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Advanced Design Studio

About the Studio

Designing a Public Building -Envisioning the Haptic The projects in the studio of advanced design deal with the development and resolution of functional, architectonic and constructional requirements. The key learning outcome is a deepened understanding into the aims and realities of architectural practice. Every year a theme is formulated to encourage an open discussion on the prospects and progress of contemporary architecture. An underlying theme of the year, Envisioning the haptic, distinguishes architecture developed through visual processes from architecture that is based on qualities of materiality and the making of buildings - the assembly of different parts and systems. It also acknowledges the pros and cons of each aspect. Quick and forgiving working methods have a definite role in the creative process, just as slow and precise studies are necessary for a deepened development. As a way to engage with these questions the studio will develop the student’s awareness of the refined possibilities inherent in elementary tools such as physical models, material assemblies and freehand sketches, as complementary to digital tools.

Rehab-center, Basel, Herzog & deMeuron, 2002.

Still from Stalker by Andrei Tarkovsky.

“[B]uildings should be built to last. What is still typical today, despite all the new technology, is after all that architecture is a genuinely unwieldy, slow medium that requires major resources for its creation. For this reason the robust is important if architecture is to be taken seriously and contribute to the development of a sustainable community. The robust is an alternative to the architecture that is mainly based on visual features. The really significant qualities of a building are complex and not always visually accessible. The robust should not be interpreted to mean something crudely hewn and therefore sturdy through its brute strength. Instead it is intended to engender durable and multifaceted architecture. There are many factors that make architecture relevant in the long term and appearance is only one of them. Robust architecture affirms the context of a project in the broadest sense. Its physical, concrete surroundings are one aspect of this. Other aspects are the technical conditions that apply to the project, its financing, its social context, its history or current or expected social role. Sigurd Lewerentz’s works provoke thought in this context as they focus on the essential, the poetic, advanced experiments, but not as visually challenging buildings that demand the attention of those who are not really affected by them…” (From “The Robust, the Sincere” Johan Celsing, published in Nordic Architects Write – A documentary anthology, Routledge, 2008.) Contemporary examples of Robust architecture are works by Meili+Peter, Sergison&Bates and Miller Maranta. The first term we will also put emphasis on Spatial Sequences. The students will put thorough consideration on how one enters their building proposal; how the main hall is perceived; how the transition between spaces is articulated; and how the main movements are orchestrated through the building. Case Studies and Surveys During the recent years the studio has developed a study methodology that apart from the individual design work comprises certain specified tasks, which draws knowledge from important examples of what has previously been built. To introduce a historic and structural overview into the design task we make case studies of a complex building type (this year Therapeutic Clinic and Bath) In order to make a shift into a detailed scale we will make measuring survey of an extraordinary building from the 20th century. (Last year one of the chapels on Eastern Cemetery in Malmö by S Lewerentz was measured.)

Courses Birth of Aphrodite.

Bath House, Mansilla Tunon, Madrid 1998.

4:1 (A42A1B) and 5:1 (A52A1B) Therapeutic Clinic and Bath –Phase I A Therapeutic Clinic and Bath is a complex program with a mix of large and small spaces. The character of the Clinic and Bath is to be understood as an institution for health and contemplation rather than a sports facility. It forms an interesting context for investigating haptic, sensual qualities and spatial sequences, alongside with constructional strategies. The first phase will be focused on a general idea of character and organization and have a given set of required presentation material and images – much like the procedure of an architectural competition. 4:2 (A42A2B ) and 5:2 (A52A2B ) Therapeutic Clinic and Bath –Phase II Continuation of project 4:1/5:1. Architectural standpoints are developed further alongside with closer considerations of the functions. The result should be a convincing proposal regarding structural and organizational principles, the building form as a whole, and its relation to the surroundings. In this phase main tools are physical models and drawings (incl floor- and ceiling plans, and internal elevations). Seminars/tutorials with a structural engineer will be arranged. 4:3 (A42A3B) Multipurpose Room – A Conversion An existing structure in a ruined stage is to be converted into a multipurpose room. New elements such as roof structure, a window, a wall section, a drainpipe etc are fragments to be interacted with the qualities of the existing. There are collage-like strategies, such as conversion work by Alison + Peter Smithson, J L Mateo and Caruso St John architects. Or the will to create a new unified whole, with the example of Valerio Olgiatti or David Adjaye. 4:4 (A42A4B) Fragment – A Detailed Study For the last phase of the year we will return to either the Therapeutic Clinic and Bath or the Multipurpose Hall. Closer studies of the buildings construction and its secondary elements will be made in specific drawing tasks and physical models in scale 1:10. The aim is to come as close as possible to an understanding of spatial and tectonic qualities and of the actual production of building.

Abbey of St. Benedictusberg in Vaals, Netherlands by Dom Hans. Van der Laan.

St Knuts Chapel, Malmö, S Lewerentz. Drawing by Advanced Studio 2011.

Studio Culture

The core of what´s taught in the studio of advanced design is the ability to design a building from a complex set of issues, to keep several considerations open in a parallel process, for the best possible outcome. I.e. it means moving from ideas of atmosphere and character to spatial organisation and structural analysis and back again. It also implies using different design tools, testing ideas in different ways – moving from cad and digital images, to hand sketches and workshop crafted models, alternating slow and fast ways of working. We believe in an open process where the student should develop her personal skills and engagement into the work. The weekly rhythm of individual tutorial is important for the students to develop their proposal in depth and detail. The student shall print out new drawings for each tutorial - this is to ensure high efficiency in the informal discussions. Tutorials will be complemented with pin ups, reviews and workshops focusing on certain aspects such as construction, facade detailing, inhabitation, daylight and materiality. Theory and Practice Additional to the work on the individual projects will be literature studies and visits to construction sites. Four distinguished texts, related to the theme of the studio, will be distributed and discussed in seminars and lectures. Site visits to works under constructions will include the new crematorium at The Woodland Cemetery. Studytrip (Autumn) A study trip to Athens is planned to be arranged during the autumn term. Works to be seen by: Ictinus / Callicrates, Demitri Pikionis, Kyriakos Krokos, Bernard Tschumi

Tutors, Teachers, Professors

New Crematorium Woodland Cemetery, Johan Celsing arkitektkontor, 2012.

Poolroom, private home, Johan Celsing arkitektkontor AB.

Countryhouse, Spetz & Holst arkitekter, 2004.

Wood house, Spetz & Holst arkitekter, 2007.

• Johan Celsing, professor. Principal of Johan Celsing Arkitektkontor AB. Has designed buildings such as Nobel Forum 1993, Bonniers Konsthall 2007, Årsta Kyrka 2011. The office has won several architectural awards and competitions, such as the new crematorium for the Woodland Cemetery, now under construction, and has been published in Sweden and abroad, in periodicals such as , A+U and Casabella and the Architectural Review. Guest critic and lecturer in schools in Europe and overseas. • Roger Spetz, associate professor. Practicing architect SAR/MSA at Johan Celsing Arkitektkontor AB. Former partner of Spetz & Holst arkitekter (see www.spetzholst.se) 2005-2012. During the autumn KTH is publishing a book by Spetz: ‘Inclusive Aesthetics’, a collection of essays and lectures. Former editor of the Architectural Magazine MAMA. Has taught part time at KTH since 1999. • Tobias Nissen, senior lecturer. After his studies at the ETH Lausanne (1987-1993), Tobias Nissen was a leading member of Zwimpfer Partner Architects in Basle, Switzerland. After moving to Stockholm in 1999 he cofounded the office Vera Arkitekter (see www.vera.se). The offices work ranges from small conversions to large scale housing projects and urban planning. Vera Arkitekter has won several prizes in architectural competitions.

Academic Year 2012-2013 August 23 2012 16.20


Architectural Technology Research Studio About the Studio

The Architectural Technology Research Studio explores the role played by technology within the architecture profession, in its impact on design conceptualization, development and construction. Modes of representation, design procedures, methods and tools across a number of disciplines are creatively explored and assessed within the studio. We research architectural, cultural, sociological and technological implications of contemporary design strategies. In this way the synthesis between technological investigations and design through an interdisciplinary discourse is employed in the production of architecture. The studio emphasizes methods for testing proposals and evaluating relative values of quantitative and qualitative modeling through the development of urgent design proposals for sites of contemporary concern. Our interests include high performance materials, digital design techniques, rapid prototyping methods and computer aided manufacturing systems. Participants will develop, explore and prototype computational design approaches and digital fabrication in architecture. Computation here serves as a common platform for collaborative protocols, integrative modeling and continuous design to fabrication workflows. Students will learn how to employ advanced digital design techniques at a strategic and detailed level. The interdisciplinary approach will provide skills in communication and collaboration with external specialists, as well as a general understanding of advanced structural and environmental concerns.

Fabricating Landscapes

Each year the studio selects a particular architectural typology that challenges the methods employed, and allows explorative design principles to contribute to the wider field of architecture. The theme and typology of the academic year 2012 - 2013 involves the notion of landform buildings, applied to large scale research facilities. In this way the historical idea of the megastructure is reassessed and reformulated, in order to define digitally supported design strategies that mediate between internal research environments and the public, urban and rural environments, as well as constructed and natural landscape. The technological focus for the year will furthermore put the focus on issues of fabrication, both as a tool for design development, and as means for production of large and small scale structures. Various principles of fabrication, production and construction will be developed in the final output, as integral parts of comprehensive architectural designs.

Courses

4:1 (A42T1B) Primer The first course is sequenced as a series of design workshops introducing Computational Design, Integrative Modeling and Digital Fabrication in the context of well defined spatial design tasks. These assignments will provide skills, form studio culture, and introduce form as the integration of spatial configuration, structure and material fabrication. The first course also provides the basis for a more detailed research on the above-mentioned topics within an architectural context 4:2 (A42T2B) Fabricating Landscapes 1: Integrated Design The second course introduces more complex design assignment with well defined programmatic condition, and introduces the collaboration with specialists to inform design development. Strategies to utilize computation, integrative modeling and digital fabrication as design drivers in early architectural concept phase are tested and discussed, and design strategies for landform building typologies are introduced. 4:3 (A42T3B) Fabricating Landscapes 2: Preliminary Design The third course introduces the main project for the year, an integrated design solution for the European Spallation Source facilities in Lund, and methods and tools for interdisciplinary collaboration previously introduced will be implemented. The final outcome will be a preliminary design, the first fabricated prototypes, and a strategy for further development. 4:4 (A42T4B) Fabricating Landscapes 2: Design Completion and Refinement The fourth semester will provide opportunities to focus on one or more aspects of the design proposal. This may be directed towards fabrication, prototyping, interdisciplinary design methodologies and/or particular concerns for the main design brief, and also allows for individual exploration. The overall design proposal will be refined and brought to its final stage. 5:1 (A52T1B) Primer 5th year students will follow the 4th year schedule in order to quickly pick up skills and prepare for their thesis project. Design and research assignments may be customized with the thesis project in mind, and individual tutorials will be provided for thesis preparation. 5:2 (A52T2B) Fabricating Landscapes 1: Integrated Design 5th year students will follow the 4th year schedule, but their design assignment may be customized in preparation for the thesis. The outcome will be a design project and the thesis booklet regarding the theme of the studio with respects to architectural ambitions, collaboration and fabrication technologies. This preparation will be supported through tutorials and external consultancy. Diploma Thesis Projects Diploma students will have the support of all studio resources, and are expected to develop a program that makes good use of this. Students may decide to follow the theme of the year, or select a theme of their own.

Studio Culture

The studio is design based with a strong emphasis on collaborative work and the process of design. The projective, conceptual and explorative character of design is merged with analytical, rigorous and systematic research approaches within the fields of Computational Design, Integrative Modeling and Digital Manufacturing. The techniques will be introduced primarily through design assignments, with support from tutors and external consultants. The overarching aim is to find an integrated design approach that promotes design innovation with a strong tie to relevant issues in society combined with current practice. Design work will be supported with research into programmatic and technological questions, which will be explored through prototyping, tutorials, lectures and text seminars. Project development will combine team based and individual work. The first two courses during the fall will build up skills, conduct focused research and develop a conceptual understanding through workshops and design tasks. A series of physical scale models, prototypes and design proposals will be developed to explore the relevance of material systems and digital fabrication as a design driver from early on. The final two courses in the spring will be devoted to the intended architectural outcome and output, with a first phase conceptual development and a second phase of advanced development. More information on the studio and previous student work available at: https://www.kth.se/social/page/architectures-of-interdiscipli/

Tutors, Teachers, Professors

• Assistant Professor Oliver Tessmann is an architect with a collaborative design approach. His teaching and research revolves around computational design, digital manufacturing and collaborative design in architecture. He has been a Guest Professor at Staedelschule Architecture Class (SAC) in Frankfurt and he worked with the engineering office Bollinger + Grohmann in Frankfurt at the interface between architecture and structural design, after working with various architectural firms in Mexico, Austria and Germany. In 2008 he received a doctoral degree for research in the field of “Collaborative Design Procedures for Architects and Engineers” at the University of Kassel. • Lecturer Jonas Runberger is a practicing architect, researcher and educator, with a focus on the implications of digital design in conventional and experimental practice. He was part of the team initiating the studio in 2010, and previous teaching experience includes the KTH, the Architectural Association, the London Metropolitan University and ETHZ, Zürich. He has been participating in the SmartGeometry network since 2005 and is the director of Dsearch, an environment for digital design development within White Arkitekter. He recently completed his doctoral thesis in architecture and project communication titled Architectural Prototypes II: Reformations, Speculations and Strategies within the Digital Design Field, and is currently the academic coordinator of the Digital Fabrication Lab at the school. Additional consultancy within the fields of structural engineering, environmental design and fabrication will be provided by a range of specialists at key moments during the year.

Academic Year 2012-2013 August 23 2012 16.20


Basic Design Studio

About the Studio

Through architectural projects, this Studio investigates different experiences of architecture and conceptions of space, in relation to the synthezising design process. It could also be defined as a Research by Design Studio on applied aesthetics investigating basic architectural concepts; colour, texture, light, gravity, sound, time and space... The education is based on problematic projects, coaching tutorials, discussions, presentations, literature seminars, lectures and excursions.

Learning Outcome

Specifically - deeper critical studies in relevant concepts (as differentiation, pluralism, movement, gravitation, narrativity, specificity, temporality, ma, oku, privacy, directed sequences) – provides the students with knowledge and design experiences in order to develop their ability to reflect and use their minds in their design process. Our ambition is to learn the students how to create methods to analyze existing problems as a foundation for developing their own artistic and specific architectural voice, designing excellent projects with strong communicating concepts.

Courses

4:1 (A42G1B) and 5:1 (A52G1B) Artistic Interdisciplinary Tools and Methods: New Space for Experimental Music in Stockholm The students will study and use different artsitic interdisciplinary tools and methods in order to develop architectural projects for a new Center for Experimental Music in Stockholm; an external temporary satellite extension of Stockholms Konserthus. Through deeper studies in different contemporary artistic disciplines (film, literature, dance, music, art) and discourses of immediate importance – the foundations of design theory and practise will be questioned and furthered. What is the relation between architecture and music? How can sound and rythm change space and vice versa? What kind of qualities, design and expressions can be connected and adapted to experimental music and sound art? Discussions and exercises on how we use different senses to experience space. The brief includes several small or medium sized spaces for different kind of experimental music connected in a temporary Center located on the waterfront of Stockholm. 4:2 (A42G2B) and 5:2 (A52G2B) Architectural Conceptions – HVAR ISLAND (Croatia) By re-defining contemporary interpretations of different architectural conceptions, the students will use this investigation in the design process of architectural projects in a dynamic context with huge potential in big need for new strategies; Hvar Island outside the Dalmatian Coast. The island with 12.000 inhabitants is beautifully located close to Split, linking the Adriatic islands. The island has a long history with lots of important archaeological treasures from the Greek times. The site includes parts of the ancient Greek system of Agriculture- the Stari Grad Plain – a UNESCO World Heritage Site. The fields are still in use for production of wine, olives and lavender. In general the island is developing new typologies and design for tourism, trade and education. The programme includes mixed use – small houses, temporary housing, agriculture and tourism. Excursion to Hvar 20-27 October. 4:3 (A42G3B) Specificity in Architecture (Narrative design I) A House for an Extremely Unique Person How could the conception of narrativity be transformed into very specific architectural expressions in a tectonic project (a building for an extremely unique person or function in an urban context)? Studies and discussions of narrativity and different theories. Architectural case studies. Development of individual project design. The project programme will be developed for a specific artistic person with a specific personality and extensive history - in Stockholm (or in another city). There will be some alternatives provided (authors, poets, artists, film directors, coreographers, musicians...) but it´s also possible to choose other alternatives and urban contexts. The brief should include a house/apartment with a garden, a working space for the artist and other odd things. As an alternative it could include other programmes or functions. Study trip to Japan in March/April 2013 (preliminary) 4:4 (A42G4B) Differentiation in Urban Design (Narrative design II) Centre for contemplation A place for meditaion, connected to the theories of Zen buddism. In this architectural urban context project, we will study how narrativity and differentiation could be used in order to develop a multitude of specific architectural and urban expressions. Studies and discussions of narrativity and differentiation as well as of ideas on contemplation, cultural identity and regionalism. Urban and architectural case studies. Development of an individual design project – a Japanese culture centre focusing on the ideas of Zen in an urban context. Study trip to Japan in March/April 2013 (preliminary). Diploma Project (5th year Students) The first two projects in the autumn provide a common field of interest and a level of ambition for the diploma project. The diploma project is a further opportunity to respond to the issues raised. The course structure for the spring will be developed in dialogue with the students during the autumn. The aim is to keep a common ground for all diploma projects, whether it is a thematic issue, a site or a programme. The Diploma Projects will be supervised by Leif Brodersen and Teres Selberg.

Studio Culture

Our ambition is to learn the students how to create methods to analyze existing problems as a foundation for developing their own artistic and specific architectural voice, making design with strong communicating concepts. The Studio Culture is based on coaching tutorials, presentations, seminars, lectures and excursions. It has become a tradition to swim in the river wherever we go. First Canal Grande in Venice, then the Zagreb river (a swim excursion that ended in the hospital due to dangerous glass pieces) and last year in Split by the Adriatic Sea. Last Autumn we made investigations of the Diocletian Palace Area in Split. Some of the student´s innovative project will be adopted by the City Planning Office.

Tutors, Teachers, Professors

• Ass. Professor Leif Brodersen is a partner in A1 Arkitekter AB, Stockholm – an office with 14 employed architects working with interiors, housing, offices and urban design. The design research in the office could be described as an investigation of differentiation and diversity; Division – making differences within something earlier unified; Indifference in opposition to difference. • Affilliated Professor Helena Paver Njiric, Paver Njiric Architects, Zagreb – are one of Croatia´smost well known architect offices. They work with exhibitions (Croatian pavilion in the Biennale in Venice) shopping areas, offices and housing. The office is searching for a personal specific architecture (published in El Croquis a o). She will be heading the Hvar Island project. • Architect SAR/MSA Teres Selberg works in the field in between architecture, art and dance. She is running her own office in Stockholm and is co-founder and active member of ASF- Sweden (Architects without borders). • Architect SAR/MSA Per Elde will take part during the Spring semester. He is heading the Bachelor Level within the KTH School of Architecture. The Studio will also be connected to some very interesting architects and guest teachers during the Year. We have collaborations since earlier excursions with SANAA, Fujimoto Architects, Tetsuo Kondo and some other architects in Tokyo. Some of them will be hosting us in the excursion to Tokyo. We also collaborate with teachers from CEU in Valencia and the Technical University of Wroclaw.

Academic Year 2012-2013 August 23 2012 16.20


Contextual Space Studio About the Studio

Architecture is fundamentally a creation of defining spatial boundaries and to give people root in time and space. Architecture will never be complete since it is a continuous spatial process that will serve a life of change. Changes in the physical environment constantly affect built and un-built places. We will investigate the contextual frames and make programs and design for new and existing – modern and historic – spaces. Through the year we will explore reasons for the building (-s) to exist, originally, in today’s society and in the future. Methods will be found for gaining knowledge building/site, learn the history of architecture of the objects, identify values and threats and understand the building in relation to its physical surroundings, materials and building techniques used. During the autumn semester, we investigate how changes in the physical environment constantly affect built and un-built places. Analyse, lab and design within specific sites and room conditions will be executed in drawings, models and photos, where also its quality of precision in the handcraft will be underlined and practiced. During the spring the tasks expand in size to encompass two interlinked urban projects. Tools are developed to address the complexity and large scale. The contextual parameters will be studied, evaluated and addressed. Studio 7 will here, with great curiosity, approach other cultures and living conditions. Fifth year students will have individual settings related to existing portfolio and the coming theses work. The students will a) learn how to analyse and interpret the existing physical environment and individual buildings, using methods developed in the studio; b) practice how to add new design to the existing.

Courses

4:1 (A42R1B) Alterations of Space: Lab, Analyse and Execute Course content: tracing spatial borders. Course disposition: lectures, seminars, tutorial in studio and reviews. Presentation requirements: drawings 1:1000 – 1:1, models 1:1000 – 1:5 and photos of site. Course literature: Den förskjutna gränsen: Pål Röjgård Harryan Article in Arkitektur 6/07. The aim of the course is to increase awareness of spatial complexity in terms of both the physical environment as well as the experience of place. The goal is to find architectural tools and methods to form approaches towards architectonic space based on personal experiences. We will investigate different categories of phenomenon by locating a place and tracing its boundaries within a specific context. Tracing layers of time, the permanent and the temporary, hierarchies, contrasts and materiality will demand varying media to express the nature of the studied subject. Lectures will support this process and help inform the production of different types of two- and three-dimensional representations, essential to the course. 4:2 (A42R2B) Context of Site: Infiltration into the Existing Course content: interacting in the existing context Course disposition: lectures, seminars, tutorial in studio and reviews. Presentation requirements: drawings 1:1000 – 1:1, models 1:1000 – 1:5 and photos of site. The aim of the course is to train how architectonical interactions can keep- and give new values to an existing site. Most of the architectonical tasks today an in the future to come will be about how to transform existing built areas and single buildings. As a result of political changes in Sweden today old prominent military areas sited in great locations are abandoned. By developing programs and concepts for these locations the existing values has to be evaluated in order to become the base for interaction between the old and the new. The aim of the course is to find different approaches to interact, both in an existing building structure, and it´s surrounding area. Methods will be found for gaining knowledge about a building/site, learn the history of architecture of the objects, identify values and threats and understand the building in relation to its physical surroundings, materials and building techniques used. The experiences from the exercises in the former course 4:1 will contribute to generate spatial and architectonical input. 4:3 (A42R3B) Compact Cities Course content: Investigation and development of compact urban patterns. Course disposition: lectures, seminars, tutorial in studio and reviews. Presentation requirements: Site plans/drawings in various scales 1:10’000-1:500, necessary models diagram and surveys and investigations. Samples of components/city blocks are to be described in physical 3D models and in a detailed analysis, as an outcome of the study. In the spring term the investigation of contexts increases in complexity and expands in scale to encompass the urban environment. The introduction of a social context and related urban pattern of other cultural spheres is introduced. The extreme growth of cities worldwide asks for maximizing of exploitation. The skyscrapers are back as a standard solution for dense environments. But can the skyscraper as building type really cater for all richness of the aspects we value and demand of the urban environment? The study of compact cities, which can strengthen the street and the development of urban space, is on the agenda. The course involves the study of urban patterns and development of models. Economical historical, and cultural aspects are part of the exercise. An integral part of the course is a journey to one or more cities to both analyse pattern and building types and spatial conditions and to examine a chosen site for the coming city extension project. 4:4 (A42R4B) City Extensions Course content: extension of an existing city. Course disposition: lectures, seminars, tutorial in studio and reviews. Presentation requirements: Site plans in various scales, drawings 1:1000- 1:500, necessary models diagram and surveys and investigations. Accurate illustrations depicting the new city and its relationships and meeting with the existing are to be submitted. An illustrated text explaining the choices and aims is also to be submitted. Cities grow in different phases and patterns over time. The aim of this course is to apply the knowledge of the previous course and develop and adapt it to a real situation and site. The climatic, social and topographical conditions must be must be handled in a diligently. The new urban environment will have to respond to high demands required of a resilient contemporary city. The given site must be thoroughly analysed to maximise its potential in terms of living qualities and response to local conditions. The connections and the physical linking up with the neighbouring patterns must be resolved. The main components, if repetitive must be optimized and tested. The choice of materials and main construction principles will be part of the study.

Studio Culture

The students work primarily individually, but all the time in relation to the other students in the overall frame of the studio and the project. Some specific tasks are done as collaborations. During the working process we will stress the production of models, drawings and photos as focal point of discussions about architecture and try to develop techniques and skills for the presentation of each project. Course disposition: lectures, seminars, tutorial in studio and reviews. The focus is on context, material and scale, which we reach by working with the relation between drawings in different scales, physical models and computer models, Photoshop applications and material studies. The studio discusses relevant and contextual design solutions for new additions to the existing – in large scale and in detail – such as sustainability, sensibility and reversibility of added materials and structure, ethical approaches and social consequences to preservations and changes; promote environmentally friendly and energy efficient innovative approaches to the existing buildings; observe preservation and renewal in an local and international context.

Tutors, Teachers, Professors

• Pål Röjgård Harryan has a long experience of teaching at KTH besides his work in his office Harryan Architecture and Design. He is educated in the Royal Academy of Art in Copenhagen and has been employed in various offices in Copenhagen, Stockholm and Berlin. His interest is to combine theory and research with the practical work of architecture and design. Parallel to his practice, which involves production of buildings, furnitures and planning, he is developing his architectonical research within the frames of the Contextual Space Studio at KTH. • Alexis Pontvik grew up in Stockholm, Uruguay and Argentina. Studied in Bern, Switzerland, in Düsseldorf at the Academy of Arts and in London at the AA. Architect in private practice from 1981, since 1987 based in Stockholm, as Pontvik Arkitekter AB (www.Pontvik.se). Has worked on capacity building-, master plan- and building projects for Swedish foreign collaboration projects on the West Bank, Gaza and in Tanzania, 1994-2010. From 1986-2002 engaged as a consultant to the Stockholm City Planning Administration. Acted as jury member on a several national and international architectural and urban competitions. Gained several prizes in various Swedish national competitions some of which has been built. Taught at Kingston University and the AA in the early 80ies. Has been teaching at the KTH in 4/5 year 87/88, 95/96 02/05 and was head of third year 2006-2011.

Academic Year 2012-2013 August 23 2012 16.20


Critical Studies Design Studio About the Studio

The Critical Studies Design Studio engages in critical and feminist strategies for the production of architecture and design. Our four courses introduce design research approaches that include: Feminist Design Tools, Dialogical Interventions, Participatory Mapping, and Altering Practices. Through these approaches we encourage participants to actively position themselves in the field of critical studies in architecture, to participate with their peers and with diverse communities, and to undertake collaborative work, all of which involves critical reflections on power relations in social settings. Throughout the design projects and in our seminars we engage in the notion of altering practices, both in terms of understanding how to change existing conditions through architectural project work, and in terms of understanding how one’s own future practice as an architect can be conducted so as to actively engage in social transformation. The studio provides 4th and 5th year students with an opportunity to work through critical and experimental design methods, with the support of lectures, workshops, tutorials and seminars. A unique aspect of our studio is the integration of writing and making practices, preparing students for both professional practice, as well as for future research positions, and supporting the student to position her or himself to enable reflection and the imagination of other possible worlds.

Courses

1700

3350

2950

loft 25 kvm 0005

0005 0061

0003

0002

llah mvk 3

8000 2950

flera kopplingar mellan rum för smidighet när huset är fullt

tehnegäl trevortni

0005 0061

0002

0002 0004

murdab mvk 8

drågdärt mvk 21

EDNEOB SIVLEXÄV

sovrum

SUHTXÄV

9000 T TOLSGNILDO

oas

2250

2250 3050

3250 10200

pingis

sovrum ljus PINGIS & INNEBANDY 10 kvm

DANS

PLAN 2 32 kvm

Mindre sovrum möjliggör större ljus gemensamma rum. Det stora aktivitetsrummet i mitten kan ha kontakt med andra sociala rum av mer fast wc förvaring karaktär som kök och tv-rum, eller2 kvm 2 kvm stängas av och mörkläggas. Alterarbetsrum nativa användningar är sovsal, kafé, 9 kvm sovrum mötesrum, fotostudio, syjunta, mindre sovrum, större gemen- 9 kvm festlokal, eller helt enkelt tälta eller samma rum PLAN 1 lekaarbetsrum stort. 28 kvm

KLÄTTRA

wc/dusch 4 kvm

137 kvm

4000

3850

arbetsrum gästrum TOTAL sovrum 105 kvm uthyrningsrum 21 kvm

kök 18 kvm

träningshylla

ODLINGSLOTT badrum

PLAN 1 50 kvm

PLAN 2 30 kvm OIDUTSKISUM

3000 9000

2700 2700

“Ett rum&garage” istället för “ett rum&kök”. Som rumstyp är garagetsovrum användbart för aktiviteter som kräver oömma ytor. Vid behov kan det hyras ut.

8400

2800

2000

3000

3000

GROVRUM Jag vill inte bo i villa bara för att jag vill ha garage. Jag trivs jättebra i min etta. Men att ha ett EDNEOBbilen SIVLEXÄV garage, och kunna fixa SUHTXÄV andras bilar, det vore AMMEHoch ABBOJ ju hur bra som helst.

KONSTNÄR

EGARAG

Alternativa visuellanvändningar: kontakt med hela

bostaden och lämpar sig väl för att hänga konst t ex. I ena fallet fungerar den även som projektionsyta.

YDNABENNI & SIGNIP

garage

GROVRUM

förvaring

Utifrån intervjuer med människor i min utvidgade bekantskapskrets utvecklas ett antal lägenhetstypologier. De gestaltar särskilda hall kök badrum 4,5 kvm rumsliga egenskaper eller samband (interna 6 kvm 6 kvm samband eller relation till omgivningen) som Alternativa användningar: krävs för att möjliggöra en aktivitet eller en sovrum 10 kvm Undersökningen leder till sovsal familjestruktur. vardagsrum kafé insikten19att kvmboendet är en aktivitet, att en mötesrum förhandling sker mellan ens behov, önskemål kurser syjunta och rummen man bor i. Ibland kan de samfestlokal sas, men så är inte alltid fallet. Att möta alla fotostudio46 - kvm mörklägga tälta ellerbasbehov leka stort betyder inte att bostaden är helt funktionell. 800

PLAN 0 45 kvm

sovrum 21 kvm

Parkettgolv och tapet är inte den ultimata finishen om man vill träna seriöst hemma.

hänga konst

SNAD

ERAKCINS

4,5 klättervägg

GENERATIONSBOENDE

Lägenhetsförslagen: Klättringsväggen har god

GENERATIONSBOENDE

OAS

5 kvm

OAS

KONSTNÄR

KLÄTTRA

sovalkov

badrum arbetshörna förvaring 3 kvm

klättra

Klättringsträning kan ske på olika sätt: på klättervägg med säkring, på boulderingvägg utan säkring men med madrasser att landa på, och med hjälp av träningsredskap i och runt dörrkarmar t ex för att träna greppstyrka (som i bilden).

GARAGE

grovrumNEGNOKLAB ÅP AVOS kvm

vardagsrum 18 kvm vardagsrum

kök 13 kvm

En kartläggning av somligas bostads-ovanor

1000

badrum 5 kvm

21 kvm

PLAN 0 57 kvm

MUSIKSTUDIO

JOBBA HEMMA

sovrum 10 kvm

klättervägg

förråd 2,5 kvm

klättervägg

klättervägg

2700

hall 3,5 + 5 kvm

VÄXTHUS

klättervägg

10 kvm

klättring

3850

4000

kök 21 kvm

GARAGE

dubbelsidig lägenhet i tre plan ODLINGSLOTT

1000

MUSIKSTUDIO

Att träna klättring och cykling är kärnverksamheter i mitt liv. Är man seriös med cyklingen vill man ha en trainer hemma. TOTAL

rum

1000

1000

schakt klättervägg VÄXTHUS badrum kök?JOBBA HEMMA vertikal kommunikation

4000

12000

rum

VÄXELVIS BOENDE

600

SNICKARE SOVA PÅ BALKONGEN

Alternativa användningar:

1800

1000

klättervägg

1000

DANS

PINGIS & INNEBANDY

klättervägg

5400 3400

Hur definieras programmet för ett specifikt boende?

35 kvm

2300

103 kvm

VÄXELVIS BOENDE

1000

tv-rum 10,5 kvm

3600

sovrum 10 kvm

sovrum 9 kvm

badrum 5 kvm

sovrum 8 kvm

En typisk grej som händer är att vi börjar spela pinSNICKARE gis efter middagen. Ibland sovrum SOVA PÅ BALKONGEN plockas innebandyklubborna 8 kvm fram. Vi har inte så mycket prylar så det är inga problem, förutom att grannen förvaring blir sur. 3250

mindre sovrum

GROVRUM

badrum 3,5 kvm

éjleta ,noitartne4cnkvm ok röf mur

sociala rum

Här kan man klättra när andan faller på. Många klättringsentusiaster tränar bouldering i sovrummet ovanför sängen (klättring uppför klippblock utan säkring).

sovrum 9 kvm

3500

3000 KONSTNÄR

ensidig, grund lägenhet i tre plan

3600 2300

3000

4850

mindre mindre sovrum :ragnindnävna avitanretlAsovrum 4500

MURVORG

4520 4150

10500 5850

2500

RÄNTSNOK

klättervägg

klättringszon

10700 2430

tehnegäl trevortni ,netulsmo

1500

ART TÄLK

EDNEOBSNOITARENEG

T TOLSGNILDO

1350

2300

TOTAL 90 kvm

vardagsrum

MURVORG

RÄNTSNOK

2300

badrum 5 kvm

wc 3 kvm

Olika sammansättningar av lägenheter testas i skissmodell

4:2 (A42K3B) and 5:2 (A52K3B) Urban Working: Dialogical Interventions Course leader: Hélène Frichot This studio will develop the critical analyses and design experiments undertaken in the first half of the Autumn term toward the design of a 24 hour urban workshop for the homeless, disenfranchised, the unemployed, and all those seeking asylum, or a place of respite. We will develop our dialogues with real and imaginary urban workers, as well as with stakeholders identified by the Färgfabriken project, Stockholm on the Move, toward the development of our design projects. From work undertaken in the Färgfabriken workshop, Stockholm on the Move, we will also consider our design proposals in terms of urban infrastructures and how the work-place depends upon complex networks of communication, both virtual and real.

1500

På wc den här sidan presenteras ett urval ur denna “programskrivning” som också kan läsas som en palett av rum, egenskaper och samband som sätts samman i den större struktur en som flerbostadshuset utgör (se nästa sida).

SAO

arbetsrum gästrum sovrum uthyrningsrum

sovrum 12,5 kvm

92 kvm

GENERATIONSBOENDE

OAS

ett rum av meditativ karaktär, där Tidens betydelse återkommer i ljusets skiftningar kan upplevas utan intervjun. Ett halvår beskrivs som att vara beskådad. Den här typen försvunnet i en arbetsdimma: av rum för koncentration kan även “vart tog våren vägen?” Bostaden siktlinjer lämpa sig för intensivt kreativt arbete kan förstärka kopplingen till den eller författande. långsamma tiden, till de växlande årstiderna. Bostaden organiseras runt

En klättrare ser sitt hem med andra ögon, en dold potential blir synlig. Dörrkarmarna blir redskap. Sängen används för att landa mjukt.

GARAGE

KLÄTTRA

ODLINGSLOTT

SAO

filmvisning hänga konst

MUSIKSTUDIO

elasticitet en Utrymmeskrav och den skiftande :ragnind(att nävn a situation avitanretlAkan anpasarbetsrum varjesovrum sas genom att förändra storleken). karaktären bostaden genomgår vecka är svårlösta. Förändringsbeéjleta ,noitartnecnok röf mur Två förslag presenteras. Det ena inhovet kan mötas på olika sätt; genom nehåller ett sovloft och många vägar generalitet (att en fast situation kan att röra sig. Det andra är ett generhanteravardagsrum olika krav och önskemål), kök hall grovrum ellt golv som blir specifikt genom genom flexibilitet (att en situation nivåskillnad. är enkel att förändra), eller genom

0062

ART TÄLK

EDNEOBSNOITARENEG

växelvis boende JOBBA HEMMA

förvaring 7,5 kvm

vardagsrum 31 kvm

VÄXTHUS

0004

mur mvk 02

mur mvk 31

kök 9 kvm

VÄXELVIS BOENDE

0008

kök mvk 5,5

0008

mvk 5,11

0043

AMMEH ABBOJdrågdärt

sociala rum

OIDUTSKISUM EGARAG

sovrum

1000

llah mvk 3

murdab mvk 5,6

0003

1000

0043

2950

hall 8,5 kvm

Varje eller varannan vecka 1,5 x takhöjd = sovloft packar 104 000 barn sin väska DANS för att flytta mellanSNICKARE föräldrarna. 81% av dem bor hos SOVA PÅ BALKONGEN respektive förälder en vecka i taget. På tjugo år har växelvis boende gått från att ,nvara etulsen moudda lösning till att bli ett vanligt inslag i svenska skolklasser.

12550

PINGIS & INNEBANDY

sovrum 12,5 kvm

3900

YDNABENNI & SIGNIP

0005

1800

0004

0062

SNAD

Jag jobbar kanske 60 timmar i NEGNOKLAB ÅP AVOS veckan i snitt. Jag hinner inte med så mycket annat. Jag vill bo enkelt, inga prylar, när jag är hemma vill jag vara i fred och slippa måsten.

0008

mur mvk 02

mur mvk 31

ERAKCINS

sovloft

0008

0043

kök mvk 5,5

0004

murdab mvk 8

drågdärt mvk 21 drågdärt mvk 5,11

4250

murdab mvk 5,6

0002

4250

0043

4:1 (A42K1B) and 5:1 (A52K1B) Urban Biopolitics: Feminist Design Tools Course leader: Hélène Frichot This critical design studio is interested in power, specifically the relationship between architecture and biopower. Biopower regulates and administers social life from its interior, it is the way life and a politics of affect in the city are managed. What forms of life, labour and creative expression come together to create a city such as Stockholm, and what is the city today anyway? This studio will interrogate the ways in which architecture is used toward both repressive and emancipatory ends, and how embodied subjectivities are caught up in reciprocal relations with spatial and temporal architectural formations. We will commence from the centre of Stockholm city, at Sergel Torg, in order to map the everyday trajectories of working bodies that collectively produce the biopower of the city and who are in turn managed through biopolitical means. In order to critique the spaces of modulated control that compose today’s city, we will ask, whose body belongs where, and when? We will design biopolitical walking tours; urban gateways and foyers; office landscapes and working cells. This studio will collaborate with the Färgfabriken project, Stockholm on the Move.

4:3 (A42K2B) and 5:1 (A52K1B) Local Gathering: Participatory Mapping Course leader: Katja Grillner This studio develops tools for spatial research, collecting specific knowledge through building a participatory engagement with sites, contexts, and actors. The application of activist and feminist practices unearths social knowledge, which complements analytical and generalized instruments in urbanism and architecture, with personal, subjective and narrative accounts. Urban and architectural design proposals will evolve that consider the intimate scale of 1:1, as well as larger conceptual frameworks. During this course we plan to undertake a participatory mapping of the inner city location of Södra Stationsområdet, Södermalm, with an emphasis on the theme of the ‘commons’ or shared community resources. We also plan to collaborate with UPD (Urban Planning and Design) KTH, and join them on a study trip to Haparanda, in order to consider the different role of the ‘commons’ in urban and rural settings. 4:4 (A42K4B) and 5:2 (A52K3B) Local Caring: Altering Practices Course leader: Katja Grillner This studio builds on urban and architectural proposals developed in the previous projects, and explores possibilities for articulating their transformative potential in an extended geographical and temporal perspective. We will test our material in the design of a Child and Parental Care Garden articulated through the question of the ‘commons’, that is, the planning and management of shared community resources. The design process engages mapping, representation techniques, and critical practices that are employed to expand and develop the architectural, material, and programmatic precision of the proposed urban and architectural intervention.

Studio Culture

The Critical Studies Design Studio is a place where we engage in design and research, and we do this in an integrated way. Architectural design projects produce knowledge and instigate change. In our projects we will frequently return to questions such as, what knowledge have we gained here, and how will this project alter the conditions right here and now? Who may benefit from this change, who might not? Research in our studio is pursued both as you build up your individual portfolio of design projects and collectively as we test out and develop new critical design methods in collaboration. A series of research and methodology seminars will support the studio, which includes producing a booklet to clarify individual design and research questions, programs, methodologies and concepts. Students will be required to make a connection between their work and the effect it may have ‘outside’ of the academic environment, raising questions about social responsibility through architectural means. Combining resources between the master studio and the elective courses offered in Critical Studies, such as lecture series, and an experimental writing and studio course with international guests, we anticipate a vital exchange amongst participants with various backgrounds where we continue to build upon our network for future work collaborations. The Autumn study trip will visit Brussels, the centre of European governmental power. We will meet architects, artists, geographers, and planners working in this context.

Specific Readings

Specific readings will be addressed in studio workshops and lectures, as well as in theory and methods seminars. The titles mentioned below are central references for our studio work throughout the year. - Peter Blundell Jones et.al. (eds.), Architecture and Participation (Spon Press, 2005). - Elizabeth Kamarck Minnich, Transforming Knowledge (Temple University Press, 2005). - Doina Petrescu (ed.), Altering Practices (Taylor and Francis, 2006). - Jane Rendell et.al. (eds.), Gender Space Architecture (Routledge, 2000). - Mark Swenarton, Igea Troiani, Helena Webster, eds., The Politics of Making (Routledge, 2007). - Katie Lloyd Thomas ed., Material Matters: Architecture and Material Practice (Routledge, 2007).

Tutors, Teachers and Professors

• Brady Burroughs, architect, teacher and researcher at KTH School of Architecture, educated at Virginia Tech, with a minor in Gender Studies from Stockholm University. PhD researcher, Critical Studies in Architecture, KTH, with a research project on “women only” bathing places and the architectural potential in the separatist room. Co-founder of FATALE. • Katja Grillner, architect, PhD, professor, Critical Studies in Architecture. Co-founder of FATALE and Director of Architecture in Effect - Rethinking the social in Architecture, a national research environment. www.architectureineffect.se. • Hélène Frichot, architect-philosopher, assistant professor, Critical Studies in Architecture. PhD Philosophy, University of Sydney; BArch, University of Western Australia. Co-curator Architecture+Philosophy. http://architecture.testpattern.com.au • Sara Vall, architect and teacher in Critical Studies in Architecture. Critical Studies in Architecture affiliated researchers and guest critics • Maria Ärlemo, architect, doctoral researcher within the division of Critical Studies in Architecture at KTH. She holds a Master degree in Architecture from KTH and has qualifications within ethnology from the University of Stockholm and within urban sociology and development studies from Berkeley, University of California. • Linda Lindstrand, architect and teacher in Critical Studies in Architecture. • Helen Runting, urban planner, doctoral researcher Critical Studies in Architecture. Helen holds qualifications in both urban planning (University of Melbourne) and urban design (University of Melbourne; Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm) and has worked as an urban planner and designer both in Australia and Sweden • Meike Schalk, architect, PhD, assistant professor and program chair of the Urban Planning and Design master program, KTH. Educated at The University of Arts, Berlin, and Architectural Association in London. Owner of a practice between architecture and art whose projects involve the participation of communities and institutions.

Academic Year 2012-2013 August 23 2012 16.20


Design Process Studio

About the Studio

The design process forms a central part in the creation of any architectural project and is something separate from the daily management of projects. If management is about existing knowledge such as regulations, laws and budgets, then the design process could be understood as the creation of knowledge. A design process is not merely about finding a method to create an object, but about engaging in the complex and contradictory field of relationships that inform our understanding of our built environment. It is about introducing questions and uncertainties right before consensus is established about what we do and how we do it. Rather than a collection of tools, methods, vantage points and positions, the aim of a design process is to unravel the very ground on which we stand. In the poem The Hunting of the Snark, by Lewis Carroll, a hunting party sets out to catch the enigmatic Snark - a creature that can only be found by navigating from a blank chart. This nonsense poem manages to convey the score for a true adventure. Only by allowing ourselves to let go of convention can something unknown be revealed, only when we are lost can true adventure take place. Within the Design Process Studio the work is about tracing the complex ecologies that define our built environment and the practices involved in creating them. We question the artificial opposition between theory and practice and seek to critically engage with the discipline of architecture through both theory and practice.  This year the studio starts with a discussion about how our current political and socio-economic situation impacts architecture, with a focus on public space. Over the past few decades we have witnessed a commercial turn in the field of architecture, this new role for architecture is visable everywhere in contemporary society. We see it in the marketing strategies of cities, the emphasis on iconic buildings, gentrification and the privatization of public space. At the same time we have also seen more and more architects and designers questioning this development, their interest has shifted from what architecture looks like to what it is that architecture do. The studio is divided into four individual blocks. During the year we will examine how cities are being produced, how architecture is linked to the production of images as well as hands-on fieldwork. Along side of the courses, which are formulated as pragmatic and down to earth, there will be a series of lectures on urbanism, alternative architectural practice, new media, contemporary philosophy and architectural theory. The work will be put together in an exhibition, conceptualized and created in collaboration between students and teachers.

Courses

4:1 (A42P1B) and 5:1 (A52P1B) Public Institution During this course we will work on a small but complex program for a public building. The starting point is to answer what kind of public buildings are needed today and in our immediate future? The ambition here is to link a deeper discussion about public space, architecture and planning with a hands-on, programmatic proposal for a public building/space. Your assignment is both to propose a working program as well as making a detailed design for such a program for a planned future urban district in Stockholm. 4:2 (A42T2B) and 5:2 (A52T2B) Public Square The function of the city square as a symbolic and rhetorical space has changed over the course of history. It has been a space to honour and make visible the existing hierarchies between monarchy and people. It has been a space for worship and a space for democracy. Today it has become increasingly hard to pin down what society want public space to be. The problem is that if you are asked to create public space, but society refuse to tell you what it is, it puts the architect in a paradoxical situation of having to do something that goes against their training and nature. This course will take this challenge head on, how to design the impossible. 4:3 (A42T3B) Public Intervention This course aims to develop an understanding for alternative processes in the production of urban conditions. We will look into how informal planning and positions between fast forward late capitalism and residues of traditional planning methodologies have started to produce new understandings of our urban environment. We will introduce and propose new concepts and tools to work on topics of urban development. Away from traditional models of planning and ill-disguised cynical trends towards a more down to earth, active and participatory approach to urban and spatial questions. Each student will produce a concept for a project that can be realized with the help of the fellow students as full time co-workers and with a small economy. 4:4 (A42T4B) Public Exhibition In this course we develop and discuss ways to exhibit architecture, using the knowledge and work that has been accumulated over the year we collaborate on producing an exhibition open to the public. During this course there will be opportunities to return to projects and do some follow up research on urgent topics. This will also work as a platform to discuss the role of the School of Architecture as a producer of content and maker of opinion.

Tutors, Teachers and Professors

• Tor Lindstrand (Stockholm) is Associate Professor and co-owner of the office of Larsson, Lindstrand and Palme. He has been working on projects oscillating between architecture, visual art and performance in numerous cultural contexts, among others TATE Liverpool, Venice Architecture Biennale 2008 and 2010, Steirischer Herbst, Shenzhen and Hong Kong Bi-city Biennale of Urbanism/Architecture 2009, VOLTA Basel, Performa New York, Royal Dramatic Theatre Copenhagen, NAI Rotterdam, Stockholm Architecture Museum and Storefront New York. Together with choreographer Marten Spangberg he initiated International Festival, a practice working on context specific projects spanning from buildings, publications, films, installations, public interventions and situations. In 2010 he founded Economy together with Jessica Watson-Galbraith, a Swedish-Australian platform working with architecture, art and performance. He is currently involved in a collaborative research project on Power, Space and Ideology at KTH and Södertörn University. • Anders Wilhelmson is an architect and professor at The Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, and has for ten years been professor at The Royal University Collage of Fine Arts in Stockholm. He is running his own practice, Wilhelmson architects AB, with is engaged in a diverse field of architecture spanning from cities to furniture, as well as marketing design. Clients are among others LKAB HSB, Saab Automobile and OFFECCT. In 2006 he founded Peepoople AB, a company engaged in delivering hygiene and sanitation to the worlds urban slums, refugee camps and emergencies. Since 2009 he is an Ashoka Fellow.

Academic Year 2012-2013 August 23 2012 16.20


Landscape Design Studio

Studio Culture

The studio’s education is based on project work, small and large surveys with work both in groups and in individual tasks. The studio will provide an opportunity for future architects to be able to get knowledge in reading and understanding all forms of landscapes, as we see it necessary for a future profession as an architect. You can’t become an excellent architect or landscape architect if you don’t understand the relationship of buildings, the site and the landscape. The studio works with projects around current issues and tasks in the society, places and situations with a local and regional perspective. Our aim is to search, explore and (re)discover a Scandinavian tradition, the relationship of nature, urban landscapes, buildings and other interventions. Our hope and desire is that the studio will become a platform for exchange of ideas, theories, teaching and research with wide contacts, interdisciplinary and international. The studio is open for using all forms of techniques, mediums, materials but has its base in working with traditional architect tools. Making study trips to explore, experience and learn from urban and rural landscapes is an important part in the studios concept and culture. We see ourselves more as “Coaches” to help the invividual student to find his/hers own architectural language and understanding of the context. We work through a “Source Book” philosophy. Everyone collects info and share it! We don’t hunt for mistakes, instead we try to improve and boost the positive and good parts of the projects in an open discussion.

About the Studio

The Architecture and Landscape Studio enters into contemporary and future issues about urban development. The approach is architecture based on a landscape relation, from a strategic planning situation to small scale urban design projects. The studio is emphasizing on the urban void between the buildings in the city that creates the public spaces. The method is contextual and conceptual. The studios goal is to increase the student’s knowledge in this area and skills in the field of landscape architecture and architecture in general. The students will enter the project with varying degrees of knowledge and will subsequently end up at different levels at the end of the courses. The individual student must show an increase and development in the particular skills offered in the studio and in the field of landscape architecture. Learning outcome, at the completion of the courses, each student should: • Be able to analyze the strategic landscape situation on a place such as space, buildings history, ecology and functions. • Be familiar with the critical discussion concerning the programming and designing of publicspaces. • To learn to handle the relationship in-between buildings and landscapes, how to place volumes and create interactive spaces. • Design public spaces together with buildings on a specific site. • Be able to use common methods and techniques in landscape architecture practice. • Get familiar with materials in the field of landscape architecture. • Get a deeper understanding of contemporary urban design and landscape architecture projects through study trips, lectures and literature.

Courses

4:1 (A42L1B) and 5:1 (A52L1B) Heaven and Hell – extremes in the Landscape 4:2 (A42L2B) and 5:2 (A52L2B) Heaven and Hell – extremes in the Cityscape Head teachers Johan Paju and Gustav Appell Theory: We will work with an integrated project where landscape, building and space are parts of a whole that is creating architectural projects that take part in the local landscape context and its ongoing processes. What makes a situation desirable or really awful? It has a lot to do with relation and expectations. Also about situations. What can you as an Architect influence? We will discuss the extremes in the landscape. How do you find strength in your architecture from the local situation? What is your strategy for architecture based on your reading of the landscape and social context? Depending on your intention and the resources of the landscape different scenarios emerges. We will find the strategy and relation to perform an architectural project. The two first projects works integrated with the same topic of extremes in Architecture. The first shorter project will take place in a rural situation, probably in the former Swedish coastal areas of Estonia. The second major project will be situated in a urban context in Stockholm. The projects will include built structures, buildings, planning and landscape design depending on the students individually chosen project, desire and background. Developing the working methods we will now address the urban context, focusing on the interaction between architectural projects and the processes of the urban landscape. Study trip: Hapsaalu and Noarootsi (Nuckö) in Estonia. Projects: A public building or public space in the former kolchoz of Pürksi (Birkas). A public space linked to a public building in the Stockholm region. 4:3 (A42L3B) Going Public Head teachers Göran Lindberg and Joachim Staremo In this period we will take a closer look at our public spaces in Stockholm suburbs and inner city. It will be a course about landscape, architecture, art and design, how these subjects are represented and interact with each other and the public space. The course is interdisciplinary and a collaboration with University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, Stockholm Project: Using the landscape and taking inspiration from concepts in contemporary art and design into architectural projects in urban contexts. 4:4 (A42L4B) Grow the City Head teacher Bengt Isling Theory: It grows and withers in the city; in parks, on courtyards and perhaps buildings. This is used by people in allotment gardens, guerrilla gardening, and other local initiatives, but there are also many construction projects with such features. The landscape, which is the prerequisite for any crop, is if you want to see it everywhere present in the city. Landscape Urbanism is a current trend in landscape architecture and architecture provides theories on this which we are investigating. How can the existing landscape in Stockholm be a factor to develop and exploit? In the project we investigate conditions for growing food in the city. Project: Cultivation in a park and on buildings in Stockholm. Can we make a “ferme ornée” an ornamented farm for our time?

Tutors, Teachers, Professors

We teachers look at ourselves as reflective practitioners, education with close interaction between practice, teaching and theory. • Johan Paju looks at the landscape as a process to understand and interact with. It is all about reading the landscape, follow nature and love the people! Johan Paju was one of the founders of the office NOD in 1998. Now he operates Paju Architecture and Landscape since 2007. • For Gustav Appell the structure, space and materiality of building and site is one thing. There is no border between landscape and architecture. Gustav graduated from KTH in 1999. Since 2007 he runs his own office, Gustav Appell Arkitektkontor. • Bengt Isling is particularly interested in examining the site and society in relation to landscape architecture. He is since 1987 working at Nyréns Architects. • Göran Lindberg is interested in the relationship between buildings and landscapes, to look at the city’s structural meetings, between the built elements and spaces. Göran is one of three partners at the office Nivå landskapsarkitektur. • Joachim Staremo, architect at Equator Stockholm, pays interest in the way we experience and read architecture. Joachim was also co-founder of the Dynamo Sthlm arkitekter. • Åsa Drougge from Nivå will also be involved in the courses throughout the year.

Academic Year 2012-2013 August 23 2012 16.20


Performative Design Studio

About the Studio

The Studio actively engages the technological and affective potentials of performative design in architecture. Performance can be understood as the incorporation of contingencies or parameters (climatic, technical, material (biotic or abiotic), programmatic, cultural, social and economic) that inform the design process. The generative potential of digital tools makes it possible to use design as a way of evolving new information systems, new modes of fabricating and producing building components and architecture. Contrary to a linear design approach where technological processes are applied in the interest of optimization; this studio adopts a bi-directional approach where technological processes (digital design tools, computer aided fabrication) are incorporated as drivers of design innovation. The studio aims at increasing and challenge the existing knowledge and enhancing skills within the field of performative design and contributing to an increased comprehension of the discipline of architecture as a whole. The course sequence will establish new ways of thinking about design and fabrication, professional practice and its cultural impact. Upon completion of each project students are expected to have acquired knowledge and skills relevant to the context of the studio, competence in innovative architectural design strategies, advanced digital modeling and fabrication, an awareness of contemporary architectural discourse, and to demonstrate an increased comprehension of the discipline of architecture as a whole.

Courses

4:1 (A42D1B) and 5:1 (A52D1B) MisMatch: Architectural Irreconcilabilities I The aim of this studio is to investigate an emergent approach to design and fabrication in architecture. A series of design studies will introduce techniques and issues relevant to the studio’s topic on the architectural potential of the coupling and interference of irreconcilable constituents.These studies will serve as design research that will form the base for the larger design project in studio 4:2 and 5:2. An intensive workshop will introduce digital and analogue techniques for design and fabrication. 4:2 (A42D2B) and 5:2 (A52D2B) MisMatch: Architectural Irreconcilabilities II Through the design of a medium sized building in an urban context, students will refine the studies developed in Studio 4:1 5:1. An emphasis will be placed on the building interiorities and the transitions and flows of circulation, artificial and natural lightning, climates and structure. Design research will be conducted into issues of atmospheric, material and formal aspects of an architectural mismatch. 4:3 (A42D3B) Performative Design The aim of the studio is to further the knowledge on performative irreconcilable constituents through the design of a comprehensive building project engaging the coupling and interference of multiple architectural performances. By fabricating large-scale detailed prototypes, using both digital and analogue fabrication technology, students will be able to assess, test and modulate the performance of their proposals according to individually outlined criteria including affective, structural, mechanical and material, biotic or abiotic aspects. 4:4 (A42D4B) Performative Design In the 4:4 studio students will complete the design of the project started in the 4:3 studio placing an emphasis on the generation of spatial, material, and formal effects with respect to building and landscape; organizational logics; and programmatic innovation. Students will gain an understanding of the impact of digital design and digital fabrication on a building scale as well as on a scale that begins to address more extensive urban ecologies.

Studio Culture

Design, Research and Theory The main driver for our investigation is design work, supported by digital design systems, as well as digital and analogue fabrication techniques. In parallel, we will research contemporary production techniques. The studio will also be exposed to contemporary architectural theory in dialogue with architectural practice through a series of seminars. Techniques We will make use of 3D modeling and drawing in Maya and Rhino, parametrics and analogue modeling, particularly by taking full advantage of the Digital Fabrication Lab at the school. 3D-printing, CNC-milling and laser cutting will be used in conjunction with analogue techniques like finishing, casting and forming, in order to create models and prototypes that consist of a multitude of different media and materials. Research and Study Trip Fall semester: Study trip to explore architectural and aesthetic culture in Japan, and how both urban and architectural performance engages with multiple irreconcilable constituents. The study trip will include site visits to a number of contemporary as well as historical projects and office visits to internationally recognized practices. Teams Students will be working in teams to stimulate the discussion and to generate a common database of knowledge. The teams will be structured in a way that will allow for individual expression and development. The team approach also allows for the parallel development of different perspectives and scenarios within one and the same group. Course Structure The course is structured around weekly tutorials with students (2 times a week), a sequence of assignments or design tasks, a series of lectures, seminars and informal pinups. There will be two reviews with external invited jurors; Mid review and Final review. Guests The studio maintains a wide national and international network and regularly invites architects and theorists for reviews, seminars and workshops. Previous international guests include Thom Faulders (CCA, San Francisco), Michael Speaks (University of Kentucky), Florencia Pita (SCI-Arc, Los Angeles), Oliver Tessman (Bollinger + Grohmann, Frankfurt), Sean Lally (UiC, Chicago), Kivi Sotamaa (UCLA/Aalto University, Los Angeles/Helsinki), Matias del Campo (Span / Angewandte, Vienna), Kristof Crolla (Zaha Hadid Architects, London), Ellie Abrons & Adam Fure (University of Michigan) and Luis Callejas (Paisajes Emergentes, Medellin), Enric Ruiz-Geli (Cloud 9), David Erdman (Davidclovers, Hong Kong).

Tutors, Teachers, Professors

• Ulrika Karlsson is a Visiting Professor in Architecture and at the KTH School of Architecture. She is a partner and founding member of the architectural design collaborative servo, principle of Servo Stockholm. Karlsson received her Landscape Architecture and Architecture degrees from SLU - Swedish University of Agricultural Science (MLA) and Columbia University (MsAAD). Karlsson has also taught at UCLA’s Department of Architecture and Urban Design, Los Angeles. • Jonah Fritzell is a Lecturer in Architecture at the KTH School of Architecture. He is principal and co-founder of the architectural practice Studio Aah. Fritzell received his Architecture degree from the LTH, Lund (MArch). Previously to establishing his own practice he worked for Servo Stockholm and Los Angeles, Scheiwiller Svensson Architects, Stockholm, Delugan Meissl Associated Architects, Vienna and CF Møller Architects, Oslo.

Academic Year 2012-2013 August 23 2012 16.20


Practice-Based Research Studio About the Studio

Teaching architecture involves, in our opinion, a pact of trust between teachers and students. The pact is about personal development and involves the challenge of transformation. Students are asked to entertain abstract ideas, turn them into a cohesive concept, and then translate all in a creative way to a physical entity. Meanwhile, they have to consider a large number of variables. The challenge of Architectural education arises from the teachers’ dual role: they are asked to lead yet play only a supportive role. Students are taught to develop and act on their own vision and creativity (rather than their teachers’), within a frame of meaning and purpose of a living human complex interpreted with the help of teachers. Success means that students managed to form their own architectural identity, understand their strengths and weaknesses, exploit the former and find ways to overcome the latter. These assumptions form the conceptual foundations of my pedagogical vision. From an abstract point of view the heart of my vision can be depicted as a funnel in which individual development forms the vertical axis while the program and teachers produce a spinning momentum which gains students lift. The funnel framework involves four efforts. First, to create custom tailored education that supports the specific development of each student. Second, to establish a holistic teaching program that inspires students to think broadly and in interdisciplinary manner. Third, to amalgamate learning and research into a program that supports the study of applied issues and sustainability in a cost effective manner. Fourth, to form opportunities for students to experiment with a variety of building materials and architectural tools (such as CAM and nanotechnology), and work/research in proximity to the industry, while strictly preserving ethical standards.

Courses

4:1 (A42Y1B) Future Workplaces The two fall and winter courses will deal with the A to Z of the concept of work and the future of the workplace. Throughout the course we will explore the workplace´s full rang,e from interior furnishing to the physical spaces – ending with the building in a real site within the context of the city. This assignment is a real life project, it is sponsored by a large real estate outfit that would like to “SEE THE FUTURE” and believes that your creative and unspoiled mind can unravel this mystery. The course will start with a sponsored study trip to Denmark. On our return we shall start to investigate the location of the future building, be lectured and informed about all issues concerning the subject; materials communication, technology, future human interaction, and psychology. The site is in Stockholm and the assignment is partly renovation partly a new construction. The final design shall be of superior state of the art quality, we shall design a holistic product; concept design, production, three-D simulations, models and presentation shall be a complete and academically presentable material. We shall work in singles and/or pairs and will be coached by all experts necessary. 4:2 (A42Y2B) The Future Working Place We will continue to develop the project down to 1:1 solution (material details etc.) Final critique will occur during December in Stockholm and the best micro solutions room-meeting room furnishings will be produced 1:1 in the real facility. Course 1 and 2 shall be coached and criticized as one large project (with our Israeli teachers as critiques). Note: The strictly qualitative and innovative architecture will guaranty a sponsorship that we shall use in the third leg of the study year: the Prometheus. 4:3 (42Y3B) “Prometheus” Practise Based Research studio –Europe’s border conflicts: Today’s middle east is a boiling point in a restless world, it consists of several groups with various interests, among them Israel; restless complicated, at times unjust but more often than not an exiting and unconventional democracy built of several migrated minorities. We shall visit Israel and Jordan (Petra) (in all 3 weeks), learn about the complexities of these sites and then move to the south of Israel, the Negev desert. We shall settle down in the Kibbutz “Neot Smadar” www.neot-semadar.com, an extraordinary social and ecological environment representing a unique way of life. Here, on location, our team will investigate the ideas upon which this place was erected, and propose a architectural strategy for developing all aspects of this society: general layout (town planning), communications, industries, housing, schools, social meeting places etc. We shall deal with “strictly qualitave innovative architecture” (not trends). After spending some days (5-15?) we shall deliver fully coherent sketches summarizing our idea. Once at home (Sweden), we will develop these into a state of the art design and presentation, and a few of us shall travel back to the kibbutz for presentation. This project is a real life project coached and supported by the ”Neot Smadar” community and KTH (the course covers 50% of the trip guiding and living costs), expecting unorthodox and superior design solutions to be applied by the community. 4:4 (42Y4B) International Architecture Competition Practise Based Research studio-Competitive edge: Through participation in an international architectural competition in 8-10 teams of teachers and students, this Studio shall investigate different creative processes and advanced Holistic design production strategies. Teachers are the “producers and consultants” to the students’ teams, yet this part of the course is a “joint venture” between teachers (that are also practising architects) and students. Year 5 students can choose between the fourth year courses or the proposals below 5:1 (A52Y1B) Full Proof 1 Students shall engage in an international competition in teams or single handed. With each team/individual a teacher will be coach, alternatively partner, of the proposal, The purpose is to create an optimum project in a given frame of time and a clearly defined program and goal, a good repetition for the thesis work. 5:2 (A52Y2B) Full Proof 2 A pre project related to the thesis, with accentuation on methodology presentation and general portfolio preparation (could be updating, upgrading and professionalizing the presentation portfolio) 5:3 (A52Y3B ) and 5:4 (A52Y4B) Full Proof 3-4 Thesis Project

Studio Culture

Our studio deals with your personal capacity (we have no ism´s), and strives for holistic apprehension of architecture, there fore our study process and final presentation shall take you through all available media from free hand sketches to the outmost sophisticated 3-d modelling digital and physical as well as a heavy dose of animations. We cover with you (based on your personal judgment) a full complex process from concept to perfect presentation and, if asked, down to cost calculations. For us, design is everything and everything should be designed from your project down to the lettering you choose. And back to the perfect portfolio material you shall have at the end of this study year. If research or theory is your aim we shall create with you a program to fit your personal needs and see to it that you achieve your personal goals. Some projects shall be individual and some personal - you will do both. We travel but in a different manner than the rest of the studios (trend is rather mundane to us) this year’s study trip is a good example. We shall learn about the SocioEconomical and cultural background of this region. Again, we deal with holistic understanding and complex projects – not with trends. Our teachers are available at least two days a week as personal coaches in class. Based on our long experience we achieve with each one of you results that are highly personal and extra ordinary.

Tutors, Teachers, Professors • Ori Merom • Dr. Charlie Gullström Hughes • Ori Vidan (KOV Architects Israel) • Peter Ullstad

Academic Year 2012-2013 August 23 2012 16.20


Urban Design Studio

About the Studio

Contemporary Conditions and the new Urban Landscape The studio discusses sustainable urban development in terms of globalization, climate changes, mega cities and urban strategies transformed into new typologies and innovative architecture and urban design. Urban Studio attempts to span the ill-defined realm between architecture and urban planning by encouraging students to work at several scales and in a way that engages students in the dialogue between disciplines. Our focus is on the development of theoretical and practical tools that would enable students to better comprehend and address urban complexities beyond their physical manifestations. In our studio work we place equal emphasis on the urban and architectural scales of project development. Through intense intellectual engagement, experimentation and intense studio work we test existing and new methods for predicting, controlling and manipulating urban dynamics. Through the intense studio work and seminar based learning processes we relate the development of global cities to the urban transformations within Scandinavian context . In the process of globalization the transformations of cities and the scale and complex processes of urban development have challenged the established knowledge, methods of work and the modes of our practice. We believe that the most challenging, interesting as well as least defined aspect of our practice today is the field of urbanism. However, in the current climate of the development of cities worldwide the professional role of architects as urbanists has been diminished. The ability of new generations of architects to understand how cities grow and change as well as their ability to intervene within these complex processes could positively influence the course of development of cities around the world. It is therefore crucial that architects are equipped with new methods of work and expertise that will enable them to claim an important role as active participants in urban development. The Urban Studio work methodology is based on combination of investigative, research and design based exercises that span across various disciplines and fields of knowledge. We operate within the context of current global changes and we focus on the urban responses to the challenges of today. Our work method is substantiated by frequent international collaborations, study trips and workshops. We rely on the global network of scholars, artists, practitioners and decision makers who help us engage in the complex issues of the local contexts and contribute to raising the professional level of the design work by exposing students to different realities. The theme for the fall semester 2012 is “the new urban practices: Stockholm - Belgrade”. In our studio work we will be inventing potentials for synergies among the cultural, infrastructural, ecological aspects as well as economic aspects of urban transformations. The theme for the spring semester 2013 is “ Sustainable Cities: The Future of Urban-Infrastructures, Hong Kong- Stockholm”. During the spring semester of 2013 we will work on the Kai Tak - Urban River and a former airport site project in the Hong Kong’s District of Kowloon. In this project we will engage in strategies for re-integration of the existing urban tissues into a new urban structure by integrating nature, infrastructure, urban living and local culture. In the context of extreme urban density we will investigate a new forms of complex urban systems that would lead towards a more sustainable urban environment.

Courses

4:1 (A42U1B) and 5:1 (A52U1B) Hybrid Frameworks I: “Stockholm on the Move” During the first course of the Urban Sesign Studio we will work on a project in Stockholm. The studio will participate in a series of design workshops and laboratories sponsored and organized by Färgfabriken, (art organisation from Stockholm) that will include a series of design workshops with international guests as well as local experts, meetings and lectures. Students will participate in an intense process of producing new visions for the development of the Stockholm region together with international guests architects who will be leading the workshops. The students will have an opportunity to engage in the direct dialogue with important stakeholders and decision makers (business leaders, state and community representatives, technical experts, researchers, etc) from the Stockholm region. The student work and the results of the participatory process of design will be exhibited at the major event open to the public: “Stockholm on the Move”. The exhibit is also going to result in the new book by Färgfabriken with the same title and the exhibit about the potential urban futures of Stockolm and it’s region. The first stage of the project will be developed during the first two weeks of the Orientationscourse starting august 29th. Urban Studio students will continue the project with the Färgfabriken by engaging in the local scale proposals together with the invited guest participants. One of the main objectives of the course is to seek synergies between the of bottom up and top down urbanization in relation to new infrastructures, this we call Hybrid Frameworks. The students will be engaged in the dynamic process of integrated urban design that emphasizes importance of architectural innovation as means of exploring the potentials of the future infrastructural development of the city. Through the sequence of design proposals at various scales we will take a proactive role and serve as the mediators between the decision makers and various public interest groups. We plan to contribute to the design process as well as to learn from the real experience of many forces participating in shaping of the urban environment. During this period all fifth year students will begin formulating ideas for their thesis work. 4:2 (A42U2B) and 5:2 (A52U2B) Hybrid Frameworks II: Savamala District, Belgrade The course continues with the project in the urban district of Savamala at the bank of the river Sava in central Belgrade, Serbia. Urban Studio has been invited to colaborate with the the University of Belgrade Architecture School to participate with the urban design proposals in the processes of transformations of this central but devastated waterfront area that has recently become the focus of attention by several cultural and architectural organisations within a city and internationaly. The area of Savamala has a hidden value in its existing diverse programmatic content, it has a rich industrial history but also represents an old inner city neighborhood and an array of infrastructural systems disecting through the site. Much of the public space in Belgrade has been the contesting ground between the public on one side and the developers and the taycoons on the other. Belgrade’s growth during the last 20 years of transitions is characterized by the spontaneous and self-organised urbanisation. The city has transformed on it’s own with very little intereference by planners and architects. This transformation has been developing on all levels from the individual illegal construction to the large illegaly built shopping malls. In this project we are going to learn about the valuable experience from the recent past, investigate the current processes of urban transformations and develop project proposals within the area of Savamala that explore the potentials for civic space within an urban realm. During this project we will have an opportunity to discuss and explore the notion of the Hybrid Frameworks in the local context as the dynamic between the planned and non-planned city. In the process of design we will adress the complex contextual issues and explore the value of architecture as urban regenerator. The project will further build upon the experience and the material from the Mixer Festival and the Urban Bundle Project that took place in may 2012 in Savamala. See links below: http://commonprojectsworkshops.blogspot.se/ http://mikser.rs/en/programme/architecture/53-urban-transformations-urban-bundle/ http://www.mikser.rs/en/locations/ 4:3 (A42U3B ) Sustainable Cities I: The Future of Urban-Infrastructures, Stockholm-Hong Kong Perspective During this course we will explore the various scales of relation between human activity and it’s impact on the environment. We will identify and investigate the existing industrial infrastructure systems in and around Stockholm metropolitan area at the city scale. The aim is to relate and understand the various new potential relations between the existing infrastructures and various layers of new and existing urban systems including ecological systems. Upon investigating Stockholm at large we will perform a zoom in on the specific sites and through project interventions we will investigate potential synergic relations between the programs and the systems of the site. Two cities will be examined: Stockholm and Hong Kong. The Stockholm case will be a pretext for the subsequent study of the site in Hong Kong. Throughout the project development we will reflect on and compare the specific challenges that emerge from investigating each of the two urban contexts. The project will include an organized study trip and a workshop in Hong Kong in collaboration with the Chinese University of Hong Kong. 4:4 (A42U4B ) Sustainable Cities II: The Future of Urban-Infrastructures, Hong Kong- Stockholm Perspective Upon return from Hong Kong workshop we will continue developing the project that was started during the visit to Hong Kong. We will work with the site along the Kai Tak Creek in Kowloon District - the natural river previously transformed into a sewage channel and is today becoming an urban river with it’s renewed ecology. The potential of this urban infrastructure and its impact on the surrounding urban fabric is enormous and will be a subject of our study and further development of the design projects. Our goal is to identify potential new uses for selected areas and to propose solutions that would be based on thorough re-thinking of possible uses of space defined by the urban infrastructural systems and the greater integration of urban and ecological systems into the living tissue of the city. The principles of sustainability will be examined in their broader sense, in terms of environmental as well as social, economical and cultural issues.

Studio Culture

Urban Studio has a tradition of international collaborative projects, workshops and study trips. Locally, within the context of Stockholm we collaborate with experienced professionals who contribute as lecturers and critics to our studio work. We believe that architecture and urbanism today can develop only if seen through the multiple perspectives and experiences of the global context and therefore we put a strong emphasis on international perspective in our studio work. During the design studio tutorials we help and encourage our students to develop new innovative urban design and architecture design methodologies, essential for facing the present and future challenges and open the doors for new possibilities. Much of our work in the studio is based on intense sequence of project tasks varying in nature from analytical and speculative studies to very concrete design proposals. We stress the importance of teamwork but also value the individual expression and ability of every student to excel in his/her own way. We often collaborate with other studios through lectures and exchange of critics and consider diversity of knowledge and experience among different studios an important asset of our school. Students are encouraged to use the working and presentation techniques that they have already developed. However, we place emphasis on taking these tools to a higher level and encourage investigative processes that lead to new methods of working and thinking. In the studio work we use 2d and 3d digital media for drawing and presentation, hand sketching, model building, photography, video. We encourage readings and studio discussions on the most contemporary research and the current debates on the future of cities. Through this dialogue we explore the dynamic between theoretical and empirical findings conducted in our urban laboratory. This process strengthens the intellectual and generative processes while putting the student work in the perspective of the current debate on future of urbanization.

Tutors, Teachers, Professors • • • •

Bojan Boric (course responsible/examinator). Jesus Azpetia Patrick Verhoeven Anna Webjörn

Collaborative Partners and Institutions 2010-2012: • Professor Wallace Chang, School of Architecture, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong • Professor Richard Plunz, Program Director, Masters Program in Architecture and Urban Design, Columbia University, New York, and the the Earth Institute, Columbia University, New York. • Vladimir Us, Oberliht – an Independent Art Organization, Chissinau, Moldavia • Ivan Kucina, Professor inArchitecture and Urbanism, School of Artchitecture, University of Belgrade, Serbia • Svenska Institutet (The Swedish Institute) Stockholm • Joachim Granit and Thomas Lund, Färgfabriken, Stockholm, Sweden

Academic Year 2012-2013 August 23 2012 16.20


Sustainable Design Studio

About the Studio

Designing for a sustainable society begins with change of attitude, followed by rethinking of existing paradigms and the development of new strategies. This design studio emphasizes sustainability, ecology, energy and new technologies within architecture and urban design. The built environment still stands for an overall of 40% of energy consumption, CO2 emissions and landfill caused by construction waste. How can architecture continue to meet this challenge? What is the influence on the architectural form and the user? The main aim of the studio is to examine the relationship between architecture and environmental performance. How can the future architect generate integrated solutions for net zero energy consumption, cradle to cradle resource management as well as changing programmatic requirements in the social urban environment. During 2012/2013 the academic focus lies on the life cycle of a building and the organism of the city. Related research topics are: biology, ecology, water, energy, waste, resource management; the embodied energy of materials and structures in a life cycle perspective and how this influences the architectural design. Learning Outcomes • To develop interdisciplinary, integrated design strategies where environmental prerequisites are regarded early in the architectural process. • To acquire knowledge and insights about architecture in a life cycle perspective. • To acquire knowledge and insights about architectural form in relationship to local conditions, climate, urban settings, social environment and energy efficiency. • To gain access to recent tools for conceptual, analytical and technical design methods. • An increased understanding about the relationship between architecture and its environmental impact.

Courses

4:1 (A42H1B ) and 5:1 (A52H1B) Student Housing KTH Campus Design of a building for student housing - a permanent building with a flexible temporary program. The challenge is to define the life cycle of different activities within the building and the different building parts that are connected to these activities. The focus lies hereby on different material life cycles involved in the building’s production and constant change of users - including prefabrication, montage, maintenance and reuse. Materials for both exterior and interior shells shall be researched and analyzed for the potential to be maintained or reused and recycled, and then applied in an architectural project that expresses the result in a creative, experimental design to its users. Main criteria are: architectural expression, material research, building performance, construction, general and flexible structures. This course will be held in collaboration with KTH ABE department’s “Civil and Architectural Engineering” and “Real Estate and constructing management”. The project will be developed in groups of two students. 4:2 (A42H2B) and 5:2 (A52H2B) Urban Resources – The City’s Inner Organism Analysis of resource flows of Stockholm´s inner city. The focus lies on local conditions: infrastructure, climate, materials, social structures and their relation to urban design. The project starts with research of the city focusing on different resources like water, electricity, heat, biodiversity, ecosystems, transport and urban fabric. The research is followed by an individual architectural intervention, an operation in the existing urban situation that intensifies or condenses a public and ecological service that in itself interacts with the urban situation. Main criteria are: resilience, local ecosystem, system thinking and diversity. Research task will be done in groups, design task will be done individually. 5:1 (A52H1B) and 5:2 (A52H2B) Thesis Sustainable Design The diploma preparation work, the thesis booklet, will be done parallel and integrated into the course. 5th year students who completed one year at the Sustainable Design studio get the opportunity of individually defining the focus of their investigation responding to the raised issues. 4:3 (A42H3B) A Sustainability Prototype – Phase One: Design Proposal As a continuation of the autumn semester, the found and formulated sustainable strategies will be implemented in the design of a sustainability prototype. We will investigate and deepen the knowledge about different strategies and methods through a series of design workshops. The final outcome, inspired by the solar decathlon idea, is an architectural installation. A creative expression combined with a speculative visionary solution should test advanced architecture, new materials, new technologies and help communicating sustainability to the public. The jury at the end of the project will select one or two projects for phase two. 4:4 (A42H4B) A Sustainability Prototype – Phase Two: Construction Drawings All students will participate in the production of construction details and shop drawings for the selected proposal(s) of phase one. The aim is to build the prototype in 1:1 scale during May 2013 in Stockholm or at Virserums Konsthall’s wood and sustainability exhibition.

Studio Culture

The courses are structured around a sequence of intermediate design tasks of different scales, weekly pin-ups, seminars and tutorials, individually and/or in groups. Each project contains two reviews with external invited jurors: Mid review and Final review. The intense research and design work, partly done in groups, requires that all students work at the Studio. Research and Development is an important part of the studio culture. Tutored by the teachers, students acquire knowledge to develop new solutions to the questions raised. The use of analytical software is crucial for an interdisciplinary integrated design process, where sustainability aspects are raised early in the project. Therefore a good understanding of 3D modeling is required. Weekly Pin-Ups in form of both digital and analogue material, powerpoint presentations, print outs, analytic diagrams, renderings, 3D models as well as physical models demand a high level of work flow and production. Further professional guests will be invited to guest lectures and reviews to accompany the design process. By collaborating with other departments at the KTH - the Department of Energy Technology and Building Services Engineering as well as the Stockholm Resilience Center at SU, the studio has close contact with the fast developing field of research concerning sustainable architecture and urban design.

Tutors, Teachers, Professors

• Studio professor Sara Grahn, practising architect SAR/MSA at White Architects in Stockholm. She is working with complex urban design projects and public buildings, where the aim is to induce sustainable solutions in all scales. • Studio teacher Max Zinnecker, practising architect ETH SAR/MSA at his own firm in Stockholm after having worked 5 years for Barcelona based Cloud 9. His work is focussing on the fusion of parametric architecture with traditional wood construction and CNC processes in architectural design and production. • Assisstant teacher Marja Lundgren, Arkitekt SAR/MSA, Senior Advisor within Sustainable Architecture, Coordinator of Research at White Architects and licentiate at KTH. Her focus areas are the interrelation between architecture, indoor climate, energy and embodied energy.

Academic Year 2012-2013 August 23 2012 16.20

The Studios 2012-13  

Posters showing the advanced level studios at KTH School of Architecture

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