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RICHMOND DOWNTOWN CHARRETTE

2003 RICHMOND, UTAH

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING

UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY

Rural Intermountain Planning Program Utah State University Extension State of Utah Main Street Program Richmond City Mayor and Council Richmond City Historical Committee


RICHMOND CHARETTE 2003 RICHMOND, UTAH LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AND ENVIRONMENTAL PLANNING

UTAH STATE UNIVERSITY Advisors and Overseers: David Bell

John Nicholson

Caroline Lavoie

Chris Kvarfordt

John Ellsworth

Craig Johnson

Tamara Shapiro

Keith Christensen

Mike Timmons

Participants: LAEP sophomores students

LAEP Juniors students

LAEP Seniors students

LAEP graduate students

Rural Intermountain Planning Program Utah State University Extension State of Utah Main Street Program Richmond City Mayor and Council Richmond City Historical Committee


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TABLE OF CONTENTS


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The Richmond Charrette is a collaboration of students, professors, and the town of Richmond to develop a design document that proposes visions for Richmond’s future. In a week long “charrette” students and faculty of the LAEP department became involved with such project topics as:  The General Plan  Rural Community Urban Design  Rural Community Parks, Open Space, Trails, Connections, etc…  Rural Community Service and Activity Centers  Rural Community Identity (community entries, gardens, architecture, landscape, setting, public art, etc…)  Rural Community Landscape  Access- Community Inclusion


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THE GENERAL PLAN CURRENT ZONING

LAND USE & ZONING To maintain the integrity of the rural community character, we recommend increasing the density options with Richmond. This recommendation includes changing specific zoning ordinances to allow for more multi-family housing units and smaller single home lots with different setback standards. Allowing for mixed-use development in the downtown business area will assist in increasing density as well as maintaining an economically vital community. Expanding an agricultural zone to encompass the city will maintain the rural character of the community.


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PROPOSED ZONING

LAND USE Specific city blocks have been selected for the implementation of increased density housing. These selected areas do not contain historical structures that contribute to the community character (barns). A phasing system for increased density is recommended. Blocks selected for phase 1 should be first targeted for development and RMD housing with an emphasis on utilizing level 1 density as much as possible. We recommend the land use proposed as manufacturing/ light industrial zone be changes to a proposed land use of planned industrial commercial (PIC). This will reduce the visual impact of development on the west side of the highway. This change will allow development in a park like setting and retains the historical focus of the Sego Milk Factory.


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To encourage growth from within the city center and not along Highway 91, we recommend the central business district area be designated on both Main Street and State Street as indicated on the map. To encourage growth for the downtown business district area, we do not recommend the proposed development of neighborhood centers. In the future when population density allows, perhaps the idea of the neighborhood centers should be revisited. Increased density should occur, utilizing multi-family housing units as well as RMD- level 1. With appropriate landscape design principles, and an architectural style that fits within the community, these housing options can fit seamlessly into the community. To maintain visual appeal within the community, an ordinance that places utility lined underground should be included in the plan. The placement of utilities underground will allow for a more robust streetscape; one that does not have “half “ trees that have been cut back to power line obstruction. This will also reduce safety concerns.

RECOMMENDED ORDINANCE CHANGES 12-299.5 Regulation (For Multiple Family Dwelling Units) Under 2 we recommend a change in length of distance from 2,000 feet to 660 feet between lots. 12-224 Central Business District Commercial Zone “CBD” Recommend the addition of mixed housing opportunities to 12224.2, “Conditional Uses” portion of the ordinance. 12-221 Residential Low Density and Medium Density Zones “RLD” and “RMD” Additional ordinance recommendations: Add an architectural design guidelines ordinance. Include an ordinance that requires the placement of all utility lines underground.

(Above) Examples of Medium density Housing


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THE SEGO COMMUNITY CENTER Adaptive reuse of historic properties has long been a strategy to revitalize urban areas. In a few cases a rural community has successfully restored historic structures for a new use, often bringing a renewed interest in the area and sparking economic growth. In the case of Bennington, Vermont, an old factory and mill was converted to house Bennington Potters, a small group of local craftsmen. Over time, the “Potter’s Yard” as it came to be known, grew in reputation. Now the pottery made in Bennington is known around the world for superior craftsmanship, and has generated growth in other areas of growth in Bennington. Several towns in Europe have converted abandoned factories into educational centers, both for the communities as well as college related education. It is our opinion that with the future anticipated growth in Richmond, a center of this sort would be beneficial to the community. Richmond is fortunate to have the Old Sego Milk Factory, just west of Highway 91. This site is ideal for an adaptive reuse project. Potential adaptive reuse: -Restaurants -Museums -Shops -Community Center -Senior Day Care -Recreation Center -Farmer’s Market -Youth Center -Black and White Days Facility


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DOWNTOWN REVITILIZATION With population growth expected in the near future, Richmond city must begin thinking about issues such as the preservation of its small town feeling and history. With growth comes businesses and a wide variety of building and people. The center of town still has a small town atmosphere and should stay that way. There are a few steps the city should take to improve upon the center of town and specifically the intersection of Main Street and State Street. With these improvements and regulations comes the assurance that Richmond will retain its character. Steps to take: 1. Create document that contains standards for architectural facades that embrace past and present history. Any business entering the city center will be required to follow it. 2. A program for streets and buildings, landscape elements such as benches and lamps. 3. The street will take the character of the town with decorative paving facilitating pedestrian circulation. Establish plantings in the medians to provide shade and implementation of parallel parking.


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R U R A L C O M M U N I T Y U R B A N D E S I G N STREETSCAPE DESIGN Downtown Richmond has great opportunities for streetscape enhancement:

(Left) An example of the proposed streetscape through the central business district.

H I G H W A Y 9 1 A N D I T S I N T E R S E C T I O N S In reviewing the layout of the town and after visiting on several occasions, some areas were observed being used by children that were unsafe due to highspeed traffic. The main area of concern was the intersection where Highway 91 meets Main Street. We propose implementing planter box medians before and after the intersection to help slow traffic, as well as adding crosswalks and additional lampposts to ensure a well-lit and safe area. (Left) Treatment of HWY 91

on entering Richmond. Tree lined streets, median planters, and visual interests such as signs add to the traffic calming effect


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(Left) The intersection of State St. and HWY 91. (Below) A Plan Views of options for street treatment and perspective sketches. All concepts developed utilize traffic calming devices such as trees, planters, and most importantly smaller street width.


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Sections, perspectives, and plans show more suggestions for treatment of Richmond’s intersections and streetscapes.


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OUR PRIMARY GOALS Our primary goals for the Richmond Design Charrette are:  To preserve and enhance key historical features throughout the city  Create opportunities for economic growth within the existing central business district  Ensure a safer, more welcoming, and a pedestrian friendly streetscape on Highway 91 and Main street


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On a larger scope, this view of Richmond indicates all of the additions and changes to be made: Several of these enhancements include adding medians and lamp posts down Main Street that tie in with those on Highway 91. Removing power lines and replacing them with underground for aesthetic views. Including more trees and shrubs in the medians and planter boxes which will be placed on the sidewalk to help balance the commercial area of Main Street with the more landscaped residential areas. Introduce crosswalks in addition to those on the street corners to ensure pedestrian safety.


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R U R A L

C O M M U N I T Y

P A R K S , O P E N S P A C E , T R A I L S , C O N N E C T I O N S …


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CIVIC GATEWAY FOR RICHMOND’S MAIN STREET A GATEWAY TO RICHMOND WILL PROVIDE:

INTEREST

IDENTITY

VISUAL ENTRANCE

•CONNECTIONS WHY RICHMOND NEEDS A GATEWAY: A gateway defines a sense of place for users. Proposed gateways at the North and South entrances of Richmond will allow for recreational use as well as a landmark to the town.


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Bonneville Shoreline Main Street

Bench lands Greenbelt/ Cub River

TRAILS AND PATHWAYS OF RICHMOND

A greenbelt is proposed around the perimeter of Richmond, connecting agricultural and bench land open spaces. Trails in the interior of Richmond can be used as horse paths, bike paths, and walkways. M i S


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TRAIL UNDERPASS

PROPOSED ACCESS AND TRAILS TRAIL FOR SCHOOL/ PARK

THE CUB RIVER TRAILS

TRAIL FOR SCHOOL/ PARK

Trail along the Cub River

Cub River Water Trail for canoes, rafts, etc…

Bonneville Shoreline Trail

Interior pedestrian, equestrian, and cycling trails.


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PRESERVATION OF OPEN SPACE GENERAL PROPOSAL

(Above) A view of the preservation greenbelt. Looking east to the mountains.

As architects engaged in the preservation of open space we must approach the region through the eyes of the residents, then we can proceed outward to the visitors. The residents need to understand what the land gives to them is influenced by what they give to the land. We have created a citywide green belt, preserving community aspects. The belt consists of riparian areas, trails, even a park. The users will vary from children to adults, from birds to big game wildlife.

PROPOSED PRIORITIZATION OF LAND PRESERVATION: Section 1: East Richmond Bench Purpose for Preservation: 

Maintain the views of the mountains from the valley

Support the current activities in the area and offer more, i.e. horseback riding, jogging, bird watching, observing, and OHV use.

Offer a gateway to the mountains from the town.

A view from above on how the greenbelt would look. Four major areas of preservation are proposed: 1) 2) 3) 4)

The East Richmond Bench West Richmond Agricultural Land South Richmond Entrance North Richmond Entrance


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Section 2: West Richmond Agricultural Area Purpose for Preservation: 

Agriculture is the core to Richmond’s history. Designating agricultural land will maintain character and limit the sprawl westward into the prime soil.

Additional buffer to the existing wetlands.

Embrace the city as a whole and not create and East/West atmosphere. Section 3: South Richmond Entrance

Purpose for Preservation: 

Gateway to the city/ first impression. Able to incorporate history, state of mind, and uniqueness of the city.

Offers a division of soon to be merging areas.

Potential for grand vistas upon entering the town. Section 4: South Richmond Entrance

Purpose for Preservation: 

By enhancing the existing landform we can stimulate curiosity beyond the hill.


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STEPS TOWARD PRESERVATION: LESA: THE PROCESS OF LAND PRESERVATION LESA, or Land Evaluation and Site Analysis is a program used nationally to decide what land is the most important to preserve. It focuses especially on agricultural land and prioritization based on land productivity. HOW LESA WORKS LESA works like a point system. The land evaluation portion measures the productivity and ecological importance of proposed land. The site analysis measures how culturally and visually important the land is to us.

VISUAL COMPOSITE

ROAD COORIDORS

Soil productivity, proximity to sewers, location near floodplains and wetlands are all categories that affect the preservation points towards proposed land.

BENCHLAND PROTECTION


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SOIL PRODUCTIVITY INDEX ADDING IT ALL UP Proposed open space through the LESA system is valuated through the system of points it occurs. To the right are more examples of the point system- a visual composite of viewsheds, and proximity to road corridors and bench land areas.

PROXIMITY TO SEWERS

FLOODPLAINS

WETLANDS


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R U R A L

C O M M U N I T Y S E R V I C E A N D A C T V I T Y C E N T E R S

THE CITY CORE We recommend business development along the Main Street Corridor versus Highway 91. This will ensure that the downtown will remain active and it will preserve the rural feel throughout the rest of the town. The proposed plan will connect activity/ civic areas and will encourage development along Main Street that will reflect the community’s personality, history, and offer a friendly welcome to passer-bys.


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LIBRARY CONNECTION & MAIN STREET ENHANCEMENT

(ABOVE) IMAGES REPRESENT POTENTIAL OF MAIN STREET

EXISTING MAIN STREET

Main Street is the heart of downtown and we want to focus people’s attention on this historic treasure. The connection will provide movement between activities for all ages. These changes will make downtown more appealing for its citizens and will bring business to downtown.


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MAIN STREET AND THE CITY CENTER

Improved sidewalks and street islands will beautify the Main Street area. Planting islands in the middle of the Main Street on each block will narrow the street, slow traffic. The Main Street and State Street intersection should be cleaned up with the removal of the trailer on the southwest corner and restoring existing buildings. This will provide friendly, inviting atmosphere for pedestrian use. To facilitate unity and cohesiveness within the city center we propose a pedestrian friendly loop to link important activities. This loop will be used to connect the library, the baseball diamond, the elementary school, the city park, and finally the existing residential area on the north side of Main Street.

PROPOSED SECTION OF THE DOWNTOWN STREETSCAPE


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LIBRARY CONNECTION The second walkway will complete the activity center loop, providing a connection between the city park and the residential district. This will encourage residents to use the area by providing a pedestrian friendly way to the central business district.

PARK CONNECTION The proposed walkway will connect the library in the commercial center to outdoor activity centers. This will encourage civic activities, shopping, shopping, and recreational activities by unifying the different activities with the vehicular and pedestrian circulation routes. The driveway between LD’s Diner is transformed into an outdoor eating plaza; a place for people watching, gathering, and relaxing.

BEFORE

In the future this section of Main Street should be converted to mixed use commercial and multifamily housing‌ further complementing the activity loop

AFTER


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MAIN STREET AND STATE STREET INTERSECTION The intersection is open, barren, and in need of beautification. A roundabout will slow traffic and lessen the harsh appearance of the pavement. In addition the roundabout will serve as a landmark when traveling from the east and from State Street.


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ZONE 1

THE SEGO MILK FACTORY AREA

ZONE 2

MAIN STREET & HIGHWAY 91 INTERSECTION AREA

ZONE 3

EAST MAIN STREET DISTRICT AREA

Obscured by the increasing congestion on Highway 91, Richmond, Utah has suffered from lost visibility, lost viability and community connectivity. The scheduled improvement for Highway 91, the major access road through Cache Valley, places Richmond in a unique position to seize opportunities and avoid piecemeal growth.

Our concept draws from Richmond’s historic character and industrial history to re-establish three strong activity and service centers: the East Main Street District, the intersection of Main Street and Highway 91, and the Sego Milk Factory on West Main Street. Each center is visible or potentially vital to local tourism.


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ZONE 1 THE SEGO MILK FACTORY

The Sego Milk Factory is connected by the same historic streetscape. The factory, consisting of three structures, is located in open pastureland with unobstructed views of both the Bear River and the Wellsville Mountains. The scene is picturesque and opportune for restoration and development as an artisan commercial center and bed and breakfast, housed in the accompanying proprietor home. The adjacent rail line may provide rail service for service for visitors both in and out of the valley. As activity along the Main Street corridor increases, existing bus service may be expanded to include both he East and West sides of Highway 91

(Above) Before and after improvements of Richmond’s historic streetscape.


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ZONE 2 MAIN STREET AND HIGHWAY 91 INTERSECTION

The historic streetscape serves as a connecting artery to the other two activity nodes. The uniform lighting, trees, median, and historic signage will draw passing motorists into the Central Main Street District from the intersection of Main Street and Highway 91. Also, the increased visibility of this second activity node will provide opportunities for new service oriented businesses along the stretch of Highway. It is recommended that all development be subjected to the same historic guidelines of Main Street.


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ZONE 3 EAST MAIN STREET DISTRICT

The East Main Street District is currently the heart of local activity. It contains a number of historic structures, contemporary buildings and green spaces, which serve the social needs of the community of Richmond. Yet this area is almost completely invisible to tourists and potential businesses. A number of steps can be taken to alter this situation. A change in the zoning along Main Street from residential to commercial and the adoption of historic architectural guidelines will enhance the character of Main while providing attractive spaces for new business as residents decide to leave.


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EAST MAIN STREET DISTRICT MAIN STREET PARKING

EAST MAIN STREET DISTRICT MAIN STREET PARKING PERSPECTIVE


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R U R A L

C O M M U N I T Y I D E N T I T Y

ACTVITY CENTERS

PRESPECTIVE OF THE PROPOSED GATEWAY/ INTERSECTION OF HIGHWAY 91 AND MAIN STREET

IDENTITY BY DESIGN

Richmond residents have a rich agricultural history, which has established a deep sense of family values and rural lifestyle. These identifying characteristics are what they wish to uphold throughout their future growth. In our effort to redesign Richmond’s Main Street while still maintaining its historical influence we propose the following additions:  A gateway into town  Streetscape beautification  Addition of new commercial buildings.


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HIGHWAY 91 AND THE MAIN STREET INTERSECTION

Because of the high-speed traffic HWY 91 AND MAIN STREET

along the highway, gateway elements must be visible at least a block from Main Street from both the north and south. In the entrance corridor orchard trees, a rustic wall, and filed row planting will suggest the agricultural history. The native plantings will suggest a sense of place- and will have a sensitivity to the water scarcity of our climate. The entrance corridor, reduced speed limits, and intersection enhancements (stop lights and decorative paving) will draw passer-bys to the Main Street. By incorporating elements of the Main Street onto Highway 91, the approaching Main Street will be more readily noticed and encouraging to passing motorists to stop.


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ACTVITY CENTERS

VINTAGE STREET LAMPS FOR IDENTITY

(Before and after pictures of Main Street with beautification.)

A VIEW OF DOWNTOWN

The existing buildings of Richmond’s commercial core consist mostly of 19th century architecture. This sets a historic precedent that should be adhered to for future development. Future commercial areas should reflect the same theme of business buildings from that era as closely as possible in order to maintain desired historical preservation of the town. The identity as well as the visitor’s first impression of the community will be greatly influenced by Richmond city’s streetscape. Street trees, antique style lamps, and rustic planter boxes will help preserve and accentuate the historic appeal Richmond’s residents desire. The incorporation of historic ideals will aid in the preservation of Richmond’s cultural, agricultural, and rural society

Street lights fixtures will give Richmond identity


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A Unique Community of Friends and Neighbors In a Beautiful Small Town Setting…

Multi-colored bricks, similar to those framing the entrance to the library, will be used along the Main Street and highway

The town of Richmond is cradled by the Bear Mountains on the on the east, and opens to the bounty of Northern Cache Valley on the west. Residents and visitors alike are awed by the striking sunsets and colors of the changing seasons. Friends may wander across Main Street to chat on the library steps or meet at the aisles of Theurer’s as they shop for their Sunday dinners. Children can easily ride their bikes to school or to a friend’s house. Richmond enjoys the luxury of a safe, quiet community.

Adding a building on the east side of the bank will strengthen the continuity of the building facades. Crosswalks of bricks reminiscent of the library will emphasize the pedestrian right-of way.

Sidewalks will be widened and curb cuts used to calm traffic. Street trees and light posts will give the downtown corridor a more regular cadence. Banners, benches, and flowers will create a more comfortable pedestrian experience.


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There will be trees running from Main Street for half a block to the north and south on both sides of HWY 91. The intersection of Main and Highway 91 will have brick paving matching downtown’s.

Smaller roads and shady benches provide a peaceful and comfortable atmosphere for a friendly conversation or stroll.

Richmond’s unique character is created by its history, people, architecture, and the many other distinctive elements that make up the town . The brickwork on the library , the aroma of L.D.’s burgers, children on bikes, tractors on Main Street, and even the notorious Whiskey and Petting Lanes help shape the character of this beautiful small town. These are the essential elements of Richmond’s identity that must be preserved.

The addition of an amphitheatre will create an excellent place for town gatherings and performances. This will increase opportunities for creativity and community involvment


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ACTVITY CENTERS

There will be lamps and banners on the east side of the highway to spark interest in Main Street’s appeal. Curbs will be added to delineate the sidewalk from the highway

Convenient tables and benches surrounded by trees and flowers will increase gathering time at an already popular library and park.

Richmond is enriched, if not defined, by the people who inhabit the area. When locals were asked what they would miss most if they were to move, the overwhelming response was the people; their friends and neighbors. Through properly defined streetscape, creation of places for chance meetings, and a beautification of green spaces, Richmond’s people will continue to enjoy each other’s company for many years to come.


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R U R A L

C O M M U N I T Y L A N D S C A P E

ACTVITY CENTERS

Richmond City is set amid a diverse landscape.

The foothills and mountains to the east together with the agriculture and rangeland the west provide many opportunities for preservation and enhancement. We propose specific elements be preserved along with others be enhanced. These proposals are as follows: ď ś Riparian Corridors Surrounding Richmond. ď ś Promote development in the early pioneer development style with preservation of the best agricultural land to be preserved for agriculture. ď ś Implement an urban forestry program as follows:


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COMMUNITY FORESTRY PLAN

THE FORMAL CONCEPT

Downtown Richmond is fashioned in a formal planting system with Norway Maples lining the streets. However, this system is lacking the aesthetic value because the trees are not continuous. Filling in the spaces would allow for a more defined city center. “Spacial definition using trees become more coherent with repetition and continuity.� (Trees in Urban Design, Henry Arnold, 1980)


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ACTVITY CENTERS

THE TRANSITIONAL CONCEPT

The difficult design task is applying a combination of planting concepts in dealing with transition between formal and informal zones in the community. Through combining formal and informal plantings a subtle transition is accomplished. With smooth transitions, the overall plan can appear haphazard and compromise the goal of aesthetic unity. THE INFORMAL CONCEPT

The surrounding residential neighborhoods, where both developed and proposed areas for future development exist, a less formal approach is appropriate. Integrating a variety of trees in a less structured pattern will create a natural transition form the formal city center, Richmond city’s wide planting strip provides ample space to achieve this informal effect. THE WILDLIFE HABITAT CONCEPT

A wildlife friendly environment surrounds the city of Richmond. A planting concept designed to attract and sustain the native birds and animals that reside in Richmond. This concept emphasizes irregular planting patterns a diversity of plant species, sizes, ages, and planting that are connected and continuous. This concept will be used in areas with habitat values: waterways, etc‌


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AFTER PLANTINGS BEFORE PLANTINGS

AFTER PLANTINGS

BEFORE PLANTINGS


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BEFORE PLANTINGS

AFTER PLANTINGS


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ACTVITY CENTERS

AFTER PLANTINGS

BEFORE PLANTINGS


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ACTVITY CENTERS

PRESERVING THE RURAL LANDSCAPE


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TRAIL

STREAM

COORIDOR


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R U R A L A C C E S S ACTVITY CENTERS

Out of a 2062 total population: 9.5% have a disability  104 have a physical disability (wheelchair, stroller, canes)  44 have a sensory disability  47 have a mental disability

With Richmond’s population slowly increasing, members of the community with disabilities will also increase.

Community Members alike live in Richmond for many reasons. They enjoy:  Rural atmosphere  Friendly community members  Linkage to outdoor recreational opportunities DESIGN PROBLEM: HOW DO WE PLAN AND DESIGN PUBLIC AREAS TO INCLUDE ALL COMMUNITY MEMBERS SO THAT EVERYONE CAN ENJOY THE REURAL CHARACTER AND VALUES THAT ONLY A SMALL TOWN POSSESSES???

C O M M U N I T Y


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CONNECTIONS

o What needs to be connected?  Schools  Parks and other recreation areas  City Center: City Offices, Library, Post Office, Grocery Stores, Restaurants  Residential Area

o How to make connections more accessible to all?  Pedestrian: Signage, Sidewalks, Crosswalks, Rest Areas  Vehicular • Parking-Change Main Street parking to parallel parking and place parking lots behind stores • Provide signs indicating where handicap parking is located, and individual vertical signs for each handicap stall.


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ACTVITY CENTERS

LONG TERM GOALS

 Transit System • Pulse system in Richmond with connections to Logan and Preston  Recreational Trails • Multiple Levels of difficulty • Wheelchair and stroller accessible • Interpretive Signage  Removal of Main Street curbs and gutters  Open the street up to create a plaza between city offices and local businesses

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Richmond ut charrette 2003  

Richmond ut charrette 2003  

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