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Tooele

Downtown Charrette

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Tooele Mayor & City Council Utah Main Street USU Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning USU Extension/ Rural Intermountain Planning Program


This project was completed by students in the Landscape Architecture and Environmental Planning Department for the City of Tooele, Utah and the Utah Main Street Program. The duration of the project was four days (August 31 to September 3, 2004)


Tooele

Downtown Charrette

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South of Main Street Corridor

The South Main Corridor of the City of Tooele is an area located in downtown that extends South from Vine Street to 400 South and East from 100 West to 100 East.

Core Shopping District

Business District

Gateway District

The South Main Corridor of the City of Tooele is an area located in downtown that extends South from Vine Street to 400 South and East from 100 West to 100 East. The downtown area of Tooele has many potential opportunities and areas in need of improvement in order to create a place of enduring quality and significance. Many of the opportunities within downtown Tooele begin with the ability of community leaders and residents to commit to improving the physical characteristics of the area, creating areas of special interest and promoting activities that will bring people into the downtown. While keeping these goals in mind, our proposal focuses on a strategy that will give the City of Tooele an outline of districts and guidelines for achieving a vital and vibrant downtown. The site has been broken up into a series of districts each of which has been identified based upon certain characteristics and each of which will be associated with a series of guidelines that will help guide development along the South Main Corridor. These districts include a Core Shopping District, a Businesses District and a Gateway District. The goal within each district is to create a more unified and vibrant downtown area, however within each district this is done by focusing on slightly different elements and by using different levels of treatment.

South Corridor


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Gateway District Guidelines

Core Shopping District – Treatment Level – High

The Core Shopping District will be defined by new specialty shops and restaurants and revitalizing existing ones. The proposed improvements would be considerable, including many streetscape and roadway enhancements. •It is proposed to narrow the roadway to one travel lane with on street angled parking (60 degree), and to include a raised and planted median. •Create a more unified streetscape through the use of consistently spaced street tree plantings, unification of paving materials, inviting store frontages, and mid-block pedestrian crossings.

Business District – Treatment Level – Medium

The primary uses intended for this area include office and retail of high density. •Allowing for more dense development, enhancing existing streetscape and completing roadway improvements. •Narrow the roadway to one travel lane with on street parallel parking, and to include a raised and planted median. •Ceate a more unified streetscape through the use of consistently spaced street tree plantings, unification of paving materials, inviting office and store frontages.

Gateway District – Treatment Level – Medium

The gateway district is intended to create an entrance to the downtown area. This is achieved through: •The use of plantings and narrowing of the roadway. This spatial compression is intended to slow traffic and to frame the view of what lies ahead. •The use of annual as well as perennial flora will enhance and beautify this entry ‘parkway’ giving visitors to the City of Tooele an impression of what lies ahead.

1. Reduce roadway from two lanes to one 2. Create spatial compression along roadway by restricting travel lane to 11’. 3. Develop landscape median 4. Create entry with sentinel trees (London Planetree) 5. Reduce residential setback in this district to 10’ from back of sidewalk 6. Encourage infill development, especially neotraditional residential 7. Create Uniformity with roadside curbcuts, eliminate immediate parking lot access 8. Restrict parking lots to rear of residential commercial with only driveway access 9. Develop prescriptive architectural features (genre) and color palette 10. Eliminate all on-street parking after roadway narrows to one lane 11. Streetscape improvements include a. Series of sentinel trees starting at 4th south 35’ O.C. b. Smaller street tree species (honeylocust) planting in parkstrip and landscape median 30’ o.c. c. Use street trees to unify streetscape. d. Begin introduction of street furnishings, ie. Trashcans, benches, streetlights, signage, etc (not as abundant as in shopping district, but a concerted effort to make all furnishings relate to other districts within the downtown. 12. Redirect commercial traffic into a truck route proposed on the west side

South Corridor


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Options at the Corner of Main and Vine

Roundabout option at the Corner of Main and Vine

Courthouse Pedestrian Crossing

Ways to treat intersection in Downtown Tooele To calm this traffic, gradually reduce the road width with center islands, add neckdowns or raised intersections and diagonal parking within a block of the Main/ Vine crossroads, incorporate raised crosswalks, center island medians, and set lower speed limits or possibly reroute heavy vehicles.

South Corridor


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At the center of Tooele, Utah’s Brightest Star, shines the busy intersection of Main and Vine Streets. This point forms the core of a classic American downtown. Wide tree-lined sidewalks and small family businesses are just some of the many strengths on which citizens may build their plans for this neighborhood. Recent business and population growth, coupled with streetscape changes over time, has led to a decline in the Downtown Neighborhood’s vibrancy. Efforts to restore its faded shine should concentrate on the aesthetic and safety issues featured below.

This neighborhood is blessed

with much greenspace along its length, even at the bustling Main/ Vine crossroads. Yet there are gaps in what could be an enticing green corridor. By filling in spaces along the street park strips with suitable trees it will tie small parks together and lend a subtle visual unity along the corridor. Replace vegetation compromised by drought with xeric or drought tolerant plants. Downtown visitors would be better able to find this neighborhood’s abundant parking with improved signage, more accessible Main Street entrances to offstreet parking lots, and infrastructure improvements to those lots such as repaving and stall painting.

Downtown shoppers find Main Street’s high speeds too overwhelming to feel safe parking along its length.

Main Street’s sidewalks would once again entice crowds of pedestrians with a few improvements such as more consistent lighting, ADA-compatible curbs, and benches or other areas to sit and rest. Redesigning the county courthouse lawn as a park would also provide shade and give office workers a place where they can take breaks. Use of nearby quarried stone or traditional brickwork and iron in these enhancements will resonate with the still-visible historic artifacts scattered along these blocks.

South Corridor


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North of Main Street Corridor

A gateway is a design technique that creates a sense of cohesiveness and a sense of place. We propose creating a gateway, such as the one shown, at the entrance of historic downtown Tooele. The gateway may be a sign, a fountain, a pillar, a change in plant material, or a change in hard-scape, imagination is the only limit. As we walked through Tooele we found that there was very little signage. We propose placing wayfinders and historic markers in the downtown area to increase awareness and ease of circulation, and to entice community members and tourists to rediscover the values of historic Tooele. We propose the creation of a Downtown Merchants Association and a Historic Preservation Committee to help maintain the authenticity and cohesiveness of the downtown area. We also suggest that the Municipal Government take charge of the parking lots to the rear of the downtown buildings. Business owners may not now have the funds to refurbish and maintain the parking lots because of the decrease in business. With government involvement this restoration could invigorate the downtown and recharge the small businesses. The newer commercial area north of town has a distinctly different architecture due to the time it was built and the shear size of the buildings and parking lots. In contrast the downtown area has a much smaller scale, a quaint historic feel. A unifying green corridor on main street would help to blend these two varying areas. We purpose rows and small grouping of trees relating to varying building scales which will provide shade and atmosphere throughout the city corridor.

North Corridor


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The downtown area is currently heavily congested with fast moving traffic

and no on-street parking. We propose the use of traffic-calming devices to slow traffic through the historic downtown area. These devices include a center median, raised crosswalks, and different colors and textures of paved surfaces. On-street parking helps attract customers and recreates the atmosphere of small town Utah. We propose adding select areas of on-street parking in the historic downtown. Stalls can be head-in at 45 or 60 degrees or parallel to the curb with the curb built out to provide protection and act as additional traffic calming. The heavy traffic and uneven sidewalks and curbs are dangerous to pedestrians and may deter customers from downtown stores. We propose creating safe, simple walkways that are more than just avenues to move people. They should include consistent paving patterns with little or no change in elevation, and seating where shoppers can rest, people watch, and enjoy the atmosphere.

Street furniture, landscaping, and lighting should be chosen that reflects the historic flavor of the downtown and helps to create a sense of place. Stoplights should have crossing signs [walk/don’t walk] that are always on and crosswalks should be raised and distinctly marked for pedestrian safety.

We propose the creation of outdoor spaces to enhance the atmosphere and bring more people downtown.

North Corridor


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Recommendations for design guidelines for North Main Street, Tooele The town center area will be defined as originating at Main and Vine, and continuing outward two blocks from the intersection. The North Main Street Area will be defined as Main Street between Utah and Vine Streets.

Lighting: Provide street lights in the town center that focus on the pedestrian zone, either through additional smaller lights or by adding a lower light to existing tall gooseneck street lights toward the sidewalk. Provide additional lighting for rear parking lots.

Signage:

Trim and maintain vegetation so that target audience can see signs. Install signs to direct people to parking, public areas (library, parks, and pools), historic sites, and facilities (e.g. hospital, city hall). Install new pedestrian kiosks; these kiosks should include a permanent small-scale map of town center. Remove existing wooden kiosks.

Civic identity: Designate the intersection of Main and Vine as Tooele’s official Town Center. Convene a stakeholders group to advocate for and assist in maintaining the Town Center and Transition Zone area. Adopt specific design and maintenance codes for the Town Center and Downtown Transition Zone building fronts, sidewalks, planting strips, and parking areas. These codes should serve to assist city and private entities when altering or maintaining property to create a unified theme or “look� in the target area. Allow for outside seating/activity areas at Town Center businesses. Identify and promote child-oriented activities in the Town Center.

North Corridor


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Sidewalks and planting strips: Implement appropriate regular maintenance for all sidewalks and landscaped areas, including trash/debris removal. Evaluate sidewalks in the Town Center area for improper drainage. Failed areas (holes, sinks) and dangerous terrain (buckled/deteriorated cement, sudden changes from slope to steps) should be repaired. Consider universal access in the pedestrian zone. Sidewalks, crosswalk devices and paths, and street width should reflect accessibility to elderly or disabled citizens and parents with small children. Develop and enforce a guidance plan for plant materials used in Town Center and Transition Zone planting strips. Planting strips should be used between sidewalk and parking areas. Eliminate all obsolete curb cuts. Parking and roads: Provide entry to rear parking lots at mid-block. Entry from Main should be one-way, with exits to Vine and Utah Streets. Develop and enforce maintenance rules for private parking lots. Develop covered shelters for bus stops. Make crosswalks more visible to traffic. This can be achieved through appropriate placement of crossings, use of cobble/brick as pavement to define crosswalk, appropriate signage and crossing lights. Develop a plan to divert commercial trucking traffic away from the Town Center. Install corners at intersections that allow for a safe turning radius for cars and trucks and facilitate safe entry into traffic flow. Accommodate bicycle traffic in the Town Center and Transition Zone streets.

North Corridor


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Historic Downtown Tooele Theme

Circulation is a major problem for the historic downtown area and must be addressed in order to restore vitality and improve access for visitors. The following suggestions have been made with the historic context of the site in mind to encourage circulation for vehicles and pedestrians.

Historic in Downtown Tooele Fusion

A gateway is proposed at the intersection of Main and Vine Streets that incorporates the idea of the old arch gateway that once stood in Tooele. The pillars on each end represent those on the façade of the “Ritz” movie theatre. This gateway will be the center of focus that unifies the historic district. •Mini gateways, including a change of pavement, sidewalk, trees, or architecture, at the beginning and end of the historic district will continue the theme and further define the historic Main Street. •New benches and light posts with a historic design can be placed throughout the district to tie Main Street to the arterial streets. These features will welcome visitors and encourage them to explore the area further. Vehicles lack visible parking areas and this must be addressed in order to accommodate the visitors. •Signs or distinctly marked entryways from Main Street to parking lots and civic interests, such as the City Hall and Public Library, are needed. Placing visible signs with a historic character along the street will direct vehicles to parking located behind the stores. •Restoration and/or renovation are encouraged for both store fronts and rear entries to create a pleasant environment for visitors which will entice them to stay and lead them to other areas. •Access from the rear parking should be directed to the rear building entries, while at the same time providing pedestrian routes to the Main Street sidewalk. Existing alleys provide an opportunity for improvement of pedestrian circula-

Historic Theme tion with new walkways and plantings.


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Changing the pavement of crosswalks will help slow traffic along with bollards placed on the corners of busy intersections. These bollards could serve a double purpose with informative plaques that display certain historic interests within the four historic eras of Tooele: the Indians, the Pioneers, mining, and WWII. Materials from these eras can be incorporated into the site elements to further support the historic theme, for example: • Railroad tracks could be set into the crosswalks • Samples of mined ore or silver can be placed in the granite • Bronze or copper replicas of artifacts may be dis played as pieces of art • Plaques can be embedded into the sidewalk along Main Street in front of each building explaining it’s first use and the dates of operation • Quotes and stories of the first settlers can be engraved in various patterns into the sidewalks to remind educate visitors about Tooele’s unique history

Incorporating these features along Main, Vine, and Broadway Streets will encourage circulation through each historic district and along the bridge of the “Historic Fusion” while improving the historic character of downtown Tooele.

Historic Theme


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Architecture The objective of the architecture design is to bring unity and continuity to the buildings in the downtown historic area. The design is patterned after Tooele’s historic Main Street and will aid in restoring the historic past of Tooele while improving the tarnished conditions that presently exist. These improvements will restore vitality to the declining Central Business District by creating a pleasing historic character that will encourage people to visit the area. The design reflects the dominant styles of the architecture at the turn of the century, including: • Window awnings on the first floor • Arched windows on the second stories • Patios and balconies • Architectural details These elements add character and interest to the buildings, making the district memorable and attractive. Incorporating restaurants with patios and tables in front will provide a social environment that will be supported by residents. The second stories of these buildings can be converted into apartments and will provide live/work units for residents of Tooele. This will increase activity in the area, thereby attracting visitors from other areas. Incorporating these design principles along Main, Vine, and Broadway streets will help sustain the “Historic Fusion” between time and culture of the two districts.

Historic Theme


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Downtown Charrette

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Historic Fusion of Tooele and Newtown In the assessment of Tooele City’s history, we have found a dynamic connection between early Mormon Pioneers, the introduction of European Immigrants and the economic growth of Tooele. Initially, these two populations remained isolated, in geographic and cultural terms. Tooele City has, in effect, two dis-tinct “main” streets. While we address the preservation and potential invigoration of Tooele’s historic character, it seems an invaluable resource to address the potential fusing of these two districts. While North Broadway, once called Greek Street, lies east of Main Street three blocks, the utilization of Vine Street as a historic con-nector evokes fantastic possibilities. This could create a bridge through time and culture, fuse two powerful historic districts and generate a sense of unified history for residents and visitors alike.

Before

The city of Tooele should en courage in-fill development along this corridor. A linear “historic walk”, either along Vine St. or through the neighborhoods immediately north of Vine, is another solution that promotes this connectivity. The result could be a historic district that begins to establish a core, as opposed to the north/ south orientation of the current historic district. The creation of distinctive places makes a location memorable and attractive.

After Before and After pictures of Tooele’s historic potential

Historic Theme


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Historic in Downtown Tooele Guidelines Current Lighting The downtown area is generally very dark. Lighting is present on the road but not on pedestrian walkways or in parking lots, two areas that should be well-lit to draw people in and provide a sense of security. Even where lighting is provided, current fixtures do not seem to follow any set standards. Different styles are used in different areas, which diminishes the historic feel of the downtown area. Some of the existing street light poles are of a style with some historic character. These poles could be preserved while the light fixture itself is replaced with a historic tear-drop light. Whatever is done, lighting fixtures should be consistent in style to enhance the historic theme tying the downtown area together. Lighting must be provided on all sidewalks, along streets, and in parking lots. Sidewalk lighting fixtures should be 12 feet in height. Parking and street light fixtures should be a minimum of 20 feet in height. Lighting should be directed downwards to minimize “pollution� to surrounding properties. Light fixtures should be consistent with the character of the historic district. When a fixture style is selected, it should be used in all instances throughout the downtown area. (See examples.) Neon lighting should be limited to applications in which it was part of the original building construction. It should not be allowed on new construction. Small spotlights could be used to illuminate key buildings.

Historic Theme


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Signage Guidelines

Historical Signs

All sign materials, colors, lettering, sizes, shapes, and lighting need to fit with the time period of the building on which it is placed, except for buildings that are from the 60’s era or newer. Signs and buildings were relatively unique and hand-crafted up until the 60’s. Historical signs should be protected and preserved with collaboration with experts in order to maintain the historical character of the signs. Sign Quality

Sign Fits With Building Era

Examples of Poor Signage

Examples of Good Window Signage

Front and rear elevations with placement of where signs can go.

In most cases, only two signs should be affixed in front: one facing the street -either on the window or above it - the other hanging above the sidewalk so it is visible to pedestrians. A third sign should be posted in the rear of the building so that the back entrance is not confusing for the clients coming in from the back.

Examples of Good Hanging Signs Where there are street trees, signs need to be kept low in order to be visible from the street. These sketches show visibility in blue and the recommended sign areas in pink.

Historic Theme


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Site Furnishings The historic downtown district of Tooele is rich with pioneer and mining heritage. Architectural gems from a past era stand behind artificial facades from more recent periods. The streetscape is furnished with a variety of elements which have accrued over time in a piecemeal manner and which bear little relationship to each other or to the historic past of Tooele. These furnishings appear tattered, weathered, and uninviting.

Bland and dated

Hard, cold, uninviting

Uninviting

Worn

Existing Site Furnishing Worn, tattered

Visually cluttered

Recommended Site Furnishing

By incorporating a new palette of site furnishings the downtown appearance of Tooele will become unified once again. Elements should be selected from a unified family of materials, color, and form. Selecting unified furnishings will not only add an aesthetic quality to the city but will also provide the public with durable, comfortable structures to enjoy for many years to come.

Sidewalk Conditions The walkways and curbing of the downtown area need uniformity, clean edges, and repitition. To create an organized and visually appealing downtown area, one that is more inviting to pedestrian traffic, sidewalk designs should be uniform and simple, and sidewalk borders should be straight. A simple sidewalk design will endure into the future physically and aesthetically.

Current Conditions: •Haphazard mix of brick and concrete •Lack of uniformity in design and pattern •No standard width •Detracts from historical character

Recommendations: •Eliminate brick paving Make all sidewalks uniform width (12’) with straight, even edges •Use stone edging on curb, and between sidewalk and grass if applicable •Straighten the curb all the way to Main Street •If retained, make the grass strip between the sidewalk and road uniform width through downtown •Plant trees at regular intervals calculated from intersection to intersection

Historic Theme


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Design Guidelines

Analytical Elements of Architecture

Preserving Architectural Characteristics •The historic architectural character of structures should be maintained or restored.

When proposed changes to existing buildings or proposed new buildings in a historic setting are evaluated, the qualities of the basic building forms and materials become significant.

Building Changes •Changes to buildings that happen overtime and are historical should be preserved.

Massing refers to the architectural form, the overall volumetric shape of a building. In a historic district, massing is the single most important characteristic to consider in the evaluation of proposed additions and new construction.

Reversibility •Proposed changes to historic buildings should be reversible whenever possible. Deteriorated and Missing Components •Deteriorated or missing significant components should be replaced or recreated with materials that replicate the historic design, color and texture of the components. Anchoring Devices •New items such as signs, light fixtures, and awnings should be attached carefully to minimize damage to historical buildings. Primary Facades and Secondary Facades •The Design Guidelines should be intended for primary facades predominantly and should be minor to secondary facades.

Massing

Scale

Scale in architecture is a measure of the relative size of a building or building component in relation to a known unit of measure or customary size for such a component.

Proportion

Proportion in architecture is the relationship among the dimensions of the various building elements and the individual features to each other street trees, brick sidewalks, lamp posts, and Narrow Street is of a human scale. man hand. One of the oldest systems of proportion was the Golden Section, which was devised in ancient Greece. The Golden Section, which is a rectangle with a width to length ratio of about 5:8. In architecture, the use of repeated proportions creates a harmony in a building facade the overall shape of the facade is repeated in facade elements such as doors and windows.

Rhythm

Rhythm in architecture is the pattern and spacing of repeating elements such as windows, columns, arches, and other facade elements.

Order

Order in architecture is the arrangement and relationships of parts of a building. A symmetrical building facade — one where a center door is flanked by an equal number of windows on each side of the door — is highly ordered. For example, the facade of a sidehall row house has an arrangement of vertically aligning door and window openings that directly relate to the arrangement of hall and rooms inside

Historic Theme


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Contemporary Downtown Tooele Theme

A Town Tooele, Utah: At the Crossroads

Tooele has a long history as a mining and defense community bringing in many immigrants. Currently, Tooele is experiencing growth due to close proximity of Salt Lake City, however, many residents commute out of town and bemoan the lack of diversity of shops, rundown appearance, parking access and availability. Tooele is at a crossroads both literally and figuratively. To attract new ‘immigrants’ it must provide amenities that larger towns supply. To attract new ‘immigrants’ it must provide a clean and inviting appearance with a variety of shops and access to parking. To appear larger but at the same time more intimate, patrons should be pulled onto the side streets by creating a feeling of community. A more human, intimate scale expanded on Vine Street to accomplish this. Small one story shops with friendly entrances, bright signage, improved landscaping, and benches would improve community feel and contribute to a feeling of ‘care’. Tooele has the potential to retain its small town feel while accommodating the needs of a growing community.

Contemporary Theme


Tooele

Downtown Charrette

A Town Tooele, Utah: At the Crossroads

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As Tooele’s population grows, so will the need for density. This schematic plan provides for infill and mix-uses in downtown Tooele to accommodate growth. Landscape structure is used to improve aesthetic qualities and define the community lifestyle. Together, these amenities will bring more life to downtown Tooele. A mixed-use area with commercial offices on the street level and apartments on the upper levels signal the entry to downtown. The contemporary buildings combine with historic storefronts create an inviting downtown. Changes in the streetscape create a dynamically different feel to the downtown area. The use of extensive landscaping and safe walkways invite a friendly pedestrian environment.

Contemporary Theme


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Embracing and The Small Town Appeal Preserving Tooele is on the verge of change. The city’s projected growth rate is the second fastest in the state of Utah. Despite this rapid growth, the downtown area is suffering. New development is sprawling outwards away from downtown, bringing the businesses to near failure, leaving many of the buildings unused and vacant. This change to Tooele is inevitable; however instead of fearing it, the city must embrace it. Along with the population change, there is a marked cultural change. Anchors such as Mexican restaurants, a Hispanic market, and Greek restaurants are still giving the residents a reason to come downtown. Our design guidelines focus on supporting these businesses that in turn will foster similar development. Tooele must embrace this change, but it cannot forget its roots as a small town. Many residents are hesitant to stray away from the small town feel. Though change and staying the same seem opposites, we feel that these two themes can go hand-in-hand. What gives a city the small town feel is a sense of community and social interaction between its residents. By embracing change and bringing life back to the downtown area, a newer and stronger sense of community will be achieved.

1- Main Street North entry 2- City Hall / Post Office sector 3- East Vine Street 4- Courthouse / Park Connection 5- Main Street South entry 6- West Vine Street

1. MAIN STREET NORTH ENTRY •ISSUE Entrance into the downtown is uninviting causing limited use of downtown businesses and services. •OBJECTIVE Change peoples perspective of the downtown area by creating an inviting entrance into the downtown area. •STRATEGY Propose the removal of the car dealership located on the corner of main and 2nd north. Reduce the size of the parking in front and add more plant materials. Place focus of the parking into the rear of the buildings. Find new use for the old Safeway or tear down the building and replace with new building to house businesses. Add green spaces around the buildings. Buffer the parking lots from the street with berms and trees. New structures need to be historically in line with existing downtown buildings. Add lighting along street to make it safe and inviting at night. 2. CITY HALL/ POST OFFICE SECTOR CREATING RHYTHM TO BRING BACK LIFE IN DOWNTOWN TOOELE • ISSUE 1 Lack of consistency between governmental buildings with regards to building materials; entry direction; and landscaping materials methods. • OBJECTIVE Provide a consistent set of guidelines through which all governmental buildings are constructed. • STRATEGY Redesign city buildings to have dark red brick facades; ensure that all building entries are oriented East-West; provide a landscaping plant list from which different businesses can use. • ISSUE 2 Park strips along Main are inconsistent in their scale, planting material, and general size. • OBJECTIVE Provide a standard park strip design which can be implemented to create unity along Main St. • STRATEGY Create a guideline for Main St. businesses to abide by in terms of width, planting material and spacing, grass, all site amenities, etc.

Historic Theme


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Downtown Charrette

East Vine Street 3. EAST VINE STREET • ISSUE Lack of transition from the eastern residential development into the downtown area, both visually and physically. • OBJECTIVE To provide a smooth transition within the secondary commercial that will encourage the nearby residents to come to the downtown area. • STRATEGY Redesign the streetscape along Vine Street to provide a more walk able.

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4. COURT HOUSE/PARK CONNECTION • ISSUE Lack of visual connection between the courthouse and park. Lack of a clear physical connection between the courthouse and park. • OBJECTIVE To visually link the park to the courthouse and vice versa. To physically link the park to the courthouse and vice versa. • STRATEGY 1. Create streetscapes that are consistent on both sides of Main Street. 2. Create a plaza in front of the courthouse in place of the existing north parking lot. 3. Improve sidewalks and crosswalks to clearly indicate where pedestrians should travel. 4. Consistency in use of surfacing materials to unify area and accenting crosswalks with textured paving to alert motorists of pedestrian traffic. 5. Straighten Street in front of courthouse 6. Provide consistent street furnishings to encourage pedestrian use

Courthouse Connection

Historic Theme


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5. MAIN STREET SOUTH ENTRY ISSUE Lack of business for store owners OBJECTIVE Create a visual impact upon entry to catch people’s eye in order to use commercial district other isolated businesses. STRATEGY Make a strong visual connection of four corners at intersection. Place smaller businesses net to isolated commercial buildings to draw more people in. Place restaurants near and around the mall. Connect nearby residential area and small commercial district through green spaces and mixed use planning.

Main St. South Entry 6. WEST VINE STREET ISSUE The library and swimming pool are virtually unnoticed and disconnected from Main St; large unused parking space just west of park. OBJECTIVE Connect library and pool to Main St. in order to facilitate pedestrian connections. Parking issue west of the park can be made into a transition of soft and hardscape leading to the walkway just mentioned. STRATEGY Provide a plaza and modified walkway with additional landscaping material to help connect 2 spaces.

West Vine Street

Historic Theme


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Keeping Tooele Beautiful For Future Generations Prosperous and Neighborly Tooele Landscape Guidelines Through our on-site inventory of the landscape in public spaces of downtown Tooele, we have identified three qualitative levels: (a) satisfactory without significant alteration; (b) less satisfactory, needing intermediate ameliorative treatment, and (c) unsatisfactory, needing major revisions We have identified those tree species already present which appear to be doing well in the difficult downtown streetside environment, and which therefore are logical species to plant in the future. We have also identified other tree species which are dead, dying, or under stress, and which should be removed and not planted in the future. We have identified additional tree species, predominantly native, which, because of their environmental tolerances, seem logical to introduce into downtown Tooele, for added diversity and to contribute to a unique local identity. Additionaly, we have identified drought tolerant ground-layer species which might be introduced into planting islands as new planting occurs over time, to reduce irrigation needs. These species are low-growing, and in the case of the grass species, can be mowed occasionally to produce a turf-like cover. We believe that additional tree planting could greatly improve the streetscape as well as the parking areas and other public spaces. We support the concept of the city’s developing a tree ordinance with clear standards for placement of trees, and for selection of plant species from the list below for planting in different situations. We believe that there is room for diversity of spacing, and a variety of species, within limits, to avoid over-standardization and monotonous plantings. One of the present strengths of the street planting is the somewhat informal character, and that should not be sacrificed as new planting occurs in the “areas for improvement� that have been identified.

Landscape Guidelines


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To further educate the citizens of Tooele in the area of native plants and planting we have proposed to create an exhibition within the area of Tooele Park. This exhibition will include native grasses, shrubs and trees that will be labeled with information about the particular species.

Recommended Plant Species Canopy Trees: + Proposed Species ~ Existing Species

+ Celtis reticulata - Netleaf Hackberry ~ Fraxinus pennsylvanica - Green Ash ~ Gleditsia triancanthos var. inermis - Honeylocust ~ Sophora japonica - Japanese Pagoda Tree + Picea pungens - Blue Spruce (used for parks) ~ Platanus x acerifolia - London Plane Tree

Sub-Canopy Trees:

Fraxinus anomala - Singleleaf Ash Prunus virginiana - Common Chokecherry Quercus gambelii - Gambel Oak Rhus glabra var. cismontana - Sumac “dwarf smooth”

Ground Cover and Grasses:

Buchloe dactyloides - Buffalo Grass Bouteloue gracilis - Blue Grama Bouteloua curtipendula - Side Oats Grama Bromus marginatus - Mountain Brome Koeleria macrantha - June Grass Mahonia repens - Creeping Mahonia Grape Poa fendleriana - Mutton Blue Grass Waldsteinia fragaroides - Barren Strawberry

Also, due to the absence of specific city landscape ordinances we have proposed a few suggested ordinance changes. 1. When planting new trees, shrubs or grasses in public spaces, plants should be selected from a specified plant list provided by Tooele city. 2. Suggested distance between trees along park strips should be within the range of 20’-40’ unless other wise specified by Tooele city. 3. Entrances and curb cuts to public or private property be minimized to accommodate supplementary street plantings. 4. When planting a tree we encourage permeable paving to facilitate survival. (see construction detail) 5. Implementation of suggested sub-canopy trees be used to eliminate problems with utility wires. Over time install utility wires underground

Landscape Guidelines


Tooele

Downtown Charrette

Downtown And Recreation Connections Open Space

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Linking Main Street, Parking, and Potential Park Space The Alley just north of the Post Office could create a pleasant link to Main Street from the parking lots. We propose developing the alley as a pocket park to be lines with columnar trees on both sides of the sidewalk with shade garden plantings underneath. A small water fountain located on the side of the sidewalk would echo off the alley walls and draw people into this pleasant space from off of Main Street. Benches would also align the sidewalk, creating opportunities for lingering in the downtown area. Night lighting in the alley is an important element to create a feeling of security in the evenings. We propose a park strip to connect 50 West with Main Street . The park strip would be lined with trees to provide shade, and benches and shrubs to screen the parking lot from view. The park strip will end at 50 West where a cross walk will lead across to a potential park space which can also becomes a pedestrian link to the library and historic school building. This way, pedestrians will have no conflict with cars when visiting the library and Post Office

Open Space & Recreation


Tooele

Downtown Charrette

25

City Park & Farmers Market Square The following recommendations would increase the activity at City Park: Replace existing parking west of the park with new brick paving to accommodate a farmers market. Add more shade trees. Remove amphitheater and replace with a grassy semi-circular earth berm that could double as a place to sit and people watch as well as staging events for the fiddle fest. The earth berm would overlook the farmers market. Sound shells could be used during music events. Encorporate a cafe with outdoor seating , creating a symbiotic relationship for public and private land uses. Restaurants area a strong draw to downtown. Provide a variety of seating. The earth berm and moveable chairs from the cafe, and a low rock wall around the park, provide additional places to sit.

These images show possibilities for the two lane connector roads. These routes connect parks and open spaces through not only green vegetation but through clues at ground level such as paving patterns, and lines of sight, and through interpretive signage with information on distance to the next park or open space, historical significance, and community activities and events.

Open Space & Recreation


Tooele

Downtown Charrette

26

Regional Recreation Corridor Connections

Open Space & Recreation


Tooele

Downtown Charrette

27

Downtown &Historic Area Park

Analysis

Analysis

The Pioneer Cabin area is the focus area of the Main Street Historic Park Design Team. The cabin is currently located in a very small space with the beautiful and historic city hall on one side and commercial buildings on the other. There is an abundance of open space behind this historic site that is used as a parking lot/ vacant car lot. This space serves as an entrance to several retail buildings. There is no visual connection between the buildings in this space. An interesting alley exists extending north from Vine Street that could be utilized as a good entrance into this back space. Though not especially visible from Main Street, there is a great hallway in one of the commercial buildings that leads directly connects pedestrians from Main Street to the rear parking area. The back doors of the shops are currently utilized as service entrances for shop owners and are in need of a more inviting appearance to appeal to potential customers and patrons. There is no lighting in the parking lot and only one street light in front of the alley. Likewise, there are no trees in this back area and very few near the pioneer cabin. It is almost a completely paved block with the exception of a couple street trees on the main roads. Though lacking in aesthetic appeal, this site has a lot of potential to draw people into this historic site and onto Main Street.

Concept Plan

Illustrative Plan

Concept Plan

An axis is formed through this space, creating a central node directly to the north of the pioneer cabin. This axis divides the space into three distinct areas. These areas include a back patio area, a historical corridor, and an open gathering area. Parking is still facilitated to the north of the gathering area.

Illustrative Plan

Each area has been further developed and is illustrated in greater detail.

Downtown Historic Park


Tooele

Downtown Charrette

28

Historic Park

Gathering Area

Historic Park

•The entrance to the pioneer cabin area has been enhanced by enlarging the arch which patrons enter through and by centralizing the gates between the two adjacent buildings. •Trees and planter boxes have been added to break up the monotonous and extensive hardscape areas. •To the west of the cabin, a large grade change currently exists, but will be filled and used to extend the park area. •The stairs exiting the back side of the area will be widened and centered with the archway in the entrance. •A commemorative pioneer statue will be placed in the center of the node to the north of the stairs. This statue will be raised on a platform so it will be visible from the street and serve as a landmark to draw people further into the site. •This linear park space will be continued with a line of trees leading to the hallway that connects to Main Street.

Gathering Areas

This space is a very relaxed space and can be used at any occasion. •A pathway leads visitors around the back side of the historic city hall from the pioneer cabin where they are given a choice. Visitors can either enter through a back entrance into the museum or take a ramp or stairway that leads down into the gathering space. •A dry stream bed to the north delineates where the gathering space ends and a parking lot begins. The space could be used for small markets, art fairs/exhibits, picnicking, and a variety of other public and private events. •The parking lot to the north will facilitate parking for the shops and restaurants in the area as well as for the museum.

Downtown Historic Park


Tooele

Downtown Charrette

29

Historical Architectural Elements A tour of historic downtown Tooele only begins to reveal its unique historical significance. Once a bustling downtown area with unique structures representative of the architectural trends of its early years, Tooele’s original architectural character has been masked by a century of renovations and new construction.

Though well intended, numerous renovation attempts and many recently constructed structures have resulted in a downtown core with an architectural identity crisis. Along Main Street and Vine Street in particular, a quick visual survey exposes a lack of unity in architectural detailing and styling. In some areas, late 1800’s stone architecture clashes with 1970’s attempts at modern styling. In other places, stucco has been used in an attempt to give Historic Architectural Elements aging buildings a more modern look. The side effects of such a renovation technique have been a loss of the historic and very interesting architectural details that once lined Tooele’s streets.

Back Patio Area/ Access to Main Street The back patio area will be a comfortable nook inconspicuously attached to the Historic Park and will be accessible both from the park and from a narrow alley at the rear. Adjacent businesses will be strongly encouraged to provide back door access to the space, and the surrounding architecture will continue the historic theme into the plaza and give the space a unique, vintage atmosphere. The alley at the rear will be well-lit both for safety and intrigue. Rear-access to the adjacent businesses will be marked with historicalera signage.

Perhaps the most glaring example of the architectural discord plaguing the city is located at the corner of Vine Street and Garden Street at the site of the Utah Pioneers Museum. Though functionally sufficient, the addition constructed to connect two adjacent historic structures has severely flawed the historic significance of two of Tooele’s most historic and architecturally intriguing buildings. While speaking with several residents and costumers in the historic downtown district of Tooele, it was realized that the residents of the city have a desire to rediscover Tooele’s architectural past. In some cases, as with the Utah Pioneers Museum, history is has not been lost yet. In fact, it has only been covered up. Weathering on the side of this historic structure has led to the wearing of the relatively recent stucco on the side of the building. As the stucco cracked and fell off, it began to reveal the historic stone structure beneath.

Downtown Historic Park


Tooele

Downtown Charrette

Many of the buildings in the downtown area have been a victim of this same fate. Beneath their facades lies their original structural material. In many cases, the original walls of these structures were constructed of either stone or brick. Both materials lend themselves to unique appearances, varying colors, and interesting textures otherwise unseen in many modern architectural materials. With this in mind, it is suggested that an effort be undertaken to rediscover Tooele’s architectural history by stripping the unsightly veneers of these buildings and bringing to light the historic details and craftsmanship that once made and will again make downtown Tooele and interesting and exciting place to do business, to live, and to visit. Where newer structures have replaced historic buildings, the city of Tooele may consider the option of renovating the veneers of these buildings to reflect architectural details of the past. Some of these details can be seen by the careful eye while study the existing buildings in town.

30

Unique arch structures, window details, and decorative elements exist throughout the downtown core, and should be considered when renovating to create a sense of architectural unity that melds both new and old facades into a similar architectural period and style. Finally, architectural details wouldn’t be complete without considering landscape and lighting amenities that reflect a similar architectural style as the buildings. Care should be taken to match light fixtures, signage, benches, trash barrels, bike racks, parking meters, railings, awnings, and various other landscape elements to the architectural styling of the structures lining the downtown streets.

Main Street Currently Main Street Proposed Main Street Currently Main Street Proposed

Downtown Historic Park


Tooele

Downtown Charrette

31

Community Arrival, Connections, Experience Inclusion When a place welcomes and includes an individual, that individual is more likely to return and encourage others to do the same. However, a place that is uncomfortable or excludes does the opposite. In order to create a strong core that invites and unites the community, Tooele must establish a downtown that is welcoming, safe, and functional for all of its citizens. The typical trip to downtown Tooele includes arriving, navigating the streets, and crossing the road. These seemingly simple actions can often be a challenge to both able and disabled individuals due to inconsistencies in the streetscape and signage. In addition, simple barriers, such as steps and curbs create difficulties for individuals with disabilities, as well as the elderly. The following pages contain suggestions for a downtown plan that will allow all citizens to have a positive downtown experience of Tooele, regardless of age or ability.

The downtown experience is broken down into the following areas: arriving safely and efficiently, experiencing the downtown streetscapes through access and order, and crossing Main Street in a more comfortable and safe manner.

Community Inclusion


Tooele

Downtown Charrette

Parking Lots

32

Arrival Parking Lots

Bus Routes

Visible signs to drivers directing to rear parking lots from Main Street while traveling at the posted speed Well maintained parking lots, free from abandoned cars with new paint for stalls, elegant trees for shade, and lighting for security provide safety and order to invite people to use them Clearly marked accessible parking near building entrances and Main Street access points to allow easy access for individuals with disabilities Directional signs directing pedestrians through the parking lot to various downtown destinations to assist in way finding and deciding where to park Access between downtown buildings from rear parking to Main Street that is clean, safe, and easy to find provides a feeling of security and easy connections to store fronts organized and clearly marked. Rows of stalls that are perpendicular to buildings help direct pedestrians to their destinations.

Bus Routes Routes connecting residential areas to downtown, allowing people who cannot drive access to downtown

Corridors

Clean, shaded shelters at bus stops displaying local art or events schedules to encourage people to go downtown and allow them to wait for buses comfortably Directories of downtown vicinity locating major buildings and businesses to provide quick navigation when arriving by bus

Corridors

Attractive landscaping, lighting, and good maintenance create a safe looking link between rear parking lots and the Main Street streetscape.

Community Inclusion


Tooele

Downtown Charrette

33

Streetscape Experience

Create a friendly and familiar city with maps and art to aid navigation

Rest Stations Allow for spaces where people can meet, chat, and rest Increase desirability with kiosks and street vendors

Rest Stations

Include at least two rest areas per block

Create landmarks to assist remembering important intersections or places through displaying art work such as murals and statues Pave sidewalks on Main St. with a unique and uniform paving pattern in the downtown area to emphasize its importance

Provide rest areas where paths cross

Business Access Ensure business access that is accessible to individuals of all abilities

Emphasize landmark buildings such as the Post Office, City Hall, and the County Courthouse, by relocating or removing vendors parking or vegetation that blacks the view

Business Access

Construct sidewalks on Main St. 7 ft. wide, on other major streets 6 ft. wide and 3 1â „2 ft. in all other areas.

Replace steps with ramps at entrances to prevent tripping and assist individuals who cannot easily maneuver over stairs Build ramps that do not exceed 8% slope. Construct ramps which extend no more than 18 inches into the sidewalk from the building to prevent tripping and uncomfortable walking Install ramps at all entrances facing the street and at any other major entrances

Community Inclusion


Tooele

Downtown Charrette

34

Street Connections Mid-Street Crossings Extend curb to the edge of the outside lane to minimize crossing distance, slow traffic, and have a clear line of site to and from crossing edges Raise the crosswalk 4-6� from the road to slow traffic and increase visibility of the crossing Provide benches and shade at both ends of the crosswalk to allow for rest or waiting stations for individuals with low stamina Use texture in the crosswalk and extend it across the sidewalk to the building fronts to aid individuals with sight impairments to locate crossings Increase visibility of the crosswalk by using ladder-style markings across the road Warn drivers of a crossing with flashing warning signs 30-40’ from the crossing Help individuals with sight impairments by placing fragrant or noise emitting vegetation near entrances or intersections to help navigate using auditory and olfactory signals In order to provide accessible crossing, both sides need a curb cut or else the crossing needs to be raised to the level of the sidewalk.

Community Inclusion


Tooele

Downtown Charrette

35

Public

Performing, Functional, and Tradiontal Art

Art

Performing Arts

The small park that is located on the corner of Vine St. and Main St. provides an excellent opportunity to incorporate public art in downtown Tooele. We propose a re-design of the park, specifically designed to provide areas for displays of statues and/or murals. Most importantly would be to re-design the existing ampitheater in order to provide a venue for local performing arts to take place. Plays, concerts, and festivals can utilize the ampitheater, which in turn would create public interest in downtown, thus increasing its economic vitality.

Functional Arts Lighting fixtures, street furnishings, street signs, and streetscape elements all provide an excellent opportunity for the expression of local “functional” art. We propose Tooele City to commisson local artists to design the streetscape elements, so that downtown has unique and recognizable features that will only be found in Tooele.

Traditional Arts In order to achieve greater public interest downtown there must be elements that will attract the community’s attention. We propose the establishment of a dedicated community art gallery. This gallery will be located on northeast corner of Vine St. and Main St. The gallery would function as an exhibit hall for local artists, high school and junior high art classes, as well as local elementary school classes. Along with being a site to display art, the gallery would also function as a learning center for the arts and act as a gathering place for community functions. As the gallery establishes itself as a community icon, it would house a proposed Tooele County Arts Council. This council would actively seek public and private money that would support and foster growth of Tooele’s art interests.

Public Art


Tooele

Downtown Charrette

36

GOAL: To enhance downtown Tooele through visual and performing arts. Thus, stimulating economic growth, a healthy business environment, and an enhanced quality of life.

PROPOSED COMMUNITY ART GALLERY (NE CORNER OF MAIN ST. AND VINE ST.)

Public Art


Tooele

Downtown Charrette

37

A key element of a successful and thriving downtown is the presence of pedestrian activity. Whether they are shopping, working, or recreating, people create a place and define it as prosperous or decaying. Of course, the presence of pedestrians entails the presence of the automobile, and the vital need of appropriate parking areas and connections. Because of these essentials to downtown success, our proposal focuses on these two goals. First, create a clear pedestrian network that establishes increased access and usability of downtown. Second, produce sufficient, organized and accessible public parking that directly connects to the pedestrian network. Downtown will become more used and visited as pedestrians are welcomed into the fabric. We propose established pedestrian connections, not only from the public parking lots, but also from the surrounding neighborhoods. Sidewalks should be maintained and connected throughout the downtown and emphasis should be placed on the pedestrian right of way. Providing tree lined sidewalks, sufficient pedestrian street crossings, and calming traffic will encourage walking and usage of downtown. We’ve proposed new pedestrian routes throughout the downtown blocks and proposed parking lots, to further connect and give direct access to pedestrians and their destinations. We have also proposed the addition of street trees, on street parking and street medians to calm traffic and allow the area to be more pedestrian friendly. Another amenity of downtown is the opportunity to draw people based on unique spaces, history, civic uses and businesses. We propose that in addition to increasing pedestrian routes, an emphasis is placed on the spaces pedestrians pass through. Often the sidewalk, through alleys, or parking lots can double as small pocket parks, outdoor eating areas, sidewalk sales, art festivals, plazas, or farmer’s markets. There are also opportunities for increased business uses. Currently there are areas of downtown that are lacking tenants, appropriate uses or are simply run down. These areas could be sited for infill options that fit the current fabric of downtown. This would not only boost the area economically, but provide more incentive for pedestrians and users to move downtown.

Parking Downtown Connections & Pedestrian

Downtown Conceptual Parking and Pedestrian Networks

Blue: Public Parking Lots Yellow: Commercial In-Fill Green: Auto Traffic Flow Red: Pedestrian Network

Above: Sustainable Parking: Vegetated Swale Left: Proposed Parking lot

Parking & Pedestrian Connections


Tooele

Downtown Charrette

38

Another suggestion to increase use downtown is to provide amenities for the actual users. We propose such things as benches, increased lighting, exciting store fronts, signage, and surface paving clues for way finding. These would all increase the impression of downtown and invite an increase of pedestrian usage. Any pedestrian friendly area leans heavily on a parking system that will support, not frustrate, the users of downtown. Currently, parking in downtown is sufficient yet extremely segmented and disorganized. We purpose an efficient use of current parking area, by combining public parking into large, shared lots for each block. Each parking lot would provide organized parking stalls with clear entrances and exits. Also, each lot is located to provide access to automobiles coming off main traffic flows, and to establish direct and convenient routes for pedestrians after exiting their automobile. Parallel parking will be provided on Main and Vine Street to allow for better access, traffic calming, and increased activity. Parking for downtown will be successful as it becomes understandable. We purpose a Parking Program, in which the new public parking areas are advertised and mapped out in public brochures, posters, websites, and public meetings. Also all public lots will be designated with coordinating signage and design. All lots will be identifiable by their use of trees, landscape buffering, clear pedestrian connections and sidewalks. We also purpose a sustainable approach to the new parking lot design. Storm water runoff can be retained and used to irrigate on site landscaping. Increased tree and vegetation cover in the parking lots will provide shade and decrease air pollution and water pollution. These methods not only distinguish the public downtown lots, but improve the quality of life and health in the city. As these elements are addressed and improved, the vitality and function of downtown will be enhanced. Certainly any functioning city recognizes the need for automobile and pedestrian accommodation. But a truly successful city and community will focus on the importance of a strong pedestrian emphasis, and a well organized, supportive automobile system.

Parking & Pedestrian Connections


Tooele

Downtown Charrette

39 Summary to the Tooele Charrette & Conclusion

Create a traffic calming plan for the city of Tooele and most importantly for the highly pedestrian oriented downtown area. Some of the elements suggested for the plan are: •A median on Main street with refuge islands to increase pedestrian safety. •Crosswalks with bulb-outs in key areas of connection. •On-street parking for Main street and side streets. Cars act to buffer pedestrians, calm traffic, and create easier access for customers of commercial areas. Encourage infill and higher density for the downtown area. Allow mixed use of ground floor commercial with residential above to keep vitality in the downtown during all parts of the day. Create a unified design theme with guidelines. Guidelines should include how building facades, street furniture, and tree plantings. Whether guidelines are influenced by a historic or contemporary theme the look and feel of Tooele should be consistent. Create better inter-connections. Create alley-way connections and visual cues for orientation. A larger city-wide pedestrian plan that will aid in better connections. One example repeatedly given is for the city to encourage the development of the alley North of the Post Office which couldturn into a small civic plaza. Celebrate Tooele’s unique character. Downtown’s are good places to reflect the character of a community. In the charrette, Tooele’s unique history, relationship to the Wasatch Front, and current possibilities have been pointed out. Tooele should embrace its uniqueness and reflect that through civic and private spaces.

Conclusion


Tooele

Downtown Charrette

Advisors in the Tooele Charrette & Participants Teams Team Topic: Team Advisor: Team Leader: Team Participants:

South Corridor Kris Kvardfordt Jason Betts Tami Coleman Sarah Sevy Rachelle Jones Brad Burns Aaron Zilles Natalie Mohr

Team Advisor: Team Leader: Team Participants:

Kris Kvardfordt Greg Boudrero Bart Wolthuis Michael Jones Kim Williams Edward Young Dale Bunderson Aaron McClellan

Team Topic: Team Advisor: Team Leader: Team Participants:

North Corridor Peter Kumnle Kathie Brinkerhoff Ellies Leydsman Laura McCoy Jamie Hyatt Michael Talbot Kyle Wozniak Tami Magleby Charles Brock

Team Advisor: Team Leader: Team Participants:

Team Topic: Team Advisor: Team Leader: Team Participants:

Team Advisor: Team Leader: Team Participants:

Peter Kumble Saori Endo Alissa Salmore Lori Porreca Jennifer Hales Jordan Smith Bret Leckie David Bradley Colter Valcarce Historic Theme Mike Timmons Nate Ferguson Dustin Wiberg Melissa Fryer Brian Smart Mandie Zollinger Taylor Swenson Jeremy Boulton Zachary Koceja Mike Timmons Casey Finlinson Craig Houston Bret Fonnesbeck Stephen Seifert Trent Stroud Kristina Bingham

Team Topic: Team Advisor: Team Leader: Team Participants:

Contemporary Theme Caroline Lavoie Mark Goble Leslie Bush Susan Buffler Anthony Ekins Larinda Peterson Shawn Ori David Bingham Caryn Hansen

Team Advisor: Team Leader: Team Participants:

Caroline Lavoie Trevor Hansen Julie McGrew Dave Niederhauser Matt Durkovich Atsuko Ochi Eric Saltzman James Hall August Bateman

Team Topic: Team Advisor:

Public Art David Bell Vincent DeBritto Josh Sundloff Greg Wolfgang Suzanne Kohlmeyer Brian Boudrero Lindsey Benzon Brooklyn Oswald Bradd Epping

Team Leader: Team Participants:

Team Topic: Team Advisor: Team Leader: Team Participants:

Team Topic: Team Advisor: Team Leader: Team Participants:

Landscape Guidelines David Anderson Darrel Morrison Jason Harr Sandy Davenport Trevor Davis Scott Morton Jennifer Hutton Jillian Baker Ryan Goodrich John Ruedas Recreation Corridor David Anderson Darrel Morrison Shane Kershaw Stephanie Shaurage Emily Mills Zach Covington Jennifer Elliot Thomas Rekoutis Pamela George Paul Anderson

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Team Topic: Team Advisor: Team Leader: Team Participants:

Historic Park Area John Nicholson Kaylen Nichols Brian Harding Adam Campora Jared Manscill Paul Drake Marcus Paulsipher Nicholas George

Team Topic: Team Advisor: Team Leader: Team Participants:

Accessibility Keith Christensen Ladd Schiess Bryan Kopp Donald Burger Ben Davis Lacey Schmidt Jeran Farley Kaleb Otteson

Team Topic:

Parking and Mid-Block Access Vincent Debritto David Bell Rachel Turk Joseph Pitts Nick Kenczka Robert Barnhill Lindy Bankhead Bryan Christensen Timothy Moser

Team Advisor: Team Leader: Team Participants:

Charrette Coordinators Dave Bell Keith Christensen Chad kennedy Dave Rondina Justin Kmetzsch Kimberly Williams

Charrette Participants

Profile for USU Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning

Tooele charrette 2004  

Tooele charrette 2004  

Profile for laep
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