Page 1


2 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8


WEEKLY

•••••••••••••••••••••••••••

LAGNIAPPE

MARCH 7, 2018 - MARCH 13, 2018 | www.lagniappemobile.com ASHLEY TRICE Co-publisher/Editor atrice@lagniappemobile.com

ROB HOLBERT Co-publisher/Managing Editor rholbert@lagniappemobile.com GABRIEL TYNES Assistant Managing Editor gabe@lagniappemobile.com DALE LIESCH Reporter dale@lagniappemobile.com JASON JOHNSON Reporter jason@lagniappemobile.com

5 12 17

BAY BRIEFS

Mobile County Sheriff Sam Cochran says his challenger is not playing by the rules.

COMMENTARY

Dealing with the cult of “Potheads.”

BUSINESS

Mobile-based AeroStar recently announced plans to more than double its facility and employee count over the next several years.

CUISINE

KEVIN LEE Associate Editor/Arts Editor klee@lagniappemobile.com ANDY MACDONALD Cuisine Editor fatmansqueeze@comcast.net

18

STEPHEN CENTANNI Music Editor scentanni@lagniappemobile.com STEPHANIE POE Copy Editor copy@lagniappemobile.com DANIEL ANDERSON Chief Photographer dan@danandersonphoto.com LAURA RASMUSSEN Art Director www.laurarasmussen.com BROOKE O’DONNELL Advertising Sales Executive brooke@lagniappemobile.com BETH WILLIAMS Advertising Sales Executive bwilliams@lagniappemobile.com ALEEN MOMBERGER Advertising Sales Executive aleen@lagniappemobile.com DAVID GRAYSON Advertising Sales Executive david@lagniappemobile.com

COVER

In the wake of the latest mass shooting at an American school, local students, teachers and administrators are engaged in a conversation about campus safety.

26

CONTRIBUTORS: J. Mark Bryant, Asia Frey, Brian Holbert, Randy Kennedy, John Mullen, Jeff Poor, Ron Sivak ON THE COVER: GUNS IN SCHOOLS BY DAN ANDERSON POSTMASTER: Send address changes to P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Editorial, advertising and production offices are located at 704 Government St., Mobile, AL 36604. Mailing address is P.O. Box 3003 Mobile, AL 36652. Phone: 251.450.4466 Fax 251.450.4498. Email: ashleytoland@lagniappemobile.com or rholbert@lagniappemobile.com LAGNIAPPE is printed at Walton Press. All letters sent to Lagniappe are considered to be intended for publication. Member: Association of Alternative Newsweeklies and Alternative Weeklies Network All rights reserved. Something Extra Publishing, Inc. Nothing may be reprinted, photocopied or in any way reproduced without the expressed permission of the publishers. Individuals may take one copy of the paper free of charge from area businesses, racks or boxes. After that, papers are $3 per issue. Removal of more than one copy from these points constitutes theft. Violators are subject to prosecution.

For Lagniappe home delivery visit

www.lagniappemobile.com/lagniappehd

24

ARTS

The Southeastern Theatre Conference will hold its 69th annual convention and free performances in the Azalea City March 7-11.

MUSIC

ROSS PRITCHARD Distribution Manager delivery@lagniappemobile.com JACKIE CRUTHIRDS Office Manager jackie@lagniappemobile.com

As the newest member in a family of beloved downtown restaurants, El Papi fits the mold for authentic, upscale Mexican cuisine.

28 34 40 42 46

Perpetual Groove reunited for its latest tour while the band is preparing to release its first full-length album in seven years.

FILM

All of the obviously tremendous effort that went into “Loving Vincent” seems to have gone into the painting of each frame; the skimpy script wears thin.

MEDIA

Ben Raines’ recent stories for al.com about possibly finding the long-lost Clotilda slave ship have similarly focused massive attention on what ended up being a non-event.

SPORTS

The 74 Club’s third annual “Over the Edge” fundraiser benefits the Mobile Law Enforcement Foundation and other nonprofit organizations.

STYLE

Chili Cook-Off returns to downtown Mobile.

M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 3


GOING POSTAL

Keep the momentum going To the citizens of the city of Mobile: As I take the time to write this letter, contemplating what I should say, it occurred to me to simply speak what is in my heart to a community that has, without a doubt, displayed the kind of support other law enforcement agencies only dream of. As the police chief I am so very honored to have this opportunity to let you all know that your actions and kind expressions did not go unnoticed by me or the department. The manner in which this city and its residents provided support, not only to the family of our fallen officer, Justin Billa, but the outreach to the other victim, Fonda Poellnitz, whose life was also lost in this horrific offense, is almost indescribable. There is no other way to express the gratefulness that I have toward you all, except to say a very sincere and appreciative “thank you.” To all of you who have called, sent postcards, greeting cards, flowers, shared a kind word, a social media post or made a donation to the Billa family and the Mobile Law Enforcement Foundation, we are so very appreciative. On Tuesday our community took center stage in this country. It and perhaps the world were shown that no matter what else is going on in our humble abode, in times such as these Mobilians respond with love and compassion for their law enforcement members and crime victims that is second to none. The world saw how a city that is made up of a spectrum of citizenry becomes one. Our communities’ actions truly spoke loudly, “We

have more in common that binds us, and a lot less of what can divide us.” Thank you. With that, I say let us keep the momentum going. Take what we have and move it to higher heights in our effort to truly make Mobile the safest city in America with respect for all. I will admonish each of us to look upon one another as neighbors; let us consider ourselves as one citywide neighborhood watch. We can do it by continuing to put into action the kind of love, empathy, compassion and affection daily as we did on Tuesday, Feb. 27. Thank you for the continued overwhelming support that you all provided to the Mobile Police Department and the families of those affected by this dreadful offense. Lawrence Battiste, Chief of Police Mobile

Address the underlying problem Rob, Much like it’s not Friday night without “Shields and Brooks,” I hardly count it a week without reading your and Ashley’s columns. And I keep thinking about your column of Feb. 27, “Pistol packing teachers aren’t the answer.” I agree they aren’t, and that suggestion just has “bad idea” written all over it. I guess we all have a natural tendency to seek a quick solution when we are confronted with problems like this. In the near term your suggestion of implementing some version of airport-type security in schools probably makes the most sense. And, while we might have the most erudite of discussions on the finer points of constitutional

4 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8

theory, or whether or not feral hogs are an environmental problem in the Southeast (they are), it seems to me we are not addressing the larger question: What is wrong with a society and culture that produces so many mass killers, particularly among children? Some form of terrorism may explain some, like the Fort Hood shootings in November 2009, and we may never know what caused a millionaire to shoot 58 people from a high-rise hotel in Las Vegas. But we certainly need to figure out what we are doing to produce teenage boys who think shooting up their school and killing their classmates is some kind of a solution. You mentioned turning 50 recently. I will be 60 in a couple of months. My childhood was like something out of the movie “Stand By Me,” complete with the railroad tracks and trestle, vastly different than the world of today. Over the course of my life and working career it has often seemed to me that the pace of change has become asymptotic. Technology is, no doubt, a factor, though thought and attitude have changed too, and a great deal of that change is positive and good. At least we all mostly acknowledge racism is wrong and we are more accepting of sexual minorities, for example. But I cannot help but think we have, in other areas, become unmoored. We have reverted to societal tribalism. Trust in government and institutions is at an all-time low. Lobbyists write our laws. Money seems to drive everything. Many respected leaders turn out to be corrupt or abusers of various sorts. We have gang violence. Depression and anxiety are epidemic in our culture, particularly among young people, and there seem to

be links with social media and other ubiquitous technologies. All of these school shooters have suffered from some form of mental illness. We tend to look at things in silos. But really it is all one big thing; everything is interrelated. It will take people smarter than I am to find the answers. We can certainly raise the legal age to purchase a firearm. But we are not going to fix the underlying problem until we can address the malaise which affects significant portions of our society and figure out how to raise welladjusted, mentally healthy children. Greg Potter Mobile

We support you Editor: Today I watched the funeral procession of a fallen hero, Justin Billa, who made the ultimate sacrifice for this community. The streets were lined with thousands who showed their respect with hands over their hearts and with waving flags. They were there to honor all who have given their lives in the line of duty. We honor those who sacrificed and still sacrifice, that we may be safe. Officer Billa was a hero in death, but even more so in his life. My thanks to all who are part of the “Families in Blue.” May it give you comfort to know Mobile is behind you. Maragem Bealle Mobile


M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 5


BAYBRIEF | FAIRHOPE

Tit for tat

process. There are people in Fairhope who know that and have been through that process. I have not.” Wilson made an ethics complaint herself last year against Burrell. She does ETHICS, PROCEDURAL QUESTIONS SURROUND FAIRHOPE HIRING admit Goubil had to be aware of the complaint against her and the investigation into the Burrell complaint, which was ultimately ruled baseless. BY JOHN MULLEN “He was involved in some of the complaints,” Wilson said. “Investigations and complaints are two totally different things. People file frivolous complaints f Mayor Karin Wilson has any questions about all day long, I can assure you. I’m sure that by upsetting the apple cart there’s a public safety in the city of Fairhope, she can simply lot of tit for tat and there’s a lot of complaints against me.” make one phone call to her personal police officer. Aside from the ethical questions, Burrell and Councilman Kevin Boone also “He will be answering to me,” Wilson said. questioned how the mayor went about hiring Goubil. “He” is newly hired Fairhope Police Sgt. Tony Goubil, “If we’re not following proper procedures and the mayor’s going out and previously the Alabama Ethics Commission chief special hiring people for jobs that don’t exist we’ll certainly call that into question at agent. Wilson surprised Police Chief Joseph Petties and the appropriate time,” Burrell said. “According to the police themselves, the all five council members when she announced at a Feb. 26 correct policy and procedure was not followed. That’s what they’ve told me.” council meeting she was hiring Goubil to oversee public Wilson questioned the hiring procedures of the police department and said safety for the city. her method of hiring Goubil — as if he were a regular city employee rather “What’s interesting about the whole thing is two weeks than a sworn police officer — is an attempt to fix that system. ago she lambasted the whole council for not communicat“If anything, I put in procedures that are more transparent and actually ing with her,” Councilman Kevin Boone said. “The very follow the guidelines of our personnel hiring than that was in place,” she said. next council meeting she pulls this stunt and hasn’t talked “Because that actually has not been in place at the police department. I’ve actuto a soul.” ally took that and we’re making it like it’s all departments which means it goes While council members are raising lots of questions in out to everybody and everybody has an opportunity.” what is emerging as yet another firestorm of controversy in Burrell said the hiring of police officers requires different procedures. Wilson’s year-and-a-half tenure, the primary issue may be “The police that have talked to me have been very clear that they have very Goubil’s connection to the Ethics Commission. regimented hiring procedures and they follow them to a ‘T,’” he said. “I’ve heard comments made this person was investiBoone stated the mayor is basically adding a new position that had not been gating the mayor,” Council President Jack Burrell said. budgeted by the council and may already have someone in that role — Police “There’s the question — that if he was investigating her I Chief Petties. Petties did not immediately respond to requests for comment. thought there was a state law forbidding somebody from “She’s calling him the public safety director,” Boone said. “There is no taking a job from someone you’ve investigated in the past public safety director in the city of Fairhope. If you want to have a public safety couple of years. I don’t have direct knowledge that he was director, that’s the chief of police. We have one already. [investigating], although I’ve heard it from more than one “This stinks to high heaven, I can tell you that.” very well-placed source that he was.” Wilson said the hiring was legit and residents should be thankful for getting filed against her it never made it to the level of an investiAccording to a 2017 memo from Alabama Ethics Coman experienced candidate such as Goubil to watch over Fairhope safety. gation because it never even reached the level of dismissal. mission Executive Director Thomas Albritton, “Once you “There was nothing done inappropriately,” she said. “If anything, it’s the “You have to be investigated to be dismissed,” Wilson leave your public employer, for two years you may not go best hire we’ve made as far as doing proper procedures in that department than to work for a private business or an individual you audited said. “Some of them don’t go further than being read. If has been made. This is an all-encompassing person that’s going to really help you’re being investigated by [the Ethics Commission] you or investigated while you were a public employee.” plan for Fairhope’s future. Citizens should applaud.” know that. You receive a formal letter, there’s a whole Wilson contends that although an ethics complaint was

I

Photo | Courtesy city of Fairhope | Tony Goubil

6 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8


BAYBRIEF | POLITICS

‘New in town’ SHERIFF TARGETS POLITICAL OPPONENT IN ELECTION COMPLAINT BY JASON JOHNSON

A

slow-burning campaign for sheriff in Mobile County took an interesting turn last week after incumbent Sam Cochran raised several complaints against his one and only political challenger. Charlie Wyckoff, a self-described minister and businessman, has been putting his name into the political ring for more than two years. Since late 2015, signs and bumper stickers proclaiming “a new sheriff in town” have slowly appeared from the southwestern parts of the county into greater Mobile. Cochran said he’s been aware of Wyckoff’s campaign for years because “hundreds of people have mentioned it” to him, but wasn’t sure whether the political newcomer was looking to challenge him directly this year. Many of the signs for Wyckoff haven’t listed a specific election year. Records show Wyckoff officially declared a campaign committee and stated his intent to enter this year’s race for sheriff in April 2017, but an elections complaint filed personally by Cochran last month claims Wyckoff’s campaign activity prior to that likely violated state election laws. Specifically, Cochran alleges Wyckoff failed to designate a principal campaign committee, establish a segregated financial account for his campaign bank account or file a Statement of Economic Interest with the Alabama Ethics Commission before he began soliciting and spending campaign funds. The only campaign document filed by Wyckoff in Mobile County Probate Court appears to be that declaration of his principal campaign committee from April 2017. It lists Wyckoff’s contact information and his wife as that committee’s only member. While Cochran’s complaint was initially sent to Probate Judge Don Davis, it has since been forwarded to Secretary of State John Merrill, where a communications staff member directed Lagniappe inquiries to the Alabama Ethics Commission. That is likely because, according to at least one of Cochran’s allegations, Wyckoff’s campaign activity could be in violation of state ethics laws governing political campaigns. A copy of the complaint obtained by Lagniappe specifically cites Alabama Code 17-5-7. “Alabama Code 17-5-7 prohibits the solicitation and receipt of campaign donations of either cash or in-kind services prior to one year from the stated election date,” Cochran’s complaint reads. “Given his open solicitation for donations on a campaign website, it is clear that Mr. Wyckoff has violated this statute, which under Alabama code 17-5-19(c) is a Class B Felony.” It’s currently unclear whether Wyckoff has actually solicited any campaign contributions because he has yet to file any campaign finance reports. However, Wyckoff’s campaign website, which appears to have been created in June 2015, does include a section for campaign donations. As Cochran’s complaint notes, Wyckoff has also had some visible campaign expenses over

the past two years. He’s participated in Mardi Gras parades since at least 2017 — riding parade routes in various antique police cars adorned with “Wyckoff for Sheriff” signs and stickers. He’s also created and distributed signs, bumper stickers and cups with campaign information as well as fake $5 bills that, when opened, direct the recipients to www.wyckoffsheriff.com. It’s unclear how the creation of those campaign products was funded, but they would also most certainly have exceeded the $100 threshold that triggers the required reporting of campaign expenditures. Asked about his decision to file the complaint against his only political challenger, Cochran said he believes Wyckoff “violated state elections law in four areas.” He also noted one of a sheriff’s duties in Alabama is to serve as an election official when his or her name isn’t on the ballot. “I’m fine with anybody running for office or anybody running against me, but If you want to be sheriff or run for any office, you ought to follow the rules,” he said. “I had not made a complaint until now because I was waiting until he officially declared his candidacy.” Cochran said he initially sent his complaint to Davis as well as the Mobile County Republican Party, but said it was referred to Merrill’s office. He also said Wyckoff has since been provided a copy, which he promptly posted parts of on social media in response to Cochran’s allegations. Wyckoff has not returned calls seeking comment on his campaign and Cochran’s decision to file a complaint three months removed from the June 5 GOP primary. On social media, though, Wyckoff has dismissed the allegations as a political attack from an establishment politician. “It appears that because my name is being placed on the ballot for sheriff the current sheriff uses the word ‘felony’ among other things in his letter with his signature to the probate judge asking or demanding that I be removed!” he wrote. “I have been investigated and cleared two other times by two other agencies for the same or similar accusations. Though I dislike the political environment I am finding more and more need to campaign against a hostile political environment and deny my own feelings or comfort for a while.” In other posts he’s also suggested Cochran, who’s seeking a fourth term as sheriff, has “gotten lazy and quiet” while noting that “crime is not down, just as graduation rates are not up.” Lagniappe was unable to reach representatives of the Mobile County Republican party, at least one of whom appears to have been sent an identical copy of Cochran’s complaint to Davis. State GOP Chairman Terry Lathan said her office was so far unaware of any such complaint. “I have not seen any documents on what allegedly has or has not been filed so I cannot comment on that subject,” Lathan said, adding “all candidates, regardless of political affiliation, must follow the laws of our state.”

M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 7


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

European model TAXPAYER MONEY LIKELY GOING TOWARD PRIVATE AIRBUS DOCK BY DALE LIESCH

T

he shipping of jet components to Airbus’ final assembly line at the Brookley Aeroplex will become even more efficient once a new dock at Arlington Point is operational. Work on the dock, which will allow the company to offload more components more quickly, will be completed soon by Airbus’ logistics partner DB Schenker, but it’s still unclear who will pay for the project and how much it will cost. “It’s still under negotiation as to who will pay,” Mobile Airport Authority Executive Director Chris Curry said. “The players involved are [the MAA], the city, the county and Airbus. I don’t know if an agreement has been reached.” The addition of the dock is part of the site development agreement the MAA reached with Airbus back in 2012, Curry said. While the cost of the project is unclear, Curry did confirm dredging the area — which hasn’t been used for shipping in decades — would also be necessary. “The dredging cost depends on how deep they need it and if there are any issues they find,” he said. The dock will allow Airbus to move components from ship to shore without lifting them, spokeswoman Kristi Tucker said, more closely aligning the Brookley facility with a European model. “There’s no lifting, which is better for us,” she said. “It’s safer for the parts because there is

less handling.” The dock would also allow the company to ship more components at a time. Tucker said the move would allow Airbus to ship four sets of components to the final assembly line at once. It will also reduce the shipping time from 21 days to 15 days, Tucker said. Since the final assembly line is currently building four aircraft per month, the new dock will help ramp up production as the facility grows. The move won’t negatively impact the state Port Authority, spokeswoman Judy Adams said, but it will result in a few changes. For instance, Airbus components will be offloaded from Pier 8 at the port onto a barge and sent to Arlington Point. Currently, components are offloaded at the container terminal and trucked to Brookley, Adams said. “There is no impact on us,” Adams said. “This is something we knew was coming.” Once at Arlington Point, the components will be rolled to a truck and brought to the final assembly line for storage, Curry said. “They will be bringing parts from the dock through the Coast Guard property to a preferred location,” he said. “It’ll go from the ship to the barge to a truck to the facility.” Curry called the dock a “great investment” and said the other entities at Brookley would be able to use the dock as well once it’s completed.

BAYBRIEF | BALDWIN COUNTY

You shall not pass

COUNTY KEEPS GULF SHORES AT ARM’S LENGTH ON CITY CAMPUSES

W

BY JOHN MULLEN hen Gulf Shores officially began the search for a permanent superintendent for its city school system, it wanted to shout it from the rooftops to get the

word out. “We distributed it out through all the associations and they have sent it out all over the state,” interim superintendent Suzanne Freeman said. But there were at least three places the new school board wasn’t allowed to post the position: the school campuses in the city of Gulf Shores. City school officials asked the Baldwin County Board of Education for permission to post the job opening in the schools they will take over at some point. “They said they would get back to us and we’ve not heard back yet,” Freeman said. “Typically, in my situation previously in helping other separations, there’s been a good relationship in that they would let us post it in the schools. That’s typically the case where both school systems work together and coordinate and communicate.” Gulf Shores wants to open doors for the first time this fall and Baldwin County responded “what’s the rush?” With no inroads made on the impasse, the two sides turned to the state superintendent’s office, which appointed a mediator. Both sides are currently drafting what are essentially position papers to present to the mediator. Baldwin County made its position clear by passing a resolution Feb. 22 in opposition to the Gulf Shores starting date of July 1. During a Gulf Shores School Board work session on March 1, several reasons for wanting the split to occur this year were discussed. One was

8 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8

addressing security issues at what police believe is a vulnerable campus, board president Kevin Corcoran said. “We don’t think it is a rush,” Corcoran said. “There’s so many reasons and we’re going to present plausible reasons and not just because we want to. There’s so many things we need to do and we need to do them now.” Meanwhile, getting access to those campuses to make assessments on security, computer systems and talking with faculty and staff has been a slow process. The board is currently trying to set a date to meet with faculty and staff from the three Gulf Shores schools. For teachers, Freeman said, they are anxious about the coming change and she believes a meeting will get them valuable information and ease some of their fears. “Out of fairness to teachers, they need to know,” she said. “This is their life, their livelihood, their families are counting on this.” Corcoran said he’s heard a different kind of anxiety from teachers he’s talked with. “It’s very unfortunate but I hear from teachers they are worried about retribution should they attend such a meeting,” Corcoran said. “We need to stress there is strength in numbers. They have to make an intelligent decision so we have to have information for them.” Freeman said the meeting to assess the information technology capabilities at all three schools has also been put on hold. “We hit a little snag in terms of approval from the county to be able to do that,” she said. “Our legal counsel is helping us jump through those hoops.”


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE COUNTY

Open evaluation MOBILE COUNTY SUPERINTENDENT SEARCH NARROWED TO 3 FINALISTS BY JASON JOHNSON

T

the Chilton County School System, though he held similar administrative positions throughout the state of Texas for nearly 15 years. He also has a background in business administration and accounting. A former auditor, Fenn started as a teaching assistant and became a math and science teacher to 5th and 6th graders in Texas. He eventually became principal in multiple school systems in the Lone Star State and served as superintendent of various systems from 2001 until 2011. After earning a doctorate, Fenn moved to Alabama where he taught instructional leadership courses at the University of Montevallo before taking the assistant superintendent position in Chilton County. Most recently, Fenn served from 2016 to 2017 as the principal of the Hayes K-8 School in the Birmingham City School System. This year the ALSDE rated the Chilton County School System with an overall “C” average, while assigning a failing grade of 52 to Hayes K-8. James Gunn is the only out-of-state candidate in the top three. He’s worked in multiple Tennessee school districts as a teacher, assistant principal and principal since the mid ’80s and currently serves as the associate director of schools for the Lawrence County School System in Tennessee. While Tennessee is still in the process of developing its own letter grading system for school districts, Lawrence County saw an increase in its overall ACT scores after implementing a districtwide ACT plan Gunn helped develop, according to his resume. Also notable is Gunn’s history of leading alternative school programs. He was a founding principal of the New Directions Academy in the Dickson County School System

Photo | Lagniappe

he Mobile County school board has picked three frontrunners to replace outgoing Superintendent Martha Peek, all of whom boast long careers in public education. With a decision March 5, the board named Chresal Threadgill, John Gunn and Walter Fenn as the three finalists to take over Alabama’s largest and oldest school system. Peek, who previously announced her retirement, will leave the post by July 1. In the meantime, the board plans to host public interviews with all three candidates on Monday, March 19, with a final decision announced by March 21. At least one of the candidates being considered would be promoted from inside the central office. Chresal Threadgill, the only Mobile native being considered for the position, resigned as the superintendent of Elba City Schools, Alabama’s second-smallest school district, in July 2017 to take a position as chief of staff in Peek’s administration. During his four years in Elba, the city saw an increase in academic performance despite a shrinking student population. Elba recently received an overall “B” for its system grade from the Alabama State Department of Education. Before that, Threadgill served as an administrative assistant to the superintendent of Troy City Schools, where he oversaw curriculum, instruction and student assessment. He’s served as principal at Charles Henderson Middle School and as an assistant principal at Greenville Middle School. According to his resume, he holds a bachelor’s from Troy University and received a master’s in education administration at Alabama State University. Walter Fenn was formerly an assistant superintendent in

Mobile County Schools Superintendent Martha Peek announced her retirement effective July 1. and was previously asked to testify before the Tennessee House of Representatives as an expert on similar alternative education programs. The Mobile County Public School System has several alternative programs that serve a range of students, from those requiring a more secluded setting to those being adjudicated through the juvenile criminal justice system. In addition to the position atop the state’s largest school system, Peek’s replacement could very well be inheriting one of the highest salaries for Alabama public school employees. According to state records, Peek currently makes $215,332 per year, which is second only to the $264,736 Craig Pouncey receives for leading the Jefferson County School System.

M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 9


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Coming soon

SPRING HILL RESTAURANT GETS APPROVAL WITH NEW OWNER, CONCEPT BY DALE LIESCH

A

BAYBRIEF | BALDWIN COUNTY

Photo | Dakinstreet Architect

fter about eight months of negotiations and a ta Park is currently an “eyesore” and is “blighted,” he said. new owner, a vacant auto repair shop at 5054 Old In the application, Todd LaCour said they were asking Shell Road will be redeveloped into a restaurant. the board for a use variance, which would allow for the The application gained approval of three variances restaurant in the former garage space. from the city’s Board of Zoning Adjustment on Monday, “Another service station is not what the neighborhood March 5. needs,” he said. More than 140 Spring Hill The LaCours also asked the residents had banded together in board to approve a permeable, opposition to the property’s previous “crushed gravel” parking surface to development plans, announced last avoid making drainage problems in MORE THAN 140 SPRING July. Then-owner Shaul Zislin of The the area worse. The final variance Hangout in Gulf Shores had proposed will excuse them from building a HILL RESIDENTS HAD a restaurant with more than 80 seats wall along Border Drive. Without and an 11 p.m. closing time. the buffer, Todd LaCour said the BANDED TOGETHER IN New owners Todd and Jeff LaCour property would have enough space proposed another restaurant, but for two additional parking spots. OPPOSITION TO THE promised a smaller, less noisy experiIn spite of Maple Street Biscuit PROPERTY’S PREVIOUS ence. In fact, the building’s planned Co.’s hours, the LaCours also sought tenant, Maple Street Biscuit Co., only approval to allow any restaurant DEVELOPMENT PLANS, serves breakfast and lunch, Todd operating at the location to stay open LaCour said. to 11 p.m. Monday through Saturday ANNOUNCED LAST JULY. “We’re extremely excited for if they desired. Todd LaCour said this development,” he said. “It’s a Maple Street has shown some interest total renovation of the building — in serving an evening meal and having [a] 1,500 square feet, open-kitchen brunch in the future. concept. It’ll be the perfect place … to enjoy a meal.” But heeding suggestions from neighbors, Todd LaCour The building will be a total of 2,900 square feet, Steve asked the board to allow the restaurant to be open from 6 Stone of Dakin Street Architects said. a.m. to 9 p.m. on Monday through Thursday, 6 a.m. to 10 The former Rester Brothers property across from Lavret- p.m. on Friday and Saturday and 6 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Sunday.

Maple Street Biscuit Co. has signed a lease at the former Rester Brothers auto repair shop next to Lavretta Park on Old Shell Road. The restaurant will not have live music, he said. Maple Street Biscuit Co., out of Jacksonville, has locations all over the Southeast, Todd LaCour said following the meeting. The restaurant will be a great place for families to join for meals in the future, he said. “We live in the area,” he said. “The neighbors wanted something there and this will be a huge improvement for the area.”

BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Growing pains

Bitter pill

BALDWIN HEARS BUSINESS, RESIDENTIAL REZONING REQUESTS

MOBILE CITY COUNCIL OPPOSES STATE PHARMACY BILL

M

BY JOHN MULLEN

ayor Dane Haygood of Daphne has seen plans for the northwest corner of Alabama 181 and County Road 64 before. “About a year ago there was an annexation request with a planned unit development,” Haygood said. “They had sort of a variety of residential lots on the Allegri property there. They were going to have this French village with some retail more near the corner and some residential behind it. It was an interesting conceptual site plan they had.” A new plan for the parcel was brought before the Baldwin County Planning Commission on March 1 to have the 67.5-acre parcel rezoned to major commercial. Another plan discussed by the commission and drawing some attention was another rezoning on Higbee Road in property adjacent to St. Michael’s Catholic High School for a proposed 105-lot subdivision. On the Alabama 181 project, applicant developer Craig F. Dyas was seeking the change on behalf of owners Joseph A. Allegri Jr. Properties II and Louise Volovecky. “The applicant did not specify a particular use, but mentioned grocery stores, medical facilities, pharmacies, home good stores and bakeries as possibilities,” Planning Director Vince Jackson said. Haygood said when the previous plan came before the Daphne council it was well-received but city officials asked the applicants to come back with more details. “I believe the council was in favor of the con-

T

BY DALE LIESCH

cept,” he said. “But the documents presented by the applicant were lacking and we needed them to be tightened up a little. I think it would have passed if they had gone through those efforts.” Haygood said even though the project is going before the county and not asking to be in Daphne city limits — yet — he says it will have an effect on his city especially with traffic. He said the city could benefit from sales tax revenue if the project later came into the city. The County Commission will have final say on the rezoning but the Planning Commission gave a favorable recommendation to the change. The issue will come up before the commission during one of its April meetings, Jackson said. Principal Faustin Weber at St. Michael’s wasn’t aware of proposed changes on the land that surrounds his campus until a Lagniappe inquiry. The school owns 20 acres that are currently undeveloped and the school has plans for its land that could affect the surrounding area should a subdivision be built. “We expect there to be development in this area,” Weber said. “We think that’s inevitable. We are also intending to put in athletic fields, ballgames at night, lights and those kinds of things. That’s a future development there.” Jackson said the commission was favorable to the rezoning but was concerned about the planned residential development (PRD) variances they were seeking within the subdivision. Dewberry was the applicant representing property owner Jose Cortes.

10 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8

he Mobile City Council on Tuesday approved a resolution opposing Alabama Senate Bill 349, which would make pharmacies exempt from business license fees based on gross receipts. Prescription drugs are already exempted from sales tax, but this bill — introduced on Fed. 27 by Sen. Bill Beasley — would also exempt pharmacies from paying business license fees based on total gross sales. “We shouldn’t give one industry preferential treatment over others,” Council Vice President Levon Manzie said, following a pre-conference meeting. Councilman John Williams expanded on the bill during the council comment portion of Tuesday’s regular meeting. “All businesses should pay their fair share to the municipalities in which they reside,” he said. “We are open to discuss with the pharmaceutical industry the rate in which they are taxed.” Williams explained that pharmacies are currently taxed at a rate that would force them to pay the equivalent of roughly $6,000 for a business license on $5 million in gross receipts. “If the pharmaceutical industry believes paying $6,000 on $5 million in gross receipts is too much they are free to come and discuss it,” he said. “We don’t think it’s unfair. Every single business in our city, with the exception of banks, have a similar factor.” The retail side of pharmaceutical businesses would not be impacted by the bill, Williams said.

In other business, the council delayed until April 3 a final decision on the allocation of money to fund a settlement between the city and Waste Management over the disposal of yard debris at Dirt, Inc. The settlement would allow the city to continue to dump construction and demolition waste at Dirt, Inc. and avoid a new lawsuit from

IF THE PHARMACEUTICAL INDUSTRY BELIEVES PAYING $6,000 ON $5 MILLION IN GROSS RECEIPTS IS TOO MUCH THEY ARE FREE TO COME AND DISCUSS IT” Waste Management. The company previously won a lawsuit along with a $6 million judgement against the city’s Solid Waste Authority over breach of a 1994 contract. The delay would allow council attorney Wanda Cochran to continue to review more than 20 years of documents related to the agreement. If passed, the agreement would pay WM $348,000 per year. The funds would essentially pay Waste Management, which claims to have a contractual right to receive all of the city’s construction and demolition waste, while also allowing the city to continue to use Dirt, Inc.


BAYBRIEF | MOBILE

Woman’s best friend DISCOVERY OF BELOVED, WELL-FED DOG’S CASKET DOCUMENTED BY DALE LIESCH

T

Photo | Courtesy Fox Historical Restoration

rixie’s grave lay undisturbed and unnoticed in midtown Mobile for about two centuries. In dog years, that is. The burial site of the beloved black lab that often feasted on ice cream and fried chicken was discovered in the backyard of a house on Dauphin Street, as crews were preparing it to host a wedding and a historic homes tour. Brandon Fox, owner of Fox Historical Preservation, said landscapers found the final resting place for the four-legged friend of Helen Constantine Graf on Saturday, Feb. 24. “The landscapers came across a concrete slab,” he said. “It was 2-feet by 6-feet.” Under the concrete, Fox said the crew found an ornate child’s casket with remains inside. “It was a really beautiful casket, about 5 feet long,” he said. At first, investigators thought the remains might belong to a child because of the size of the pelvic bone, Fox said, but a neighbor suggested that maybe the remains belonged to Trixie. Then the stories about “Mama Graf” started to be uncovered, Fox said. “It’s turned into a great story,” he said. Clark Glenn fondly remembers many stories involving his grandmother and Trixie, especially how the large dog was treated like family, especially at meals. Trixie was not excluded, even from expensive restaurants, such as Ruth’s Chris Steak House. “We ate out a lot,” Glenn said of his family. “Every time we went out to eat she’d order a steak for the dog. We were like, ‘oh my God, please stop.’” While Trixie is remembered for eating filet mignon, she was fed other foods much more often, Glenn said.

Trixie, the beloved pet of Helen Constantine Graf, was buried in a coffin in her backyard. “She ate way more fried chicken and fried fish,” Glenn said. Graf and the dog often shared ice cream as dessert, he said. It was this diet that turned the “complete thoroughbred hunting” black lab into a “120-pound” companion. Trixie was such a special part of Graf’s life that Glenn and other members of the family assumed she might get a family plot. “I never doubted Trixie would get a special burial,” he said. “It was a big deal for Mama Graf. Trixie passed in 1991 or 1992, Glenn said. During the dog’s last days, Glenn said he heard Trixie was going to get

a casket and would be buried in the yard. It was Glenn’s uncle who traveled to Radney Funeral Home for the casket. Glenn said it was the “most ornate, expensive casket” ever. While he wasn’t there when the dog was buried, Glenn recalled the event from family stories. He said Graf wanted Trixie buried under some camellia bushes in the yard. Glenn’s cousins dug a grave at the very edge of those bushes and buried the casket. At that point, Glenn said, Mama Graf wanted to have a small ceremony for the dog, but was dismayed by the grave’s placement. “She told them it was in the wrong spot,” he said. “It needed to be about 2 feet farther back.” As Glenn tells it, the cousins had to dig up the casket and bury it basically underneath the bushes. “They put only about an inch of dirt on top of it,” he said. “Mama Graf,” as family called her, was a “larger-than-life” figure, Glenn said, who dominates the subject of conversation even now at large family gettogethers. “I didn’t realize how special it was until I was older,” Glenn said. “It has been great to have these memories bubbling up.” Trixie will continue to be memorialized at the home she shared with Graf. The current owners, John Edward McGee and Demetrius James, had the dog placed back in the ground once the confusion about the remains subsided. At first, McGee said, the couple thought the cement block was part of a water catchment system. They and others soon realized there was a coffin buried in the backyard. “It appeared that a lot of the stuff inside was plastic,” he said. “We were pulling out the plastic to see what could be inside.” The discovery of the 5-foot coffin shocked the couple, as one might expect. “We were almost paralyzed,” James said. Investigators with the Mobile Police Department were called and once it was determined it was the remains of a dog, they offered to call animal control officers. James and McGee declined, opting instead to give Trixie a permanent grave in the yard. “We felt like this was Trixie’s home,” McGee said. “We felt she needed to remain in the exact same place.” They dug a much deeper hole and buried Trixie again the same day. This time, though, the police put Trixie’s remains in a body bag and labeled it, so that folks in the future would know it’s a dog. James and McGee own two standard poodles, named Eva and Miles. James said the day after Trixie’s third burial, Miles laid right on the spot where her grave sat. “It was almost as if he was protecting her,” McGee said. The couple is still trying to determine what exactly they’ll do to further memorialize the special black lab. James said they may put a plant there.

M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 11


COMMENTARY | DAMN THE TORPEDOES

Spanking judge story different in Arkansas ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

when all of this first became public. The DA’s office didn’t want to deal with it because of political ramifications, and the feds had told Tyson they were going to handle things. I’m sure plenty of people worried hundreds of cases might have to be retried when prisoners came out of the woodwork claiming Herman railroaded them because they wouldn’t play. But federal prosecutors can still make it right. The civil rights violations alleged against Thomas don’t appear to have a statute of limitations. Eric Holder is nowhere in sight to help him. In fact, Jeff Sessions, who most certainly knows all about this, can and should pull the trigger any time he wants. We have a new, highly thought of U.S. Attorney right here in town who should be able to handle this easily. At the very minimum, the people of this community deserve to see the other 10 pages of communications that let Herman Thomas escape federal prosecution nine years ago. He’s already run for state Senate once and he’s running for the House now and continues reapplying for his law license every year. Does he also work in positions that put him in contact with young men? Most anyone who managed to escape prison, as Thomas certainly did, would lay low, move to a Third World country or change his name. But HYT isn’t built that way. He continues to push the ridiculous narrative he was screwed by politics even as he tries to again attain political power. Is anyone around here remotely worried about how all this might eventually turn out?

THEGADFLY

12 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8

Using a Freedom of Information Act request, I was able to get one simple email from DOJ to Rhodes telling her to recuse. But the feds withheld 10 more pages from us. I know that all seems rather bizarre, but it makes a lot more sense when you realize Holder’s wife is from Mobile. Do Hermie and Mrs. Holder and Mr. Holder know one another? It seems pretty likely two successful, politically involved members of the Democratic Party in Mobile have at least run into each other once or twice. If there’s another reason Holder would have walked in on his very first day in office and pulled his troops off Herman’s trail, maybe it’s in those 10 pages of emails we aren’t allowed to see. I’m well aware Thomas has spent the past few years attempting to construct an alternate argument that he was framed by Republicans who didn’t want him to become presiding Mobile County Circuit Court judge. That story should include a visit from his fairy godmother. It’s total fantasy. Charlie Graddick was presiding judge and nobody was wrestling that away from him. Besides, Herman was finally prosecuted by John Tyson — a Democrat. It’s fascinating to think a sitting Circuit Court Judge was allowed to spank young men and get away with it. Even if you don’t want to believe the semen in his little secret office had anything to do with claims he used his power to coerce men into having sex with him, Hermie admitted to spanking young men. He just said it was something he did in his spare time, not as a judge per se. There weren’t a lot of people in a hurry to have Herman Thomas thrown in jail

Cartoon/Laura Rasmussen

S

top me if you’ve heard this one. A judge is accused of using his powerful position to give lighter sentences to defendants who helped satisfy unusual sexual desires that included paddling young men and boys on their bare butts. The feds swoop in and indict him and the pervy judge lands in the slammer. What? You’ve never heard that story before? Oh, that’s right, I forget this is Mobile. Our version of that story is a little different. It goes something along the lines of: Powerful judge is accused of manipulating sentences in exchange for sex and spanking young men on their bare butts. He’s tried, but a specially selected judge tosses all of the charges against him, even after the jury hangs 11-to-1 for conviction. But before that kangaroo court can take place, the United States Department of Justice orders the local U.S. Attorney to recuse herself from the case without ever telling the public or the local district attorney why. The pervy ex-judge walks free and then runs for office. Twice. Back to the first example. So, just a couple of weeks ago, former Arkansas District Judge Joseph Boeckmann, 71, pleaded guilty to federal charges that included wire fraud, witness tampering and corruptly using his official position. Judge Boeckmann resigned from office in 2016 after a state judicial review commission accused him of taking thousands of photos of young, male defendants and also spanking them. (Sound familiar????) The commission said in return for doing that, Boeckmann reduced sentences or personally paid their fines. So shortly after Arkansas Spanky stepped down, federal prosecutors unsealed a 21-count indictment against him. Last month, the ex-judge pleaded out and got a five-year sentence in a federal slammer. Reading about Judge Boeckmann brought back all kinds of fond memories of our own former judge, Herman Y. Thomas, a man who I would — after sitting through his trial and listening to hours of interviews with inmates who claim he sexually abused them — say is almost miraculously not sitting in prison right now. No, he’s actually running for the Alabama House of Representatives District 99 seat. The original Judge Spanky and Judge Boeckmann do have so many things in common, other than their enjoyment of spanking young men’s bare bottoms, that they’d probably never lack for conversation if they ended up cellmates one day. For instance, Hermie also faced issues with the state’s judicial oversight commission following the revelation he was moving hundreds of cases from other judge’s dockets, and accusations he was sexing up and spanking defendants. Like Boeckmann, Thomas resigned his office once confronted. It was a slick move because it automatically sealed the Judicial Inquiry Commission records. The big difference between the two men’s cases really came in how they were handled by the federal government. In Boeckmann’s case, former U.S. Attorney Eric Holder’s Justice Department obviously went after him. In Thomas’ case, Holder’s DOJ issued an order to U.S. Attorney Deborah Rhodes office to recuse from any prosecution of Hermie, citing a “conflict of interest.” As I’ve written before, that order to recuse came Jan. 21, 2009, the very first day Eric Holder walked in as Attorney General. So essentially it was like, “Hi, I’m Eric. Where’s the men’s room? Oh, by the way, tell the U.S. Attorney in Mobile to recuse from any prosecution of Herman Thomas. Thanks.”

AND THE SEARCH FOR THE CLOTILDA GOES ON....


COMMENTARY | THE HIDDEN AGENDA

Potheads in the mist ASHLEY TRICE/EDITOR/ASHLEYTOLAND@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

I

had resisted it. I wasn’t going to do it. It seemed like just another fad that would fade away. But I kept hearing about it, and admittedly it did sound like it could make my life a little easier. So I finally went for it. I got an Instant Pot. And let me just say, I had no idea what I was getting myself into. First, a little backstory. For those of you who may not have heard of this small kitchen appliance, an Instant Pot is a pressure cooker about the size of a crockpot. I was initially reluctant to get one because my small appliance graveyard (aka the cabinet above my fridge) was getting a bit crowded. The never or rarely used blender, food processor, ice cream maker and fondue pot were taking up most of the space up there. And why would I need a pressure cooker anyway? I can do just about everything it does either in my Dutch oven or slow cooker. Why add yet another appliance to the mix? Certainly it would suffer the same fates as the trendy bread maker and sandwich maker my mom had purchased in the late ‘80s/early ‘90s. That fate? Sitting unused on a shelf for over a decade until they were finally tossed. I expressed all of these concerns to my friends who were Instant Pot fans, but they swore to me I would actually use this one. Everything is done in one pot so it makes cleanup easy, they said. But the most appealing thing about this contraption, they said, is unlike a slow cooker you could put frozen meat in it and it would be ready in an hour (or much less), unlike the 6-8 hours a slow cooker takes. Though I love my slow cooker, during the week I rarely have (or make) the time to put something together in the mornings to cook in it. And I will often even forget to grab something out of the freezer to thaw, to just bake in the oven. So on many nights I would find myself scrambling, defrosting, ordering takeout or heading to the grocery store to get dinner even though I had a freezer full of meat. Sigh. Maybe I did need one. So I took the plunge. I got one and Googled a few recipes and had great success. It was fast, tasty and easy to clean. It was truly love at first pressure cook! I was singing its praises to another Instant Pot friend and asking her where was the best place to find more recipes and she directed me to Pinterest and said there were several “really good Facebook groups.” I happened to be on Facebook later that night so I found the groups. I was a bit surprised to find many were closed groups and I had to answer questions before I was allowed into the “community.” But now, I know why. Apparently, I have unwittingly joined an appliance cult. These Instant Pot people are absolutely insane. First of all, they call themselves “potheads.” Seriously. They talk about these pots like they are people and some even take them on trips. One woman had just given birth — like literally, that very day — and took the time to post a photo of her newborn (to a page full of strangers), and also tell about how she had just thrown something in the Instant Pot before her water broke and she was luckily able to bring the pot to the hospital and feed everyone. “Hey honey, make sure to grab the car seat and the Instant Pot.”

This is what a woman who had just brought another person into this world was thinking about, her freaking InstaPot. Oh! I’m sorry, don’t dare call it InstaPot, it’s two words, Instant Pot. People, especially the self-proclaimed “newbie potheads” (eyeroll), post on the page and erroneously call it an InstaPot. This is a common occurrence for some reason, and this is apparently like fingernails on a chalkboard to the diehard Instant Potters. They get very angry about this and jump all over the newbies. It gets so heated the moderator has to turn off the comments on the post. So yeah, there are so many things wrong with this. Who gives a flying frozen frankfurter what people call the thing? (The pothead mob does!) Secondly, someone apparently sits around and moderates a page of recipes because it gets so hostile. Yes, I said a Facebook page of RECIPES requires moderation. RECIPES! I guess I shouldn’t be so surprised at the level of passion. These nuts fight over how long they should cook chicken breasts, and making yogurt and cheesecakes is always a hot topic. Some even decorate their pots with decals (Jack’s head from “This is Us” seems to be the most popular right now) or knit covers for them, usually some sort of animal — owls and penguins and such. Yes, you read that correctly. They make little sweaters for their kitchen appliances. (Or you can buy them on Amazon. Because, of course, you can.) The current potheads are bad enough but there seems to be a whole subset of folks who are just fantasizing about Instant Pot ownership. There are often posts like this: “I just can’t wait to get one. Should I get the 3, 6 or 8 quart?” And once they finally do get one, some of them talk about it like they are going to have sex with it. “Tonight’s my first night to do it. I’m so nervous!” Um, OK. I want to write, “Well I sure hope you shaved your legs and have on your good panties.” But that would probably get me kicked out of the cult by the moderator. You are probably thinking, “Why don’t you just leave the group if you find these sad small appliance aficionados so annoying?” I tried to turn off the notifications at first, but somehow it still monopolizes my feed. And now, I’m hooked. I don’t really care about the recipes on these pages — I just use Google for those. Much like Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey and their primates, I am fascinated by these “potheads” and love observing them in the wild (Facebook). Hopefully, I won’t end up like Fossey, brutally murdered by one of these freaks who would probably put my severed head in the Instant Pot and then argue with the rest of the cult about how long it needed to be cooked and if it would come out more tender on the “porridge” or “stew” setting. Oh potheads, with a big head like mine, I would go manual high pressure for 18-20 minutes, with a 10-minute natural release then a quick release (I’m speaking to them in their native tongue now). My cheeks should be fork tender and falling off the bone. But for God’s sake please make sure to remove and wash the silicone ring afterwards so everything else you cook won’t taste like my bitter noggin. Happy cooking!

M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 13


COMMENTARY | THE BELTWAY BEAT

Road to Democratic presidential nomination goes through Alabama BY JEFF POOR/COLUMNIST/JEFFREYPOOR@GMAIL.COM SELMA — On Sunday, the annual commemorative march across the Edmund Pettus Bridge marked the 53rd anniversary of “Bloody Sunday,” a pivotal event in the Civil Rights movement. In 1965, John Lewis, now a Georgia Democratic United States congressman, and Hosea Williams led the march. They peacefully led 600 marchers from the Brown Chapel AME Church to the Edmund Pettus Bridge. The march turned violent as the marchers crossed the bridge and were confronted by Alabama State Troopers, who beat and gassed them. The marchers’ message was heard as Americans across the country saw the bloody event unfold on their televisions. Many believe the televised, brutal confrontation on the Edmund Pettus Bridge led to the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act, a law reducing barriers to minority voting. In recent years, the annual commemorative event has been a favorite of Democratic politicians who aspire for higher office. Even though Alabama has a less critical role in national

mate event, the Martin and Coretta King Unity Breakfast, and was a participant in Sunday’s bridge crossing. She frequently posed for selfies and was often seen accompanied by her new colleague, Alabama Sen. Doug Jones. Jones, who has national credentials among Democrats given his upset victory in Republican Alabama last year, was a beneficiary of strong support within the black community. Without the high turnout among African-Americans last December, Jones would not have beaten Roy Moore to become U.S. senator. In the post-2016 presidential election autopsy, Democrats blamed poor turnout by black voters in swing states. That is likely the reason Donald Trump beat Hillary Clinton in Michigan and Pennsylvania. Poor voter participation in the inner cities of Philadelphia and Detroit and high turnout in rural areas of those states was undoubtedly an advantage for Trump. Democrats had counted on generating the same black turnout as they had with Obama in the previous two presidential election cycles. That was indeed an oversight by Clinton’s campaign and her allies in the media that predicted a FOR NATIONAL DEMOCRATS SEEKING Hillary landslide. TO GET ACQUAINTED WITH SOUTHERN As a preventive measure, AFRICAN-AMERICAN VOTERS, THE ANNUAL Democrats could be looking to MARCH IN SELMA IS CONSIDERED TO BE ONE nominate a black candidate to opOF THE BEST OPPORTUNITIES TO DO SO. pose Trump in the 2020 general election. Kamala Democratic Party politics given its Republican Harris would check a lot of boxes. She’s a streak, the Selma event has been an early stop female. She’s a minority. She will have served for Democratic Party presidential hopefuls. not only as a U.S. senator but also as her state’s In 2007, shortly before the epic battle attorney general. between then-Sens. Barack Obama and Hillary It also doesn’t hurt that her home state of Clinton kicked off for the 2008 Democratic California has the most Democratic Party connod, both Obama and Clinton, along with her vention delegates and the most electoral votes. husband, former President Bill Clinton, apAs a Democratic presidential candidate, she peared in Selma and participated in all of the is appealing and formidable for those reasons. ceremonial events. A 2020 run was probably a big reason why Clinton was perhaps most remembered California’s freshman junior U.S. senator had for her recitation of a hymn by Rev. James such a prominent role in Selma last weekend. Cleveland, which she performed with a cringeTwo weeks after the “Bloody Sunday” march worthy thick accent while speaking at Selma’s in 1965, the 54-mile march from Selma to First Baptist Church, saying, “I don’t feel no Montgomery began. The march started at a time ways tired.” when tensions were high, and any threat was Obama edged out Clinton for the nomination thought to be possible. Marchers endured cold and went on to defeat Sen. John McCain in the and rainy weather as they made their way from 2008 presidential election. Dallas County along a two-lane U.S. Highway In Democratic intraparty races, winning the 80 in Lowndes County and into Montgomery to black vote is essential. It’s a big reason Clinton the Alabama Capitol. was able to defeat Sen. Bernie Sanders, her only Upon their arrival in Montgomery, Martin legitimate competition in the 2016 race for the Luther King Jr. delivered his “How Long, Not party’s nomination, by such a wide margin in Long” speech and attempted to give a petition the South. to then-Gov. George Wallace, despite Alabama For national Democrats seeking to get State Troopers blocking the way. acquainted with Southern African-American On Sunday, dignitaries, presumably includvoters, the annual march in Selma is considered ing Sen. Kamala Harris, purporting to continue to be one of the best opportunities to do so. the fight for civil rights were escorted in, Perhaps that is why U.S. Sen. Kamala Harris around and out of Selma back to Montgomery (D-California) was an active participant at last along that same U.S. Highway 80 by Alabama Sunday’s event. State Troopers. Harris was a featured speaker at the Selma That’s certainly a remarkable sign of how Bridge Crossing Jubilee weekend’s penultidifferent things are now compared to then.

14 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8


COMMENTARY | THE GRIOT’S CORNER

Gun violence: When leaders must lead BY KEN ROBINSON/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

O

n March 29, 1991, The New York Times published an op-ed piece penned by former President Ronald Reagan. He was no longer in the Oval Office, but felt it imperative to weigh in on a very important piece of legislation. He wrote in part: “Anniversary is a word we usually associate with happy events that we like to remember: birthdays, weddings, the first job. March 30, however, marks an anniversary I would just as soon forget, but cannot. It was on that day 10 years ago that a deranged young man standing among reporters and photographers shot a policeman, a Secret Service agent, my press secretary and me on a Washington sidewalk. I was lucky. … Jim Brady, my press secretary, who was standing next to me, wasn’t as lucky.” After recounting the fate of those who were shot that day, President Reagan zeroed in on his motivation for writing the opinion piece. He observed: “This nightmare might never have happened if legislation that is before Congress now — the Brady Bill — had been law back in 1981. Named for Jim Brady, this legislation would establish a national seven-day waiting period before a handgun purchaser could take delivery. … Critics claim that ‘waiting period’ legislation in the states that have it doesn’t work, that criminals just go to nearby states that lack such laws to buy their weapons. True enough, and all the more reason to have a federal law that fills the gaps. … The effect would be a uniform standard across the country.” The Brady Bill was signed into law on Nov. 30, 1993. Its passage was due in part to the influence and support of such individuals as President Reagan. Someone who, throughout his political career, showed himself to be a strong gun rights advocate also understood there are times one must and should act in the whole public’s interest and

for the benefit and safety of all. Three years later, President Reagan, along with former presidents Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter, sent a letter to the full U.S. House of Representatives urging them to vote in favor of legislation that included a 10-year ban on manufacturing certain assault weapons, such as the AR-15, for private citizens. Their letter included the following: “While we recognize that assault weapon legislation will not stop all assault weapon crime, statistics prove we can dry up the supply of these guns, making them less accessible to criminals. We urge you to listen to the American public and to the law enforcement community and support a ban on the further manufacture of these weapons.” Speaking of then President Bill Clinton and the three former presidents Reagan, Carter and Ford, one political commentator at the time noted, “Together, the four make a formidable lobby, stretching across a broad ideological spectrum and giving political cover to wavering House members. As pressures intensified … several lawmakers who had never voted against the National Rifle Association, the leading opponent of the ban, announced that they would support the measure.” The Public Safety and Recreational Firearms Use Protection Act, commonly referred to as the federal Assault Weapons Ban, became law in September 1994. Although it was enacted with a 10-year sunset provision, and no political will would be present in 2004 to ensure its renewal, the law nevertheless served as a powerful example of how leaders from diverse ideological backgrounds could come together and act on the public’s behalf. As implied in the act’s name, public safety, along with public health, were of top concern to these leaders. They could come together around the idea that gun violence had

become a pressing public safety and public health issue. In 2018, gun violence is indeed an acute public safety and public health issue. According to the Centers for Disease Control’s latest figures, there were more than 11,000 gun-related homicides in 2016 and around 22,000 gun-related suicides. Such staggering numbers set the United States apart from any other developed country. No other advanced nation comes close. When it comes to mass shootings (excluding the shooter, when at least four people are either injured or killed in a shooting incident) there has been a steady and tragic upward trajectory. In 2013, 961 people were injured in mass shootings and 288 killed. Each year the numbers have grown. In 2017, there were 1,981 injured and 590 killed, respectively, in mass shootings. Truly, gun violence is a public health and public safety emergency in America. The nation experiences a flu epidemic, or the spread of some other viral disease such as West Nile or Ebola, and our leaders are quick to declare a public health crisis and spring into action, which they should. Yet what is causing the

PRESIDENT REAGAN AND OTHER PAST LEADERS HAVE SET THE EXAMPLE WHEN IT COMES TO CRITICAL CONCERNS ABOUT PUBLIC SAFETY AND PUBLIC HEALTH: LEADERS MUST LEAD.” deaths of tens of thousands of Americans each year — gun violence — seems to afflict our leaders with paralysis and render them incapable of mounting any type of effective response. Incredibly, Congress refuses to even authorize any money to simply study the problem of gun violence. Writing in The Atlantic, Sarah Zang noted, “After a deadly shooting, the debate always, it seems, breaks down like this: One side argues for gun control, and the other argues there is no research proving those measures work. There is, in fact, little research into gun violence at all — especially compared to other causes of death in the United States.” More than 30,000 Americans a year are dying from gun violence and the government doesn’t want to know why or what to do about it. Gun violence is a complex issue that will require well thought-out solutions. However, if a problem isn’t looked at honestly and thoroughly, it’s difficult to devise a wise and effective way forward. President Reagan and other past leaders have set the example when it comes to critical concerns about public safety and public health: Leaders must lead.

M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 15


BUSINESS | THE REAL DEAL

Mobile-based AeroStar expanding its space, workforce BY RON SIVAK/COLUMNIST/BUSINESS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

M

obile-based AeroStar recently announced plans to more than double its facility and employee count over the next several years. Founded in 2011, AeroStar services commercial, commuter and military aircraft and has outgrown its current local worksite footprint. According to a news release, the company plans to add a new 16,875-square-foot building next to its current 6,000-square-foot facility at the Mobile Aeroplex at Brookley. AeroStar has benefited from its relationship with VT Mobile Aerospace Engineering customers, such as FedEx, JetBlue and Delta Airlines, and has built a substantial list of clients. It performs hydraulic, pneumatic and electromechanical commercial aircraft maintenance work on all Airbus, Boeing and Bombardier platforms. “We’ve seen a dramatic increase over the years of airlines moving to smaller third-party maintenance providers, like ours, for component maintenance needs. To keep up with the stringent turnaround times, we need more technicians and test equipment,” Greg Guzman, president and managing partner of AeroStar, said. “To fuel future growth, we need to invest in new test equipment that can keep up with the ever-changing technology of the newer aircraft.” The $2 million investment includes construction expenditures, land, machinery and equipment. Work is set to begin this month and be completed near the end of 2018. The company currently employs 22 workers; AeroStar officials anticipate creating 28 new positions to handle ramped-up workloads. “Entering into a fast-developing aerospace sector in Mobile, AeroStar made its presence quickly known in the industry. We are excited to see this homegrown business commit to new investment and jobs in our community,” said David Rodgers, the Mobile Area Chamber of Commerce’s

senior project manager of economic development. “There is no greater show of confidence than when existing businesses choose to reinvest in our community. We appreciate this investment by AeroStar because it will create jobs for our citizens and add momentum to our push to become a global destination for the aerospace industry,” Mobile Mayor Sandy Stimpson said. More information about AeroStar can be found on the company’s website.

Commercial real estate moves

• Veterans Recovery Resources recently purchased two buildings on a 3-acre parcel of land on Springhill Avenue. According to Pete Riehm with NAI Mobile, the first building — the former Postal Workers Social Club — is 1,600 square feet, sits on 0.95 acres, is located at 1156 Springhill Ave. and sold for $130,000. The second site — a former Mobile County public school — is roughly 21,000 square feet, sits on approximately two acres, is located at 1200 Springhill Ave. and sold for $87,000. The buyers plan to redevelop both properties to form the professional campus for its veterans treatment program. John Vallas of Vallas Realty represented the sellers in both transactions, while Riehm worked for the buyers. • Encore Chrysler Dodge Jeep Ram announced the acquisition of 38.8 acres located at the corner of Hitt and Schillinger roads in West Mobile for $1.5 million. The site is situated directly across the street from Abba Shrine Temple, located at 7701 Hitt Road. Plans are reportedly in place for Encore to build a new and pre-owned vehicle purchase facility that will include an original equipment manufacturer-part sales department as

16 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8

well as an automobile service/repair department. John M. Delchamps, associate broker with the Merrill P. Thomas Co., worked for Encore in the transaction. Burton Clark with Cummings Associates represented the seller. • Tilson Technology Management, based in Portland, Maine, has leased an 8,000-square-foot office/warehouse facility located at 9699 U.S Highway 31 in Spanish Fort, according to Adam Metcalfe with Metcalfe and Co., which handled the transaction. • Lewis H. Golden of Hamilton & Co. recently represented the owners of 1751 Old Shell Road for business leasing inside the historic property at that address. Salon West 54 Hundred, an Aveda salon, will occupy a 2,280-square-foot area in Suite A.  Marietta Urquhart of White-Spunner Realty represented the salon in site selection and the lease transaction. “This lease represents the final available space for the building. The salon will be a great fit for the building and for the midtown community,” Golden said. • Some $650,000 was paid for 5 acres of property located at the intersection of Juniper Street and County Road 20 in Foley, according Stacy Ryals with Hosteeva Realty, who worked for the sellers. The local owners of Doc’s Seafood Shack & Oyster Bar, located at 26029 Canal Road in Orange Beach, were the buyers. • The 3,200-square-foot Crystal Ice House historic warehouse property, located at 800 Monroe St. in the Church Street East Historic District in downtown Mobile, was recently sold to investors for $150,000. Gaines Zarzour with Zarzour Cos. represented the buyer. Lewis H. Golden of Hamilton & Co. represented the sellers.

Swift Industrial Power hires Troutman

Nashville-based Swift Industrial Power recently announced it has added Scott Troutman to the company’s Mobile team as a customer service representative. He will provide sales support and promote the company’s array of service offerings to customers in South Alabama and the Florida Panhandle. “This is an exciting time to join the company and the team here in Alabama,” Troutman said. “I recognize the commitment and service level Swift provides its customers, and I’m looking forward to building on that as we expand our customer base.” Chris Jourdan, Swift Industrial Power general manager, believes Troutman will play a significant role in the future growth of the company. “Scott brings a great deal of experience in the automotive industry and will be an integral part of our team as we seek to extend our reach into southern Mississippi,” Jourdan said. Swift Industrial Power is located at 1125 Corporate Drive, N., in Mobile. The company has offices in Knoxville and Trussville, Tennessee; Mobile, Dolomite and Trussville, Alabama; and Fort Lauderdale, Jacksonville and Lakeland. Florida. For more information on the company, visit its website.


CUISINE | THE REVIEW

El Papi serves flavorful upscale Mexican fare BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

T

Rob had been gushing about the quesadillas, so Ashley ordered the Pastor ($13). Of course this is pork, and marinated in red chili with pineapple was a wise route. I was afforded a triangle of the sizable fold and found all the flavors detectable. It’s not chunks of pineapple but more so a hint. Ashley and I are both unashamed to put pineapple on pizza and therefore are OK with it in our Mexican food. We told Rob he had to sample the sandwich side of the menu, so he chose the carne asada torta ($13). Served on Mexican telera bread, the juicy steak, refried beans, tomato and lettuce with cheese and avocado on top created a sandwich that should be eaten with a fork. It was hard to share as it fell apart, but was good. It came with a crispy side of tater tots, which I loved. We asked for some hot sauce, and though there’s a bottle on the table it was totally drinkable. Good chili flavor and vinegar is a must, but sometimes you need something that comes with a respiratory warning. Paolo, our waiter, went back to the kitchen and got the chef to mix up something with a little more flame. It wasn’t face-melting but admittedly hotter, and I certainly appreciated the effort. The bowls looked promising, and they were. I started with the Tinga de Pollo ($10) and Paolo offered to top it with a fried egg for an extra buck. I declined and enjoyed the red rice, refried beans, pico de gallo and crema with the shredded chicken and onions. This was my favorite dish of the day. Fairly light and healthy, the avocado was the cherry on top. Paolo kept asking if we’d like to try a margarita. I wasn’t technically on the clock, so I took one for the team with El Papi’s Margarita Clasico ($9). With lime, agave and Cointreau added to the tequila, I found it really sweet. By sweet I mean it was too sweet for me. Many others would have liked it. There were three other signature margaritas. I should have taken a closer look and had the house margarita. When it comes to tacos, the craze is lengua, but I am a cachete ($6) man. Braised beef cheek with fresh onion and a salsa verde on corn tortillas were a good choice. I will say their corn tortillas are light and smooth enough that fans of flour tortillas won’t mind

Photo | www.el-papi.com

he best part of the new Lagniappe office being downtown is that we are so close to all the attractions. Mardi Gras was predictably a blast this year, but for me the proximity to our downtown restaurants is of utmost importance. Thank goodness I’m not there every day or my scales would be heading northward at a time when I’m trying to turn them southward. But on the chance I do get to visit with the gang, a great meal is within walking distance. Our entire city is peppered with restaurants good, bad and ugly. I believe most are good and the awful ones don’t stick around for long. Downtown, though, has the highest concentration of really good restaurants, and in the past couple years some of the best contributions to the “good” scene have been associated with Chuck’s Fish. With ties to Harbor Docks seafood in Destin, this group of restaurants garnered fans on Dauphin Street beginning with Five Bar in the former Bull location. There’s five of everything, but remember Uptown Chicken will be your favorite appetizer. After that we were treated to Chuck’s Fish just a few steps away, where you’ll find amazing sushi, steaks and fresh fish. The closing of Café 615 next to Five Bar begat the latest in the group, in the form of higher-end Mexican restaurant El Papi. A lunch date with the bosses had us hoofing it a block or two and we found ourselves passing through the beautifully transformed courtyard. The interior of the restaurant was stunningly different, with an open-air feel on a windy, sunny day. We braved the breeze and sat outside, holding down napkins and menus with anything of weight. Rob and Ashley both enjoyed prior visits and let me steer the ship on my first. With waters and tea on the way, I ordered the chili con queso ($7 plus $1.50 with homemade chorizo). This group of restaurants is known for its appetizers (in El Papi they call them aperitivos) and this one did not disappoint. I loved the flavor and texture and admit it was more elegant than most orderby-number joints. I could have eaten two of them by myself. Though fairly small for the price, it was delicious.

the texture, although with tacos I am all about the corn. I did enjoy the pickled carrots that garnished the plate. I think they are doing a good job at El Papi and I predict they will only get better and better. I still need to find time for dinner there. Definitely give them a try.

El Papi 615 Dauphin St. Mobile 36602 251-308-2655

M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 17


E WING HOUSE ($)

195 S University Blvd. Suite H • 662-1829

EUGENE’S MONKEY BAR ($) 15 N Conception St. • 433-2299

FATHOMS LOUNGE

SMALL PLATES AND CREATIVE COCKTAILS 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000 $10/PERSON • $$ 10-25/PERSON • $$$ OVER 25/PERSON

COMPLETELY COMFORTABLE ALL SPORTS BAR & GRILL ($) 3408 Pleasant Valley Rd. • 345-9338

AL’S HOTDOGS ($)

CLASSIC HOTDOGS, GYROS & MILKSHAKES 4701 Airport Blvd. • 342-3243

ATLANTA BREAD COMPANY ($-$$) SANDWICHES, SALADS & MORE. 3680 Dauphin St. • 380-0444

BAKE MY DAY ($)

OLD-FASHIONED SOUTHERN BAKE SHOP 156 N. McGregor Ave. • 219-7261

BOB’S DINER ($)

GOOD OLD AMERICAN COOKING 263 St. Francis St. • 405-1497

BRICK & SPOON ($)

3662 Airport Blvd. Suite A • 525-9177

BUCK’S DINER ($)

CLASSIC AMERICAN DINER 58 N. Secion St. Fairhope • 928-8521

CAFE 219 ($)

SALADS, SANDWICHES & POTATO SALAD 219 Conti St. • 438-5234

CAMELLIA CAFÉ ($-$$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN FARE 61 Section St. • Fairhope • 928-4321

FLOUR GIRLS BAKERY ($) 809 Hillcrest Rd. • 634-2285

FIREHOUSE SUBS ($)

HOT SUBS, COLD SALADS & CATERING 6300 Grelot Rd. • 631-3730

FIVE GUYS BURGERS & FRIES ($) BURGERS, MILKSHAKES & FRIES 4401 Old Shell Rd. • 447-2394 4663 Airport Blvd. • 300-8425 5319 Hwy 90 • 661-0071 1225 Satchel Page Dr.• 378-8768

FOOSACKLY’S ($)

FAMOUS CHICKEN FINGERS 29181 US Hwy 98 • Daphne • 375-1104 7843 Moffett Rd. • 607-6196 1109 Shelton Beach Rd. • 287-1423 310 S. University Blvd. • 343-0047 2250 Airport Blvd. • 479-2922 7641 Airport Blvd. • 607-7667 2558 Schillinger Rd. • 219-7761 3249 Dauphin St. • 479-2000

FOY SUPERFOODS ($) 119 Dauphin St.• 307-8997

GULF COAST EXPLOREUM CAFE ($) HOMEMADE SOUPS & SANDWICHES 65 Government St. • 208-6815

HOOTERS ($)

3869 Airport Blvd. • 345-9544 5470 Inn Rd. • 661-9117 28975 US 98 • Daphne • 625-3910

CAMMIE’S OLD DUTCH ($)

JAMAICAN VIBE ($)

CARPE DIEM ($)

JERSEY MIKE’S ($)

MOBILE’S CLASSIC ICE CREAM SPOT 2511 Old Shell Rd. • 471-1710

DELI FOODS, PASTRIES & SPECIALTY DRINKS 4072 Old Shell Rd. • 304-0448

CLARK’S KITCHEN ($-$$) CATERING 5817 Old Shell Rd. • 622-0869

CHICK-FIL-A ($)

107 St. Francis St. • 415-1700 3244 Dauphin St. • 476-0320 3215 Bel Air Mall • 476-8361 4707 Airport Blvd. • 461-9933 435 Schillinger Rd. • 639-1163 1682 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 621-3215 30500 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-3020

CHICKEN SALAD CHICK ($)

CHICKEN SALAD, SALAD & SOUP 2370 S. Hillcrest Rd. Unit R • 660-0501 5753 Old Shell Rd. • 408-3236 1802 US Hwy 98 Suite F• 625-1092

CHI-TOWN DAWGZ ($) CHICAGO STYLE EATERY 1222 Hillcrest Rd. • 461-6599

CONNECTION FROZEN YOGURT ($) 1880 Industrial Pkwy. • 675-2999

CREAM AND SUGAR ($)

COFFEE, BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DESSERT 351 George St #B • 405-0003

DAUPHIN ST. CAFE ($)

HOT LUNCH, DAILY MENU (INSIDE VIA) 1717 Dauphin St. • 470-5231

D’ MICHAEL’S ($)

PHILLY CHEESE STEAKS, GYROS & MORE 7101-A Theodore Dawes Rd. • 653-2979

D NU SPOT ($)

MIND-BLOWING ISLAND FOOD 3700 Gov’t Blvd. Ste A • 602-1973 AUTHENTIC SUB SANDWICHES 29660 AL-181 • DAPHNE • 626-3161 3151 Daupin St• 525-9917 7449 Airport Blvd. • 375-1820

JIMMY JOHN’S ($)

SANDWICHES, CATERING & DELIVERY TOO 6920 Airport Blvd. • 414-5444 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-8694 62 B Royal St. • 432-0360

JOE CAIN CAFÉ ($)

PIZZAS, SANDWICHES, COCKTAILS 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

JONELLI’S ($)

1252 Govenment St.• 301-7556

MONTEGO’S ($-$$)

FRESH CARIBBEAN-STYLE FOOD & CRAFT BEER 6601 Airport Blvd. • 634-3445 225 Dauphin St. • 375-1576

MOON PIE GENERAL STORE ($)

107 St Francis St #115 • RSA Bank Trust Building

MOSTLY MUFFINS ($) MUFFINS, COFFEE & WRAPS 105 Dauphin St. • 433-9855

NEWK’S EXPRESS CAFE ($)

OVEN-BAKED SANDWICHES & MORE 1335 Satchel Page Dr. Suite C. • 287-7356 7440 Airport Blvd. • 633-0096 Eastern Shore Center • Spanish Fort • 625-6544

NOURISH CAFE ($)

HEALTHY WHOLE FOODS & MORE 101 N Water St. (Moorer YMCA)• 458-8572

LODA BIER GARTEN ($) PUB FOOD AND DRAFT BEERS 251 Dauphin St. • 287-6871

MAMA’S ($)

SLAP YOUR MAMA GOOD HOME COOKING 220 Dauphin St. • 432-6262

MARS HILL CAFE ($)

GREAT SANDWICHES, COFFEE & MORE 1087 Downtowner Blvd. • 643-1611

BAR FOOD 271 Dauphin St • 438-9585

POLLMAN’S BAKERY ($)

BAKERY, SANDWICHES & MORE 750 S. Broad St. • 438-1511 4464 Old Shell Rd. • 342-8546 107 St. Francis St. Suite 102 • 438-2261

PUNTA CLARA KITCHEN ($)

9 Du Rhu Dr. Suite 201 167 Dauphin St. • 445-3802

LIGHT LUNCH WITH SOUTHERN FLAIR. 226 Dauphin St. • 433-6725

GREAT SMOOTHIES, WRAPS & SANDWICHES. Du Rhu Dr. • 378-5648 570 Schillinger Road • 634-3454

2550 Dauphin Island Pkwy S. • 307-5328

WAREHOUSE BAKERY & DONUTS ($) COFFEE AND DONUTS 759 Nichols Avenue, Fairhope • 928-7223

WILD WING STATION ($) 1500 Gov’t St. • 287-1526

GREAT FOOD AND COCKTAILS 609 Dauphin St. • 308-3105 CONTEMPORARY AMERICAN FOOD 351A George & Savannah St. • 436-8890

LAUNCH ($-$$)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St. • 432-8000

MAGHEE’S GRILL ON THE HILL ($-$$) GREAT LUNCH & DINNER 3607 Old Shell Rd. • 445-8700

NOBLE SOUTH ($$)

LOCAL INGREDIENTS 203 Dauphin St. • 690-6824

4861 Bit & Spur Rd. • 340-6464

JERUSALEM CAFE ($-$$)

MOBILE’S OLDEST MIDDLE EASTERN CUISINE 5773 Airport Blvd. • 304-1155

MEDITERRANEAN SANDWICH COMPANY ($)

GREAT & QUICK. 3702 Airport Blvd. • 308-2131 274 Dauphin St. • 545-3161 2502 Schillinger Rd. Ste. 2 • 725-0126 6890 US-90 • Daphne • 621-2271

MINT HOOKAH BISTRO ($) GREAT MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 5951 Old Shell Rd. • 450-9191

OLLIE’S MEDITERRANEAN GRILL ($-$$) MEDITERRANEAN RESTAURANT & HOOKAH 1248 Hillcrest St • 634-9820

TAZIKI’S ($-$$)

MEDITERRANEAN CAFE 1539 US HWY 98•Daphne • 273-3337

INVENTIVE & VERY FRESH CUISINE 6 N. Jackson St. • 433-0377

FAR EASTERN FARE

334 Fairhope Ave • Fairhope • 928-2399

OSMAN’S RESTAURANT ($$)

4513 Old Shell Rd.• 473-0007

REGINA’S KITCHEN ($-$$)

85 N. Bancroft St. Fairhope • 990.8883

SANDWICHES, SUBS & SOUPS 2056 Gov’t St. • 476-2777

AUTHENTIC FOODS FROM HIMALAYAN REGION 3210 Dauphin St. • 287-0115 400 Eastern Shore Center • 459-2862

WRAPS & SALADS 3220 Dauphin St. • 479-2480

BACKYARD CAFE & BBQ ($)

ROLY POLY ($)

ROSHELL’S CAFE ($)

2906 Springhill Ave. • 479-4614

‘CUE

HOME COOKIN’ LIKE MOMMA MADE. 2804 Springhill Ave. • 473-4739

ROYAL KNIGHT ($)

BAR-B-QUING WITH MY HONEY ($$)

ROYAL STREET CAFE ($)

BAY BARBECUE ($)

LUNCH & DINNER 3004 Gov’t Blvd. • 287-1220

BBQ, BURGERS, WINGS & SEAFOOD 19170 Hwy 43 Mt. Vernon. • 829-9227

HOMEMADE LUNCH & BREAKFAST 104 N. Royal St. • 434-0011

59 N Florida St.

SALLY’S PIECE-A-CAKE ($) SATORI COFFEEHOUSE ($)

SERDA’S COFFEEHOUSE ($)

BRICK PIT ($)

A FAVORITE BARBECUE SPOT 5456 Old Shell Rd. • 343-0001

COTTON STATE BBQ ($)

DOWNTOWN LUNCH 101 N. Conception St. • 545-4682

DICKEY’S BARBECUE PIT ($-$$)

SIMPLY SWEET ($)

BBQ AND MORE Jubilee Sq.Ctr. Hwy 90, Daphne • 210-2151 McGowin Park Ctr. Satchel Paige Dr. • 471-1050 7721 Airport Blvd. • 380-8957

STEVIE’S KITCHEN ($)

RIBS, SANDWICHES & GREAT SIDES 3314 Old Shell Rd. • 479-9898

COFFEE, LUNCHES, LIVE MUSIC & GELATO 3 Royal St. S. • 415-3000 CUPCAKE BOUTIQUE 6207 Cottage Hill Rd. Suite B • 665-3003 SANDWICHES, SOUPS, SALADS & MORE 41 West I-65 Service Rd. N Suite 150. • 287-2793

SUGAR RUSH DONUT CO. ($) 4701 Airport Blvd. • 408-3379

SUNSET POINTE ($-$$)

GREAT DESSERTS & HOT LUNCH 23 Upham St. • 473-6115

MCSHARRY’S ($-$$)

THE GALLEY ($)

CLASSIC BURGERS, HOTDOGS & SETTING 1808 Old Shell Rd. • 473-7872

MIKO’S ITALIAN ICE ($)

DONUTS, COFFEE & SANDWICHES 1976 Michigan Ave. • 442-4846 505 Schillinger Rd. S. • 442-4845 29160 US Hwy 98 • 621-2228

MOMMA GOLDBERG’S DELI ($)

18 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8

DUMBWAITER ($$-$$$)

ABBA’S MEDITERRANEAN CAFE ($-$$)

YAK THE KATHMANDU KITCHEN ($-$$)

R BISTRO ($-$$)

DAILY SPECIALS MADE FROM SCRATCH 57 N. Claiborne St. • 694-6853

SANDWICHES & MOMMA’S LOVE 3696 Airport Blvd. • 344-9500 5602 Old Shell Rd. • 287-6556

AMERICAN RESTAURANT & BAR 250 Dauphin St. • 476-1890

HIGH QUALITY FOOD WITH A VIEW 107 St. Francis St • 444-0200

7 SPICE ($-$$)

NOJA ($$-$$$)

6358 Cottage Hill Rd. • 725-6917

DUNKIN DONUTS ($)

TP CROCKMIERS ($)

DAUPHIN’S ($$-$$$)

650 St Louis St. • (251) 308-8488

THE WINDMILL MARKET ($)

MICHELI’S CAFE ($)

HOTDOGS SANDWICHES & COOL TREATS 3371 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 300–4015

SOUTHERN CASUAL FAMILY DINING 10800 US HWY 31 • Spanish Fort• 621-4995

THE CHEESE COTTAGE

FUDGE, PRALINES & MORE 17111 Scenic Hwy 98 • Fairhope • 928-8477

22159 Halls Mill Rd. . • 648-6522

DEW DROP INN ($)

TIN ROOF ($-$$)

UNCLE JIMMY’S DELICIOUS HOTDOGS ($)

3011 Springhill Ave. • 476-2232

AUTHENTIC IRISH PUB 101 N. Bancroft St.• 990-5100

HEALTHY, DELICIOUS MEDITERRANEAN FOOD. 3762 Airport Blvd. • 725-1177

CORNER 251 ($-$$)

PAT’S DOWNTOWN GRILL ($)

THE BLIND MULE ($)

DELISH BAKERY AND EATERY ($)

HIGH QUALITY FOOD & DRINKS 251 Government St • 460-3157

DOWN-HOME COUNTRY COOKIN 7351 Theodore Dawes Rd. • 654-0228 13665 N. Wintzell Ave. • 824-1119

TIME TO EAT CAFE ($)

KITCHEN ON GEORGE ($-$$)

ORIGINAL SANDWICH AND BAKE SHOP 42 ½ Section St. • Fairhope • 929-0122 102 Dauphin St. • 405-0031

AT FLU CREEK 831 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-7766

MARY’S SOUTHERN COOKING ($)

FALAFEL? TRY SOME HUMMUS

CHUCK’S FISH ($$)

TROPICAL SMOOTHIE ($)

562 Dauphin St.• 725-6429

JUDY’S PLACE ($-$$)

3915 Gov’t Blvd. • 219-7922

SEAFOOD AND SUSHI 551 Dauphin St.• 219-7051

33 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-5635

PANINI PETE’S ($)

O’DALYS HOLE IN THE WALL ($)

COFFEE, SMOOTHIES, LUNCH & BEERS. 5460 Old Shell Rd. • 344-4575

LICKIN’ GOOD DONUTS ($)

2304 Main St. • 375-2800

FIVE ($$)

JUBILEE DINER ($-$$)

HOME COOKING 4054 Government St. • 665-4557

THYME BY THE BAY ($-$$)

GRILLED STEAKS, CHICKEN & SEAFOOD 312 Schillinger Rd • 607-7200 901 Montlimar Dr • 408-3133

THREE GEORGES CANDY SHOP ($)

BAKERY 5638 Three Notch Rd.• 219-6379

A VARIETY COMFORT F00D. BREAKFAST ALL DAY. 6682 US-90 • Daphne • (251) 621-3749

INSIDE VIRGINIA’S HEALTH FOOD 3055 A Dauphin St • 479-3200

DREAMLAND BBQ ($) MEAT BOSS ($)

5401 Cottage Hill Rd. • 591-4842

MOE’S ORIGINAL BAR B QUE ($) BARBEQUE & MUSIC Bayfront Park Dr. • Daphne • 625-RIBS 701 Springhill Ave. • 410-7427 4672 Airport Blvd. • 300-8516

SAUCY Q BARBQUE ($) AWARD-WINNING BARBQUE 1111 Gov’t Blvd. • 433-7427

SMOKEY DEMBO SMOKE HOUSE ($)

SUPREME EUROPEAN CUISINE 2579 Halls Mill Rd. • 479-0006

SUSHI BAR 650 Cody Rd. S • 300-8383

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

DELICIOUS, TRADITIONAL THAI CUISINE 28600 US 98 • Daphne • 626-5286 3821 Airport Blvd. • 344-9995

GUMBO, ANGUS BEEF & BAR 72. S. Royal St. • 432-SCAM (7226) EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE 271 Glenwood St. • 476-0516

SAGE RESTAURANT ($$) INSIDE THE MOBILE MARRIOTT 3101 Airport Blvd. • 476-6400

SOUTHERN NATIONAL ($$-$$$) 360 Dauphin St • 308-2387

THE TRELLIS ROOM ($$$)

CONTEMPORARY SOUTHERN CUISINE Battle House Hotel, Royal St. • 338-5493

THE WASH HOUSE ($$)

17111 Scenic HWY 98 • Point Clear • 928-4838

A LITTLE VINO DOMKE MARKET

WINE, BEER, GOURMET FOODS, & MORE. 720 Schillinger Rd. S. Unit 8 • 287-1851

FOOD PAK

FOOD, WINE & MORE 5150 Old Shell Rd. • 341-1497

POUR BABY

WINE BAR, CRAFT BEERS & BISTRO 6808 Airport Blvd. • 343-3555

FIREHOUSE WINE BAR & SHOP

THAI & SUSHI 5369 D Hwy 90 W • 661-5100 THAI KITCHEN & SUSHI BAR 960 Schillinger Rd. S • 660-4470 3966 Airport Blvd.• 343-5530

CUISINE OF INDIA ($$) LUNCH BUFFET 3674 Airport Blvd. • 341-6171

FUJI SAN ($)

THAI FARE AND SUSHI 2000 Airport Blvd. • 478-9888

GOLDEN BOWL ($)

HIBACHI GRILL & ASIAN CUISINE 309 Bel Air Blvd • 470-8033

HIBACHI 1 ($-$$)

2370 Hillcrest Rd. Unit B • 380-6062

ICHIBAN SUSHI ($)

JAPANESE & CHINESE CUISINE 3959 Cottage Hill Rd • 666-6266

KAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($-$$) QUALITY FOOD, EXCELLENT SERVICE 5045 Cottage Hill Rd. • 607-6454

216 St Francis St. • 421-2022

LIQUID ($$)

323A De La Mare Ave, Fairhope • 990-0003 1104 Dauphin St.. • 478-9494

RICE ASIAN GRILL & SUSHI BAR ($)

SOUTHERN COOKING & THEN SOME 1716 Main St. Daphne • 222-4120

A PREMIER CATERER & COOKING CLASSES 1880-A Airport Blvd. • 450-9051

BRIQUETTES STEAKHOUSE ($-$$)

BENJAS ($)

CHINA DOLL ($)

CASUAL FINE DINING 104 N. Section St. • Fairhope • 929-2219

ROYAL STREET TAVERN

THE SUNFLOWER CAFE ($)

TRADITIONAL SUSHI & LUNCH. 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-9077

TAMARA’S DOWNTOWN ($$)

DROP DEAD GOURMET BAY GOURMET ($$)

BANZAI JAPANESE RESTAURANT ($$)

CHARM ($-$$)

SEAFOOD, ASIAN & AMERICAN CUISINE 69 St. Michael St • 375-1113

113 Dauphin St.• 436-0989

THE PIGEON HOLE ($)

BANGKOK THAI ($-$$)

VON’S BISTRO ($-$$)

3758 Dauphin Island Pkwy. • 473-1401

THE HARBERDASHER ($)

BAMBOO STEAKHOUSE ($$)

ROYAL SCAM ($$)

RED OR WHITE

OPEN FOR LUNCH, INSIDE GULFQUEST 155 S. Water St • 436-8901

ANG BAHAY KUBO ($$)

LIVE MUSIC, MARTINIS & DINNER MENU. 26 N. Royal St. • 338-2000

SOUTHERN NAPA

BISTRO PLATES, CRAFT BEERS & PANTRY

AMAZING SUSHI & ASSORTMENT OF ROLLS. 661 Dauphin St. • 432-0109 3964 Gov’t Blvd. • 378-8083

ROCK N ROLL SUSHI ($$)

273 S. McGregor Ave • 287-0445 6345 Airport Blvd. • 287-0555 940 Industrial Pkwy • 308-2158 6850 US HWY 98 • Daphne • 753-4367


STIX ($$)

610240 Eastern Shore Blvd. • 621-9088

TASTE OF THAI ($$)

9091 US-90 Irvington • 957-1414

TOKYO JAPANESE STEAK HOUSE ($$) UPSCALE SUSHI & HIBACHI 364 Azalea Rd. • 343-6622

WASABI SUSHI ($$)

JAPANESE CUISINE 3654 Airport Blvd. S. C • 725-6078

FROM THE DEPTHS BAUDEAN’S ($$)

FRIED, GRILLED, STEAMED & ALWAYS FRESH 3300 River Rd. • 973-9070

THE BLUEGILL ($-$$)

A HISTORIC SEAFOOD DIVE W/ LIVE MUSIC 3775 Hwy. 98 • 625-1998

BONEFISH GRILL ($$)

ECLECTIC DINING & SPACE 6955 Airport Blvd. • 633-7196

BOUDREAUX’S CAJUN GRILL ($-$$) QUALITY CAJUN & NEW ORLEANS CUISINE 29249 US Highway 98 Daphne. • 621-1991

CRAVIN CAJUN/DIP SEAFOOD ($) PO-BOYS, SALADS & SEAFOOD 1870 Dauphin Island Pkwy • 287-1168

ED’S SEAFOOD SHED ($$)

FRIED SEAFOOD SERVED IN HEFTY PORTIONS 3382 Hwy. 98 • 625-1947

FELIX’S FISH CAMP ($$) UPSCALE DINING WITH A VIEW 1420 Hwy. 98 • 626-6710

FISHERMAN’S LEGACY ($) DELI, MARKET AND CATERING. 4380 Halls Mill Rd. • 665-2266

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($) 30500 AL-181 • Spanish Fort • 206-8768 3654 Airport Blvd. • 338-9350

LUCY B. GOODE ($$)

GULF COAST CUISINE, REINVENTED 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

LULU’S ($$)

LIVE MUSIC & GREAT SEAFOOD 200 E. 25th Ave. • Gulf Shores • 967-5858

R&R SEAFOOD ($-$$)

LAID-BACK EATERY & FISH MARKET 1477 Battleship Pkwy. • 621-8366

RIVER SHACK ($-$$)

SEAFOOD, BURGERS & STEAKS 6120 Marina Dr. • Dog River • 443-7318.

THE GRAND MARINER ($-$$) LOCAL SEAFOOD & PRODUCE 6036 Rock Point Rd. • 443-7540

THE HARBOR ROOM ($-$$) UNIQUE SEAFOOD 64 S. Water St. • 438-4000

THE SEAFOOD HOUSE ($-$$) 751 Azalea Rd. • 301-7964

TIN TOP RESTAURANT & OYSTER BAR ($$) SEAFOOD, STEAKS, & EXTENSIVE WINE LIST 6232 Bon Secour Hwy County Rd. 10. • 949-5086

WINTZELL’S OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) FRESH SEAFOOD FOR OVER 75 YEARS 605 Dauphin St. • 432-4605 6700 Airport Blvd. • 341-1111 1208 Shelton Beach Rd. • Saraland • 442-3335 805 S. Mobile St. • 929-2322

IS THE GAME ON?

ASHLAND MIDTOWN PUB ($-$$) PIZZAS, PASTAS, & CALZONES 245-A Old Shell Rd. • 479-3278

BAUMHOWER’S ($)

WINGS, BURGERS & PUB GRUB 6880 US-90 #14 • Daphne • 625-4695

BUFFALO WILD WINGS ($) BEST WINGS & SPORTING EVENTS 6341 Airport Blvd. • 378-5955

BUTCH CASSIDY’S ($)

FAMOUS BURGERS, SANDWICHES & WINGS 60 N. Florida St. • 450-0690

CALLAGHAN’S IRISH SOCIAL CLUB ($) BURGERS & BEER 916 Charleston St. • 433-9374

HEROES SPORTS BAR & GRILLE ($) SANDWICHES & COLD BEER 273 Dauphin St. • 433-4376 Hillcrest & Old Shell Rd. • 341-9464

HURRICANE GRILL & WINGS ($-$$)

MUDBUGS AT THE LOOP ($)

WINGS, SEAFOOD, BURGERS & BEER 7721 Airport Blvd. Suite E-180 • 639-6832

OFF THE HOOK MARINA & GRILL ($)

EVERYTHING BAKED OR GRILLED 2617 Dauphin St. • 476-9464

CAJUN KITCHEN & SEAFOOD MARKET 2005 Government St. • 478-9897

ISLAND WING CO ($)

MUG SHOTS ($$)

BAR & GRILL 29740 Urgent Care Dr. • Daphne • 662-9639 6255 Airport Blvd. • 447-2514

OLD 27 GRILL ($)

BURGERS, DOGS & 27 BEERS & WINES. 19992 Hwy.181 Old County Rd. Fairhope • 281-2663

LUCKY’S IRISH PUB ($)

IRISH PUB FARE & MORE 1108 Shelton Beach Rd •Saraland • 473-0757 3692 Airport Blvd • 414-3000

WEMOS ($)

WINGS, TENDERS, HOTDOGS & SANDWICHES 312 Schillinger Rd. • 633-5877

MAMA MIA!

BUCK’S PIZZA ($$)

DELIVERY 350 Dauphin St. • 431-9444

CORTLANDT’S PIZZA PUB ($-$$) GREAT PIZZA. LUNCH & DINNER 4356 Old Shell Rd. • 342-0024

GAMBINO’S ITALIAN GRILL ($) ITALIAN, STEAKS & SEAFOOD 18 Laurel Ave. • Fairhope • 990-0995

GRIMALDI’S ($)

Bel Air Mall • 476-2063

GUIDO’S ($$)

FRESH CUISINE NIGHTLY ON MENU 1709 Main St. • Daphne • 626-6082

HOUSE OF PIZZA ($)

3958 Snow Rd C. • Semmes • 645-3400

JONELLI’S ($)

PINZONE’S ITALIAN VILLAGE ($$) AUTHENTIC ITALIAN DISHES 312 Fairhope Ave. • Fairhope • 990-5535

830 W I65 Service Rd. S • 378-5837 4663 Airport Blvd. • 342-5553

LOS ARCOS ($)

QUAINT MEXICAN RESTAURANT 5556 Old Shell Rd. • 345-7484

RAVENITE ($)

MARIA BONITA AGAVE BAR & GRILL ($-$$)

PIZZERIA DELFINA ($)

OLÉ MI AMIGO ($-$$)

ROMA CAFE ($-$$)

POOR MEXICAN ($)

PIZZA, PASTA, SALAD & MORE 102 N. Section St. •Fairhope• 929-2525 PIZZA & PASTA 107 Dauphin St. • 375-1644

PASTA, SALAD AND SANDWICHES 7143 Airport Blvd. • 341-7217

TAMARA’S BAR & GRILL ($)

WINGS, PO-BOYS, BURGERS 210 Eastern Shore Center, Hwy. 98 • 929-0002

TRATTORIA PIZZA & ITALIAN ($$) ITALIAN FOOD & PIZZAS 11311 US HIghway 31 Spanish Fort• 375-0076

VIA EMILIA ($$)

HOMEMADE PASTAS & PIZZAS MADE DAILY 5901 Old Shell Rd. • 342-3677

OLÉ MI AMIGO! AZTECAS ($-$$)

TASTE OF MEXICO 5452 Hwy 90 W • 661-5509

CAFÉ DEL RIO ($-$$)

MOUTH WATERING MEXICAN FOOD 1175 Battleship Pkwy • 625-2722

DAUPHIN ST. TAQUERIA ($)

ENCHILADAS, TACOS, & AUTHENTIC FARE Ok Bicycle Shop • 661 Dauphin St. • 432-2453

MEXICAN CUISINE 3977 Gov’t Blvd. • 660-4970

HEARTY MEXICAN FARE 736 holcombe Ave.• 473-0413 3050 AL 181 • Spanish Fort • 621-7433

ROOSTER’S ($)

LATIN AMERICAN FOOD 211 Dauphin St. • 375-1076

TAQUERIA CANCUN ($)

3172 International Dr. • 476-9967

TAQUERIA MEXICO ($-$$) AUTHENTIC MEXICAN FLAVOR 3733 Airport Blvd. • 414-4496

NO GAMBLING CASINO FARE BEAU RIVAGE:

875 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 888-952-2582

BR PRIME ($$-$$$)

FINE DINING ESTABLISHMENT.

EXOTIC CUISINE AND SUSHI

STALLA ($$)

MELLOW MUSHROOM ($)

PIES & AWESOME BEER SELECTION 2032 Airport Blvd. • 471-4700 5660 Old Shell Rd. • 380-1500 2409 Schillinger Rd S • 525-8431 29698 Frederick Blvd.• Daphne • 621-3911

MIRKO ($$)

1715 Main St. • 375-0543

PASTA & MORE 9 Du Rhu Dr. • 340-6611

THE SEAFOOD RESTAURANT 1595 Battleship Pkwy. • 626-0045

BRILLIANT REUBENS & FISH-N-CHIPS. 101 N. Brancroft St. Fairhope • 990-5100

PIZZA, SUBS & PASTA 1368 ½ Navco Rd.• 479-0066

NAVCO PIZZA ($$)

EL PAPI ($-$$)

615 Dauphin St • (251) 308-2655

FUEGO ($-$$)

OUTSTANDING MEXICAN CUISINE 2066 Old Shell Rd. • 378-8621

FUZZY’S TACO SHOP ($) 5713 Old Shell Rd.• 338-9697

HACIENDA SAN MIGUEL ($-$$)

3300 W. Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 877-774-8439

BEACH BLVD STEAMER ($) SEAFOOD

CARTER GREEN STEAKHOUSE ($$-$$$) RICH TRADITIONS, STEAK, SEAFOOD

C&G GRILLE ($)

LARGE BREAKFAST, LUNCH OR DINNER MENU

PALACE CASINO:

158 Howard Ave. Biloxi • 800-725-2239

MIGNON’S ($$$)

STEAKS, SEAFOOD, FINE WINE

PLACE BUFFET ($-$$) INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

STACKED GRILL ($-$$)

BURGERS AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

TREASURE BAY:

1980 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 800-747-2839 INTIMATE & CASUAL WITH DAILY SPECIALS ELEGANT ATMOSPHERE & TANTALIZING ENTREES LOUNGE WITH COCKTAILS & TAPAS MENU

WIND CREEK CASINO:

BREAKFAST, LUNCH, DINNER, LATE NIGHT

FIRE ($$-$$$)

777 Beach Blvd.Biloxi • 877-877-6256

303 Poarch Rd. Atmore • 866-946-3360 PRIME STEAKS, SEAFOOD & WINE

GRILL ($)

CONTEMPORARY & OLD-FASHIONED FAVORITES

SCARLET PEARL:

RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE ($$$)

9380 Central Avenue D’Iberville • 800266-5772

SATISFACTION ($-$$)

MADE-TO-ORDER FESTIVE TREATS AND SPECIALTY CAKES.

AMERICAN FARE & ROCKIN’ MEMORABILIA EXCEPTIONAL SERVICE & TASTE SOUTHERN FAVORITES BUFFET

HARRAH’S GULF COAST:

280 Beach Blvd. Biloxi • 288-436-2946

TASTE OF MEXICO 880 Schillinger Rd. S. • 633-6122 5805 US 90 • 653-9163

MAGNOLIA HOUSE ($$-$$$)

AUTHENTIC MEXICAN CUISINE 800 N Section St. • Fairhope • 990-0783

THE BLIND TIGER ($-$$)

LA COCINA ($)

ISLAND VIEW:

ITALIAN COOKING

HALF SHELL OYSTER HOUSE ($-$$) HARD ROCK CAFÉ ($)

5055 Cottage Hill Rd. • 308-4888 2394 Dawes Rr. • 639-3535 2004 US 98 • Daphne • 265-6550

CASUAL & RELAXING, EXTENSIVE MENU

BLU ($)

LOCAL SEAFOOD AND 40+ BEERS

EL MARIACHI ($)

763 Holcombe Ave • 473-0413

INTERACTIVE ASIAN DINING

HIGH TIDE CAFÉ ($)

JIA ($-$$)

HARD ROCK CASINO:

MARCO’S PIZZA ($)

SEAFOOD, STEAKS, WINE

TIEN ($-$$)

CQ ($$-$$$)

EL CAMINO TACO SHACK ($) 212 Fairhope Ave. • 928-8108

THIRTY-TWO ($$$)

COAST SEAFOOD & BREW ($-$$)

COMFORT FOOD 1716 Main St. Ste. C • Daphne • 281-2982

29669 Alabama 181 • Spanish Fort • (251) 625-3300

850 Bayview Ave. Bilox • 888-946-2847

THE DEN ($-$$)

AMAZING ARRAY OF MOUTH-WATERING FOOD.

TERRACE CAFE ($)

LA ROSSO ($$)

IP CASINO:

THE BUFFET ($-$$)

DON CARLOS MEXICAN RESTAURANT($)

MANCIS ($)

MCSHARRY’S IRISH PUB ($)

A TASTE OF ITALY. BYOB. 28691 U.S. Highway 98 • 626-1999

1252 Gov’t St. • 301-7556

CAJUN INSPIRED/FRESH SEAFOOD & MORE 621 N Craft Hwy • Chickasaw • 422-3412

RALPH & KACOO’S ($-$$)

PAPA’S PLACE ($$)

FINE DINING, SEAFOOD AND STEAKS

FLAVORS BUFFET ($-$$) ALL YOU CAN EAT BUFFET

quality food and simple unique cocktails

CHEF WENDY’S BAKING ($-$$) UNDER THE OAK CAFE ($-$$)

CLASSIC ALL-AMERICAN CASUAL CUISINE WITH OVER 100 OPTIONS.

WATERFRONT BUFFET ($$-$$$) SOUPS, SALADS, FRESH SEAFOOD, AND MORE

CHOPSTX NOODLE BAR - $-$$

VIETNAMESE SANDWICHES, PHO, AND APPETIZERS.

SCARLET’S STEAKS & SEAFOOD ($$$) SAVORY STEAKS AND SEAFOOD

BUTLER’S BAR & LOUNGE ($$) EXTRAORDINARY DRINK MENU, COCKTAILS

M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 19


CUISINE | WORD OF MOUTH

TexarBama goes from food truck to stationary in Fairhope BY ANDY MACDONALD/CUISINE EDITOR | FATMANSQUEEZE@COMCAST.NET

Photo | FAcebook

Casey Carrigan and Bradley Parmer are opening TexarBama BBQ in District Hall at Warehouse Bakery in Fairhope Friday.

I

remember being impressed the first time I tried TexarBama food truck’s barbecue at an event for Fairhope Brewing Co. Now the gang is settling into a more permanent location just down the street. The countdown is on for a Friday, March 9, opening date at 761 Nichols Ave. in Fairhope, next to Warehouse Bakery in District Hall, where TexarBama will be serving its fine Texas barbecue — including hormone- and antibioticfree USDA prime beef and Compart Duroc pork. A full bar, a new smoker named Black Betty and high-quality meats will be the main attractions. Live music Friday, Saturday and Sunday evenings are another reason to visit. Barbecue by the pound and Texas-sized sandwiches dominate the menu. Brisket tacos will more than likely be your favorite with such toppings as candied bacon and pickled red onions. Potato salad, slaw, beans and Texican corn are the sides. These guys play to win. Visit www. texarbama.com for more information.

Dumbwaiter breaking new ground

Don’t worry, folks, downtown Dumbwaiter is not changing. The new Dumbwaiter Fairhope at 58 N. Section St. should be opening in the next couple of weeks or so, and while focus has zeroed in on the building across the bay, Dumbwaiter on the Hill will continue to be a Dumbwaiter, but the concept will be as a venue for private parties and dinners. Even more exciting is that there are plans for a third location in Mobile. The location hasn’t been released yet, but we should know in a

20 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8

couple of months. We will inform you as soon as we get word.

Downtown Cajun Cook-Off hits Cathedral Square

With the triumphant return of the ACS Chili Cook-Off downtown last weekend, we are now readying ourselves for another event just blocks away at the fourth annual Downtown Cajun Cook-Off at Cathedral Square on Saturday, March 24. Presented by Cunningham Bounds, the fun begins at 10 a.m. and runs until 2 p.m. at a cost of $10 per ticket, in advance at the Child Advocacy Center in Mobile, Arrow Exterminating in Mobile and Baldwin Counties and Mellow Mushroom in midtown and on Old Shell Road. Online ticket prices are $13 in advance, $15 for day of the event. Proceeds benefit the Child Advocacy Center of Mobile. Competition should be a little stiffer this year with Mark Saunders out for the season in Puerto Rico, but The Garage will still have a formidable team. Rally your troops and let’s make this the best one yet!

Jonelli’s calls it quits

I get choked up saying this, but Jonelli’s closed this past Saturday, March 3. Many expressed their sorrow via social media during the last week as the opportunity for Chicago beef sandwiches, pizza and hot dogs slipped away. I would love to see this pop up in another location, downtown or as a food truck. It’s a heck of a loss for midtown. Recycle!


M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 21


COVER STORY

Students, teachers, administrators weigh various school safety opJASON JOHNSON/REPORTER

H

igh schoolers in Mobile say they remember having more drills for active shooters than for fires or severe weather — one of a number of ways a generation of teenagers has come to view the potential for a violent attack on their schools as a common concern. Asked if it’s strange practicing procedures in preparation for someone walking into her school shooting a gun, Murphy High School student Chlöe Duren said “not anymore.” Duren has heard people older than her talk about where they were on 9/11 or when they heard about the Columbine shooting in 1999, but she can’t recall what she was doing when she heard 17 students had been killed in a Feb. 14 school shooting in Parkland, Florida. She said it all starts to run together if you’ve grown up in it like she and her classmates have — another day, another death toll, another drill. “Sometimes when I walk into a new classroom I think, ‘where am I going to hide if a shooter comes in? Would I jump in front of my friends?’” she said. “These are the kind of things we have to think about, and some people still want to say our concerns aren’t valid.” Since the Parkland shooting, some students have called for tighter gun regulations across the country. Those students, led by survivors of the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shootings, seem to have found a voice of their own on the issue. So far, Congress has held bipartisan discussions on how to make schools safer but has yet to bring up any major consideration for a full vote. Meanwhile, the Alabama Legislature has focused on campus security and ways to make schools safer without limiting citizens’ right to bear arms. As the familiar scenario plays out, local school systems are trying to learn from a situation some believe could have been prevented by focusing on what they can control today — security within their institutions, and mental health and social services for troubled students.

Safety in the classroom

When the Feb. 14 shootings took place, the Mobile County Public School System was in the middle of a week-long break for Mardi Gras. However, Security Director Andy Gatewood said it was one of the first things he and his staff discussed when they returned. A former Mobile Police officer, Gatewood supervises the system’s 12 school resource officers who oversee each MCPSS feeder pattern. He said safety is always a top priority for a school system of its size but an event such as the one in Florida reaffirms “how important this task is.”

22 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8

“We see things get defeated and realize we can take a better approach here,” he said. “We try to be proactive, and some of the events in the recent past have brought to light some of these things.” After 26 students and teachers were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Connecticut in 2012, Gatewood said MCPSS, like many systems, installed magnetic locks to the entrances of its elementary schools — giving staff members the ability to grant or deny access into the school remotely. Similarly, because police in Parkland had trouble with a significant delay in the school’s security camera feed, he said MCPSS plans to continue an ongoing effort to “systematically update” the more than 6,000 cameras used throughout the district’s 80-plus schools. Over time, that will replace older analog camera systems operating on a closed circuit with internet protocol systems that can send and receive digital footage in real time. It would also allow local police to access school camera feeds remotely in an emergency situation. But Gatewood said resource officers, enhanced entrances and improved surveillance are not fail-safes against someone with ill intent. That’s why MCPSS develops and routinely reviews individualized “school safety plans” based on student population, location and school layout. Superintendent Martha Peek said those plans cover many aspects of how students and teachers should proceed in situations such as an active shooter scenario, a fire or a weather event. “It’s good to have a plan, but you have to make sure everybody in the building is educated on what that plan is, and you have to practice,” Peek said. “In our schools, those drills are conducted on a regular basis and school resource officers observe each of those at least twice a year.” Drills for “code red” situations, which include an active shooter on campus, are required by the state Department of Education. They’re also the type of drill students Duren and other students say have become “run of the mill” in recent years, but Gatewood argued that’s a good thing. He said executing those school safety plans needs to be second nature to teachers as well as to students. In schools without armed security, he said, those plans can be critical to minimizing casualties between the time a shooting starts to when police can respond to the scene. “We have to make sure our kids and teachers are prepared. We have to give them the tools they need to be ready to act in these kinds of unfortunate events,” he said. “Our intent is that this never happens here, but we have to be prepared if it does.” MCPSS uses handheld metal detectors during routine sweeps of middle and high schools but only has walkthrough units at two of its alternative schools that have

small populations and serve students with a history of behavioral issues. Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey and U.S. Sen. Doug Jones have spoken in favor of putting more metal detectors in schools throughout the state since the Parkland shooting, but Gatewood said while those devices are successful in small settings, a broader application for the local school district could be as expensive as it is impractical. A school with more than 2,000 students and multiple entrances, he said, would require a large increase in time, manpower and funding. Within the current security framework, though, there have been multiple reports of students bringing guns onto MCPSS campuses in recent months. In October police investigated a 14-year-old student who brought a gun to Murphy High School, and less than a month later a Baker High School student was suspended for bringing an unloaded handgun to school in his backpack. In January, a Murphy student was arrested for firing a handgun into the air on school grounds during an altercation with another student. No one was hurt, but the school went into lockdown until police took the student into custody, which reportedly took several minutes. The student has since been expelled. Nat Trejo said she was in Murphy’s band room when the lockdown occurred that day, though she expressed concern that she couldn’t actually hear the announcement that initiated it. “We usually don’t hear the announcements in there because we’re playing. There was a lockdown a few weeks before that and nobody heard it either,” Trejo said. “Thankfully, no one was hurt, but in that situation, you could not know what’s going on until it’s potentially too late.” Trejo and some of her classmates said if the student had more than a handgun or had come to school intending to hurt someone, the situation could have been “disastrous” in places like the band room, the gymnasium and older areas of the school such as the biology building.

Who has guns at school? Who should?

While local schools use a combination of high-quality cameras, magnetic doors and school resource officers, many don’t have all three at the same time. Only MCPSS elementary schools are outfitted with secure entrances, and the district is still in the process of updating its camera systems. It also came as a surprise to several students that MCPSS resource officers do not carry a firearm on any school campus. Gatewood said SROs were armed from the 1970s until a legal change in 2007, but have been prohibited from carrying weapons since. A 2014 Attorney General’s opinion reaffirmed that all school systems need rules “prohibiting all persons, other than authorized law enforcement personnel, from bringing or possessing any deadly weapon or dangerous instrument onto school property” to comply with state law. “We’re no longer allowed to carry firearms because we’re employees of the school system, even though we all have law enforcement training and went through our own qualifying for judgmental shooting,” Gatewood said. “For my guys, the requirement is a minimum five years of law enforcement experience in the field and at least a bachelor’s degree in criminal justice.” Gatewood and Peek said they’d support any law change allowing SROs to carry on campus again, though both said they were opposed to arming teachers with concealed weapons. Despite lots of talk on the subject, a number of school administrators, SROs and educators in the state have criticized the idea of arming teachers. Peek said educators aren’t law enforcement officers and arming them wouldn’t make students safer. “What happens if a gun is stolen? When I speak with [local law enforcement], the first thing they say is that most guns in the hands of young people are stolen,” she added. “I would have no problem with our resource officers being armed because they’ve been trained, they know how to handle guns and they know how to make decisions about when appropriate force is needed.” Five Murphy students expressed similar concerns over how teachers would


COVER STORY make the determination of when to use a gun, and how a gun could be kept inaccessible to students but accessible enough for a teacher in the event it is needed. Senior Tiffany Trotter posed the question: “What if they’re trying to break up a fight between students and one takes a swing at them? Is it OK to pull out their gun then?” That doesn’t even get into the cost of training teachers to appropriately use a weapon, and it’s unclear in most proposals who would pay for teachers’ guns. MCPSS Director of Social Services Denise Riemer said her schools need more resources for counseling, not handguns. “I want to be armed with knowledge to help these children, but I don’t want to be armed with a firearm. If we could have more funding for mental health issues or residential treatment for these children exhibiting mental health problems, that would certainly be money well spent,” Riemer said. “We have to be proactive. That’s the better way to keep children safe.”

Mental health at school

The Parkland shooting was carried out by a former student who teachers had concerns about for years. He’d been placed in alternative educational settings, prevented from bringing a backpack to school and was eventually expelled about a year before he returned with a gun. That backdrop has made in-school social services and mental health programs the focus of efforts to prevent similar occurrences in the future. Riemer said MCPSS has programs in place to help students with mental or behavioral issues, but they’re already stretched thin. She’s one of just five full-time social workers who serve more than 55,000 students but says Mobile County is fortunate to have “strong community partners.” AltaPointe provides 20 therapists for 36 schools selected by need, and The Bridge Inc. facilitates behavioral in-school rehabilitation programs. Riemer said counselors don’t work with every student, but those in need can be identified by teachers or classmates who interact with them nearly every day. She said administrators work to impart a “see something, say something” mentality and students, to their credit, have reported a number of incidents involving suspected guns on campuses and social threats in recent years. Riemer said MCPSS also makes use of federal funding to train teachers to recognize signs a student might be struggling with mental issues or problems outside of the classroom, such as sudden changes in behavior, appearance, friends or attendance. “It may just be something going on at home, but we want teachers to be aware of those nuances of difference, because sometimes that’s all we get,” she said. “Teachers are the front lines. Any teacher can tell you the students in their classroom that might be having a rough time.” Riemer said the school system also works through child and family-based programs established by the Department of Youth Services, law enforcement agencies and the district attorney’s office. But intervening in certain situations can be challenging, especially when a student has an uncooperative family or — as was the case was in Parkland —  is already legally an adult themselves. When students who could pose a danger to themselves or others are identified, unless they’ve already done something or made a specific threat, security officials have very few options for addressing it. Gatewood placed

some of the blame on a lack of state mental health facilities. “It seems as though we’ve lost many resources, and that affects the way we’re able to handle some things that could be similar to this situation in Florida,” he said. “Even if we say someone’s a potential threat, and in some cases even if they’ve made particular threats and need treatment, we — as in the state of Alabama —  really lack the resources to provide that treatment to them.”

March For Our Lives

In conservative Alabama, even Democrats have to tiptoe around most proposed gun restrictions, but high school students do not. Even if there are no sweeping reforms — such as a national ban on certain types of weapons — some students say they’re just tired of seeing nothing change at all. That’s why Duren and her classmates organized events to keep local attention focused on gun violence as opposed to letting conversations about more rigorous background checks and gun restrictions fizzle out, as they have after mass shootings in the past. On March 14, with the approval of Murphy’s administrators, students plan to join a nationwide walkout for 17 minutes — one for each of the Parkland victims. Duren said she expects at least 50 students and teachers to participate. The same group of students have also organized a separate gathering at 1 p.m., March 24, to mirror the national “March For Our Lives” event in Washington, D.C. Locally, students plan to gather in Public Safety Memorial Park on Airport Boulevard to host a series of speakers and discuss ideas they believe will prevent school shootings in the future. Those ideas include, but are not limited to, raising the minimum age for purchasing all firearms to 21 as well as a ban on bump stocks, silencers and what they described as “assault weapons.” While many of those are controversial proposals, organizers say they want to take as much of a bipartisan approach as possible and invited even those who disagree with them to sit down at the event and look for common ground on what can be done to make schools safer. That said, a couple of their proposals have actually seen traction. Bills banning “assault weapons” — a term loosely used to describe semi-automatic rifles built on the AR-15 platform — have been introduced at the federal and state level, though neither has progressed very far. Florida passed a Senate bill raising the minimum age to purchase rifles from 18 to 21 as part of a larger package that would also arm some school personnel, though the House has yet to take up that particular legislation. While a familiar political stalemate may be brewing among lawmakers, the response to Parkland has been unique in how vocal survivors from the school have been and how quickly their advocacy has spread to other student groups such as the one at Murphy. Many who don’t share those students’ views have decried them as “too young” or “too naive” to have anything to say about politics, and the Murphy students have no doubt similar comments will be made about them. They also don’t really care that much. “The children at Sandy Hook didn’t have the articulation to talk about their experience, but these are high school students. They’re in the prime time for discovering yourself and your political views,” Trotter said. “Look at the Civil Rights movement or the Vietnam protests. At the head of most any political or social movements, you’ll find young people.” M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 23


ART ARTIFICE

Theater convention fills downtown

I

BY KEVIN LEE/ARTS EDITOR/KLEE@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

f you think downtown Mobile could stand a little more emotional highs and lows, with enhanced dramatics all around, then you’re in luck. You’ll have thousands of like-minded souls running its streets this week. The Southeastern Theatre Conference will hold its 69th annual convention in the Azalea City March 7-11 to bring the arts front and center for the greater part of a week. It will also fill hotel rooms as 5,500 attendees are expected. It’s the convention’s second visit to Mobile in the last five years. Though the prior date was on the heels of Mardi Gras, it was more than parades that brought them back. “[Tourism personnel] have treated us like gold. We made a couple of different site visits down there and we did the convention there in 2014 and everyone involved has been stellar,” SETC Marketing Manager Clay Thornton said. Thornton said more than 330 workshops will be conducted between Tuesday and Sunday across a wide range of specialties. Theater enthusiasts from across the nation will be here to learn, network, audition, interview and listen to keynote speakers such as playwright Suzan Zeder, costume designer Jane Greenwood and TV, stage and film actor Chris Chalk. The visitors will be helped by Mobile’s theater community to boot. Joe Jefferson Players Executive Director Jason McKenzie is organizing a corps of local volunteers. “We have folks signed up as liaisons for each of the 10 community theater groups coming in from out of town. Basically they’ll be answering questions about things in Mobile, finding out about

Solley-Wilson now atop ACAC

Alabama Contemporary Art Center’s board of directors has tapped current director of exhibitions and programs Amanda Solley-Wilson as its new executive director. The position has been vacant since Bob Sain resigned in December 2015. Solley-Wilson has been a key player in ACAC’s recent focus on Cuba and its artists. The current exhibit, “Back to Havana,” will be in place through June 1. “The arts are a community asset that can bring people together and provide them with a voice. This year and next we join organizations across the state in celebrating our bicentennial by recognizing our collective stories and writing new ones,” Solley-Wilson said in the statement. The board also noted Julie H. Friedman of the Alabama State Council on the Arts was voted to the position of board vice chair. The press release also noted the return of cultural force majeure Ann Bedsole to the board.

24 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8

a problem, if they have a flat tire or need a dentist or whatever, that kind of stuff,” McKenzie said. Those community theater groups will form the most public aspect of the convention: free performances in Mobile’s grandest space. Thursday through Saturday, the Saenger Theatre (6 S. Joachim St.) will host 10 successive plays by community theater companies from regional states such as Kentucky, South Carolina, Georgia and Mississippi. “Specifically, those community theater performances are competition winners in their state and so they’re culminating in this main convention,” Thornton said. Thursday’s lineup begins at 6 p.m. with “Flowers for Algernon,” followed by “The Last Five Years” at 7:30 p.m. and “I Am My Own Wife” at 9 p.m. Friday’s slate starts at lunchtime with “The End of a Line” at 12:30 p.m., “Don’t Dress for Dinner” at 2 p.m., “Women On Fire” at 3:30 p.m., “Second Lady” at 6:30 p.m. and “Paper Thin” at 8 p.m.. On Saturday, “27 Wagons Full of Cotton” starts at 12:30 p.m. and the closer is “Doubt” at 1 p.m. The crews will need to move at breakneck speed. How do they set up and strike sets in lightning-quick fashion? “They have to fit in 10-by-10 blocks and that’s part of the requirement of the competition. We’ll be on hand to help when they load in their set for their Saenger performances,” McKenzie said. He will play point man for the visitors’ time away from the convention center.

Kennedy bows out at ballet

On Feb. 7, Mobile Ballet Managing and Development Director Karen Kennedy tendered her resignation from the dance group. She told Lagniappe on March 1 it was a six-week resignation “to allow for a smooth transition.” “It was a good time for me and for the ballet, for that transition. The board has asked me to stay on as a volunteer and continue my involvement, so I look forward to it,” Kennedy said. Kennedy said she had served as managing and development director since May 2012. She had no insight for a timetable in finding her successor. Kennedy noted other transitions, as previous board chair Sandra Parker, M.D., has handed her position to another physician, Jill Ringold. “[Ringold] was a dancer who grew up in Mobile Ballet as a member of our performing company in high school and now has young children who are students. She’s going to do a great job,” Kennedy said.

“I’m giving them a list of events while they’re in town, bars and restaurants and shops and things primarily downtown since that’s where they’re all staying. Artwalk is that Friday so that should be fun for them,” McKenzie said. The JJP honcho said the city and the Downtown Business Alliance have been particularly helpful. On March 8 and 9, 20 high school companies from 10 states — Alabama, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia and West Virginia — will perform at the Mobile Civic Center Theater. Those start at 10 a.m. and run through 10:45 p.m. “It is essentially a setup where we have two winning high schools rather than community theaters from each state. Those do cost a little bit of money, like $20 per block of shows,” Thornton said. While attendance at the convention workshops is limited to paid members, a unique instructional phase will be open to public appreciation. “A mural painting workshop will take place, I think in the Riverview Garage, maybe the Battle House, over a couple of days,” Thornton said. “Master painter Scott Bradley’s class will grid out a design, take their spots and then they’ll do the painting in two-hour blocks on Friday and Saturday. The public is welcome to watch the process, and the mural will be left after the convention leaves town.” If history repeats, they’ll also leave some ringing cash registers for Mobile merchants, some great memories for conventioneers and another return visit in a handful of years.

Westerlies mix influences at pair of shows

A young brass quartet with formidable chops, The Westerlies’ versatility abounds. In addition to their own work, the Seattle-born, New York-based combo has appeared on recordings by Fleet Foxes, Vieux Farka Touré and Dave Douglas. These young lions blow into Mobile for a pair of March performances. The first is a free sneak preview at Serda Brewing (600 Government St.) on Saturday, March 10, 6-7:30 p.m. This show is co-sponsored by Mobile Chamber Music and the Mystic Order of the Jazz Obsessed. The second is a Sunday, March 11, 3 p.m. concert at Laidlaw Performing Arts Center (5751 USA Drive S.) on the University of South Alabama campus. That program includes compositions by Wayne Horvitz and Charles Ives, spirituals by the Golden Gate Jubilee Quartet and original Westerlies works. Tickets are available at Carpe Diem coffee house and at the door.


M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 25


BAND: PERPETUAL GROOVE DATE: FRIDAY, MARCH 9, WITH DOORS AT 7:30 P.M. VENUE: SOUL KITCHEN, 219 DAUPHIN ST., WWW.SOULKITCHENMOBILE.COM TICKETS $15-$35, AVAILABLE AT VENUE, ITS WEBSITE OR BY CALLING 1-866-777-8932

S

ince its mid ‘90s revival, the jam rock style popularized by bands such as Widespread Panic and Phish has been inundated with more modern aspects such as live-looping and EDM. However, some bands have remained true to the sounds that brought them notoriety. With a new album expected this year, one such band, Perpetual Groove — PGroove — returns to Mobile with its serene, jazz-inspired brand of Southern jam rock that has changed very little since the band’s inception. PGroove began to take shape 20 years ago when guitarist/vocalist Brock Butler and bassist Adam Perry met in Savannah. After moving to Athens, PGroove began expanding its audience around the Southeast and beyond, especially on the festival circuit. With each show, the band added to its dedicated legion of fans, who craved PGroove’s innovative sound, dominated by intricate rock overtures that are often instrumental. When the band called a hiatus in 2013, PGroove fans were uncertain as to the band’s future. However, its 2015 revival and its moves since have proven PGroove’s legacy is far from over. Even though Butler is exploring his solo projects in Los Angeles, he knows PGroove still has music to be

heard, both live and on wax. “We’re still out there, and we’re at a point where everyone is getting along really well and communicating as friends, which translates musically and creatively,” Butler said. “Considering how much heavy and not-great things there are out there in the world, I’m grateful each and every day that I get to do my favorite thing in the world. I get to travel around and make music. It makes me happy, and I’ve only had positive things happen as a result of doing it.” Since breaking its hiatus, PGroove has given its audience the 2016 EP “Familiar Stare,” which marked keyboardist John Hruby’s return to the band. Hruby joined the band for its 2007 release, “LiveLoveDie,” noted for its heavier rock edge and relatively abundant vocal work compared to the band’s previous studio efforts. Even though the band’s latest EP release features the “LiveLoveDie” lineup, “Familiar Stare” balances the band’s archetypal instrumental style with more moderate lyrical work. Butler says tracks on “Familiar Stare” such as “Best of Anything” and “Fall” were written on the edge of the band’s hiatus and evolved over the years. “I think it’s something to our credit,” Butler said. “I love STS9 [Sound Tribe Sector 9], but they don’t do the lyrical component. I also love singer-

26 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8

MUSIC

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

FEATURE

Getting back into the Groove

songwriter stuff. It’s a balance of what we do as a band. With the shows that we play, I think the best setlists are ones that have a nice balance of both things. The selection for ‘Familiar Stare’ is that same philosophy.” Butler says “Familiar Stare” solidified Hruby’s role in PGroove and represents “a definitive lineup” 20 years in the making. Overall, Butler says, this lineup thrives from the musical chemistry they have established both on stage and on a personal level. He likens the group’s creative time together to musical conversations based on instinct. “This is the squad,” Butler said. “I think there’s something special that is no substitution for what happens over time, when you communicate with these same people musically and all of the experiences that you go through both on stage and in a personal sense.” PGroove’s followers will witness the band’s chemistry through its upcoming fulllength release, the band’s first in seven years. Butler says their collaboration with producer/engineer Jason Kingsland (Band of Horses, Carl Broemel) has been exciting and has left them with an abundance of content from which to choose. He adds the band is taking a different approach than usual. Past visits to the studio were governed by the band’s live show and whether they would be able to repeat studio arrangements in a live environment. This standard prevented PGroove from exploring new sounds through multiple layers of instrumental tracks. For the new album, Butler says, “no idea is a bad idea.” “In the past, I’ve tried not to use too many tricks in the studio where, when we try to play it live, it’s impossible to do with 20 guitar overdubs and things like that,” Butler said. “I’m not saying it’s not going to be overdub craziness, but I’m not keeping in mind how a particular idea can be executed live. I want an album to stand alone as a piece of art.” Another new aspect is the way in which the album was financed. PGroove utilized Kickstarter to generate funds for the effort. At this point in the band’s history, Butler and his bandmates realize PGroove’s live shows provide its members’ livelihood; a day off the road means a paid day of work missed. However, Butler says the group’s “strong and family-oriented” following gave them the confidence needed to start the campaign, which generated more than enough funds to create the album. Butler says he knew the band’s following would see this as an opportunity to be personally involved in their beloved group’s future. “Our fan base is a good, polite audience,” Butler said. “I’d like to think PGroove has a nice vibe all the way around, and people want to be involved. They want to pass it to their friends and turn other people on … It means something to them. It’s another component of our dynamic.”


M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 27


MUSIC BRIEFS

Outlaw country

BY STEPHEN CENTANNI/MUSIC EDITOR/SCENTANNI@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

Band: Sarah Shook & the Disarmers Date: Sunday, May 11, 7 p.m. Venue: Callaghan’s Irish Social Club, 916 Charleston St., www.callaghansirishsocialclub.com Tickets: Call 251-433-9374.

Photo | John Gessner | Sarah Shook & The Disarmers

B

loodshot Records’ Sarah Shook & the Disarmers will shake things up in the OGD with an evening of outlaw country. Shook is a reactionary artist whose dark style reflects both her strict Christian upbringing and the male-dominated indie country music scene. With merciless lyrics and an underground attitude, Shook stands alongside such contemporaries as Margo Price and Alynda Segarra (Hooray for the Riff-Raff). With her band the Disarmers by her side, Shook evokes a purring, bittersweet croon that is beautifully scarred with disillusionment — and wrapped in a warm blanket of edgy honky-tonk. The band is preparing for the April 6 release of its second album, “Years,” which Shook describes as a musical navigation “through exhaustion, depression, betrayal, hangover after hangover, upper after downer after upper, fight after never-ending fight.” The album’s power is rooted in the subtle contrast of its lyrical theme and sonic vibe. This aspect is established in the album’s opener, “Good As Gold,” a heart-wrenching lyrical rendition of possible rejection running through an upbeat honky-tonk bounce. Further exploration of the album’s tracks will bring smiles and tears alike to unsuspecting indie country fans.

RIP Officer Billa Band: Bayfront Boogie 2018 Date: Saturday, March 10, with doors at 11 a.m. Venue: Moe’s Original BBQ, 6423 Bayfront Park (Daphne), www.moesoriginalbbq.com Tickets: Free In tribute to fallen Mobile Police officer Justin Billa, Bayfront Boogie will give the public a chance to celebrate Billa’s life as well as his commitment to his community and his family. Moe’s Original BBQ in Daphne will feature $10 all-you-can-eat crawfish plates at this philanthropic event. The Bayfront Boogie will also hold a raffle and silent auction, with all proceeds going to Billa’s family. In order for this to be a proper Bayfront Boogie, Moe’s will fill the day with Southeastern music. Fresh from their Friday night show at The Brickyard, Midnight Revel’s Tyler Tisdale and Shelby Kemp will spend the day jamming for the crowd. Birmingham’s Winston Ramble will follow with its mellow Southern-fried jam rock.

Acid surf guitar

Band: Yonatan Gat Date: Saturday, March 10, 9 p.m. Venue: The Merry Widow, 51 S. Conception St., www.themerrywidow.net Tickets: $10 in advance/$12 day of show; available through Ticketfly

Guitarist Yonatan Gat earned worldwide notoriety as a founding member of the raucous Israeli garage rock outfit Monotonix. After six years the band’s members decided to part ways, and thus began Yat’s solo career. Since relocating to New York City, this fiery string master’s raw, primal rock style has been lauded by The New York Times, Vice and The Village Voice, which declared him “Best Guitarist in New York” in 2013. Gat is no stranger to the Azalea City, and his adrenalized, sometimes improvised local shows have been legendary. In his most recent album, the 2015 release “Director,” Gat takes on the musical persona of a schizophrenic Dick Dale working his way through an introduction to acid. Gat uses the 11 cuts on this album to establish a psychedelic world of surf rock on the edge of madness. From the ominous string-plucks of “Canal” to the relentless beats of “Gibraltar,” Gat set new standards for surf rock.

28 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8


M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 29


AREAMUSIC LISTINGS | March 7 - March 13

WED. MARCH 7

Bluegill— Matt Neese Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Brickyard— Chad Davidson Band Felix’s— Jamie Anderson Flora Bama— Albert Simpson & John Kulinich, 11a// Neil Dover, 2p/// Bruce Smelley, 5:30p//// Rhonda Hart Duo, 6p///// Mario Mena Band, 10p////// Dustin Bogue, 10:15p Lulu’s— Adam Holt, 5p McSharry’s— Doc Rogers, 7p

THURS. MARCH 8

Bluegill— Lee Yankee Duo Blues Tavern— Retrobution Band Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— David Chastang, 6p Brickyard— Yellowhammer El Camino— Crawfish & Leavin Bros Duo Felix’s— Light Travelers Flora Bama— Zach Diedrich, 2p// Albert Simpson & John Kulinich, 5p/// Dueling Pianos, 5:30p//// Mark Sherrill, Chris Newbury, James Daniel & Jose Santiago, 6p///// Ja Rhythm, 9:30p////// Jerry Jacobs Band, 10p/////// Mario Mena Duo, 10:15p Listening Room— Drugstore Gypsies, 8p Lulu’s— Bust, 5p Manci’s— Josh Ewing, 7p McSharry’s— Lite Travellers, 7p Off The Hook— Karaoke with Sugarbabies, 6p Soul Kitchen— Cody Johnson, 8:45p Veets— Drew Bentley Live with Veet, 8p

Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Kill Monsters, 9:30p IP Casino— The Pointer Sisters, 8p Listening Room—Jamell Richardson, 8p Lulu’s— Cadillac Attack, 5p Main Street Cigar Lounge— Bayou Rhythem, 8p Manci’s— Grayson Capps and Corky Hughes, 7p McSharry’s— DJ Chi, 10p The Merry Widow— Liza Anne + Sun Seeker, 9p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — The Tree-Oh, 8p Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — Joshua Stephen Ward Duo, 6:30p Soul Kitchen— Perpetual Groove, 8:30p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Strickly Isbell, 5:30p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Hippy Jim, 6p Zebra Club— Identity Crisis, 9p

SAT. MARCH 10

Big Beach Brewing— Spearman Brewers, 6:30p Bluegill— Jimmy Lumplin, 12p // Matt Neese Blues Tavern— Rick McNaughton Band Brickyard— Slide Bayou Callaghans— The High Divers with Hannah Wicklund & the Stepping Stones Felix’s— John Cochran Duo Flora Bama— Al & Cathy, 1p// Spencer Maige 1p/// J. Hawkins Trio, 2p//// Jo Jo Pres, 2p///// David Swanson, 4p////// Dave McCormick, 5p/////// Jack Robertson a.k.a.The Big Earl Show, 5:30p//////// Johnny B. Trio, 6p///////// Mackenna & Brock 6p////////// Greg Lyons, 8p/////////// Fox Iguanas, 10p//////////// Brandon White Duo, 10:15p///////////// Red FRI. MARCH 9 Clay Strays, 10:30p Big Beach Brewing— Golden Nugget— IrmaThomas,8p Dueling Pianos with Frankie & Hard Rock (Center Bar) — Steve, 6:30p Bluegill— Ryan Balthrop, 12p // Kill Monsters, 9:30p Hard Rock (Live) — Aaron David Chastang Duo, 6p Lewis: Songs and Stories, 8p Blues Tavern— Johnny No Listening Room— Radney Brickyard— Midnight Revel Foster with Eric Erdman, 8p El Camino— Johnny Hayes Lulu’s— Ronnie Presley, 5p Felix’s— Grits n Pieces Flora Bama— J. Hawkins Duo, Manci’s— Delta Smoke, 7p 1p// Lea Anne Creswell Duo, 2p/// McSharry’s— DJ Carter, 10p Jack Robertson a.k.a. The Big Earl The Merry Widow— Yonatan Gat, 9p Show, 5:30//// Brandon White, 6p///// Lee Yankie & the Hellz Yeah, Moe’s BBQ (Mobile) — 6p////// Scott Koehn, Lisa Zhanghi Emily Stuckey Duo, 6:30p & Doug Habbena, 6p/////// Smokey Moe’s BBQ (Semmes) — Otis Duo, 8p//////// Yeah, Probably, Glass Joe, 6:30p Off The Hook— Brett Lagrave 10p///////// Bruce Smelley Duo, Soul Kitchen— Matisyahu, 10:15p///////// Jerry Jacobs Band, Eminence Ensemble, 8p 10:30p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)—

30 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8

Three Bean Soup, 5:30p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Jason Justice, 11a

SUN. MARCH 11

Big Beach Brewing— Jim Burt, 3p Bluegill— Quintin Berry, 12p // Fortag, 6p Callaghans— Sarah Shook & the Disarmers Felix’s— Matt Bush Flora Bama— Lee Yankie, 11a// Smokey Otis Trio, 12p/// Chad Parker Duo, 1p//// Songs of Rusty McHugh with Jason Justice, 1:30p///// Al & Cathy, 2p////// Mason Henderson, 3p/////// Dave McCormick, 5p///////// Nick & The Ovorols, 5:30p///////// Big Muddy, 6p////////// Perdido Brothers, 6p/////////// Mackenna & Brock, 10p//////////// Spencer Maige, 10:15p///////////// Daisy Dukes Band, 10:30p Frog Pond— David Wilcox, 3p Listening Room— Caleb Caudle Album Release Party with Abe Partridge, 7p Lulu’s— Albert Simpson, 5p The Merry Widow— Wild Moccasins Off The Hook— Open Mic with Jimmy Dunnam Soul Kitchen— Fleet Foxes, Natalie Prass, 8p Tacky Jacks (Gulf Shores)— Lisa Christian, 2p Tacky Jacks (Orange Beach) — Gerry Gambino, 11a

MON. MARCH 12

Felix’s— Jamie Anderson Flora Bama— Gove Scrivenor, 2p// Brandon White, 5:30p/// Cathy Pace, 6p//// Lee Yankie & The Hellz Yeah, 9:30p///// Daisy Dukes Band, 10p////// Petty & Pace, 10:15p Lulu’s— Brent Burns, 5p

TUE. MARCH 13

Bluegill— Jamie Adamson Boudreaux’s Cajun Grill— Ryan Balthrop, 6p Butch Cassidy’s— Chris Powell Felix’s— Chris Houchin Flora Bama— T-Bone Montgomery, 2p// J. Hawkins Duo, 5:30p/// Perdido Brothers, 6p//// Spunk Monkees, 9:30p/////Yeah Probably, 10p/////// Bruce Smelley Duo, 10:15p Lulu’s— Lefty Collins, 5p Moe’s BBQ (Daphne) — Robbie Sellers, 6:30p


M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 31


FILMTHE REEL WORLD In ‘Loving Vincent,’ visual greatly outweighs narrative

S

BY ASIA FREY/FILM CRITIC/AFREY@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

AREA THEATERS AMC MOBILE 16 785 Schillinger Road South Mobile, AL (251)639-1748 CRESCENT THEATER 208 Dauphin St Mobile, AL (251) 438-2005 REGAL MOBILE STADIUM 18 1250 Satchel Paige Drive Mobile, AL (844) 462-7342 AMC JUBILEE Square 12 6898 Highway 90 Daphne, AL (251) 626-5766

ubject and form are a perfect match in the Oscar-nominated film “Loving Vincent,” which is animated with 65,000 oilpainted, hand-painted frames. The film explores Vincent van Gogh’s life, centering around his death from a self-inflicted gunshot wound at the age of 37. This extraordinary film is a gift to art lovers, but its achievements are more artistic than cinematic. The film follows the journey, after van Gogh’s death, of Armand Roulin, the son of a postmaster in Arles who was the subject of several van Gogh paintings. Charged by his father with delivering a letter to van Gogh’s brother, Armand travels from town to town, interviewing people who came into contact with van Gogh. This format is entirely too convenient to function as proper storytelling, and the series of interviews feels just like that, and eventually becomes routine and tedious, despite the colorful spectacle of the film itself. Using the same style of animating that you might remember from Richard Linklater’s “Waking Life,” real actors perform not just the voices, but perform

the film itself, which was then painted over by hand. Chris O’Dowd plays the postmaster and Saoirse Ronan plays Marguerite, the daughter of a doctor who Armand believes holds the key to uncovering the truth about van Gogh’s death. Although van Gogh lived long enough after his fatal injury to claim responsibility for shooting himself, Armand and his father suspect foul play. The visual greatly outweighs the narrative and, while I marveled at many individual scenes, the cumulative effect is somewhat inert and dull. Each character is introduced in a wooden way, as Armand simply goes from one character to the next. It is like an utterly beautiful, highbrow version of the game “Guess Who.” The story switches to a sketchier black-and-white style for flashbacks to the time when van Gogh was alive, a nice device that keeps the story clear and adds another beautiful element. It is hard to argue with the thrill of seeing Armand, wearing the same dazzling yellow jacket he wears in a portrait painted in real life by the tormented master, come to life, even if his role in the story is reminiscent of James Lipton

in “Inside the Actors Studio,” a bit too expository to really blend into a film. All of the obviously tremendous effort that went into “Loving Vincent” seems to have gone into the painting, and the skimpy script wears thin, despite the glory of its execution. Perhaps the filmmakers were too deeply in thrall to their subject to get the proper distance to create a dramatic story. What we get instead is an emotional and beautiful tribute. This animated film is wonderful for fans of Vincent van Gogh, but not ultimately successful in telling a good story. Everything is there, all the stuff of the van Gogh legend — his ear, his sunflowers and artist cameos from Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and others. The thing about van Gogh is that he is so universally beloved and so exposed at this point, “Loving Vincent” is in danger of becoming the latest in a long line of museum gift shop souvenirs of his unquestionably beautiful works. The technique is gorgeous, but the story is not dynamic, and while the animators succeeded in capturing the drama of van Gogh’s work, the writers failed to express the drama of van Gogh’s life.

NEXUS CINEMA DINING 7070 Bruns Dr. Mobile, AL (251) 555-5555 AMC CLASSIC WHARF 23151 Wharf Lane Orange Beach, AL (251) 981-4444 COBB PINNACLE 14 3780 Gulf Shores Pkwy Gulf Shores (251) 923-0785 EASTERN SHORE PREMIERE CINEMA 14 30500 State Hwy 181 Spanish Fort, AL (251) 626-0352 Nexus Cinema Dining 7070 Bruns Dr Mobile AL 36695 251-776-6570 32 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8

Photos | Good Deed Entertainment / Disney Enterprises Inc.

While the technique of “Loving Vincent” is gorgeous, the story is not dynamic, and writers failed to express the drama of van Gogh’s life. “A Wrinkle in Time” is the story of three peculiar beings sending Meg, her brother and her friend to space in order to find Meg’s missing father. NEW THIS WEEK A WRINKLE IN TIME

The beloved children’s sci-fi classic comes to life with a star-filled cast. All listed multiplex theaters, Nexus Cinema Dining.

GRINGO

NOW PLAYING DEATH WISH

All listed multiplex theaters.

RED SPARROW

All listed multiplex theaters.

ANNIHILATION

All listed multiplex theaters.

Harold Soyinka (David Oyelowo) finds himself at the mercy of his back-stabbing business colleagues back home, local drug lords and a morally conflicted black-ops mercenary. All listed multiplex theaters.

GAME NIGHT

STRANGERS: PRAY AT NIGHT

All listed multiplex theaters, Nexus Cinema Dining.

A family’s road trip takes a dangerous turn in an abandoned mobile home park. All listed multiplex theaters.

THE HURRICANE HEIST

Thieves attempt a heist on the U.S. treasury as a hurricane approaches. All listed multiplex theaters.

All listed multiplex theaters, Nexus Cinema Dining.

EVERY DAY

All listed multiplex theaters.

BLACK PANTHER

All listed multiplex theaters.

THREE BILLBOARDS OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI Crescent Theater, AMC Classic Wharf, Regal Mobile Stadium 18, AMC Jubilee Square 12

DEN OF THIEVES

Regal Mobile Stadium 18

12 STRONG

All listed multiplex theaters.

PROUD MARY

Regal Mobile Stadium 18

THE POST

All listed multiplex theaters.

DARKEST HOUR

All listed multiplex theaters.

SAMSON

INSIDIOUS: THE LAST KEY

THE 15:17 TO PARIS

All listed multiplex theaters.

JUMANJI: WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE

All listed multiplex theaters.

THE GREATEST SHOWMAN

AMC Mobile 16

PETER RABBIT

FIFTY SHADES FREED

Regal Mobile Stadium 18

All listed multiplex theaters. All listed multiplex theaters.


M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 33


CALENDAR OF EVENTS MARCH 7, 2018 - MARCH 13, 2018

TOUCH-A-TRUCK CHILDREN AND THEIR FAMILIES CAN CLIMB ABOARD MORE THAN 50 BIG TRUCKS AND OTHER LARGE VEHICLES AT TOUCH A TRUCK, SATURDAY, MARCH 10, AT HANK AARON STADIUM FROM 10 A.M. TO 2 P.M. BENEFITS PEDIATRIC CANCER RESEARCH AND ADOPTION. GENERAL INTEREST

Celebrate Historic Mobile The Historic Mobile Preservation Society hosts Celebrate Historic Mobile March 8-11. Includes programs and activities including tours of living spaces, sacred places and resting places. Visit www historicmobiletour.com. LoDa Artwalk The second-Friday LoDa Artwalk will be held Friday, March 9, at 6 p.m. in the Lower Dauphin Street district. Sponsored by city of Mobile Special Events and Mobile Arts Council. Call 251208-1550. Girls Night Out at The Pillars Join us for a fun night out for you and your girlfriends, Thursday, March 8, at 5 p.m.  Come enjoy drinks, food, music, giveaways, shopping and more. Free admission. Cocktails & Creatives Join us for a happy hour designed to unite Mobilians interested in creativity and creative pursuits at The Merry Widow, Thursday, March 8, at 5:30 p.m. Mission is to inspire everyone to explore their creative natures. Orange Beach Festival of Art Two days of visual, musical, performance and culinary fine arts from 100 exhibitors. Saturday and Sunday, March 10 and 11. Visit www. orangebeachal.gov/facilities/ festival-arts/about. Wave to Work Week A survey campaign is being conducted March 5-9 to understand how Mobilians get around our beloved city, while creating awareness and advocacy for the Mobile public

transportation system. Visit facebook.com/wavetowork/. Hoopalooza 2018 A family-friendly day of fun and fellowship sponsored by Christ the King Catholic School Booster Club. Open to players in grades 2-8 as well as high school and adult teams. Saturday, March 10, 9 a.m. to 7 p.m., at Christ the King Catholic School in Daphne. Visit ctkdaphne.org/hoopalooza for ticket information. Inaugural Grill on the Hill Numerous teams compete for top honors in the chicken, beef, pork and side dish categories. There will also be live music, drinks and raffle items. Saturday, March 10, at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church. For more information visit stpaulsearlyedcenter.com/ events/. Leadership Seminar for Girls In today’s media-absorbed society, it is difficult for young girls to develop a healthy sense of self-worth, self-respect and self-love. Alabama Contemporary Art Center on Saturday, March 10, noon to 3 p.m. For tickets visit Eventbrite.com. Wee Exchange Kids Resale Join the largest children’s consignment sale on the Gulf Coast on Wednesday, March 14, at the Abba Shrine, 7701 Hitt Road.  Radney Foster live

As a young musician straight out of Texas, Radney Foster spent the lengthy drives in between tour stops reading the likes of John Steinbeck, Larry McMurtry and Harper Lee. Come see him Friday, March 9, 6-7 p.m. at Page & Palette in Fairhope.

34 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8

Funky Monkey 5K & Fun Run Run, have fun and enjoy Mobile’s biggest banana split at the Funky Monkey 5K & Fun Run Saturday, March 10, 8 a.m. at University of South Alabama campus. Call 251-6655490 or register at bitly.com/ FM5k2018. Spring Bazaar Admission is free Saturday, March 10, for Christ United Methodist Church Spring Bazaar featuring food trucks, arts, crafts and so much more. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Visit christumcmobile.com/ springbazaar. WWII Living History Event Experience a day in the life of a World War II soldier. See authentic camping, blacksmithing, drills, small-arms firing and more on Saturday, March 10. Visit http://www. dauphinislandtourism.com/ calendar/. Gulf Coast Talent Showcase The Gulf Coast Spotlight Talent Showcase was created to shine the spotlight on talented young performers right in our own community. Sunday, March 11, beginning at 2 p.m. Contact Adrienne Rea, 251-438-3621. JDRF South Alabama Walk Sunday, March 11, beginning at 1 p.m. at Five Rivers in Spanish Fort. Games, music, food and fun! Free, with registration at walk.jdrf.org/Southalabama. Women’s Resource Center Celebration Banquet Mobile Convention Center, Tuesday, March 13. Silent auction at 5 p.m., dinner at 6 p.m. Call 251-473-4000 for tickets or visit www.savalifemobile.org.

Tabletop Game Night Join the Spanish Fort Public Library for some good oldfashioned fun. The library will have games on loan and you are welcome to bring your own. Meet new friends and sit a spell on Tuesday, March 13, at 4 p.m. IRISH DANCING Learn traditional jigs, reels, hornpipes and ceilidh dances. Performance and competition opportunities. Classes ongoing weekly for kids 3-18, Saturday mornings at the Azalea City Center for the Arts. New students always accepted. Call Julie Black at 228-239-2422 or email maccrossanirishdance@yahoo.com. Midtown Optimist Club Join Midtown Optimist Club every Wednesday at noon for lunch at Azalea City Golf Course. Call 251-348-3542. Practical Gardening Class A six-week class at Mobile Botanical Gardens on how to look at your landscape and select plants, soil preparation, proper plant maintenance and more. Thursdays through March, 6:30-8 p.m. Call 251-342-0555 or visit mobilebotanicalgardens.org. Rabies Clinic The Mobile County Health Department offers $10 rabies shots. This Saturday’s clinic is at Dauphin Island Town Hall, 1011 Bienville Blvd., 1:30-3:30 p.m. Call 251-690-8823. TOPS Take Off Pounds Sensibly meets every Tuesday at 5:30 p.m. at Spanish Fort Presbyterian Church. Call 251-625-6888. Toastmasters Toastmasters International meets regularly at six locations

in Mobile and Baldwin counties. Visit www.toastmasters.org for more information.

FUNDRAISERS

Let’s Get It 5K The 5th annual 5K in memory of Justin Hasty will benefit the Wounded Warrior Project and Semper Fi Fund/America’s Fund. Saturday, March 10, 11 a.m. at the Mellow Mushroom at the Loop. Visit jmhletsgetit.com. Touch-a-Truck Children and their families can climb aboard more than 50 big trucks and other large vehicles at Touch a Truck, Saturday, March 10, at Hank Aaron Stadium from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Benefits pediatric cancer research and adoption. Over the Edge The 74 Club will host the 3rd annual Over the Edge event on Friday and Saturday, March 9-10, at The Mobile Marriott. Visit www.otemobile.com, call 251-402-4508 and read “Upon Further Review” in this issue. Couture at the Manor Join Make-A-Wish Alabama for Couture at the Manor, a fashion event for all ages Thursday, March 8, at 6 p.m. Fashion, fun, silent auction and more will bring awareness and support to our local Make-A-Wish children. All ages welcome. General admission $30, VIP $45. Building Walls Join us Thursday, March 8, at the Bragg-Mitchell Mansion for a band party benefiting McKemie Place. Music, cocktails and food! For tickets, visit https://www. eventbrite.com/e/building-wallsband-party-tickets-43409376614.


Mobile SPCA Spay-ghetti Dinner It’s the 10th annual Spay-ghetti Dinner on Thursday, March 8, at Our Savior Catholic Church, 1801 Cody Road. All proceeds benefit the Mobile SPCA’s spay-neuter program. Call 251-633-3531 or visit MobileSPCA.org. Spring Tea The Bragg-Mitchell Mansion is hosting its annual Spring Tea fundraiser, Friday, March 9, 2-5 p.m. at 1906 Springhill Ave. Proceeds will benefit the restoration and operation of Bragg-Mitchell Mansion. Contact Bragg-Mitchell Mansion at 251471-6364. Free Concert Salvation Army USA Southern Territorial Songsters will perform in Mobile Friday, March 9, at Byrne Hall on Spring Hill College’s campus. The concert is open to the public with free admission. Visit http://salvationarmyalm.org/ coastalalabama/. Bandit Big Rig Series As many as 27 Big Rig tractortrailer cabs will be racing around the half-mile oval track at the Mobile International Speedway on Friday, March 9, and Saturday, March 10. Visit http://www. mobilespeedway.net/. Bark & Bingo Serda Brewing and ARF are partnering for this fundraiser for dogs benefiting ARF. Come play for a chance to win great prizes and enjoy vendors from Walks & Wags, Dog Days Baker and My Happy for 123. Bring the whole family Wednesday, March 14, at 7 p.m.

ARTS

Spring Repertoire Performance This performance will introduce Classical Mobile Ballet to our community. Featuring Lily Ojea

Loveland and Aaron Melendres. Sunday, March 11, 2:30 p.m. at St. Luke’s Episcopal School. Purchase tickets at ClassicalBalletMobile.org/Forms. Teacher Workshop Mobile Museum of Art hosts “Art and History in Alabama: Every Picture Tells a Story” Saturday, March 10, 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Workshop includes Painting with the Elements and Printmaking with Map Skills. Visit mobilemuseumofart.com/event/ teacher-workshop-art-historyalabama/. Power Lines Poets A Mobile-based poetry troupe featuring local writers and performers returns to the Mobile Museum of Art, Thursday, March 8, 6-7 p.m., for a new quarterly slam poetry session. Power Lines Poets will perform and invite guest poets to take the mic as well. Open Studio Artists at work, with complimentary beverages and works by more than 60 area artists on display. Sunday, March 11, 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., at Cathedral Square Gallery. Call 251-6940278. Spanish Moss Miniature Art Show Through March 30 at Mobile Art Council. Nothing larger than 5”x5” paintings or drawings.

MUSEUMS

“Titanic: Honour & Glory” “Titanic Honour & Glory” runs through April 15 at the History Museum of Mobile. In addition to the exhibition, the museum will host monthly events. Call 251301-0273 or email gavin.snyder@ historymuseumofmobile.com.

“Right on Course” The United States Sports Academy’s American Sport Art Museum and Archives is open free to the public weekdays, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. One of the newest exhibits is “Right on Course.” Visit www. asama.org. “Windows to the Sea” “Windows to the Sea” is the latest permanent exhibit at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab Estuarium. Visit disl.org. “Savage Ancient Seas” “Savage Ancient Seas” will transport GulfQuest guests to a time when the last of the great dinosaurs roamed Earth and swam the seas. Visit www. gulfquest.org. Fairhope’s Founding Learn more about the 1894 founding of Fairhope at the Fairhope Museum of History, 24 N. Section St. The museum is open daily (except Sunday and Monday), 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Call 251-929-1471. Little Discoveries “Outside the Box,” aimed at children age 6 and under, explores how innovation and creativity can lead to a world of possibilities, starting with a simple cardboard box. Wednesdays at 10 a.m. Call 251-208-6893 or email jholland@ exploreum.com. Thursdays at MMoA Every Thursday from 10 a.m. to 9 p.m., the Mobile Museum of Art offers free admission to all visitors. No reservations are necessary. MMoA is at 4850 Museum Drive. Call 251-208-5200. “Permian Monsters: Life Before Dinosaurs” Take an adventure back in time 290 million years when bizarre-looking animals dominated life on land and sea. The Exploreum will display this traveling exhibition through June 3. Visit exploreum.com.

“Galapagos: Nature’s Wonderland” In the vastness of the Pacific Ocean, there is a paradise unlike any other: the Galapagos Archipelago. Immerse yourself in this spectacular film at the Exploreum, until May 26. Visit exploreum.com.

SPORTING EVENTS/ACTIVITIES

Cornhole Tournament Hosted by Fairhope Girls Softball League, Saturday, March 10, from noon to 3 p.m. This fundraiser will have multiple cornhole sets placed in the infield of one of the fields and brackets that will pave the path to greatness! Cost is $20 per team. Winners will split the pot with the league. New classes for all ages Classes offered at LeFlore High School include Art for Kids (ages 6 and up), Art for Adults, Pre-Ballet & Tumbling (ages 4-6) and SelfDefense for Women & Girls (ages 12 and up). Call 251-208-1610 or visit mobilecap.org. Group Rides South Alabama and Mississippi Mountain Bike Association invites all levels of cyclists to join them every Tuesday and Thursday at 6 p.m. at USA Bike Trails and Sunday at 9 a.m. at Chickasabogue Park. Email carrie@rideSAMBA.com. Weekly 1K/5K Every Thursday evening at 6 p.m., join Red Beard’s Outfitter and Cortlandt’s Pub in the Spring Hill Village Shopping Center for a 1K or 5K run and walk. No cost to participate. Bingo Join Via! Health, Fitness, Enrichment Center at 1717 Dauphin St. for bingo every Tuesday and Thursday, 1:30-3:30 p.m. Call 251-478-3311.

Happy Hour Yoga with Friends Looking for a healthy happy hour? Join our Happy Hour with Friends class every Friday at 5:15 p.m. at Sterling Hot Yoga. Yoga makes you happy and being with friends makes you happy, so why not combine the two for even more happiness? Bridge Lessons The Mobile Bridge Center offers free bridge lessons each Tuesday at 6 p.m., 1510 University Blvd. Arrive a few minutes early to register. Call 251-666-2147, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fitness and Athletics Classes Try something new this year! Classes are being offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School in Tai Chi, bellydance, candlelit yoga, Piyo Tone and piano. Call 251463-7980 or visit mobilecap.org. Pickleball for Adults (indoors) Offered at Palmer Pillans Middle School on Saturday, 9 a.m. to noon. Great sport for all ages combines tennis, pingpong and badminton on a court onefourth the size of a tennis court. Call 251-463-7980 or go to communityactivitiesprogram.com. Ballroom Dance Azalea Ballroom Dance Club hosts dances the second and fourth Tuesday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Via! Health, Fitness & Enrichment Center, 1717 Dauphin St. Call 251-623-9183 or visit azaleaballroomdanceclub. com. Ballroom Dance Moonlight Chassé Ballroom Dance Society hosts dances the first and third Monday of every month, 7-9:30 p.m. at Hot Wheels Skating Rink in Daphne. Email cassief13@aol.com.

M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 35


MEDIA MEDIA FRENZY

Ship hits the fan? Not so, Raines says

I

BY ROB HOLBERT/MANAGING EDITOR/RHOLBERT@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM

t may not go down in journalism history on quite the same level as Geraldo Rivera breaking into Al Capone’s empty vault on live TV, but Ben Raines’ recent stories for al.com about possibly finding the long-lost Clotilda slave ship have similarly focused massive attention on what ended up being a non-event. On Monday Raines published a story revealing the shipwreck he claims to have discovered at the beginning of the year in the Mobile-Tensaw Delta during an extreme low tide has been determined by experts not to be the famed slave ship Clotilda, the last vessel to carry slaves into the United States roughly 160 years ago. Since January, Raines and other al.com reporters have written heavily about the wreck as possibly being the Clotilda, sparking worldwide media attention and causing teams of investigators to descend upon the muddy banks of the Mobile River. But despite criticism from readers heaped online under Raines’ latest story chastising him and his publication for rushing to print before finding out whether the rotted-out wreckage was indeed the Clotilda, al.com’s star environmental reporter remains unbowed. He says despite the fact the ship he found turned out not to be the Clotilda, his reporting has focused attention on how important it is to actually find the wreck. He said of 12,000 ships involved in the slave trade, just 10 have been discovered. “I don’t think I jumped the gun. I published a responsible story citing archaeologists who examined the wreck and said it might be the ship. Finding the Clotilda should have been prioritized long ago by the state and the marine archaeological community, especially given that there is an international partnership called the Slave Wrecks Project, involving the Smithsonian, the National Park Service, etc.,” Raines wrote in response to questions from Lagniappe. “The fact is no one was looking for the ship. I think the fact that a newspaper reporter went out to look for it and came up with a 19th century shipwreck served as a powerful wake-up call to the marine archaeology community that this ship should be found,” he continued. “More to the point, the response we’ve seen involving major players in the archaeological world suggests how seriously they took my find. Just because it was not the Clotilda does not discount the fact that some of the world’s leading marine archaeologists were excited enough by the images and research in my story that they volunteered their time to come here and check it out.” In January Raines and al.com published stories and video all but declaring the mud-covered wooden wreckage to be the Clotilda. The story was picked up internationally. The New York Times — where his father once served as executive editor — wrote a long piece detailing Raines’ discovery. CBS, The Washington Post, FOX News and many other media outlets across the nation carried the story. Our local television stations did extensive stories as well. While Raines always wrote the wreckage “might be” or was “possibly” that of the last ship to bring slaves into the U.S., the tone, tenor and level of coverage might suggest al.com was reveling in the discovery even before it was confirmed. Part of their coverage has even included an online compilation of international media attention for their story and articles speculating about protecting the site and who owns it. Part of Raines’ coverage even included bringing the ambassador from Benin to the wreck. “The ambassador sought me out and asked

me to take him to the site,” Raines explained. “He understood that this might not be the ship and even discussed it on camera while we were there. Still, it was a moving and powerful experience to see the entire issue of slavery from his perspective. I think the story and video of him there were enlightening. In his words, even ‘if this is not the ship, this is where this happened and I am glad to have been here to speak to my ancestors.’”  Monday’s article, entitled “Wreck found in Delta not Clotilda, the last American slave ship,” offered an explanation of how archeologists from the University of West Florida had “set in motion a full-scale investigation” of the wreckage after Raines brought them to the site. The discovery also set in motion activity by the Alabama Historical Commission, visits from the Slave Wrecks Project and Diving with a Purpose, which investigates slave shipwrecks. Jim Delgado, whose group SEARCH participated in exploration of the Titanic and helped raise the Mobile-built Civil War submarine H.L. Hunley, was involved as well. Although in the end it was determined the ship Raines found was far too large to be the Clotilda and had many other basic characteristics ruling it out, he still believes al.com was right to go forward with the stories before being more certain he’d found the Clotilda. He cited instances in the past where his reporting had led scientists to follow up and said this is a similar circumstance. “I did extensive research and published a comprehensive story. We discussed the issues you mention in our newsroom and felt the story was good investigative journalism. As journalists, when writing about science, particularly where we are doing some of the scientific work ourselves, our results are suggestive, not definitive. But that does not prevent us from writing about them. We use appropriate caveats and try to get the scientific community to follow up with more definitive testing,” Raines wrote. Raines brushes aside any criticism from those who feel he’s letting the ends justify the means and ignoring journalistic standards to achieve his desired goals. True, there was no Clotilda, but Raines says everything he has done so far is going to lead to its eventual discovery. “I am delighted to see what is going on in Africatown right now. There is an excitement in the community. I just left a meeting where leading archaeologists suggested the ship can and should be found, and that it probably won’t be too difficult, especially as my reporting revealed that the only section of the Mobile River that hasn’t been searched with modern equipment is the area right around where I found this 100-plus-year-old wreck,” he wrote. “I’m proud of my work regarding the Clotilda. I wish it had been the ship, but I am confident that the ship will be found and believe my reporting played a role in starting that process.”

Tommy Russo passes

Past and present employees of WPMI-TV are among those mourning the sudden death of Thomas David Russo this past weekend at the age of 56. An assignment editor at WPMI for many years, Russo was beloved by friends, family and co-workers. Memorials to him from many current and former members of local media quickly popped up on social media following news of his passing. A burial mass was held March 7 at Christ the King Catholic Church.

36 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8

THE NEW YORK TIMES CROSSWORD PUZZLE LETTER RECYCLING BY WILL NEDIGER / EDITED BY WILL SHORTZ ACROSS 1 Small flute 5 Tries to beat the buzzer? 10 Throws together 15 Airport waiter? 18 404 Not Found, e.g. 19 Energize 20 Not happy, to say the least 21 Kitchen brand 22 Historical period spelled using only the letters of 2-Down 24 Singer who once spelled her name with a “$” 25 Word before data or deal 26 Unlikely to be talked out of 27 “That wasn’t nice!” 28 Revolutionary War hero spelled using only the letters of 13-Down 30 Website with a “Sell an item” option 31 Order to go 33 Enter the fray 34 Woman’s name that sounds like its second and first letters, respectively 35 Fix 36 Snack items spelled using only the letters of 36-Down 38 Inner tubes? 40 Casual top 41 Ancient theaters 42 Prince of Shakespeare 43 Screw up 44 Fund-raising org. 45 Be annoying 47 Garment that’s often plaid 48 Sukkot celebrant 51 Christmas drink 55 Geraint’s wife, in Arthurian romance 56 What assayers assay 57 Butt’s end? 58 Many an office worker’s problem 60 It’s imagined 62 TV demonstrator at the 1939 World’s Fair 63 Page 1, e.g. 64 Oscar winner with four #1 Billboard hits 66 Bass player 67 When it comes to 69 You can lend one without letting go of it 70 Jewel-case holder 73 Combo-meal entree 75 Spanish “Listen!” 76 Mound 77 Future stallion 79 Tin lizzies 80 Basket part 81 “That so?” reply 82 “See you later” 84 Basket part 85 Put the pedal to the metal

86 Word that might be helpful on a class reunion name tag 87 Rack site 89 Photog’s purchase 92 What a press pass provides 95 Really impressive, spelled using only the letters of 39-Down 98 Chalked stick 99 Stern-looking 100 Many a year-end list 102 Alpo alternative 103 Drive-____ 104 No-good, spelled using only the letters of 71-Down 106 Include without notifying others, in a way 107 Bygone deliverers 109 Cause of a tic, for short 110 “The Master Builder” playwright 111 Bagel topping spelled using only the letters of 89-Down 113 Penguins’ org. 114 Group of stars 115 Temporary tattoo material 116 Writer Nin 117 Sun spot? 118 Track schedule 119 Much-abbreviated Latin phrase 120 “Aw, rats!” DOWN 1 It’s comped 2 Historical period 3 Double a score

4 Therefore 5 Jamaican export 6 Was dateless 7 Muhammad’s favorite wife 8 Young ____ 9 Place to get pampered 10 Nanki-Poo’s father, with “the” 11 Glacial ridges 12 Whole-grain cereal brand 13 Revolutionary War hero 14 Jamaican rapper ____ Paul 15 Shade of blue 16 Armpit, medically 17 Ones not up to par? 18 Grandfather of Alfred the Great 23 Aloft 28 Sarcastic response to a fail 29 Basil, e.g. 32 Word before “before” 33 Hypothetical 36 Snack items 37 Jackie of “The Tuxedo” 39 Really impressive 43 Holder of shells 44 “Hey!” 46 Approve another season of 47 Seaweed in Japanese cuisine 48 Amount of jam or jelly beans 49 Part of a motorcade 50 Berth places 51 “You and I have a deal!” 52 Roger in the Navy

53 Clandestine 54 Brand in the dairy aisle 59 Breakfast spots 61 Relish 65 Took back one’s story 68 Cherry throwaway 71 No-good 72 Was mounted atop 74 Kind of medicine 78 In ____ of 83 Six things in some six-packs 85 Neighbor of a Montenegrin 88 Pep 89 Bagel topping 90 Slyly attracts 91 Gets back together 92 Extras 93 Nickname of Duke basketball’s Mike Krzyzewski 94 Huggable 95 Challenge for a collegebound student, maybe 96 Medical inserts 97 ____ Creed (Christian statement of faith) 101 Actor Davis 103 Lead role in “Boys Don’t Cry,” 1999 105 Neeson of “Schindler’s List” 106 Fostered 108 Ballot hanger 111 X 112 Dojo surface

ANSWERS ON PAGE 39

F U T U R E S H O C K


SPORTS UPON FURTHER REVIEW

Over the Edge combines adventure with advocacy BY J. MARK BRYANT/SPORTS WRITER/SPORTS@LAGNIAPPEMOBILE.COM/TWITTER @GOULAGUY

T

he 74 Club is a group of volunteers with a very simple mission: to help those in need. The sky’s the limit for what projects the organization will undertake to raise the funds necessary to provide assistance to local nonprofits and individuals. In 2016, club members conceived their most impressive venture yet. The inaugural Over the Edge event allowed participants the chance to rappel 200 feet off the Mobile Marriott on Airport Boulevard. The event was a smashing success, with more than $100,000 raised. Interest in the unique challenge has continued, and the third annual Over the Edge is set for this Friday and Saturday. Having surpassed $100,000 last year, a similar total is this year’s fundraising goal. In order to reach these amounts, participants are asked to raise a minimum of $1,000 to support the charitable efforts of The 74 Club and Dennis Langan Construction. Net proceeds have been donated in the past to such groups as Camp Smile, McKemie Place, Mobile ARC, St. Mary’s Home, The Family Center and The Shriners Children’s Transportation Fund. A new entity — the Mobile Law Enforcement Foundation — join the list this year. Since being established in 2007, the foundation has advocated for and promoted the goals of the Mobile Police Department and its members, provided education, training and wellness programs, and conducted research for the development of police officers. Organizers say a portion of this year’s proceeds will go to promote the foundation, which will have members rappelling down the Marriott. “Over the Edge gives participants the opportunity to help the less fortunate in our area and experience the thrill of

rappelling more than 200 feet while friends, family and the community watch,” said Randy Copeland, board member of The 74 Club. Local celebrities and media personalities are scheduled to rappel on Friday, while the main event will take place Saturday. Copeland said Jake Coker, former quarterback for the Alabama Crimson Tide and St. Paul’s Episcopal School, would be present Saturday from 10 a.m. to noon to sign autographs. The first 90 individuals who raise at least $1,000 have the opportunity to participate. Those wishing to donate but not rappel may also contribute. Because of the 74 Club’s 501(c)(3) nonprofit status, all donations are 100 percent tax deductible. The 74 Club gets its name from the fact that several members were in the 1974 graduating class at McGillToolen Catholic High School. Some of the friends had been participating in volunteer projects since 2003, but it was in 2010 that one of their own became their mission. “One of our former classmates got sick with cancer, and we put together a golf tournament to help with expenses and to provide emotional support,” Copeland said. Although their friend lost her battle with cancer, they have continued hosting the Lydia Leon Bennett Memorial Golf Tournament in her honor. It was at this point the group incorporated and officially became The 74 Club. Among the other events listed on its website (the74club.org) are The 74 Club Spring Benefit Table Dance, a barbecue fundraiser for an uninsured cancer patient, the Moon Pie Toss to benefit St. Mary’s Home, the Luck of the Irish Cook-Off and the Dragon Boat Races. Copeland, the president of specialty valve and expansion

joint distributor RMC and Associates, said the rappelling idea started in summer 2015 when he received a call from a customer. On a flight into Gulfport, among the passengers were people wearing “Over The Edge” shirts. When asked about the equipment they carried, the reply was they were going to rappel off the Beau Rivage casino. “My customer had played in our golf tournament, so he knew we were always looking for ways to raise money for charities,” Copeland said. “The OTE organizers invited us to Memphis for their next event. They do about 125 around the country, but never in Mobile. “We saw about 60 participants going down a 30-story building. We came back enthusiastic about hosting our own event.” That passion has not subsided. To see the individuals and groups that have signed up to participate this weekend, please visit otemobile.com. Copeland said the event is open to anyone. The OTE organizers had a 94-yearold man rappel in Cincinnati, while persons with disabilities have also participated. Young people can participate with their parents’ consent. “Even if you don’t go down the building, we will have food tents and music in the parking lots,” Copeland said. “This will be a great family event.”

Sports briefs

• The NCAA has awarded ESPN a five-year agreement to televise the NCAA Beach Volleyball Championship in Gulf Shores through 2022. The next championship will take place May 4-6 on the Gulf Shores Public Beach. The Gulf Shores & Orange Beach Sports Commission, city of Gulf Shores and The University of Alabama at Birmingham are hosting the event. • The Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference has named freshman Hannah Brenton of Spring Hill College as its conference Softball Pitcher of the Week. Brenton (4-1) registered two complete games and earned wins in two conference victories over Kentucky State University. On the weekend, she recorded one shutout with 10 strikeouts while surrendering seven hits and one unearned run. • The University of South Alabama men’s and women’s tennis programs each claimed the Sun Belt Conference Tennis Athlete of the Week honors, with the league announcing junior Alexandria Stiteler and sophomore Clement Marzol as the winners. Stiteler claims the award for the sixth time in her career, while Marzol is a first-time winner. Stiteler posted three straight-sets victories at No. 1 singles and went 2-1 in doubles. Marzol went 4-0 in his matches, posting a 2-0 record in singles and 2-0 in doubles. • The United States Sports Academy recently celebrated longtime employee Becky Cochran, who retired after serving the Daphne school in various roles for more than 24 years. Cochran started her USSA career in 1993 as an admissions assistant and spent time working in continuing education, the registrar’s office and admissions.

M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 37


SPORTS FROM BEHIND THE MIC

Say hello to the NCAA’s little lie BY RANDY KENNEDY/CONTRIBUTING WRITER

W

hat does Nick Saban have in common with For the star players at Alabama, Auburn, Clemson, Al Pacino, aside from the fact they are both Georgia, Oklahoma and every other university that’s serisurprisingly shorter than you think? ous about competing for championships, there still has They are both in the business of convincto be a wink and a nod to the concept of regular studenting the public to suspend disbelief in order to enjoy the athletes after they leave the field. work they produce. The point is not that all the players on the field or In Pacino’s case, that means the audience allows court in college athletics are dumb. Far from it. And it’s itself to believe that a quintessential not that they don’t attend class. Italian-American from East Harlem Alabama has started an admirable is really a Cuban drug kingpin from tradition of leading the country Miami who loves nothing more than in having the most players who shooting a machine gun while wearhave already received their college ing a fashionable suit and vest. degrees before playing in their final FOR THE STAR PLAYERS AT For Saban, it means convincing bowl game. The SEC even gives out ALABAMA, AUBURN, CLEMSON, college football fans that the young jersey patches for graduates to wear GEORGIA, OKLAHOMA AND EVmen who run onto the field every during their bowl games. ERY OTHER UNIVERSITY THAT’S Saturday for the Crimson Tide are But they aren’t students who just SERIOUS ABOUT COMPETING FOR actually students at The University happen to practice football following of Alabama just like the nursing their final afternoon classes while CHAMPIONSHIPS, THERE STILL majors and education majors sitting their classmates go for a malt. The HAS TO BE A WINK AND A NOD in the stands cheering on their team. fantasy that they are helps us better TO THE CONCEPT OF REGULAR In both cases it’s a fantasy that connect with the incredible athletes STUDENT-ATHLETES AFTER THEY we’ve allowed ourselves to buy into who represent our alma maters. LEAVE THE FIELD. so we can better enjoy the entertainFor the players, the double stanment they provide. dard has both benefits and detriments. The difference is that when It starts with college admission Pacino (who, like Saban, is 5-feet-6) standards that are more lenient for walked off the set of “Scarface” we didn’t expect him to athletes than other students and no worries about how to be Tony Montana and say things like “say hello to my pay for school or pay off student loans. It includes the little friend” before killing another rival. We knew he was advantage of tutors and study tools the average student just playing a part. couldn’t imagine. It also includes first crack at class

38 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8

scheduling that doesn’t conflict with sports obligations. On the other hand, athletes are often given the message of what they are really there for. Many student-athletes are strongly discouraged from majoring in subjects that require labs or internships that would conflict with practice times. They aren’t given the opportunity to pursue the same social activities as other students because they are working on their sports skills for the NCAA maximum of 20 hours a week (or 40; it’s really hard to keep track of the exact number when it comes to these things). This subject has reared its head again this month as college basketball players and coaches all across the country are caught in the scandal that began when the FBI decided it was time to stop grown-ups who have decided to traffic in talented high school basketball players. These unscrupulous characters who represent financial advisers, agents and sometimes universities know college is just a way station for many of these future multi-millionaires. The players know it, too. But they’ve also been taught that the way the game is played is to pretend to be a normal college student for at least a year before moving on to professional riches. South Carolina football coach Will Muschamp pointed out last week that football is mostly immune from the kind of outside influences college basketball recruits encounter. “Our sports are different in the fact that our apparel companies aren’t targeting our guys at this point — that I know of, and [in] high school,” Muschamp said. “That’s where it becomes much different between the two sports — just from my knowledge. So I think that’s a huge difference and I think the numbers of targets certainly change the landscape a little bit as far as the things that have been going on.” That answer is as confusing as it’s intended to be. It’s simply another half-hearted attempt to say “nothing to see here, just a bunch of good studentathletes doing noble student-athlete things.” I have no problem with the free market system paying whatever these young men can procure from a professional team. But I do have a problem with the NCAA painting a picture of college sports and its athletes that is as removed from real life as an Oliver Stone script. Randy Kennedy writes a weekly column for Lagniappe and is co-host of “Sports Drive” every weekday from 3-6 p.m. on WNSP 105.5 FM, the country’s first all-sports FM station.


STYLE HOROSCOPES IT’S NOT THE CLOTILDA, BUT … PISCES (2/19-3/20) — In conjunction with Celebrate Historic Mobile, you decide to hang on to that old, smelly recliner you’ve had since the ‘90s. Your latest discovery is not the Clotilda, it’s just a rudimentary duck blind built by some fellas out of Chickasaw. ARIES (3/21-4/19) — Mobile ArtWalk will become FartWalk after you ask for a second side of beans at El Papi beforehand. Your latest discovery is not Henri de Tonti’s missing hand, it’s discarded chicken bones from Popeye’s. TAURUS (4/20-5/20) — You’ll slather yourself with Mr. Zog’s Sex Wax and hang 10 to the surf rock of Yonatan Gat at The Merry Widow. Your latest discovery is not Joe Cain’s headdress, it’s just a feather boa one of his mistresses used to crotch floss. GEMINI (5/21-6/21) — You’ll satisfy your meat tooth at TexarBama’s grand opening in Fairhope this weekend. Your latest discovery is not Hank Aaron’s first baseball bat, it’s just the remnants of a recent blighted-house demolition. CANCER (6/22-7/22) — You’ll jump the gun and start shopping at the midtown Publix before it even opens. The veggies are so fresh they aren’t even there yet. Your latest discovery is not a time capsule buried by Jean-Baptiste Le Moyne de Bienville, it’s just a coffee can full of dogecoin. LEO (7/23-8/22) — You’ll concoct a generic seafood flavoring to remind diners how their dinner would taste had the state not closed the waters to harvesting due to high bacterial counts. Your latest discovery is not the cornerstone of Mobile’s first courthouse, it’s just a rectangular fatberg from the sewer system. VIRGO (8/23-9/22) — You’ll turn “Over the Edge” into an X Game by BASE jumping off the Mobile Marriott instead of rappelling. Your latest discovery is not the ghost of Charles R.S. Boyington, it’s just Keyboard Keith looking for someone to listen to his latest ballad. LIBRA (9/23-10/22) — You’ll channel your inner thespian at the Southeast Theatre Convention and communicate exclusively in Early Modern English. Your latest discovery is not the membership roster of the Ku Klux Klan, it’s just a list of conservative leaders in the Alabama Legislature. SCORPIO (10/23-11/21) — You’ll open up a restaurant that exclusively serves crawfish a la Instant Pot. Your latest discovery is not the bra you left in the FloraBama in 1987, it’s just the bra someone left in the Flora-Bama in 1987. SAGITTARIUS (11/22-12/21) ­­— Admiring his ability to play the long game, you’ll ask Charlie Wyckoff if he’ll run for president in 2028. Your latest discovery is not a Springfield Model 1861 from the Civil War, it’s an AR-15 legally purchased by a 15-year-old last week. CAPRICORN (12/22-1/19) — In honor of AeroStar’s expansion in Mobile, you purchase a 1992 Ford AeroStar someone was conceived in at a Bon Jovi concert. Your latest discovery is not the most exclusive restaurant in Baldwin County, it’s just Waffle House. AQUARIUS (1/20-2/18) — As a permanent solution to campus violence, you suggest reverting to an educational system of in-home tutors and apprenticeships. Your latest discovery is not a long-lost invention by Lonnie Johnson, it’s just a back scratcher purchased from the truck stop on the Wilcox exit.

ANSWERS FROM PAGE 36 M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 39


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com FORECLOSURES MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certainmortgage executed by Timothy D. Orr, Jr. a married male & Kendra D. Orr, originally in favorof Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Embrace Home Loans, Inc., on the 17th day of February, 2016, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge ofProbate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Bk: LR7348 Pg: 629; the undersigned Embrace HomeLoans, Inc., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained insaid mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the mainentrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on May 3, 2018, during thelegal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 43, Fox Hunter Ridge, Phase 2,according to the plat thereof recorded in Map Book 118, Page 53 of the records in the Officeof the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  9401 Fox Hunter Ct E, Semmes, AL  36575. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ONAN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, ANDEXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDSOF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUTWARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a nonrefundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Embrace Home Loans, Inc., Mortgagee/Transferee. Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 429270 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 14, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by John C. Ritchie, Jr. and Pamela N. Ritchie, husband and wife, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Regions Bank d/b/a Regions Mortgage, on the 11th day of April, 2008, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6366 Page 26; the undersigned Regions Bank dba Regions Mortgage, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on April 12, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 54, Carriage Hills, Unit Four as recorded in Map Book 26, Page 31 of the records of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  2645 Old Dobbin Dr E, Mobile, AL  36695 THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by

said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Regions Bank dba Regions Mortgage, Mortgagee/ Transferee. Elizabeth Loefgren SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 425864 Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 21, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Chance L. Townsend, a single man, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Fairway Independent Mortgage Corporation, on the 17th day of October, 2016, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Bk: LR7437 Pg: 1676; the undersigned Lakeview Loan Servicing LLC, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on April 5, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 38, Block 12, West Village Chickasaw Subdivision, as recorded in Map Book 4, Page 327-334, in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  208 7th Street, Chickasaw, AL  36611. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Lakeview Loan Servicing LLC, Mortgagee/ Transferee  Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 430602 Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 21, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Alberta F. Milton, surviving spouse, originally in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., on the 23rd day of April, 2008, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6405 Page 1863; the undersigned Nationstar Mortgage LLC dba Champion Mortgage Company, as Mortgagee/ Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on April 5, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 9, Block B, according to the Map of McCants Subdivision, as recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama in Map Book 6, Page 165.  The hereinabove described property being one and

40 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8

the same as described in mortgage recorded in Book 6405, Page 1863 and deed recorded in Book 1156, Page 772. Property street address for informational purposes:  1506 Next St, Mobile, AL  36617. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process.This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Nationstar Mortgage LLC dba Champion Mortgage Company, Mortgagee/ Transferee  Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 421179 Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 21, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Robert Arthur Sanders, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. acting solely as nominee for Lenox Financial Mortgage Corporation, on the 12th day of November, 2015, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Bk: LR7323, Pg: 280; the undersigned Finance Of America Reverse, LLC., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on April 19, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: The land described herein is situated in the State of Alabama, County of Mobile, described as follows: Lot Number 8, according to Plat of Habersham Heights, as recorded in Map Book 19, Page 94 in the Office of Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama.  Property street address for informational purposes:  8050 Oak Hill Drive, Semmes, AL  36575. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Finance of America Reverse, LLC, Mortgagee/Transferee. Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/ foreclosures 428908 Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 21, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Keirdrick A. Freeman and Sakara B. Freeman, husband and wife, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Magnolia Mortgage Company LLC, an Agent for Guaranty Trust, on the 5th day of October, 2012, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6944 Page 1874; the undersigned Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. , as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on April 19, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot C-24, Magnolia Springs, Phase One, according to plat thereof recorded in Map Book 121, Page 15 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  8681 Farrington Loop S, Semmes, AL  36575. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Mortgagee/ Transferee. Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 359756 Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 21, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Harry Wendell Davis and wife, Deborah D. Davis, originally in favor of RBC Centura Bank, on the 26th day of September, 2007, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6266, Page 833; the undersigned SMS Financial 30, LLC, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on April 5, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Parcel A: Commencing at the Southwest corner of Lot 2, resubdivision of Lots 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 and 33, Haven Park Subdivision, according to plat thereof recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate Court of the County of Mobile, Alabama in Map Book 9, Page 439; thence run Northeastwardly 429.4 feet along the South line of said lot 2 to the point of beginning of the property herein described; thence with a deflection angle to the left of 84 degrees 06 minutes 54 seconds run Northwardly 440.45 feet to a point on the South right of way line of Coleman Dairy Road, thence run Eastwardly and along said South right of way a distance of 129.87 feet to a point; thence with a deflection angle to the right of 89 degrees 31 minutes 49 seconds run Southwardly 136.16 feet; thence with an interior angle of 89 degrees 71 minutes 89 seconds run Westwardly 27.69 feet to a point; thence with an interior angle of 85 degrees 02 minutes 11 seconds run Southwardly 82.37 feet; thence with an interior angle of 94 degrees 57 minutes 49 seconds run Eastwardly 90 feet to a point; thence run due North 218 feet more or less to the South right of way line of Coleman Dairy Road; thence run Eastwardly along said right of way 141.18 feet more or less to the Northeast corner of said Lot 2; thence with an interior angle of 90 degrees 28 minutes 11 seconds run Southwardly 394.26 feet to a point; thence with an interior angle of 97 degrees 17 minutes 40 seconds run Southwestwardly 332.9 feet to the Point of Beginning. Parcel B: Commencing at the Southwest corner of Lot 2, resubdivision of Lots 28,

29, 30, 31, 32 and 33, Haven Park Subdivision, according to plat thereof recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate Court of the County of Mobile, Alabama in Map Book 9, Page 439; thence run Northeastwardly 429.4 feet along the South line of said Lot 2 to a point; thence with a deflection angle to the left of 84 degrees 06 minutes 54 seconds run Northwardly 222.12 feet to a point; thence with an interior angle of 88 degrees 07 minutes 15 seconds run Eastwardly 103.26 feet to the point of beginning; thence with a deflection angle to the left of 94 degrees 57 minutes 49 seconds run Northwardly 82.37 feet to a point; thence with an interior angle of 85 degrees 02 minutes 11 seconds run Eastwardly 27.69 feet to a point; thence with a deflection angle to the left of 90 degrees 28 minutes 11 seconds run Northwardly 136.16 feet to a point on the South right of way line of Coleman Dairy Road; thence with an interior angle of 89 degrees 31 minutes 49 seconds run Eastwardly 70 feet along said South right of way line of Coleman Dairy Road to a point, thence run due South 218 feet more or less to a point due East of the Point of Beginning, thence run West 90 feet more or less to the Point of Beginning. Property street address for informational purposes:  9531 Coleman Dairy Road, Semmes, AL  36575. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. SMS Financial 30, LLC, Mortgagee/ Transferee. Elizabeth Loefgren SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 354192 Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 21, 2018

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness described in and secured by that certain mortgage executed by Christopher Bryan and Melissa S. Bryan, husband and wife to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. (MERS) acting solely as nominee for Lender, Southwest Funding, LP, and Lender’s successors and assigns dated October 6, 2016, and Recorded in Book LR 7438, Page 346 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, which said mortgage was subsequently assigned to Banc of California, National Association, dba Banc Home Loans by instrument recorded in Bk: LR7603, Pg: 1612 of said Probate Court records; notice is hereby given that the undersigned as mortgagee will under power of sale contained in said mortgage, sell at public outcry for cash to the highest bidder, during legal hours of sale on March 30, 2018, at the front door of the Courthouse of Mobile County, Alabama, 205 Government Street Mobile, Alabama 36602, the following described real property in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, being the same property described in the above referred to mortgage: Commencing at the Southwest corner of the West half of the East half of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter, Section 2, Township 3 South, Range 3 West; thence North 01 degrees 10 minutes East along the West line of the West half of the East half of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest Quarter of said Section 2, a distance of 1297.29 feet to the South line of the Broadus Loop Road; thence South 01 degrees 10 minutes West, along the East line of a private road, 425.43 feet; thence South 03 degrees 22 minutes East along said private road, 219.32 feet; thence South 07 degrees 56 minutes East along the East line of said private road, 81.87 feet, to the point of beginning; thence South 88 degrees 50 minutes East, 299.73 feet to an old fence line; thence South 01 degrees 10 minutes West along said old fence line, 100 feet; thence North 88 degrees 50 minutes West, 290.0 feet, to the East line of said private road; thence North 01 degrees 16 minutes East along said private road, 36.67 feet; thence North 07 degrees 56 minutes West along said private road, 64.44 to the point of beginning. TOGETHER WITH: Commencing at the Southwest corner of the West Half of the East Half of the Northwest Quarter of the Northwest


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com Quarter of Section 2, Township 3 South, Range 3 West; thence South 89 degrees 06 minutes East along an old fence, 40.0 feet to the East line of a private road; thence North 01 degrees 16 minutes East along the East line of a said private road, 370.86 feet, to the point of beginning; thence continue North 01 degrees 16 minutes East along the East line of said private road, 100.0 feet; thence South 88 degrees 50 minutes East, 290 feet to an old fence line; thence South 01 degrees 10 minutes West along the old fence line, 100.0 feet; thence North 88 degrees 50 minutes West, 290 feet to the point of beginning. Together with the right of ingress and egress over a 40 foot wide private roadway, the East line of which is described as beginning at the Southwest corner of the above described property; thence North 01 degrees 16 minutes East 136.37 feet; thence North 07 degrees 56 minutes West, 146.31 feet; thence North 03 degrees 22 minutes West, 219.32 feet; thence North 01 degrees 10 minutes East, 425.43 feet to the South line of the Broadus Loop Road. ALABAMA LAW GIVES SOME PERSONS WHO HAVE AN INTEREST IN PROPERTY THE RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES. PROGRAMS MAY ALSO EXIST THAT HELP PERSONS AVOID OR DELAY THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS.  AN ATTORNEY SHOULD BE CONSULTED TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND THESE RIGHTS AND PROGRAMS AS A PART OF THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. This property will be sold on an “as is, where is” basis, subject to any easements, encumbrances and exceptions reflected in the mortgage and those contained in the records of the office of the judge of the probate where the above-described property is situated. This property will be sold without warranty or recourse, expressed or implied as to title, use and/or enjoyment and will be sold subject to the right of redemption of all parties entitled thereto. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying the said indebtedness and the expenses incident to this sale, including a reasonable attorney’s fee. The sale will be conducted subject (1) to confirmation that the sale is not prohibited under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2) to final confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the mortgagee. Banc of California, National Association, dba Banc Home Loans. Mortgagee William McFadden McFadden, Rouse & Bender, LLC 718 Downtowner Blvd. Mobile, AL  36609 Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 21, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Huong Thi Nguyen, single woman, originally in favor of JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A., on the 18th day of October, 2011, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6827 Page 1955; the undersigned Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae”), as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on April 5, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 24 of Unit 2 of Driftwood Estates, according to plat thereof recorded in Map Book 18 at Page 40 in the Records of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  7730 Edgar Roberts Rd, Irvington, AL  36544. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Federal National Mortgage Association (“Fannie Mae”), Mortgagee/Transferee Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/ foreclosures 406812 Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 21, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE

the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, Default having been made in the payment of the indebt- on April 5, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its edness secured by that certain mortgage executed by right, title, and interest in and to the following described James L. Simpson and Elizabeth B. Snider, both unmar- real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: ried, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registra- That real property situated in the County of Mobile, State tion Systems, Inc., as nominee for SurePoint Lending, Inc. of Alabama, described as follows, to-wit: Commencing dba First Residential Mortgage Network, Inc., on the 10th at the Southwest corner of Block 4, Grand Bay Heights day of April, 2008, said mortgage recorded in the Office Subdivision, of a part of Section 35, Township 6 South, of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Range 4 West, Map Book 3, Page 6; go North along the Book 6365 Page 1968; the undersigned Lakeview Loan East right-of-way line of Lindburgh Avenue 490.2 feet Servicing, LLC, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by to a point on the North right-of-way line of a 40 foot virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, right-of-way; then go East along the North line of said will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in 40 foot right-of-way 150 feet to a point; which point befront of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, ing the Point of Beginning; thence running North 160 Mobile County, Alabama, on May 3, 2018, during the le- feet to a point; thence running East 83 feet to a point; gal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and thence running South 160 feet to a point; thence runto the following described real estate, situated in Mobile ning West 85 feet to the Point of Beginning. This being County, Alabama, to-wit: Lots 19 & 20 in Block One (1) a part of the same property recorded in Real Property in Gulf Way Addition to Grand Bay, as recorded in Deed Book 139, Page 24, in the Office of the Judge of ProBook 153, Page 34 in the Office of the Judge of Pro- bate of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address bate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  12881 Pine Street, Grand for informational purposes:  12741 Saeger Rd, Grand Bay, AL  36541. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN Bay, AL  36541. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the propan interest in property the right to redeem the property erty under certain circumstances.  Programs may also under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. process. An attorney should be consulted to help you An attorney should be consulted to help you understand understand these rights and programs as a part of the these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must ten- bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five der a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its the real estate and to credit its purchase price against purchase price against the expenses of sale and the the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or subject to postponement or cancellation. Nationstar cancellation. Lakeview Loan Servicing, LLC, Mortgagee/ Mortgage, LLC d/b/a Mr. Cooper, Mortgagee/TransTransferee Elizabeth Loefgren SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. feree Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for for Mortgagee/Transferee Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures www.sirote.com/foreclosures 429884 421673 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 14, 2018 Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 21, 2018

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made by the herein referenced Grantees in the terms of that certain Vendor’s Lien Deed executed on July 15, 2016, by Jarrod L. McDade and Mandy R. Worthy, as Grantees to Iras Development Company, Inc., as Grantor which said Vendor’s Lien Deed was recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, in Real Property Book LR7403, Page 1970, and said vendor’s lien having been last assigned to EMON, LLC, which assignment was recorded in the office of the Judge of Probate Mobile County Alabama in Real Property Book LR7524, Page 714 and default continuing under said Vendor’s Lien Deed, by virtue of and pursuant to the power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, the following described real property will be sold at public outcry, for cash, to the highest bidder, in front of the North entrance of the Courthouse of said County, located at 205 Government Street, Mobile, Alabama 36644, during the legal hours of sale, on March 28, 2018. LOT 18, as per plat of TIMBERLAND, UNIT I, as recorded in Map Book 88, Page 19, Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying said Vendor’s Lien debt and costs of foreclosure. EMON, LLC   Holder of said Vendor’s Lien WILLIAM B. JACKSON, II STOKES & CLINTON, P.C. Attorneys for Lienholder Post Office Box 991801 Mobile, Alabama 36691 (251) 460-2400 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 14, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Cecil A. Lambeth and wife Kathy L. Lambeth, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Nationstar Mortgage LLC, on the 22nd day of November, 2013, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Bk: LR7100, Pg: 747; the undersigned Nationstar Mortgage, LLC d/b/a Mr. Cooper, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Isiah Swopes, a married person and Regina Swopes, his wife, originally in favor of Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc., on the 2nd day of June, 2000, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 4843 Page 1147; modification recorded in Book LR7448, Page 1322; the undersigned Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. successor by merger to Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on April 19, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 20, Gulf Dale, Third Unit, according to the plat thereof recorded in Map Book 11, Page 28, in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  3016 McGough Court, Mobile, AL  36605. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars

($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. successor by merger to Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc., Mortgagee/ Transferee Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 430850 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 14, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Perry Lampkin and Toddy Eldridge, an unmarried couple, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Advance Mortgage & Investment Co. of North FL, Inc., on the 26th day of July, 2007, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6233 Page 1680; the undersigned Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on April 5, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 17, Amberly, Unit 3 “A” Subdivision, according to plat thereof recorded in Map Book 29, Page 61 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  1659 Longwood Road, Mobile, AL  36609. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Mortgagee/ Transferee Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 130929 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 14, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Lawrence Edward Enzor, Jr. and Peggy R. Enzor, husband and wife, originally in favor of Magnolia Mortgage Company, LLC, on the 24th day of December, 2003, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 5517 Page 0154; the undersigned Wells Fargo Bank, N.A, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on April 26, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 61, Alvarez›s Third Addition to Saraland, according to plat thereof recorded in Map Book 9, Page 404 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational pur-

poses:  1131 Alvarez Drive, Saraland, AL  36571. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A, Mortgagee/Transferee  Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 195007 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 14, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Allen M. Watson, an unmarried man, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for American Advisors Group, on the 25th day of April, 2013, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 7029 Page 1681; the undersigned American Advisors Group, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on April 12, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot No. 1 of Whip O Will Hill as recorded in Map Book 21, Page 19 of the records of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  8170 Whip O Will Lane, Irvington, AL  36544. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. American Advisors Group, Mortgagee/Transferee Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/ Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 429141 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 14, 2018

M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 41


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Kathryn L. Jones, a single woman, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Quicken Loans Inc., on the 25th day of November, 2015, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book LR7326 Page 1245; the undersigned Quicken Loans Inc., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on March 29, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lots 4 and 13, Block 19, Dubroca Tract, according to plat thereof recorded in Deed Book 141, N.S., Page 39, of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  156 Westwood St, Mobile, AL  36606. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVEDESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Quicken Loans Inc., Mortgagee/ Transferee. Elizabeth Loefgren SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 416918 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 14, 2018 

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Camille B. West, a single woman, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Primelending, a Plainscapital Company, on the 5th day of March, 2010, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6633 Page 1225; the undersigned Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on April 26, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 14, Second Addition, Part A, Park Forest Estates, according to Plat thereof recorded in Map Book 12, Page 25, of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  858 Vista View Drive, Mobile, AL  36608. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified

funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Mortgagee/Transferee Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/ foreclosures 430490 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 14, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Robert Busby and Christina Busby, husband and wife, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for Advance Mortgage & Investment Co. of North FL, Inc., on the 18th day of July, 2008, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6420 Page 333; the undersigned Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on March 29, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 15, Graceland, Unit 2, according to plat thereof recorded in Map Book 114, Page 31, of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  4169 Grace Ct, Wilmer, AL  36587. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., Mortgagee/ Transferee Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 412221 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 14, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Demetris Henderson and Monica Henderson, originally in favor of CitiFinancial Corporation, on the 18th day of April, 2002, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 5148 Page 1792; the undersigned Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC, a Delaware Limited Liability Company, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on March 29, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 12, according to a map of Washington Place, recorded in Deed Book 156 N.S., Page 450 of the Records in the Office of the Judge of Probate Court of Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  25 Washington Pl., Mobile, AL  36603. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE

42 | L AG N I A P P E | M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8

MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Bayview Loan Servicing, LLC, a Delaware Limited Liability Company, Mortgagee/ Transferee Pam King SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 429601 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 14, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Leona A. Driggers, an unmarried person and Johnny M. Driggers Jr., an unmarried person, originally in favor of Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc., as nominee for PHH Mortgage Corporation, on the 30th day of August, 2007, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6251 Page 1262; the undersigned Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a Mr. Cooper, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on April 26, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot 25, Yancey Glen Subdivision (Revised), according to the Plat thereof recorded in Map Book 104, Page 102 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  12218 Yancey Glen Dr, Mobile, AL  36695. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement or cancellation. Nationstar Mortgage LLC d/b/a Mr. Cooper, Mortgagee/ Transferee. Rebecca Redmond SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL  35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 429247 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 14, 2018

FORECLOSURE NOTICE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness described in and secured by that certain Vendor’s Lien retained in Deed from David F. Pruitt and Linda M. Pruitt, husband and wife to Michael Sharpe and

Meridith Sharpe dated July 30, 2015, and Recorded in Book  LR7289, Page 1459 of the records in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama, notice is hereby given that the undersigned as holder of said Vendor’s Lien  will under power of sale contained in said Vendor’s Lien, sell at public outcry for cash to the highest bidder, during legal hours of sale on the  March 20, 2018  at the front door of the Courthouse of Mobile County, Alabama, 205 Government Street, Mobile, AL 36602, the following described real property in the County of Mobile, State of Alabama, being the same property described in the above referred to mortgage: LOT 2, UNIT ONE OF DEER RUN ESTATES SUBDIVISION, AS RECORDED IN MAP BOOK 44, PAGE 30, OF THE RECORDS IN THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE, MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA. TOGETHER WITH A 30 FOOT NON EXCLUSIVE EASEMENT FOR INGRESS AND EGRESS OVER, ACROSS AND UPON A 30 FOOT WIDE STRIP OF LAND LYING IMMEDIATELY EAST OF THE ALABAMA-MISSISSIPPI STATE LINE AND RUNNING FROM THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF LOT 2, TOWNSHIP 5 SOUTH, RANGE 4 WEST, SOUTWARDLY ALONG THE ALABAMA-MISSISSIPPI STATE LINE TO THE NORTHWEST CORNER OF THE PARCEL OF LAND CONVEYED HEREBY. ALABAMA LAW GIVES SOME PERSONS WHO HAVE AN INTEREST IN PROPERTY THE RIGHT TO REDEEM THE PROPERTY UNDER CERTAIN CIRCUMSTANCES.  PROGRAMS MAY ALSO EXIST THAT HELP PERSONS AVOID OR DELAY THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS.  AN ATTORNEY SHOULD BE CONSULTED TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND THESE RIGHTS AND PROGRAMS AS A PART OF THE FORECLOSURE PROCESS. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS”  BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF THE PROBATE WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Said sale is made for the purpose of paying the said indebtedness and the expenses incident to this sale, including a reasonable attorney›s fee. The sale will be conducted subject (1) to confirmation that the sale is not prohibited under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and (2) to final confirmation and audit of the status of the loan with the mortgagee. David F. Pruitt and Linda M. Pruitt Mortgagee John T. Bender, Attorney McFadden, Lyon & Rouse, L.L.C. 718 Downtowner Blvd. Mobile, AL 36609 Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, March 7, 2018

MORTGAGE FORECLOSURE SALE Default having been made in the payment of the indebtedness secured by that certain mortgage executed by Joy K. Davis, a single person, originally in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., on the 26th day of July, 2010, said mortgage recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate of Mobile County, Alabama, in Book 6686 Page 1198; the undersigned Wells Fargo Bank, N.A, as Mortgagee/Transferee, under and by virtue of the power of sale contained in said mortgage, will sell at public outcry to the highest bidder for cash, in front of the main entrance of the Courthouse at Mobile, Mobile County, Alabama, on April 19, 2018, during the legal hours of sale, all of its right, title, and interest in and to the following described real estate, situated in Mobile County, Alabama, to-wit: Lot T-2, Spring Lake, Unit One, according to plat thereof recorded in Map Book 65, Page 63, in the Office of the Judge of Probate, Mobile County, Alabama. Property street address for informational purposes:  242 Spring Lake Drive N, Mobile, AL  36695. THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD ON AN “AS IS, WHERE IS” BASIS, SUBJECT TO ANY EASEMENTS, ENCUMBRANCES, AND EXCEPTIONS REFLECTED IN THE MORTGAGE AND THOSE CONTAINED IN THE RECORDS OF THE OFFICE OF THE JUDGE OF PROBATE OF THE COUNTY WHERE THE ABOVE-DESCRIBED PROPERTY IS SITUATED.  THIS PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD WITHOUT WARRANTY OR RECOURSE, EXPRESSED OR IMPLIED AS TO TITLE, USE AND/OR ENJOYMENT AND WILL BE SOLD SUBJECT TO THE RIGHT OF REDEMPTION OF ALL PARTIES ENTITLED THERETO. Alabama law gives some persons who have an interest in property the right to redeem the property under certain circumstances.  Programs may also exist that help persons avoid or delay the foreclosure process. An attorney should be consulted to help you understand these rights and programs as a part of the foreclosure process. This sale is made for the purpose of paying the indebtedness secured by said mortgage, as well as the expenses of foreclosure. The successful bidder must tender a non-refundable deposit of Five Thousand Dollars ($5,000.00) in certified funds made payable to Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the time and place of the sale. The balance of the purchase price must be paid in certified funds by noon the next business day at the Law Office of Sirote & Permutt, P.C. at the address indicated below. Sirote & Permutt, P.C. reserves the right to award the bid to the next highest bidder should the highest bidder fail to timely tender the total amount due. The Mortgagee/ Transferee reserves the right to bid for and purchase the real estate and to credit its purchase price against the expenses of sale and the indebtedness secured by the real estate. This sale is subject to postponement

or cancellation. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A, Mortgagee/ Transferee Ginny Rutledge SIROTE & PERMUTT, P.C. P. O. Box 55727 Birmingham, AL 35255-5727 Attorney for Mortgagee/Transferee www.sirote.com/foreclosures 430477 Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, March 7, 2018

FORECLOSURE Default having been made in the terms of that certain vendor›s lien deed executed on August 24, 2014 by Zandra Coxwell as grantee to Kevin Frost and Sue Nell Frost as grantors, which was recorded in the Office of the Judge of Probate Mobile County, Alabama in Map Book 103 Page 45 by virtue of and pursuant to the power of sale contained in said vendor›s lien deed, the following described property will be sold at public outcry, for cash, to the highest bidder, in front of the north entrance of Mobile County Courthouse located at 205 Government St Mobile, Alabama 36644 during the legal hours of sale on March 15, 2018: Lot 2 of the resubdivision of lots 15,16, & 17 Block C Glen Acres Subdivision 1st Addition as recorded in Map Book 103 Page 45 Probate Court of Mobile, County.  Said sale is for the purpose of paying said vendor›s lien deed and costs of foreclosure. Kevin Frost, Holder of Vendor›s Lien 920 Dawes Rd. Mobile, Alabama 36695 251-591-0302 Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, March 7, 2018

CIRCUIT IN THE CIRCUIT COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA CASE NO.: 02-CV-2017-902298 JAZEMINE BANKS, the Plaintiff, v. JAMIE LINDA NGUYEN, factitious parties A, B, C, D, being those persons or entities whose identities are presently unknown but who will be added by way amendment once ascertained, Defendants. LEGAL NOTICE NOTICE TO: JAMIE LINDA NGUYEN You are hereby notified that the above-styled action seeking compensatory and punitive damages was filed on November 9, 2017, and that by reason of an Order of the Court entered on February 6, 2018, you are hereby commanded to Answer or otherwise plead to the allegations of the complaint on or before April 23, 2018, by filing your answer with the Clerk of the Circuit Court of Mobile County, Alabama, and by sending a copy of the same to attorney for the plaintiff, Charles J. Potts, Briskman & Binion, P.C., P.O. Box 43, Mobile, Alabama 36601, or suffer a default judgment to be entered against you. Done this 23rd day of February, 2018 /s JOJO SCHWARZAUER CLERK OF THE CIRCUIT COURT MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 14, 21, 2018 

PROBATE

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: MARK ANTHONY REYES SR. Case No. 2017-0538 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 21st day of February, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. WAYNE A. GRUENLOH as Administrator of the estate of MARK ANTHONY REYES SR., deceased. Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 14, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: JUANITA TRAYLOR, Deceased Case No. 2018-0271 Take notice that Letters Testamentary have been granted to the below named party on the 9th day of February, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. TRACY TRAYLOR JOHNSON as Executrix under the last will and testament of JUANITA TRAYLOR, Deceased. Attorney of Record: Thomas B Walsh Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, March 7, 2018

NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: WILLIE ROY BINGHAM Case No. 2017-2409 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 9th day of February, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. LATEDRA BINGHAM DIXON as Administratrix of the estate of WILLIE ROY BINGHAM, deceased. Attorney of Record: PATRICK COLLINS Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, March 7, 2018


LAGNIAPPE LEGALS | 251.450-4466 | legals@lagniappemobile.com NOTICE OF ESTATE ADMINISTRATION PROBATE COURT OF MOBILE COUNTY, ALABAMA Estate of: OSCAR TED BEVERLY, JR. Case No. 2017-2051 Take notice that Letters of Administration have been granted to the below named party on the 23rd day of February, 2018 by the Honorable Don Davis, Judge of Probate of Mobile County Probate Court, Alabama and that all parties having claims against said estate should file the same with the Probate Court of said county within the time allowed by law, or they will be barred. JASON B. JACKSON as Administrator of the estate of OSCAR TED BEVERLY, JR. deceased. Attorney of Record: C. Andrew Harrell, Esq. Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 21, 2018

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS LEGAL NOTICE – INVITATION TO BID STRIPPING & WAXING OF FLOORS – AS NEEDED Sealed Proposals will be received by the Board of School Commissioners of Mobile County, AL at its offices located in the Purchasing Department, 1 Magnum Pass, Mobile, AL 36618 until the day of Wednesday, March 21, 2018 at 2:00 P.M., then publicly opened and read aloud. Bid forms and specifications can be found on the Mobile County School System’s website: purchasing.mcpss.com or a copy can be picked up in the Purchasing Office, 1 Magnum Pass Mobile, AL 36618 from the hours of 8:00 A.M. – 4:00 P.M. Mon.-Fri. Should you have any questions, please call Julie Morgan at (251) 221-4473. BID ON: STRIPPING & WAXING OF FLOORS – AS NEEDED BID #18-15 BID DATE:  WEDNESDAY, MARCH 21, 2018 @ 2:00 P.M. Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 2018

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that the University of South Alabama (Owner) will accept sealed Bids for the following Work: HVAC WORK FOR FOOD COURT University of South Alabama Mobile, Alabama USA JOB #17-80A USA BID #8022701 Supply and install all mechanical upgrades to include hoods; exhaust fans and roof curbs; supply duct and grills; and all electrical associates to the mechanical scope of work. Bids will be received and clocked in at 2:00 PM local time on Thursday, March 29, 2018, at Procurement Services on the Main Campus of the University of South Alabama. Bids will not be accepted after the time indicated herein and will be returned unopened. A cashier’s check or bid bond payable to the University of South Alabama in an amount not less than five (5) percent of the amount of the bid, but in no event more than $10,000 must accompany the bidder’s proposal. Bid Documents shall be available only through the USA Purchasing Office.  Contact as follows: University of South Alabama Procurement Services Technology & Research Park Bldg. III 650 Clinic Drive, Suite 1400 Mobile, AL 36688 PH# (251) 460-6151. FX# (251) 414-8291 (rbrown@southalabama.edu) Bids must be submitted on Proposal Forms furnished in the Bid Documents or copies thereof. The preceding is an abbreviated advertisement. The complete advertisement may be obtained from the location listed above. A PreBid Conference will be held at 10:00 AM local time on Thursday, March 22, 2018, in Room AD023 of the Administration Building. Those in attendance will include the Owner, Engineer, and Consultants. Contract bidders, subcontractors and suppliers are encouraged to attend. A tour of the Project site is scheduled immediately after the conference. All questions concerning the Project should be submitted in writing to Daniel Greer at the following address:  307 University Blvd. N., AD001 Mobile, AL 36688 dgreer@southalabama.edu Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 21, 2018

ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS Notice is hereby given that the University of South Alabama (Owner) will accept sealed Bids for the following Work: Flooring Annual Contract University of South Alabama Mobile, Alabama USA JOB #18-11 USA BID #8022002. Bids will be received and clocked in at 2:00 PM local time on Tuesday, March 20, 2018, at Procurement Services on the Main Campus of the University of South Alabama. Bids will not be accepted after the time indicated herein and will be returned unopened. A cashier’s check or bid bond payable to the University of South Alabama in an amount not less than five (5) percent of the amount of the bid, but in no event more than $10,000 must accompany the bidder’s proposal. Bid Documents shall be available only through the USA Purchasing Office.   Contact as follows: University of South Alabama Procurement Services Technology & Research Park Bldg. III 650 Clinic Drive, Suite 1400 Mobile, AL 36688 PH#(251) 460-6151 FX# (251) 414-8291 (rbrown@southalabama.edu) Bids must be submitted on Proposal Forms furnished in the Bid Documents or copies thereof. The preceding is an abbreviated advertisement. The complete advertisement may be obtained from the location listed above. All questions concerning the Project should be submitted in writing to Daniel Greer at the address listed below. 6062 USA Drive South Mobile, AL 36688 dgreer@southalabama.edu Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 14, 2018

PUBLIC NOTICE STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE Notice is hereby given that a bill as described in the synopsis below will be introduced in the 2018 Regular Session of the Legislature of Alabama and application for its passage and enactment will be made: A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT. SYNOPSIS: Relating to Class 2 municipalities; to create an alternate Self-Help Business Improvement District as authorized in Section 11-54B40, Code of Alabama 1975; to provide procedures for any Class 2 municipality to establish one or more SelfHelp Business Improvement Districts for the purpose of promoting tourism, including the creation of non-profit corporations to manage the districts; to provide certain required provisions in the articles of incorporation of district management corporations; to provide for the levy of a special assessment on a particular class of businesses located within the geographical area of the district for the purpose of promoting tourism for the benefit of businesses in the district; to provide for dissolution of a district and withdrawal of a non-profit corporation’s designation as a district management corporation. Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 14, 21, 2018

STATE OF ALABAMA COUNTY OF MOBILE Notice is hereby given that a bill as described in the synopsis below will be introduced in the 2018 Regular Session of the Legislature of Alabama and application for its passage and enactment will be made: A BILL TO BE ENTITLED AN ACT. SYNOPSIS: Relating to Class 2 municipalities; to further provide for the appointment of members to a board of adjustment; to provide for qualifications of members, and appointment and terms of  supernumerary members; to further provide for appeals to the board of adjustment and the time of appeals from administrative decisions; and to further provide for notice and grounds for appeals and that appeals to the board of adjustment will be heard de novo.

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on April 06 , 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  662 Chin St., Mobile, AL 36610. 2006 Dodge Charger 2B3KA53H46H195546 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on April 06 , 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  1627 Navco Rd., Mobile, AL 36605. 1995 Toyota Camry 4T1SK12E2SU512142 2004 Jeep Grand Cherokee 1J8GX68J74C167172 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on April 06 , 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  1421 Cody Rd. N., Mobile, AL 36618. 2004 Chevrolet Silverado 1GCEK19T84E260674 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on April 06 , 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  8681 Chunchula Landfill Rd., Chunchula, AL 36521. 1997 Jeep Grand Cherokee 1J4GZ58S4VC717637 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on April 13 , 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  158 Dunn Ave., Mobile, AL 36606. 2001 Chevrolet Impala 2G1WF55K219363867 Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 2018

Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, March 7, 14, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on April 13 , 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  3301 N Schillinger Rd., Semmes, AL 36575. 1995 Buick Roadmaster 1G4BT52P3SR423611

Erica Tiffany Singleton, whose whereabouts are unknown, must answer Mignonette F. Sams’ statement of claim by March 21, 2018, or thereafter, a judgement by default may be rendered against her in Case No. SM 2017 001652 00, Circuit Court of Mobile County. Done this 21st day of February 2018.

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on April 13 , 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 19050 A State Hwy 181, Fairhope, AL 36532. 2000 Ford F250 1FTNF20F5YEB51600

Lagniappe HD Feb. 21, 28, March 7, 14, 2018

NOTICE OF SALE Notice is hereby given, pursuant to Alabama Statutes, that the goods stored in units rented by occupants listed below will be sold to the highest bidder at a public auction online at www.storagetreasures.com on March 23, 2018 at 10:00 am to satisfy liens claimed by STORAGEMAX MIDTOWN, together with all costs of sale. Dexter J. DeVaughn, Michael A. Mitchell, Katrina R Agee, Jennifer Epps, Marcelene K Lewis, Michael R Zinnerman Any of the above goods may be withdrawn from sale by STORAGEMAX MIDTOWN at any time without prior notice. Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on April 06 , 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2014 Chevrolet Camaro 2G1FB1E34E9278449 1998 Toyota Corolla 2T1BR18E1WC045001 2000 Oldsmobile Intrigue 1G3WX52HXYF169098 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on April 06 , 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  3351 Dauphin Island Parkway, Mobile, AL 36605. 2005 Toyota Camry 4T1BE32K55U588936 2001 GMC Yukon 1GKEC16T41J314562 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on April 06 , 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at   453 Mobile St., Mobile, AL 36607. 2016 Chrysler 200 1C3CCCAB4GN103946 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on April 06 , 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at   5775 Plantation Rd., Theodore, AL 36582. 2009 Saturn VUE 3GSCL53799S622309 2016 Kia Soul KNDJP3A50G7286218 Lagniappe HD Feb. 28, March 7, 2018

Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 2018

Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on April 13 , 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  18342 Couch Plant Rd., Summerdale, AL 36580. 2008 Chevrolet Tahoe 1GNFC13008R272727 Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on April 13 , 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  7960 Two Mile Rd., Irvington, AL 36544. 2015 Ford Escape 1FMCU0G78FUA19137 1999 Mitsubishi Mirage JA3AY26AXXU026499 2002 Saturn L200 1G8JU54F42Y582395 2004 Nissan Sentra 3N1CB51DX4L869626 Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on April 13 , 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  9401 Fox Hunter Ct., Semmes, AL 36575. 2004 Chevrolet Silverado 1GCEC14X34Z350606 Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on April 13 , 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at 1015 N Craft Hwy., Prichard, AL 36610. 2006 Chevrolet Impala 2G1WD58C869159740 1999 GMC Sierra 1GTFC29U6XZ524438 Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on April 13 , 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  2000 Halls Mill Rd., Mobile, AL 36606. 2012 GMC Sierra 3GTP2VE70CG245571 Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 2018

The following unclaimed vehicle(s) will be sold on April 13 , 2018 - Time - 12pm, if not claimed - at  4515 Lott Rd., Eight Mile, AL 36613. 1991 Ford F150 1FTEF14N4MNA97499 Lagniappe HD March 7, 14, 2018

STYLE BOOZIE

Getting chili with it BY BOOZIE BEER NUES/SOCIAL BUTTERFLY

I

’m not sure what is more ubiquitous right now — the pollen or spring events. Probably still the pollen at this point, but the events are certainly catching up. So grab a Kleenex, take a Claritin and join the party because you know there is no slowing down until it gets butt hot. But before you put on your party dress (or pants), you should probably catch up on all of last week’s gossip. So get to it!

Chili Cook-Off comes home

Well, I would say moving the 29th annual American Cancer Society Chili Cook-Off back downtown last Saturday was a very smart move. And Mother Nature didn’t hurt things either as she provided absolutely perfect weather. We hear the number of people who attended was around 10,000, raising $150,000 for the charity. Not too shabby! We hear things went very smoothly, even at the new venue at Mardi Gras park, with great entertainment by Coastal Community College Show Choir, Nanafalia and Crowned Jewelz. My spies said though The Grounds did a nice job the past few years, it was just nice to be back in the heart of the city, with the skyline as the backdrop. There were great team costumes — the usual superheroes and villains and my spies even spotted a very realistic Chunk and his mom, Mrs. Fratelli, from “The Goonies.” Other crowd favorites were the “Netflix and Chili” team and the “Stranger Chili” team, who did a takeoff on “Stranger Things.” Heck, with all this love, maybe Netflix should be the major corporate sponsor next year. Apparently folks were also thirsty this year, as they ran out of beer before the event ended (#somobile)! The overall winner was Goodwyn Mills Cawood, who also came in first in “Meat and Bean.” Palate Pleasing won for “Decoration” and Aker won for “Spirit.” Hargrove pulled in the most “Chili Change” at $1,081. Penske came in first for “Meat Only.” Airbus FAL took the “Veggie/Chicken/Other” category, while Fausak won for “Wild Game.” Of course, the true winner is the American Cancer Society! I already can’t wait for next year!

IHOP and AJ flip out over Starla

It’s not hard to see why Starla Chapman, who battled and beat cancer as a 2-year-old, was named Head Chef of IHOP’s Kid Culinary Team following national tryouts in New York City on Feb. 27, aka “National Pancake Day.” The now 9-year-old has an amazing personality and spirit. To celebrate the Baldwin County resident’s homecoming, IHOP and

USA Children’s & Women’s Hospital threw a party in her honor at the Airport Boulevard location of IHOP with a cake, balloons and lots of the special-recipe pancakes now known as Starla’s Stack. They are even on the menu at the local pancake house. AJ McCarron, former Alabama Crimson Tide quarterback, and his mom, Dee Dee Bonner, surprised Starla during the party. Back when the youngster was battling cancer, AJ wore a bracelet honoring her during a National Championship game. Their relationship continued past his days at Alabama, with Starla serving as flower girl in his wedding to model Katherine Webb. Turns out the football player and Starla had something in common — both were treated at USA Children’s & Women’s Hospital in Mobile. AJ sustained serious injuries from a Jet Ski accident as a child. Following her recovery, Starla and her family have made giving back to the local hospital and Children’s Miracle Network Hospitals a priority. Can’t wait to try her tasty pancakes!

And the Oscar goes to … us!

Just confirming we are the best L.A. in the country for movie-making (duh!). “Get Out,” which was filmed right here in Mobile and Fairhope, took home an Oscar at the Sunday night Academy Awards show in the other L.A. (yawn). Jordan Peele won for “Best Original Screenplay,” making history as the first AfricanAmerican to win in that category. Yay, Jordan! Please come back, and also tell all of your friends we are ready for more lights, camera and movie-making action!

Report from the Gossip Wire

So my spies went out for a little fun downtown after the Chili CookOff Saturday night. One spy said while they were at their fave barbecue joint, one girl had a little trouble staying on her barstool. Boozie understands! Those things can be tricky at times! And this ‘cue-lovin’ spy said a few girls may have regretted not changing out of the swimsuits and cover-ups they had obviously been sporting earlier in the day when it was warmer. She said they looked quite chilly on this Chili Cook-Off day. Hey, I never know how to dress around here either, although a bathing suit in public is never an option for the ol’ Boozester (#beergut). You’re welcome. Well kids, that’s all I’ve got this week. Just remember, whether rain or shine, dramatic or scandalous, or just some plain ol’ “Netflix and Chili” lovin’, I will be there. Ciao!

M a r c h 7 , 2 0 1 8 - M a r c h 1 3 , 2 0 1 8 | L AG N I A P P E | 43


Lagniappe: March 7 - March 14, 2018  
Lagniappe: March 7 - March 14, 2018