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2017 BELT ANNUAL REPORT

Koshi Tappu Kanchenjunga Biodiversity Education Livelihood Terra-Studio [KTK-BELT]


CONTACT US

51 Larch drive, Manhasset Hills NY 11040, USA

Nepal

Nepal Country Office: Taragaon Museum Boudha, Tusal, Nepal

Web:

www.belt-project.org www.theverticaluniversity.org

Email:

info@belt-project.org

Phone

+977 021620002


KTK-BELT studio KTK-BELT, INC. is a nonprofit organization that is tax-exempt in the United States under Internal Revenue Code (IRC) Section 501(c)(3). KTK-BELT, INC. was registered in the state of New York on August 7, 2014 and possesses the Employment Identification Number (EIN) 47-2166334. It maintains offices in New York and Nepal and complies with laws in both jurisdictions.

OUR MISSION KTK-BELT’s mission is to catalyze new models of biodiversity conservation and environmental learning in eastern Nepal. It works with teachers, farmers, youth, and women to create a ‘Vertical University’ that will span from Koshi Tappu Wildlife Sanctuary (67 m.) to Kanchenjunga (8,586 m.), the third tallest peak in the world. The idea is to give a framework to local farmers to become ‘professors’ of the Vertical University, to share their indigenous knowledge while also physically conserving threatened species and landscapes.

OUR APPROACH KTK-BELT works in concert with nonprofit cooperatives registered under the Nepal Company Act, which it helps establish and nurture, called ‘Learning Grounds.’ Each Learning Grounds, governed by a diverse local Board and monitored by the Social Welfare Council (SWC) of the Nepal Government, owns its own biodiversity-rich conservation land base, which it holds in perpetuity in order to prevent ecosystem fragmentation and deforestation. Youth Fellows and BELT Farmers, trained and supported by KTK-BELT staff, run and administer the Learning Grounds and build capacity across the 8,000-meter vertical gradient through peer-to-peer, upstreamdownstream collaboration.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS 01. Executive Summary 02. Facts & Figures 03. Conservation Impact 04. Education Impact 05. Livelihoods Impact 06. Our Supporters 07. Financial Breakdown 08. Project Team


SECTION 01 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Since we launched KTK-BELT in 2015, our singular mission has been to create the world’s first 8,000-meter ‘Vertical University’ from the plains to the Himalayas, as a medium for safeguarding the extraordinary biodiversity along this gradient. What began as an aspiration has steadily evolved into operational reality this past year. Whereas in 2016, we had just 4 youth fellows, today we have 19. Whereas we started with just one Learning Grounds partner in Yangshila, we were able to add three more in 2017, expanding our human and geographic reach literally to new heights. Whereas in 2016, KTK-BELT’s entire budget was just $135,000, this past year it doubled to over $250,000, enabling even more growth and expansion. With the addition of fantastic new partners such as the Rainforest Trust, ICFC Canada, and Nature Needs Half, we took formidable strides in building our institutional strength and sustainability. This past year, we grew to 39 full-time employees and 67 part-time or task-based employees, demonstrating that conservation work can be a major rural employment generator. Of these employees, 51 (48%) were women. Today, 86% of our staff belong to indigenous minorities and work in the villages they are from. KTK-BELT is illustrating a tangible pathway to arrest rural outmigration and improve caste and gender equality, while safeguarding nature. We are very proud that KTK-BELT and our Learning Grounds partners were recognized this past year in the global sustainability and design fields. In 2017, we won 3 major awards including the SEED Public Interest Design Award, the ‘What Design Can Do’ Climate Action Challenge in the Netherlands, and the Global Energy Award. Many of our staff and youth fellows, who had previously never traveled outside of Nepal, represented the project in major forums in Assam and Tehran, sharing our work with design and conservation leaders from around the world. While accepting that building the Vertical University will require millions more in funding, it is a testament to the connection people seem to feel with this project that over 70% of our funding has come from crowdfunding. In May, we entered the CrowdRise Earth Day Roadmap Challenge and raised $157,000 in just 28 days from over 500 donors. This earned us 2nd place in the competition, the prize for which was an additional $75,000, making it one of the most successful crowdfunding campaigns in Nepal’s history.

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Our core work has been designing and creating what we call ‘Learning Grounds’— micro-conservation hubs situated in different micro-climates and elevations. In 2017, KTK-BELT grew to over 30 Learning Grounds encompassing 200 acres of protected habitat, benefiting endangered species such as pangolins, snow leopard, and red panda. In addition to protecting IUCN Red List species, these Learning Grounds provide opportunities for place-based environmental education and green livelihood for the rural communities where they are located. The Vertical University is essentially the connection of all of these Learning Grounds to each other, which forms a giant conservation, education and livelihood corridor to help shift the relationship between people and nature. In 2017, KTK-BELT was able to move from community-level impact to landscape level impact through the Lumbasumba Conservation project. With a five year grant in the amount of $227,000 from the Rainforest Trust, KTK-BELT working with its local partner Sankhuwasabha Learning Grounds (SLG) is aiming to create a new, legally recognized ‘Category V’ protected landscape of northeastern which will be known as the ‘Lumbasumba Conservation Area.’ By formally demarcating this region, it will add 176,630 acres of protected habitat. The Lumbasumba Conservation Area will physically link two existing protected areas, Makalu Barun National Park (Established in 1992, area: 1,500 km2) and Kanchenjunga Conservation Area (Established in1997, area: 2,035 km2), substantially aiding in reviving and sustaining migratory species such as the snow leopard. A project like this is only possible because of the deep relationships we have at the grassroots level. We have been fortunate to have an incredible year, full of successes and triumphs over challenges. Many are outlined in the pages that follow. We look forward to sharing even more conservation success stories in 2018! Thank you so much to all our supporters, donors, and partners!

- THE KTK-BELT TEAM

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SECTION 02 FACTS & FIGURES

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FINANCIAL BREAKDOWN

70.9%

49.7%

24.5%

26.2%

4.6%

8.9%

CROWD-FUNDING THROUGH KICKSTARTER IN 2016 & CROWD-RISE IN 2017

RAINFOREST TRUST

LOCAL INDIVIDUAL DONATIONS

CONSERVATION PROGRAM STREAM

EDUCATION PROGRAM STREAM

LIVELIHOODS PROGRAM STREAM

15.1%

ADMIN & OPERATIONS

$250,529 EXPENDITURE OF 2017

$135,370 EXPENDITURE OF 2016

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SOCIAL FIGURES

37%

63%

39 FULL-TIME EMPLOYEES BETWEEN KTK-BELT & LG PARTNERS

67 PART-TIME TASK BASED EMPLOYEES

79%

DIRECTLY INVOLVED IN CONSTRUCTION

INDIGENOUS CASTE GROUPS

51%

48%

55 MALE EMPLOYEES

13%

NATIONAL EMPLOYEES

51 FEMALE EMPLOYEES

1%

INTERNATIONAL

106

TOTAL EMPLOYEES IN 2017

38

TOTAL EMPLOYEES IN 2016

10

59%

KTK-BELT PROJECT ANNUAL REPORT 2017

86%

FROM LOCAL REGIONS

8%

LEADERSHIP & MANAGEMENT ROLES

8%

SCIENCE & RESEARCH ROLES

89%

81 TEAM MEMBERS FROM YANGSHILA

5%

5 TEAM MEMBERS FROM KURULE-TENUPA

8%

7 TEAM MEMBERS FROM SANKHUWASABHA


PROGRAMMATIC BREAKDOWN

02

200

03

75

2000+

02

80

04

01

07

150

01

Globally endangered ‘indicator’ species being conserved (Chinese Pangolin, Indian Pangolin and Snow Leopard)

Bio-intensive permaculture farms activated

Community members reached through public awareness programs on conservation & sustainable living

Students attended 17 modules in the outdoor education program

Green BELT school designed and developed

BELT Farmers recruited and trained in permaculture, organic agriculture, seed conservation

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New BELT Fellows selected, trained and employed

Acres of habitat purchased for conservation

Educational videos created about different indigenous plants

BELT campuses’ construction underway

Learning Grounds construction started and 01 has been completed

Km of trail infrastructure developed

New Learning Grounds organization registered in Papung VDC

01

Vertical Biodiversity Fund Setup to generate revenue for longterm sustainability

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OUR GLOBAL REACH

WHAT D DO CLIM CHALLE AMSTER SEED PUBLIC INTEREST DESIGN AWARD PORTLAND, OREGON

FUNDRAISER WITH ROHIT JOHN CHHETRI & DJ RANZEN NEW YORK, BOSTON BUCKMINSTER FULLER CHALLENGE ANNIVERSARY & FINALIST NEW YORK

ADVISORS VOLUNTEERS 12

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DESIGN CAN MATE ACTION ENGE RDAM ENERGY GLOBE AWARD TEHRAN, IRAN

EASTERN HIMALAYAS NATURENOMICS FORUM ASSAM, GUWAHITI

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GLOBAL FUNDRAISING EVENTS FOR CROWDRISE FROM KATHMANDU TO NEW YORK TO MERA PEAK KTK-BELT PROJECT ANNUAL REPORT 2017

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“

I am glad that I could support KTKBELT through my performance at the New York and Boston fundraisers. The audiences showed great interest in the initiative. KTK-BELT really cares for plants and animals and, being a nature lover myself, I think what they do is very critical. The rich biodiversity of Nepal, the rare herbs found here, KTKBELT is helping maintain these assets by teaching traditional techniques to the new generations. I’d like to thank the organization for creating this initiative. My best wishes and love to KTK-BELT team!

Rohit John Chhetri Melrose Ballroom, New York Performance by Rohit John Chhetri in New York 16

KTK-BELT KTK-BELT PROJECT PROJECT ANNUAL REPORT 2017


KTK-BELT PROJECT

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“

It is an honor to be associated with KTK-BELT. This collaboration and friendship will remain forever in my heart. Ranzen Jha Melrose Ballroom, New York

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In Nepal’s context, women are never treated equally. In every field, women are underestimated and only provided minimum remuneration in comparison to men. My father passed away when I was seven years old, so I learned about gender disparity very early on. My mother suddenly became a single mother with five children- four daughters and one son. We didn’t have a single piece of land. To make ends meet, my mother along with my elder sisters worked in a construction site as labourers carrying sand, bricks, cement, and aggregate to pay for my tuition of 500 rupees. They never allowed me to work in construction site asking me only to focus on my education and build my career. Many people used to say that she should send only my brother to boarding school and educating daughters is not necessary. However, my mom never saw the difference and gave all of the younger siblings the same education. I am happy to work for an organization that also doesn’t see gender disparities and in fact, encourages women to work in all areas of the project - even engineering, IT, filmmaking, management,and account. At KTK-BELT, as the Operations and Logistics Coordinator, I am responsible for managing, supervising a team of over 39 full-time interdisciplinary staff and more than 60 parttime employees. I’ve learned how to begin and implement complex construction projects, all the while ensuring that gender and caste inclusivity is at the center of the process. In January, I even represented the project globally at the Energy Globe Award conference in Iran. Along with Kumar Bishwakarma, our local partner’s liaison, we presented the project. It was my first trip abroad. Although overwhelming at first, I realized I can also represent the project at a global level and interact with higher level stakeholders. I still have a lot more to learn but feel that I am ready to take on new challenges. Pema Bhutia Operations and Logistics Coordinator KTK-BELT PROJECT ANNUAL REPORT 2017

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SECTION 03 CONSERVATION IMPACT KTK-BELT’s philosophy of conservation is to develop approaches that protect the entire biotic community, as opposed to any single species, no matter how iconic or charismatic. The downstream implication of this full ecosystem approach has been that we are focused first on safeguarding terrestrial habitat through our land purchase model, whereby we support local nonprofit Learning Grounds organizations to purchase biodiversity-rich, intact ecosystems in perpetuity. Our goal is to safeguard land in such a way that larger community forests and government forests are linked, to expand habitat at a landscape level, across the elevation gradients. In this way, even small parcels of land can have significant and meaningful conservation value, by expanding habitat for predation, reproduction and other life processes. In 2017, KTK-BELT spent nearly half of its budget on conservation activities, with $63,250 being spent directly on land purchase, bringing the total land area to over 200 acres of habitat. However, the impact of these strategic land acquisitions cannot be measured in their physical size but in the extant of new connectivity created, which most benefits apex predators, which are among the most threatened groups in Nepal and globally. KTK-BELT is conserving agro-diversity. Today it is estimated that globally 12 crops account for over 90% of our food consumption, with thousands of food crop varieties in danger of being lost. As the impact of industrial monoculture continues to grow and food diversity attenuates, it is ever more important, to protect local heirloom seeds and incentivize permaculture and homesteads that adhere to agro-forestry. Many of our Learning Grounds are essentially permaculture farms actively safeguarding varieties of traditional crops that have been replaced with hybrid or GMO crops by global agroindustries. Alongside these traditional varieties, with support from Everything Organic Nursery in Kavre, we have also created experimental plots with new, locally suited, nonGMO, organic varieties of fruits and vegetables, as farmers are also in need of novel crops, to sustain interest in agriculture. The Learning Grounds physically conserve native crops in danger of being lost, and also educate and incentivize BELT Farmers to do the same. By promoting and facilitating 100% organic agriculture wherever the Learning Grounds are located, KTK-BELT is also protecting the ‘unseen’ soil biodiversity and health of pollinators, which have also precipitously declined in both the local and global context. In 2017, KTK-BELT was able to move from community-level impact to landscape level impact through the Lumbasumba Conservation project. With a five year grant in the amount of $227,000 from the Rainforest Trust, KTK-BELT working with its local partner Sankhuwasabha Learning Grounds (SLG) is aiming to create a new, legally recognized ‘Category V’ protected landscape of northeastern which will be known as 22

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the ‘Lumbasumba Conservation Area.’ By formally demarcating this region, it would add 176,630 acres of protected habitat, of which more than 80% is currently densely forested. The Lumbasumba Conservation Area would physically link two existing protected areas, Makalu Barun National Park (Established in 1992, area: 1,500 km2) and Kanchenjunga Conservation Area (Established in1997, area: 2,035 km2), substantially aiding in reviving and sustaining mammals, invertebrates, amphibians, and birds which migrate between the two areas for feeding, breeding, grazing, predation, and predator avoidance. As this is a vital snow leopard corridor, it would also help conserve one of the world’s most iconic endangered species. Species conservation impact is extremely hard to substantiate and measure. However, KTK-BELT has been able to engender more than modest impact for the conservation of the Indian and Chinese Pangolins, two of the 8 global species of pangolin which are found in Nepal. As this species has only one predator (humans), by educating local people about the immense ecosystem services created by this species and its status as the world’s most illegally trafficked mammal, with its scales being smuggled even more than rhino horns or tiger pelts, we were able to substantially shift the attitudes and behaviors of people in Yangshila. Over the next year, we will be expanding our pangolin conservation work across northern Morang from Yangshila eastward through community education and awareness building as well as strategic land purchase of sensitive pangolin habitats. Given our strength in ground-level work, KTK-BELT can create species conservation impact for those species where community education and awareness at the grassroots level is often sufficient for protecting the species. We therefore will expand this program to other species such as Himalayan Musk Deer, Gangetic River Dolphin, Vultures, and Blue Sheep, all species poached by humans despite having no predatory instinct towards them.

02

200

03

75

Globally Endangered ‘indicator’ species beig conserved (Chinese Pangolin, Indian Pangolin and Snow Leopard)

Bio-intensive permaculture farms activated

Acres of habitat purchased for Conservation

Educational videos created about different indigenous plants

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The goal of the Lumbasumba Conservation Area project is to establish and demarcate a new, legally recognized ‘Category V’ protected landscape in Sankhuwasabha district of northeastern Nepal which would be called the ‘Lumbasumba Conservation Area.’ By formally demarcating this region, it would add 176,630 acres of protected habitat, of which more than 80% is currently densely forested.

- Karma Bhutia

SLG Director

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LUMBA SUMBA CONSERVATION PROJECT LCP, a five-year initiative funded by the Rainforest Trust aims to establish a 176,000acre conservation area in upper Sankhuwasabha (formerly Chepuwa, Pawakhola, and Hatiya VDCs), a currently unprotected/undesignated region between Kanchenjunga Conservation Area and Makalu Barun National Park. By declaring the Lumbasumba, it will fill a critical conservation gap, particularly for migratory species such as snow leopard and blue sheep that traverse this high elevation landscape. Considering the natural and cultural richness of the Bhot Khola region and historical dependence by indigenous herders and farmers, Category V designation under the IUCN global protected areas system will ensure that livelihood needs and conservation objectives are dually met. In the first phase of the project, orientation programs and community dialogues were organized at the regional, local and households level to disseminate the project aims and activities. Following this, biodiversity inventory programs, extensive socioeconomic survey, and sensitization programs were initiated in the project area. The next phase entails preparation of a detailed feasibility report and designation of the protected area at the local level. This will in turn help to regulate and manage conservation activities, halt illegal poaching, and provide a framework designation at the National Level. Awareness programs focusing on endangered habitats and species in the area, their importance to the larger ecosystem, will facilitate and enhance knowledge among local farmers and herders of the Lumbasumba region

Sankhuwasabha

TEAM: Rajeev Goyal, Mohan Pandey, Aditi Subba, Nitesh Singh, Wangchu Bhutia, Karma Bhutia, Kamala Rai

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White Lake, Sankhuwasabha


Mohan Pandey, LCP Coordinator

Khija Bhote, Community Mobilizer, LCP


BIODIVERSITY INVENTORY The Proposed Lumbasumba Conservation Area is endowed with unique geological features, including high altitude wetlands and rangelands supported with rich biological diversity. The huge gradient in elevation (800-5200 masl) supports at least 15 forest types 6 climatic regions, 2,000 species of flowering plants, 58 mammals, 187 birds, 6 fish species, 6 amphibian species, and 9 butterfly species suspected or known to occur based on feasibility studies and published literature. Among these, 19 mammals and 12 bird species are listed in various categories (CR, EN, VU, NT) of IUCN Red List. Specifically, the following fauna are found in the proposed LCP: Himalayan Musk Deer (EN), Red Panda (EN), Snow Leopard (VU),Asiatic Wild Dog (EN), Himalayan Black Bear (EN), Wood Snipe (VU), and Steppe Eagle (EN). This region is equally significant for flora. A database of 110 species belonging to 43 families has been prepared so far, of which 3 are endemic plant species (Berberis mucrifolia, Pedicularis oxyrhyncha and Begonia panchtharensis), 4 species [(Nardostachys jatamasi (CR), Taxus wallichiana (EN), Abies spectabilis (EN) and Aconitum heterophyllum (EN)] are listed in different threat categories of IUCN Red List, 8 species are listed in CITES appendix, 30 species are prioritized by Government of Nepal for conservation, and more than 80 species are medicinal. Moreover, the Lumbasumba is endowed with numerous lakes and waterfalls such as White Lake and Dalle Lake, offering appropriate habitat for several fauna and flora. Such critical habitats must be preserve before its value is threatened with human intervention.

TEAM: Mohan Pandey, Nitesh Singh, Ganga Limbu, Rajeev Goyal, Wangchu Bhutia

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EXPANDING THE COMMUNITY LAND TRUST In 2017, KTK-BELT spent $63,250 on conservation land purchases to safeguard old growth forests, natural springs systems, and other vital habitats across the Koshi Tappu-Kanchenjunga landscape vulnerable to land grabbing by urban developers seeking to make a quick profit. As the land is purchased for the local Learning Grounds partners it stays in the communities that have stewarded these habitats for generations. This community land trust approach is a direct response to the insidious process of ‘land plotting’ secondary to proliferation of rural roads across the Himalayas which has accelerated the conversation of highly important forests systems into housing or agriculture monoculture. Since 2015, over 200 acres of habitat has been safeguarded across 33 locations of the KTK-BELT. These habitats include pangolin forests in Yangshila, wetlands in Koshi Tappu, and rhododendron forests in the TinjureMiilkhe-Jaljale forests, each with its own particular threats and opportunities. After carrying out biodiversity inventories of these lands, strategies for reviving endangered species in particular are then drafted and implemented by KTK-BELT staff.

TEAM: Rajeev Goyal, Lokendra Yakkha, Kumar Bishwakarma, Karma Bhutia

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ENDANGERED SPECIES RESEARCH & CONSERVATION Snow Leopard: Snow leopard (Panthera Unica) metaphorically known as “Ghost of Mountain” is a charismatic cat species that dwells throughout the remote high mountains and Himalayas of Central Asia including Nepal. Elusive and considered a keystone species, snow leopards are s barometer of healthy mountain ecosystem. However, human intervention in high altitude rangeland for grazing domestic stock forcing wild ungulates to graze in limited area, illegal hunting of snow leopard and its prey throughout its range to meet local and economic demand their population undoubtedly have declined in recent decades. It has been listed in vulnerable category by IUCN, Appendix I by CITES and protected under government’s law of Nepal. Learning such unfortunate scenarios, KTKBELT in partnership with Rainforest Trust is aiming to establish Lumbasumba Conservation Area to create vast conservation corridor for snow leopard which links two protected areas: Makalu-Barun National Park and Kanchenjunga Conservation Area. Pangolins: Eight species of pangolin are found in tropical Africa and Asia. Among them two species: Chinese pangolin (Manis pentadactyla) and Indian pangolin (Manis crassicaudata) are found in Nepal. Although harmless to human they are heavily poached for their scales and meat giving the species the unenviable status of being the world’s most heavily trafficked mammal. The pangolin has just one predator: humans.

Pangolin art campaign with Louise Fletcher

Through awareness campaigns, KTK-BELT has shifted perceptions among local farmers, sensitizing them to the huge threats facing pangolins and their immense ecosystem value. Through its land conservation work, KTK-BELT has been able to prevent pangolin habitat from being degraded by human activity.

TEAM: Rajeev Goyal, Priyanka Bista, Nitesh Singh, Wangchu Bhutia, Mohan Pandey, Ganga Limbu, Anish Magar 32

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Pangolin awareness program in 11 different villages


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Anish Magar explaining about the pangolin banner made of scales painted by 150 community members 34

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A year ago, I had to sit quietly and watch many pangolins being hunted in our community. If I spoke, it wouldn’t have been taken seriously. Today, after a massive effort which included village awareness meetings, art workshops by Louise Fletcher, community exhibits, and even distributing pangolin themed tote bags, the situation is now very different. It has become unpopular to hunt animals. I believe now, at least in our community, the poaching of pangolins has completely stopped. This endangered species still has a chance to survive but we need to keep advocating and raising awareness. Anish Magar Youth Conservation Corps member, Yangshila KTK-BELT PROJECT ANNUAL REPORT 2017

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INDIGENOUS KNOWLEDGE CONSERVATION Indigenous knowledge is an under-valued and largely ignored system of place-based information. The nature of indigenous knowledge places it at threat of disappearance, just as is the case with local languages, crafts and artisanship. The Indigenous Knowledge Portal (IKP) was created by KTK-BELT and its Learning Grounds partners in 2016 to attempt to capture, display, celebrate and conserve the incredibly intricate array of local knowledge held by farmers from all walks of life inthe KTK-BELT landscape. In 2016 we began the IKP and documented 15 videos of farmers talking about plants found in their region. In 2017, this portal expanded to 75 videos including plants such as Ghodtapre which helps with brain functions, Chandmaruwa which treats high blood pressure, and Tulasi which treats common cold. In addition to the documentation, we also started showcasing the videos locally during movie nights and other functions. Watching these videos, now, people are learning from each other. We even invited farmers to the outdoor education classes where they illustrated the use of local medicinal plants to the the students- making them more aware of the depth of indigenous knowledge and their own landscape. Ganga Limbu, a 23-year old local youth had started her training in film-making in 2016 has now become the lead coordinator for the IKP. Along with filming, she also oversees budget projections, program planning, work plan development and recruitment of other youth fellows.

TEAM: Rajeev Goyal, Priyanka Bista, Ganga Limbu

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Field visit in Habeli Outdoor Learning Center

Both my parents are farmers. I did not think that the knowledge they possessed was important. In the past year working as a volunteer with KTK-BELT and YPLG, I’ve learned the importance of indigenous knowledge. In fact, my mother was also filmed in one of the videos. She talked about holy basil. I’m currently assisting with the documentation of indigenous knowledge of plants with farmers and I also help with the research on scientific information about each plant. It’s fascinating to get to know each plant deeply both for its local purposes and also global usages. I would like to pursue an education in Botany in the future and continue to learn more. Anamika Subba Kerabari- 5, Satishale.

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LEARNING GROUNDS PLANTATIONS The topography of the Chure region has given rise to two different climate zones, tropical and subtropical, and numerous micro-climates. The location of our Category II Learning Grounds reflects this diversity. In Rangcha (450 m), we created a tropical permaculture demonstration on just 3 acres of land containing mango, mangosteen, betel nut, lychee, pineapple, papaya, avocado, coconut, and other tropical fruits, intended to supply organic food to local children in the outdoor education program. The 8-acre Aaptar Learning Grounds (700 m) likewise focused on rice plantation and contains four varieties of rice to save the local seeds in order and increase food security while promoting organic cultivation methods. The Learning Ground itself successfully produced 1100 kilos of rice, lentils and various other vegetables this year, which generated the first revenue from the project. The 10-acre plot in Dahar (900 m) focused more on essential oils, where lemongrass, fig, artemesia and other oil bearing plants were planted this year with participation of 32 BELT farmers. The 40-acre Maharaje Learning Grounds (1300 m), our flagship Learning Grounds, has been developed as a bio-intensive organic farm, with expert guidance from Judith Chase and Binod Puri of EVON Nursery in Kavre. Components of the farm design include 30 almond trees and 23 apple trees of low chilling varieties whilst other plants like macadamia nuts, grapes, kiwis, artichokes, and peppers are in progress to be implemented in the area. In addition, other local rare varieties of crops like filinge, buckwheat and mustard have been cultivated that not only conserves crop varieties in the area but further assists in pollination by attracting local bees, thereby also conserving threatened pollinators.

Aaptar Learning Grounds

TEAM: Rajeev Goyal, Wangchu Bhutia, Binod Puri, Ranjan Karki, Abhishek Bishwakarma, Deepak Magar

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Maharaje farm


Maharaje farm training with Binod Puri of EVON Nursery, Kavre, lead coordinator of the Maharaje Plantations project

Rice harvesting in Aaptar Learning Grounds


SECTION 04 EDUCATION IMPACT The Nepalese education system remains focused on rote learning focused on the ‘iron gate’ School Leaving Certificate (SLC) exam administered in 10th grade. The curriculum tested by this exam is irrelevant to rural contexts, and is not taught in a practical manner, meaning that rural youth lose interest in formal education at an early age and forego higher education in favor of outmigration. Despite the richness of economic opportunities inherent in agro-forestry and naturebased products and services, rural youth are not made aware of these possibilities. A new approach to rural education that bridges indigenous and academy knowledge and brings in technology and design to make it exciting to young people, is critical to reverse the trend. In 2017, we piloted our outdoor education program in Yangshila. The key to the whole program was taking students out of the classroom each Friday and Sunday and bringing them to the interpretive points along the plant trails and Learning Grounds that we are designing. This direct, sensorial form of learning has been shown to be more impactful and engaging than simple rote learning, which they are already inundated with. The goal was to also sensitize them to the environmental challenges around them so that when they are not in school, they can share knowledge within their own communities. Our goal is to develop and administer 195 place-based modules for 6th, 7th and 8th graders, that will engage 720 Nepali students by 2019 in Yangshila, Kurule and Koshi Tappu. The Yangshila pilot was divided into 5 phases. In Phase 1, ‘Stakeholder Engagement’ we engaged in encounter and exchange workshops with government officials at local and district levels responsible for administration of the outdoor education program. MOUs were drafted with the district education officials and with the local community forest user groups (CFUGs) to obtain requisite permissions to allow children to enter the forest during school hours. After MOUs were drafted with the BELT Schools targeted for this project in Yangshila, we created a steering committee comprised of relevant government stakeholders, teachers, parents and CFUG members. Phase 2 involved selecting and training youth fellows who learned the outdoor education methodology, helped craft and deliver modules, and built capacity of the BELT School teachers. Phase 3 consisted of research and development of place-based outdoor education modules. As part of this, surveying and mapping of catchment area around the Learning Grounds and trails was carried out to designate the ‘interpretation points.’ We then reviewed existing best practices in outdoor education, forest schools, environmental education programs from around the world, while also studying carefully the existing grades 6-8 curriculum of

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government schools. Modules were drafted and shared with the Steering Committee for feedback and endorsement. During Phase 4, equipment and supplies were purchased for the schools to implement the outdoor education program. Weekly courses were delivered to students for grade 6. Phase 5 focused on replication. In terms of content, in 2017 we developed 12 modules focused on the following topics, which will be expanded and deepened to develop additional place-based modules tied to the interpretive points: 1) The Sikti Plant Trail; 2) Mapping our Learning Grounds; 3) Pangolin Art Workshop; 4) Species Conservation; 5) Ecosystem Services; 6) Forest Interrelationships; 7) Plant Taxonomy; 8) Botanical and Indigenous Knowledge; 9) Water Cycle and Precipitation; 10) Natural Water Filtration; 11) Observing Birds: A Basic Introduction; and 12) Wetland Filtration. Exhibits and awareness programs in the Learning Grounds are helping to bring this education to the communities at large. Often students from the Outdoor Education program present their knowledge at these events. By showing documentary films, global issues are tied to local opportunities.

2000+

02

80

04

01

07

Community members reached through public awareness programs in conservation & sustainable living

Students attended 17 modules in the outdoor education program

Green BELT school designed and developed

BELT campuses’ construction underway

Learning Grounds’ built fabric under construction, with 1 completed

Km of trail infrastructure developed

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First module in the forest 44

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I will run and come to attend the classes even when my parents tell me to look after the goats or do house chores. I don’t want to miss any outdoor classes. I wish outdoor classes would never close! Bhakta Bahadur Khadga Grade 6 Student, Sawitri High School

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OUTDOOR EDUCATION Over the course of the last year, KTK-BELT’s Outdoor Education Program has successfully implemented 17 modules created by the Team and has experienced positive outcomes from the students studying and participating this program. Eighty students were educated in contemporary global environmental issues and conservation alternatives in order to make them think and respond beyond what is taught inside the walls of the classroom. Students are taught through practical activities which include the arts, literature, scientific experiments and many walks in their neighborhood Sikti Trail. This has allowed students to broaden their vision of education and their role in the broader community. Students who were reserved and reluctant in the initial phase of the class have now become mini-advocates, frequently preaching about environmental issues and conservation acts to their community. We have observed them from taking education as a constant obligatory act of childhood to acknowledging the enjoyment education provides to learn and explore more than what is written in their books. Classes held in the Outdoor Education Program has significantly emphasized in students to speak forward and present themselves in larger mass to build their confidence. This is an extremely crucial part in developing child psychology and the personality of our students as we had noticed that despite a student being very smart, they are reluctant to come forward and present themselves.

TEAM: Priyanka Bista, Wangchu Bhutia, Aditi Subba, Durga Kattel, Ganga Limbu along with guest lecturers

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Module on water cycle and precipitation


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“

Education plays an essential role in enhancing conservation awareness, especially to children from a young age�, is what we all learn and that was all my learning limited to whilst studying environmental conservation. However, to be able to practice that learning virtually and see the difference it makes in individuals, asserted the knowledge that I had upheld throughout my academical studies. Moreover, to be able to work in a team of enthusiastic individuals trying their best to elevate knowledge for the students has been nothing short of utter delight. And even if teaching more than sixty students through the magnificent neighborhood forest gets tough at times, it is the eagerness of those students to discover and learn more that gets me going through each module. Aditi Subba Conservation Program Officer

Module on water filtration 48

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BELT SCHOOLS PROGRAM

Participatory workshop to design the eco-school

Over the course of a year, KTK-BELT’s Outdoor Education Program successfully implemented 17 modules aimed at 6th graders, receiving enthusiastic feedback from the students in the program. Three schools were selected as partner schools for the program: Shree Sabitri High School, Shree Janasewa Basic School and Shree Shanti Primary School. Timely workshops and meetings with partner schools were held every quarter to update the students’ performance. Apart from Shatishale, the Outdoor Education Team has further moved ahead in designing an eco-friendly school in Maharajey Learning Grounds. The school in the area is one of the oldest schools in Yangshila, constantly hit by natural disasters such as landslide and earthquakes. To commence building the eco-school, surveys were conducted along with the research of sustainable buildings existing in the village area nearby. Then, two workshops were held with the community where they developed models and selected the location and types of designs they preferred. Scholarships were distributed for 26 marginalized students from one of the partner schools. Parents who could not afford a set of uniforms or warm clothes for their children were supported with scholarships from Scott Skinner and the Phulmaya Foundation. Partner school Janasewa Basic School was a beneficiary of this program with students receiving school uniforms, stationery and other academic essentials.

TEAM: Priyanka Bista, Kumar Bishwakarma, Durga Kattel, Ganga Limbu, Pema Bhutia, Wangchu Bhutia

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Meeting with teachers of Sabitri High School

Coordination meeting with partner schools’ teachers


Scholarships for economically struggling students impacted by the landslides disaster in Jansewa School

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“

When the projector light shone directly on my face, I saw no one in the crowd. It felt like there was no one in front of me. That made me speak, unafraid, without a single bit of hesitation. Seeing me speak, now more of my friends are encouraged to come forward as well. Aruna Limbu Shree Sabitri High School Outdoor Education Student

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Aruna Limbu speaking about the importance of pangolins in front of 300 audience members KTK-BELT PROJECT ANNUAL REPORT 2017

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It’s been interesting for me, as a science teacher of one of the partner schools, to observe our students change during their year-long engagement through the outdoor education program. If, before, when told to not do something, they would’ve either said, ‘No, I will do it’ Or ‘OK, I wont’.Now they ask the question ‘why?’ Students have become more curious and interested in learning new topics. Urlesh Rai Sabitri High School

Trail walk with partner school teachers, community forest user group members and other community representatives KTK-BELT PROJECT ANNUAL REPORT 2017

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EXHIBITS AND AWARENESS PROGRAMS Keeping with our philosophy that community engagement is indispensable to biodiversity conservation, KTK-BELT organized local awareness raising events in Yangshila and Kurule-Tenupa. While workshops, seminars and orientations were also organized, none were as uplifting and important as movie nights conducted to create awareness and promote action through the power of cinema. Over the last year, three movie nights were conducted centering on various topics of both local and global importance, and each had more viewers than the preceding one. The first film to be screened was a documentary on Mira Rai, a Nepalese trail runner. The icon herself had a marginalized background not unlike that of those watching the film, making it even more inspiring to local youth who saw themselves in her story. The Next Movie Night was about plastic pollution. The 2016 documentary, ‘A Plastic Ocean’ uncovered the unsettling truth of marine waste and how it was affecting the overall environment of the world and how future generations would ultimately face an environmental catastrophe that might be impossible to solve. The viewers were made aware of how harmful plastics could be not only for personal health but the entire ecosystem. Although Nepal is a landlocked country without an ocean nearby, pollution of this gigantic water resource would mean disturbing the cycle of carbon sink, increasing the level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and ultimately a rise to greenhouse gases. The last movie night saw the highest number of viewers, proving how informative and successful the past screenings have been. The third documentary, “Pangolins of Yangshila’ was created by Ganga Limbu, a youth fellow from the community who told the story of this endangered species and how its last hope remained with the viewers themselves.

TEAM Priyanka Bista, Wangchu Bhutia, Mina Rai, Ganga Limbu, Durga Kattel Videos of local farmers shown Indigenous Knowledge Portal 56

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Movie night in Pragati Chowk Learning Grounds with over 300 community members attending to watch documentaries KTK-BELT PROJECT ANNUAL REPORT 2017

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When my grandchild saw me burning plastic oil wrapper, she said immediately, grandmother, you will get cancer. Please don’t burn plastics. We saw a video about its impact on movie night. Here, let me help you find some twigs to help you light the fire but please don’t burn plastic. Local community member, Yangshila

Movie night in Pragati Chowk Learning Grounds, Yangshila, attended by over 300 people, where ‘Plastic Ocean’ was screened in collaboration with the Plastics Foundation

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BELT CAMPUSES Tamur BELT Campus building is conceived as a flexible community center, providing suitable spaces for meetings, training, research and exhibitions. This space will enable the local communities to have a gathering space and facilities where to understand and study local problems, find collettive solutions and build capacities. The structure is designed to respond to local climate and provide passive solutions to achieve sustainable livable spaces. Construction techniques are thought to minimize impact on environment and consume as less water as possible, introducing compressed earth blocks, rammed earth walls, locally sourced timber and roof tiles.

TEAM: Priyanka Bista, Marco Cestarroli, Suraj Budhathoki, Sanam Pradhan, Pabitra Magar, Anila Rai

ENGINEERS: Geotech engineering

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Tamur Learning Grounds foundation coming up KTK-BELT PROJECT ANNUAL REPORT 2017

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Rammed earth training help in Bhaisetar, KuruleTenupa, by earth building engineer from Spain, Yago Cuevas, Estudio Cavernas 62

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This is my favorite spot in the building. I can feel the breeze. The views of the landscape are beautiful! It’s a fun space to sit with your friends, eat and also maybe read.’ Buddhiraj Magar, Student from Jansewa School

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LEARNING GROUNDS DESIGN-BUILD Over the past year, most of our work concentrated

on acquiring land for the local Learning Grounds, creating a concept for the Learning Grounds, and engaging local communities in the stewardship and design of the Learning Grounds. This year, our signature project was the Pragati Chowk Learning Grounds which will function as a youth training space, ICT lab for research and media work and a place where biodiversity data will be stored. We also began development of Rangcha Learning Grounds, where more than 11,000 compressed earth bricks, with extremely low embedded carbon, climatically adapted, were created. We also created fencing of our Learning Grounds using local bamboo and engaged local labor. All of these construction and design activities have engaged local youth and farmers in income generating activities, which has led to additional support and interest among communities in the project.

TEAM: Priyanka Bista Suvoraj Limbu, Suman Rai, Tek Man Magar

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Dahar Learning Grounds with Wolfgang Kotz, volunteer

Dilmaya Mahat, Eco-Products and Services Fellow, lays green bricks in Rangcha Learning Grounds


Subaraj Limbu, eco-construction worker, assembling a CSEB house

Dahar Learning Grounds construction


SECTION 05 LIVELIHOODS IMPACT One of the main drivers of poaching, illegal wildlife trade, and habitat degradation is the lack of alternative employment at the village level. Therefore, KTK-BELT’s strategy for conservation impact has been to establish Learning Grounds embedded in communities which can catalyze new employment through sustainable products and services. The Learning Grounds do this through 1) demonstration of alternative, more efficient methods of agro-forestry; 2) giving easy access to technology, tools, and plant material; 3) providing employment opportunities in green building, livestock rearing and other areas; and 4) stimulating eco-tourism for the entire community. Though we are still early in our livelihood impact, the initial interventions included setting up for four main organic agriculture-based Learning Grounds in Rangcha (450 m), Aaptar (600 m), Takure (1200 m) and Maharaje (1400 m), directly reaching more than 150 rural households living adjacent to the Learning Grounds. These Learning Grounds have started to function as training hubs for local farmers, especially women, who do not have even the most basic support such as access to seeds/plant material, water, solar dryers, compost, and agriculture tools. The Learning Grounds are also meant to foster more communal approaches to agriculture which can reduce labor burdens and foster resilience. This year we formally launched the ‘BELT Farmers Program,’ essentially KTK-BELT’s version of a payment for ecosystem services (PES) scheme. The basic arrangement is that in exchange for acquiescing to not sell their land for 7 years and committing to zero poaching, BELT Farmers receive benefits proportional to their sustainability commitments, such as access to raw inputs, technology, markets and income-generating home-stay investment. When local farmers do not sell their land, there are many conservation benefits. First, it helps curb rural land grabbing, which has caused haphazard urbanization and massive levels of ecosystem fragmentation in Nepal. Second, it ensures that local farmers are the long-term recipients of the benefits of the Learning Grounds. Another way in which KTK-BELT is making livelihood impact is through the BELT Fellows Program. This program provides training, capacity building and full-time employment to youth ages 18-35. In 2016, there were 4 youth fellows and in 2017 there are 19, showing strong growth. The program seeks to tap into the interests and talents of individual youth. Some youth fellows focus on film and photography, whereas others focus on construction or outdoor education. The idea is that one day, by having 60 youth across the entire Koshi Tappu-Kanchenjunga landscape, specializing in different skills of value to the Vertical University, they can lead and further develop the project.

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This year also saw the launching of the ‘Vertical Biodiversity Fund’ (VBF), the purpose of which is to create revenue through green products and services from across the Koshi Tappu-Kanchenjunga landscape, from Learning Grounds to Learning Grounds, and use that revenue to provide more green employment and conserve additional acres of conservation land. In November of 2017, KTK-BELT was selected as one of 13 winners from over 400 global projects in the ‘What Design Can Do’ Challenge in Amsterdam. As a result, we participated in a 6-month accelerator program led by Social Enterprises NL to further develop our green livelihoods arm, develop the VBF and realize the vast potential for green products and services to make the project more sustainable.

150

01

19

01

BELT Farmers recruited and trained in permaculture, organic agriculture, seed conservation

New BELT Fellows selected, trained and employed

New Learning Grounds organization registered in Papung VDC

Vertical Biodiversity Fund Setup to generate revenue for longterm sustainability

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BELT FELLOWS PROGRAM The BELT Fellows Program was developed to recruit, train and build the capacity of 60 youth fellows from across the Koshi Tappu-Kanchenjunga landscape. By bringing together young people from different castes, ethnicities, and backgrounds, our aim is to create a pipeline of young leaders to lead the vertical university. The youth fellows are supported to gain skills in different competencies under the rubric of conservation and sustainable entrepreneurship, thereby helping to reduce rural out-migration, a central objective of the project. These skills include species conservation, design, green building, organic agriculture, film and photography, eco-tourism and hospitality, among other skills that will create youthful capacity across the BELT. Our belief from the beginning has been to ensure that local knowledge needs to remain in local communities. The youth we train from the regions help in that process. Today, youth fellows, in each of our program areas have become the backbone of KTK-BELT. If, initially, they had little to no skills entering their program areas, today, they are able to lead as coordinators or supervisors in the areas of work. To support their growth and mentor the local Fellows, we recruit young, highly talented staff and global volunteers.

Ganga Limbu, youth fellow, participating in the 2017 Balipara Foundation Conference

While in 2016, we had five youth fellows from Yangshila in 2017, our fellows cohort increased to 17 fellows (7 women and 10 men). They are leading design-build, construction, accounting, products and services, and agriculture. Last year, they even participated in international conferences with Ganga Limbu attending the Balipara Foundation’s Naturenomics Forum in Guwahati where she presented her project, Indigenous Knowledge Portal, in front of 300 esteemed scientists, researchers, conservationists and activists.

TEAM: Priyanka Bista, Pema Bhutia, Ganga Limbu, Mina Rai

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Rammed earth training


Screen printing workshop

Ganga being filmed for the Eastern Himalayan Naturenomics forum video


When we first started working on the CSEB project where we were making earth blocks using the Auram 3000 machine, there was a lot of opposition and also ridicule. People, including our neighbors, family members used to say that as girls if we work in construction our bones are going to break, our bodies will be weaker, and we’ll dangle from the machines. Of course, it was hard physically and initially my body really hurt but we got used to it. It was a wonderful experience being a part of this team where men and women worked together hand-in-hand. We ended up producing 24,685 bricks of all sizes. After a few months, the dialogue of community members started to change. In fact, a women’s group in Rangcha village actually started doing bamboo work themselves. They said that seeing our work made them realize that they, themselves could also do construction work. In Satishale, today, we get numerous women applicants both old and young for construction work. Today, I am not doing construction work as I realized I wanted to study further and focus on accounting. I work as the accounting fellow of Tamur Learning Grounds. I have moved to Kurule-Tenupa with two of our team members, Sanam dai, and Pabitra to oversee Tamur BELT campus construction. Here, the battle for women is even worse than Yangshila. Every day, I have to also be on-site to make sure that women are not ridiculed. It takes a lot of effort to encourage women’s participation but I’m happy that I am working towards making that happen in a new community. It’s going to be hard but in time I’m confident we’ll empower more girls. Anila Rai Accounting Fellow, Tamur Learning Grounds 72

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BELT FARMER PROGRAM We created the BELT Farmer Program to tackle the root causes of land grabbing. By signing a pledge to not sell their land for seven years, local farmers retain their land and prevent fragmentation amidst escalating rural land prices and the nefarious practice of ‘land plotting.’ To commence this program, a household survey was conducted with the objective to know the current issues of agriculture and land use. Initially, 42 households became BELT farmers in 2016. In 2017, we integrated 132 BELT farmers in Yangshila across three belts. In exchange of their commitment to prevent land grabs, farmers have now received valuable trainings in seed banking, permaculture, vermicomposting , and bio-intensive farming along with volunteering experience working on CSEB brick creation, metal work and other areas. Based on their performances and skills set, the BELT farmers were hired as Learning Grounds plot operators in either part-time or full-time employment, as per their needs and requirements. We currently have 5 BELT farmers working full time in KTK-BELT while almost 100 BELT farmers have worked part-time in KTK-BELT.

Training in permaculture with Rishi Adhikari

TEAM: Rajeev Goyal, Wangchu Bhutia, Binod Puri along with other trainers in permaculture, community seed banking, biointensive farming

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Training in community seed bank


Volunteer work by farmers

Training with Binod Puri in biointensive beds


VERTICAL BIODIVERSITY FUND As per the Social Welfare Council (SWC), the apex government body regulating NGOs in Nepal, there are over 300 INGOs operating in the country and 46,235 NGOs indicating that multiple NGOs either have to depend on a single INGO for foreign grants or other local sources of income such as donations or membership fees for their sustainability. INGOs operate in Nepal through signing project agreement with Sthe WC for a certain project period. After the expiration of this project period, INGOs are not permitted to bring foreign grants until their agreement is extended/renewed. As a result of this, many local NGOs face financial crisis and are forced to shut down or collapse, since they can’t even run administrative operations without international support. KTK BELT operates in eastern Nepal through collaboration with various local partners established as nonprofit distributing organizations, the capacity of which it builds from the first step. Considering the need for grant independence, the Vertical Biodiversity Fund (VBF) was established and registered in Nepal under Company Act 2063 as a nonprofit organization, which can generate revenues through products and services as planned in KTK BELT’s five-year plan. The revenue from VBF will gradually increase year-by-year, to reduce the proportional dependence on foreign grants among KTK-BELT’s total fund requirement for covering the total project cost of KTK BELT & its affiliated Learning Grounds. The revenue generated from the VBF will be used to contribute substantially to the conservation and protection of biodiversity through financially supporting the ongoing operations and project activities of Learning Grounds. The VBF helps to create self-sufficiency for its partner organization while mitigating donor dependency for sustaining operations.

Workshop in Dharan: production of trail signage

TEAM: Priyanka Bista, Shankar Bhusal, Rajeev Goyal, Mina Rai

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production of trail signage


BELT workshop

pangolin movie night preparation

recycling paper


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I will never forget one line my father said to me, “Mina, if you want to study more, I can sell my kidney for your education.” These lines still echo in my mind. It has been a year since my father passed away. As a girl, a normal father in my village would never wish for their daughter to pursue a career or continue studying but he told me he wanted me to be a banker. I now possess both a Bachelors and Masters in Finance and Business Administration because of his ongoing support. His own father, an Indian Army man, had grown up without a father but because of his persistence and hard-work joined the army and became a Jamdar of the Indian Army, a really well-respected position. Although my father tried very hard to join the army or to get a proper job, he always struggled throughout his life so he dedicated his life to ensuring his own children received education. He told me never to feel alone because their dreams and aspirations were always with me and to keep striving for my career. As the accounting fellow, I’m currently managing the accounts of both YPLG, the local Learning Grounds partner, and Vertical Biodiversity Fund (VBF). I am deeply fascinated by the field of accounting and financial planning. I want to know how projects are developed, planned, how funds are raised, and everything relating to accounting. I am also very fascinated by thinking about the long-term sustainability of projects. My father’s words help me push myself everyday- I work towards improving myself and focus on my career because of his encouragement. My family sees me as a role model. They see my progress growing every day. Although I grew up with many hardships, I feel that with enough hard work, I’ll be able to make my father proud. Mina Rai Accounting fellow, YPLG & VBF Pragati Chowk Learning Grounds

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SECTION 06 OUR SUPPORTERS THANK YOU TO OUR GENEROUS DONORS AND SUPPORTERS! In 2017, KTK-BELT raised $157,783 from over 500 individual donors around the world. This amount was sufficient to earn KTK-BELT 2nd place ($75,000 bonus prize) in the CrowdRise Earth Day Roadmap Challenge. As a result, more than a quarter-million dollars was generated for the vertical university project through crowdfunding in 2017. We thank our incredible donors and supporters from all over the world.

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Aaron Krupp Aayush Khadka Abbas Rezvi Abdo Balikcioglu Abhay Goyal Abhaya Shrestha Abhinab Basnyat Acchyata Shrestha Ada Chirapaisarnkul Adarsha Bajracharya Adarsha Siddhi Bajracharya Adira Riben Aditi Mukherji Agnes Berecz Aida Salica Akarsha Bajracharya Alain Nahmias Alana DeJoseph Alex Paya Alexandra Daignault Alina Gonzalez Allison Sande Allison Madl Alok Bhattarai Alok Shrestha Aly Lakhaney Alyssa Cheung Amit Saxena Amit Shah Amrit Tuladhar Amy Hartenstine Ana Lopes Anand Somareddy Anand Agrawal Ananda Siddhi Bajracharya Andrew Burtless Andrew Carter Andrew Whitesell Aneel Piryani Aneil Rajaram Angelika Wimmer Angshul Moktan Anil Bhattarai Anil Gupta Anil Shahi Anita Resnick Anita Singh Anjan Chhetri Ankit Patel

Ankit & Elizabeth Shah Anna Stirr Annise Dobson Anshu Chakrabortty Anthony Johnson Anuj Shrestha Anuradha Khanal Apoorv Grover Arjun Gurung Armanda Roco Arnold Wendroff Arun Ranjitkar Asha Sah Ashish Saxena Ashley Chu Ashim Pradhan Ashma Basnyat Ashok Gurung Association Les Bistaris Nepal Association of Indians in America Atish Shrestha ATREE Aurore Garcon Austin Lord Ayasha Bista Ayush Chauhan Baato Documentary Film Babita Sen Balaram Shrestha BALIPARA FOUNDATION Bama Dhungana Barbara Ferris Belinda Stewart-Cox Ben Kessler Benedetta Serapioni BENEVITY Benjamin Kessler & Shaumyika Sharma Bessma Mourad Bhargava Pulipati Bhaskar Dhungana Bhawana Dhungana Bickey Rimal Bigyan Bista & Elina Pradhan Bijay Acharya Binod Shah Blair Glencorse Blerta Copa

BMS Rathore Brent Sterling Nemetz Brian Yang Brijesh Goyal Bruna Zeni Buddha K. Budhhi Sem Caitlin Walker Caitlin Walraven Camille Lemieux Carlota Laffler Carolina Adler Caroline & Michael Scimone Carolyn Jacoby Cassandra Porsch Catherine Pierattini Cesar Davila Chandra Goyal Charu James Cheistina M. Orth Chelsea Wolfe Chrissy Kohrt Christian Axel Majert Christopher Hoadley Clemens Kunze CrowdRise Crystal Gifts Inc Damyanti Goyal Dan Burrier Dana Sacco Daniel Matlack Daniel Donaghue Daniel Katz Daniela Amandolese Darlene Foote Darren Pettinato David Comeau David Kelley David Mccolgin David Song David Steidel Deep Rana Deepa Kilian Deepen Dawadi Deewendra Shrestha Dehn Gilmore Dennis & Susan Kepner Devjit Roy Chowdhury Dhiren Patel KTK-BELT PROJECT ANNUAL REPORT 2017

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Dinesh Mittal Dipshika Basnet Divya Mittal Dolly & Buddhadev Manvar Donald Ross Dorje Shrestha Dr. P D’Imperio Dristi Basnet E.D. Lemelson Eden Valadez Elaine Retholtz Elena Mendoza Elise Goldin Ellen O’Connor Elsie Love Emily Bartlett Emily Chew Emma Klingenstein Eric D. Lemelson Eric Shrestha Evelina Post Ewa Wojkowska Faith Boucher Familie Kotz Et Alias Fayal Greene Federica Ricci Fiona Danks Francoise Millet Franklyn Lugo Frans Bosman Fred Martinelli Frederick Rawski Friedrich von Kirchbach Friends Of Nepal Ganesan & Jayshree Balachander Ganesh Chaudhary Gaurav Bisht Gaurav Mittal Gaurav Chandrashekar Gaurav Rana Gayatri Basnet Gayatri Patnaik George Varughese & Kala Gurung George Papamichael Georgina Rovirosa Ghanshyam Mehta Gina Moreno Valle Ginna Fleming 82

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Gloria Zeni Gopilal Acharya Govinda Upadhyay Greater Good Habermann Koehn Foundation Hajnalka Kenderessy Harinakshi Bangera Harini Hayley Pinto Hee-Chung Kim Him Ranjit Hitendra Rambhia Hoover Chung ICFC CANADA Inga Williams Institute of International Education Iomaa Isha Nirola Jacob Kasell Jacqueline Bartelt Jagdish C. Awasthi James D’Imperio James Sharrock Jamuna Pandey-Badal Janardan Singhal Janmanjay Ranjit Jatra Nepal Jay Halfon Jeevika Thapalia Jeewasmi Thapa Jeff Achen Jeffrey Ravel Jemima Sherpa Jenne Shrestha Jennifer Bower Jhak Gurung Jill Foster Jim Sheahan Jjd Wiers Joe Tseng John Bush John Gilmore John Keegan John LaSalle John McNeur John P. Coyne John Quinan John Shane John & Clare McNeur

Jon Souder Jonathan Brown Judith & Raymond McGuire Judith Staudenmaier Judy Tinelli Jui Shrestha Jules White Julia Shepardson Jurate Kaushal Avashia Kabita Kunwar Kai Windhorst Kamal P Kamaljit Bawa Kanishka Rathore Karla Sainju Karuna Foundation Katharine Johnson Katharine Walsh Kathryn Cardenas Kathryn Cassetta Kathryn Rae Kaushal Avashia Kaustubh Lele Kelly Riche Ken Hill Kimberlee Bent Kimberly Frank Kiran Mira McDermott Kneha KC Krishan G Singhal Kristin Kagetsu Kristina Saxena Kuseshwar Sah L. Shanti Kumar Labi Shrestha Lalit Jha Lane Smith Laura Diamond Dixit Laura Harris Laurie Irwin Laurie Vasily Lavanya Ravulapalli Laxmi Prajapati Lee Daniels Lena Kayser Leonard Roussel Limor Goren Lisa Austin Lisa Katayama


Living Earth Institute Lois bastide Lorenzo Ramero Lori Stewart Louis Chang Louise Fletcher Lucas Millard Lucy Heasman Luke Wagner Luna Ranjit Luzon Technologies Lynn Pacifico Lynne Lipton Lynne Roberts Ma Guffond Mabi Singh Madhu Singhal Mahendra Shakya Malabika Das Maneet Dhungel Manfred Seebauer Manish Marc Million-Ranquin Marco Borga Marguerite Dey Maria Garbellotto Marie Shaw Marie Wakefield Marilou Pudiak-Town Marilyn Fried Marina Ruiz Marissa Polnerow Marjorie Van Strien Mark Van Doesburgh Marla Haut Marloes Heineke Martinelli Fred Mary Prance Masha Spaic Matt Eckelman Matthew Romaine Matthew Simantov Matthew Steele Maureen Orth Maya Albanese Maya Krishnasastry Meg Garlinghouse Mendoza Mette Nielsen Michael Fiorillo

Michael Gill Michael Lieberman Michael Northrop Michele Hadlow Michele Metcalf Michele Nagliati Milan Kc Milan Rai Milly Das Ming Yuan Song Mishi Choudhary Mohammad Mohsin Mona Shrestha Monica Jasty Monty Berke Mukesh Maharjan Mukunda Raj Dahal Muna Gurung Murodbek Laldjebaev Nabin Sherchan Nan Min Nancy Evans Nancy Lagin Narbada Chhetri Narendra Lodha Naresh Newar Natalie Rold Nataliya Mikhalchuk Natasha Habermann Nature Needs Half Navraj Pradhan Neeta Gupta Neeta Jain Neha Mittal Nepalese American Foundation Nicolas Murat Nicole Yeo Nidal Islam Niechao Bai Nilam Chhetri-McDermott Nima Lama Nina Smith Niraj Vishwas Nirav Shah Nirmal Mattoo Niva Shakya Noah Horton Olivia Molden Om Bansal Omar Ezat

One More Generation (OMG) Paisley Dressler Pam Elardo Pamela Israel Pan Suk Kang Pankaj Upreti Parag Andleigh Paribesh Pradhan Pasang Lama Patricia Osbourn Patrick Biggam Patrick Eyerkaufer Patrizia Paul Chong Pawan Dhakal Pena Sherpa Pepijn Bosman Pete Nicholson Peter Gill Peter Hobbs Peter Kang Phil Lilienthal Phoolmaya Gurung Phyllis Berger Pilar Belhumeur Pilar Herrera Piya Hanvoravongchai Poshan K.C. Prabhat Gautam Pradeep Bansal Prajna & Layla Shakya Prakash Bhave Pramila Mittal Pramod Jain Prasanna Dahal Pratibha Shrestha Pratik Pandey Pratik & Manjula Shrestha Pratima Rana Pratistha Kansakar Preetee Singhal Prem Goel Prerna Basnet Priyanka Bista Priyash Bista Pushpa Bhattarai Pushpa Bista Quick Response Biodiversity Fund (QRBF) Rabi Thapa KTK-BELT PROJECT ANNUAL REPORT 2017

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Radhesh Pandit Rainforest Trust Usa Raghav Goyal Ragini Modi Rai and Lilia Goyal Raj & Suman Mittal Raj Biraj Rijal Raj Modi Rajan Kotru Rajan Man Bajracharya Rajeev Goyal Rajendra Magar Rajendra Modi Rajesh Siddhi Rakesh Karmacharya Rashmi Bajracharya Ravi Gupta Ravi Pulipati Ravindra Goyal Reema Joshi Reena Rupani Rene Fan Renu Kanga Fonseca Reshu Aryal & Bhaskar Dhungana RESOLVE Richard Brigg Richard Navitsky Richard Schneider Rick Pal Rijesh Shrestha Rishi Goyal Robert Beazley Robert Habermann Robert Rocheteau Roberta Raeburn Robin Curtis Rojina Upadhaya Rojina Shrestha Ron DeMaio Ron Ranson Rose Burris & Steve Mader Rosemary Burris Roshi Khadka Rudra Pandey Ruggero Altair Tacchi Sabin Ninglekhu Sabine Garrido Sachin Maskey 84

KTK-BELT PROJECT ANNUAL REPORT 2017

Sadeep Shrestha Safari Club International Sagun KC Saisab Pradhan Saisha Grayson Sajjan Agarwal Sameer Barakoti Samriddhi Padhye Samyem Tuladhar Sandesh Waje Sandev Shrestha Sandra Burt Sandra Voge Sandy V Sangay Sherpa Sangita Manandhar Sanhita Sahasrabudhe Sanjay Goyal Sanjeev Sherchan Sanman Thapa Sarahana Shrestha Saraf Foundation For Himalayan Traditions And Culture Saras Mittal Scott Frank Scott Harrison & Angela Detlor Scott Skinner Shabnam Bista Shailesh Gongal Shailesh Mittal Shambhu Koirala Shanti Kumar Sharad Shrestha Shashi S. Shah, MD Sheelagh O’Reilly Shefali Goyal Sheila Chellgren Shi Heng Zhou Shitoshna Nepal Shive Mittal Shraddha Ghale Shu Yun Wong Shweta Pradhan Shweta Basnet Sidley Austin LLP Simona & Tom Bares-Lemmon Simone Wong Sirjana Pant

Sitaram Singhal Social Enterprise NL Sohita Torgalkar Sonia Kohli Sophiya Thakali S.P.E.C.I.E.S. Srijana Pokhrel Stefano Medri Stephanie Kaufman Stephanie Odegard Stephen Adolphus Subash Bista Subhas R Sucharita Mehta Sudha Shrestha Sujan Niraula Sujeet Kansakar Suman Rijal Sumit Goyal Sumit Jhaveri Sundar Gurung Sunita Pun Suraj Karki Surendra Lawoti Sushrut Acharya Paresh Shrestha Suresh Wagle Surinder M Kathuria Ranzen Jha Rohit John Chhetri Susmita Jasty Suzanne Sousa Swapnil Appa Chaudhari Swarn K Gupta Swati Mittal Jagetia Swetha Manohar T. Paresh N. Patel Tamar Bedolfe Tammy McCullough Tamor Basnyat Tara Lodha Tara Niraula Taranga Ghosh Tassanee Tantumaroj Tenzing Ukyab Thomas Debandt Thomas Hulscher Tieg Zaharia Traci Paris


Trishna Basnet Trishna Gurung Tulsi Maharjan Ubha Raymajhi Udip Raymajhi UIAA Ujjwal Dhaubhadel Usha Agarwal Usha Bansal Valérie Thöni Van De Voorde Josephine Vanessa Round Varun Saraf Vero Millet Vicki Warren Vijay Gupta Vijay & Kalpana Arya Foundation Vijaypal Arya Vikram Surya Chiruvolu Vinod Singhal Vishnu Kanungo Wade Lahring What Design Can Do (WDCD) William Brandt William Fulton William Preston Weeden Foundation Wolfgang Kotz Wright Ingram Institute Yesha Gurung Subba Yogendra Saxena Yogendra Shakya Yuka Nishino Yuvraj Gurung Zac Hartley

THANK YOU! KTK-BELT PROJECT ANNUAL REPORT 2017

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SECTION 07 FINANCIAL BREAKDOWN GOVERNMENT MONITORING AND EVALUATION (2.47%) ADMIN STAFF SALARIES & BENEFITS (5.25%) OPERATIONAL COSTS (7.38%) AD

15.

BELT FARMER PROGRAM (1.34%) BELT FELLOWS (3.70%) PUBLIC AWARENESS (0.09%)

NS

IO AT

ER

OP

1%

N&

MI

LEARNING GROUNDS OPERATIONS (3.89%)

8.9%

LIVEL

IHOO

DS

BELT SCHOOLS PROGRAM (0.32%) EDUCATION CURRICULUM (0.53%)

BELT CAMPUS CONSTRUCTIONS (5.02%) 86

KTK-BELT PROJECT ANNUAL REPORT 2017

EDUC ATIO N

LEARNING GROUNDS PLANNING (20.27%)

26.2

%

EDUCATION CURRICULUM (0.53%)


$250,529 EXPENDITURE OF 2017

CONSERVATION MAPPING & RESEARCH (2%) CONSERVATION LAND TRUST (25.65%)

49.7%

CONSERVATION

CONSERVATION PLANNING (5.09%)

LUMBASUMBA CONSERVATION PROJECT (18.57%)

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KTK-BELT INC. Country Office Nepal Taragaon Museum, Tusal, Bouddha, Nepal

Fund Accountability Statement

For the period 1 January 2017 to 31 December 2017 Particular Sources of Fund Opening Fund Balance Total Opening Fund Balance (A) Fund Received during the year Fund Received from Donor Local Contributions Other Income Total Fund Received (B) Total Fund Available (C=A+B) Application of Fund Program Expenses Administration Expenses Total Application of Fund (D) Fund Balance (E=C-D) Loan during the year (F) Net Fund Balance (G=E+F)

Sch 1

4 5

Transaction Currency (NRs.)

Reporting Currency (USD)

1,624,588.00 $ 1,624,588.00 $

15,926.00 15,926.00

24,314,546.00 1,172,160.00 18,649.00 25,505,355.00 27,129,943.00

$ $ $ $ $

238,378.00 11,492.00 183.00 250,053.00 265,980.00

21,694,671.00 3,859,282.00 25,553,953.00 1,575,990.00 664,542.00 2,240,532.00

$ $ $ $ $ $

212,693.00 37,836.00 250,529.00 15,451.00 6,515.00 21,966.00

40,352.00 1,828,956.00 185,475.00 418,888.00 (233,139.00) 2,240,532.00

$ $ $ $ $ $

396.00 17,931.00 1,818.00 4,107.00 (2,286.00) 21,966.00

Closing Fund Balance

Represented by: Cash Bank Receivables/Advances Fixed Assets Payables Total

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2


Balance Sheet

As on 31 December 2017 Sources of Funds

Sch

Contributory Capital Surplus Fund Loan Total Source of Funds Application of Funds Fixed Assets (a) Gross Block Less: Accumulated Depreciation Net Block

3

Investments (b) Current Assets Advances and Receivables Cash Balance Bank Balance

Transaction Currency (NRs.) 375,990.00 1,864,542.00 2,240,532.00

Reporting Currency (USD) $ 3,686.00 $ 18,280.00 $ 21,966.00

564,520.00 $ 145,632.00 $ 418,888.00 $ -

5,535.00 1,428.00 4,107.00 -

Less: Current Liabilities & Provisions

185,475.00 40,352.00 1,828,956.00 2,054,783.00 (233,139.00)

$ $ $ $ $

1,818.00 396.00 17,931.00 20,145.00 (2,286.00)

Net Current Assets (c)

1,821,644.00

$

17,859.00

Total Application of Funds (a+b+c)

2,240,532.00

$

21,966.00

2

KTK-BELT PROJECT ANNUAL REPORT 2017

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KTK-BELT INC. Country Office Nepal Taragaon Museum, Tusal, Bouddha, Nepal

Income Statement

For the period 1 January 2017 to 31 December 2017 Particulars

Sch

Income Grant Income -KTK BELT Inc. USA -KTK BELT Inc. Rainforest Trust Local Contribution Other Income Total Income

Transaction Currency (NRs.)

Reporting Currency (USD)

24,314,546.00 18,078,310.00 6,236,236.00 1,172,160.00 18,649.00 25,505,355.00

$ $ $ $ $ $

238,378.00 177,238.00 61,140.00 11,492.00 183.00 250,053.00

21,694,671.00 12,706,074.00 104,924.00 6,553,516.00 2,960,464.00 3,087,170.00

$ $ $ $ $ $

212,693.00 124,569.00 1,029.00 64,250.00 29,024.00 30,266.00

2. Education Learning Grounds & Plant Trail Place Based Education & Outdoor Schools program Program Coordination

6,706,401.00 6,202,847.00 239,076.00 264,478.00

$ $ $ $

65,749.00 60,812.00 2,344.00 2,593.00

3. Livelihoods Capacity Building + Training LG Operations and Admin

2,282,196.00 $ 1,286,899.00 $ 995,297.00 $

22,375.00 12,617.00 9,758.00

$ $ $ $ $ $

37,836.00 18,498.00 13,162.00 6,176.00 250,529.00 (476.00)

Expenditure Program Expenses 1.Conservation Mapping + Research Conservation Land Trust Conservation Planning Program Coordination

Administrative Expenses Operational Costs Staff Costs Monitoring & Evaluation Total Expenditure Excess of Income over Expenditure

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4

5

3,859,282.00 1,886,759.00 1,342,523.00 630,000.00 25,553,953.00 (48,598.00)


KTK-BELT PROJECT ANNUAL REPORT 2017

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SECTION 08 PROJECT TEAM & PARTNERS

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KTK BELT BOARD OF DIRECTORS RAJEEV K GOYAL CO-FOUNDER / ENVIRONMENTAL DIRECTOR Rajeev is the Co-Founder/ Environmental Director of KTK-BELT project. He is a graduate of Brown University, the New York University School of Law and has recently received a Masters in Agriculture at Cornell University. He is a lawyer, activist, rural-development worker, and former Peace Corps volunteer. Between 2008 to 2011, he was the national coordinator of the Push for Peace Corps Campaign. He is the author of ‘The Springs of Namje’ .

PRIYANKA BISTA CO-FOUNDER / DESIGN DIRECTOR Priyanka is the Design Director of KTK-BELT Project overseeing the architecture and planning arm of the project. She has post-graduate degrees in Architectural Regeneration and Shelter after Disaster along with a Bachelors in Architectural Science. She has worked for over three years at Diamond and Schmitt Architects in Toronto, most notably, her contributions were made towards the design of the Centre for Green Cities in the Don Valley Brickworks Revitalization project, National Arts Centre, Ottawa and the Regent Park Redevelopment project in Toronto. Her extended research and architectural experiences include Spain, Haiti, Israel and India. As a design and planning associate, she worked with Collaborative Media Advocacy Platform (CMAP) on the Human City Project (HCP) in Port Harcourt, Nigeria.

DR. JULES WHITE TECHNICAL DIRECTOR Dr. Jules White is the Technical Director of KTK-BELT. He is an Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Vanderbilt University and the Art Editor of the American Center for Artists. He has been volunteering on the Bhedetar project since 2003 as a donor and strategic advisor. He is supporting KTK-BELT with innovative integration of GIS and Android technology into village knowledge management systems.

SCOTT SKINNER, ESQ. TREASURER Scott is the Treasurer of KTK-BELT and also a co-founder of Phul Maya Foundation, the 501(c) (3) nonprofit which is the fiscal agent of TLG. He is the founding partner and an attorney in Biggam, Fox & Skinner law firm for over 20 years. Before becoming a lawyer, Scott served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Nepal from 1964-1966 and has continuously engaged on charitable projects in the country since that time. Within the model VDC project, Scott and his law partner Pat Biggam have fundraised and helped build five new primary schools in Bhedetar, numerous libraries, and water infrastructure projects.

VARUN SARAF BOARD MEMBER Varun Saraf is the Chairman of the Saraf Foundation for Himalayan Traditions and Culture and founder of numerous social impact and business ventures.

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DR. KAMAL BAWA ADVISORY COUNCIL CO-CHAIR Kamal Bawa is Distinguished Professor of Biology at the University of Massachusetts Boston, and Founder-President of ATREE. Professor Bawa has published more than 200 scientific papers and 11 authored or edited books and monographs. Among the many awards he has received include the Giorgio Ruffolo Fellowship at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government (2009), Charles Bullard (twice 1972, 2010) and Maria Moore Cabot Fellowships (1973) at Harvard University, Guggenheim Fellowship (1987), Pew Scholar in Conservation and the Environment (1992), the world’s first prize in sustainability--the Gunnerus Award in Sustainability Science from the Royal Norwegian Society of Letters and Sciences (2012), and the international MIDORI Prize in Biodiversity (2014) from the Aeon Foundation in Japan at the United Nations Conference of Parties to the Convention on Biological Diversity. Dr. Bawa is an elected fellow of several science academies, including the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (2012), the Royal Norwegian Society of Letters and Sciences (2012), and Royal Society of London (2015). He has headed or served on a number scientific panels, and he currently serves on the governing boards of several national and international organizations. His second coffee-table book, Himalaya: Mountains of Life, a sequel to Sahyadris: India’s Western Ghats was published in January 2013.

DR. GREG GREENWOOD Dr. Gregory B. Greenwood, a natural resources specialist trained in agricultural ecology, population ecology, and ruminant nutrition, is Executive Director of the Mountain Research Initiative (MRI) in Berne, Switzerland. His mandate is to develop a strategy to increase and focus global change research in mountain regions throughout the world as part of IHDP and IGBP programs, and as a policy objective of the Swiss National Science Foundation. Greg Greenwood was previously Bioenergy and Climate Science Advisor for the California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection and Deputy Assistant Secretary for Resources/Science Advisor for the California Resources Agency, Sacramento. He has extensive experience with and publications on land use development and ecology, including global change in mountains.

SANJEEV M. SHERCHAN Sanjeev M. Sherchan is the Director for Global Leadership Initiatives at the Asia Society. In this capacity, Sherchan is primarily responsible for conceptualizing and overseeing all aspects of the Society’s global initiatives. He joined the Asia Society in the fall of 2000 as a Program Assistant in the policy department. Prior to that, before returning to the United States for graduate studies in 1998, Sherchan worked as a consultant for PLAN International in Nepal. In December 2008, he was one of the 60 National Democratic Institute (NDI) accredited foreign election monitors who observed voting and counting during Bangladesh’s Ninth Parliamentary Elections. He was deployed in the Jessore district in south western Bangladesh.

WILLIAM T. DOWELL William Thatcher Dowell is a renowned author, journalist, translator and editor/producer. Between 1989 to 2001, Bill served as a correspondent with Time Magazine, where he was the Southeast Asia Bureau Chief from 1995 to 1997, based in Hong Kong. He spent 14 years in the Paris Bureau as a contract stringer, and prior to that was a TV correspondent for ABC News and NBC News, where he reported on and Associate Producer of NPR’s “All Things COnsidered.” Bill is the co-authored of In the Shadow of the Dragon, with Winter Nie at IMD. Most recently he was the co-editor of The Essential Edge.

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ADEWALE AJADI Adewale Ajadi is a facilitator, coach, and change agent with over twenty years of experience working with people, organizations, and communities. He is a qualified barrister and holds an MSc in international business economics. He recently led a program to reduce the incidence of mass violence in the Niger Delta, Nigeria. He delivers leadership training for the African Leadership Center in Nairobi. He developed the Framework for Excellence in Equality and Diversity (FEED), an international framework for organizations engaging the complex challenges of equality and diversity. He is currently the Country Director for Synergos in Nigeria, an institute dedicated to developing effective, sustainable, and indigenous solutions to global poverty.

NAYANTARA GURUNG KAKSHAPATI NayanTara is a photographer, curator and arts manager based in Kathmandu, Nepal. Her work seeks to embrace themes such as change, identity, gender, and history within the context of ‘the New Nepal’. She enjoys working across platforms to connect visuals, sound, research, education, activism; using storytelling as an underlying approach. In 2007, she co-founded photo.circle, a photography platform that has fdacilitated learning, networking, publishing, marketing and other opportunities for Nepali photographers. In 2010, she co-founded the Nepal Picture Library; a digital photo archive that strives to document a ground-up history of the Nepali people.

JAY R. HALFON, ESQ. Jay R. Halfon is a practicing attorney and public policy strategist. He represents tax-exempt organizations, including public charities,private foundations, advocacy groups and political entities. He has a broad range of experience influencing public policy in both Congress and state legislatures. Mr. Halfon served as executive director and general counsel of the New York State Trial Lawyers Association from May 1998 to December 2001. Previously he was executive director of the New York Public Interest Research Group (NYPIRG) for a decade ending in 1997. He serves on the Board of numerous foundations including 350.org.

MASHA ETKIND Since 1989, Masha Etkind has been a professor in the Department of Architectural Science, Ryerson University where she teaches Design, History and Theory of Architecture. Masha’s focus and area of expertise within the Department is Heritage Conservation: Theory and Practice. Before teaching at Ryerson, Masha worked with D. Malik Architects and Planners, and J. Michael Kirkl and Architects; she also worked in France, Russia and the USA. She is also an Adjunct Professor and a leading partner in the joint annual design studio at Azrieli School of Architecture, Tel Aviv University, Israel.

CHRISTIE PEARSON Christie Pearson is an artist, architect, and writer living in Toronto. She works in collaboration with choreographers, composers, dancers, djs, sound and visual artists to create multidisciplinary urban events such as Fire on the Water at the Sunnyside Bathing Pavilion; Nightswim at Toronto’s inaugural Nuit Blanche; the performance Slip at Harrison Baths; and the Wade festival of installation and performance art in outdoor pools. She created Thewaves to create events exploring water, sound and architecture. She is a founding member and editor of the journal Scapegoat: Architecture, Landscape, Political Economy where she co-edited Night and Eros. Her architectural work includes significant cultural and community spaces for organizations such as the University of Toronto, the City of Toronto, the Media Arts Resource Collective, Kitchener Public Library, Native Child and Family Services, and Eva’s Phoenix.

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MARK VAN DOESBURGH Mark has been active in the impact investment space for the last 18 year both at Oxfam Novib as head of the financial services unit and as a co-founder of Triple Jump where he served as a managing director for more than 10 years. Triple Jump is providing loans, equity and advisory services to financial institutions and funds in more than 60 developing countries. Currently Mark is on the board of two financial institutions in these countries and is in addition advising on structuring of impact funds in the renewable energy and smallholder farmer space.

ROBERT HABERMANN Robert is an environmental lawyer, sustainability advocate and supporter of conservation work. He is currently a Fellow at the Pace Energy and Climate Center and an advisor at The Sustainability Lab. He previously worked for over five years on renewable energy development in Africa, breaking ground on first-of-their-kind solar and battery projects. He has also worked in the IUCN Mission to the United Nations in support of biodiversity and illegal wildlife trafficking agreements. Robert is a graduate of Tulane University, Washington University School of Law and has recently received an LL.M. in climate and energy law at the Elisabeth Haub School of Law.

KTK-BELT TECHNICAL TEAM PEMA LAMU BHUTIA OPERATIONS AND LOGISTICS COORDINATOR Pema Lamu Bhutia, originally from Chepuwa VDC, Sankhuwasabha District, holds a Bachelors in English from Bundelkhand University in Jhansi. She has worked as an assistant teacher at Clifton Hall Boarding School and Kamalodaya Academy School. As KTK-BELT’s operations and logistics coordinator, she brings rigor and professionalism to the workplace. She supervises the work of over 39 interdisciplinary staff along with managing construction work.

MOHAN PANDEY PROJECT COORDINATOR, LUMBASUMBA CONSERVATION PROJECT Mohan is currently working on the Lumbasumba conservation project as an ecologist. He is originally from Syangja district with a master’s degree in Botany with specialization in ‘Ecology and Resource Management’ from the Central Department of Botany, Tribhuvan University. He is interested in research related to endangered plant species, use and harvesting patterns of wild plant resources, local ethnobotanical knowledge, impact study and management of invasive plant species, climate change and conservation. He holds 5 years’ experience in long-term vegetation monitoring, biodiversity conservation, invasive alien plant species, documentation of ethnobotanical knowledge and other aspects of ecology. During research projects, he has worked in various districts across Nepal including the Terai Arc Landscape (TAL), Chitwan Annapurna Landscape (CHAL) and Kailash Sacred Landscape (KSL).

NITESH SINGH CONSERVATION PROGRAM OFFICER He is wildlife enthusiast and researcher currently working on Lumbasumba project. Holding a master’s degree in Environmental Science from Central Department of Environmental Science, Tribhuvan University and previous experience in the wildlife studies at different elevational gradients of Nepal is fundamental source of competence to achieve a wildlife conservationist and researcher position in this organization. Assisting in two PhD studies particularly on dietary analysis of herbivores and carnivores species, worked and volunteered in organizations like NTNC and WWF has enhanced his capabilities and further motivated to acquire in-depth knowledge on faunal diversity. KTK-BELT PROJECT ANNUAL REPORT 2017

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WANGCHU BHUTIA EDUCATION & LIVELIHOODS COORDINATOR Wangchu Bhutia, originally from Sankhuwasabha District, has joined our small team as a Medicinal Plants Specialist. With a Bachelors degree in Science, he has over seven years of experience in biodiversity conservation, NTFP cultivation, nursery management and ecotourism. He has worked with TMI, Red Panda network and other conservation agencies throughout remote regions of Nepal. Since his arrival, Wangchu has already documented and mapped over 400 different plant species within Yangshila. Currently he’s building an extensive database of scientific information of each plant to serve as a foundation for a GIS map, educational plant trails and a plant compendium. He will be critical member in expanding the BELT campaign beyond Yangshila VDC.

SHANKAR BHUSAL ACCOUNTANT Shankar is a qualified member of Association of Chartered Certified Accountants (ACCA, UK). He also possesses a Bachelors degree in Business studies from Tribhuwan University and currently is pursuing his Masters. He has over three years of experience in an Audit firm, R.K. Associates, Chartered Accountants, as a Senior Auditor handling the accounting assignments & conducting the internal/external audits of various organization having diverse goals including some NGOs/ INGO/Projects such as Shanti Med Nepal Switzerland, Nepal Soka Gakkai International, Kiran Namaste Nepal & project audits carried out by Kathmandu University with collaboration with different consortium partners and audit of “Revenue Administration Support” (RAS) Project carried out by GIZ.

ADITI SUBBA CONSERVATION PROGRAM OFFICER Aditi Subba, 25 years old, completed her Masters in Science in Environmental Conservation and did her research in invasive plant species. She will be working as a program officer within the Lumbasumba Conservation project. Her interest lies on cross-cutting issues like communityenvironment correlation, human-wildlife/biodiversity conflicts and influence of religion in terms of conservation. A scientist by academics, you will, however, see her deeply absorbed in fictional novels in her free time, trying to balance the two contrasting pursuits of her interest.

TULA B KANDEL LEGAL ADVISOR, NEPAL Tula Bahadur Kandel is a practicing attorney in Nepal Since 2000, he has served as an advocate of the court. Mr. Kandel completed his LLM from Kathmandu School of Law. Beside his legal practice Mr. Kandel has worked as consultant to various national and international organisations and also worked as a project director on a project of Nepal Bar Association and Canadian Bar Association in support of the First Constitutional Assembly of Nepal. Mr. Kandel specializes in establishing businesses for foreigner entities and immigration law. He has worked for numerous NGOs and INGOs on human rights and other issues.

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YANGSHILA LEARNING GROUNDS TEAM MEMBERS KUMAR BISHWAKARMA, DIRECTOR A community member of Yangshila VDC, Kumar Bishwakarma is a dedicated fourth grade teacher, medicinal plants expert, and a passionate environmentalist. In 2013, under his leadership KTK-BELT’s local partner, YPLG was formed as a nonprofit company. He has been voluntarily working for the cause for 2 years to mobilize the community, build the land assets for the project, and tirelessly work towards bridging the gap between conservation and education. He is a trained permaculture designer and an advocate for children and science education.

GANGA LIMBU ENVIRONMENTAL YOUTH FELLOW Ganga Limbu, a 21 year old girl, is the first youth fellow of KTK-BELT working in the areas of participatory mapping, social research and environmental education. She’s currently enrolled in her Bachelors degree in Mahendra Multiple Campus, Dharan. She was born in a large family in Mukten village of Bhedetar VDC. Since she was young, she has received scholarships from Phulmaya Foundation and most recently received a scholarship for her Bachelors degree. She’s currently living in Satisale village, Yangshila. Along with doing research in the existing education curriculum, she’s interested in learning different softwares including ArcGIS, AutoCAD and Sketchup. .

SANAM PRADHAN CONSTRUCTION YOUTH FELLOW Sanam Pradhan, a 28 year old married youth with two young girls is from Yangshila VDC and will be working as the alternative energy and construction fellow. He has his SLC certification and technical trainings as electrician from Alliance for Social Mobilisation, a certification in computer course and driving. He will be operating the community building workshop which will house laser cutters, power tools and building materials. He will be working with us to design and build the Sikti Plant trail and Pragati Chowk plant workshop.

DURGA KATTEL OUTDOOR EDUCATION YOUTH FELLOW Durga Kattel, a 25 year old male from Satishale village, has been volunteering with KTK-BELT for the past few weeks. He is a full-time teacher in Jansewa Primary School and a steering committee member of YPLG. He has a bachelors degree in Education. His current work is focused on designing, developing and conducting household surveys in communities where YPLG and KTK-BELT are currently working in. As a social research fellow, he will be working on developing a participatory research and design programme to employ various tools to enable community participation in the design of the different learning grounds.

DHANMAYA RAI PRODUCTS YOUTH FELLOW Dhanmaya Rai, 33 years old single mother with two kids, originally from Yangshila Satishale ward no.5. She did not complete her studies due to economic condition of her family but she is very enthusiasm to learn different skills and knowledge, she is a good learner and got 6 years of experience in screen printing, got little knowledge of cutting and sewing cloths. She is very hardworking and reliable. Currently working with YPLG as Middle BELT Land Manager, along with her work she is learning driving as well and also enrolled her name for SLC examination.

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MINA KUMARI RAI ADMIN/ ACCOUNTANT FELLOW Mina Kumari Rai was born 14th Oct 1991 in Yangshila Morang. She is very young and energetic. She is dedicated and passionate girl for her Job. She does her duty very honesty and she is really self-motivated and kindest girl. She has more knowledge about her sector and she has to follow her field’s principles and she could do anything what she wants, so she is very profession on her field. She had worked at NGO office from 2013 to 2014 as an Accountant. She had completed her post graduate from Tribhuwan University. She is a brave girl so she could do anything in stressful environment. She could be adjusted in any times of society. At last, she is well ambitious her field.

SANCHA LIMBU CARPENTRY FELLOW Born and brought up in Satishale village of former Yangshila VDC, Sancha is currently working as a construction fellow in carpentry, cseb and also metal work. He is incredibly hardworking and a perfectionist, interested always in improving his skills step by step. Although only educated until grade four, he is very interested in learning new techniques.

LAXMI MAGAR PRODUCTS AND CONSTRUCTION FELLOW As a 33 year old female, Laxmi Magar, comes from a humble economic background from Rangcha village. She has been working in the construction team for over eight months and originally started working in the production of CSEBs. Eventhough she only has second grade education, she is tenacious and hardworking and wants to learn computers and other software. Although she is currently working in the construction field, she will slowly start to work in (and hopefully lead) the products and services area of our project. She’s also a fierce female leader always ensuring that other women in the community are also mobilized. She has also been supporting the execution of the BELT farmer program.

PABITRA MAGAR BAMBOO AND CONSTRUCION FELLOW 29 year old, female from Thumki, Kerabari-5, Morang Pabitra Magar comes from a remote village in Kerabari called Thumki. Originally born in Dahar, her economic background is very marginal. Since the age of 10 she has been interested in construction. Despite not getting any support from her family or her community, she persisted with her interests. As a construction fellow, she will be learning to manage the bamboo workshop.

DILMAYA MAHAT HOSPITALITY AND COOKING FELLOW Dilamya Mahat is a mother of three children. They live in Satishale but on government land. Although socio-economically marginalized, she’s extremely hard working and bright. She’s currently learning how to write in English so she can start using the computers and developing budgets and write reports.

DASANG TAMANG METALWORK FELLOW 20-year-old, male from Satishale Morang. Although only 20 year old, Dasang is a highly skilled trades-person in metal work. He is extremely diligent towards his work and is a perfectionist while executing detailed level construction. Again, he has very little education but is deeply interested in learning new construction techniques. As a youth from the village, he faces constant pressures of going abroad as a migrant worker, however, he has committed to continuing with the project as a core staff.

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SURENDRA LIMBU METAL WOOD FELLOW Although only 25 years old, Surendra has been trained in both carpentry and metal work. He is extremely diligent towards his work and is a perfectionist while executing detailed level construction. Again, he has very little education but is deeply interested in learning new construction techniques. As a youth from the village, he faces constant pressures of going abroad as a migrant worker, however, he has committed to continuing with the project as a core staff.

RANJAN KARKI FARM MANAGER Ranjan Karki is a young and energetic person from Sundarpur Chuhandawa- 9, Sarlahi. As his family occupation is farming, he got interested in the agriculture sector. He has received 4 months’ training from Everything Organic Nursery, Dhulikhel. He worked as a Farm Officer at Dwarika Hotel’s Eco-organic Farm Ltd. for 1 year. He gained knowledge from his experience and training. He is currently working as the Agriculture Field Manager at Vertical Biodiversity Fund. He is a well-rounded individual who lives with passion, dedication, and grace.

ABHISHEK BISHWAKARMA AGRICULTURE FELLOW Mr. Abishek Bishwakarma is a young and energetic person from Budhagaon - 3, Rolpa. He worked for a year in Dwarika’s Himalayan Shangrila Village Hotel Resort farm called Eco-Organic Farm Pvt. Ltd in Dhulikhel. He gained practical knowledge from the experience and training there. He has also worked as an agriculture technician at Eco-Organic Farm Pvt. Ltd. He is currently working as An Agriculture Fellow in the Vertical Biodiversity Fund.

TIKA RAM RANA AGRICULTURE FELLOW Mr. Tika Ram Rana is originally from Kerabari Gaonpalika- 2, Morang. He worked in Saudi Arabia for 2 years as a plumber in a private company before working in Qatar for 2 years in a supermarket where his role was to display good. After returning from overseas, he took a 5-days permaculture training in Yangshila after which he was hooked on farming. Now, he is working in Maharaje farm as an Agriculture Youth Fellow with KTK-BELT.

SANKHUWASABHA LEARNING GROUNDS KARMA BHUTIA, DIRECTOR Karma Bhutia is an advisor to KTK-BELT and the founder of Sankhuwasabha Learning Grounds. He is currently a Program Director at The Mountain Institute. He holds a Bachelor degree in Social Science and has over 15 years experience in community development and natural resource management. For the last 5 years, Mr Bhutia has been working on the MAPs cultivation techniques and has empowered 2000 individual farmers to double their income through this technique in Illam district. He will be closely working with our agriculture team, in particular Wangchu Bhutia, to train local farmers in medicinal plants cultivation. He will be working directly on the BELT campaign by expanding the project to Sankhuwasabha VDC.

WANG CHEDDAR LAMA DISTRICT COORDINATOR Wang Chhedar Lama is currently working in Lumba Sumba conservation Project / Sankhuwasabha learning ground (SLG) as district coordinator From March 2018 . He is originally from Sankhuwa sabha district Bhotkhola -4 (Siprung) with bachelor degree in Education and ongoing Master degree on Rural Development faculty From Dhankuta multiple campus . He has work experience of 17 years on Climate change , Forest management , write up OP/constitution of CFUG , Forest inventory , GIS/GPS , Good Governance ,Bio diversity and environment conservation sector . During his project period he has worked in very remote area of different district ( Solukhombhu , Taplejung and Sankhuwasabha ) KTK-BELT PROJECT ANNUAL REPORT 2017

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KAMALA RAI YOUTH FELLLOW Kamala Rai, originally from Chasuwatar, Pawakhola is a Youth Fellow at KTK BELT. She has an experience over 8 years as a social mobilizer in FECOFUN and also worked in a field of women empowerment program for 18 months and natural resource conflict transformation program for 6 years. Kamala is more interested in documentation of local culture, flora, and fauna.

TSERING DORJI YOUTH FELLLOW Tsering is a 28-year-old energetic youth from Pawakhola. Currently, working as an office helper in a local school, he is an enthusiast of learning and exploring new things. He has been practicing pastoralist in higher elevations of Pawakhola since his childhood and well known about landscape, flora, and fauna. His role is to give technical assistance in camera trap setting and wildlife monitoring.

SACHIN LAMA ADMIN/ ACCOUNTANT FELLOW Sachin Lama is an accountant for Sankhuwasabha Learning Ground and is a native of Chyamtang, a remote village of Sankhuwasabha District. Mr. Lama holds a bachelor’s degree in Business Studies from Dharan Model College. He is sociable person and enjoys working for community welfare. Apart from community interest he is fond of listening music and likes to explore places with natural and cultural importance in his leisure time.

KHIJA BHOTE, SOCIAL MOBILIZER LCP PROJECT Khija Bhote, a 53-year-old social worker from Chyamtang village in Sankhuwasabha, is the Secretary of the Chomolungma Community Forest User Group. Mr. Bhote is well known for his contributions to society, culture, landscapes, and trail building in his native Chepuwa VDC. He has worked as a social mobilizer for the Upper Arun Valley Development and Conservation Society and as a social mobilizer in Lumbasumba Conservation Project.

KURULE-TENUPA LEARNING GROUNDS LOKENDRA YAKHA, DIRECTOR Lokendra Bahadur Yakha, a highly skilled farmer and local leader, is the Chairman of Tamur Learning Grounds. In 2015, he became a spokesperson for Climate + Change, raising awareness globally about devastating localized impacts of climate change on spring systems in the middle hills of Nepal. Mr. Yakha is also an indigenous leader of the vanishing Yakha ethnic group of Nepal, and is trained in permaculture design.

ANILA RAI ACCOUNTING FELLOW Anila is originally from Yangshila. Initially she started working as a construction worker in the CSEB project. Currently, she is studying for her bachelors in accounting as well as working as the accounting fellow of Tamur Learning Grounds.

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PARTNERS & FUNDERS RAINFOREST TRUST USA ICFC CANADA Nature Needs Half Quick Response Biodiversity Fund (QRBF) Weeden Foundation Living Earth Institute Saraf Foundation For Himalayan Traditions And Culture Greater Good RESOLVE UIAA ATREE USA Sidley Austin LLP Photo.circle Habeli Outdoor Learning Center Friends Of Nepal Karuna Foundation One More Generation (OMG) What Design Can Do Climate Action Challenge (WDCD) CrowdRise Eric D. Lemelson Louise Fletcher Habeli Outdoor Learning Centre Habermann Koehn Foundation Social Enterprise NL Safari Club International S.P.E.C.I.E.S. Institute of International Education Wright Ingram Institute

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KTK-BELT PROJECT ANNUAL REPORT 2017

2017 KTK-BELT ANNUAL REPORT  
2017 KTK-BELT ANNUAL REPORT  
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