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FEBRUARY 2012 | L3MAGAZINE.COM

CUBA GOODING JR. THE 20TH ANNUAL PAN AFRICAN FILM & ARTS FESTIVAL AND MORE

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THE BEAUTY OF BLACK

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AFRICAN HISTORY IS EVERY MONTH

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WELCOME

PAN AFRICAN FILM & ARTS FESTIVAL

THE 20TH ANNUAL PAN AFRICAN FILM & ARTS FESTIVAL, 2012 ZAKADA MILTON

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FILM & ARTS

E Visit www.paff.org for additional information.

stablished in 1992, The Pan African Film Festival (PAFF) is a non-profit corporation dedicated to the promotion of cultural and racial tolerance and understanding through the exhibition of film, art and creative expression. This years’ Festival is kicks off with the film adaptation of Steve Harvey’s ‘Think Like A Man,’ based on the New York Times best-selling book by radio host/ comic Steve Harvey. The ensemble cast includes Michael Ealy, Jerry Ferrara, Meagan Good, Regina Hall, Kevin Hart, Taraji P. Henson, Terrence J, Jenifer Lewis, Romany Malco, Gary Owen, Gabrielle Union and Chris Brown. The comedy follows four interconnected and diverse men whose love lives are shaken up after the ladies they are pursuing buy Harvey’s book and start taking his advice to heart. When the band of brothers realize that they have been betrayed by one of their own, they conspire, using the book’s insider information to turn the tables and teach the women a lesson of their own. The movie is directed by Tim Story and written by Keith Merryman and David A. Newman. It’s produced by Will Packer in conjunction with Rainforest Films and distributed through Sony Pictures. The film is scheduled for theatrical release March 9, 2012. Another featured film is ‘Bob Marley – The Making of a Legend.’ Directed by Esther Anderson & Gian Godoy, the film is Based on footage short in the early 1970s and lost for 38 years, Esther Anderson’s lens takes us on a journey to the Caribbean islands, to Jamaica and into 56 Hope Road, Kingston, to see and hear the young

ARTS

Bob Marley before he was famous. While exploring the love relationship between them, the film shows the Wailers’ first rehearsal, when the idea of a Jamaican super group like the Beatles or the Rolling Stones was still just a dream and sits in on the launch of their international career. Features Bob Marley, Peter Tosh, Esther Anderson, Ras Daniel Hartman, Countryman and Mother Macky. PAFF’s goal is to present and showcase the broad spectrum of Black creative works, particularly those that reinforce positive images and help to destroy negative stereotypes. We believe film and art can lead to better understanding and foster communication between peoples of diverse cultures, races, and lifestyles, while at the same time, serve as a vehicle to initiate dialogue on the important issues of our times. For the 2012 Festival, over one hundred and thirty quality films from the United States, Africa, the Caribbean, Latin America, Europe, the South Pacific and Canada will be showcasing the diversity and complexity of people of African descent. The festival, now in its 20th year, is one of America’s largest fine arts shows featuring prominent and emerging Black artists and fine crafts people, including local, national and international poets, musicians and storytellers. The Festival runs from February 9th to 20th in Los Angeles. One of the musical features of the festival includes the Hip Hop Around the World forum and the Awards Brunch.

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FEBRUARY 2012 | NO. 008 CEO & EDITOR-IN-CHIEF VP & CHIEF CREATIVE OFFICER PUBLISHER ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER

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WELCOME

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

A negative experience is a call for a positive to balance it. Moving from day to day we experience ups and downs with family, career, health and a host of other areas. Lately, negative presence has been rearing its ugly head, and has been met with disdain until we see the negative’s presence through the eyes of a sage. A sage will tell you that a negative presence is a call for positive to balance it. The laws of the universe call for balance. Feminine energy has a masculine energy; every proton has a neutron, and every deficit has a surplus. Negative and positive are no different. Many people around the world are celebrating Black History month. Here at L3, we don’t celebrate this monthly, we celebrate this daily. We celebrate the struggles that our ancestors went through (the negative) so that we can be here to express our talents freely (the positive). In speaking to Iwer George in Trinidad & Tobago, I was reminded of the wisdom of the sage. Iwer told me of the struggles and fight he’s received in his career. He tempered those tales with examples of the positives that not only balanced the negative, but exceeded the negative.

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Natasha Von Castle

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The most common complaint I hear about negatives, is in finance. Don’t fret, the positive is there! Whether it be you ‘setting up shop’ around a skill or talent, there is an angle for the positive, you just have to open the door to let it in! As we draw our ancestors’ experiences closer to us this month, we see that what we go through today is no different than what they went through before – we just happen to be in a different era. The more we explore the creativity and innovation they practiced, the more we see that we too can succeed in our respective fields today. From slave ship to freedom to leadership; negative is really positive in disguise!


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

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WELCOME

T H E AT R E A RT S

A PRIVATE SCHOOL GLORIA WILSON GOMEZ EDITED BY E. BADOVINAC

Theatre Arts! An aspect of Caribbean culture that is becoming more prominent in the North America’s is Theatre Arts. Every island across the Caribbean has programs promoting the rich and diverse landscape of its unique theatre programs. We happened to come across a small production that we found so funny, we had to share it with our readers. To enhance your appreciation of theatre, the story is shared in script format meaning it includes direction, so you read what the actors read when rehearsing for performance. The play continues from last November’s 3rd installment where Granny confronts Mr. Foolie about his willingness to be run by foreigners who have a controlling interest in his Private School. The last question she asked the principal last month was ‘where he’s running to when ‘they’ ring the bell!’ (Continued from the January Edition)

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Sassy:

Neville, Mr. Burnhill! See what’s wrong with the boy, hold him, blessed Almighty. Lord listen to the patois ah come from this mouth of mine. Me neva tink me woulda gwaan like dis!

Granny:

That’s what happens when you relax Sassy! Yuh can speak patois.

Sassy:

Yes, but let the man hold him (referring to Bogo). He is swinging those arms out of control. I can’t believe this. Heaven come down and roll (she looks up to God). Save dis bwoy from sorrow and pain.

Granny gets up on her feet moving slowly towards Bogo, her body and actions resembles the action of sumo wrestler. Mr. Foolie and Mr. Burnhill move quickly toward Bogo: Miss sassy imitates their actions. Some of the students are standing at the door with Miss Curious. They are in disbelief. Bogo takes a swing at Mr. Foolie. Mr. Foolie ducks.


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Sassy:

Is he alright? I had such a scare there.

Sassy:

Does it have a smell Neville?

Bogo continues to give attitude

Granny looks at Sassy in amazement.

Sassy:

Sassy:

Well … is he alright?

Some of the children are in clear of what’s going on. They are laughing and Miss Curious is trying to restrain them. Mr. Foolie:

(To Sassy). We can never tell with young people. They are like time bombs wanting to go off. (To Miss Curious) Get those children away from that door for Christs sake.

Granny makes a final dash towards Bogo. Mr. Foolie also makes a dash and they both grab him at the same time. Mr. Burnhill paces in anticipation. Burnhill:

(British accent) This is not order at all. I have never experienced such … well, to put it bluntly, I have never seen anything like this in my life. British children are far … (he pauses), they are more subtle if an when …

Mr. Foolie:

(to Bogo) Steady on son, steady on.

Granny:

Never mind passing yuh mouth (to Mr. Burnhill) on my Bogo. All those young people take things and sometimes old people take things too, only some ah dem don’t exhale.

Burnhill:

(Smiling) You mean ‘inhale.’ A good shower will do the trick if you ask me, it always does.

Granny waves her finger Granny:

Don’t take the Lords name in vain.

Granny makes a dash towards Bogo. Mr. Foolie makes a dash too. They both grab Bogo and save him from falling. Mr. Foolie:

Steady boy.

Sassy:

Is he alright? He was fine a few minutes ago.

Mr. Foolie:

Sassy:

You should be asking me if I’m alright. The boy is young and full of energy. It looks like he’s on something. He is on something. It does have a bad effect on them, I do hope that the younger children did not see all this carry-on (She looks over at the door only to see Miss Curious standing there with some students). Neville tell her something (she flaps her hands at Miss Curious beckoning her to move). I can’t believe Miss Curious would stand there.

Well I’m not sure if I know the right smell. They say you must know it when you smell it!

Mr. Foolie turns to see Miss Curious is still standing at the door with the group of children. Mr. Foolie:

Miss Curious, take those children away. This is hardly an exhibition. Put Bogo to sit. We can never tell with young people (shakes his head).

Miss Curious: Experience is the best teacher Sir. They will know what not to do.

Miss Curious waves back at her. Mr. Foolie is busy trying to calm Bogo. Suddenly a small pouch falls from Bogo’s pocket as he bends over. Mr. Foolie grabs it up. He finds a small bottle, half full with a clear substance and a half rolled cigarette.

Sassy:

Some people lose it sometimes; not just young people, we all do wrong things at times. (She looks at Burnhill) How do you know that showers wake up these kinds of people?

Mr. Foolie:

Mr. Foolie:

I was sayig young people are like time bombs, waiting to go off.

What do we have here? Son of the living God. He holds the pouch up to the light.

Everybody is now looking at the pouch and cigarette in Mr. Foolie’s hand in dismay. Mr. Foolie then sniffs, and sniffs again. Granny sits quietly, her hand s in her lap. Her body language tells it all, she is disappointed. Sassy asks Mr. Foolie out loud…

Suddenly Bogo lifts his head and starts laughing; everyone is shocked. He says to Mr. Foolie Bogo:

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T H E AT R E A RT S

But, I knew my action would make an impact. I was just acting my pasrt in the play that Miss Curious is putting on for the end of the concert. In the play, my name is Spliffy. Mr. Foolie looks over at Miss Curious who makes faces at him and leaves. Burnhill:

(Responding immediately) This matter must remain confidential Mr. Foolie. It must be dealt with here and now. No one outside these walls will hear of this incident. (He stopped as if he just heard what Bogo had said.) Was that an act?

Granny:

Tank you sah. Dis ah my bwoy mih raise from since him madda ah farrin. Miss Sassy know all bout it.

Sassy:

Yes I … I know all about this young man but it’s not the issue at hand.

Granny drops the issue. Burnhill:

Mr. Foolie:

Some children are just bent on bending the rules.

Bogo:

I know better than to take illegal substances.

Mr. Foolie:

I don’t believe one word. They had a slight smell of some sort.

Granny:

Lawd him charge up well. Me neva tink him can change soh.

Bogo:

Mr. Foolie:

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I believe it’s time to hear from Hilson himself. Maybe he would enlighten us as to what has caused him to turn to (slowly) drinking and smoking.

The bottle that you found on me is a mixture of water and rum flavoured crystals. I tried to make the smell as close as possible to the real thing. The cigarette is just rolled up white paper, there is not one drop of ganja in it. Why, let us sit down as civilized people and discuss what has driven you to put on such a show. (To Bogo loudly in his ears) Are you mad? Young man do you realize that there are serious consequences for your actions

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today? Do you realize you have put the school (Mr. Foolie looks at Mr. Burnhill) at risk of losing … Kids these days take things to the limit. They seem to know all there is to know until the authorities come. Sassy:

I would leave the authorities out of this. Some take liberties with our young people.

Bogo lifts his head and Sassy continues... Sassy:

I said SOME. Well, go on. Tell us the truth; why the white rum and ganja?

Granny:

Will he get a beating Mr. Foolie?

Bogo:

I told you it’s all an act. Maybe I’m looking for attention. It was all an act. I read somewhere that it’s the greatest way to get attention. One has to be extreme, then people will listen.

Burnhill:

(Joking) Are you expected to smoke the real thing on stage? Is the whip still a deterrent on the island Mr. Foolie?

Sassy:

Mr. Burnhill!

Burnhill:

Well, that’s a fair question, pardon my humour. Let’s lighten up a little, the boy’s young, let’s hear what he has to say.

Bogo straightens up and seems even more clear headed. Bogo:

I would like to speak on behalf of all young people. Most young people rebel because people in authority don’t give them a chance to give their views. They are always told what to do.

Mr. Foolie:

We are dealing with you, man. Isn’t that what you want to be, a man? We’re not dealing with the other young people, we are dealing with you, a seventeen year old who feels his rights were violated.

Sassy:

Easy Neville, we must get to the bottom of this. Go on Hilsten; tell us how you really feel. Have you tried smoking? Bogo cuts her off... Bogo:

For the last time, I did not disrespect the school and I never will. What I did today


T H E AT R E A RT S

was an act, a cry for help. I am being judged because of my hair and a lack of understanding of what my hair stands for. That is the issue. We were taught never to judge a person’s exterior. You have told us that a million times Mr. Foolie. My locks happen to represent my religious convictions. I take my religion, Rastafarianism, very seriously. Why must I cut my hair? It hurts no one. I feel I have been treated unfairly; I say this because I have never held back on my contribution to this school. I have always conducted myself well, and represented you well in almost every area of school life. But the one thing that helps to make me who I am remains a thorn in my flesh and yours; my hair. I would like you to see me for what I do or what I can do for mankind. Do not focus on how others perceive me through my hair. I know my views will have long and short-term repercussions, but I am willing to take a chance. Mr. Foolie Sir, would it be fair to ask a Christian to remove a cross from around his neck, or to ask a Muslim to remove his kepi? I wouldn’t! I demand the same respect, that’s all I want. I want to be free to wear my locks and be judged on merit only. Mr. Foolie:

I appreciate and admire your argument, however, respect goes both ways young man. We at Private Secondary have rules, policies and an image to maintain. Unfortunately there is no room for negotiations with regards to the present problem. You have made your decision and I am confirming mine. You have defended yourself well.

Bogo:

Sir, schools in Jamaica are far too rigid. We are behind the times; we need to be liberated.

Granny:

(clapping her hands) Case closed now; Mr. Foolie dun talk.

Mr. Foolie:

One day, you’ll find rigidity a blessing. And, you will yearn for the way we conduct our schools in the Caribbean.

Burnhill:

Maybe we …

Mr. Foolie:

(Cuts off Mr. Burnhill) I believe enough has been said. Let the curtains fall. This young

man needs to be in a more progressive environment, one that has freedom and liberation. Sassy:

Neville!

Granny:

Mih feel is time mih sen Bogo to meet him madda in Canada. Dem have nice schools and no restrictions.

Mr. Foolie:

Ah! Restrictions are many. We’ll hear and we’ll see.

They all get up. Bogo:

I look forward to such freedom.

Granny:

God bless you son. Wait. Mih nah see Miss Curious in ah while. She alright?

Mr. Foolie:

If I know Miss Curious well enough, she must be planning some thing spectacular.

Suddenly the door opens and a large choir is seen dressed in black, red and green. Donelle, the lead singer begins the choir with the song “One Love.” Sassy:

I’m still waiting for my tea and well buttered scone from Mr. Cutter’s bakery. Please don’t lick your fingers and make sure the pot is hot!

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TO N YA L E E W I L L I A M S

CONGRATULATIONS TO CANADA’S

TONYA LEE WILLIAMS!

SASHA STOLTZ

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lack Theatre Workshop (BTW) honoured actress Tonya Lee Williams at their 26th annual Vision Celebration Gala, in Montreal, Canada. The prestigious Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Achievement Award is given to a person who has a measure of distinction in Canada and has made significant contributions to the development of Black performing arts. For over thirty-five years Tonya Lee Williams has been such an individual. Nominated for two Emmy Awards and winner of two NAACP Image Awards, an ACTRA Award of Excellence, a Harry Jermone Award, an African Canadian Achievement Award, a Planet Africa Award for Media and Entertainment, Ms. Williams has been instrumental in reflecting positive images from the Black communities and reaching millions of viewers through her roles as, Olivia Winters for the past twentythree years on The Young and The Restless, as Maxine on Vision TV’s

She’s The Mayor, as Karen in Lifetimes Double Wedding, as Ruth in Clement Virgo’s film Poor Boys Game, and other film and TV shows. We remember Tonya in her early years in Canada on the Wear A Moustache milk commercial campaigns, Polka Dot Door, dancing on Boogie, hosting the Miss Teen Canada Pageant, hosting Welcome to My World and starring as Belinda on Check It Out. Also her early years in Hollywood on Hill St. Blues, Falcon Crest, What’s Happening Now, Gimme A Break are a few additional titles we can name! In 2001 Ms. Williams brought much needed attention to artists of colour when she Founded ReelWorld Film Festival. Based in Toronto, ReelWorld screens films from the Aboriginal, Asian, Black, Latino, Middle Eastern, South Asian and other multi-racial communities. The festival now in its 12th year has given a voice to many artists in Canada and around the world.


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R E E L T O S C R E E NF R O M R E E L T O S C R E E N

FROM REEL TO SCREEN! MICKEY HUTCHINSON

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colourmethefilm.com olour Me is the recently released doc- ton, Ontario – one of Canada’s fastest growing, ethnically dominated umentary that challenges viewers suburbs. At its heart is Fletcher’s Meadow high school, which has a to re-examine how they think about seventy percent black student population. Today, Anthony is a husrace. Following motivational speaker band and father of two children. He’s confident, charming and talAnthony McLean through interactions ented. Audiences love him and kids admire him. By most accounts, with high school students, audiences he is successful and sure of himself. But inside, he knows differently. watch as the speaker interacts with the stuAs he walks through life, the voices of his childhood haunt him. Don’t Miss thismentorship Riveting that will change the Think dents through groundbreaking pro-Documentary Born to a white mother and black father in theway sleepyyou town of Sharon, gram for black teens in Brampton, Ontario. The Ontario, Anthony and his brother were the only two people of colour Race. about city of Brampton is one of the most demographi- for miles around. At thirty, he’s finally ready to take a hard look at cally changing cities in Canada. While challenging his own identity. The teens ask themselves tough questions. Why do screening, followed an interactive Q&A with film students The to analyse and abandon the stereotypesby middle-class suburban black teens dress,the talk and walkmaker like they live they have accepted, Anthony is forced to critically in the ‘hood? Why is getting a good education seen as ‘selling out’? Barsoum and motivational Anthony McLean, willand examine Sherien his own identity. And after blackspeaker communities’ struggle for education, equality Anthony McLean shows six teens what it means freedom, why are more black youth dropping out and behind bars? place… take to be black, but there’s a catch: he’s not sure Anthony is left with serious questions of his own, such as: Why do I what it means himself. Sick of stereotypes that behave differently with my black friends than with my white family? surround the black community, sick of documen- Why am I trying to conceal my ‘whiteness’? When rates of black youth taries that profile “at-risk” youth, and sick of per- in crime and teen pregnancy rise to match our American neighbours, sisting rhetoric on the ‘black struggle,’ Anthony this film asks why, while exploring the confines of race, the complexiwants things to change. ties of identity, and the need for everyone to find their voice. For five months, the six youths go on a journey to discover what it really means to be black. The Watch Anthony’s journey by visiting this website: backdrop to this group’s introspection is Bramp- www.colourmethefilm.com L 3 M A G A Z I N E . C O M | F E B R U A RY 2 0 1 2

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T I G E R L I LY D R E A M

TIGERLILY DREAM

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f you love unique pieces of jewelry Tigerlily Dream will be your new crush! The handcrafted necklaces, bracelets and earrings by designer Yelsi Saravia are absolute must haves and she has something for every kind of woman whether downtown bohemian, rock chick, sophisticated lady, fashionista or art lover. Yelsi Saravia, who was born in Honduras and raised in Miami , started Tigerlily Dream in 2010 after the birth of her daughter Olivia Tigerlily, for whom the line is named. The line originally started with a girl collection, entitled “Bon Bon” made out of brightly colored fabrics, which is now exclusively sold through Nest & Cradle. Due to the popularity of the girl’s collection Yelsi took the next step and designed a collection for women using wood, textiles, leather, gold fill, brass and semi precious stones.

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HEIKE WOLLENWEBER


T I G E R L I LY D R E A M

Honduras and Miami are two places that strongly influence Yelsi’s design aesthetics. She draws inspiration from her cultural background and the richness of the textiles in Central America. The art and craft of Central American countries tend to be bold and bright but yet humble at the same time. Yelsi is intrigued and inspired by this juxtaposition as well as the strength of the people in Third World countries. A strong and spirited woman herself, Yelsi explains her philosophy. “I once read that style is optimism made visible. It presumes you are a person of interest, the world is of interest and the world is worth making an effort for.” What could be more beautiful than a woman’s optimism, strength and confidence? Tigerlily Dream accessories underline and bring out the beauty of the wearer and go hand in hand with each personality. Have your pick of a leather bracelet with a purple skull or a filigree gold necklace adorned with delicate charms or a bold and bright necklace with agate, crystal and quartz. Talking about her customers Yelsi says, “a Tigerlily girl believes style is not about fashion. It’s about knowing and believing in you and externalizing that spirit with a sort of humble confidence.” She explains further, “I produce accessories to celebrate the individuality of stylish, urbane girls who don’t religiously follow fashion but instead exude an original personal style.” The new collection for spring/ summer 2012 will be available shortly, including also some unisex pieces for the first time as well as new pieces using gold leaf. One thing is for sure, the new Tigerlily Dream collection is about beautiful jewelry that will have you ready for any occasion or to express your personality every day. To get your unique Tigerlily Dream piece check out the shop on the website http://tigerlilydream.com or if you happen to live in or visit Miami soon hit up boutiques Miss Pepper or Cheap’n’Chic.

Connect with Heike via Twitter @axesmedia

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THE DECEMBERISTS

THE DECEMBERISTS RELEASE LIVE ALBUM WE ALL RAISE OUR VOICES TO THE AIR. LIVE SONGS COMING MARCH 13TH!

CONTRIBUTED

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THE DECEMBERISTS

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he Decemberists have announced the March 13 release of We All Raise Our Voices To The Air (Live Songs 04.11-08.11), a 20-track live double-album (and triple-vinyl set) culled from the band’s 2011 tour supporting their chart-topping, Grammy-nominated album The King Is Dead. With songs spanning their entire first decade as a band—from their debut EP 5 Songs through each of their six LP’s—We All Raise Our Voices To The Air is the first-ever live album from a band that has grown into one of rock’s most thrilling live acts. Before the January 2011 release of The King Is Dead, TIME magazine made the prescient prediction that the album’s release would “mark their crossover to the realm of important American rock groups alongside the likes of Wilco and the White Stripes.” They were proven right when the album debuted at #1 on the Billboard Top 200. Fueled by the #1 AAA radio hit “Down By The Water” which is nominated for Best Rock Song and Best Rock Performance at the 54th Grammy Awards. The album has produced three Top 10 AAA singles (“This Is Why We Fight” and “Calamity Song”) and has become the band’s best-selling album of their career, earning them a legion of new fans. In concert, The Decemberists lead singer, songwriter and guitarist Colin Meloy, keyboardist & accordionist Jenny Conlee, guitarist Chris Funk, bassist Nate Query, and drummer John Moen, with additional member Sara Watkins on fiddle, guitar and vocals, deliver an unforgettable live experience full of spontaneity. A band of breathtaking versatility, The Decemberists can reach deep into their rich catalog of songs for gorgeous folk-rock gems (“Rise To Me”), murderously driving rockers (“The Rake’s Song”), expansive suites (“The Crane Wife 1, 2, and 3”), the worst song Meloy ever wrote (“Dracula’s Daughter”), or epic sea shanties that inspire enthusiastic crowd participation (“The Mariner’s Revenge Song”). The performances on We All Raise Our Voices To The Air are drawn from 12 different shows at venues including the legendary Ryman Auditorium in Nashville, Stubb’s BBQ in Austin, Marymoor Amphitheatre in Seattle, and their final two shows at McMenamins Edgefield Amphitheatre in their hometown of Portland, which featured the addition of a horn section that can be heard on several songs. In a review of the band’s first of three sold-out shows that kicked off the 2011 tour at New York City’s Beacon Theatre, the New York Post wrote that “during this two-hour show, the set spanned the band’s 10-year career, but wisely leaned heaviest on the just-released CD, The King Is Dead. Songs from that record made the best case for why the group should be superstars.” www.decemberists.com L 3 M A G A Z I N E . C O M | F E B R U A RY 2 0 1 2

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L OV E I N F O R M AT I O N

DO YOU KNOW YOUR SEX-TISITICS? LISA BLAKE

Birds do it. Bees do it. Brits, Kiwis and Swedes do it. But who does it best, for the longest and with the most people?! Let’s take a trip around the world and see if you can guess who does it the most, who is the best, who is the worst and even who smells! A note on this quiz: it’s based on surveys from Durex and Onepoll.com and probably shouldn’t be taken too seriously. Just because 15,000 women choose one country’s men as the worst lovers in the world doesn’t make it true…!

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Sex-Tistic #1: According to the 2007 / 2008 Durex Global Sexual Wellbeing Survey, which questioned 26,000 participants in 26 countries, the global average number of sex partners for a woman was 7! Sex-Tistic #2: The most promiscuous women in the world are found in New Zealand with an average of 20 partners! Sex-Tistic #3: The men with the highest number of partners, averaging 29, is Austria! Sex-Tistic #4: The country with the least amount of promiscuous activity is China where the survey said men averaged 4 partners and women averaged 2. Sex-Tistic #5: A 2009 poll by Onepoll.com asked 15,000 women from 20 countries to rate the world’s best and worst lovers by country … Germany came out as being the worst! The reason?! ‘Too smelly!’ Make of that what you will. It doesn’t sound very scientific. The ten countries with the worst lovers are supposedly as follows: 1. Germany (too smelly) 2. England (too lazy) 3. Sweden (too quick) 4. Holland (too dominating) 5. America (too rough) 6. Greece (too lovey-dovey) 7. Wales (too selfish) 8. Scotland (too loud) 9. Turkey (too sweaty) 10. Russia (too hairy) Sex-Tistic #6: The best Lovers in the world come from Spain! Although Spain came out on top, Canada made the list, but just barely squeaking in at #10. Home and native land! The ten countries with the best lovers are as follows: 1. Spain 2. Brazil 3. Italy 4. France 5. Ireland 6. South Africa 7. Australia 8. New Zealand 9. Denmark 10. Canada

THE BEST LOVERS IN THE WORLD COME FROM SPAIN Sex-Tistic #7: Who lasts the longest in bed? According to the Penguin Atlas of Human Sexual Behaviour, published in 2000, the country the longest amount of time to do it is Brazil at 30 minutes! The U.S. came in a close second at 28 minutes, followed by Canada at 23 minutes and the U.K. at 21 minutes. Thailand was said to be the quickest, at 10 minutes. Sex-Tistic #8: The Durex 2007 survey found that the people of Nigeria were the most satisfied lovers, with 78% of the people saying their love life is as exciting as it can be! Mexico came in second at 74%. Least satisfied were the Japanese at 10%. Sex-Tistic #9: In 2005, the study polled 317,000 people in 41 countries and found that the Greeks are the most sexually active! It turns out they have sex 138 times a year. In case you’re wondering, the global average is 103 times per year! Sex-Tistic #10: Canadians and Americans are tied for the most likely place they will have sex which is, you guessed it, in front of a camera! We’re most likely to make a sex tape. Hope we’re also the most likely to have a safe in the house! L 3 M A G A Z I N E . C O M | F E B R U A RY 2 0 1 2

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VISIT BANGKOK

DIVE HEAD FIRST INTO THE THAI CAPITAL’S COLOURFUL CULTURE, AVOIDING ITS FAMOUS UNDERBELLY

VISIT BANGKOK!

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p en your mind on arrival to bustling Bangkok where a sensory overload awaits. this portal to South East asia houses all manner of weird and wonderful sights, from roads swarming with frantic tuk tuk drivers (who appear to break the laws of physics with their traffic dodging) to locals consuming bizarre looking creatures on skewers (insects and scorpions among them) from street stands. night cues entertainment in the form of lean thai boxers who floor any stocky Western tourists that dare to get in the ring, plus glittering, kitsch cabaret shows featuring androgynous performers. daylight, meanwhile, brings wild lizards in green parks and floating markets where realms of ripe vegetables hover over rivers. You’ll crosspaths with an ever-welcoming thai people as you journey through the capital too and, whether it’s your first or fiftieth trip, it’s a city that can’t cease to amaze...

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JADE BREMNER

OF KANOO WORLD TRAVELLER

✓ MUST-DOS ✪The Grand Palace, home to the Kings of Thailand, can be visited when its royal owners are not in residence. A spectacular show of 18th century architecture, you’ll find distinctive gold domes and ornate halls inside while outside you can stroll around the palace grounds which are filled with magical statues in the shape of mythological giants and halfbird creatures. ✪Watch a Thai boxing match at the Lumpini Stadium every Tuesday and Friday. Westerners are offered pricier ringside seats at the gate, but for the full experience sit at the back with rowdy locals who’ll be shouting and waving their betting slips in the air – far more atmospheric. ✪The best way to see the floating markets, without getting caught in a tourist trap, is to rent a boat at Chang Pier and ask to be taken to the less crowded Noi-Khlong Om-Bang Khu Wiang Floating Market where locals sell better quality vegetables, fruit, knick knacks and gifts from their river boats. ✪One ‘experience’ everyone should have is a night out on the Khao San Road. A known traveller’s hangout, the streets are lined with fake designer goods by day and a lively atmosphere come sundown when the streets become jampacked with people partying into the wee hours. ✪Treat your body to a


VISIT BANGKOK

traditional Thai massage at the Conrad’s beautiful spa which consists of 11 private treatments rooms for men and women, offering a range of deep rhythmic massages of varying pressures to relieve muscle tension and stress – perfect after a hard day’s sightseeing. If you crave a more highend, air-conditioned fix away from the hustle and bustle, try the Siam Paragon luxury shopping centre where you can browse and buy the likes of Hermès, Cartier and Chanel before breaking for a bite at its superb food emporium – it’s filled with international cuisine. There’s a fantastic art scene in Bangkok showcasing inventive artists’ works inspired by the vibrant city itself. To see it, start at 100 Tonson Art Gallery. Set in a private house it exhibits both Thai and international contemporary artists or make for the Bangkok Art and Cultural Centre which focuses upon the country’s heritage through the medium of film, photography, theatre, sculpture and fine art. “ WHERE TO STAY InterContinental Bangkok 973 Ploenchit Road, ichotelsgroup.com Situated near the airport, this hotel also places you within easy reach of the bohemian area of Siam Square and luxury mall Siam Paragon. Suites at this business hotel are superstylish – and absolutely huge – providing a luxurious haven in which to unwind after busy days

in the city. Rooms from $153. The Sukhothai South Sathorn Road, sukhothai.com If you’ve a hankering after Thai charm, there’s few better spots to stay than this historic hotel. The building dates back to the 13th century and today the pretty boutique venue blends old and new to glorious effect with spacious rooms sat beneath lofty ceilings, sprawling manicured gardens and a gently lapping infinity pool. A real oasis in the midst of Bangkok’s chaos. Rooms from $214. ” WHERE TO EAT Bed Supperclub 26 Sukhumvit Road, bedsupperclub.com/Bangkok Go gourmet at this chic hangout, where you can savour delectable dishes like smoked salmon with pink ginger-guava vinaigrette amid glossy white interiors fit for a fashion magazine. Menus change monthly to keep goods seasonal and fresh and the adventurous eaters among you should opt for the ‘special surprise’ four-course menu, which uses the best ingredients of the day. From $50. Langsuan Road (12) 6 Langsuan Soi Keep things local and low key at this authentic and exceptionally delicious eatery which sees business people queue outside daily to get a taste of the inexpensive treats on offer. Top dishes include tasty green chicken curry, shrimp noodles and local fresh vegetables. From $2.

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A N YA AY O U N G C H E E

ON OUR RADAR!

ANYA

AYOUNG CHEE SPRING/SUMMER 2012 CONTRIBUTED

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nya Ayoung Chee recently announced her engagement to her long time boyfriend which put the HOTTT designers focus on Wedding Dresses, the kind that are easy, sexy, and beach-worthy (hint as to the location of the wedding!). In the meantime, Anya presents her line of Spring / Summer 2012 Limited Edition Navaho dresses. You can place your orders at anyaayoungchee.com/shop

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LOVE ADVICE

UNKISSABLE

LIP HIGHLIGHTERS FROM LONDYN NIKOLE! RENNE JENNINGS

“Expanding her expertise in makeup with her eponymous product line, the Londyn Nikole Collection will feature an assortment of durable and long-lasting cosmetics that will be released this year”

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L3’s own Londyn Nikole is constantly evolving as a brand, and now that brand can be found on your lips. Responding to the growing need for cosmetics that last and lip glosses that provide long-lasting wear without dullness or the constant complaint of stickiness, the celebrity makeup artist announced the pre-launch of her own eponymous cosmetics brand today, the Londyn Nikole Collection. Having professionally mastered her exquisite makeup artistry working with renowned celebrities in motionpictures, television, music and major media publications for a number of years, Londyn Nikole has taken note of the inside tips to perfecting the perfect lip gloss and produced the first of many products that will be released under her beauty brand. Unkissable, the first debut under the collection is a super hydrating, glossy and innovative line of lip products built on its tagline that, “beauty shouldn’t have to cost everything in order for you to achieve anything.” It will feature affordable lip lighters, a dual purpose lip gloss that glows under black light as the same color during the day and lip paint, an innovative and highly pigmented gloss that comes in eight fashionable colors while serving as a primer and gloss with vitamins A and E. Leave it to a true makeup enthusiast to know that a lip is not complete without liner. Unkissable will also feature lip slick, a put down liner, lipstick and gloss which alleviates the confusion of creating the perfect lip. Its the look of a lip liner with the color payoff of a lipstick and the beautiful shine of a gloss. Heavily inspired by her desire to ensure that all women have finished and signature looks, the Londyn Nikole Collection will debut its full launch campaign on March 26, 2012. Pre-orders can be placed from February 26, 2012 March 3, 2012 by visiting: www.LNCollection.com.

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LOVE ADVICE

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MISS FEBRUARY 2012

TANYA MALCOM Model: Tanya Malcolm Email: tanyamalcolm82@gmail.com Model Mayhem: http://www.modelmayhem.com/1302251 Photographer: Jerome Dupont Neu Era Photography.

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LOVE ADVICE

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LOVE ADVICE

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I N T E R N AT I O N A L A F FA I R S

INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS DJs WE LOVE TO HEAR SPIN AND YOUR EARDRUMS WILL FALL IN LOVE TOO! OLIVA LEWIS

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I N T E R N AT I O N A L A F FA I R S

LADY LOY With Lady Loy, music has no boundaries! Whether it be the energy of younger artists, or the timelessness of music made by industry veterans, this Lady selects the best every time! As a music presenter on the UK’s Jamrock Radio (Sunday’s from 8pm to 10pm GMT / 3pm to 5pm EST), Lady Loy has developed a reputation for entertaining listeners with old school, classic revives, golden oldies with a dash of modern Reggae and Dancehall vibes. In addition to great music, Lady Loy also adds artist interviews to enhance Jamrock Radio listener’s experience. Some of the people who have graced her airwaves include Papa Michigan (of Michigan and Smiley), Max Romeo and commentary on Lee scratch Perry! Lady Loy’s passion for music is also a reflection of her passion for the community! She is the editor of Blackbright News, a publication relaying the interests and activities of the African and Caribbean community in the UK. Connect with Lady Loy – UK Veteran Queen on Podomatic here: http://loyonlife.podomatic.com/

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T H E A LT E R N AT I V E B E AT

RODRIGO Y GABRIELA “11:11”

This song is the answer to all of your “11:11” wishes--yes, every single one of them. The dueling Spanish guitars of R y G revisit this track from their last album (of the same name), but this time there’s a twist: it’s remixed with a 13-piece Cuban orchestra straight from Havana called C.U.B.A. Arriba!

LADYSMITH BLACK MAMBAZO FT. MELISSA ETHRIDGE & JOE MCBRIDE “DIAMONDS ON THE SOLES OF HER SHOES”

This Paul Simon cover by the South African a cappella group LBM, alongside femme fatale Melissa Ethridge & the everjazzy Joe McBride will have you feeling the heat! You literally won’t be able to resist the catchy beats and uplifting vocals of this 9-man vocal band. Did I mention they’re nominated for a Grammy?

THE ALTERNATIVE BEAT

FRÁÇOIS & THE ATLAS MOUNTAINS “MUDDY HEART” Whether they’re singing in English or French, this bilingual band hits every note. Hailing from Bristol and then France, Fránçois is another internationally inspired musician whose music has the power to transport you, this time cycling through the French countryside, or sipping on a “café glacé” on a beautiful terrace.

ALLIE MASON

THE EXPERIMENTAL TROPIC BLUES BAND

THERESA ANDERSSON FT. PETER MOREN

I dare say, TETBB is second only to chocolate as Belgium’s top export. Far more “experimental” than they are “blues,” this trio from Liège takes you on a different kind of trip, if you know what I mean (wink, wink). With names like “Dirty Coq,” “Boogie Snake” and “D’Inferno,” they’re wacky to say the least. Consider yourself warned.

Swedish-born, with savory-sweet vocals and a multiinstrumental prowess, this fearless femme teams up with fellow a Swede, better known for being one-third of Peter Bjorn and John, on this über melodious number. Typically a one-woman band, utilizing not one, but two looping pedals, this duet was a risk that paid big returns!

“WORM WOLF”

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“WHAT COMES NEXT”


D I G I TA L D OW N L OA D S

DOWNLOAD

ON THE

CHAM LINDO P FT. MICHIE MEE 1 “Wine” 8 “Love” FROGGY MADD SQUAD JESSE ROYAL 2 “Sanctuary” 9 “Butterflies” SINGING MELODY KAYLA BLISS 3 “Collide” 10 “Rock n Sway” KAYSHA LEE BOUNTY KILLER 11 4 “Mr. “Prototype” Pol-Lu-Tician”

AMMOYE 15 “Radio”

RDX 16 “Hustle” 17 I-CIENT-CY “Empress” BIG MAN ZEST 18 “Dem Ah Pree” RUGS FT. 19 BUNNY MARCIAGRIFFITHS

“You Made Me So Very Happy”

KONSHENS AMY WINEHOUSE 12 “Do 5 “Our Sum’n” Day Will Come” J. WILL 20 “Bass Drop” CHUKY FT. GYPTIAN CHRIS DEMANTAGUE 6 “Just The Two of Us” 13 “Burning From The Heart” HEZRON KING ALI BABA FT. OCTAYNE 7 “She’s 14 All Woman” “Superstar”

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TOP 10 CHARTS

TOP 10 CHARTS

KONSHENS

RICO VIBES TOP 10 VIDEO PICKS FOR FEBRUARY

“DO SUM’N”

Compiled by Rico Vibes

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“ONE BY ONE”

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KONSHENS

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DELLY RANKS

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CHIPMUNK FT. MAVADO

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LAZA MORGAN FT. MAVADO

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MAVADO

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PROTEJE FT. KYMANI MARLEY “RASTA LOVE”

“DO SUM’N”

“COOK HENNESSEY”

“EVERY GYAL”

MR. VEGAS “BRUK IT DOWN”

“SETTLE DOWN”

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HEZRON

9

CHAM

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LAZA MORGAN FT. MAVADO “ONE BY ONE”

“SHE’S ALL WOMAN” “WINE”

JEMERE MORGAN “FIRST KISS”

CHAM “WINE”


NEW RELEASES

LOG ON NOW!

NEW RELEASES

REDESIGNED, LINDO P

Lindissimo

CHRIS SMITH A.K.A NIGHTMARE Hate On Us - Volume 2

KALIBANDULU & REP JA XXX MAS Remix CD 2011

REFRESHED, RELOADED & RELAUNCHED

DESTINY PIZ

Looking Into Your Eyes

SINGING MELODY

They Call Me Mr. Melody

KHEILSTONE MUSIC/AHTIK STUDIO & TALL KING PRODUCTIONS | Disorda Riddim

GERI D’FYNIZ

CONNECT WITH L3

B.A.M. (By All Means)

AMMOYE Radio

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ON BLAST

MUSIC ON BLAST

THE CHOP UP WITH DARQ! MARCUS WELLER

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t takes a lot to impress the Hip Hop audience. We’re tough critics, especially of yunguns who run the Rap route as opposed to the Hip Hop route. DARQ caught our attention, and hold our attention as an artist we have to keep our eye on. We’re kinda excited about this kids flava….

MW: It’s not unusual for us to see white kids into Hip Hop. We have Beastie Boy and Em as great examples. What drew you to this genre? D: The Beastie Boys and Eminem are both legends in their own right and the contributions they have made to Hip Hop have been game changing. As for me, it’s a little different having been born and raised in the Bronx. I grew up in the birth place of Hip Hop, so for me, rapping was engrained in my system. With that being said, I didn’t have much of a choice being placed in that genre. Nowadays it has become more and more usual to see white kids rapping. I don’t necessarily see myself as just a white rapper. I consider myself a Hip Hop artist who is just that nice. In Hip Hop, talent is talent regardless of skin color.

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ON BLAST

Your music video for the song RAW is what caught our attention. The video really show us the mind of a person gone over the edge. What inspired that song? The song R.A.W.(Risk it All Willingly) was written about the everyday struggle to follow your dreams. Amy Davis and I wrote this song together from a place of being ready to give up. The song asks the question, “is it worth it” and from start to finish it speaks about sacrifice and everything given up for this almost unattainable dream.

Hip Hop is based on the realism of life. What are or who are some of the things that inspire you and the music you make? I draw my inspiration from many places. My peers, my idols, and my children to name a few. At the end of the day, I take the most inspiration from life. My life and the lives of those around me. I feel that intertwining life and vulnerability in my music makes me a more relatable artist and will keep me relevant in the long run.

The Hip Hop market is very tough and competitive. What is it about your music that puts you on top? I agree completely, the hip hop market is very tough and competitive. I don’t feel, at this point in my career that I’m on top or exactly where I necessarily want to be, however, what separates me from so many, is probably the fact that I don’t just rap. I create timeless music, music that can change and impact others. Most artists bring different attributes to the table such as flow, swag, flash, etc. As for me, between my lyrical ability, the realism in my music, and the raw passion that drives my creativity will show in the very near future that those are the exact keys which will separate me from the rest.

What advice would you give other independent artists who are on the same journey as you? My advice to any independent artist who is grinding is to stay with it. Stay focused. And by any means, stay true to yourself. A lot of artists feel they need to be someone else to create music or to cater their sound to others to stay with the times. The more real an artist is with his audience, as the times change, your audience changes with you. Keeping the audiences attention is crucial to your survival in this industry and if you’re not real, your audience will know, will call you out on it, and in the end, you will lose them. Connect with DARQ via Twitter @DARQBXKID L 3 M A G A Z I N E . C O M | F E B R U A RY 2 0 1 2

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ON BLAST

LUNDEN DELEON CONTRIBUTED CONTRIBUTED

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Lunden De’Leon was born in Barbados, and at a young age Lunden’s family relocated to South Carolina. While in high school, Lunden yearned for what was outside of her familiar surroundings, so, with all the courage she had, she hitched a ride to Hollywood with only $200 in her pocket. “I was homeless for a short period of time in Los Angeles,” says Lunden. “I did not know what the future held but I was determined to turn my stumbling blocks into stepping stones.” Lunden soon found a roommate that changed her life forever. “I tagged along to a modeling audition with my roommate. I wasn’t interested in modeling or acting but when you’re hungry and penniless you’ll try anything to put food on the table. I got the audition. That same day I was signed to a one year modeling contract.” Fans recall first being introduced to Lunden as Joanne Mbutu on the hit television series Vital Signs. Years later, she catapulted that breakout role into a successful career with quite an impressive track-record by creating a number of unforgettable performances and starring in over fifty movies and television shows like the 20th Century Fox Movie The Ladies Room, Surviving Paradise, Fury, Faux-Pas, Cryptz, the HBO award-winning film Kickin Chicken and the NBC hit comedy “Just Shoot Me.” Lunden was soon voted by The Ave Magazine as “One of the Most Significant Women in Entertainment” alongside Halle Berry, Beyonce, Oprah Winfrey and many more. Featured in Forbes, Marie Claire, Entrepreneur Magazine, Business Week, Women’s Wall Street, Black Enterprise and many more, Lunden opened the doors to her Los Angeles based record label Dirrty Records making headlines around the world for releasing a punk remake of Jimi Hendrix’s classic Purple Haze. Lunden was inducted into the Caribbean Hall of Fame alongside such legends as Bob Marley and Sidney Poitier. Known for her compassion, confidence and inspirational achievements, Former Los Angeles Mayor James K. Hahn issued a special proclamation declaring February 7th as “Lunden De’Leon Day” in the City of Los Angeles. Her film production company, Palmetto Film Studios, makes and distributes 5-7 films a year. “I moved my record company to South Carolina and started a film production company to give back to my community,” says Lunden. “I’m blessed and believe in blessing others.” Look out for an upcoming interview with the amazing Lunden DeLeon!


ON BLAST

CHUKY FT. GYPTIAN BURNING FROM THE HEART

Walking the path through the Reggae fraternity with confidence, and with poise, Chuky makes his world introduction through the song “Burning From The Heart.” Teaming with multiple award winning and chart topping artist Gyptian, Chuky fuses acoustic Reggae with Lover’s Rock and a bit of a cockney accent to deliver this fan favourite. The song is taken from Chuky’s upcoming album ‘Welcome to the World Of …,’ which allows the new artist to seep into the bones of new fans who may not be familiar with the young talent. Listeners, especially the female ones, will LOVE this song. We also predict playing it in a dance / bashment will see lighters in the air in salute to a truly good chune. As a newbie on the scene, nice introduction! CONTRIBUTED

L3’s rating is 4 out of 5 L 3 M A G A Z I N E . C O M | F E B R U A RY 2 0 1 2

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ON BLAST

GAME RECOGNIZE GAME

VIRTUS MUZIK WAITING FI DI ALBUM

People outside of Italy may not know about this artist, but VirtuS is an artist you should take note of. Early this year, VirtuS released his new album ‘Waiting Fi Di Album’ which is XX tracks of reworked classic riddims produced by VirtuS. Some of the material was previously released, and other songs are original and new productions. There are several names that contribute to making this album a reality. Italian collaborators Bizzarri, B-dub, Can-I-Bis, Eleven Beats, Filomuzik, Greezzly, Random Production, Scara Soul Dub and Shiny D (BSide/Acoustic Impact). French collaboration comes via FuryBass and Ahoe records. Spanning all the sub-genres of Reggae music, VirtuS gives listeners a little Roots Reggae with tracks “Tek Care,” and “People Ah Fight.” Up tempo sounds come from “Girl Fi Life,” and remixed sounds of Roots Reggae over Hip Hop is found in the song “No Informer.” For those wanting true Dancehall chunes, they can get that with “She Nah Ready,” “Gangsta Nuh Good” and “Bun Til A Morning.” The last song “Bun Til A Morning,” was pressed on vinyl (collector’s item!), while “Ragga Music Inna Mi Life” comes from a riddim which features Yami Bolo and Million Stylez. As a foreigner doing Reggae and Dancehall, it’s tough to impress us but we are definitely impressed! L3’s rating is 4 out of 5

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MARCO

Bahamian artiste, producer and label CEO S’Voyce is ready for a new year and more success. First up on the agenda for 2012 is the release of his debut album “I Became Me.” The album will be released early in the year and has been anticipated by fans after the release of the singles “I Became Me,” “Don’t Give Up” and “Game Recognize Game.” “Game Recognize Game,” one of the artistes personal favorites, is based on a true story. S’Voyce says he ‘wanted to share a little of what was happening in my life socially and in my odd relationships.’ The artist says “I now use the lessons learned to guide me through life and look out for those who are trying to play games with my head or my heart. Now I know when someone is trying to use me, hence the title ‘Game Recognized Game.’” For 2012, S’Voyce plans to shoot music videos for himself and for fellow artistes as he plans to add video producer and director to his credentials. Local performances across the Bahamas as well as international shows are in the planning stages and S’Voyce hopes to travel more, meet fans in person and leave an impact with more live shows. Keeping busy as an artiste as well as a producer S’Voyce has recently produced the Spanish Ego Riddim and plans to start voicing Bahamian as well as Caribbean and international artistes. In a recent message to fans, the artist took time to thank every single person, fan and DJ who bought or otherwise supported his EP “Christmas Time Again” as the proceeds were donated to the Ranfurly Children’s Home in Nassau, Bahamas. L3 rating is 3 stars out of 5

HEIKE WOLLENWEBER


ROBERT GLASPER AH YEAH

ON BLAST

ANTHONY CRUZ CRUZ CONTROL

This song is definitely an intimate speed that brings out the essence of the love within. Glasper tickles the piano keys the way a woman would want to tickle her man – seductive enough that her dude would want to play back. Musiq Soulchild’s vocals are perfect and layered, and act as the introduction to the feminine in Chrisette Michelle. Ever present is Glasper on the piano which the song can’t do without. With his album ‘Black Radio,’ Mr. Glasper is positioning himself to step into the role of younger generation Quincy Jones. Having been in the Jazz genre for several years, and being 3 albums deep (Black Radio will be four) Glasper is the best we have, especially for the discussion of combining Jazz and urban sound. Rightly, this musician cannot be pinned to any one box as his forthcoming album looks at Hip Hop, R&B, of course Jazz, and even Rock, demonstrating how each genre can and should be appreciated by the other. We sampled the song “Black Radio” which features yasiin bey (Mos Def), and have to say that true Hip Hop aficionados will definitely bob their heads and say Hip Hop lives. Likewise “Afro Blue” featuring Erykah Badu will continue the head bob. We LOVE the movement Robert Glasper is on. He gives life to Hip Hop, stays true to his Jazz roots and shows us that we can be friends with Rock! His first single release from ‘Black Radio’ is “Ah Yeah,” which is exactly what we say when we hit repeat on the iPod! L3’s rating is 4.5 out of 5

CONTRIBUTED

Anthony Cruz has selected good songs, for good riddims and combined the two elements for his 3rd studio album entitled ‘Cruz Control.’ This mellow album containing a majority of Lover’s Rock classics takes listeners on a musical journey of Love, romance and spirituality. Using songs such as “So In Love,” “Real Hot,” and “Only The Father” Cruz hits the cruise control button as fans coast on music that touches the spot. Stepping out of his lane, Cruz dares the ventures of Dancehall with the chune “Top Gallis” letting fellow artists know he’s been doing his thing since when, and they should pay him the respect he deserves. We agree with the message, just not his choice of riddim on which the message was delivered. Coming back into his lane, Cruz’s final song on the album, “In Time You’ll See” is worthy of submission for ‘anthem of the year.’ The song is a plea to God to bless him and keep him on the right track. Emotions are heightened by the back singers who add a spiritual essence to the song. In addition, the beat of the song is like that of the heart beating causing an immediate connection with the listener. Most songs on Cruz’s album have been released as singles, however, “In Time You’ll See” makes the album worth the buy. L3 rating is 3 stars out of 5

CONTRIBUTED L 3 M A G A Z I N E . C O M | F E B R U A RY 2 0 1 2

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LOVE

ON BLAST

MONKEY BARRELL RIDDIM REVIEW CONTRIBUTED

In Dancehall, the group Ward 21 can do no wrong, and the Monkey Barrell Riddim (also called the Laughing Donkey Kong Riddim) is yet another example of the groups’ sure-step. With their history for releasing high grade riddims, the Monkey Barrell features veteran artists Red Rat (“Couple More Rounds”), General Degree (“Haul and Pull”), and Mr. Lexx (“Sickest Flow”) who maintains the standards they helped to set as far as Dancehall is concerned. One artist whose song stands out on the riddim is Point O’s “More Gyal.” The up and coming DJ celebrates women of all shapes and sizes while calling out their names and emphasizing the roles each of his girls play in his life. Roles such as the ‘linky,’ the ‘friend’ and the ‘dog’ can be found around the artist and feels no way to play the role of ‘husband’ to all these women. The way Point O plays off the structure of the riddim (which is beat heavy), it’s clear he understands how to get listeners involved in his music. Honorable mention also goes to Timberlee whose song “Prescription Make Up” has us nodding in agreement that there are some women who are just not worthy of being looked at and it’s not because of their physical looks, but because of their character. If you’re looking for pleasant surprises on the riddim, those can be found in Europe’s Million Stylez voicing on the riddim as well as a slew of upcoming talent. Bling Dawg’s focus on Jamaica’s plentiuous sunshine in his song “Life in The Sunshine” is based on the Roy Ayers original “Everybody Loves The Sunshine” which sounds HOTTT in this riddims mix! Monkey Barrell is in par with the greatness of the Cosa Nostra, Badda Badda, Bellyas, and other riddims produced by Ward 21. L3’s Rating is 4.5 out of 5

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LOVE ACHE RIDDIM REVIEW CONTRIBUTED

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There is a new Riddim Driven Album on the streets entitled the Love Ache Riddim which is receiving favourable feedback. Produced By Canadian underground dancehall reggae producer Damion “Matic” Hill and Jamaican songwriter/ Artist, Roger “G’ovany” Robinson, the Canadian – Caribbean co production hits the right notes. The 13 track album features songs that touch on realistic themes that speak to young and old audiences globally about striving for the right things in life, actions of some women and the movements of so called friends. The album was recorded at Rokwonstudios Kingston, Jamaica and mixed at Rokwon/Backroom recording Studio facility Canada. The album captures the vocals of internationally known reggae artists, Fanton Mojah, Wasp, Aaron Silk, and Suhverto. Also worthy of mention is G’ovany who also co-ordinated the project. Tishawn, Sir Ford and Jah Dane, are singled out for their contribution to the project along with Canadian / Jamaican deejay Albeeno. L3’s Rating is 2 out of 5


ON BLAST

CLUB DANCE RIDDIM REVIEW CONTRIBUTED

Don’t let the name of this album fool you! The music and lyrics have minimum to do with a club, and maximum to do with couples dancing in a dance as they rock and sway to the sweet Reggae grooves. Produced by one of Jamaica’s youngest veterans, Kemar McGregor, talents featured include Nadine Sutherland whose song “Truly Baby (Forever)” makes us want to hit the dance floor to groove with that special someone, as does Jamaica’s upcoming Nikesha Lindo who sings about “Caution” while offering her heart. Sinead O’Conner also lends her vocals to the album, rendering the song “How About I Be Me.” The singer gives the riddim her raw unabashed vocal side clearly felt in her lyrics “don’t start me talking about love,” and “I want to be a real full woman and live.” Two Canadian talents are featured also being Tony Anthony and Ammoye. Tony does well with “Living In Glory,” but without doubt, Ammoye shines brightly with “Radio.” With vocals performed as if she is at one with the riddim, the silkiness and sweetness of Ammoye’s voice causes listeners to rewind the song. Set to the backdrop of the living room, the vocal scene is one of a couple listening to music on the radio which is selected in such a way it becomes ‘baby making music.’ Our hint to this is heard when Ammoye sings “I want to feel your loving!” Kemar has definitely produced another good riddim! L3’s rating is 3.5 out of 5 Purchase the riddim here: http://itunes.apple.com/us/album/club-dance-riddim/id493639245

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LOVE ADVICE

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DG

DESTRA GARCIA MYDESTRA.COM NATASHA VON CASTLE

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estra Garcia is an amazing person and artist. Ms. Garcia was not born with a silver spoon in her mouth (although looking at her presentation, you would think she was.), but was born with a drive and determination to be the best, and the best she is. Unafraid to pursue her passions and goals, Destra knew from an early age that music is where she wanted to be, and where she belonged. Coming from a traditional Trinidadian family, Destra was encouraged to have a backup plan which she does. Much to her fans happiness, the back-up plan was never used, but might come to light one day in song. We are pleased to present one of Soca’s most exciting performers in a way like you’ve never known her before. Presenting this Soca Siren, and Queen, Ms. Destra Garcia.

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L3: You have a background in Business Administration in terms of education, but ended up singing Soca. How did that switch come about? DG: That in itself is a story. In the Caribbean, which is very traditional, parents don’t want to have their children have a career in music because it doesn’t pay well and can’t support financially etc. My parents were very encouraging of me and my music career, they just asked that I have a back-up plan by getting my education, so if anything I had something to fall back on. I studied, and I was supposed to be a Pilot. I did my physics, languages, math etc., and had everything in place to become a Pilot. When I finished Junior College, I decided I was going to get my Pilot’s license, but, at the time it cost $100,000 TT dollars which was too much for my parents, so I decided to work in an office. I moved up the ranks as it was a sales based job, and my personality suited sales. I also studied PR (Public Relations), as well as Marketing, but was always doing music on the side. Then, came my break. I was an adult by that time, and my Mom said ‘well, you’re an adult, and I really can’t stop you from doing music. You have your education so if anything happens, you have that to fall back on…’, when she said that, that was it.

I’M GOING TO TRANSFER THE ENERGY OF THE MUSIC TO THE PEOPLE

The business side of the music can be a little tougher for females in the business than men. Have you ever thought of recording a song that playfully expresses what you encounter in the boardroom when making decisions for your career? Well it’s something I’ll think about. This is a good idea, and will be good to touch on as not all females coming into the business have an easy time. I know I didn’t. At this stage where I am now, I no longer have problems, but you’re right, it would be good to sing a song about that. What is your earliest memory with music, and when did you know this was a career you wanted to pursue? When I started my journey in life, I was on stage since the age of 10, and that’s when I knew I wanted to sing. I love to perform and to entertain the fans – that’s where I do my thing, so I knew from early that’s where I wanted to be. We know as fans what we see when you perform on stage, but can you tell us what you feel when you’re on stage performing? Well, I love the stage. It’s a whole different ‘me’ when I’m there. I get star struck, and say to myself ‘I can’t believe I just did that, or wow, I didn’t know I could sing like that while jumping’ etc. The transformation in me takes place the minute I step on stage and immediately I know what I need to do. All of a sudden, I take control; I’m giving commands and I’m singing and everything that I do on stage is just normal for me. When I step off the stage, and I see other people perform, I get a little intimidated, and I look at those performers like ‘wow.’ That feeling hits especially when I’m about to perform new songs. As the Carnival season is here, I’ll be performing new songs, I’m hitting my second and third sets. At one point I was in the band room wondering how I’m going to trans-


fer the energy of the music to the people and get them to do what I want them to do. I was freaking out. But as soon as I get on stage, it’s something different. One of the band members said ‘D, when you get on stage, you’re going to do what you do. You’re worrying for nothing.’ and he’s right. When I get there – It just happens. You perform for thousands of people around the world on a regular basis. Have you ever had a funny experience with a fan that made you say ‘oh my God I can’t believe that just happened?’ Yes. There was one instance where I was calling girls on stage to dance with the musicians (this was in Canada too.), and one female came on stage and said ‘no, I want to dance with you.’ I was like what?. The next instance was in Miami. I was performing the song “It’s Carnival” and a man was bothering to come on stage and dance with me. That song causes a frenzy in the crowd as it is, so doesn’t really need stage work because it’s a fan song, but finally I said ok come up on stage. When he got on stage he wanted to wine on me so I told him no, its not that kind of song; this is a grab your flag and jump kind of song. I told him I want to see him jump and wave, and the crowd laughed with me to encourage him to jump and wave. All of a sudden,

he pulled my top down. Gasp. My boobs were out and I couldn’t believe he did that. I got ashamed, I got embarrassed, I got angry; everything was all in one. I took up the microphone and I started to beat him with the mic. By the time I came off stage, I thought to myself I can’t believe I just did that, but I beat him with the microphone. I was angry. A lot of things happen. It doesn’t happen all the time, but when it does happen, it stands out in my mind. Those two events I’ll never forget. Being featured on some of the hottest Soca riddims, and working with some of the greatest producers, do you ever feel pressured or stressed when it comes to making music? Yes it does. Stress, no, but pressure yes. I know ultimately I’m going to produce a good song, and I try my best to deliver at all times. I sit down with the producers personally, and if I can’t do it well, as in deliver the lyrics, or something is off with the melody, or I feel like I’m just reaching half way, I’ll pull in another writer or whomever I need so the song comes out great. Some people say it’s not good to work with many producers and writers because some are greedy etc., but I believe in having a wide collaborative effort. Working like that makes it better, especially when you have such a vast catalog, and so many fans. You cannot give them less than what they deserve. At the end of the day, not giving your best looks bad on you as an artist, so I have to give my best. Fans don’t hesitate to say ‘this song flopped, or the melody in this song doesn’t sound good, or this sounds off.’ I don’t want them to say that about my music because they deserve the best. When I put a song out there, I need it to be good. Every song I’ve released, was not released unless it was perfect. I have a song that was supposed to be released on Boxing Day (2011), but I would not release it. I kept tweaking it and tweaking it until it was right to me and perfect for the fans. The producer is saying the time is right for the song, but I’m saying I’m not releasing it until it’s perfect. Ok. You’re a perfectionist, and that perfection collectively comes to light via your new album. What can fans anticipate with that?. Well the album came out at the end of January which is right in time for Carnival season. It’s called My Destra dot come. We decided to call it


that because of the marketing album. The name alone is a call to action, so when people hear the name of the album, they will log on to the site. You have just relaunched your website www.mydestra.com. Tell us about some of the upgrades you’ve made to the site? We’ve added some cool features such as the blog feature, the photo gallery where we post pictures from the events where I’ve performed instead of fans having to wait for the pictures to come out in Newspapers or magazines. We’ve also added a video section where fans can watch videos, and they can interact and see what’s going on with Twitter all in the same place. This is my way of having the fans as up close and personal as possible on the site. We’ll also be doing giveaways at different times of the year such as Valentine’s Day and things like that so there are always activities for the fans to participate in, and there’s always new content being added so fans know what I’m doing all in one place. Your site is the ultimate hang out / lime for fans. It’s a central place where everyone is connected. And that’s what I love about the site. All these people have all these things in common, and one of those things is their love for me. The site unites everybody from all over the world so that is GREAT. (Destra smiles and playfully laughs). As the Carnival season kicks off in Trinidad, what are some of the things we can anticipate coming from you? Any tricks up your sleeve?. Tricks is me you know. This season I’m really going to keep it breezy. In the past I had dancers, and video screens and pre recorded footage for the screens to play while I’m performing which is all good, but I realized that my fans just really want me, so, this year, less of the grand production and more of me. Whether it’s a wine, a wuk up, a jab, a special jab, or me in the crowd with them – whatever it is, this year it’s me and the fans. One more thing, when I perform in Trinidad, I don’t get to be intimate with the fans, but this year I’m changing that. Normally I can be intimate in Canada, England all the other islands and not at home. This year I’m changing that, I’m going to be more intimate with the fans and I LOVE it. What general advice can you give our readers on

Life, Love, Lyrics? Life is short. We need to embrace it – both the good and the bad. Don’t settle for anything less than what you deserve in life. You have to maximize your life and make the right decisions. Sometimes you have regrets which are a part of life. Live to your full potential. Live every day to the fullest. Be healthy, see things and learn about the world. There’s so much we take for granted; whether it’s a flower outside, being able to run, anything and everything just don’t take things for granted. As for Love; love is great. Whether you’re in love or loving a family member, love is great. It’s great to receive, and it’s great to give love. Love goes hand in hand with life and living. You must always let people know you love them, and take their love when they’re giving it to you. Time passes so fast, before you know it, it’s been ‘x’ amount of years, especially when you get busy. So give and receive love every day, not just sometimes. Show that love to family and to strangers – it’s so important. You build memories based on love. And what can I say about Lyrics?. I may not be a lyricist like Bunji Garlin, but I do write about things I’m passionate about, and things that are important. Lyrics express your inner being, and there are different aspects to our inner being. There the sexy side of us, the sultry, the party, the loving; so many sides, and those come through in our lyrics.

connect with destra on every level at www.mydestra.com

Connect with Destra on every level at www.mydestra.com


CGJR.

CUBA GOODING JR. ON HIS ROLE IN RED TAILS MAARIE MOORE

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t is ironic that we sat just a few blocks from here in 1991 when Cuba Gooding Jr. Gooding, along with Laurence Fishburne, were promoting “Boyz ‘N the Hood” at the Mayflower Hotel in New York City. He was hanging with Morris Chestnut, who wasn’t that well known at the time and wasn’t doing interviews. “I’m just here to support Cuba,” Chestnut chuckled. In 1995 Gooding shared the screen once again with Fishburne in the HBO film, “Tuskegee Airmen.” Today, in an exclusive interview for his role as Major Emanuelle Stance in the monumental movie, “Red Tails,” Gooding discusses his journey to here.


THE ONES WHO ARE REALLY PASSIONATE ABOUT WHAT THEY DO ARE THE ONES THAT SUSTAIN.

MM: Cuba, what’s your staying power? CGJ: You know, I used to go, I don’t know, I don’t know. But the older you get, the more you start to look and ask yourself that question. I think the ones who are really passionate about what they do are the ones that sustain. There’s a passion there with me. I love moving people emotionally with these stories, and especially now. Remember when I first started the business, there weren’t a lot of roles we could be proud of and promote. I was being killed, especially with the black press, on some of these decisions that I made to make these movies. But I was like, ‘Man, that’s all we have.’ So you guys are breaking my balls on movies that I had to fight other black actors to get and you’re telling me I’m holding us, as a nation back. I’m like, ‘What the Hell? I’m trying to work. I’m trying to live.’ Like Elijah says in the movie, ‘I’m trying to live.’ So now it’s like when roles come down the pike like this, they gotta figure out, ‘Ok, are we’re going to green light this movie?’ Did you think you would be traveling this road again when you did ‘Tuskegee Airmen’? Well, here’s the thing. When we did the first one, George Lucas announced he was doing a movie on the Tuskegee airmen

while we were in pre-production. We went into production and he did a second one and put it on the shelf. And I was pissed ‘cause I was like, ‘Aah man, we were supposed to do it that way, not this small way.’ But now, I look back on it and it was God’s will that we did the HBO film. At the time I didn’t understand and I’ve had a few wonderful talks with George since then and he’s like, ‘It wasn’t time for me to make it then. I didn’t have the technology that I have now,’ and I totally understand and agree with him. Did you know about the Tuskegee Airmen before the movies? When I auditioned for the first one I was embarrassed and frustrated cause I didn’t know who they were and I was then 21, 21. I was the most educated, I thought, having just finished school. I didn’t know anything about the Buffalo Soldiers, the Black Marine Corps group, or the Harlem Hellcats. I didn’t know about these men. I didn’t know that every single major American war effort, that the history of America has had blacks in it from the Indian wars to the Civil war, to World War I, always. Every American conflict has had a black participant in it. So yeah, it was eye opening


Do you see a parallel of the story of Red Tails to this century? Absolutely, darlin’! Let me tell you. I was in Beirut, Lebanon and this old lady came up to me and she said, ‘I love the diver movie.’ People are ready for these stories today because they’re dealing with the same issues that these men dealt with back then, you know. It’s so relevant today. Even with a black man in the White House, opposing candidates’ agenda are not the issues, but making him a ‘one time’ president reinforces your observation. I just watched the movie again the other day and it was the first time it hit me that it was like a modern day ‘Boyz ‘N the Hood.’ People are dealing with the same issues whether it’s France or the UK. I do, however, think this movie is very healing in that so many prisons are filled with black men who feel, ‘I came from nothing and I might as well end up nothing.’ No, you didn’t! You came from royalty, bro! You came from majesty and you have to understand that. If they don’t tell you, you won’t know. If you don’t know, you don’t grow. It’s time for us to grow, I think. Are there now better roles for black actors? Ten times better. It’s not anywhere near where it should be. The fact that we shot this movie in 2009 and it’s coming out in 2012

without any studio involvement is a big deal. Twentieth Century Fox finally helped George realize his vision, but you know, you would think that between then and now there would be three or four of these movies. But I think they are all waiting to see how this one does. It’s also an action movie. It’s a roller coaster ride. He {Lucas] said he made it for little boys and he really did. This is a throwback to the old clops and robbers movies and we just got blessed as a nation that this is also a film that educates us on these American warriors. Whenever I see troops I say, I got a movie coming out as my gift to you. I don‘t care what color they are. This is for them. This is to celebrate them as men and women, white men and women, Asian men and women who fight for our armed services. This is our love letter to them because it’s no easy thing that they do. They risk their lives for the freedoms they provide for us and it’s brilliant. Will we ever see you behind the camera? Yes, you will. So you want to write and direct? That’s the end goal. “RED TAILS” OPENED IN THEATERS THIS FRIDAY, JANUARY 20.


YC

DJ YOUNG CHOW BRINGING TRINI HEAT NATASHA VON CASTLE

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J Young Chow is the epitome of a dream that’s come true: get paid to do a job you LOVE to do. Chow works, plays, learns, and is inspired by music. Music is his blood; if you don’t bleed the same way, you might not understand. His Father, King Chow is the same way; Father passed the blood on to the son. Playing for thousands of people at any given time, Chow has the right selection and the right timing which ultimately gives him the right results. The results come not from the swag that Chow exudes with every movement, but the results come from his respect for music. Considering the fact that DJ Young Chow is young (23), his professionalism (showing up to events on time, making sure paperwork is in order before moving forward with projects and not being associated with anything that will tarnish his image) makes him the DJ of choice for people in the events industry, and for fans. Did we mention the fact that he performs on the #1 radio station in the world, HOT 97 FM in New York?


We sat down with Chow in New York, and this is what he has to say… L3: You are young, successful and the centre of attention. Can we say you’re living your dream right now? YC: Actually I am living my dream right now – it couldn’t get any better than this, and I couldn’t be happier! We’ve read about your Father’s influence over you in terms of becoming a DJ. Can you see music continuing with your children when you have them? Of course! There’s a thing called music that runs in the blood and veins of our family! My sister DJ’s as well – she goes by the name Princess Chow, my brothers are in music too, so I know my kids are definitely going to take it on as well.


What advantages would you say your Fathers influence has given you regarding how you move within the business side of the industry? Watching my Father do his thing was definitely a big influence on me because as a kid watching him do what he did, and what he loved to do, motivated me to get involved. It motivated me to want to learn more and do more, and I actually took everything he taught me, and developed it into something more. My job as the junior is to transform what he did and make it bigger and better. That shows that I’ve absorbed everything he taught me, and added my generations style, which puts us ultimately more advanced than where he was. I think that’s the advantage I have – I can take what he did, and add to it! Some DJ’s don’t place importance on education, but you do! How important is education from a school perspective, and from a street / music history perspective? Intelligence and education is the key to all aspects of life. The more intelligent you are, the more you’ll be able to grasp new ideas and new innovation. You will be able to perfect what you’re doing because not only are you practicing and doing the practical, you’re learning the fundamentals of it at the same time. You MUST have an education. I love to learn. I went to junior high school, high school and college and loved every minute of it. Not only did I like to learn, I like to teach people as well. That is one of the best parts to learning, is being able to share that knowledge with others so they know too! What did you study in College?! Business Management. How has your Trini – Canadian – Chinese background influenced how you hear, select and play music? Yeah that’s a good question! Coming from the background that I come from, I was exposed to all types of music. Everything you can think of, I heard it! Starting in Trinidad & Tobago, I heard all types of Soca, and not just Soca, but groovy Soca, Calypso (and yes, there is a difference between Soca and Calypso), Ragga etc. Even though it’s all called Soca, we have different types with different tempos. Being Canadian and American allowed me to learn more about Hip Hop music. Now when it comes to New York, the whole of the West Indies is in New York as in we have Bajan, Bahamians, Guyanese, Jamaican’s, Trini’s, Vincentian – everybody is here, so I had to play Soca, Reggae, Pop, Techno, House – everything because there are so many people here with so many different tastes. Having those cultures around me, I had to become educated as to the fact that people have different tastes, and I had to learn to play for those tastes. Being exposed to all that music from early, helped me, and helps me when I play. So we can fly you anywhere in the world and you could read the crowd and play?! Definitely, let’s go! I just came back from Romania last month (December, 2011), where I played Pop and Techno the entire night. I didn’t play any Soca, Reggae, Hip Hop – none of that. Straight Pop and Techno!


Was that your first time going to Romania? Yes, First time in Romania, second time in Europe. Was playing in Romania everything you thought it would be? What was it like? Because I had already been to Europe, I knew what to expect, but playing in Romania was definitely great. I love the reaction the audience gave me when I played! Romanian women are more aggressive than American women because they like American guys. There’s just something about us that they like, and aren’t afraid to let us k now they like us too! Everybody loves something different I guess! You are known for ‘mixing up’ the ladies whenever you play. What is it about women and the dance floor that you connect with why you automatically have this effect?! Women love me, and I love women! Once I’m in a party filled with women, I’m always going to the best, and the best is to get them dancing and happy! I strive to please women – they have such an impact on my life! The more women, the better; the sexier they are, the better. All of that is motivation! Mixed CD’s are a huge part of promoting yourself as a DJ and gaining fans. How many Mixes do you put out at any given time? I do 4 mixed CD’s per year that is promotional, and I do 1 mixed CD that’s just for my birthday party. The titles are “Spectacular,” “No Stopping Me,” “Soca Mix” and “Hip Hop Meets Reggae.” All are available on my website www.djyoungchow.com


Which artists, in any genre, are a ‘must play’ for you right now? Nicki Minaj, Vybz Kartel, Lil Wayne… If we could give you access to any 3 artists, and have you A&R the artists and production, which would you, select for a collaboration? Vybz Kartel, Drake and Buju Banton Have you ever heard a record that you just had to play but came from an unknown artist? 1st Lady is doing real good right now – she’s next to blow. There’s a lot of talent out there, in time they’ll blow! Your website www.djyoungchow.com brands you well and keeps fans connected via Twitter feeds, music downloads, mixtape downloads etc. Is the site an example of how important your fans are to you? Yes it is. That is the reason why I keep the site updated and I let the fans know everything that’s going on with me through videos, Twitter feeds etc. Fans can know everything in one spot at one time! Playing on HOT 97 is a HUGE and good look! Playing for HOT 97 has affected me in a really big way. My clientele grew to an enormous audience because of the station. I’m based in New York, and yes I have fans in Trinidad and Canada etc., but being on HOT suddenly opened me to the whole world. So many people from so many countries listen to the station all the time – around the clock – so playing for the station is definitely a blessing! It’s a good feeling and I love it! Companies who want urban exposure often turn to DJ’s to rock their shirts, pants, shoes etc. Are there any plans for you working with a company in terms of your endorsing a company? I’m open to the idea, but it has to be a brand I like! Do you have plans to go into music production? I do! This year, 2012, you’ll be playing a lot of global dates as in different countries. Are you excited?! Yes I am - real excited! Your crew includes your brothers Chinese, Spin Citi, Hyper Leon, Princess Chow and Juke Box. Out of all of you, who cracks the most jokes, and, if you were stranded on Gilligan’s Island, who’s most likely to find food to cook?! The funniest and cracks the most jokes is definitely Chinese! All day, every day he stays on cracking jokes. As for Gilligan’s Island, I would be the one to get food and cook! What can you cook?! Everything! I’ll come and cook for the ladies in the L3 Office, but I want something in return! LOL! What general advice can you give readers and fans about Life, Love, and Lyrics? Love your life and love yourself. If you don’t love yourself, how can someone love you? Love your life too. If you don’t love your life, make changes so that you do – that’s why you’re here on earth – to live a life you love. As for lyrics, take time and perfect your work no matter what it is. If you’re a singer, DJ, janitor, whatever, you have to perfect your work and be the best. Also, don’t stop learning – that’s the key! MAKE SURE YOU STAY CONNECTED WITH YOUNG CHOW VIA WWW.DJYOUNGCHOW.COM


IG

IWER GEORGE MR. TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO NATASHA VON CASTLE

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t is said that when God trusts a person with a mission, he makes sure that his representative receives all materials to complete the mission. When God trusted the Kingdom of Soca to Iwer George, he included a heavy plate of armor. The armor is divided in two: one side for the earth battle, and another side for the spiritual battle. Iwer, having all the experience in the world, interchanges his armor when necessary. When I spoke to Iwer, it was early in the morning (7am TT time to be exact). The veteran artist was not wearing armor; rather, he was ready to share information. It is through that sharing of information, fans understand why God trusts him with this special genre of music. He is a man of integrity. Iwer George is a warrior, and his music is the weapon that unifies the kingdom so that events operate in a certain order. I can’t tell you enough about this exceptional man, so I’ll let him speak for himself.


Presenting Iwer George… L3: When Soca fans and Trinidad & Tobago patriots think of Soca, they think of Iwer George. When you create music, do you create it thinking about Soca, or do you create it as a musician thinking about music without a genre in mind? IG: When I create my music, I already know that I’m creating Soca and Soca only. I don’t believe in cross over because there is no place for cross over in the world of music. I think 100% of Soca, and my whole intentions is music for people to enjoy, jump up, wave, wine up – you know; just Soca music to make the people happy. We can comfortably say you have been performing Soca for the past 25 years. Comparing when you began, to where the genre is today, are you happy with its advancements? I am 100% happy, and one of the reasons I am happy is because we’ve been able to spread all over the world. We’re appreciated by so many people. You are particularly concerned about the foundation of Soca. In an interview earlier last year (2011) you were specific about connecting with and including what you call the ‘grassroots.’ Approximately 1 year later, what are the initial results of that movement? We were able to execute that mission in months. The real problem was that Soca music in Trinidad & Tobago, which is the Mecca of Soca music, was being played as a seasonal thing where the big stations would play Soca from Christmas to Carni-


val and come Ash Wednesday, everybody goes back to their business as normal and forgets that we have Soca.

fans take it and run with it and make it spread to all corners of the world.

Some years ago, I launched a radio station (Soca 91.9 FM) which is 100% Soca. Within seven months of those two years we were able to affect all the other radio stations that weren’t playing Soca music outside of the Carnival season, to increase the amount they played from nothing, to five percent, then ten percent, then fifteen percent because when we launched the station, we did so three months before j’ouvert. We were able to get two percent of the listeners across the country in days, and everybody (the other major radio stations) panicked which caused those stations to change their formats. Even the DJ’s in the clubs who were not playing Soca began to play Soca.

I’ve been fighting an uphill battle, but, if radio stations don’t play the song I release, when I perform that song on stage for the fans, they take it and they go with it and they make it a hit. What I’m saying is the fans are the formula for success.

In my opinion, this was ridiculous. Living in a country where this is ‘your’ music, you cannot go to a club where for nine months in the year you’re not hearing Soca, that did not make sense, and that had to change. Now in Trinidad, every club plays Soca. When Soca comes on, the people really ‘bruk out’ as they say. We were able to execute that in seven months. I paid a hefty price for that, but I trust in God that good will over shadow evil. As much as they tried to fight me for that, and stifle my career because of that, the good always overshadows the evil. Soca has allowed you to travel to many countries around the world. Have you ever been to a non-Caribbean country whose similarities culturally resemble Trinidad & Tobago? I’ve been to Nigeria, and I recognize that the music is very close to Soca, and Soca does very well there. Also, when I went to India, Soca music is the same meaning that the chutney side of our music has origins in India. Our music, Chutney Soca, does well there to. My eyes have really been opened because of travelling. I went to Australia and I met people who don’t have Caribbean links, and to see them appreciate Soca in Australia is unbelievable. When I went to Japan it was the same thing! Some of the biggest support for Soca music comes from Japan. It’s just amazing to see. When I went to Germany for World Cup, after Trinidad played England and lost, we performed on the same stage and thousands of people, some of them hearing Soca music for the first time and connecting with it is unbelievable! Turning to your music, you’ve been on the lips of fans, radio and media consistently over the years. Would you say you’ve developed the formula for Soca success? Yes I would say so. What makes it last is that some people don’t think I have that formula, and they ignore me. By ignoring me, they give me the space and the opportunity to prove myself. That is the reason why, when I release a song, in two days time it’s gone in the sense that the

Calypso allows and expects that the lyrics in a song deliver a message. The message usually is about politics, but can include comments towards society. If we asked you to compose a Calypso song, would the message be about politics or would it be a social commentary? Well, what I do with Calypso, before I go there, we must understand that Soca is the music; the composition, the writing; all of that has never moves from Calypso. What I do is I write Calypso to a Soca beat. What I write is Calypso. For example ‘Ah plan stop sing Soca, and go and live in Greneda … when ah lie down in my bed, jab jab singing in ma head….’ Those are Calypso lyrics, because of the way in which they rhyme, and because of what I’m singing about, which have been placed or performed to a Soca beat. Regardless of what you’re talking about, that is the format of Calypso. Right now I’m doing Calypso riding on a Jab Jab beat. In 2010, a popular radio station in Trinidad limited the airtime it gave one of your songs which was competing for the Monarch. You decided to withdraw from competing that year. To outsiders, that was considered a bold move, to some insiders, that was a gesture of not being afraid of the ‘Soca mafia’ that some allege exists. What do you say about that? When Carnival is going on, and we come to that last week and the artists are selected as to who is going to compete in the Soca Monarch, the promoter of the Monarch will make sure the music of the competitors are played on all the stations. What made the situation one that required that action, is the official station sponsoring the Monarch competition, as in the station that the most listeners are listening to (as they had the Monarch tickets for people to win, and the inside


information on what is going on with the competition etc.), was not playing the music of one of the competitors. What that translates to is the station has a hidden agenda. They are obviously trying to get to me prior to getting on stage. I ended up between the sea and the rock. Now remember I live by the words of the almighty God. I believe in certain things, and one of those things is that you must never mash up that which you build. I ended up in a situation where I couldn’t come out (in public) and say that I didn’t want to compete because of what was happening as that would mash up what I’ve been building, so, I just didn’t show up the night of the competition. I had to tell the promoter that if this radio station continued that practice ion the future, me as a veteran who has been there for so long, publicly sent in my resignation, instead of just dropping off the show and have it get a bad name, or go to the press and have them bash the integrity of the competition, I did what I did. Within a year, it was corrected, and time heals wounds. The next year, the promoter moved that station from being the official station of the Monarch. I had to stand firm because if that trend continued, there would be a lot of problems in the future. Now, we’re at a time where some radio personalities are also artists; they’re singing too which is dangerous. A man (meaning a radio personality / DJ) could pull a man’s chune (not play another artists’ song), because a man (the radio personality / DJ) feels a man (the artist) is a threat to him. We can’t have that. In order to save the face of everybody, it couldn’t go that way. I took a loss. Once you make the Soca Monarch you’re guaranteed to make $100,000 TT dollars for sure. I sacrificed $100,000 to make a statement. I would like people to see this as another one of my sacrifices for Soca music. If I wasn’t who I am, I could have never sacrificed that. Every radio station now does not play with this issue. Last year’s Soca Monarch competition had an unexpected outcome. Your fans felt you were robbed of the title, and based on this years’ song “No Pain,” you agree with your fans and are outspoken about your feelings. Does the critics’ talk of your song being disqualified this year faze you at all? No. I know the song is not the same. Just by saying the song is similar makes the song the #1 song of the land. This now makes people want to listen to it. When the song came out, Mr. Machel Montano started spreading that propaganda and I think he tried to plant that in people’s brain so that he could weaken the song. Me an mih Jab Jab people waiting fuh he nah (the thick Trinidadian accent comes out) to deal with his propaganda that the song is like last years’ song. But, there are a lot of people out here who might not be a musician, but in school, they went to music school and know that the only way the song can be the same song is if the chord structure is


the same, I’m singing the same lyrics and the beat is the same beat. This years’ song has a different beat, and I’m singing about a whole different story. I can’t believe Machel Montano thinks he could look at one country, no, scratch that, look at the whole world, and think he guh fool everybody. Blatantly – in front of all the cameras and fool everybody. That is a star ting. He really thinks he could do that?! The song captures the last moments of Carnival / Soca Monarch 2011. It re-invokes a spirit that tells the pain that people suffered last year as a result of the Soca Monarch. I don’t have to say anything because I get to realize that the people are talking about it. What I also have come to realize I feel Machel Montano and the Soca Monarch committee paid a very hefty price for that decision. The song “No Pain” has been uploaded on several outlets via YouTube. On one channel, you’ve had over 105,000 views in 5 weeks, and that’s just one channel. Any thoughts regarding fan feedback to the song based on the views? All I will say is that the people are speaking, and you cannot go around what they are saying which is “when Jab Jab in yuh brain, yuh feel no pain.” That’s all I said and everybody starts to get frighten. I never bashed anybody; I never called anybody outside of their name. All I said is “if you know they robbed me last year put your 2 hands in the air.…” We didn’t pelt down the stadium – which is the most honorable thing for my fans. We never caused a riot in town. “When Jab Jab music enter we brain, we just don’t feel no pain.” I think the lyrics is what’s really hurting them more. They can rob me, but I ent feelin nuttin (the Trini comes out again). In addition to being a successful artist, you are also a very successful business man. Is the art of business a part of your DNA as in you come from a family of business men / women? No but when I get into the entertainment business I know that the only way I could grow is if I keep multiplying. My ultimate goal is to subsidize my onstage income with my outside stage income. If I make $100 per month on stage, I have to make $100 per month when I’m off stage so I can maintain my same lifestyle when I am no longer on stage. The only way I can do that is if I invest properly. I was a tailor before, so that gave me the discipline I needed in business. From there I opened a grocery store, I had a few taxi’s on the road, then I went into real estate, then the media business (the radio station), and now Trinidad’s first cruise liner / party boat. With

I, ME MYSELF IS IWER GEORGE THE PERFORMER. THERE IS NO SEPARATION, AND THERE IS NO ‘ACT’ WHEN I’M ON STAGE. THAT IS EXACTLY HOW I AM. ME ON STAGE IS JUST NATURAL.


each business, I had to multiply. Of all the businesses to open, you decided on a radio station? Why radio as opposed to the many other facets of the music industry you could have invested in? I opened the radio station for two reasons. When I came home from touring one year, I saw all the veteran Calypso artists, Black Stallin, Duke, all of them marching down the street. So I asked “why are they in the street marching?” Then I realized they had some placards, and they were marching in front of a radio station. They were marching because they wanted 50% airplay. I felt bad because I didn’t go in the march. I was hurt, but I it stuck in my head and I felt I had to march too. I don’t believe in marching. I believe that marching is another form of slavery. We’ve come out of slavery for a long time; we can’t go back to that. I applied for a radio station license the next week. I did some research and put my application together. I looked for one to buy, but no one was selling so I applied for the license. Some guys went in front of the 96.1 FM radio station, opened fire, and shot it up. They did this because they weren’t getting any airplay. The marching propelled an energy that wasn’t good for business at all because in our country, most of the artists come from communities known for crime. This means, they come from where the guns come from. That incident with 96.1 getting shot up, I took that mantle on myself to make sure that never happens again ... ever. When we opened, we had an open house where people could lime in front of the building, they (the artists) could come inside the building, submit their music, talk to us etc., and Natasha, we have never had an incident. No one has ever complained to government that they’re not getting airplay. We’ve never had anyone march in front of the station because they’re not getting airplay. There has been no criminal conduct where the station is concerned. I handled that for myself, and all the evidence is there. Those things have never happened. If that ever did happen, we would lose our business and we couldn’t have that happen. We had to nip that in the bud immediately. I thank God for the strength and power to be able to handle that mission. You are the right man for the job. You are the example. You are the person we can trust. We can trust your leadership and your vision. We can trust the fact that you are so spiritually grounded – you are going to make the right decisions. With you being that right person, that right leader, why would you step down as the

CEO of the radio station? I stepped down for two reasons. One, as the CEO at the radio station I was holding three portfolio’s; two, we just bought a cruise ship, and that job requires most of my time as right now, I am the only person who can manage that project. We’re getting ready to launch the ship which is very demanding - that’s why I stepped down. I can’t do the two. I prayed about it (stepping down at the radio station), and not long after prayer, Brian Haynes left the position he had and came over to our radio station. One thing I do want to share with the readers is that Choral Vision, the cruise ship, is a division of the radio station – it’s still one umbrella. We read on a popular website that ‘Iwer George is the yardstick against which Dancehall Soca is measured.’ Are you bothered with the sub-definition ‘Dancehall Soca’ or would you prefer ‘Soca?’ I prefer Soca, but I understand what that writer is saying. The comment was actually made 15 to 20 years ago when Soca was going through a faze with the influence of Dancehall. Music is like that; it goes through a lot of fazes. One of the characteristics we’ve noticed about your stage performance is your charming personality! How much of ‘you’ is on the stage when you perform?! I, me myself is Iwer George the performer. There is no separation, and there is no ‘act’ when I’m on stage. That is exactly how I am. Me on stage is just natural. Still with your stage performance, how does it feel to see thousands of people jump in unison to your music, especially when you’re performing live on stage such as the Soca Monarch competition? Band members even jump with you while playing instruments! I personally feel it’s the hand shake; the direct handshake from the Almighty God. To be able to have that power, to go on a stage and have 20,000 plus people moving is no different from Elijah Mohammed making a statement to the Nation of Islam, or the Pope or a Pastor. Power is power. When you have a bad side, face, you have a negative and a positive. The real side of the bad face is the positive side that has the power. Being able to move people is a power. This is a special blessing from the Almighty God to be able to do this. What general advice can you give readers about Life,


Love and Lyrics? You must never do things in your yard, meaning you must never ‘doo doo,’ where you sleep. If you sit home on a Sunday, eating your nice macaroni pie that your Wife made for you, and you feel you need to go to the bathroom, you don not go to the bathroom with your plate. Rest your plate on the table and go to the bathroom. My theory is you do not ‘doo doo’ where you eat. Don’t act foolishly where you work. That is the place where you earn your income. If you’re a person who earns revenue from the corner, don’t cause a scene on the corner because the Police will come and lock off the area where you are earning your income. Don’t be foolish. Not only do your actions affect you, it also affects the people who work with and around you. The day may come that you need their support, but can’t get it because you decided to ‘doo doo’ where you eat. Don’t do it! For Love, if you’re not feeling it from inside, you cannot pretend to Love. This is something that happens to you from inside. Don’t force it and don’t pretend. For lyrics, no comment … yet! Stay in touch with Iwer through Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/IwerGeorge


C MR. CHIN

ONE OF THE CAYMAN ISLANDS BEST TRICIA SPENCE

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n the middle of December 2011, I had the opportunity to unleash my deejaying skills in Grand Cayman. Jamaica and The Cayman Islands (Grand Cayman, Cayman Brac and Little Cayman) have always had a close relationship, they once being a dependency on Jamaica (circa 1863); Administrative links only being broken in 1962 when Jamaica gained Independence from the United Kingdom. That aside though, The Cayman Islands (with a population of under 50,000) has a fair percentage of Jamaicans as residents there, estimated at about 20% of the population so the cultures do bear some similarity. While there though, it was quite obvious that Dancehall and Reggae were highly appreciated by the radio listeners (with cars blaring them from their speakers) and party-goers getting energized at the beats. When I arrived, I was hospitably greeted by popular Promoter, Famous Guss, who had mentioned a young artiste he felt had

great potential. He handed me a CD with the artiste’s song and dropped me off at the hotel. As I got in my room, I booted up my laptop and had a listen to this young artiste; I thought to myself, Famous Guss was actually right. Fast forward, a few hours later and I’m at Club 7 to throw it down with Operator TNT and Slata Rich. The club is filled with people of all ages, bouncing and bopping to the multiple genres that were jumping at them from the bass thumping speakers. While at the console, I thought to myself, “well lemme see how popular this artiste is”, so I loaded the song on the deck and to my surprise the patrons loved his song, so much so I had to pull it up 6 times. It just so happened that the artiste and the producer happened to be in the club and came over after the party had ended to express their appreciation. We had an animated discussion into the morning and I just knew I had to expose them to the world.


Allow me to introduce you to Mr Chin. TS: Cayman is less known for music than it is for Turtles and Off Shore Banking, so how did you get into music? MC: Music is in my family. I grew up watching my father perform in various bands and play the guitar around the house. In my early life my older brother was also a strong influence, he became a DJ in the early 90’s and started one of Caymans first sound system - Renegade. Is music what you’ve always wanted to do? Yes! Music has been a dream of mine from an early age. As a teenager I started out with a few friends of mine trying to form a sound system following in my brother’s footsteps. After being not as successful with the sound systems I decided to get into the car sound industry - creating Sound Impaq - and spent many weekends doing sound clashes against other car sounds. I even went as far as purchasing my own dub plates from various artists. What was the appeal of music? Music is an art! To be able to listen to a piece and recognize the different instruments to me is very intriguing. Then the feeling that you get from the harmonies and the emotions from the artist takes it to a whole different level. There are people who sing and then they are people who sing and the difference is always evident in the way they express themselves through words, melody and tones. We don’t hear of many producers out of the Cayman Islands, so how challenging is it to find a good production & engineering team to work with? It is extremely difficult to find a production team here because of our size and limited individuals in the industry. Also those that are interested in music tend to lean towards hip hop which adds to the challenge in itself. Fortunately for me, I guess you can call it luck or good karma, a few of my friends also were influenced in various ways by the music industry and therefore we more than often take it upon ourselves to work together enhancing whatever areas fit our niche. As for on island engineering, not many people have mastered the art of mixing and few have the capable equipment.


How is the local production scene in The Caymans? Over the past few years the production scene here has grown; again this could be attributed to the many young hip hop artists that are making their way into the music industry. In comparison to years gone by, we are much further in production than some might expect. How would you describe your style and who are some of your influences? Three of my greatest influences are, my brother, Sizzla and Damian Marley. My brother played a huge role. He started me out with the foundation of reggae. Being significantly older than I am, we grew up in different eras and I was exposed to some of the fundamental moments in history through his passion for music. Sizzla has a great way of expressing himself through his music and more than often keeps it real and positive. Over the years you can see the transformation and growth of his character through his music. Damian Marley, however, through the style and flow of his music is certainly what has captured me; especially the riddims that his production team comes up with, not to mention his stage show presence and his confidence. All in all he is a well rounded performer and I look up to him and the heights he has taken career to. You seem fairly young and many young people are big on social media and technology to promote their music, do you think technology is harming the music more than it is aiding it? Technology in itself is good and in today’s world we are truly useless without it. However for the music industry it plays some great roles and some negative ones as well. As far as promotion goes, the technology today is next to none, for instance, a new artist like myself can readily put music out on the internet for the world to access and this in turn brings awareness to who I am and what I’m about as a musician. With that said, for those artists out there who already have albums out that they are promoting and hoping to have high sales for, technology completely blows them out of the water as consumers can also go online and download just about anything that appeals to them for free.

EMOTIONS FROM THE ARTIST TAKES MUSIC TO A WHOLE DIFFERENT LEVEL

Who is guiding your career? I’m truly a one foot soldier at this point of my career but I do find most of my guidance and support comes from my fiancée. How important is Teamwork in developing an artist’s career? Teamwork is absolutely essential! Having a team that is focused and aware of their individual roles and dedicated to live up to their requirements is key in this industry. It becomes very difficult to have a person around that can do the job, but that’s not their main focus or drive. In order to be a success everyone on board needs to have the same vision in sight.


What are you working on right now? Over the past few years I have built up quite a selection of music, all reggae but some more hype than others. Lately I have started working on more culture music, in particular songs dedicated to mothers and women in general, for me this is almost like a growth in character and appreciation towards life. Where do you see yourself in 5-10 years? I see myself being known globally. It is a dream of mine to tour the world and have a supportive fan base and a professional management team. I look forward to spreading love and unity as one to people through my music. What are you doing to ensure you get there? Right now my greatest dedication has been time. I’m more focused now than I have ever been and I spend a lot of my time in the studio writing, voicing and meditating. I believe in quality and don’t just allow anything that comes to mind to end up in a song. My music comes from the heart and I make sure that when I’m done with a song I can look back at it and feel pride in the work I have put in. What can be done to make the Cayman Music Production scene more present on the international level? Because we are such a small country, we are often overlooked and our music viewed as insignificant in comparison to countries that are more established and have a greater music presence. Having collaborations with recognized artists or being signed by one of the well known Labels/ Producers would bring the heights of our local talent and our music industry on a whole, to another level. What general advice can you give on Life, Love, Lyrics? One of my life long lessons instilled by my mother has carried me to where I am today “Manners will take you where money can’t.” Live like you’ve never lived before and love like there’s no tomorrow. As for lyrics, feel every beat, feel every word, send a message through your music, represent yourself through your music and write from the heart.


KING TURBO Grown Folk Vol 4. The Ultimate Slow Jams Mix

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