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CUMBRE JUVENIL DE LAS AMÉRICAS YOUTH SUMMIT OF THE AMERICAS MEXICO 2017

NOVEMBER 4 TO 11, 2017, MEXICO


Introduction / 3 Our Venue / 4 Program / 3 General Information about the Event / 5 Program / 6 Topics / 7 Defining social inclusion / 8 Exposure to Community Inclusion / 9 Actions to promote community inclusion / 11 Family groups / 12 Keynote speakers / 15 Cultural Nights / 20 Visits to YMCA Mexico Programs / 22 Evaluation / 13 Participants per National Movement / 23

CONTENTS


The YMCA Youth Summit of the Americas 2017 had a total of 95 participants; young leaders who had the opportunity to share experiences, deepen their knowledge and develop leadership skills and competencies through the week. Participants will go on to strengthen their community work, mobilize other young people and increase their impact. Young staff and volunteers from 13 countries renewed their commitment to strengthening community inclusion, youth development, the work of the YMCA and incorporating a global perspective to the programs and activities of the Movement. The event was organized by the YMCA of Latin America and the Caribbean, Canada and the United States. The YMCA of Mexico was the host this year. Methodology and content were developed by a group of leaders from the three regions who worked to generate an interesting, dynamic and participatory program that would allow attendees to grow as leaders and form new international youth networks. This report recaps the main activities, as well as the outcomes that were accomplished during the week.

INTRODUCTION


Mexico is a country of contradictions and offers a very diverse perspective in many areas. Its people know how to respond and show their solidarity in the face of adversity and, above all, they stand out for their warmth and hospitality. YMCA of Mexico is a very good representative of that Mexican diversity and culture. In 2017, YMCA Mexico celebrated 125 years of existence. One of the best ways to celebrate this significant milestone was to receive a hundred of young people from the Americas and have been able to share some of the work and programs that they implement throughout the country. YMCA Mexico is seen as a model in many areas, both in Latin America and in the rest of the continent, with actions ranging from caring for the environment and raising funds to community work in rural and urban communities.

MÉXICO CITY

OUR


Total participant: Ages:

112 From 18 to 30 years old

Participants:

95

LACA: USA: Canada:

35 40 20

Men: Women: members of the planning committee and staff: Special guests:

34 61 10 07

Number of participants per country Brazil: Canada: Chile: Colombia: USA: Guatemala: HaitI: Mexico: Peru: Panama: Uruguay:

02 20 06 09 40 01 02 07 02 05 01

DATA OF


PROGRAM SAT. 4

SUN. 5

MON. 6

TUE. 7

WED. 8

DEVOTIONAL / PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES

DEVOTIONAL / PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES

DEVOTIONAL / PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES

THU. 9

FRI. 10

SAT. 11

BREAKFAST OFFICIAL STAFF PRESENTATION

SESSION YMCA MEXICO

EMERGENCY PROTOCOLS

PLENARY

REGIONAL MEETINGS

SIMULTANEOUS WORKSHOPS

CONVERSATION TABLES VISIT TO COMMUNITIES

VISIT YMCA CENTERS

COFFEE TALKS

VISIT YMCA CENTERS

REGIONAL MEETINGS

LUNCH

ARRIVALS

SIMULTANEOUS WORKSHOPS WELCOME ACTIVITIES

DINNER

CULTURAL ACTIVITIES

WORLD YMCA SESSION

SIMULTANEOUS WORKSHOPS

CULTURAL ACTIVITIES

FAMILY GROUPS

FAMILY GROUPS

WELCOME DINNER

DINNER

DINNER

CHECK IN HOTEL

CULTURAL NIGHT: MEXICO

CULTURAL NIGHT: USA

CULTURAL NIGHT: CANADA

DINNER AT THE HOTEL

DEPARTURES CONCLUSIONS

FEEDBACK

DINNER AT THE HOTEL

FREE TIME

DINNER


Defining social inclusion

Exposure to Community Inclusion

Actions to promote Community Inclusion

TOPICS


DEFINING SOCIAL INCLUSION Engaging with the Dimensions of Diversity to Understand Ourselves and Others

Individual Impact: Strengthening Community Inclusion and Engagement

Facilitators: Safaya Fawzi and Agneis Koenitz-Hudac, YMCA USA

Facilitator: Brenda Soriano, YMCA USA

In this workshop facilitators presented an update of the dimensions of diversity that were made by the YMCA of the USA and local YMCAs.

Attendees to this workshop discussed the history of the Long Beach YMCA on community development issues and how the Center known as the New American Welcome Center and the YMCA community schools build relationships and build community leaders.

These dimensions reflect demographic changes, perceptions and work related to diversity and inclusion in the United States and internationally. In the session, this tool was revised, which favored the conversation about different perspectives and reactions towards it. Model of community inclusion in the Eje Cafetero Facilitators: Carlos Correa and Juliana MarĂ­n, YMCA Colombia This workshop showed how the movement works in Colombia, which is the axis and the central focus of its action, which, unlike other movements, the movement works with the community. There was an opportunity for them to experience the true vocation of being part of the YMCA movement.

Guiding youth action towards the community Facilitator: Isaac ArĂŠvalo, YMCA Chile The workshop presented information that participants could compare it with their local realities and thereby sharpen criteria to establish new strategies when the established ones do not respond to institutional objectives. They also learned about the current state of youth reality and social impact of YMCA Temuco youth actions. Lastly, short, medium and long-term plans and strategies were built with regards to youth processes through group work.


EXPOSURE TO THE COMMUNITY INCLUSION The intersection between healthcare, social determinants of health and the YMCA

Weaving links. An experience of community inclusion in the ACJ-YMCA Medellín

Facilitator: Brie Davis, YMCA USA

Facilitators: Susana Marín Arango and Katherina Suaza Varelas, YMCA Colombia

This workshop explored opportunities to collaborate with other participants within and outside the YMCA to address the health needs of the population of the respective communities. The approach was to take advantage of the collective impact transformation potential.

This workshop presented an overview of how it is possible to build social nets in communities from the generation of links that enable transformation processes.

The information presented in the workshop will be relevant for communities that face any health problem of their population, from the prevention of violence to the prevention and management of chronic diseases. For All: Working with and adapting programs and services for diverse populations

The experience of YMCA Medellín was presented in which it has been possible to work from inclusion as a response to the needs of the community, which has found a place where they are accepted regardless of their conditions and opportunities for recognition and generation of opportunities for their participation in the social, political and economic life of the city. Finally, facilitators presented the current challenges of community inclusion and transformative actions to face these challenges.

Facilitators: Nicolle Wright and Lauren Carmack, YMCA USA

Community Inclusion: our YMCAs approach to fostering inclusion with Syrian refugees

In this workshop facilitators presented experiences working in the YMCA Camps area, (Y-Camp) and with the community development area and a dialogue was held regarding the services and programs offered are well adapted and accessible for all.

Facilitator: Luke Moyer, YMCA Canada This workshop discussed the challenge and the opportunity to involve Syrian refugees in the community. The question of how Syrians can best be helped to feel part of the culture without sacrificing their own beliefs was presented.


EXPOSURE TO THE COMMUNITY INCLUSION Adjusting participants perceptions/programs to be more inclusive in their communities Facilitator: Lindsay Martin, YMCA Canada In this workshop dialogue was facilitated to understand the meaning of community inclusion and how it is seen from different perspectives. In the same way, participants were asked to understand how sometimes people are not aware that some situation may be exclusionary for an individual or for a group, and above all, the participants were made aware of the inclusion within their own community.


ACTIONS TO PROMOTE COMMUNITY INCUSION Sociocultural animation, dynamics and recreational songs Trauma-Informed Care Approaches Facilitator: Jennifer Miller, YMCA USA This workshop provided a complete understanding of the effects of trauma on young people, shared practical ideas to deal with trauma when working with young people, as well as taking advantage of their own personal care to improve the quality of services. Youth Integration Facilitators: Ariel Ercoli and Diego Bustos, YMCA Chile This workshop showed a bit of what the different populations of Chile and the world in general live in, in addition to presenting the work of YMCA with young people with some addiction or family problems, in order to help them to insert themselves into society , providing support in a personal, family and community aspects. All this is done so that the young person feels the social support and can identify with the YMCA. The use of sport such as Parkour, Basketball and Baby Soccer was presented as help tools, so that the young person feels the necessary confidence to tell their problems and receive the necessary support.

Facilitator: Claudia Portocarrero, YMCA Peru This workshop presented theoretical and ludic tools and through games and dynamics participants can reach the different communities encouraging participation, integration and learning through experience. It was explained that the game allows knowing oneself and others, learning, developing social skills, relating to the environment and to others. Expanding our Y community into rural communities Facilitator: Janine Thompson, YMCA Canada In this workshop facilitator explained how to reach smaller communities discovering what needs are there. An experience was presented on how the YMCA launched a series of programs in a rural community and how the needs of the community were identified as well as the tools used.


FAMILY GROUPS This year was the second one to implement Family Groups. They are work teams formed by participants of the event, focused on reflecting, self-questioning and sharing points of view in smaller groups helping to maximize participation and have a closer experience between participants. The structure of the Family Group consists in assigning a facilitator, a guide, support questions and the task of guiding and motivating the group to fulfill the objectives of the program or event. The facilitator is another participant, with a special assignment to work together with the members of their group.


OLMECAS

Octavio Márquez Diana Sofía Sosa Luis Isaac Arévalo Jackie Bravo Ryan Natividad Marjorie Kaythy Amanda Trask Sokthea Phay Tunde Lawal

MAYAS

Mirza Cruz Carlos Correa Marc Rosen Gabriela Noriega Nicole Wry José Ubilla Jocelyn Hay Betty Sells-Asberry Shane Smith Cait McGinnis

AZTECAS

Jill Knight Gabriela López Briana Reece Yailin Ruiz Brenda Hernández Bonnie Bauer Juan Rodríguez Matt Jarrel Megan Gierhart

LACA LACA LACA / ALCACJ Y USA Y CANADA LACA / ALCACJ Y USA Y USA Y USA

Mexico Colombia Chile USA Canada Brazil USA USA USA

LACA / ALCACJ LACA / ALCACJ Y USA LACA / ALCACJ Y CANADA LACA / ALCACJ Y CANADA Y USA Y USA Y USA

Mexico Colombia USA Panama Canada Chile Canada USA USA USA

Y CANADA LACA LACA LACA Y USA Y USA LACA Y USA Y USA

Canada Mexico Panama Panama USA USA Chile USA USA

TOLTECAS

Jeff MacNeil Brenda Soriano Karla Contreras Mark Barron Amanda Hooper Lance Friday John Fernández Kendra Gautreau Leslye Zamorano Claudia Portocarrero

Y CANADA Y USA LACA Y USA Y USA Y USA LACA Y CANADA LACA LACA

TEOTIHUACANOS Dan Fraser Luke Moyer Heidi Sinclair Jessica García Carlos Fuentes Sasha Batts Colleen Leung Nicolle Wright Carlos Hincapié Diego Bustos

Y USA Y CANADA Y CANADA LACA Y USA Y USA Y USA Y USA LACA LACA

Canada USA Guatemala USA USA USA Colombia Canada Mexico Peru

USA Canada Canada Mexico USA USA USA USA Colombia Chile

FAMILY


ZAPOTECAS

Minutha Mahadevaiah Katherina Suaza Ariel Ercoli Brie Davis ChaCha Junior Jonathan Valdivieso Georgina Smith Brandon Cunningham Matt Clements

MIXTECOS

Anna Swanby Valentina Moreno Edith Cruz Justine Schultes Lindsay Martín Alejandro Jugo Haley Cruz Sidney Gafford Jamie Johnson

PUREPECHAS Pedro Manotvani Lina Grajales Javier Guzmán Jeff Briz-Felisilda Elizabeth Ryan Tiffany Dunbar Nacy Koenitz-Hudac Kristen Spronz Shannon Davis

Y USA LACA LACA Y USA Y USA LACA Y CANADA Y CANADA Y USA

USA Colombia Chile USA USA Panama Canadá Canadá USA

Y USA LACA LACA Y CANADA Y CANADA LACA Y USA Y USA Y USA

USA Colombia México Canada Canada Peru USA USA USA

LACA / ALCACJ LACA / ALCACJ LACA / ALCACJ Y USA Y CANADA Y USA Y USA Y USA Y CANADA

Brasil Colombia Chile Estados Unidos Canadá Estados Unidos Estados Unidos Estados Unidos Canadá

HUASTECOS Logan Finerfrock Kayla Condron Evalynn De Ycaza Safaya Fawzi Lauren Carmack

TLAXCALTECAS Allison Magee Kelsey Beck Susana Marín Ana Clara Martí Jenny Miller Pat Jackson Samuel Joseph Stevens Linsea Waugh

Y USA Y CANADA LACA Y USA Y USA

USA Canada Panamá USA USA

Y CANADA Y CANADA LACA LACA Y USA Y USA LACA Y USA

Canada Canada Colombia Uruguay USA USA Haiti USA

FAMILY


KEYNOTE SPEAKERS Marco Antonio Pérez Network Manager in Mexico and the Region of “Alliance for Integrity” Master in Business Administration, MBA from Anáhuac University, Bachelor in Psychology and graduated from the Program of Academic Excellence. He attended the International Formation Course at the European University of Rome. He is currently the Network Manager in Mexico and in the region of “Alliance for Integrity” a global initiative developed by the German Government and implemented by GIZ, which promotes a multisectoral business model, characterized by Integrity. He is also a spokesman for the 2030 Agenda, which seeks to integrate efforts of different sectors in the next 15 years to end poverty, fight against inequality and ensure the survival of the planet. From 2015 to 2017, he headed the United Nations Global Compact Network in Mexico. The largest Corporate Sustainability Network on the planet. During his time he managed to consolidate the value proposition of the Network and to triple the assets. He was Director of Social Commitment at the Anahuac University where for 5 years he managed university volunteerism, as well as the diploma in social commitment and leadership, Impulsa. He has led International Brigades to Kenya in East Africa, in Calcutta India, China, as well as in Peru and Honduras, mobilizing more than 200 Mexican volunteers in those countries and in National Brigades after natural disasters in Guerrero, Veracruz and Baja California South. He is the author of the chapter “The role of volunteering in the donation culture” of Bank of America Merrill Lynch’s book

“Volunteering of Banking, Commitment to Mexico”. He is a lecturer and lecturer teaching different subjects of Social Entrepreneurship and Sustainability, besides having more than 50 publications and columns in different media on Sustainable Development.


KEYNOTE SPEAKERS Neydi Sagnité Cruz García Deputy Chairman of the Board, YMCA Mexico Neydi got a Master in International Cooperation for Development by the Research Institute Dr. José María Luis Mora, Graduate in International Relations by the Faculty of Political and Social Sciences, UNAM, titled with Honorable Mention, she received a Scholarship from CONACYT – National Graduate Certificate of Quality. Titled also with Honorable Mention. She is Deputy Director General of International Cooperation in the Ministry of the Environment and Natural Resources (SEMARNAT), Unit Coordination for International Affairs (UCAI) INTERNATIONAL COOPERATION FOR DEVELOPMENT. ENVIRONMENT. CLIMATE CHANGE. INTERNATIONAL ECONOMIC FORUMS (GREEN GROWTH). 2011 to 2014, she led the International Programs Operation, Generation of procedures and operational standards as Director of Promotion to Internationalization at the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM), General Directorate of Cooperation and Internationalization (DGECI). She was the Regional Focal Point for Latin America and the Caribbean Team on South- South Cooperation of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Mexico. She served as Director of the Economic Relations of Mexico with Europe, Africa and the Middle East in the Ministry of Foreign Affairs (SRE), General Directorate of Bilateral Economic Relations (DGREB), Mexico. She has publications such as “Europe and Latin America: Improving

University Relations Investing in Cooperation Actions” in the Newsletter of the EU-LAC Foundation, September 2014, she has several diplomas and workshops such as “Introduction to Development of Philanthropy in Mexico” by the Kreesge Foundation / YMCA USA. Neydi has received several awards such as the Community Social Service Medal “Dr. Gustavo Baz Prada” in 2005, UNAM, and the University Excellence Award, awarded by the Political Queer Magazine in November 2003. Neydi is the current Deputy President of the Board in YMCA Mexico.


KEYNOTE SPEAKERS Pedro Eliud Cisneros Cuervo Pedro got a degree in International Relations from the National Autonomous University of Mexico UNAM, where he graduated with honors and also got the Gabino Barreda Medal for the best average of his generation. He got a Master's degree in International Relations and International Law from the Complutense University of Madrid, Spain and is a graduate of the Master's in Political Journalism from the School of Journalism Carlos Septién García. He is a member of the Diplomatic - Consular Branch of the Mexican Foreign Service since 2006 and currently holds the rank of First Secretary. Abroad, he has served as Promoter of the Institute of Mexicans Abroad at the General Consulate of Mexico in Miami, Florida; Consul of Mexico and Head of Economic Affairs in Dublin, Ireland and Cultural Attaché and Head of Press at the Embassy of Mexico in Beijing, China. In the Ministry of Foreign Affairs, he was Director of Educational and Cultural Cooperation Agreements and Programs; Director of Cooperation with the European Union and currently serves as Deputy General Director of Liaison with Civil Society Organizations.


CULTURAL NIGHTS The cultural nights were an important part of the Summit’s program. They were an attractive way to review what participants learned during the first three days of work, as well as to show the culture and diversity of the 3 regions, Canada, USA and Latin America and the Caribbean, through recreational activities full of energy and creativity. LACA volunteers organized icebreakers, recreational and integration activities on Sunday afternoon. On Monday night the delegation of the United States organized different activities with music and dance, and on Tuesday the delegation of Canada was in charge of making their cultural night through a very entertaining rally where they shared interesting facts about Canadian culture.


VISITS TO YMCA MEXICO PROGRAMS Tepoztlan Communities While in Camp Camhomila, participants had the opportunity to visit some communities near the camp and where YMCA Mexico does some work with children and young people. The participants were divided into groups and had the opportunity to visit 4 communities:

- San Andrés de la Cal - San Juan Tlacotenco - Santo Domingo Ocotitlán - Tepoztlán Centro


CULTURAL VISITS Wednesday was the day to visit some of the most emblematic places in Mexico City. The group was divided into 2 teams. One group visited the Museum of Anthropology and History, and the other group had the opportunity to visit the Templo Mayor and the Museum of Popular Art.


YMCA COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT CENTERS As part of the activities, there was also time to visit the Community Development Centers, which offer different programs for the benefit of the community. The objective of the visits was to deepen social inclusion issues through a more direct experience with the beneficiaries of the programs as well as the staff and volunteers in charge of them. The Community Development Centers visited were: YMCA Iztacalco (Mexico City) YMCA Naucalpan (State of Mexico) YMCA Atizapรกn (State of Mexico)


EVALUATION To measure the results of the Summit, the organizers designed surveys that the participants answered before and after the event in order to measure the impact on each of them. It should be noted that a third survey will be sent six months after the conclusion of the Summit as a follow-up. In general, the event was evaluated positively, in all its activities and recommendations were received in areas of opportunity detected by the participants themselves. A total of 64 responses were received out of a total of 95, which represents 67% of the participants in the post survey


PARTICIPANTS PER NATIONAL MOVEMENT Luis Isaac Arévalo Mark Barron Sasha Batts Bonnie Bauer Kelsey Beck Jackie Bravo Jeff Briz-Felisilda Diego Bustos Lauren Carmack ChaCha Junior Matt Clements Kayla Condron Karla Contreras Carlos Correa Mirza Cruz Haley Cruz Edith Cruz Brandon Cunningham Brie Davis Shannon Davis Evalynn De Ycaza Tiffany Dunbar Ariel Ercoli Safaya Fawzi John Fernández Logan Finerfrock Dan Fraser Lance Friday Carlos Fuentes Sidney Gafford Jessica García

LACA Y USA Y USA Y USA Y CANADA Y USA Y USA LACA Y USA Y USA Y USA Y CANADA LACA LACA LACA Y USA LACA Y CANADA Y USA Y CANADA LACA Y USA LACA Y USA LACA Y USA Y USA Y USA Y USA Y USA LACA

Chile USA USA USA Canada USA USA Chile USA USA USA Canada Guatemala Colombia Mexico USA Mexico Canada USA Canada Panama USA Chile USA Colombia USA USA USA USA USA Mexico

Kendra Gautreau Megan Gierhart Lina Grajales Javier Guzmán Jocelyn Hay Brenda Hernández Carlos Hincapié Amanda Hooper Pat Jackson Matt Jarrel Jamie Johnson Ryan Johnson Samuel Joseph Stevens Alejandro Jugo Jill Knight Nacy Koenitz-Hudac Tunde Lawal Colleen Leung Gabriela López Allison Magee Minutha Mahadevaiah Susana Marín Juliana Marín Octavio Márquez Ana Clara Martí Lindsay Martín Cait McGinnis Jeff MacNeil Jenny Miller Pedro Manotvani Valentina Moreno Luke Moyer Ryan Natividad Gabriela Noriega Katoya Palmer Sokthea Phay

Y CANADA Y USA LACA LACA Y CANADA Y USA LACA Y USA Y USA Y USA Y USA Y CANADA LACA LACA Y CANADA Y USA Y USA Y USA LACA Y CANADA Y USA LACA LACA LACA LACA Y CANADA Y USA Y CANADA Y USA LACA LACA Y CANADA Y CANADA LACA Y USA Y USA

Canada USA Colombia Chile Canada USA Colombia USA USA USA USA Canada Haiti Peru Canada USA USA USA Mexico Canada USA Colombia Colombia Mexico Uruguay Canada USA Canada USA Brazil Colombia Canada Canada Panama USA USA


Claudia Portocarrero Briana Reece Juan Rodríguez Marc Rosen Yailin Ruiz Elizabeth Ryan Joanne Saintilias Justine Schultes Betty Sells-Asberry Heidi Sinclair Georgina Smith Shane Smith Brenda Soriano Diana Sofía Sosa Kristen Spronz Katherina Suaza Anna Swanby Janine Thompson Amanda Trask José Ubilla Jonathan Uvalle John Valdivieso Jade Verney Linsea Waugh Nicolle Wright Nicole Wry Leslye Zamorano Romulo Dantas Ingrid Ritcher Peter Dinsdale Mary Anne Roche Cici Rojas Tom Valentine Kevin Washington Angela Cifuentes Daniel Galán

LACA LACA LACA Y USA LACA Y CANADA LACA Y CANADA Y USA Y CANADA Y CANADA Y USA Y USA LACA Y USA LACA Y USA Y CANADA Y USA LACA LACA LACA Y CANADA Y USA Y USA Y CANADA LACA WORLD YMCA Y CANADA Y CANADA Y CANADA Y USA Y USA Y USA STAFF STAFF

Peru Panama Chile USA Panama Canada Haiti Canada USA Canada Canada USA USA Colombia USA Colombia USA Canada USA Chile Mexico Panama Canada USA USA Canada Mexico World YMCA Canada Canada Canada USA USA USA USA USA

Daniel Gómez Nico Gourdet Jorge Herrera Abraham Martínez Antonio Merino Jessica Nkongolo Mulalo Sadike Adriana Stanovici

STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF STAFF Y USA

USA USA USA Mexico LACA Canada Canada USA


"It was a totally enriching and integrating space, and it also made it possible to understand the community inclusion and share experiences for an increasingly inclusive world in local actions daily." Katherina Suaza – Colombia “One of the greatest richness of our movement is that we are a very diverse movement and that each one has its own ways and approaches to engage with community but the element that unite of all of us is that we work based on three focus areas which are education, employment and health”. Ana Clara Martí – Uruguay

“The YMCA develops leaders through programs focus on education, health, and employment. Our work is local, but we think global, so we can contribute to the accomplishment of the Sustainable Development Goals”. Samuel Joseph – Haiti

“This week we have learned from each other through workshops and sharing ideas from our YMCA. We have also had the opportunity to visit the communities in Mexico and visiting the YMCA and their work they are doing and show the passion that we all have for the work that the YMCA does”. Heidi Sinclair – Canada

TESTIMONIALS


“The event is the final phase of a comprehensive training program where we learned new approaches and different movements. And now, we can return to our city, to our YMCA, with ideas, new projects, and tools to improve our programs to better serve our community”. Pedro Mantovani – Brazil

“This week we have connected with other young leaders from across the Americas who because of politics, because of the state of the world today, like me, we will never cross paths with except for the YMCA”. Safaya Fawzi – USA

“After a year of participating in this program, I want to confirm the importance of creating spaces for youth where we are the leaders. Today I want to thank everyone who has been involved in this program and encourage you to continue supporting spaces like these where we can transform our reality, help others and strengthen our communities. Thank you for this opportunity! Juan Rodriguez – Chile

”The Y strengthens communities, the Y is a safe haven for all communities” Babatunde - USA

TESTIMONIALS


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