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The work that has been produced in my graduate studies at the University at Buffalo has been focused in the field of media architecture and physical computing within the Situated Technologies Research Group. Most of my work has been exploring architecture as an interface/environment for people to interact with and response to. Architecture not only engages the typical senses of visual and tactile experience, but the rest of our senses of smell, taste, and hearing. My work explores the sonic layer of our perception of space by manipulating soundscapes and creating new soundscapes. My research has been focused in how space can be created and defined by the sonic environment. Not only am I interested in our sensory perception of space but I am also interested in the different interfaces in which we interact with space. One specific interface that I’m interested in exploring is games, which many people can response to and become agents within cultural, social, and spatial production.


contents : House Rules

Fall 2008

A comprehensive studio project dveloped in the last year of study in my undergraduate studies, which is a rule based vertical housing scheme.

Totems

Spring 2009

A design build project during the last semester of my undergraduate studies.

Taxicab Soundmachine

Spring 2010

“Taxicab Soundmachine“ explores the built environment, and brings to light the invisible consequence of that built environment with the use of the exsisting infrastructure and through the construction of a new soundscape.

Emergent Patterns of Movement

Spring 2010

This project collect patterns that are created within the rhythnmic patterns of walking. It explores how new patterns through revealing these patterns to the users of that space.

StepSong

Spring 2011

“StepSong” builds upon the project “Emergent Patterns of Movement”, which analyzes the collective number of footsteps in relation to time to translate the “PPM” people per a minute to beats per a minute within a song.

Sensory Perception of Space

Spring 2011

Through several sonic mappings of space, we are able to understand how we can construct and percieve space in our minds based on through previous sonic experiences.


_each individual game piece has a certain orienta on with same propor ons and modules act collec vely to create certain spa al conditons

u circ

c spa on laƟ

[eat] [waste] [eat] [waste] [eat] [waste] [eat] [eat][waste] [waste]

e

_defining the modules: 6’ circula on space results from resizing of modules 18’ x 12’

_the most restric ve rule in organiza on of housing units; eat/ waste modules are aligned ver cally and spaced horizantally across the grid

fold

fold

[living] [waste] [eat] [sleep]

[eat]

[living]

[waste] [sleep]

[eat]

[living]

[waste]

fold

fold

[sleep]

[living] [eat]

[sleep] [waste]

[living] [eat] [sleep] [waste]

_emergence of public(program) and private(balcony) space within the voids created by the aggrega on of the housing units


10m high dive [play area 15’ pool depth 14’ clear hight]

l ng wal climarebia ]

trampoline

e 6’W [play bing lan each clim

[Olympic play area 9’6’W x 16’6L x 3’9’’H 33’ clear height]

1m high dive [play area 10’ pool depth 8’ clear hight]

raquetb all court

[raquet/ha L X 20' H] ndball play area 20' W

X 40'

basketba

ll court [NBA pla y minium area 50’ W x 94’ 20’’H] Lx bowling

pool ta

ble

[play are a 8’ table and 48” cue len 12'4"W gth: x 16'2"L ]

fooseball

[play area 4’L x 2’ W table 10‘ x 7’ ]

table

lane [play area lane 62’1 0” lane app L x 5‘ W roach 15’ ]

shuffle

[play are board a [play are a 39’L x 6’W ]

_reorganiza on of aggrega on a er inser on of dimensionally strict public programs

_reorganiza on of aggrega on a er implementa on of an exterior staircase

H OUSE RU L ES FALL 2008 PROFESSOR ANNETTE LECUYER As a video game, the rules are defined and unchangeable, but as a physical game, outside of the digital environment, the game rules can be altered, where the new game rules becomes defined by the site, the programma c needs, and architectural systems. Each system (plumbing, mechanical, parking, housing, circula on) has its own spa al rules in propor ons, dimensions, and scale. The integra on of these system creates new rules and configura ons contribu ng to the overall form. Tetris, a game within the stacking puzzle game genre was chosen as a housing aggrega on model because of its spa al quality of producing dense or spacious volumes depending on the placement of game pieces in rela on to each other. Each game piece becomes a modular apartment unit which has (4) necessary spaces for living: the bedroom(sleep), kitchen(eat), bathroom(waste), and living room(social). The site and the aggrega on of these game pieces define the first layer of the system. At mes spa al condions emerge out of the aggrega on such as the circula on corridors and balcony spaces, but new spa al condi ons and organiza ons also occur when new systems are introduced and are layered into the aggrega on. Although there are very restric ve rules, each unit has its own unique characteris cs created by the adjacencies.


EIG H TEEN TH STREET PARK SPRING 2009 PROFESSOR BRAD WALES Phase 1 of the Eighteenth Street Corner Park consists of steel and concrete fabrica on of totems which line up to form a as a barrier between Urban Roots garden center and 18th Street park. A 5 inch separa on between totems creates a visually permeable division between the two areas and creates a mutually beneficial rela onship; the fence will draw in visitors to the Garden Center, while volunteers of the Center act as caretakers for the park. A 3/8 thick 1x 4 plate of steel may be used in each design. A varia on of height, width, profile, and technique creates a strong sense of diversity in the design of each totem. Conceptually and aesthe cally, each is capable of standing on its own. But with the collision of these disposi ons, new circumstances of geometry, propor on, and manipula on of material arise.

Four totems were constructed with the idea of a crack or fissure wrapping the concrete that would direct water and rust to the corners of the totems away from the les. This would also allow the sculptural steel to be seen from the garden center and park. The angles are sloped to reduced the amount of hand and foot holds.


_soundmap of 14th St. and 8th ave. to Ave A, a transla on of milliGuass Values to audio freq.

5X TRANSISTORS

RESISTOR

ANTENNA

BATTERY

SPEAKER

_device prototype

TAXICAB SOUNDMACHINE SPRING 2010 PROFESSOR MARK SHEPARD U lizing the techniques of the Theramin, the Taxicabsound machine provides a public service which reveals the electromagne c radia on in the streets of New York City. As taxis aggregate through the landscape, the vehicle becomes an instrument transla ng milliguass values into aural frequencies, revealing the impercep ble landscape to the occupants of the urban environment. The transla ons of these values hold two primary roles in that it exposes overlooked aspects of the environment while ques oning the biological implica ons of these electromagne c fields at the scale of the human body. The control of the pitch and volume, EMFs eec vely begin to generate new forms of crowding throughout the landscape and directly ques ons the quali es of our built environment through the exposure of these exsisting features.


DECIBEL TRIGGER

SEQUENCE 1

IDENTIFY MULTIPLE SEQUENCES

SEQUENCE 2

00000 10000 01000 00100 00010 00001 00000 00001 00010 00100 00000

01234 54300 01234 12345 SEQUENCE OF PLAYBACK THROUGH MULTIPLE CHANNELS

_ me and sequence via MaxMSP

SPEED OF PLAYBACK

TIME LAPSE


EMERGENT PATTQAERNS OF MOVEMENT FALL 2010 PROFESSOR JORDAN GEIGER AND PROFESSOR MARC BOHLEN This project looks at how space is ac vated at dierent mes of days and the pa erns of movement that emerge. The footstep is collected from a piezo element which acts as a contact mic, by detec ng audio vibra ons through solid surfaces generated by the footstep. Analyzing the footstep as a beat, iden fies the flow and density of the space at a specific me where the total count of footsteps is divide by elapsed me. With the use of mestamps, speed and direc on of travel can be iden fied. Beats would be played back sequen ally according to pa erns collected, iden fying specific rhythms at dierent mes of day, by placing the speakers in a 1 to 1 rela onship with the floor le that is collec ng the footstep.


RECORDING FOOTSTEPS Each floortile has its own table within the database of 2 seond sound samples when is triggered by a footstep

floortile2 [0, tile2_1.wav, c:\windows\path, 3:45:04, 12\01\2010] activationcount2 [13503, timestamp, count] floortile1 [index, sample name, audio sample location, timestamp, date] activationcount [index(0 - 86400), timestamp, count]

floortile1 [0, tile1_1.wav, c:\windows\path, 3:45:02, 12\01\2010] activationcount1 [13502, timestamp, count]

PLAYBACKING FOOT STEPS_wayfinding system

floortile 7

floortile 8

floortile 9

floortile 3

floortile 10

floortile 11

floortile 12

floortile 4

floortile 5

floortile 6

floortile 1 triggered @ 12:34:38 && floortile 2 triggered @ 12:34:40

Return PATTERN 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1;

playback random sample from 2:34:40 from tile3

playback random sample from 2:34:42 from tile4

playback random sample from 2:34:44 from tile5

playback random sample from 2:34:46 from tile6

_ me and sequence via SQL


PATTERN RECOGNITION specific paths can be identified using a linear sequence of timestamps

floortile 1

1 0 0 0 0 0

floortile 2

floortile 3

1 1 0 0 0 0

1 1 1 0 0 0

floortile 4

floortile 5

floortile 6

1 1 1 1 0 0

1 1 1 1 1 0

1 1 1 1 1 1

7:14:32 7:14:34 7:14:32 7:14:34 7:14:32 7:14:34

7:14:34 7:14:36 7:14:34 7:14:36 7:14:34 7:14:36

7:14:36 7:14:38 7:14:36 7:14:38 7:14:36 7:14:38

7:14:38 7:14:40 7:14:38 7:14:40 7:14:38 7:14:40

7:14:40 7:14:40 7:14:40 7:14:40 7:14:40 7:14:40

7:14:42 7:14:42 7:14:42 7:14:42 7:14:42 7:14:42

DATABASE FOR PATTERNS PATTERNS [index, date, start_time, 00000000] PATTERNSCOUNT [index, start_time, 00000000, count]

floortile2 [100, tile2_100.wav, C:\Windows\tile2\, 12:34:40,12\01\2010] floortile2 [200, tile2_200.wav, C:\Windows\tile2\, 12:34:40,12\02\2010] floortile2 [300, tile2_300.wav, C:\Windows\tile2\, 12:34:40,12\03\2010] floortile2 [102, tile2_102.wav, C:\Windows\tile2\, 12:34:42,12\01\2010] floortile2 [202, tile2_202.wav, C:\Windows\tile2\, 12:34:42,12\02\2010] floortile2 [103, tile2_103.wav, C:\Windows\tile2\, 12:34:44,12\01\2010] floortile2 [203, tile2_203.wav, C:\Windows\tile2\, 12:34:44,12\02\2010] floortile2 [301, tile2_301.wav, C:\Windows\tile2\, 12:34:44,12\03\2010] floortile2 [104, tile2_104.wav, C:\Windows\tile2\, 12:34:46,12\01\2010] floortile2 [204, tile2_204.wav, C:\Windows\tile2\, 12:34:46,12\02\2010] floortile2 [205, tile2_205.wav, C:\Windows\tile2\, 12:34:48,12\02\2010] floortile2 [302, tile2_302.wav, C:\Windows\tile2\, 12:34:48,12\03\2010]

floortile3 [121, tile3_121.wav, C:\Windows\tile3\, 12:34:40, 12\01\2010] floortile3 [222, tile3_222.wav, C:\Windows\tile3\, 12:34:40, 12\02\2010] floortile3 [323, tile3_323.wav, C:\Windows\tile3\, 12:34:40, 12\03\2010] floortile3 [124, tile3_124.wav, C:\Windows\tile3\, 12:34:42, 12\01\2010] floortile3 [225, tile3_225.wav, C:\Windows\tile3\, 12:34:42, 12\02\2010] floortile3 [326, tile4_326.wav, C:\Windows\tile3\, 12:34:42, 12\03\2010] floortile3 [127, tile3_127.wav, C:\Windows\tile3\, 12:34:44, 12\01\2010] floortile3 [228, tile3_228.wav, C:\Windows\tile3\, 12:34:44, 12\02\2010] floortile3 [329, tile3_329.wav, C:\Windows\tile3\, 12:34:44, 12\03\2010] floortile3 [130, tile3_130.wav, C:\Windows\tile3\, 12:34:46, 12\01\2010] floortile3 [231, tile3_231.wav, C:\Windows\tile3\, 12:34:46, 12\02\2010] floortile3 [132, tile3_132.wav, C:\Windows\tile3\, 12:34:48, 12\01\2010] floortile3 [232, tile3_229.wav, C:\Windows\tile3\, 12:34:48, 12\02\2010]

floortile4 [90, tile4_90.wav, C:\Windows\tile4\, 12:34:40,12\01\2010] floortile4 [101, tile4_101.wav, C:\Windows\tile4\, 12:34:40,12\02\2010] floortile4 [202, tile4_202.wav, C:\Windows\tile4\, 12:34:40,12\03\2010] floortile4 [91, tile4_91.wav, C:\Windows\tile4\, 12:34:42,12\01\2010] floortile4 [102, tile4_102.wav, C:\Windows\tile4\, 12:34:42,12\02\2010] floortile4 [92, tile4_92.wav, C:\Windows\tile4\, 12:34:44,12\01\2010] floortile4 [103, tile4_103.wav, C:\Windows\tile4\, 12:34:44,12\02\2010] floortile4 [203, tile4_203.wav, C:\Windows\tile4\, 12:34:44,12\03\2010] floortile4 [93, tile4_93.wav, C:\Windows\tile4\, 12:34:46,12\01\2010] floortile4 [94, tile4_94.wav, C:\Windows\tile4\, 12:34:48,12\01\2010] floortile4 [104, tile4_104.wav, C:\Windows\tile4\, 12:34:48,12\02\2010] floortile4 [204, tile4_204.wav, C:\Windows\tile4\, 12:34:48,12\03\2010]

floortile5 [102, tile5_102.wav, C:Windows\tile2\, 12:34:40,12\01\2010] floortile5 [203, tile5_203.wav, C:Windows\tile2\, 12:34:40,12\02\2010] floortile5 [103, tile5_103.wav, C:Windows\tile2\, 12:34:42,12\01\2010] floortile5 [204, tile5_204.wav, C:Windows\tile2\, 12:34:42,12\02\2010] floortile5 [104, tile5_104.wav, C:Windows\tile2\, 12:34:44,12\01\2010] floortile5 [205, tile5_205.wav, C:Windows\tile2\, 12:34:44,12\02\2010] floortile5 [308, tile5_308.wav, C:Windows\tile2\, 12:34:44,12\03\2010] floortile5 [105, tile5_105.wav, C:Windows\tile2\, 12:34:46,12\01\2010] floortile5 [206, tile5_206.wav, C:Windows\tile2\, 12:34:46,12\02\2010] floortile5 [106, tile5_106.wav, C:Windows\tile2\, 12:34:48,12\01\2010] floortile5 [207, tile5_207.wav, C:Windows\tile2\, 12:34:48,12\02\2010] floortile5 [309, tile5_309.wav, C:Windows\tile2\, 12:34:48,12\03\2010]

TILE1 // TILE 2 search query 12:34:38 //floortile1 = 1 && 12:34:40//floortile 2 = 1 return dates INSERT into PATTERNS the calculated pattern for the time sequence PATTERNS [0, 12/01/2010, 12:34:38, 111111000000] floortile 7

floortile 1

floortile 8

floortile 2

floortile 9

floortile 3

floortile 10

floortile 11

floortile 12

floortile 4

floortile 5

floortile 6

PATTERNS [1, 12/02/2010, 12:34:38, 111111000000] floortile 7

floortile 1

floortile 8

floortile 2

PATTERNSCOUNT [0, 12:34:38, 111111000000, 2] most popular path @ 12:34:38 PATTERNSCOUNT [0, 12:34:38, 111110000011, 1]

floortile 9

floortile 3

floortile 10

floortile 11

floortile 12

floortile 4

floortile 5

floortile 6

PATTERNS [2, 12/03/2010, 12:34:38, 111110000011]

floortile 7

floortile 1

floortile 8

floortile 2

floortile 9

floortile 3

floortile 10

floortile 11

floortile 12

floortile 4

floortile 5

floortile 6


Spring 2011 Professor Mark Shepard “Sound Trek” takes the form as an Internet radio, conceived to explore a new layer of urban characteris c generated by its rhythm, created as people associate and move through the public space, sidewalks and the surrounding environment, and exposes the rhythmic spa al quality through music. It explores how people move through space and generates rhythms associa ng with me, place, culture, and life pa ern. This project analyze the rhythmic pa erns that are generated by the flow of people in and out of site specific loca ons and the ac vity levels at singular moments in me. Rhythm is usually associated with music, but can also measure as a med movement through space. We draw a fine rela onship between the beat each person generates with footsteps and the beat or tempo that is found in music. These mundane, everyday rhythms of a footstep are converted into music that people enjoy on a daily basis and allow everyone to understand and enjoy the latent rhythm of our world. Sound Trek works as an Internet radio with an interface similar to Pandora or Grooveshark. However, unlike the two radio choosing sta ons by ar st or genre, the users of Sound Trek choose sta ons based on choice of loca on, or the choice of rhythm. The choice of loca on is base on the unit “ppm” – people per a minute. Each sta on is characterized by providing music that has a bpm (beats per a minute) similar to the loca on’s ppm rhythm. The music gives the users a glimpse of what is occurring at that loca on in terms of rhythm. Choosing a sta on based on beats per a minute, allows users to choose songs based on pace. They can listen to sta on of their choosing, influencing themselves by whether the user wants to slow down, speed up, keep their current working pace through different sta ons. This interface could be thought of as a way of exploring space sonically and through song. Each space is unique in the rhythms that are generated over me. While this project does not directly translate these rhythms into a musical piece, it does translate a single instance out of larger rhythmic pa ern over a dynamic range of me so that that rhythmic flow is perceivable. Most songs are within a range of 50 to 200 beats per a minute, and as the amount of people decreases or increases, radio sta ons would begin to emerge or die out. The physical and rhythmic walking pa erns would start to inform the digital rhythmic pa erns of use of the radio sta ons. As a global product, not only does the system inform local cycle and specific cycles of me a ached to a site but it also informs a global cycle of social and industrial produc on.

Sound Trek Trek - Internet Inteerne Inte rrne neett Radio Ra R adio a dio d io www.soundtrek.com

Internet Radio - Listen to the movement of the World

Sound Trek ® Log in

Currently Selected Location

Regisiter

Press

Advertising

Contact Us

Hot Stations Near by Main St. and Chippewa St. ƵīĂůŽ͕Ez

ĞůĂǁĂƌĞWĂƌŬ͕ ƵīĂůŽ͕Ez

Current TEMPO: 116 ppm

Current TEMPO: 78.5 ppm

ϰϮŶĚ^ƚ͘dŝŵĞƐ^ƋƵĂƌĞ͕ EĞǁzŽƌŬ͕Ez Current TEMPO: 148 ppm

Popular Stations in the World E. T. Katy Perry

Pervious Selected Location London, UK

Beijing, China PRC

Copenhagen, Denmark

I Gave You All Mumford and Sons

'ŝǀĞ>ŝƩůĞDŽƌĞ Maroon 5

Dark Storm The Jezebels

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^ŚŝďƵLJĂ͕ dŽŬLJŽ͕:ĂƉĂŶ

Current TEMPO: 113 ppm

Current TEMPO: 186.5 ppm

About Us


Sound Trek is driven by two types of people: actors and audiences. The audiences are the one who listens to the sta ons, while actors are the one who mix the rhythm on the site. A person could be in both roles, being an audience and actor at the same me. However, the actor from one place does not necessarily is the audience of the same place. One could be an actor of one place and an audience of another. This creates a mix source bouncing between the dierent loca ons. In this manner, Sound Trek acts as a pla orm; the users of Sound Trek become the audience, influence by the rhythmic characteris c from the dierent loca on base sta on they have selected, and everyone is an actor, because the applica on relies on the real physical rhythm that is generated by each person at the site. The informa on flow creates a cycle that each loca on draws their own status base on the me, and current tempo among the people, and reflects back and forth between the digital and physical world.


SENSORY PERCEPTION of SPACE

SPRING 2011 Professor Teri Rueb As humans, we use each of our sensory organs to create a complete image of the environment in which we occupy. Each of the senses has a different range of sensing. What happens when we start to separate and parse each of our senses into individual senses of sight, hearing, smell, touch, taste? The primary sense of sight has the furthest range of effec veness, and the secondary senses of hearing and smell confirm the visualized spaces as we experience it. Reality is further confirmed through the sense of taste and touch as they are senses that are local to the body itself and a direct interface to the brain. As we move and transi on through different space physically and temporally, our sensory registers trigger sensory memories a ached to space and me. The sense of sight is heavily relied upon, and is the first sense that we use to verify the world in which we occupy. Merlaeu –Ponty quotes Paul Klee sta ng that color is the “place where our brain and the universe meet” (Ponty 278). Our sight creates a two dimensional image which our mind processes into a three dimensional image by processing the different depths in color with the use of shadow and ligh ng. This visual image does not create the whole story of the space, and can o en create conflic ng views with our other sensory inputs. “Touch ar culates another kind of complex world. The human hand is peerless in its strength, agility, and sensi vity. Primates, including man, use their hands to know and to comfort members of their own species, but man also uses hands to explore the physical environment, carefully differen a ng it by the feel of bark and stone”(Tuan 11). Most of these background sounds are hidden away or ignored, but the use of the contact microphone brings these sounds into the foreground. It also brings forth the hidden network of mechanical and inner workings of building components. The doors, walls, windows, desks, garbage cans, water fountains, toilets, and sinks are all building components that we use in our everyday lives. This network of objects and surfaces are located in certain space defining how we engage and the order that we engage these surfaces.


These surfaces are the interfaces of the building and our comfort levels just as the sense are interfaces for the world and the mind. We can close a door to enclose space or open a window for ven la on. We have garbage cans and bathroom so that waste can be expelled from the environment in which we occupy. Behind these interfaces are networks of pipes, vents, wires which work in the background to further ensure that we are conformable within the environments in which we work and play. These different systems engage and overlap, depending on our engagement of the environment whether it is automated or analog. The automated light switch s ll relies on the human body to engage it. By placing a contact microphone on mul ple surfaces, we begin to map the mundane everyday interac ons of the physical body and the physical world sonically. Not only do we, as humans, explore the physical environment through our touch, but we ac vate the physical and built environment through our sense of touch as well. Ponty states, “Everything I see is in principle within my reach, at least within reach of my sight, and is marked upon the mark of the ‘I can’. Each of the two maps is complete. The visible world and the world of my motor projects are each total parts of the same Being” (Ponty 255). Just as the visible and the body are closely ed together, the sonic world and the body are closely ed together in this mapping project. The visible and physical world can be engaged because we can perceive that it exists, but the sonic environment is created through the physical interac on between the human body and the space that the body is currently contac ng and occupying. Without the physical interac on, the sonic map is blank. The three dimensional space emerges through the sonic percep on of sound and the understanding that the texture of sound defines the material quali es of these interac ve surface, and the intensity and loca on of singular or mul ple interac ons within a sound clip. Within this mapping project, the sonic map becomes the primary map and the visual map of the waveform becomes the suppor ng material. The visual map is the two dimensional representa on of space whereas the sonic map is the three dimensional representaon of space. “The world of sound would appear to be spa ally structured, though not with the sharpness of the visual world. It is possible that the blind man who can hear but has no hands and can barely move lacks the sense of space; perhaps to such a person all sounds are bodily sensa ons and not cues to the character of an environment”(Tuan 14). In this mapping project, the visual world is less sharp than that of the sonic world. The visual representa on does not contain enough informa on to decipher the three dimensional space in which the interac on occurs. The waveform shows the number of interac ons. The amplitude shows the intensity of the interac on and the wavelength shows the dura on of the interac on, but the sonic map contains much more informa on to decipher the three dimensional space. The sound clip is a spa alized sound map in which the number of interac ons, types of interac on, intensity of interac on, loca on of interac on in terms of distance to the physical microphone, and material proper es are revealed. It is the network of informa on embedded in each sound clip that allows us to dis nguish the spaces from memory. Each piece of informa on is separate nodes of informa on, but as a whole it helps the viewer create a complete image. While the sonic map creates the spa al image, the visual is a reinforcement of the truth or reality of the sonic map. The secondary sense of hearing becomes the primary sense and the primary sensing of sight becomes a secondary sense. Both maps rely upon each other to create a complete story of a singular moment in me, just as we rely on our five senses to create the complete story of a space. Our sonic percep on of space is defined by the acous cal proper es of the materials within a space. Sound gives a space iden ty through the reverbera on or absorp on of material. Each material has its own characteris cs and sound quality which is defined by the human interac on within the space. The squeaking of shoes rubbing against the floor or the hard footstep is defined by how the human body engages the material. The map in some ways becomes a map of what the material can perceive in terms of touch and sound. Bibliography Tuan, Yi Fu. 1977. Space and Place: The Perspec ve of Experience. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press Merleau-Ponty, Maurice. 1961. Eye and Mind. Paris.

Location:CROSBY 215 Material: METAL

Location: WATER FOUNTAIN 1ST FLOOR Material: METAL


K A T H Y

Y U E N

55 ANNETTE DRIVE MARLBORO NJ 07746-1988 kyuen3@buffalo.edu 9 1 7 - 8 8 6 - 8 1 8 2


Work Sample