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APSCUF-KU Newsletter APSCUF-KU Lorem IpsumNewsletter Dolor

Fall 2018

Spring 2016

Kutztown University University Chapter Chapter Kutztown Association of of Pennsylvania Pennsylvania State State Association College and and University University Faculties Faculties College

Message From APSCUF-KU President, Thomas Stewart Faculty Colleagues,

One of the top questions faculty members have asked me about lately is the state of contract negotiations. As many of you know, our last contract expired this past summer; however, before it expired, the State System offered and we accepted a one-year extension. That extension expires this coming summer. Members of our local delegation attended the State Legislative Assembly last week in Harrisburg and received an update about negotiations. First, they are slightly behind where they might normally be. State APSCUF President Ken Mash attributed this to the relatively recent start of the new State System Chancellor, Dan Greenstein. The tone of the initial meeting with the Chancellor and his team was positive. A couple of issues related to retirement have been discussed. First, according to Mash, it is unlikely that there will be another early retirement incentive such as the $30,000 incentive offered in 2013. Second, the State System and APSCUF are both favorable to the idea of a phased retirement, where a faculty member could go from full-time to part-time before retiring; however, there may be some obstacles to this in state law. APSCUF will be following up on this. Also, the State Legislative Assembly passed a motion in favor of gun-free campuses in the State System. The original version of the motion was brought forward by KU’s Bill Donner. By now, you should have received your recommitment letter from State APSCUF. If you haven’t done so already, please show your solidarity by filling out and returning these forms as quickly as possible. If you didn’t receive one, let me know, and I will get one to you. Locally, there are lots of events taking place. We had around 50 APSCUF members attend the Faculty 1


Fall 2018

APSCUF-KU Newsletter Lorem Ipsum Dolor

Spring 2016

Mixer at the Saucony Creek Brewing Company. We’ve been addressing ongoing building issues through the Meet-and-Discuss team. Amy Lynch-Biniek led a well-received information session about Lytle Hall. We will provide regular updates on the progress of this. The administration presented a detailed update on Lytle Hall. One early outcome of that is a commitment from management to provide a better and more complete communication process. Your local APSCUF will be following up on that. As always, please feel free to contact me at (610) 683-4277 or sthomas@apscuf.org with any questions. In Solidarity, Tom Stewart President, APSCUF-KU

Contents In Memoriam Dr. Carl Seiple; Beloved faculty member and professor. P. 3

Student Perspective Women’s Faculty Luncheon; Move in day; New APSCUF members; Faculty Promotions. Recommitment. Flu Shot information, Membership information P. 4-6,9,10,11,12,13

Events and Recognition PA Promise legislation for affordable education; Betsy Devos’s Reform Plan for education. By Xiana Fontno p. 7-8 2


APSCUF-KU Newsletter Lorem Ipsum Dolor

In Memoriam

Fall 2018 Spring 2016

P. 8-10 The English department announces the passing of professor Carl Seiple. Seiple taught literature, research methods and drama courses. Among his many contributions, he advised the English Honors Society, the student group Actors Creating Theater, Flash Mob Drama, and was a perennial officer for the English Association of the Pennsylvania State Universities. He retired in spring 2017. Andrew Vogel, chair, Department of English Daily Brief 09.19.18

Colleagues and students appreciated and respected him for his love of literature and his dedication to students and the department. He influenced and advised many young people and always loved the arts. Stephen’s Funeral Home, Inc. Daily Brief 09.19.18

State APSCUF

State APSCUF President-Ken Mash, East Stroudsburg; Vice President-Jamie Martin, Indiana University of Pennsylvania; Immediate Past President-Steve Hicks; Lock Haven; Treasurer-Chris Hallen, Bloomsburg; Secretary-Michele Papakie, Indiana; Coach Executive Leader- John Gump, Kutztown; Faculty Officer-At-Large- Cassandra Reyes; Faculty Officer-AtLarge-Joyce Overly, Clarion; Faculty Officer-At-Large-Kara Laskowski, Shippensburg Labor Relations, (Grievance– Faculty and Coaches): Head of Labor Relations— Mary Rita Duval; Directions— Julie A. Reese. Joshua J. Grubbs. Sara E. Miller. Administrative Assistants— Jewell Tunstall. Angela Belcher Government and External Relations: Associate Dir ector of Communications— Kathryn Morton; Administrative Assistant— Ty Marks; Director of Government Relations— Sean Crampsie Membership Services: Dir ector— Nancy Koutris; Secretary/ Receptionist—Monica Troutman State Organizer: Chambr ia Thomas Researcher: Chr is Dunne Support Staff: Executive Secr etar y—Andrea Mahoney: Administrative Assistant for fiscal Affairs & Manager for physical Facilities—Beth Connelly 19 North Front Street Harrisburg, PA 17101; 717.236.7487 or 800.932.0587

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APSCUF-KU Newsletter APSCUF-KU Newsletter Lorem Ipsum Dolor

Spring 2016

Women’s Faculty Luncheon Congratulations

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The 3rd annual Faculty Women’s Luncheon, under the theme “Empowering Ourselves and Each Other,” took place on August 30th. Guest Speaker Chambria Thomas, APSCUF Organizer, presented. The event was cosponsored by APSCUF-KU and the Provost’s office and supported by the Commission on the Status of Women, Women’s Consortium, Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies program, and the KU Women’s Center. More than 40 participants networked and built community during this successful event. Emily Cripe,

APSCUF KU Vice President

Empowerment

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APSCUF-KUNewsletter Newsletter APSCUF-KU Lorem Ipsum Dolor

Move In Day

Fall 2018 Fall 2019

Spring 2016

On Saturday, August 25th, approximately fifty APSCUF-KU faculty 3 came together to welcome students and their families back to school. Move-In Day is an event that has become a tradition for our local. We get a chance to circulate throughout the DMZ, hand out cold bottles of water to thirsty families, and talk to them. It is important for students and their parents to know that they are part of a campus community that includes APSCUF. It is also a great opportunity for newer members of our union to serve and take the lead on service projects. Dr. Michael Gambone, History.

Congratulations The Kutztown Univer-

KU Leadership Faculty President: Thomas Stewart Vice President: Emily Cripe Secretary: Amy Lynch-Biniek Treasurer: Ju Zhou Delegate: Bill Donner, Anthropology & Sociology Delegate: Lisa Frye, Computer & Information Technology Delegate: Bob Kilker, English Delegate: Jason Lanter, Psychology Delegate: Thomas III Robinson, Psychology Alternate: Robert L. Smith, Communication Studies Alternate: Anke Walz, Mathematics Alternate: Yuxia Quian, Communication Studies Alternate: Carol Watson, Elementary Education Coaches President: John Gump Vice-President: Judy Lawes

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APSCUF-KU Newsletter

Committee For Action Through Politics

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Fall 2018 Spring 2016

APSCUF Upcoming Events Thursday, October 11

Representative Council

3:15pm

AF 202

Tuesday, October 16

Meet & Discuss

3:15pm Stratton 317

Tuesday, October 30

Pre Meet & Discuss

3:15pm

OM 322A

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APSCUF-KU Newsletter

Betsy DeVos On Secondary and Post-secondary Education By Xiana Fontno

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Student Perspective

Fall 2018 Spring 2016

After the 2018 presidential election, Newly appointed president Donald J. Trump made Betsy 7 DeVos the Secretary of Education. She has been vocal about her support for increased school choice, reducing federal obligations in education, and assisting underperforming schools, all of which she has addressed in her plan to reform education in the United States of America. A fact sheet made available by the U.S Department of Education provides a look at the five areas DeVos wants to reform. These objectives are part of the presidential Fiscal year budget (FY) for 2018. The proposed budget will allot $59 billion in discretionary funds towards education reform which, according to the U.S Department of Education, is a 13 percent decrease from the 2017 continuing resolution. According to DeVos, “This budget makes an historic investment in America’s students. President Trump is committed to ensuring the Department focuses on returning decisionmaking power back to the States, where it belongs, and on giving parents more control over their child’s education.” $1.4 billion will help expand school choices. The U.S Department of Education claims this would “enable more students an equal opportunity for a great education.” $167 million are for charter schools which have seen an increase in demand. $250 million will go towards lower income families so that parents can send their children to a private school of their choice. $1 billion will go to Title I, a program that helps schools meet academic standards. The idea is that more Title I grants will be funded in an effort to supply schools with financial assets to give children more rigorous coursework and teaching. Devos says she would like to “Maintain Support for the Nation’s Most Vulnerable Students.” She claims this will help children who are disabled or learning English as a second language. The budget would grant $12.7 billion to provide services to disabled students. Lastly, $736 million will go towards the English Language Acquisition program to assist students who are learning English as a second language. Part of her plan focuses on the Pell Grant and loan repayment. A Pell Grant is a federal subsidy that helps students pay for college on a need basis. The FY 2018 budget would expand this grant to year -round funding and simplify loan repayment according to the department. As for loan repayments, DeVos would like to reduce the repayment plans from five plans to one that she claims would expedite loan repayment for undergrad students. TRIO and GEAR UP programs will see reduced funding. These programs help low-income students prepare for postsecondary education and also provide services such as childcare so students can complete their education while raising children. Federal Work-Study programs are also at risk of financial reduction. DeVos has labeled it as a “poorly-targeted program”. Funds seen after the reduction will be “given to students who would benefit most”. Work-Study is a need based program that allows students to work and go to school to pay for their education. DeVos has stated that by eliminating community learning center programs, literacy development grants, and instruction grants would save taxpayers $9 billion. DeVos claims that these programs are redundant and ineffective. She also feels as though there is little evidence to support the effectiveness of these programs. ~Xiana Fontno, Professional Writing ‘19, APSCUF KU Intern https://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/budget/budget18/budget-factsheet.pdf https://www.ed.gov/news/press-releases/education-budget-prioritizes-students-empowers-parents-saves-taxpayerdollars

https://www2.ed.gov/programs/gearup/index.html https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vd2KM_jhijU&t=137s

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APSCUF-KU Newsletter Lorem Ipsum Dolor

Student Perspective

Fall 2018 Spring 2016

The Pennsylvania Promise By Xiana Fontno

8 Recently, the Pennsylvania Budget and Policy Center proposed a plan to make state higher education more affordable for lower and middle class students. The PA Promise would budget over a billion dollars in order to secure a more reasonably priced state education at any of the 14 state universities, community colleges, and increased grants for state related schools. In addition to helping recent high school graduates, the legislation aims to send adults without a college degree back to school minus the financial burdens. Here’s what Pennsylvania residents can expect from this perspective legislation. State school enrollment has dropped 10% since 2011 according to data comprised by the Keystone Research Center. This is due to the rising cost of tuition and lack of federal funding. Families are also paying more for their students to live on campus, causing college expenses to rise. According to the Keystone Research Center, “As state funding has plunged, tuition has increased, forcing families and students to pick up the slack.” The PA promise offers coverage of tuition and fees for recent high school grads that choose to attend any of the 14 state universities for a maximum of 4 years. Students who are eligible for financial aid would still receive their state and federal packages and then acquire promise funds after deduction. This resource would be available to students whose family income is less than or equal to $110,000 a year. In addition, students whose family income is less than or equal to $48,001 a year can receive a minimum grant of $2,500 and tuition and fees covered by the PA promise legislation. According to the Keystone Research Center, tuition and fees make up 73% of costs at state schools. In an attempt to slash costs of attending a four year state university, enrollment at community colleges have soared. Even that is proving to be a cumbersome financial obligation to many new college students. Statistics by the research center show that tuition has risen about 5.8% for community colleges. The bill would assure free tuition and fees for anyone attending one of the 14 PA state community colleges. However, in rural communities, many lack access to these community colleges. The PA Promise would reduce tuition costs at nonaffiliated community colleges in rural areas. These communities see higher poverty rates and lower qualities of life due to the lack of high paying jobs and education according to the Keystone Research Center. The legislation would also send adults back to school. Adults without a college degree could receive grants up to $2,000 for classroom-related instruction and would also help cover apprenticeship programs. This assistance is available to adults with a family income of less than or equal to $110,000. For more information about the PA Promise legislation, visit these websites: http:// www.senatorhughes.com/pennsylvania-promise-free-affordable-education/ and https://www.pennbpc.org/sites/default/files/KRC_PBPC_PAPromise_Final.pdf ~Xiana Fontno, Professional Writing ’19, APSCUF KU Intern

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APSCUF-KU Newsletter Lorem Ipsum Dolor

Recommitment

Fall 2018 Fall 2019

Spring 2016

On September 11th 2018, APSCUF members signed recommitment forms to show support and solidarity for their union at the WCU APSCUF department representative meeting. Thank you for sticking with your union.

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Those who do not move do not notice their chains ~Rosa Luxemberg

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APSCUF-KU Newsletter

Welcome

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Fall 2018 Spring 2016

Welcome New Members! Brad Congelio

Sports Management (8/20/18)

Marco Ehrl

Communication Studies (8/20/18)

Myung Soon Song

Mathematics (8/20/18)

John Ellerbach

English (8/20/18)

Brandon Krieg

English (8/20/18)

Necati Tekatli

Business Administration (8/20/18)

George Vera Castellano

Counseling & Student Affairs (8/20/18)

Andrew Miness

Secondary Education (8/20/18)

Tracy Vargas

Anthropology/Sociology (8/20/18)

Zhifang Li

Communication Studies (8/20/18)

Erik Day

Art/Art History (8/20/18)

Jamal Jones

Music (8/20/18)

Jayne Struble

Art/Art History (8/20/18)

Nathaniel Meyer

Art/Art History (8/20/18)

Richard Kern

Elementary Education (8/20/18)

Brenda Muzeta

Secondary Education (8/20/18)

James Gutierrez

Music (8/20/18)

Cory Hutcheson

English (8/20/18)

Andrew Thierauf

Music (8/30/18)

Pierette Kulpa

Art/Art History (8/31/18)

Christopher Harris

Social Work (9/5/18)

Kurt Cavender

English (9/5/18)

Diane Elliot

Library & Learning Technologies (9/10/18)

Kelli Deiaco

Counseling/Psychological Services (9/11/18)

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APSCUF-KU Newsletter

Congratulations

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Kutztown Faculty Promotions

FACULTY AWARDED TENURE, FALL 2018

Fall 2018 Spring 2016

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Darren Achey, Physical Sciences Tabetha Berstein-Davis, Special Education Margaret Bestwick, Elementary Education Anne Brawand, Special Education Emily Cripe, Communication Studies Michael Davis, Geography Summer Doll-Myers, Communication Design Diana Ebersole, Communication Studies Richard Heineman, Biological Sciences Yoon Mi Kim, Social Work Brian Kronenthal, Mathematics Keith Massie, Communication Studies Catherine McGeehan, Elementary Education Feisal Murshed, Business Administration George Sirrakos, Secondary Education Fang-Hsun Wei, Social Work Wing Hong Tony Wong, Mathematics FACULTY AWARDED PROMOTION, FALL 2018 Assistant Professor to Associate Professor Darren Achey, Physical Sciences Anne Brawand, Special Education Emily Cripe, Communication Studies Michael Davis, Geography Summer Doll-Myers, Communication Design Diana Ebersole, Communication Studies Edward Hanna, Social Work Yoon Mi Kim, Social Work Brian Kronenthal, Mathematics Catherine McGeehan, Elementary Education George Sirrakos, Secondary Education Fang-Hsun Wei, Social Work Wing Hong Tony Wong, Mathematics Associate Professor to Professor Albert Fu, Anthropology and Sociology Yongjae Kim, Sports Management and Leadership Studies Karen Kresge, Communication Design Amy Lynch-Biniek, English Valerie Trollinger, Music Yong Zhang, Computer Science and Information Technology

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APSCUF-KU Newsletter

Flu Shots Opportunities

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Fall 2018 Spring 2016

Moved or Planning on Moving?

Please inform the APSCUF office if you have a new address. Any changes to your name, marital status, dependents, or address will require an updated PA Faculty Health & Welfare Fund enrollment card. Please make sure to contact Sarra at (610) 683-4277 or apscufku@kutztown.edu

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APSCUF-KU Newsletter Lorem Ipsum Dolor

Fall 2018

Membership Information

Overload and Distance Education Payments

Spring 2016

Overload and related payments will be included in the October 26, 2018 paychecks. Distance education payments must be submitted locally between now and no later than November 2, 2018. Distance Education payments will be included in the November 21, 2018 paychecks. If you do not receive a distance education payment in your November 21 2018 paycheck, either the paperwork to authorize the payment was not sent to your Payroll Office by the deadline, or your Payroll Office has questions about the paperwork. In any case, you will have forty (40) days from November 21, 2018 to file a grievance if you do not receive a distance education payment, or if you are disputing the amount paid. This means that grievances must be filed at Step Two of the Grievance Procedure no later than December 31, 2018 in order to be considered timely.

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APSCUF-KU Fall 2018  

September/October newsletter

APSCUF-KU Fall 2018  

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