s but were out of style by the time we could buy jeans with holes in them. I remember they were hard to unwrap when you wanted to eat one, and you didn’t get the cool color tint under the peel like with the dyed ones. This year’s trend is classic pastels and black, if you can find it. Once the hunt is over and the kids are in their mid-chocolate

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Photo | Wikimedia.org

would say we eat a moderate amount of eggs in this household. I have enough friends with chickens that my fridge stays fairly stocked with farm-fresh eggs. Although “perimeter shopping” is the best way to eat right, I rarely have to hug that back wall of the grocery store to actually pay for eggs. Here we are at Easter time with eggs on the brain, so let’s take a look at all we can do with the incredible edible. First off, how are you boiling your eggs? I’ve done it many ways. I’ve started with cold water, brought them to a rolling boil, taken them off the heat and covered them for 12 minutes. However, when I need to do multiple batches of eggs this proves difficult. The easiest method is to start with boiling water and ease those eggs in. Reduce the heat to a good simmer and cook for about 13 minutes. When you extract them from the water they should not look wet. The moisture will disappear within a second or two. Some fancypants claim steaming your eggs will make them easier to peel. I’ve never done it, but I reckon you’d have to change the name from hard-boiled. Dyeing eggs is your own problem. I’m not getting into an

With Easter just around the corner, it’s time to perfect your technique for turning out perfectly boiled eggs. buzz, you are faced with the (welcomed) problem of too many boiled eggs. What is a boy to do? If you intend to eat them, take care to refrigerate them before and after hiding them. Refrigerated boiled eggs may last about a week. Get to cooking something before they expire. The first thing that comes to mind is, of course, deviling the eggs. There are millions of recipes, but if I could keep mine close to the ones at Noble South that are topped with caviar, I’d be happy. I do others with great results, too, but I have a simple rule: for deviled eggs you may use only Hellman’s, Duke’s or Blue Plate mayonnaise, no exceptions. Oh, yeah, and try to use the paprika sparingly. You probably have some leftover ham the day after Easter. If so, a ham-and-egg pie is a must. This oft-forgotten dish was a favorite of my childhood. It’s really perfect if that April cold snap we always get falls just after Sunday. I’ve given a recipe in the past. If you’re finding one on the web, keep it simple. Egg salad is a lunch box pleaser. We’ve already discussed the mayonnaise rule. The secret ingredient (if there is such a thing) in good egg salad is often mustard. If you don’t have fancy Dijon, then straight yellow will do. It’s just a squirt or two, don’t let the volume match the Duke’s. Maybe you cut out the mustard altogether and replace it with Sriracha — not for the faint of heart. The other options are the crunch. If you want egg salad that is smooth and creamy, then by all means keep it boring. I used to enjoy it with a little sweet pickle relish like chicken salad. Green

onions are great for egg salad. Celery is also a common addition to the dish. A little parsley or fresh dill can make a sandwich sparkle. Have you noticed that all these additions are the same color? Pickle them. That’s right. Don’t be afraid to pickle the boiled eggs. There is an odd stigma associated with pickled eggs. Maybe because we’ve seen them in giant jars in convenience stores next to cigarettes and cash registers all over the country. If you’ve never sat in a shady dive of a bar with ceilings almost as low as the lights and stared at a gallon-sized glass vessel of eggs suspended in a uniquely pink solution until you mustered up the courage to try one with a Budweiser, then you and I are likely not very good friends. The pickled egg is a delicacy. Making your own isn’t very hard. The key is to make sure your sterilize your jars and lids for maximum staying power. If done properly and refrigerated, pickled eggs can last over three months. The pink hue comes from beet juice. Take it or leave it. Think about all the things boiled eggs make a little better. Potato salad sucks without them, no matter which grandma is making it. Both need the eggs. Tuna salad demands eggs, in my opinion. Boiled egg in giblet gravy is spectacular. Heck, just peel them and eat them with a little salt and pepper. Whether you are using white, brown or Roy G. Biv, take the time next week to do something worthwhile after all that chicken went through. I’m hungry enough I’m going to boil some right now.


A p r i l 1 3 , 2 0 1 7 - A p r i l 1 9 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 25


CUISINE | THE BEER PROFESSOR

Don’t be a sourpuss BY TOM WARD/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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WORD OF MOUTH

Dream Dinners expands to Daphne BY ANDY MACDONALD There’s good news for Daphne residents who are pressed for time in the kitchen. Dream Dinners, the originator of the mealassembly industry, has signed a franchise deal with Ken Kleban of Kleban Properties to open a store in Daphne by this summer, with a long-term goal of continued development along the Gulf Coast. The new facility is expected to open at 1539 U.S. Highway 98, Suite 202. Founded in 2002, Dream Dinners promotes the family dinner by making it easier on the chief cook and bottle washer. Guests choose from seasonal, rotating menus and prep their dinners in the store to cut down on the legwork. They say a guest can plan out a month’s worth of meals in about an hour. “Dream Dinners was a natural fit for

strong — with a grapefruit bite — and grows on you, sip by sip. Another very strong sour is Serpent Bite from Atlanta’s Orpheus Brewing. Unlike the Gose Gone Wild, it had a very pale coloring, like a light lager, but with a nice strong flavor. Some of the bigger craft brewers have also put out sours available both on tap and in bottles. Sierra Nevada’s Otra Vez is a gose with strong cactus flavor. I found it dry, and more bitter than sour; I wouldn’t order it again. On the other end of the spectrum is New Belgium’s Tartastic, a lemon ginger sour ale. It is very good — citrusy and refreshing, just right for a hot afternoon. It tastes a bit like a shandy — or even a crisp white wine. Closer to home, a number of Alabama brewers also are putting out some sour beers. Madison’s Blue Pants Gose is very light, with a golden color and no head. It is not overpowering, and while it might be too bland for those who really like sour beers, if you’re new to sours it might be a good one to start with. Birmingham’s Avondale Brewery also puts out a sour ale, the Réunir Farmhouse Tart, and Fairhope Brewing Co. currently has three sour styles: Merlin, Sundown and Tarts & Crafts. Tarts & Crafts is a pale wheat beer with cherry flavors, and my favorite. The color of a blush wine, it is light, but with great flavor. It is widely available in our area, and has recently joined the number of Fairhope brews available in bottles. Enjoy!

us. As a family business we value Dream Dinners’ mission of growing great kids by helping families spend more time together around the dinner table,” Kleban says. “We’re excited to partner with Dream Dinners Mobile owner Stacey Mobley to expand Dream Dinners in Alabama and make a difference in the Daphne community.” The mouthwatering Mobile location he speaks of is at 283 McGregor Ave. S. on the east side of the Pinebrook Shopping Center. Visit dreamdinners.com for more information.

Fresh seafood at the Beau

Coast Seafood and Brew is the latest craze at Biloxi’s Beau Rivage. The new restaurant features more than 40 regional craft beers but the star of the show is the local seafood. In a coastal town regarded for its seafood heritage and deep-sea fishing charters, this new restaurant by MGM

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Photo | Orpheus

hile a sour beer may not initially sound appealing to everyone, I would encourage those of you who have never tried one to take the plunge. If you’ve become accustomed to craft beers that are all about the hops — and more hops — sours will come as a nice change. Light and acidic, sours tend to have a relatively low ABV (usually from 4.5 to 5.5, about the same as a lager), and are often flavored with some type of fruit. The sour beer tradition originated in Belgium, with styles such as lambics and red ales. The most popular German style of sour is a gose, an unfiltered wheat beer. A number of these European varieties can be found in our area, often in 22-ounce or 750ml wine-shaped bottles (often called bombers). In the United States, sours have become increasingly popular with craft brewers, who have taken the style and made it their own, with unique twists. They are still not as widespread as craft IPAs or porters, but more and more pubs — especially those specializing in craft brews, such as Alchemy Tavern and Old Shell Growlers — have sours on tap. One of the best sours I’ve tried — on the excellent recommendation of my server at LoDa Bier Garten — was the wonderfully named Gose Gone Wild Tijuana from Baltimore’s Stillwater Artisanal. It is said to be brewed with blackberries, hibiscus, lime, Mayan sea salt and smoked agave, and looked more like a Cosmopolitan than a beer. I was skeptical of its pomegranate color, but delighted when I tried it, as it was very

SERPENT BITE FROM ATLANTA’S ORPHEUS BREWING IS A DRY-HOPPED, SOUR SAISON, WITH A TART BITE AND NOTES OF ORANGE AND TROPICAL FRUIT.

Resorts International is bringing to life the phrase “dock to table.” “Coast Seafood and Brew presents seafood straight from the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico,” says Executive Chef Kristian Wade, who grew up along the Pascagoula River. “We have talented chefs who understand and specialize in seafood, and using ingredients sourced from local vendors we are proud to showcase this area’s superb coastal cuisine to our visitors.” Expect classic dishes incorporating favorites such as triggerfish, grouper and snapper, or something more daring such as Shrimp Corn Dogs. I’m interested in the expansive oyster selection. Try a few from Murder Point and other Gulf locales as well as the far-reaching flavors of Washington state and British Columbia. Raw, fried or charbroiled, they have it. The casual attire restaurant is open Monday, Thursday and Friday, 5-9 p.m., and

Saturday and Sunday from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.

Krystal opens new location

Krystal is upping its game with new menu items and a new location at 110 S. University Blvd. near PDQ. The small, square burgers have been in the Mobile market for more than 40 years and this new restaurant should have a built-in college crowd. Chicks, pups and even surf and turf are an important part of a higher-learning diet. Don’t forget the breakfast bowls and Sunrisers!

Bishop’s Bar and Grill closed

It was a short run, but Sunday, April 9, was the last day for Bishop’s Bar and Grill on Airport. We always hate to hear of closings. Godspeed to another Airport Boulevard restaurant. Recycle!


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COVER STORY

Governor resigns amid personal, political failures BY LEE HEDGEPETH/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

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hile former Gov. Robert Bentley’s resignation ended what was nearly the first impeachment of a top politician in Alabama history, the cloud of the Republican’s misdeeds will likely loom large in Montgomery for some time to come. Last Friday, the House Judiciary Committee’s special counsel, Jack Sharman, released a 131-page report that is the result of multiple interviews, statements and other evidence collected by the committee totaling thousands of pages. The report and its accompanying exhibits provide an intimate view of the tangled web Alabama’s 53rd governor had woven for himself prior to his formal fall from power.

Capitol crimes and confrontations

Much of the Sharman report details violations of campaign finance law — including two charges to which Bentley eventually pleaded guilty. Those particular allegations involve a loan Bentley made to his own campaign and unlawfully failed to disclose, and a check the 74-year-old politician personally wrote and signed paying a prominent law firm to represent Rebekah Mason — for “legal fees,” according to his own note on the check’s memo line. Despite that free legal representation, though, according to the impeachment committee, “Gov. Bentley and his associates, including Mason, refused to cooperate in any meaningful sense and, indeed, obstructed this investigation.” Obstruction in and of itself, the report notes, is grounds for impeachment. Also laid out in the report is a potentially unlawful contribution by the Republican Governors Association meant to offset costs of a Las Vegas trip attended by Bentley and Mason that included a Celine Dion concert. The report also reveals the overall practice of funding Mason’s work for Bentley, which wasn’t paid for entirely by taxpayers but also involved a shadowy nonprofit called the Alabama Council for Excellent Government (ACEGOV). Through that group, which the governor’s former body man, Ray Lewis, said was formed to “get Rebekah Mason paid,” and through Bentley’s campaign, Mason received close to a half-million dollars in less than two years. Rebekah Mason’s husband, Jon, was awarded the Cabinet-level position as director of Serve Alabama in the governor’s Office of Faith-Based and Volunteer Service, making $91,400 per year, according to online records; but the day after Bentley’s resignation he was fired. When asked, the former First Lady’s then-executive assistant, Heather Hannah, said she was wary of whether Jon Mason’s post was based on merit. “Was Mr. Mason unqualified for that position?” Special Counsel Sharman asked Hannah under oath. “It would be purely my opinion, but yes,” Hannah responded. “He had helped like behind-the-scenes newscasts and conferences with WVUA, which is the local Tuscaloosa station, but to my knowledge had no previous experience, definitely not running a state agency.”

Bow to the throne

In addition to the potential and now confirmed campaign finance crimes, the impeachment committee’s executive exposé includes extensive evidence Bentley used

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law enforcement resources as well as personal and political intimidation to facilitate and cover up his affair with Rebekah Mason, a reality that led to a toxic environment for all those involved. “Gov. Bentley directed law enforcement to advance his personal interests and, in a process characterized by increasing obsession and paranoia, subjected career law enforcement officers to tasks intended to protect his reputation,” Sharman’s report concludes. Then, in page after page, the report sets out a narrative of Bentley allegedly doing just that, particularly in an effort to find and destroy an explicit recording of Bentley and Mason that has since been released. “For example,” page 10 of the report says, “Gov. Bentley directed law enforcement officers to end his relationship with Mason on his behalf; drive to Tuscaloosa to recover a copy of the recordings from his son; drive to Greenville to confront a longtime public servant about whether she had a copy of the recordings; and investigate who had a copy of the recordings and identify potential crimes with which they could be charged.” The report says Bentley eventually backed off any potential investigation of the recording’s origins when law enforcement told him they would follow through any leads to their logical conclusion, even if it led to Bentley family members. “To ensure the silence of his staff,” the report says, “Gov. Bentley encouraged an atmosphere of intimidation. Concern over the recordings appears to have become an obsession.” Handwritten notes by Bentley’s longtime bodyguard, Ray Lewis, reflect that “atmosphere of intimidation”: “... the governor boasted about how he chewed [his scheduler] out in front of [other staffers] and stated that he thinks Stan [Stabler, a top law enforcement officer] heard,” Lewis — who guarded Bentley for years — scrawled in his planner. “He said he wants everyone to know he is not taking any shit and he is in charge.” Lewis wrote he then “said to [Bentley] that he does not want to be accused of trying to intimidate witnesses.” “The environment as far as work has become one of mistrust,” Lewis also noted. “Everyone is afraid to say or mention [Mason] without the possibility of being fired.” And, according to the report, opposition to Mason and Bentley’s relationship truly was a deal breaker for the ex-governor. In part of her testimony to the committee’s special counsel, Heather Hannah revealed just how deep the rifts in the administration really were: deep enough to result in the ousting of the woman who made Bentley Alabama’s unlikely governor — his first campaign manager, Angi Smith. “Angi Smith was relieved of her position in the governor’s office not too long after she discovered the affair,” Hannah testified. “She saw the governor and heard a conversation of the governor with Rebekah. [She] assumed it was Mrs. Bentley because of the private nature of their conversation, and when he hung up the phone she saw it was Rebekah Mason. And she immediately confronted the governor with it, and he got very angry with her and asked her to get out of the car. And so she confronted Rebekah

the next day, and it was my understanding that [Mason] went immediately to the governor and the governor immediately had Angi removed from her position.” On April 8, just days before Bentley’s resignation, Smith tweeted her thoughts. “Lesson from [Alabama politics] is never push away the people that care about you enough to tell you when you are wrong. They save you from yourself.” Smith wasn’t the only political victim of Bentley’s personal affair. Bentley fired then-Alabama Law Enforcement Agency Secretary Spencer Collier after he cooperated with authorities conducting the criminal probe of then-Speaker of the House Mike Hubbard against the governor’s wishes. The Sharman report paraphrases Bentley’s reaction to Collier’s cooperation with law enforcement: “I don’t know why you signed that affidavit. I told you not to. I didn’t want to get in the middle of this trial, and now I’m in the middle of it.” Hubbard was eventually convicted of a dozen felonies. Collier later filed suit against Bentley, claiming he was fired not only because of his cooperation with law enforcement, but also because he refused to facilitate and cover up the governor’s affair with Mason. However, Collier has admitted that prior to being fired, he had followed Bentley’s order to drive to Greenville and confront a government employee suspected of having access to the tape of the governor and Mason. Lewis was also eventually fired after excessive overtime costs approved by the governor for Lewis’ constant watch over the state’s top politician was revealed. Bentley denied approving the overtime and later relieved Lewis of his duties. Lewis — like Collier — filed suit against the governor for wrongful termination. The report also reveals some startling details about the dark working environment that apparently extended well beyond the governor’s staff and well beyond the capitol complex itself. According to a transcript of her testimony, Hannah told Sharman the governor personally confronted her twice over a potential recording of him and Mason, once threatening that she “will never work in the state of Alabama again if you tell anyone about this [affair].” “The second Bentley confrontation of Hannah occurred shortly thereafter when she came face-to-face with Gov. Bentley in the parking lot of the Mansion,” the report says. “Then, Gov. Bentley confronted her about his suspicion that she had bugged his office to listen to conversations between him and Mason. Hannah relates that Gov. Bentley warned her to ‘watch herself,’ that she ‘did not know what she was getting into,’ and that because he was the governor, people ‘bow to his throne.’” Then in June 2016, according to police reports, around the time of her testimony to the Alabama Ethics Commission, Hannah found writing on the windows of her vehicle parked outside her home: “Bitch Die” and “You Will F------ Die.” Later, after Hannah had returned from testifying, someone threw a rock through the front window of her Vestavia Hills home. She reported both incidents to police.

Flim-flam, thank you, ma’am

While a hostile workplace was standard for many, it wasn’t the case for Rebekah Mason herself. “Meanwhile,” the impeachment report says, “Mason enjoyed a favored spot among his staff, exercising extraordinary policy authority.” During the latter part of his tenure, Mason — who the report says was called “flim-flam” by some staffers — served in a position whose job description was personally written by Gov. Bentley. According to Ray Lewis, when legal advisers suggested changes to the description, Bentley rejected them and became agitated. “The political advisor is appointed by and serves at the pleasure of the governor. This person should have excellent written and verbal communication skills, exceptional time management skills with the ability to effectively multi-task, and must be able to coordinate and communicate,” the job description reads. “As an appointee of the governor one should always represent the governor’s office with honor and integrity while at work or away from work.” The report’s appendices show that — indeed — Mason had a wide berth when it came to shaping policy. According to messages between Mason, Bentley and other top officials, the governor’s alleged mistress was apprised of nearly all happenings in the administration, even personally editing press releases, approving social media posts, and making major policy decisions. Lewis, in his lawsuit against Bentley, even claims, “whatever people may say, Rebekah Mason was the


COVER STORY governor of Alabama.” “A stark example of Mason’s control was her role in state budget negotiations in 2015,” the committee’s report says. “Spencer Collier told us that in years past, the budget process was initiated by a meeting with State Finance Director Bill Newton and his staff. At the conclusion of that meeting, Collier would meet with Gov. Bentley to discuss strategies for addressing any potential cuts. However, in 2015, ALEA was required to meet with Mason and Jennifer Ardis to set budget priorities.” That meeting turned out not to be a formality, either. “Collier reported that Mason proposed closing multiple driver’s license offices throughout the state and asked ALEA to put together a plan,” the report continues. “It was Collier’s understanding that Mason intended the plan to be rolled out in a way that had limited impact on Gov. Bentley’s political allies. Collier claims he reported this to the Attorney General’s office because he was concerned about a Voting Rights Act violation.” When the closure of the DMV offices — most in majority-black counties — garnered national criticism for its disparate impact on minorities, Mason personally handled the response by the governor’s office. The closures were eventually halted after the Obama administration’s Department of Transportation threatened to sue over their effect on minorities, particularly in the state’s Black Belt region. Bentley’s preference for Mason over other staffers was continually apparent, the report shows. Ardis, Bentley’s former press secretary who was said to have been “extremely involved in protecting the affair and helping maintain its secrecy,” was on more than one occasion forced to drive to engagements while Mason flew on the state plane. At one point Mason sent a photo of the Birmingham Bowl logo with the text “Are y’all flying or driving?” Mason even, at one point in messages with staffers, appeared to be speaking as the governor’s personal mouthpiece, effectively issuing veto threats: “Let me throw this out there,” she wrote in response to other staffers’ concerns about a particular piece of legislation. “Gov[ernor] is going to veto the thing anyway … ” Mason was also heavily involved in speech writing and reviewing official documents for public consumption. Not only do messages show Mason drafted Bentley’s State of the State address, they also provide insight into her control of documents such as the state flight logs. One version of the logs reviewed by Mason includes edits including the removal of air travel to a John Kasich campaign event in Mobile in lieu of language emphasizing Bentley met with Mayor Sandy Stimpson during the same visit. A Lagniappe reporter at that meeting between Bentley and Kasich confirmed that Mason was also present.

Live free or Dianne Bentley

Some of the other, more salacious portions of

the Sharman report give an inside look at the extent of the ex-governor’s affair and his treatment of the then-first lady. Not only did Bentley send his former wife of 50 years messages meant for Mason (“I love you Rebekah), Dianne Bentley was physically sickened by the whole situation, according to what she told Ray Lewis. “Governor has changed. He is very arrogant and seems to have almost a God complex,” Lewis wrote. “Mrs. B seemed on edge. Mrs. B told me … that she is on the verge of a breakdown. She said she wakes every morning with an upset stomach. She said she is extremely depressed. She said she is taking medication just to make it through the day. She said ‘[Mason] is a whore.’ That is the first time in nearly four years that I have ever heard Mrs. Bentley ever say anything that strong. That’s like saying a cuss word for Mrs. B.” Lewis also said Dianne Bentley believed the then-governor’s treatment of her amounted to abuse. “Mrs. B and I talked about the governor treating her badly because she has low self-esteem and [he] knows that she will not leave. She also said that he emotionally and mentally abuses her and that she is so embarrassed because that is her … platform as first lady.” According to Hannah’s testimony, that sad irony wasn’t lost on the governor, who made a similar observation after a “purple” event raising awareness for domestic violence. “And I believe one of his quotes,” Hannah testified under oath, “was, oh, ‘ironic domestic violence is purple because that’s how you beat a woman black and blue,’ or something, something really terrible like that,” she said. “And Mrs. Bentley told him she felt like she was being a victim of, you know, domestic violence mentally and verbally. And he just laughed her off and said … that’s just your project.” Like Angi Smith, another staffer, Collier Tynes (who Hannah said was hired by Bentley to “keep Dianne busy”), has spoken out since the scandal surfaced — specifically on the issue of domestic violence. “Emotional abuse is real and dangerous,” Tynes tweeted. “Thanks to Mrs. Bentley, Alabama has [Alabama Coalition against Domestic Violence’s new website]. Find out signs of abuse and how to help.” Later, again like Smith, Tynes shared her “lesson” from Alabama politics: “If you throw away integrity to keep your power and influence, you have already thrown away your power and influence.” While she still had a close political hold on Bentley, and while his marriage was crumbling beneath him, Rebekah Mason emailed the governor a statement to be read by Dianne Bentley on her departure as first lady. Mrs. Bentley would indeed go on to divorce the now-criminally convicted former governor. She would never, though, read Mason’s statement.

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S A M P L E B A L L O T O N LY. N O PA P E R B A L L O T S A C C E P T E D T H I S Y E A R . P L E A S E V I S I T V O T E N A P P I E S . C O M T O C A S T Y O U R B A L L O T.

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ART ARTIFICE

Federal budget cuts reach Mobile arts BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

T

he White House released its new federal budget outline a month ago and sparked alarm. In the cultural realm, the proposal — tagged a “skinny” budget — is seen as downright anorexic. The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) would be axed altogether. Each of the 52-year-old agencies received roughly $148 million in the last budget. The 50-year-old Corporation for Public Broadcasting would be privatized. Current appropriations are $445 million annually. NEA money arrives in Mobile mostly through block grants given to the Alabama State Council on the Arts (ASCA). According to ASCA Director Al Head, this funding constituted 16 percent of its $4.7 million annual budget, with the rest coming from appropriations. “That’s not counting the fact it is matched at the local level by a combination of businesses and private contributions and in some cases local government. Our grant monies we allocate are matched at a rate of about 7-to-1,” Head said. Head and others described the government funds as seed money that prompts further private participation. The nod of approval is vital. “Even as far as private donations, they’re inseparable because the city or county in which you reside, if they don’t seem to be having any interest in supporting the arts then neither does the chamber or business community,

because they tend to take their lead from government,” Mobile Opera Director Scott Wright said. Wright said Mobile Opera receives about $10,000 to $20,000 annually — “It’s different every year” — from ASCA. Their entire annual budget is roughly $400,000. “Often [private support or foundations] feel there’s more burden and they don’t want to be left holding the bag or supporting something entirely. So if there’s a withdrawal of government support of any kind, often it’s followed

MOBILE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA RUNS ON A $1.8 MILLION BUDGET. LAST YEAR, $52,400 OF THAT WAS FROM THE ASCA.” by a withdrawal or reduction in private support,” Mobile Museum of Art Director Deborah Velders said. Mobile Symphony Orchestra runs on a $1.8 million budget. Last year, $52,400 of that was from the ASCA. “We don’t have anything else that consistent on the operating side,” MSO Director Celia Mann Baehr said. “The city does give us another $20,000. Then there’s the state license tag grant that is $3,000 or so every few years.”

Get into the act at MMoA

Admission is $10; tickets can be purchased from any member, at the door or online at gofundme.com/pcmc10. Other rewards are also available online as part of the chorus’ efforts to raise $1,000 for its anniversary. More information about the chorus is available at its Facebook page or portcitymenschorus.org. You can also email info@portcitymenschorus.org.

Exploreum summer camps announced

The Gulf Coast Exploreum’s (65 Government St.) weeklong summer camps begin May 29 and continue a 15-year tradition of making sure each child has a unique opportunity for fun while engaging in science and exploring new challenges. Programs are for an array of ages, from 4 to 14, and cover a Men’s chorus marks a decade universe of topics. Music, biology, space exploration, chemThe Port City Men’s Chorus will celebrate its 10th anniistry, forensics, engineering, geology, paleontology — it’s all versary with a special show on Saturday, April 15, at 6 p.m in Bernheim Hall at the Ben May Public Library (701 Government available for the most curious of growing minds. Classes fill fast. The class descriptions and rates can be St.). The volunteer community chorus is one of only two Azalea found at exploreum.com/education/camps. City men’s choruses and usually holds about three shows a year.

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Jazz Festival poster contest

The Gulf Coast Ethnic & Heritage Jazz Festival is seeking a design for its 19th annual event, set for Aug. 7-12. A cash prize of $300 goes to the winning entry. The contest is open to all artists and limited to one entry each. Entries must be: • An original, unpublished two-dimensional work by the submitting artist depicting a jazz theme; • In any medium; • Include the words “Gulf Coast Ethnic & Heritage Jazz Festival” and “Mobile, Alabama,” as well as the year, “2017”; • 24 inches high by 18 inches wide; • Mounted on white foam core; • Received at the Mobile Arts Council, 318 Dauphin St., Mobile, AL 36602 by May 15 with a completed entry form. For further information on entries and forms, contact Raoul Richardson at drraoulrichardson@outlook.com.

ARTSGALLERY

Mobile Museum of Art (4850 Museum Drive) welcomes the Joe Jefferson Players for an evening dedicated to theatrical pursuits. On Thursday, April 13, at 6 p.m., JJP Executive Director Jason McKenzie will discuss the history of community theater and the midtown-based troupe, one of the oldest in the state. After the discussion, Baker High School FAME Academy Director of Theatre Studies Eric C. Browne will lead an improvisation exercise. For more information about the event, call Elizabet Elliott at 251-208-5200.

Baehr said there’s another $10,000 from the county that comes through Mobile Arts Council. She also listed private funding from sources including Wind Creek Casinos, Alabama Power, Regions Bank, Volkert Inc. and the Daniel, Bedsole and Larkins foundations. “[Bedsole Foundation Director] Chris Lee has said when the cuts from the city emerged, their requests increased exponentially. That has spread out across the businesses and individuals,” Baehr said in reference to previous publicsector crunches. Baehr also named programs MSO utilizes, such as composers-in-residence or The League of American Orchestras, which exist because of NEA funding. Federal money has also bolstered MSO education programs. ASCA said Alabama is 19th in per capita funding for state arts agencies. The Washington Post estimated 54 percent of NEA block grants go to low-income areas, which is a lot of rural Alabama. “It gives us the opportunity to go into schools and communities that are very much underserved, where they don’t have a lot of other dollars. They don’t have access to as many private resources as Birmingham, Montgomery, Mobile, Huntsville,” Head said. “I don’t want anyone to think any of the arts organizations in Mobile, that ‘they’re fine, they’ll just go someplace else.’ We’re already going ‘someplace else.’ We need that, too,” Wright cautioned. Head is also on the board for the Alabama Humanities Foundation and fears it would be hit even harder with the NEH zeroed out. He estimated 80 percent of its budget relies on NEH funding. “They fund everything from films to Museum on Main Street to lectures and programs for teachers and students. If NEH were to be abolished it would be hard for the Alabama Humanities Foundation to survive,” Head said. Wright is hopeful. He foresees Capitol Hill as a savior of sorts. “I predict the NEA survives but in a truncated state. I think there are people who are invested enough in those things to say ‘Wait, if we just kill this off then we have no mechanism to deal with it in a better time. Let’s at least keep it so we have a skeleton crew to work with in the event things improve and we can fund it better.’ Resurrection is harder than revival,” Wright said. “People don’t remember the real estate deals necessarily or the plumbing issues of ancient cultures, but they do know those cultures by their art. It’s the part that lives the longest and has our dreams and aspirations embedded in the art itself. It tells others who we are,” Velders said.


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FEATURE

MUSIC

Photo | hissgoldenmessenger.com

BAND: DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS, HISS GOLDEN MESSENGER THURSDAY, APRIL 13, WITH DOORS AT 7 P.M. SOUL KITCHEN, 219 DAUPHIN ST., WWW.SOULKITCHENMOBILE.COM TICKETS: $25 ADVANCE/$30 DAY OF SHOW; AVAILABLE AT VENUE, ITS WEBSITE, MELLOW MUSHROOM (BOTH LOCATIONS) OR BY CALLING 1-866-777-8932

Southern powerhouses share Soul Kitchen stage

D

M.C. Taylor of Hiss Golden Messenger is touring in support of “Heart Like a Levee,” released last October.

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

rive-By Truckers and Hiss Golden Messenger will share the Soul Kitchen stage Thursday evening in support of recent albums that are true personal testaments. Hiss Golden Messenger will open the show with tracks from the band’s latest release on Merge Records, “Heart Like a Levee.” The band is a platform for the versatile compositions of frontman/guitarist M.C. Taylor. From track to track, this singer-songwriter gracefully walks many different stylistic paths. “Heart Like a Levee” seamlessly shifts between folk, rock and alt. country with a little groove courtesy of “Like a Mirror Loves a Hammer.” Taylor even gives a nod to the Gulf Coast with the album’s Dylanesque opener, “Biloxi.”

“I would say that I really like that part of the country,” Taylor said. “I’m drawn to the water and the history of that place, and I don’t know why that is. I’m fascinated by that particular part of the South. There are a lot of different Souths. The Biloxi area is one that I’m fascinated with, for some reason or another.” Taylor penned the songs during an intense period of transition in which he traded the 9-to-5 world to pursue his musical endeavors. During this time, a snowstorm forced the band to seek haven in a hotel room for a few days. This downtime forced Taylor to review recent events in his life, with thoughts of losing upcoming shows due to the storm acting as a backdrop. “It gave me a lot of time to think, and think long and hard about the path [being a full-time musician] that I was about to set out on,” Taylor said. “No shows meant no money at the time. I think that I obviously did not take the decision to play music full-time lightly. When you are counting on making a certain amount of money, and it’s taken away, it makes you face something kind of scary.” While some of these thoughts brought uneasiness, other thoughts gave Taylor self-assurance. He says this dedication to his art was a chance to for his children to “understand their father as a man in love with his world and the inventor of his own days.” This testimony is rooted in Taylor’s view of his parents. The songwriter admits he had a “really good upbringing” by parents who were happy people. However, he was haunted by their lack of passion and consummation when it came to “what they did.” Taylor hopes his children will learn the power of having passions and letting them fill every part of daily life. “I think that approach to life is powerful,” Taylor said. “I like for my kids to see that their dad is able to put something into the world that affects people in a positive way.” Anyone wanting Taylor to provide details as to the inspirations behind his songs might be disappointed. He feels his songs should be subject to

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personal interpretation, and will be the first person to encourage listeners to find their own interpretation of the album. He says he would rather leave his listeners with more questions than answers. Taylor says he feels people need to take comfort in throwing a “question out into the cosmos without having an answer.” “I’m not trying to teach anybody anything,” Taylor explained. “That’s one thing that I have to be careful of. I always want to be clear that I’m not trying to dispense wisdom. I just have a particular language that I use to describe certain things.” After Hiss Golden Messenger’s testimony, one of Alabama’s most enigmatic rock outfits will take the stage. Since 1996, the Drive-By Truckers have been the musical ambassadors of the New South. Cuts from their latest album, “American Band,” will no doubt be heard by their Soul Kitchen audience. A flashback to the Drive-By Truckers’ early days, “American Band” is filled with stellar rock anthems crafted for listening environments ranging from the barroom to the back roads. Members Patterson Hood and Mike Cooley shared songwriting duties for “American Band,” which began with their last release “English Ocean.” Hood likens Cooley’s songs to an untapped source of musical gold he has known existed for years. “I can’t wait to hear Cooley’s next song,” Hood said. “I’ve been that way since he started writing songs. I probably could be his biggest fan. For years before he ever admitted to writing songs, I would kinda get onto him and say, ‘Man! You should write songs! You think like a really good writer.” This album also reflects a concept repeated throughout the Drive-By Truckers’ catalog. Hood says many songs on 2001’s “Southern Rock Opera” were set in the late ‘70s. The songs on their 2004 album “The Dirty South” were set during the Reagan era. For this album, the Drive-By Truckers are focusing on the “here and now.” Hood has made this album the personal testimony of a Southern liberal in a time when the

rest of the nation sees the South as exclusively conservative. When news of the album and its concepts first hit the public, Hood says, the band received some “nastiness on Facebook,” which was ignored. He explains the political and social messages echoing through “American Band” are nothing new to the Drive-By Truckers’ music, but this album sends the message a little more directly than previous releases. “I grew up in Alabama, but I grew up around liberals,” Hood said. “We’re a minority and will probably always will be a minority in the South. It’s been very rare that I’ve voted for somebody that won and even rarer that I’ve voted for anyone that won in my home state. That’s been part of the dynamic. My dad was a Jesse Jackson supporter in 1988. You can imagine how many guys in Culver County voted for Jesse Jackson in 1988.” Even so, Hood wasn’t sure how the public would react to the album’s tracks, especially on tour. However, Hood says “American Band” has been the band’s “best received record ever.” The album has received great reviews. Hood says their shows in Europe were one of their best runs through the area, with one performance in London selling out a 3,000-seat venue. “I’ve been really pleased,” Hood said. “I didn’t know how it would be received. You never know what other people are gonna think about it, until you get out there and play it and work it.” Hood says he has enjoyed watching this album make people think, and hopes its messages lead others to become more empathetic. While he enjoys the sociopolitical messages of “American Band,” he also wants listeners to remember Drive-By Truckers is still a rock outfit, and “American Band” definitely delivers on that level, maintaining the hard-driving, raw Southern rock that has been pleasing the masses from the beginning. “I’m really proud of this record on a lot of different levels, including that it sounds good blasting through a car stereo driving down the road,” Hood said.


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MUSIC BRIEFS

Back from The Dead

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

Band: Bob Weir & the Campfire Band Date: Wednesday, April 19, with doors at 7 p.m. Venue: Saenger Theatre, 6 S. Joachim St., www.mobilesaenger.com Tickets: $40-$98, available at Saenger box office and through Ticketmaster

Photo | Paradigm Talent Agency | Bob Weir

T

wo years ago the Grateful Dead, one of rock ‘n’ roll’s most legendary bands, bid farewell to its legion of dedicated fans. Deadheads continue to get their live musical fix through the surviving members, including vocalist/guitarist Bob Weir, who is bringing songs from his latest release, “Blue Mountain,” to the Jewel on Joachim. Judging from the music on the new release, this recipient of the Grammy Lifetime Achievement award has provided Deadheads with an excellent addition to the Grateful Dead’s already extensive legacy. Weir uses each track on “Blue Mountain” to wrap his listeners in a warm embrace. The album is also a beautiful demonstration of musical honesty, both lyrically and instrumentally. From the Grateful Dead to his band RatDog, “Blue Mountain” offers a perfect mix of Weir’s musical career with its collection of undeniably Americana tracks that portray him as a modern-day cowpoke troubadour. In addition to his live show, Weir is also giving concert-goers a little lagniappe of his own. Every ticket order will include a downloadable copy of “Blue Mountain.” This show also features a “special fan experience,” with an autographed vinyl copy of “Blue Mountain,” premium seating and concert merchandise.

Uptown punk you up Bands: Future Hate, Natural Causes Date: Thursday, April 13, 8 p.m. Venue: The Merry Widow Tickets: $8, available at the door

The Merry Widow will explode Thursday night with the heated sounds of two underground powerhouses. Mobile’s Future Hate will make its presence known on The Merry Widow stage. In recent weeks this local group has been touring Japan, giving the Land of the Rising Sun a dose of rage through wide distribution of its album “Potboiler.” In a world where mainstream has nearly overtaken punk rock, “Potboiler” comes from an underground band that refuses to surrender. A taste of the album can be found on Bandcamp. Natural Causes hail from the fringes of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, the area that gave birth to bands such as Flat Duo Jets and Southern Culture on the Skids. The classic garage punk sound of Natural Causes shows no mercy yet maintains a beguiling attitude.

Feeling horny?

Band: Blackwater Brass Date: Friday, April 14, 10 p.m. Venue: The Brickyard, 266 Dauphin St., 251-219-6488 Tickets: Call for more info

The Lagniappe New Southern Music and Mobile Bay showcases were the epicenters for the newest music at SouthSounds 2017 — including Blackwater Brass, which traveled from Ocean Springs, Mississippi, to introduce their Gulf Coast style of funky grooves to the Azalea City. Blackwater Brass represent a new school of Deep South brass sounds, bringing this classic musical style into the modern age. While its music is a definite nod to the Crescent City, where the band is based, Blackwater Brass has set themselves apart with their energetic brass sound. Those who venture to The Brickyard should be ready to party: Blackwater Brass maintains an infectious energy throughout their set. This brass powerhouse has no problem transmitting aural energy to their audience, who will no doubt also note their versatility. While funk and jazz run along their sound’s foundation, Blackwater Brass demonstrate their originality with songs such as “Strawberry Jam” with a euphoric jam that plummets into an onslaught of horns.

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AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | April 13 - April 19

THUR. APRIL 13

Bluegill— Tim Kinsey Blues Tavern— Vickie Bailey & Friends, 8:30p Brickyard— Ben Jernigan and Company Dority’s Bar and Grill— Lee Yankie Felix’s— Jeri Flora Bama— 100 Dollar Car, 9:30p// Christina Christian, 2p/// Destiny Brown, 5p//// Dueling Pianos, 5:30p//// Mark Sherrill, John Joiner & Chris Newbury, 6p//// Jay Williams Band, 10p//// Brian Hill Trio, 10:15p Hangout— Continuum Live Bait— Brandon Styles, 7p Lulu’s— Adam Holt, 5p Manci’s— Ross Newell, 7p May Day Park— Emily Stuckey,11:30a McSharry’s— Rock Bottom, 7:30p Old 27 Grill— Two Suzy’s, 6p Saenger— A Chorus Line Soul Kitchen— Drive By Truckers, Hiss, Golden Messenger, 8p Wind Creek Casino— No Idea, 9p

FRI. APRIL 14

All Sports Bar & Billiards— DJ Markie Mark, 10p Big Beach Brewing— El Dub, 6p Bluegill— Lee Yankie, 12p// Cary Laine Duo, 6p Blues Tavern— Fat Lip, 9p Brickyard— Blackwater Brass Callaghan’s— Trade Day Troubadours Dority’s Bar and Grill— Eric Erdman Felix’s— Grits N Pieces Fin’s— The Regulators, 8p Flora Bama— Tim Kinsey, 1p// Lea Anne Creswell Duo, 2p/// Logan Spicer, 4p//// Jack Robertson Show, 5:30p//// Big Muddy, 6p//// Davis Nix, 6p//// Johnny Barbato Trio, 6p//// Chris Bryant Duo, 9p//// Lee Yankie and the Hellz Yeah, 10p//// Ryan Balthrop Trio, 10:15p//// Soul Circus Cowboy, 10:30p Hangout— Yeah Porbably Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Radio Inc., 9p IP Casino— Kathy Griffin, 8p Listening Room— Dankia Holmes ft. Jeb Hart Live Bait— Brandon Styles, 7p Lulu’s— Jeri, 5p Main Street Cigar Lounge— Category 4, 8p Manci’s— Modern Eldorados, 7:30p McSharry’s— DJ Tiger, 10p

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Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Ole River String Band, 8p Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Alexander Wilkerson, 6p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Charles E. Wilson Duo, 6:30p O’Daly’s— Gene Murrell, Tony Edwards and David White, 10p Old 27 Grill— Jamie Anderson, 6:30p Soul Kitchen— Muscadine Bloodline, Rexton Lee, Ryan Dyer, 10p Wind Creek Casino— No Idea, 9p Windmill Market— Emily Stuckey,11:30a

SAT. APRIL 15

Alchemy— The Arbitrary w/ Jurassic Shark, 10p Big Beach Brewing— John Martin Davis Band, 2p// Southern Fired Voodoo, 6:30p Bluegill— Brandon Bailey, 12p// Bust Trio, 6p Blues Tavern— Half Way Show and Band, 9p Brickyard— Infant Richard and the Delta Stones Callaghan’s— Great Peacock Dority’s Bar and Grill— Harrison McInnis Trio Felix’s— Matt Neese Duo Fin’s— The Captain Jerry Smith Band, 8p Flora Bama— Al and Cathy, 1p// Jay Hawkins Trio, 1p/// Big Muddy, 2p//// LeaAnne Creswell, 2p//// Sean Casaway, 4p//// Zachery Diedrich Duo, 5p//// Jack Robertson Show, 5:30p//// Jezebel’s Trio, 6p//// Mary Sarah, 8p//// Brian Hi;; Duo, 9p//// River Dan Band, 10p//// Foxy Iguanas Trio, 10:15p//// Soul Circus Cowboys, 10:30p Hangout— Yeah Porbably Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Radio Inc., 9p Listening Room— Grayson Capps w/Corky Hughes Lulu’s— Light Travelers, 5p McSharry’s— DJ Carter, 10p Moe’s BBQ (Foley) — Shelby Brown, 6p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Stephen Sylvester Duo, 6:30p Old 27 Grill— Lonesome Mel, 6:30p Pirates Cove— El Dub, 5p River Shack— Pearls of Trinity U.S.A., 8p Top of the Bay— Lee Yankie & the Hellz Yeah Wind Creek Casino— Mickey Utley, 9p

SUN. APRIL 16

Big Beach Brewing— Broken Down Car, 3p

Bluegill— Quintin Berry, 12p// Jamell Richardson, 6p Blues Tavern— John Hall Trio, 6p Brickyard— Jake Buford Dority’s Bar and Grill— Fat Man Squeeze Felix’s— Jimmy Lumpkin Flora Bama— Smoky Otis Trio, 12p// Mary Sarah, 1p/// Songs of Rusty, 1p//// Albert Simpson, 2p//// Dave McCormick, 2p//// Mel Knapp, 5p//// Jezebel’s Chill’n, 5:30p//// Perdido Brothers, 6p//// Whyte Caps, 10p//// Logan Spicer and Tony Ray Thompson, 10:15p Frog Pond— Willie Sugarcapps, 3p Hangout— Luke Langford & 331 South Lulu’s— Delta Reign Duo, 5p McSharry’s— Trad. Irish Session, 6:30p Old 27 Grill— Barry Gibson, 11:30a

MON. APRIL 17

Felix’s— Bryant Gilley Flora Bama— Founders and Friends, 2p// Cathy Pace, 6p/// Zachery Diedrich, 8p//// Petty and Pace, 10:15p Lulu’s— Brent Burns, 5p Old 27 Grill— Marty McIntosh, 6p

TUE. APRIL 18

Bluegill— Mobile Big Band Society Butch Cassidy’s— Jerry Powell Felix’s— Bobby Butchka Flora Bama— T. Bone Montgomery, 2p// Perdido Brothers, 6p/// Al & Cathy, 8p//// Tim Kinsey Duo, 10:15p The Intracostal— Brent Burns Lulu’s— Albert Simpson, 5p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Lefty Collins, 6p

WED. APRIL 19

Bienville Sqaure— Phil and Foster, 11:30a Bluegill— Ross Newell Brickyard— Nick and the Ovorols Callaghan’s— Phil and Foster Felix’s— Tropic Flyer Flora Bama— Neil Dover, 2p// Rhonda Hary and Jonathan Newton, 6p/// Logan Spicer, 8p Listening Room— Gene Evaro Jr. Lulu’s— Albert Simpson, 5p Manci’s— Manci’s Antique Roadshow, 6p Saenger— Bob Weir and the Campfire Band


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FILMTHE REEL WORLD Kidman is queenly but dull in new Herzog film

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BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

AREA THEATERS AMC MOBILE 16 785 Schillinger Rd. S. (251) 639-7373 CRESCENT THEATER 208 Dauphin Street (251) 438-2005 HOLLYWOOD STADIUM 18 1250 Satchel Paige Dr. (251) 473-9655

erman auteur Werner Herzog delivers a stately biopic in “Queen of the Desert,” which is straightforwardly conventional almost to the point of satire. From the obvious soundtrack to all the times star Nicole Kidman writes in her diary and her voiceover explains the plot to us, this true story of British explorer Gertrude Bell and her passion for the deserts of the Middle East is a perfectly nice film, but hardly what one expects from the director of “Grizzly Man.” The film opens with Kidman as Gertrude Bell, a headstrong young woman whose parents, like all aristocratic, cinematic parents, are trying to get her married. They encourage her to hide her intellect to attract a man, and she says she won’t play dumb. Kidman is a beautiful woman, but at 49 she is difficult to accept as someone so much younger. After referring to several incidents from her (extremely distant) childhood, they relent to her pesky independent and intellectual nature and permit her to go abroad.

Soon she falls in love with diplomat James Franco, who I officially cannot take seriously. Their courtship takes them exploring the beautiful landscape and reciting poetry to one another; she has finally found a man worthy of her, but her parents do not agree. His tragic death catapults her into a series of repetitive excursions into the desert in search of Bedouins and artifacts and whatnot. All the self-important male numbskulls she meets inquire why in God’s name she wants to traipse about out there, and you find yourself asking the same thing. It’s not clearly defined, and her flowery explanations are rather thin. Although she comes to find a purpose and eventually becomes a valuable advisor to the British, her reasoning has an “Eat, Pray, Love” vibe, and she even describes herself as a “woman who misses her man.” “Queen of the Desert” is a lovely, beautifully shot and costumed, but dull film, and Kidman is undeniably good in it. She is every inch a queen, to be sure, and radiates intelligence, not to mention posture, in every scene. You feel like

you’re watching a rote period film on television, but with an inexplicably starpowered cast. Robert Pattinson shows up as T. E. Lawrence, aka “Lawrence of Arabia”; his is one of many quietly wellplayed scenes with Kidman. Damien Lewis plays another of the men worthy of Bell’s attention, and their star-crossed feelings have flashes of interest, only to give way to more swooning voiceovers, love letters read aloud and dreamy, drippy montages. The film trafficks heavily in traditional imagery and stock scenes — Herzog took a story of a revolutionary woman and made it stodgy and predictable. The film isn’t bad, but I must admit longing for it to end. This is why people hate period pieces. On the other hand, if you’re an unabashed fan of the “Dear Diary” style of film set in a bygone era, and you just really want to watch such a film, or of you really like camels or Nicole Kidman, “Queen of the Desert” is serviceable, romantic and inoffensive. “Queen of the Desert” is now playing at the AMC Mobile 16 and is also available to stream.

AMC JUBILEE SQUARE 12 6898 U.S. 90 Daphne, (251) 626- 6266 CARMIKE CINEMAS 23151 Wharf Ln. Orange Beach (251) 981-4444 COBB THEATRES PINNACLE 14 3780 Gulf Shores Pkwy Gulf Shores (251) 968-7444 EASTERN SHORE PREMIERE CINEMA 14 30500 Alabama 181 #500 Spanish Fort, Al (251) 626-0352 Information accurate at press time; please call theaters for showtimes.

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Photos | IFC Films / Universal Pictures

FROM LEFT: “Queen of the Desert,” featuring Nicole Kidman, is a lovely, beautifully shot and costumed but dull film. A recognizable cast led by Dwayne Johnson and Vin Diesel returns for the eighth installment of the “Furious” series. NEW IN THEATERS FATE OF THE FURIOUS

Now that Dom (Vin Diesel) and Letty (Michelle Rodriguez) are on their honeymoon, Brian and Mia have retired from the game and the rest of the crew has been exonerated, the globetrotting team has found a semblance of a normal life. But when a mysterious woman seduces Dom back into a world of crime he can’t seem to escape, the crew will face trials testing them as never before. All listed multiplex theaters.

RIFFTRAX LIVE: SAMURAI COP

A live, never-before-seen riffing on the beloved z-grade action film of the early ‘90s, “Samurai Cop.” Regal Mobile Stadium 18

THE CASE FOR CHRIST

Based on the true story of an award-winning journalist who, working to disprove the newfound Christian faith of his wife, begins chasing down the biggest story of all time — with unexpected, life-altering results. Cobb Pinnacle 14, Regal Mobile Stadium 18, AMC Mobile 16, AMC Jubilee Square 12

NOW PLAYING

All listed multiplex theaters. KONG: SKULL ISLAND SMURFS: THE LOST All listed multiplex VILLAGE theaters. All listed multiplex LOGAN theaters. All listed multiplex GOING IN STYLE theaters. Crescent Theater, all listed THE SHACK multiplex theaters. All listed multiplex THE BOSS BABY theaters. All listed multiplex GET OUT theaters. All listed multiplex GHOST IN THE SHELL theaters. All listed multiplex CHIPS theaters. Eastern Shore Premiere LIFE Cinema, Cobb Pinnacle 14, All listed multiplex Carmike Wharf 15 theaters. JOHN WICK: POWER RANGERS CHAPTER 2 All listed multiplex Regal Mobile Stadium 18, theaters. BEAUTY AND THE BEAST Carmike Wharf 15


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CALENDAR OF EVENTS APRIL 13, 2017 - APRIL 19, 2017

CRAWFISH IN THE COURTYARD MUDBUGS, MUSIC AND MORE! DON’T MISS OUT ON AN EVENING OF ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT CRAWFISH AND BEER, PLUS ADMISSION TO THE EXPLOREUM’S EXHIBITS. THE EVENT IS TUESDAY, APRIL 18, FOR AGES 21 AND OLDER. THE EXPLOREUM IS AT 65 GOVERNMENT ST. MORE INFORMATION AT WWW.EXPLOREUM.COM. Photo | www.exploreum.com

GENERAL INTEREST MobTown Movies: “Moana” Thursday, April 13, 7:30 p.m. Langan Park, 4850 Museum Drive. Presented by city of Mobile. MobTown Movies: “Star Wars: The Force Awakens” Friday, April 14, 7:30 p.m. Medal of Honor Park, 1711 Hillcrest Road. Presented by city of Mobile. Mobile Pops Join the Mobile Symphonic Pops Band Saturday, April 15, as it begins its 40th concert season with a spring concert at Cottage Hill Medal of Honor Park, 1711 Hillcrest Road. Visit themobilepops.com. Fairhope Walking Tours Join Fairhope History Museum Director Donnie Barrett for a walking tour of Fairhope on Saturday, April 15, at 10 a.m. at the Fairhope Colony Cemetery.

Saturday, April 15, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. The museum is located at 24 N. Section St., next to the Fairhope Welcome Center. For more information, call 251-929-1471. Sunrise service at Bellingrath At Bellingrath Gardens and Home on Easter Sunday, guests are invited to a special sunrise service on Live Oak Plaza. The service will begin at 6:30 a.m. and is open to all. Call 251-973-2217. Sunrise service at Fort Gaines The service will be on the great lawn within the walls of Fort Gaines on Dauphin Island. Free admission will be given to guests from 6- 7 a.m. Fine forgiveness Return your overdue books, DVDs, audiobooks and any other library-owned material to the libraries in Baldwin County through April 15 and all fines will be forgiven. Call 251-970-4010.

Easter in the Squares Saturday, April 15, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. The day starts in Bienville Square with activities and and an Easter egg hunt, then ends in Cathedral Square. Call 251-434-8498.

IANDS meeting The International Association of Near Death Studies meets second Wednesday of every month at the West Regional Branch of the Mobile Public Library on Grelot Road at 6 p.m.

Satsuma Blossom Festival The Fairhope Museum of History will again host the Satsuma Blossom Festival,

Brown Bag in Bienville Every Wednesday through May 5, join friends in Mobile’s Bienville Square from

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11:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. for lunch and live music. Cancer Support Groups The third Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of every month, ostomy, GYN and cancer support groups meet. Call 770312-8638 for ostomy and 251-445-9802 for GYN. Dauphin Island Boardwalk Talks Boardwalk Talks are held the first and third Wednesday of each month at 11:15 a.m. at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab, 101 Bienville Blvd. Call 251-861-2141. Midtown Optimist Club Join Midtown Optimist Club every Wednesday at noon for lunch at Azalea City Golf Course. Call 251-348-3542.

Exploreum’s exhibits. The event is Tuesday, April 18, for ages 21 and older. The Exploreum is at 65 Government St. More information at www.exploreum.com. “Taste of Rotary” The Point Clear Rotary Club is hosting “Taste of Rotary” Tuesday, April 18, at the Fairhope Civic Center, 6 p.m. All money raised goes back into the community. Call 251-454-0921.

ARTS “A Chorus Line” Thursday, April 13, 7:30 p.m. at the Saenger Theatre. Presented by University of Alabama’s College of Art & Sciences, Department of Theatre & Dance. For more information, visit theatre.ua.edu.

Toastmasters Do you want to deliver a speech like a pro or gain leadership skills to advance your career? Toastmasters International meets regularly at six locations in Mobile and Baldwin counties. Visit www.toastmasters. org for more information.

Documentary screening University of South Alabama will be screening “Cowspiracy,” Thursday, April 13, 5 p.m. at Marx Library, Study Room 0181; email hdail@southalabama.edu.

FUNDRAISERS

Tea for Two Tuesday afternoons at 2 p.m. the Fairhope Museum of History hosts a tea with a lecture on Fairhope history. April 18 speaker will be Stephen McNair, Ph.D., historic preservation consultant. Call 251929-1471.

“Crawfish in the Courtyard” Mudbugs, music and more! Don’t miss out on an evening of all-you-can-eat crawfish and beer, plus admission to the

MUSEUMS


“Windows to the Sea” Dauphin Island Sea Lab announces a permanent exhibit at the Estuarium, “Windows to the Sea.” Visit disl.org.

Fitness classes New fitness classes are in progress at Palmer Pillans Middle School. To register or for more information, call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com.

“Shipwreck! Pirates and Treasure” Dance classes A new, highly interactive exhibit at GulfQuest features more than 500 authentic New dance classes are in progress at Palmer Pillans Middle School. To register or artifacts recovered from deep-ocean for more information, call 251-463-7980 or shipwrecks. Visit www.gulfquest.org. go to communityactivities.com. “Christenberry: In Alabama” On the occasion of Alabama’s Bicentennial Celebration, this exhibit honors artist William Christenberry’s exploration of themes related to his native state. Mobile Museum of Art, 4850 Museum Drive. Through June 4. Call 251208-5200.

Ballroom dance Azalea Ballroom Dance Club hosts dances the second and fourth Tuesday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Via Health, Fitness & Enrichment Center, 1717 Dauphin St. Email cyoungblood9278@gmail.com, call 251623-9183 or visit azaleaballroomdanceclub. com.

“Faces of Africa” The History Museum of Mobile exhibit “Faces of Africa: A Mystical View of Tribal Heritage” runs through Monday, July 31. Call 251-208-7420.

Ballroom dance The Moonlight Chasse Ballroom Dance Society hosts dances the first and third Monday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Hot Wheels Skating Rink in Daphne. Email cassief13@aol.com.

“Drugs: Costs and Consequences” The Gulf Coast Exploreum Science Center and the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration team up to present a powerful interactive exhibit of the effects of drugs on individuals and society. Through August. Visit exploreum.com. Fairhope’s founding There is quite a story behind Fairhope’s founding in 1894. Learn more at the Fairhope Museum of History, 24 N. Section St. The museum is open daily (except Sunday and Monday) from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 251-929-1471. Little Discoveries “Outside the Box,” aimed at children 6 and under, explores how innovation and creativity can lead to a world of possibilities, starting with a simple cardboard box. Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Call 251-208-6893 or email jholland@ exploreum.com. Thursdays at MMoA Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., the Mobile Museum of Art offers free admission to all visitors. No reservations are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive. Call 251-208-5200.

SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES Mobile BayBears The Mobile BayBears are back in action at Mobile’s Hank Aaron Stadium. This week the team hosts the Jackson Generals for a five-game home stand April 12-16. Call 251-479-BEAR. Tai Chi Beginner Tai Chi classes are being offered in Stirling Hall (behind All Saints Episcopal Church, 151 S. Ann St., Mobile) every Saturday from 10 a.m. to noon. Classes may be joined at any time. Email rjvarley@ comcast.net. Bridge lessons The Mobile Bridge Center offers free bridge lessons each Tuesday at 6 p.m. at 1510 University Blvd. Arrive a few minutes early to register. Call the Bridge Center at 251-666-2147, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

PUBLIC MEETINGS Police Citizens Advisory Council Councilman C.J. Small announced the Police Citizens Community Relations Advisory Council will meet Thursday, April 13, at 6 p.m. in District 3 at the Greater Mt. Carmel Missionary Baptist Church, 1305 Rev A T Days St. (near the corner of Michigan Avenue and Duval). Mobile Finance Committee Councilman Joel Daves announced the Finance Committee will meet Thursday, April 13, at 2 p.m. in the Council Conference Room on the 9th floor of the South Tower in Government Plaza. Baldwin County Commission: First and third Tuesday at 8:30 a.m., 322 Courthouse Square, Bay Minette. Work sessions are the second and fourth Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. rotating between Bay Minette, the Foley Satellite Courthouse, the Fairhope Satellite Courthouse and the Baldwin County Central Annex Building in Robertsdale. www. baldwincountyal.gov Baldwin County Planning Commission: First Thursday at 6 p.m., 22251 Palmer St., Robertsdale, www.baldwincountyal.gov. Bayou La Batre City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 5:30 p.m., 13785 S. Wintzell Ave., www.cityofbayoulabatre.com. Chickasaw City Council: Second and fourth Tuesday at 7 p.m., 224 N. Craft Highway, 251-452-6450. Citronelle City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6:30 p.m., 19135 Main St., 251-866-7973. Creola City Council: Second and fourth Thursday at 6 p.m., 190 Dead Lake Road, #A, 251-675-8142. Daphne City Council: First and third Monday at 6:30 p.m., 1705 Main St. Work sessions are the second Monday of each month at 6:30 p.m., www.daphneal.com. Dauphin Island Town Council: First and third Tuesdays at 7 p.m., 1011 Bienville Blvd., www.townofdauphinisland.org. Elberta Town Council: Third Tuesday of each month at 6 p.m. in the town hall. Workshop meeting on the second Tuesday. townofelberta.com. Fairhope City Council: Second and fourth Monday at 6 p.m., 161 N. Section St. Work sessions are held before each council meeting at 4:30 p.m., www.cofairhope.com. Fairhope Planning Commission: First Monday at 5 p.m., 161 N. Section St. For more information visit www.cofairhope.com. Foley City Council: First and third Monday at 5:30 p.m., 407 E. Laurel Ave. Work sessions begin at 4 p.m., www.cityoffoley. org. Gulf Shores City Council: Second and fourth Mondays at 4 p.m., 1905 W. First St., www.gulfshoresal.gov. A p r i l 1 3 , 2 0 1 7 - A p r i l 1 9 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 47


MEDIA MEDIA FRENZY

WPMI lands ‘Best Newscast’ Abby

BY ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

L THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE INITIAL DESCRIPTION BY JERRY MICCOLIS / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Ascribes, with “up” 7 Title film character played by Tyler Perry 12 Hails 19 Showy gymnastics maneuver 20 Togalike Roman cloak 22 In an attentive manner 23 SWAN 26 Crunchy green vegetable 27 Profitable 28 Sportscaster Johnson 29 Show up 31 Wet blanket? 33 They contain libidos 34 MARS 43 Largest city of Yemen 44 French region now part of the Grand Est 45 Ally (with) 46 Hershey product similar to a Heath bar 47 Part of a domain name 49 Gists 51 Foreboding atmosphere 55 ATLAS 60 Fixed fee 63 Spa sound 64 “Once in Love With ____” 65 Objectivist Rand 66 Fat-substitute brand 67 Pride-parade letters 69 Self-referential 71 Fifth-century pope dubbed “the Great” 73 An evergreen 74 Martinique, par exemple 75 Exist 76 Musical instruments that lie flat 78 TRIO 84 Jose ____ (tequila brand) 85 ____ the Explorer 86 Chapel Hill sch. 87 It’s a long story 91 Squealed 93 Really bothers 96 Drew useful material from 97 OKAY 101 Fiery end? 103 ____ es Salaam 104 Of a heart chamber 105 Direct 108 Stop, in sailor’s lingo 112 Shudder of emotion 117 WASP 120 Opening letters? 121 One of the Wahlbergs 122 One way to pay 123 Introversion 124 Idol worshiper

125 Yoga poses

39 Land next to Peru: Abbr. DOWN 40 Obligation 1 Musical Mama 41 Drop a line, say 2 Cut 42 Raise 3 Something delivered by 47 Banned insecticide a diva 48 Desdemona’s husband, 4 Droopy in opera 5 Capital of Uganda 50 Candidate’s goal 6 Nearly out? 52 Bobby of the Black 7 Gullet Panthers 8 Second first lady 53 Stephenie who 9 Foolish oldsters wrote the “Twilight” series 10 K thru 12 54 Periodic table figs. 11 King who spoke at Ken56 Actor Holm nedy’s inaugural ball 57 Where cultures thrive? 12 Lugs 58 Horse bit 13 Samuel Adams, e.g. 59 Wonder Woman 14 Rich supply is one 15 Natl. Guard counterpart 60 City, but not county, 16 Small, as Beanie Babies leader? 17 1961 title role for Charlton 61 Yale of Yale University Heston 62 La ____ (notre planète) 18 A comic called Wanda 68 Neuter 21 Burglar frightener 69 Med. scan 24 ____ Nui 70 Poetic time (Easter Island) 71 Stop: Abbr. 25 Mooers’ mouthfuls 72 That life evolves, to Darwin 30 Muse of lyric poetry 74 Pressed 32 Flight of fancy 75 Apothegm 34 Publisher’s pile: Abbr. 77 Global sports org. 35 ____ Park, Ill. 79 German for “first” 36 Commercial 80 Cole Porter’s “Well, Did lead-in to Caps You ____?” 37 “____ Boom-De-Ay” 81 Actress Anderson 38 Certain house … or house 82 They may match presidendressing tial administrations

83 Train 88 Nonspecific amount 89 Mild exclamation 90 Supplemental work for actors 92 Golden ____ (General Mills cereal) 94 Winter Olympics activity 95 Willa Cather’s “My ____” 96 Bad-mouths 97 Writer who coined the term “banana republic” (1904) 98 Drab songbird 99 Airport amenity 100 Realm chronicled by C. S. Lewis 101 ____ expected (predictably) 102 1991 Wimbledon champ Michael 106 Ghostbuster Spengler 107 ____ Préval, two-time president of Haiti 109 Say further 110 Brandy grade, briefly 111 Volcano at the meeting point of the African and Eurasian plates 113 Pet-protection agcy. 114 White House spokesman Spicer 115 Greek peak 116 Some degrees 118 Bad start? 119 Col.’s superior

ANSWERS ON PAGE 53

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ate last month when the Alabama Broadcasters Association handed out its annual “Best in Broadcasting Awards,” dedicated to honoring the year’s best in television and radio, our local TV news stations took home a few prestigious awards. As the battle for ratings supremacy rages on between Mobile’s three television stations, WPMI-TV — long considered the upstart to “legacy” stations WKRG-TV and WALA-TV — landed two impressive “Abbys,” as the awards are known. The biggest of those was “Best Newscast in Alabama,” the contest’s premier award. Local15 also took home another one of the biggest awards when reporter Christian Jennings’ coverage of police shootings in Baton Rouge won the “Best Hard News Story” Abby. The story was unusual in that Jennings broadcast from Baton Rouge. “We are grateful to be recognized by our peers for this outstanding recognition for our news coverage, and we will keep fighting to earn the respect and trust of our viewers in the MobilePensacola market,” said Robert Totsch, general manager/market director for Mobile-Pensacola. “We are committed to our viewers by alerting and protecting, along with being a watchdog for the people. A recent example of this commitment came on the morning of April 3. During one of the first severe weather events of the spring we stayed with storm coverage to its conclusion. During the height of the storm our competitors broke away for paid programming and food segments on a lifestyle show.” WKRG-TV took home three Abbys — the most of any local station. Reporter J.B. Biunno was recognized as the state’s top reporter. He also helped WKRG take home the “Sports Reporting” Abby for his interview with Pensacola-based boxing legend Roy Jones Jr. and a look back at the controversial 1988 Olympic boxing champi-

onship, where it is widely acknowledged Jones was “robbed” of a gold medal because of rigged judging in favor of the host country’s boxer. And the station’s chief meteorologist, Alan Sealls, won the “Weather Anchor” Abby, adding to his evergrowing box of accolades. WALA-TV’s Kati Weis took home the “Best Investigative Reporter” Abby for her story, “Fox10 New Investigates: Testing the Waters, Part 1 and Part 2.” In this report, Weis tested water from local water systems and public parks, and also got results from both Baldwin and Mobile county schools’ testing of some of their older facilities. While the overwhelming majority of the testing showed no problems locally, Weis did discover one house in Bayou La Batre with a lead level twice the legal limit. The Abbys were awarded Saturday, March 25, at the Hyatt Regency in Hoover.

More awards

JJPR, a Daphne-based public relations firm, recently took home five Medallion Awards, including “Best of Show,” from the Public Relations Council of Alabama. The awards ceremony, recognizing outstanding work in the PR field, was held April 4 in Birmingham. JJPR won “Best of Show” and a Medallion Award for work done for the Haint Blue Brewing Co. in Mobile. The agency also received an award for work done with Baldwin County Economic Development, Children’s of Alabama and Innovation PortAL. “We’re honored to be able to produce awardwinning work for our clients,” said JJPR President Jennifer Jenkins, APR. “Our clients inspire us — the collaboration and partnership we have with them drives our creativity and desire to help them succeed.”


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SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

BayBears open 2017 campaign with many changes BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

T

Carlyle’s name may sound familiar to BayBear fans, as he was part of Mobile’s Southern League championship in 1998. He posted a team-best 14-6 record with an earned run average of 3.38 that season. Carlyle spent nine seasons as a pitcher in the majors.

New players

Fasano named his top starting pitchers at the media luncheon. The right-handed hurlers are Tyler Carpenter, Osmer Morales, Luis Diaz and Jordan Kipper. The remaining pitchers are Cody Buckel, Abel De Los Santos, Jon Fitzsimmons, Eric Karch, Ronnie Muck, Chris O’Grady, Eduardo Paredes and Brandon Peterson. Paredes, a 22-year-old from Venezuela, is listed as the Angels’ No. 16 prospect by MLB Pipeline. He was on the Angels’ 40-man roster before being optioned to Mobile in March. New coaches Other pitchers on the prospect list are De Los Santos In addition to fresh faces on the field, there is also a (19), Morales (21) and Kevin Grendell (23). Grendell is new group of coaches, led by manager Sal Fasano. starting the year on the 7-day disabled list. “I am thrilled to have the opportunity to work with Just as the season started, left-hander Greg Mahle was him,” Morgan said. “He played in assigned to the BayBears staff. He the majors for 11 years, and was pitched in 24 games with the Angels well respected. last season. In a corresponding move, “Jeff Pearlman of ESPN gave right-hander Alex Klonowski was him an enormous compliment. He placed on the 7-day disabled list. said, ‘When I think of Sal Fasano, Behind the plate are Jose Briceno THE 21ST SEASON OF however, I think of greatness. Not and Wade Wass. This is a homecomMINOR LEAGUE BASEBALL of Willie Mays or Ted Williams ing for Wass, who grew up in Pengreatness, but of a uniquely excellent sacola and played at the University of HAS ARRIVED AT HANK human being who, were class and Alabama. decency the most valued standards of Fasano said he is fortunate all of AARON STADIUM. a career, would be the easiest Hall of his infielders can play two or three HOWEVER, IT WAS NOT A Fame inductee of all time.’” different positions. David Fletcher is Fasano has been coaching for No. 11 on the Angels’ prospect list. CELEBRATION OF THE PAST He is joined by Andrew Daniel, Zach seven seasons. Named the Eastern League’s Manager of the Year in AT THE MOBILE BAYBEARS’ Houchins, Hutton Moyer, Angel Rosa 2011, he has spent the last two years and Luis Tejada. MEDIA LUNCHEON. as pitching coordinator for the ToThe final Top 30 prospect is outronto Blue Jays. fielder Caleb Adams (28). Sharing the “I am so happy to be here,” said outfield with him are Forrestt Allday, Fasano, as well known for his Fu Bo Way and Zach Welz. Manchu mustache as for his playing skills. “I think the “My goal is not to see these guys for the whole year,” minor leagues are the purest form of baseball. You are so Fasano said. “I want to get them promoted soon. close to making it to the big leagues, but you haven’t been “We are going to put a good product on the field. I can changed by all the money and prestige.” guarantee you will see a lot of hustle.” Completing his staff are hitting coach Ryan Barba, pitching coach Buddy Carlyle, assistant coach Ryan SeWelcome additions bra, athletic trainer Matthew Morrell and strength coach Morgan said he is very pleased with the upgrades to Adam Auer. The Hank, particularly a new drainage system and sod.

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Photo | Lagniappe

he 21st season of minor league baseball has arrived at Hank Aaron Stadium. However, it was not a celebration of the past at the Mobile BayBears’ media luncheon. Those connected to the organization made an effort to point out everything new going into the 2017 campaign. The biggest change, by far, is the switch to a different Major League parent club. After spending the previous 10 years with the Arizona Diamondbacks, the BayBears are now the Class AA farm club of the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim. Mobile will remain a member of the Southern League. “This is a big change for everyone,” Chris Morgan, BayBears general manager, said. “The Angels had their Class AA for 20 years in Arkansas. At least 10 of our guys played there last year with the Travelers.”

BAYBEARS MANAGER SAL FASANO COMES TO MOBILE WITH SEVEN YEARS OF COACHING EXPERIENCE, MOST RECENTLY WITH THE TORONTO BLUE JAYS. “We lost a lot of games to inclement weather last year,” Morgan said. “We had a massive amount of rain on the first day the team arrived. By the time they were ready to take the field that night to practice, there was not a single puddle.” Other improvements include 1,300 new grandstand seats (the rest will be replaced before the 2018 campaign), field-level public address speakers, a digital scoreboard and field-level netting to protect fans. “We may be the first stadium in the minors to protect 100 percent of our fans from line drives,” Morgan said. “We had about a dozen people hit in the last few years. This gives us all peace of mind. “We could not have done all this work without the support of our City Council and the mayor’s office. I would like to thank council members John Williams, Fred Richardson, Levon Manzie and C.J. Small for being here today to see the results.”

Special nights

Weekly promotions will continue this season and include Sunday Fun Day, Every Monday Matters, 2 for Tuesday, Dollar Dog Wednesday, Thirsty Thursday, Wind Creek Friday Night Fireworks and Autonation Saturday Night. There will be an additional fireworks show after the game on Tuesday, July 4. Other special events include Star Wars Night on May 6, Santa Claus Night on July 22, Halfway to Mardi Gras Night on Aug. 5 and Fan Appreciation Night on Sept. 2. Visit www.MobileBayBears.com for more information. The BayBears started their season last week on the road at the Chattanooga Lookouts. The home schedule begins Wednesday against the Jacksonville Jumbo Shrimp at 6:35 p.m. There will be 70 home games through Labor Day, Sept. 4. For ticket information, call 251-479-BEAR (2327).


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STYLE GARDENING

Not your grandmother’s daylilies BY PEGGY WRIGHT/MOBILE COUNTY MASTER GARDENER/COASTALALABAMAGARDENING@GMAIL.COM

Q: I would like to try my hand at daylilies and need some advice. A: You have picked a happy and generous perennial to try. My

advice is: Go for it! The first thing most of us picture when someone mentions daylilies is our grandmothers’ common single, orange daylilies blooming around old home places — even in ditches. But those happily fertile and prolific ancestors have produced, with a little help from man, thousands of combinations of color, shape and size, now available to the home gardener. Modern daylilies range from frilly doubles to miniature forms, spider forms, those with picotee (contrasting color bands) petals and other striking variations. It is estimated between 300,000 and 500,000 new daylily varieties are grown each year in the United States alone. More than 50,000 varieties of daylilies are registered, with 1,650 new daylilies introduced into commerce each year. Rather overwhelming, isn’t it? Daylilies are beautiful, low-maintenance perennial flowers with a long tradition in our gardens. They are a member of the Hemerocallis genus, which comes from the Greek words for “beauty” and “day.” In fact, most flowers do open for just one day, but what a lesson in enjoying the moment! Even better, there are now reblooming varieties. Most flowerscapes hold numerous buds opening in succession for weeks. Colors include almost every tint of the rainbow except true blue and pure white. Daylilies range in height from 8 inches to 5 feet, with blooms from 2 inches to 8 inches and varieties available that bloom early season, midseason or late season to extend performance. Most of the daylilies we see today are either diploid or tetra-

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ploid. The earliest daylilies were all diploids, which simply refers to a plant having two sets of chromosomes, one from each parent in each cell. Tetraploids have four sets of chromosomes from each parent in each cell, offering the variety of richer colors, new patterns, distinctive edges and eyes (ring at the top of the throat of the blossom), heavier texture, better sun, disease and insect resistance, and increased stamina. Our grandmother would be surprised to know today’s daylilies can be classified as dormant, semi-evergreen, or evergreen. Daylilies can survive, even thrive, with little care. They adapt to a wide range of soil, water and light conditions and are relatively resistant to insects and diseases. Daylilies flower best with 6 hours of direct sunlight daily, but can perform in light, partial shade. Give them well-drained, porous, slightly acidic soil high in organic matter. They do not tolerate constantly wet feet so if your soil is heavy clay, consider constructing raised beds, incorporating organic matter to improve drainage. The best time to plant daylilies in our coastal zone 8 is early spring or very late fall. Containerized daylilies can be removed from the pot and planted so the soil level is slightly higher than the surrounding soil in the bed. If you have divided plants, build a soil mound in the hole and spread the roots out over the mound, then backfill to the same level the plant originally grew in. To plant bare-root plants, first trim off the top one-third of the leaves into a fan shape to reduce transplant stress, then proceed as you would with plant divisions. Most cultivars can be planted 18 inches apart. Daylilies will multiply for many years without much attention, but when they bloom only around the outside bed edge, divide them. Late fall or early spring is a good time here, and a garden fork is the best way to lift up a clump and divide it.

Although daylilies are very tolerant of dry conditions, they do need extra water when first planted until they become established, during extremely dry periods and during flowering. Mulching with pine straw, pine bark or leaves will conserve moisture and control weeds. While daylilies are relatively pest- and disease-free, thrips, spider mites, aphids, slugs or snails may damage the plants. If these pests are present, choose an insecticide or organic control suitable for daylilies. If your plants develop rust, bronze-colored splotches on the leaf straps, use an appropriate fungicide. You can find a wealth of information online at the website of the American Hemerocallis Society,daylilies.org/AHSFAQsNew. html. Once established and happy, daylilies will produce — and reproduce — for years to come. Sit back and enjoy the show.

YOU ARE INVITED TO THESE UPCOMING GARDENING EVENTS What: Mobile Master Gardeners Lunch & Learn When: Monday, April 17, noon to 1 p.m. Where: Jon Archer Center, 1070 Schillinger Road N., Mobile Topic: Container Herb Gardens with Laurie Ibsen-Reeves What: Mobile Master Gardeners monthly meeting When: Thursday, May 11 Where: Jon Archer Center, 1070 Schillinger Road N., Mobile Topic: Creating a Backyard Bird Habitat with Martha Terry


STYLE HOROSCOPES ARIES WAS ACTUALLY ANXIOUS ABOUT THIS HARMLESS HOROSCOPE ARIES (3/21-4/19) — Your Medicaid claim for pigeon toes will be rejected because they’re the result of your own free will. Your barstool at Hayley’s will be occupied by at least two sorority girls. Someone will playfully “boop” you on the nose and you won’t be amused. Your lucky Easter egg contains Johnson’s Foot Soap®. TAURUS (4/20-5/20) — With the start of youth baseball season, you’ll add parents everywhere to your prayer list. With three weekly practices and games every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday, anyone raising two Dixie boys has likely died on the inside. Your lucky Easter egg contains less money than you’d hoped. GEMINI (5/21-6/21) — After watching a viral video of a passenger being forcefully removed from a United Airlines flight, you’ll help another airline capitalize by suggesting a new slogan: “Delta: We’ll never hurt you on purpose.” Your lucky Easter egg contains a smaller, more secular egg. CANCER (6/22-7/22) — You’ll get kicked off a flight for refusing to wear pants, your rationale being ultimate comfort. That won’t fly on the airline without designated seats. You’ll book on Delta with no problems. Your lucky Easter egg contains a brand-new pair of Zubaz. LEO (7/23-8/23) — You’ll write letter after nasty letter in hopes of preventing a remake of “Dune” from happening. Your lucky Easter egg contains a copy of the first season of “Doctor Who” on DVD. Don’t worry, it’s larger than it looks on the inside. VIRGO (8/24-9/22) — Working on an Easter egg hunt at your office, you’ll mix up the kids’ eggs with the adult-themed eggs. You won’t realize the mistake until the boss’s 4-year-old slurs his speech more than normal. Your lucky Easter egg contains more Easter eggs, like a Russian matryoshka doll. LIBRA (9/23-10/22) — Hungover from a night of whiskey and “The Detour,” you’ll try to accumulate enough stamina to run in a charity fundraiser. You’ll most definitely throw up, something you hate to do. Your lucky Easter egg contains all the booze. SCORPIO (10/23-11/21) — On behalf of the state, you’ll write a compassionate letter to Gov. Kay Ivey explaining that the people of Alabama wouldn’t mind footing the bill if she wants to buy all new furniture for her office at the Capitol. Your lucky Easter egg contains an unborn chicken. SAGITTARIUS (11/22-12/22) — You’ll employ the holy ordination you earned online and host a Easter sunrise service. You’ll baptize the gathering of vagrants with water from your birdbath. They just came for a free breakfast. Your lucky Easter egg contains a single cashew. CAPRICORN (12/23-1/19) — Your eccentric Google searches this week will include images for “waxy earbuds” and videos for “humane euthanasia.” You’ll be momentarily concerned when your car sputters, but likely not concerned enough. Your lucky Easter egg contains leftover Christmas candy. AQUARIUS (1/20-2/18) — A long joke on the new Louis C.K. Netflix special hits especially hard and forces you to re-evaluate your life. In response, you’ll begin writing a passionate email to the comedian, before realizing what a horrible idea that really is. Your lucky Easter egg contains common sense. PISCES (2/19-3/20) — Things will get testy after your in-laws get involved in a home improvement project. It’ll be important to remember good help is hard to find, and there is no way to hit someone with a hammer and avoid jail. Your lucky Easter egg contains white guilt.

ANSWERS FROM PAGE 48

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STYLE BOOZIE

SouthSounds delivers another perfect weekend BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

Sounds in the South

SouthSounds is a weekend that continues to amaze me! Every year the event grows and becomes more popular. Again this year, LoDa Artwalk was scheduled to be in conjunction with SouthSounds as well as Engaging the Next Generation. Needless to say, Friday night was hopping! SouthSounds kicked off with Sweet Crude in Cathedral Square and the party didn’t end until Sunday night with All Them Witches at The Merry Widow. Boozie is going to have to hire more spies to keep up with everything next year! So many bands, so little time! The bands my spies did catch, they said, did not disappoint. One spy said as always, The Underhill Family Orchestra was great! She also mentioned she was digging Joelle Grace’s attire! Not everyone can pull off high-waisted and wide-leg pants like she can. That wasn’t the last we’d see of The Underhill Family Orchestra, Saturday they and She Returns from War did a secret pop-up show at Hayley’s! Umm, how come I am never around for this? Hayley’s was a hot spot this past weekend even though they had few bands on their schedule. After The Wild Feathers’ great set in Cathedral Square Saturday night,

they were spotted at Hayley’s and LoDa Bier Garten! Last week’s cover star, Big Freedia, put on quite the show at The Merry Widow. Boozie hears it was crazy! I’m kicking myself for missing it. One spy said it was the best show of the year. I’m told Big Freedia’s backup dancers were some of the best. I wonder if they offer dance lessons? I must admit, Big Freedia is a diva after my own heart. First off, she wore white on white, which is a personal fave — not to mention she wore with it with gold sneakers. She even performed Beyonce’s “Formation,” one of my favorite songs. Ugh, I’m kicking myself for missing out! Rounding out SouthSounds, JoJo Hermann from Widespread Panic performed with his side project, JoJo’s Slim Wednesday, in Cathedral Square on Sunday, which was great. Later that evening he surprised everyone by sitting in with The Marcus King Band! Oh, I can’t forget to mention Yeah, Probably won both the Mobile Bay and New Southern Music Showcases. The grand prize was a pretty sweet deal — time in Studio H20 with the incomparable Rick Hirsch, Callaghan’s gift card, gas gift card AND they get to play at the Hard Rock in Biloxi! I just love how SouthSounds brings everyone, including artists, together! Let the countdown to the next music festival in Mobile begin! Looking at you, TenSixtyFive!

Twerking around town

A woman has been spotted twerking all over Mobile. She was first spotted at the corner of Airport Boulevard and Schillinger Road, twerking under a sign. Then she was

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Photo | Daniel Anderson

I

believe ol’ Mother Nature deserves a pat on the back or high five or something. She has been killing it with the weather here recently! I almost feel like we aren’t in Alabama, with all the cool nights and perfect days Before it gets too hot and starts raining every afternoon, kick back with a cold drink in one hand and Boozie’s words in the other and enjoy the finer things in life!

BIG FREEDIA AT SOUTHSOUNDS 2017. spotted the next day at the intersection of Cody Road and Old Shell Road, back at it. It is said she’s twerking for Jesus and her tax return. Both are good reasons to dance. Apparently, this lady is known as The Twerking Granny. Boozie must admit Granny’s got moves, though I am not sure if her booty is real or not. We may never know!

Congrats

Congrats are in order for radio personality Matt McCoy. Matt and his girlfriend, Stephanie, got engaged last Thursday! If you remember, Matt was voted “DJ whose voice leads you to believe you may want to see HIM naked” back in 2015 for the Nappies. You may recall when Matt accepted his Nappie, he did a little dance involving a trench coat being opened to reveal Matt in a full nude bodysuit with a leaf over one part. I’m sure Stephanie knows what she’s in for, but for all you Nappie voters, y’all missed the chance to see him “naked”! Well, kids, that’s all I’ve got this week. Just remember, whether rain or shine, dramatic or scandalous, or just some plain ol’ SouthSounds lovin’, I will be there. Ciao!


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com HELP WANTED LANDSCAPE & FOREMAN WORKERS NEEDED FOR FULL TIME POSITIONS IN MOBILE COUNTY. EXPERIENCE PREFERRED. PAY WILL DEPEND ON EXPERIENCE. CONTACT TURFMASTER LANDSCAPE 251-645-5811. Lagniappe HD April, 13, 20, 27, May 4, 2017

PROBATE NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: ANNA H. DIXON, Deceased Case No. 2017-0181 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 3rd day of April, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. JANELL P. JAMES as Executrix under the last will and testament of, ANNA H. DIXON, Deceased. Attorney of Record: JEROME C. CARTER Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 27, 2017.

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: OLIVETTE ANITA BEATON Case No. 2016-0858 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 4th day of April, 2017 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. REGINA BEATON GREEN as Administratrix of the estate of OLIVETTE ANITA BEATON, deceased. Attorney of Record: SANDRA RANDER, Esq. Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 27, 2017.

NOTICE OF SALE The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 12, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3356 Springhill Ave., Mobile, AL 36607. 2002 Dodge Durango 1B4HR48N02F150171 Lagniappe HD April 6, 13, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 12, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 4763 Lott Rd., Eight Mile, AL 36613. 2010 Toyota Camry 4T1BF3EK6AU027583 1999 Ford Ranger 1FTYR14V4XPB65202 2004 Jeep Liberty 1J4GK58K74W225623 Lagniappe HD April 6, 13, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 12, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 205 Shelton Beach Rd. Apt. 157, Saraland, AL 36571. 2002 Hyundai Santa Fe KM8SC13D22U260685 2008 Chevrolet Cobalt 1G1AL58F787119418

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 12, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 369 Ralston Rd., Mobile, AL 36606. 2002 Kia Optima KNAGD128525163452

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 12, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 17423 County Rd. 48, Robertsdale, AL 36567. 2002 Ford SRW Super 1FTNW21F92ED30311

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7401 Half Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2015 Kia Forte KNAFK4A61F5342693

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 12, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 58 Macks St., Mobile, AL 36607. 2008 Chevrolet Impala 2G1WT58K089109556

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 12, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 5405 Whilelm Dr., Mobile, AL 36695. 2007 Chevrolet Silverado 2GCEC13V671118191

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 1997 Honda Accord 1HGCD5689VA169058

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 12, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 212 Bessemer Ave., Prichard, AL 36610. 2006 Honda Accord 1HGCM66526A066593 2010 Toyota Camry 4T1BF3EK2AU041383

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 12, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2625 Middle Rd., Mobile, AL 36605. 1995 Nissan 4X2 1N6SD11S4SC320679

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3158 Emogene St., Mobile, AL 36606. 2006 Jeep Commander 1J8HH48K06C229612

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 12, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 7135 14th St., Mobile, AL 36608. 1995 Pontiac Firebird 2G2FS22S6S2219728

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1621 Cedar Downs Dr., Mobile, AL 36605. 2007 Chevrolet Impala 2G1WT55K279109061

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 662 Chin St., Mobile, AL 36610. 2008 Lexus IS250 JTHBK262285059040

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  8390 Zeigler Blvd., Mobile, AL 36608. 2000 Chevrolet S10 1GCCS1959YK280982 2005 Cadillac CTS 1G6DP567950111915

Lagniappe HD April 6, 13, 2017

Lagniappe HD April 6, 13, 2017

Lagniappe HD April 6, 13, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 12, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 16891 Hwy. 45 Lot 1, Citronelle, AL 36522. 2001 King Royalite 1DRRF31221B076572 2001 Honda Accord 1HGCG22571A029098 Lagniappe HD April 6, 13, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 12, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 6425 Spanish Fort Blvd., Spanish Fort, AL 36527. 2001 Chevrolet Blazer 1GNCS13W112132596 2005 GMC Sierra 2GTEK13T751222882 2003 Chevrolet Trailblazer 1GNDS13S732255713 2002 Ford LGT Convt 2FTRX18L42CA41475 2002 Mitsubishi Diamante 6MMAP57P32T011937 2005 Lexus RX330 2T2GA31U05C022135 Lagniappe HD April 6, 13, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 12, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 5681 Hwy. 90, Theodore, AL 36582. 2005 Ford Five Hundred 1FAFP25185G141695 Lagniappe HD April 6, 13, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 12, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 5713 Three Notch Rd., Mobile, AL 36619. 2004 Ford Explorer 1FMZU63K04ZB41854 Lagniappe HD April 6, 13, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 12, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 10330 Mason Ferry Rd., Wilmer, AL 36587. 2003 Chevrolet Silverado 1GCHK29U13E112313

Lagniappe HD April 6, 13, 2017

Lagniappe HD April 6, 13, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 12, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 5900 Middle Rd., Theodore, AL 36582. 2006 Chevrolet Tahoe K15 1GNEK13Z76R166365

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 12, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 106 Martin Luther King Dr., Prichard, AL 36610. 1999 Ford LGT Convt. 1FTRX17W6XNB59976 2000 Mercury Grand Marquis 2MEFM74W8YX616286 1996 Ford Explorer 1FMDU32P6TZB81893

Lagniappe HD April 6, 13, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 12, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 4600 Calhoun Rd., Mobile, AL 36619. 2001 Dodge Caravan 2B4GP44R11R153243 2004 Cadillac Deville 1G6KD54Y84U249691 2005 Nissan Altima 1N4AL11D65C335388 Lagniappe HD April 6, 13, 2017

Lagniappe HD April 6, 13, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 12, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 3400 Lloyds Lane Apt V-7, Mobile, AL 36693. 2003 Nissan Maxima JN1DA31D43T522170 Lagniappe HD April 6, 13, 2017

Lagniappe HD April 6, 13, 2017

Lagniappe HD April 6, 13, 2017

Lagniappe HD April 6, 13, 2017

Lagniappe HD April 6, 13, 2017

Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  4763 Lott Rd., Eight Mile, AL 36613. 2000 Chevrolet Silverado 1GCEC14W3YE291450 2004 Nissan Altima 1N4AL11D44C176448 2007 Mercury Marquis 2MEFM75V57X627864 2010 Ford Fusion 3FAHP0HA7AR322136 2009 Toyota Prius JTDKB20U997883702 2003 Hyundai Santa Fe KM8SC13E53U527831 2008 Mitsubishi Galant 4A3AB56F08E010949

Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1308 Bay Ave., Mobile, AL 36605. 1997 Honda Accord 1HGCD5638VA037574 2009 Lexus ES350 JTHBJ46G292295054 Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 4129 Government Blvd., Mobile, AL 36693. 1997 Toyota 4Runner JT3GN86R4V0052733 Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 634 West Main St., Prichard, AL 36610. 2009 Dodge Ram Truck 1D3HB13T19J527469

Deadline for legal advertising in

Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

Lagniappe HD is every

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 5891 Sunshine Lane, Mobile, AL 36619. 2006 Chevrolet Silverado 1GCHC29U86E290706

Monday at 3 p.m. Lagniappe HD is distributed

Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

each Thursday.

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 2311 East Dr., Mobile, AL 36693. 1988 Toyota PU DL JT4RN70D4J0055248

Lagniappe HD offices are located at

Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

1100B Dauphin St.

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1113-B I-65 Service Rd. N., Mobile, AL 36618. 2000 Ford F750 3FDXF75N5YMA02776

Mobile, AL 36604. For more information or to

Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on May 19, 2017 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1015 N Craft Hwy., Prichard, AL 36610. 2001 Honda Accord 1HGCG56671A113166 Lagniappe HD April 13, 20, 2017

place your ad call Jackie at 251-450-4466. Or email at legals@lagniappemobile.com

A p r i l 1 3 , 2 0 1 7 - A p r i l 1 9 , 2 0 1 7 | L AG N I A P P E | 55


Lagniappe: April 13 - April 19, 2017  
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