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Fall 2015

THEN AND NOW 150 years on the Hill

STUDENTS JOIN THE CROWD SMALL GIFTS ADD UP

TRUSTED GUIDES MENTORS MATTER


KU Giving is published by KU Endowment, the private fundraising foundation for the University of Kansas. You are receiving this magazine because you support KU.

CHAIR, BOARD OF TRUSTEES Deanell Reece Tacha

PRESIDENT Dale Seuferling

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT, COMMUNICATIONS & MARKETING Rosita Elizalde-McCoy

EDITORS Charles Higginson Valerie Gieler

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Rosita Elizalde-McCoy Lisa Scheller Victoria Sickinger

ART DIRECTOR Sarah Meiers

GRAPHIC DESIGNER Brandan Deason

We welcome your comments, suggestions and questions. KU Giving magazine P.O. Box 928 Lawrence, KS 66044-0928 785-832-7400 kugiving@kuendowment.org

Postmaster: Send address changes to: KU Endowment P.O. Box 928 Lawrence, KS 66044-0928

Murphy Hall, KU School of Medicine, in 1923 and today. See more “now & then,” page 8.


CONTENTS | FALL 2015

FEATURES OVER YOUR SHOULDER | 8 Much has changed since KU was founded in 1865; a glimpse of past and present.

DREAM FIELDS | 12 New playing fields at Rock Chalk Park rival the best in the nation.

WISE AND TRUSTED GUIDES | 14 Meet some exceptional faculty mentors, through the words of students and alumni.

DEPARTMENTS PRESIDENT’S NOTE | 2 Glorious Indeed EVERY GIFT MATTERS | 3 A crowd of student supporters WHY I GIVE | 4

ACROSS KU | 16 Taking on cancer with code; Spencer to become more open; celebrating the Advancement Board; Field Station joins national network; honoring Chancellor Hemenway

THE FAITHFUL | 20 Family’s commitment to KU comes full circle

ON THE COVER Past and present collide in this photo illustration by Brandan Deason, based on a contemporary photograph by Brian Goodman and an image from University Archives.

THE LAST FULL MEASURE | 21 A colorful thread ties one generation to the next

LET’S BE SOCIAL

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PRESIDENT’S NOTE

GLORIOUS INDEED IN THIS ISSUE OF KU GIVING, we

North College, the first University of Kansas building.

celebrate the sesquicentennial anniversary of the University of Kansas — 150 years that make up the tapestry of memories of the university’s rich history. Lawrence, Kansas in 1865 was largely a rural area, with grazing cattle dominating the landscape. The pioneers who settled here chose the highest ridge overlooking the Kansas River valley as the site for this university, and they understood the significance of their decision. That location, Far Above the Golden Valley, must have been Glorious to View then, and remains so to this day. Just a few years later, in 1891, KU Endowment was formed to receive a gift of land from Governor Charles Robinson and a $2,500 gift from Colonel J.J. McCook of New York, a former Union Army officer. The gifts were used for the site of KU’s first football stadium, named McCook Field. The first endowed fund was established in 1903 for purchasing books of “fine literature.” The second one, created in 1927, is for a student poetry award. As with all endowed funds, they are to be available in perpetuity, so they’re still assisting KU to this day. Since then, every student who has attended KU has benefited from private philanthropy in some way — through the land, buildings, scholarships, professorships or research made possible by donors like you. All gifts serve, as our motto reads, “To Build a Greater University.” As I reflect on this milestone in KU’s history, reading an account from Susan Savage, a member of KU’s first class in 1866, touched me:

“I was reminded of that first day of the University…when I enrolled as a student at North College. On that morning, I went out early into the dewy pasture to catch my pony for the three-mile ride into town. It was a bright and beautiful morning with a hint of autumn coolness in the air. No one, I am sure, ever climbed Mt. Oread with higher hopes than were mine on that September morning.”

UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES

I climbed Mount Oread in 1973 with my own dreams and aspirations, to begin a new life. Many of you have similar recollections. Thanks for the memories, KU. And Happy 150th Birthday!

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EVERY GIFT MATTERS

GET THE CROWD INTO THE GAME THREE’S A CROWD. SO IS 1,200.

KU Endowment offered cash prizes for various achievements. The top prize, $4,000, went to the organization that received support from the most individual donors: national service sorority Omega Phi Alpha. Overall, in purely monetary terms, Ever Onward was a good investment. Costs for website hosting, technical support services and credit card processing totaled about $1,340. Along the way, staff members in Communications and Marketing, Annual Giving, and Information Services departments all, as we say, learned a lot. Next year? Most likely, the Student Endowment Board will take this year’s lessons and build on them. The hope is to inspire students to give — a challenge, for obvious reasons — by putting in front of them requests from their student peers to support student organizations. In other words, to join a crowd. — Charles Higginson

KORNERBOOTH PHOTOGRAPHY

As it turned out, that’s about the number of students who contributed to KU Endowment’s first crowdfunding initiative. Crowdfunding — raising money for a project through small contributions made by a large number of people, typically through the Internet — is the ultimate example of small gifts adding up. But it’s also a new way of fundraising, and endowment staff looked long and hard at the idea before deciding to take the plunge. You don’t have to look very long at the results, however, to see the idea has its place. Because crowdfunding is most familiar to younger people, it was logical for our Annual Giving department to team up with our volunteer Student Endowment Board to develop this first attempt. Several months of planning, preparation and programming went into it. The project, named Ever Onward, launched Feb. 26 and ran through April 26. The organizers hoped to recruit 10 student organizations this first time around, but 14 signed up. The organizations created their own appeal webpages, using the Ever Onward templates, and conducted their own campaigns. Several met with good success. By the end of the campaign, they had raised more than $26,852, with upward of 1,200 unique donors who made more than 1,510 total gifts. Two organizations met and then raised their goals.

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WHY I GIVE | SNAPSHOTS

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1 “Opal and I both graduated from the University of Iowa. When we moved to Topeka, we found KU to be very similar in many ways, even the beauty of the campus. Just as Iowa provided a quality education for both of us, KU has done the same for our children, Ty, Kelly and Chris. All three have KU degrees. KU has provided much enjoyment for our family, and it seemed only fitting to give something back. Hopefully our gift will benefit a most deserving student athlete.” Bob and Opal Wheeler, Topeka Gift to establish and endow the Robert C. and Opal D. Wheeler Basketball Scholarship.

2 “We wanted to honor our parents, Eldon ’31, and Harriet Perry Sloan. During Eldon’s time at KU, he played cornet and once played under the baton of John Philip Sousa. Eldon served on the Kansas Board of Regents and had a distinguished legal career. He was proud of his claim to fame, which was that at the time of his death in 2012, he was the oldest living alumnus of the marching band.” John E. Sloan, bachelor’s in art history 1957, Gig Harbor, Wash., Paul G. Sloan, bachelor’s in mathematics 1961, San Rafael, Calif., and Mary Sloan Mozingo, bachelor’s in music 1963, Lawrence Gifts to establish an endowed scholarship for non-music-major trumpet players in the KU Marching Band.

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3 “Assisting in the acquisition of a new piano to complement the new and improved Swarthout Recital Hall was a pleasure. I look forward to many more wonderful experiences in that space, which is now up to the standard of the music performed there. Additionally, my father-in-law, Robert Harrison, attended Geology Camp in the mid ‘30s and found it to be a very educational and enjoyable experience. It was his express wish that a scholarship be made available for students to have the same opportunity as he did.” Elizabeth “Beth” Harrison, Lawrence Gift to the School of Music for the acquisition of a Steinway piano and a gift to the Dellwig Geology Field Camp Scholarship in honor of Robert Harrison.

“ It was Robert’s express wish that a scholarship be made available for students to have the same

opportunity as he did.

—Elizabeth “Beth” Harrison


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4 “We began giving to student scholarships in the School of Education when Anne established a scholarship in Mark’s name as a birthday gift. But as state support for the University of Kansas waned, we became concerned for the amount of debt being incurred by KU students. Particularly, our hearts went out to students who sought to serve our society by educating our young people — so we have grown our support for scholarships. We also support the Dole Institute and its mission to establish a ‘public square’ where competing ideas can be discussed in a respectful environment.” Anne (Crump) Jarboe, bachelor’s in education 1978, and Mark Jarboe, bachelor’s in education 1978, master’s in curriculum and instruction 1989, Lawrence Gifts to support the John E. Crump Memorial Scholarship in education, the Mark Jarboe Scholarship in education and the Dole Institute of Politics.

“We are thrilled to offer this

annual award in John’s memory. —Jeff Eriksen

“When my father passed away, my mother, Jane Eriksen; my sister, Jana Eriksen Voth; and I set up a memorial fund. Because Dad was a graduate of the KU School of Business, a life member of the KU Alumni Association and a past KU Endowment trustee, we felt this was a perfect way to recognize his love for KU and KU Endowment. We established the John G. Eriksen Entrepreneurship Award for students who participate in the KU Catalyst student business accelerator program. We are thrilled to offer this annual award in his memory.” Jeff Eriksen, bachelor’s in business administration 1979, Hutchinson, Kan. Gifts to establish and endow the John G. Eriksen Entrepreneurship Award for students who aspire to start companies. 5

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WHY I GIVE | FEATURED GIFTS

FROM LOSS, BRINGING HOPE TO OTHERS her peals of laughter could be heard across a room. That’s how Shawndra Beauchamp Turner’s parents described her. But in one shattering moment in 2007, Shawndra’s life turned upside down. After experiencing months of abdominal pain, she learned the cause — a rare form of colorectal cancer, specifically, signet ring cell adenocarcinoma. Shawndra was 30, decades younger than the average person diagnosed with colorectal cancer. Later, Shawndra cradled her 9-month-old daughter, Ella, with the heartbreaking realization that she might not be there to walk her daughter to her first day of kindergarten, let alone see her graduate from high school. Along with motherhood, Shawndra had everything going for her — a happy marriage to Doug Turner, loving family and many close friends. She enjoyed her rewarding career as a nurse practitioner at Children’s Mercy Hospital, where she delighted in caring for her young patients. On March 15, 2009, Shawndra’s journey with cancer claimed her life. But not before she blogged that she would like to establish a foundation to help others who have colorectal cancer. “Funding for cancer research is soooo badly needed,” Shawndra wrote. “With research, my diagnosis may someday be considered a chronic disease instead of a deadly disease.” To support Shawndra’s wish, in 2011, her parents, Gary Beauchamp, M.D., and Carolyn Beauchamp, established the Shawndra Beauchamp Turner Colorectal Cancer Research Fund at The University FUN-LOVING, MAGNETIC AND CARING;

Shawndra Beauchamp Turner

WHY THEY GAVE

“We think that’s what Shawndra wanted — to set up a fund to support research that will help others in the future.

— Gary Beauchamp, M.D., and Carolyn Beauchamp

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KU GIVING | FALL 2015

of Kansas Cancer Center. Since then, they’ve provided additional gifts to KU Endowment to grow the fund. “We think that’s what Shawndra wanted,” said Carolyn Beauchamp. “She wanted people to know what was going on because colon cancer was not talked about all that much. She was really wanting to bring it to light, and this is the only way we knew how to do it — to set up a fund to support research that will help others in the future.” Part of the support for Shawndra’s fund comes from an annual walk. Each year since 2011, the family has helped lead the March Against Colon Cancer, an indoor walk at Oak Park Mall. This walk equally benefits funds named for Shawndra and also Jennifer Ireland, a young wife and mother who died from colon cancer in 2007. While Shawndra and Jennifer never met, Shawndra was the first beneficiary of Jennifer’s fund. Shawndra’s sister, Andréa Kristoff, serves on the board of directors of the Jennifer Ireland Foundation and directs the annual walk. Though Shawndra is gone, her family wants to give hope for others, both through the fund they’ve established and by sharing their knowledge. Chances for survival of colorectal cancer are good if it’s detected early, said Carolyn Beauchamp. “The problem is, we generally don’t have conversations about it at younger ages,” she said. “Our advice is, if there’s a symptom that doesn’t seem right, go ahead and have it checked out. Be your own advocate.” — Lisa Scheller

TOP: COURTESY OF BEAUCHAMPS / BOTTOM: LISA SCHELLER

Family’s gift supports colon cancer research and education


GIVING BACK — FOR THE FUTURE Support will transform health education

MARK MCDONALD

DAVID ZAMIEROWSKI WAS A YOUNG PHYSICIAN with one year of internship experience when his life took a big detour in the 1960s. That’s when he was drafted for the Vietnam War. He was assigned as a battalion surgeon for an artillery unit, where he worked on soldiers’ physical health at the aid station he ran, and also on their mental health as he faced the introduction of heroin by the Viet Cong to his troops. He served with distinction, earning the Bronze Star twice. He returned to the U.S., and his career brought him to the University of Kansas Medical Center, where he added board certification as a plastic surgeon to his certification as a general surgeon. His experience in the burn unit at KUMC led him to specialize in treating wounds and burns, and eventually he founded the first Wound Care Centers in the Kansas City area. During his career, he found time to trial and patent numerous surgical devices, for which he now holds more than 75 patents. Two of them have become commercially available — the Vacuum Assisted Closure (VAC) external wound dressing, for which he has patents on component parts, and the Prevena surgical incision dressing. The VAC has been used to treat more than 8 million wounds worldwide and to stabilize soldiers’ traumatic injuries. David’s wife, Mary, is an accomplished scholar in her own right. They met as students at Johns Hopkins University; she holds a doctorate in biochemistry from Vanderbilt University and completed post-doctoral work at KU. She later became his office manager, helping him build his busy practice. They

raised two daughters, Nancy and Amy, who is a KU alumna. Upon his retirement in 2003, David Zamierowski became a mentor to students in the health professions at various area institutions. “This is when I decided I should become more involved in developing a simulation program,” he said. “I observed first-hand the opportunity to revolutionize healthcare education — it’s a tremendous advance in teaching.” He became more involved with the programs at KUMC also, currently holding the position of adjunct research professor in the department of plastic surgery. This experience inspired David and Mary Zamierowski to make a lead gift to establish a state-of-the-art simulation program at KU. In honor of their generosity, KU Medical Center is creating the Zamierowski Institute for Experiential Learning, with locations at the new Health Education Building and Sudler Hall. While they have supported various programs at KU for years, their most recent gift makes them among the most generous donors to the medical center. “We hope our gift will benefit every doctor, nurse and health professional studying at KU for many generations,” David said. “When I was in training in the 1970s, I had to practice procedures on real patients. Just about every one of these poor souls knew it was my first time, but they still let me practice on them. Patients today should feel reassured that the young doctor or nurse treating them has had a great deal of experience practicing with simulation tools first. This is a dramatic improvement.” — Rosita Elizalde-McCoy

WHY THEY GAVE

“ We hope our gift will benefit

every doctor, nurse and health professional studying at KU for many generations.

— David Zamierowski

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over your shoulder INCE KU OPENED ITS DOORS 150 YEARS AGO, philanthropy

BY CHARLES HIGGINSON PHOTOGRAPHY BY BRIAN GOODMAN HISTORICAL PHOTOS COURTESY OF UNIVERSITY ARCHIVES

has played a central role in its development — indeed, its very existence. The New Englanders who founded Lawrence wanted a university here, and they acted on that desire. The first parcels of land dedicated to the university, on the hill now known as Mount Oread, came either as outright gifts or at deeply discounted prices. In the 1920s and ’30s, Elizabeth Watkins transformed the eastern end of campus, building two scholarship halls, a student hospital and a home for its nurses. Her nearby elegant home, which she bequeathed to KU, still serves as the Chancellor’s residence. Hundreds of additional examples could be cited of giving that has transformed the university during its 15 decades of existence. Taken together, private giving through KU Endowment has supported all or a portion of about two-thirds of campus buildings and 85 percent of the land available for campus expansion. Donor support also enables the university to preserve the renowned beauty of the campus and maintain infrastructure. Enjoy these pictorial examples of then and now, showing how our campuses in Lawrence and Kansas City have changed or, in a few cases, remained much the same.

Marvin Hall, today and in 1942, covered in ivy.

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Jayhawk Boulevard with Dyche Hall prominent, in 1920 and today.

North side of Strong Hall, in the 1920s and today.

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Looking across Jayhawk Boulevard toward Bailey Hall, today and in 1941.

The Kansas Memorial Union, in the 1930s and today.

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KU GIVING | FALL 2015

The Campanile, in the late 1950s and today.


The KU Medical Center campus in Kansas City, Kansas from the air, in 1939 and in 2013.

Memorial Stadium, today and, with a passing trolley car, in 1927.

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dream fields BY ROSITA ELIZALDE-McCOY PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF KANSAS ATHLETICS

T WAS A DREAM 20 YEARS IN THE MAKING — NEW PLAYING FIELDS FOR KU’S TRACK AND FIELD, SOCCER AND SOFTBALL TEAMS TO RIVAL THE BEST IN THE COUNTRY. WITH THE RECENT CONSTRUCTION AND OPENING OF ROCK CHALK PARK, THE DREAM IS NOW A REALITY.

KU Endowment played a role in acquiring the land and facilitating the development of the Kansas Athletics facilities and an adjacent recreation center for the city of Lawrence. The KU portion of the complex, 63 acres in total, represents the largest addition to the campus in more than 50 years. The new facilities rank among the elite in the country. The track-and-field surface has been recognized as the fifth Class I Certified Track in the U.S. “We now have a world-class facility that our student-athletes absolutely love,” said Sheahon Zenger,

“ It’s going to help us elevate our program to where we want to go. You can’t help but get jacked up when you play under the lights. You can’t explain it, but as an athlete it’s just exciting.” —MARK FRANCIS, HEAD COACH, SOCCER

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KU GIVING | FALL 2015


“ From a fan-experience standpoint, people are still talking about how great an experience they had, how nice a facility it is. And recruits are now talking to me about Rock Chalk Park. So from a recruiting standpoint, the word gets out. It’s a great place to be.” —STANLEY REDWINE, HEAD COACH, MEN’S AND WOMEN’S TRACK AND FIELD

Kansas Athletics director. This caught the attention of the NCAA, which selected KU to host the 2016 NCAA Regional meet, featuring the top student-athletes west of the Mississippi River. “When we have more than one stadium going at the same time, and you add in the city’s recreation center, you truly have a carnival-type atmosphere out there,” Zenger said. “It’s great.” Alumni Dru and Thomas Fritzel, of Lawrence, funded the construction of the facilities for lease back to Kansas Athletics. “Without the Fritzels’ support, Rock Chalk Park would not be a reality today,” said Zenger. The soccer and softball venues also have been lauded as some of the best in the country, and they’re helping recruit top athletes to Kansas. They include expansive locker rooms, coaches’ offices, and training rooms and equipment specific for each sport. Moreover, the park includes 7,000 spectator seats for track and field (with room for 3,000 more), 1,500 for softball and 2,500 for soccer. The softball seats are entirely seat-back chairs, as are many in the track and soccer stadiums.

“ Our facility is one of the best in the conference and the country. When I ask recruits what they like about Kansas, the first thing they say is our facility; that’s never been the answer before. We’ve gotten a few big-time commitments here recently, largely due to how impressive this facility is.” —MEGAN SMITH, HEAD COACH, SOFTBALL KUENDOWMENT.ORG

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wise and trusted

guides KENT SPRECKELMEYER, FAIA, PROFESSOR OF ARCHITECTURE

“Kent Spreckelmeyer had a profound positive effect on my life. He made a significant contribution in helping me figure out how to achieve my dream of creating a nonprofit, Kinitiative. He has become more than a professor to me, he is a friend and a father figure.” —Bakary Suso, master of architecture 2015

As mentors, they provide guidance, counsel, advice, encouragement, direction — whatever a student may need at the moment. It’s an informal, loosely defined activity, but a great mentor can become legendary for influence lasting far beyond a few years spent on campus. Here, in the words of their students, is a small selection of recent and current KU faculty known for their skill as mentors. OVERLOOK BUT DEEPLY SIGNIFICANT TO STUDENTS.

“Roger was key in my development as an artist and teacher. His creative assignments taught us to think critically and to problemsolve the most outlandish things. I still enjoy running into him and catching up — some teachers just stick with you that way.” —Laurie McLane-Higginson, bachelor’s in fine arts 1976, bachelor’s in art education 1979

“Ron is humble and underestimates his tremendous impact as a scientist and educator, and most importantly his role as a mentor. In addition to the knowledge I gained in my time studying with him as a post-doc at KU, his lasting influence has been the importance of mentoring students to be the leaders who will advance research and education into the future.” —Ken Audus, doctorate of pharmacology 1984, dean of KU School of Pharmacy

KU GIVING | FALL 2015

TEACHING, RESEARCH AND SERVICE, A ROLE THAT IS EASY TO

ROGER SHIMOMURA, M.F.A., DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR OF ART EMERITUS

RONALD BORCHARDT, PH.D., SOLON E. SUMMERFIELD DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR OF PHARMACEUTICAL CHEMISTRY

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ACULTY MEMBERS PLAY AN IMPORTANT ROLE IN ADDITION TO

KISSAN JOSEPH, PH.D., PROFESSOR OF MARKETING, DIRECTOR OF THE CENTER FOR INTEGRATED CUSTOMER EXPERIENCE, STOCKTON FACULTY FELLOW

“Kissan Joseph was one of my biggest influences during my time at KU. As I was helping to launch Foster Care Technologies in 2014, Kissan was generous with his time and gave us some great ideas. He continues to be a great mentor for me. KU is lucky to have him.” —Paul Epp, master of business administration 2014

EVANGELIA CHRYSIKOU, PH.D., ASSISTANT PROFESSOR OF PSYCHOLOGY

“Dr. Chrysikou has been a consistent academic support system throughout my undergraduate career. If I became too stressed or needed guidance, I always could ask to meet. I owe my acceptance into graduate school to her.” —Claire Gorey, bachelor’s in psychology and applied behavioral science 2013

ROB WEAVER , PH.D., PROFESSOR OF MOLECULAR BIOSCIENCES EMERITUS

“Rob Weaver and I shared some research interests. In 1978, we were both on sabbatical leave in Switzerland. I visited Rob’s lab, where he shared technical information and introduced me to colleagues whose experiments later influenced my research — leading to inventions significant for human health and rewarding to the University of Washington, where I served as a faculty member.” —Benjamin Hall, bachelor’s in chemistry 1954


JERRY BAILEY, ED.D., ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR EMERITUS, EDUCATIONAL LEADERSHIP & POLICY STUDIES

“Dr. Bailey has made an indelible mark on my studies, my career and my life. Having met my first day on campus, he mentored me through my undergraduate journey and the pursuit of both my masters’ and doctoral degrees. His patience, kind questioning, and friendship make him a KU gem. He means the world to me.” —Kari Stubbs, bachelor’s in education 1991, master’s (1995) and doctorate (2007) in education curriculum and instruction

VIRGINIA HARPER HO, J.D., ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF LAW, DOCKING FACULTY SCHOLAR

“Professor Harper Ho makes time to sit down with students, whether they are in her classes or not. She brought an exciting internship in China to students and personally guided the application process. She has since gone above and beyond to proactively help me achieve my goals.” —Kasey Considine, law and master’s in East Asian Languages and Cultures 2016

RITA H. CLIFFORD, PH.D., R.N., ASSOCIATE DEAN, COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT (RETIRED)

“My relationship with Dr. Rita Clifford spans 35 years. As a graduate student, she was my ‘go to’ person for all academic questions and sound advice. Her door was always open. To this day, I remain grateful for the quality of the education I received, and I apply the principles learned every day.” —Barbara Gill MacArthur, master of nursing 1981

KERRY BENSON, STRATEGIC COMMUNICATIONS CHAIR

“Around enrollment time, undergraduate students often asked me which journalism professors to choose. I would ask: ‘What do you want out of the class? To be a good writer? To be your best?’ If the student wanted to be their best, then I said Professor Benson.” —Devinee Fitzgerald, bachelor’s in journalism 2012, graduate student

MATTHEW SMITH, D.M.A., ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR OF KU BANDS

“Dr. Smith is the reason I came to KU for graduate studies. He pushed me outside my comfort zone; I never left feeling Dr. Smith hadn’t taught me something. I proudly count him as one of the top influences in my academic and professional life!” —Ben Harper, master of music 2015

MICHAEL DETAMORE, PH.D., CHEMICAL AND PETROLEUM ENGINEERING PROFESSOR, DIRECTOR OF THE BIOMATERIALS AND TISSUE ENGINEERING LABORATORY

“I have been lucky to have had great mentorship throughout my education. Dr. Detamore initially sparked my interest in research during a campus visit as a high school student, and his lab group has taught me invaluable research and professional skills.” —Ashley Farris, bachelor’s in biochemistry 2015

BARBARA LUKERT, M.D., PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE EMERITA

“I met Dr. Lukert on my first rotation as an intern at KU Medical Center. She has been a mentor to me ever since, a model of the kind of physician I want to be. She always puts the patient first. As a mentor, she is always interested in how you are doing and she kindly pushes you along to be better!” —Leland Graves III, M.D., Professor of Medicine and Director, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Genetics

ALICE LIEBERMAN, PH.D., PROFESSOR OF SOCIAL WELFARE, CHANCELLOR’S CLUB TEACHING PROFESSOR

“I love Alice Lieberman. She is an amazing professor who is so passionate about social work and instilled that passion into her students. She inspires students to think outside the box about so many things that impact our world.” —Betsy Fredrickson, bachelor’s in social work 1990

Far Above: The Campaign for Kansas seeks support to recruit and retain great faculty by raising endowed professorships, expanding funds to sustain research activity, and enhancing funds for awards recognizing great teaching and mentoring.

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ACROSS KU

super-supercomputing system, named Watson, took on the two all-time top Jeopardy champions in a three-round match — and won handily. The company has since turned Watson away from high-end parlor tricks, retooling the mechanics and the software to tackle serious matters. Health care has been at the top of that list. Now, patients at The University of Kansas Cancer Center can take advantage of the power of Watson (named for the company’s founder, Thomas Watson). The cancer center recently became one of 14 big-name cancer centers partnering with IBM to use Watson in a new way. Watson will compare MANY REMEMBER WHEN IBM’S

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cancer patients’ genetic data with databases of cancer genes and scientific papers about cancer genetics. Watson can complete an analysis in minutes that could take a team of experts hours or days. Of the 1.6 million Americans diagnosed with cancer each year, most receive standard treatments: surgery, chemotherapy or radiation. If those treatments fail, some patients can benefit from treatment based on gene sequencing that targets their specific cancercausing genetic mutations. But an individual’s genome contains more than 100 gigabytes of data. The challenge is the need to analyze it all, looking for relevant patterns and comparing them to published records and clinical studies. Given that cancers don’t wait around, speed also is of the essence. This is where Watson can help. The hope is to enable oncologists to gain better insights faster, using Watson to identify potential drugs that target patients’ specific genetic profiles. “As part of our efforts to offer the best care to our patients, we developed an exciting partnership with IBM Watson Health to begin analyzing complex genetic information in order to better diagnose and treat patients with cancer,” said Andrew Godwin, cancer center deputy director and director of molecular oncology at the University of Kansas Medical Center. “Our goal is to ultimately exploit critical points of vulnerability in a patient’s tumor to personalize care and improve outcomes.” The cancer center is sequencing genomes of both normal and cancerous cells of 40 patients with leukemia, lung, ovarian, colorectal or brain cancer. Other cancer centers are focusing on different cancers. Funding from the Landy Family Cancer Center fund at KU Endowment and from The University of Kansas Hospital supports the four-month project. — Charles Higginson

ISTOCKPHOTO / NOBI_PRIZUE

CODE VS. CANCER


BUSINESS AND CIVIC LEADERS from the

Kansas City metropolitan area recently

OPENING DOORS AND MINDS TO ART RENOVATION OF THE SPENCER MUSEUM OF ART IS WELL UNDER WAY,

Performing Arts in Kansas City, Missouri, to celebrate the 10th anniversary of the Advancement Board. The board is an advisory group of more

thanks to the generosity of nearly 200 University of Kansas alumni

than 80 members who work to develop

and friends who have made gifts totaling $7.4 million in support of

community support for KU Medical Center,

the project.

The University of Kansas Hospital and The

Construction began in May, and the museum will reopen in fall 2016. Recent major gifts have been made by Sam and Connie Perkins of Olathe, Kansas; John T. and Linda Stewart of Lawrence

University of Kansas Physicians, collectively known as the academic medical center. “Advancement Board volunteers

and Wellington, Kansas; Dolph Simons Jr. and his wife, Pam, of

have been out in the community, making

Lawrence; and Emprise Financial Corporation.

speeches on behalf of our campus,”

This is the first broad renovation of the museum since it was

said Bob Page, president and CEO of

built in 1977. The renovation will transform 30,000 square feet of

The University of Kansas Hospital. “They

space, including the entry lobby, central court and surrounding

have been in touch with lawmakers in

galleries. The work will expand and improve areas for teaching,

Topeka and Washington on our behalf.

learning, research and storage, and it will bolster the museum’s

They have not only been generous with

capacity for interdisciplinary study as it serves learners across

their resources, but have encouraged

Kansas and beyond.

others to follow their lead.”

The museum’s updated physical structure will reflect its

Doug Girod, executive vice chancellor

programmatic emphasis on university engagement, with a new

of the University of Kansas Medical Center,

academic suite featuring a state-of-the-art study center and

said the board has provided critical

teaching gallery, made possible through an anonymous donation

resources for the medical center to achieve

in honor of longtime curator Stephen Goddard. The design

its goals. He thanked board members for

introduces more natural light into the museum and creates indoor

their support: “Today, our accomplishments

display space that will be visible from the street and the Kansas

are not just dreams … they are reality. Each

Union. On the west side of the museum, new two-story windows

of you contributed your time and shared

will give a view of KU’s historic Marvin Grove, representing the

your passion for our institutions — helping

connection between art and nature.

others realize the potential in supporting

“The Spencer Museum’s architectural changes reflect our core purpose of opening windows, doors and minds to art for all,” said

LISA SCHELLER

gathered at the Kauffman Center for the

our academic medical center.” The Advancement Board was conceived

Saralyn Reece Hardy, the Marilyn Stokstad Director of the Spencer

in 2004 under the recommendation of

Museum of Art. “I am inspired by the generous support of so many

Forrest Hoglund, KU alumnus and member

donors to realize this collective dream that will benefit students,

of the KU Endowment Board of Trustees.

faculty and the public for years to come.”

— Rosita Elizalde-McCoy

— Lisa Scheller KUENDOWMENT.ORG

17


ACROSS KU

Using ground- and tower-mounted sensors and by physical sampling, the NEON team will collect scientific data about the natural environment for 30 years.

NATURAL CONNECTIONS

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KU GIVING | FALL 2015

The Fitch Reservation is a unique spot because it represents a transitional zone, an area with characteristics of both forested and tall grass prairie habitats. “It’s very important to be a part of NEON, because it gives us an opportunity to participate in a larger spectrum of research and also provides a much broader perspective of how information collected here and characterizations here compare on a national basis,” said Ed Martinko, director of the Kansas Biological Survey, which manages the Field Station. A CENTURY-OLD GIFT

More than 100 years ago, the first governor of Kansas, Charles Robinson, and his wife, Sara, donated their farm to the university. In 1947, Professor E. Raymond Hall requested the university secure an area specifically for ecological research. The Robinsons’ land was chosen to become the University of Kansas Natural History Reservation. The next year, Henry S. Fitch was appointed as the site’s first naturalist. In 1986, the reservation was dedicated as the Fitch Natural History Reservation in honor of Fitch and the decades of pioneering ecological studies at the site.

COURTESY OF KANSAS BIOLOGICAL SURVEY AND KU FIELD STATION

not far from the winding Wild Horse Road, there is a small clearing with a newly poured concrete path that slithers through the Fitch Reservation, a 590-acre tract of now-forested former prairie and one of 11 reserves that make up the KU Field Station. The sidewalk, carefully laid — so as to not disturb the natural habitat surrounding it — leads to a 116-foottall, orange-and-white metal tower. Seemingly out of place, this observation tower is one of 106 key sites across the U.S. chosen for the National Ecological YOU CAN HELP Observatory Network To support the KU Field (NEON). Station, contact Dale Slusser at dslusser@kuendowment.org or With these sites, scien785-832-7458. tists hope to gather valuable information about how land, life, water and climate interact over the course of a generation. The data collected will be used to make informed decisions on issues such as natural resource management and human well-being. NEON should be fully operational by 2017 and will collect data for 30 years. TWENTY MINUTES OUTSIDE LAWRENCE,


HONORING THE STUDENTS’ CHANCELLOR: ROBERT HEMENWAY THE UNIVERSITY OF KANSAS LOST A LOYAL ADVOCATE AND FRIEND when former Chancellor Robert Hemenway died July

31. Hemenway served as chancellor from 1995 to 2009, and his vision guided KU to unprecedented successes, including recordsetting fundraising and research support; increased student enrollment; the start of the National Cancer Institute designation Fitch Reservation in 1941 and 2012, showing the change in landscape from mixed-use to all forest.

process; and the resurgence of our athletics program. A former English professor who never lost his love of teaching, Hemenway was perhaps most notable for his smile and approachable nature, his passion for education and his commitment to putting students first. He took pride in making the university more student-focused and in improving the campus experience. “Chancellor Hemenway, who always preferred being called ‘Bob,’ was a wonderful and friendly man who loved his job, loved the people around him, and loved this place — and he was loved in return,” said Chancellor Bernadette Gray-Little.

LEFT: COURTESY OF KANSAS BIOLOGICAL SURVEY AND KU FIELD STATION / RIGHT: KU MARKETING COMMUNICATIONS

“Under his leadership, the university made tremendous strides in how we educate students, conduct research and serve the people of Kansas.” Hemenway is fondly remembered by people all over the country — KU alumni, former students, faculty, staff members,

Today, students and researchers from all areas of study use the KU Field Station land, which now includes more than 3,400 acres across four sites. Maintaining this amount of land is no easy task and is currently the responsibility of just two employees. “You can look at a picture on television; you can go to a movie,” Martinko said. “But when you’re actually standing in the middle of a field and seeing beautiful plants and animals in their natural setting, it’s an irreplaceable experience.” To maintain the KU Field Station as a valuable resource for children, students, researchers and visitors alike, donors can create an endowed fund to last for generations. — Victoria Sickinger

colleagues — as evidenced by the many messages of support received by the university. “Bob was an outstanding ambassador for KU,” said Dale Seuferling, president of KU Endowment. “His kind, easygoing demeanor endeared him to alumni and friends. He was a great partner with KU Endowment, traveling with us to countless events across the country. I will miss his friendship and support.” He leaves behind his wife, Leah, and eight grown children. The Hemenway family asks that memorial contributions be made to the Robert E. Hemenway Scholarship Fund at KU. Gifts may be sent in care of KU Endowment or online at www.kuendowment.org/hemenway. We can think of no better way to honor Chancellor Bob than by continuing to help students achieve their dreams. — Valerie Gieler KUENDOWMENT.ORG

19


THE FAITHFUL

KANSAS ROOTS REACH OUT TO NEW ENGLAND THE REV. BRINTON W. “PETE” WOODWARD JR.

A favorite winter pastime of Rev. Brinton W. “Pete” Woodward Jr. is maple sugaring at his home on Squam Lake in New Hampshire.

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KU GIVING | FALL 2015

Woodward played basketball and tennis for KU in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

With Kansas family ties going back to Territorial days, Woodward has remained connected to the Sunflower State. Brinton Webb Woodward, his greatgrandfather, moved from Pennsylvania to Lawrence in 1855. He established what would be the state’s first drug store — Round Corner Drug — and, in 1863, survived Quantrill’s Raid. He served on the Board of Regents in the 1870s and lived in a large home high on Mount Oread’s eastern slope. Woodward is the father of two grown sons, one of whom has been blind since birth and is developmentally delayed with autism. “The purpose of my planned estate gift is two-fold. It reinforces my commitment to broad access to education and support for those who need special tools to succeed,” Woodward said. “And it brings full circle my family’s commitment to the University of Kansas from the beginning of Lawrence and the advent of the university.” — Lisa Scheller

COURTESY OF PETE WOODWARD JR.

has embraced the culture of New Hampshire since moving there in 1977. Yet, he values his family’s historic ties to Kansas. He recently created estate plans to benefit disabled students at KU, in particular, students who are vision-impaired. A standout KU basketball and tennis player in the late 1950s and early 1960s, Woodward graduated from KU in 1962 with a bachelor’s degree in history and the humanities. As a Topeka native and third-generation Jayhawk, he carried on his family’s KU tradition. Woodward’s grandparents and parents attended KU, and his wife, Kathy (Kathleen Crothers), earned a bachelor’s degree in English from KU. In 1967, two years after earning a master’s of divinity at General Theological Seminary in New York, Woodward fulfilled his dream of participating in the ministry and coaching when he was hired as chaplain, teacher and coach at Kent School in Kent, Connecticut. Ten years later, he became headmaster for the Holderness School in Plymouth, New Hampshire, where he stayed until retirement.


THE LAST FULL MEASURE

AN UNBROKEN THREAD

Amid the university’s colorful fabric, estate gifts tie one generation to another if she were alive today. Carey studied textiles and weaving at the University of Kansas in the 1920s. Her husband, Robert Carey, earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from KU in 1930. When Mrs. Carey died in 1983, she left the bulk of her estate — $2 million — to establish endowed scholarships in textiles and mechanical engineering. To date, these scholarships have provided more than $3.5 million in support to more than 1,000 KU students. During the past three decades, the principal of the Carey estate gift has more than doubled in value. A recent recipient of Carey textiles scholarships is Jaime David, who earned a MFA in textiles this past spring. A non-traditional student, David had been out of college for 10 years when she enrolled in graduate school at KU. Thanks to scholarship support and part-time work, David graduated nearly debt-free. Chances are, Mrs. Carey would have been tickled pink, or rather, crimson and blue, if she could have seen “Color Machine,” David’s giant quilt of 187 colors that measures 10 feet tall by 47 feet wide.

David designed the quilt with a computer algorithm last fall, purchased fabric in January and went to work. Within weeks, the quilt filled her living room. By the time her final project went on display in March, it could have completely covered the front of her house. The first time she saw the entire quilt at once was when she unrolled it in the gallery of KU’s Chalmers Hall (Art and Design Building). “There’s nothing that could prepare me for the scale of it,” David said. “It just kept unrolling and unrolling. It was kind of crazy. There were things that surprised me. For instance, the lighter pattern in the middle. I felt like that gave it a little spark.” The quilt represents David’s success — stitched together from her dream of majoring in textiles and backed with generous scholarship support. “Because of the support through the Carey scholarship and a student award, I had incredible opportunities to attend textile conferences, to study in Japan and complete my largescale thesis project,” David said. “These experiences have taught me that nothing is impossible, and that it’s never too late to go back to school.” — Lisa Scheller

STEVE PUPPE

DORRIS FAIR CAREY WOULD BE SMILING

KUENDOWMENT.ORG

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CO ARCHITECTS HELIX

Construction of the Health Education Building at KU Medical Center began in August. It’s scheduled to open in 2017 as the state-of-the-art learning space for the Schools of Medicine, Nursing and Health Professions. The modern, collaborative environment will help KU fundamentally transform the way future health care professionals learn.

KU Giving Issue 21  

KU Giving is published three times a year by KU Endowment, the private fundraising foundation for the University of Kansas. We welcome your...

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