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TABLE OF CONTENTS

The Campaign Campaign Case for Support Campaign Project Descriptions

Campaign Details Campaign Timeline Campaign Stucture Campaign Pattern of Giving Campaign Gift Range Chart Campaign Naming Opportunities

Campaign Financials Campaign Financials Report Campaign Cash Flow Report HITW Model Rowe Model Engineer’s Report on Main House and Evanston Hall Campaign Gift and Fiscal Policies

Campaign Planning Committee Campaign Planning Committee Roster


Northwestern Settlement 1400 Augusta Blvd Chicago, IL 60642 773.278.7471 nush.org

President Ron R. Manderschied Chairman Robert J. Best Vice-Chairman Glenn A. Dalhart Treasurer James G. Houston Assistant Treasurer Kurt Mueller Secretary Barbara R. Rouse Assistant Secretary Susan Diaz Directors Margaret J. Barr Alderman Walter Burnett, Jr. Julie W. Coffman Paula B. Danoff Barry Ehlers Kathy Elliott Elza L. Garnett Carol Golder Mimi Harris Patricia M. Johnson Carolyn H. Krulee Connie Magnuson Amy O’Donnell Marc E. Peters John Relias John W. Rowe Holly Sunshine Ofelia Svitak Dennis Van Mieghem William G. Welnhofer Nancy G. Whiteman Honorary Board Mr. Ellerth Overboe Mr. and Mrs. John Par Dr. Arnold Weber Harriet Vittum Society Nancy and William Anixter James C. Caldwell, Jr. Libby and Steve Cummings Ann and Glenn Dalhart Kathleen and Michael Elliott Elza and John Garnett Valerie and William K. Hall James G. Houston Charlotte and Rollins Huggins Dr. Christine L. Jacobek Patricia M. Johnson Lucinda and Richard Kasperson Ellerth Overboe Carole and John Par Bonnie and Daryl Rabert Brian W. Saber Dee Stevens Marion J. Ware Terry and Robert Zengeler

September 3, 2013 Dear Fellow Board Members, I am pleased to present to you Northwestern Settlement’s Campaign Plan. The Campaign Plan represents a tremendous amount of effort on the part of many people, including the Campaign Steering Committee, numerous Settlement staff, and various consultants. I would particularly like to recognize my fellow Planning Committee members for taking their work so seriously: Anna Atkinson Beth Boehrer Kathy & Mike Elliott Patty Johnson Connie Magnuson Amy O’Donnell Bill Welnhofer They reviewed voluminous amounts of material, came to meetings prepared and enthusiastic, were willing to commit more time and effort when required, and took a considered but forward-thinking approach every step of the way. We are convinced that our Capital Campaign aspirations are feasible and in our final meeting on August 20th the Planning Committee voted unanimously to finalize the Campaign Plan and recommend to the full Board of the Settlement to move forward into the next phase of the Campaign. This will all happen under the leadership of the to-be-formed Campaign Steering Committee as our job – to create a Campaign Plan – is now complete. We believe that the critical elements necessary for a successful capital campaign have been addressed in the Campaign Plan that follows. I will be presenting this Campaign Plan to the Settlement Board for approval at our September meeting. Again, my thanks to everyone who provided guidance, perspective, information and commitment along the way. These are exciting times for the Settlement. Sincerely,

Glenn Dalhart Chair Campaign Planning Committee


The Campaign


CAMPAIGN CASE FOR SUPPORT

Opening Doors of Opportunity The bedrock of American society is the notion that everyone has equal opportunity to succeed. But for low-income families and individuals, any number of challenges can undermine the realization of a life of stability and self-determination. At Northwestern Settlement, we have been working without pause for 122 years to open the doors of opportunity for Chicago’s working poor. Our work has improved life outcomes for tens of thousands of individuals and families. A Mission for the Times True to the founding settlement house spirit of flexibility and responsiveness, our programs have changed with the times. As innovators and risk takers, we have led the way in community health, camping for inner-city youth, and most recently the charter school movement to reform public education. As our West Town neighborhood has gentrified, we have adjusted to serve low-income neighbors dispersed across the city. But through all the changes we have seen, our mission remains as relevant and urgent as ever: to nurture, educate, and inspire children and families in need, empowering them to take personal responsibility and attain self-sufficiency. We accomplish this mission through a constantly evolving set of programs. The Food Pantry and Emergency Financial Assistance are life saving. Head Start, Rowe Elementary School and House In The Wood camp are life changing. All are integral pieces of our comprehensive and responsive approach to improving life outcomes. An Enduring Model of Success The scope and scale of our work speaks volumes. Each year we serve 8,000 neighbors through core programming. In 2012-2013, this included: 2,400 families each month at the Food Pantry, 255 children in our School Age after school program, 500 “scholars" at Rowe, and 400 summer campers at House In The Wood. Another 32,000 individuals came to us to experience live theater, and more than 500 volunteers contributed their time. Our sustained success is based on visionary leadership, thoughtful and continuously innovative program development, cost-effective service delivery, and strategic programming partnerships. Year after year, our supporters, partners, and volunteers reaffirm their commitment to Northwestern Settlement. In the 122 years since our founding, we have had a remarkably stable board of directors, only three executive leaders, and an incredibly dedicated and supportive network of auxiliary boards.

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CAMPAIGN CASE FOR SUPPORT As we look forward to our 125th anniversary in 2016, we continue to respond to the challenges of the day, identifying those where the Settlement, given its unique philosophy of flexibility and responsiveness, can make the greatest impact.

Education, a Critical Weapon in the Fight Against Poverty Today more than ever, the single greatest tool for breaking the cycle of poverty is long-term access to high-quality education. Young adults with only a high school diploma earn 50% less than those with a bachelor’s degree, and face a lifetime of low wages. Yet in Chicago, only 59% of public high school graduates will enroll in college and less than 6% will graduate. Fourteen years ago, we obtained a charter, raised capital, and founded the Noble Network of Charter Schools so that underserved, inner-city high school students would receive the education they needed to gain admission to, and succeed in, college. The network has since expanded to 13 campuses operating independently of the Settlement. 89% of Noble’s students are low-income, but a remarkable 90%+ enroll in college. For many students, however, high school is too late. By the time a typical Chicago Public School student gets to eighth grade the achievement gap has widened and that student is three to four years behind grade level. At that point, the gap cannot be closed. We have addressed this issue for decades through Head Start, after-school, and other significant programs, but we were compelled to “double down” on education as we continued to see the current system fail to deliver for the majority of our children. We could not stand by and watch further generations failed by public education. To do our part to build college readiness before the achievement gap sets in, we chartered Rowe Elementary School in 2009 as a K-2 school and are expanding one grade per year. We will graduate the first class of eighth graders in 2016. Rowe Elementary School has been developed in the culture and style of the Settlement. It is neighbor-based, with a focus on providing wrap-around social services and inspiring programs for the whole family. With the number of Rowe families growing each year, we have a special opportunity to expand our reach and impact. Just as Rowe is designed to prepare students for the rigor of schools like Noble, our Head Start program helps prepare children to meet high expectations at schools like Rowe. We seamlessly integrate supportive services, such as the Food Pantry, into Head Start because family wellbeing is critical to achieving positive education outcomes. These multiple layers of caring connection create a powerful sense of belonging and possibility. As one Head Start parent said about the Settlement, “It’s like another home.” Making another significant investment to further address the achievement gap, we plan to expand our Head Start Program, more than doubling the number of children we reach each year, 2


CAMPAIGN CASE FOR SUPPORT and are considering an Early Head Start Program to target the issues that cause the achievement gap before birth and in a child’s first years. We will also create a Parent Center where we can develop workshops and self-help groups, and are investigating providing screenings and mental health services to children and families there. At this time, we are also investigating the possibility of leasing or purchasing a public school building that was permanently shuttered due to recent CPS actions. Obtaining control of such a building would provide much-needed space to house the expanded Head Start program, and create numerous programming opportunities for the Settlement. As our investment in education grows, House In The Wood is poised to become an integral part of these educational efforts. Already, Rowe is one of the only schools in the country to have its own outdoor education camp. But our goal at Rowe is more visionary; we want all our students in grades 3, 4, 6, and 8 to experience a one-week, curriculum-based STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) program each year at House In The Wood. That programming is critical to our vision of education and was built into the fabric and operating budget of Rowe from the beginning of School planning. To accommodate the program, we plan to expand the camp’s sleeping and dining capacity by 50% and build a state-of-the-art Outdoor Education Center. This expansion will not only serve Rowe. It will allow many other children and families to engage directly with the environment throughout the year both during the regular camp summer season and through winter and spring sessions for Settlement and public school groups. The expansion is part of the master plan developed in 2011 for House In The Wood and to be funded by this Campaign. That plan includes important upgrades to the camp’s infrastructure and a significant effort to make the camp more viable year-round. This expansion will also increase our earned income potential with the goal of eventually freeing up significant unrestricted operating funds. According to Richard Louv, author of Last Child in the Woods: Saving Our Children from Nature-Deficit Disorder, “If we really want to help kids, we need to get them out into nature.” Camp is a place where children learn independence, work on decision making and develop personal responsibility. They get this experience at House In The Wood, one of the last remaining residential camps serving low-income children from the Chicago area. With strategic investment, we can make this very special place available to many more children and families. As more than one camper has said about House In The Wood, “It changed my life.”

Strengthening the Core At the same time we build programs in education and camping, we are aware that our home campus can be a more effective and inspiring base for the dozens of core Settlement programs 3


CAMPAIGN CASE FOR SUPPORT including Adventure Stage Chicago, the Food Pantry, Emergency Services, and the Golden Agers. We need to continue the upgrade of the Main House and address wear-and-tear issues in Evanston Hall. These investments, ranging from a new HVAC system in the Main House to tuck-pointing and restroom upgrades in Evanston Hall, will breathe new life into facilities that are subject to heavy usage on a daily basis. And to ensure that our facilities remain in excellent shape, we will develop a Building Reserve Fund of approximately $1 million. A capital replacement plan has been completed for all our facilities so that we can be certain we are raising sufficient funds to meet these capital needs going forward.

What We Can Accomplish Together The impact of this visionary growth will be extraordinary: Thousands of neighbors will receive services in an environment that reflects well on them and on the Settlement after renovations to the Main House and Evanston Hall. Thousands of young scholars will benefit academically, socially, and emotionally from the full range of educational and family support services at Rowe. Countless Rowe scholars, Settlement families, and underserved youth from across Chicago will be inspired by camp and outdoor education programming made possible by improvements to House In The Wood. Hundreds more low-income children will be prepared for life success from as early as infancy through the expansion of Head Start. Hundreds of young families will be made stronger by the creation of a new Parent Center with pre- and post-natal counseling, education services, development of self help groups, and ongoing parent engagement to explore their needs and new program areas. The Settlement will be positioned to respond to the future needs of our neighbors.

A Campaign to Nurture, Educate and Inspire If together we can accomplish all of these achievements, we will ensure program growth and excellence into the future and begin the next chapter in Northwestern Settlement’s history from a position of strength and sustainability. To do so, we plan to launch a $14 million campaign to meet the following campaign goals: 4


CAMPAIGN CASE FOR SUPPORT

Main House and Evanston Hall – We will complete critical renovation and repairs to the Main House and targeted upgrades to Evanston Hall so that the facilities needs of neighbors, programs, and staff are met. $1,000,000 Rowe Elementary School – We will offset start-up costs with contributed income so Rowe can maintain the highest quality program, grow to full enrollment, and serve as a model to inspire creation of other schools. $5,000,000 House in the Wood – We will double the capacity and deepen the impact of Camp by adding an Outdoor Education Center, expanding the dining hall and shower facilities, and building new housing for teen and adult family campers. $4,000,000 Head Start Expansion – We will expand early childhood education services by either transforming the first floor of Evanston Hall into a larger, state-of-the art facility to accommodate more children or by acquiring another property to meet this need, and we will develop a Parent Center. $2,000,000 Building Reserve Fund – We will secure the smooth running of our facilities and equipment—from roofing to stage lights to faucets—so that resources are never diverted from programs and our capital assets are well preserved. $1,000,000 Campaign Expenses – A successful campaign requires resources. $400,000

The Power to Change Things Being poor should never consign a person to a life of poverty. As Ron Manderschied says, “It is from opening doors that the power comes to actually change things.” At the Settlement, we help open doors by providing knowledge, opportunity, and support. In a world of great and diverse need, we believe this is a worthy calling. Together, through our Campaign, we will see to it that the work of Northwestern Settlement endures to create opportunity, one person and one family at a time, generation by generation for many years to come.

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CAMPAIGN PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS Aug - 13

Main House and Evanston Hall

$1,000,000

Our main campus is integral to our operations and core activities including Emergency Services, After School, Head Start, Adventure Stage Chicago, and AmeriCorps. The physical environment of these facilities has a direct impact on operations and the delivery of services, as well as morale. Keeping the Main House and Evanston Hall in good shape matters to our constituents, our program partners, and our staff. The Main House requires serious repair and Evanston Hall needs targeted renovation. Investing now will head off larger infrastructure issues in the future and enhance operations by providing an environment that reflects well on our Settlement neighbors and our organization. Improvements to the Main House include:  New HVAC system, boiler, water heater, and sump pump  Roof and exterior repairs (tuck-pointing, playground wall, and front columns and limestone)  Electrical upgrades Improvements to Evanston Hall include:  Renovation of hallways, including flooring  New lighting in the Office Center, theater, and parking lot  New ceiling tiles throughout  Restroom upgrade  New carpeting in the theater and Office Center  Exterior tuck-pointing  Update theater lighting and sound systems The Main House and Evanston Hall are essential to our life-changing work. We must make critical repairs now to strengthen our home base so we can continue serving our underserved neighbors in West Town and across the city efficiently and in an atmosphere of dignity.


CAMPAIGN PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS Aug - 13 Rowe Elementary School

$5,000,000

The stakes could not be higher: Chicago’s public elementary schools are failing to keep children at grade level, which undermines each child’s path to college. And without college, these children are more likely to become tomorrow’s working poor. Our commitment to providing the full complement of supportive and enriching programs at Rowe from day one has helped ensure each “scholar’s” academic, social, and emotional success. However, this same commitment requires significant resources through 2017 while the school grows, one grade at a time, toward a sustainable business model based on full enrollment and limited private funding. What makes Rowe exceptional is also what requires special resources:     

Scholars in grades 3, 4, 6 and 8 participate in a one-week outdoor education camp experience at House In The Wood Rowe has two certified teachers in each K-3 classroom for a scholar-toteacher ratio of 14:1 A full-time social worker trains teachers and facilitates the daily integration of social-emotional learning in the classroom Each scholar participates in individualized academic goal setting and assessment facilitated by classroom teachers All teachers and staff receive 4-5 hours of professional development weekly

By raising $5,000,000, we will ensure Rowe’s continued growth and success, enable program development (including fuller integration of House In The Wood, Adventure Stage Chicago, and Family Support Services), and facilitate the development of Rowe as a national model for replication and information resource sharing. Investment now will help us meet this goal. Hundreds of young scholars each year will benefit academically, socially, and emotionally from the full range of educational and family support services at Rowe. Children need Rowe. We must keep Rowe exceptional, and make it sustainable. This is life-changing work.

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CAMPAIGN PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS Aug - 13 House In The Wood Camp

$4,000,000

The outdoor camp experience is transformative for children and families who have little or no experience beyond their urban neighborhood, yet House In The Wood is one of the last remaining Chicago camps dedicated to serving low-income families. Investment in House In The Wood will make camp available year-round to more children and Settlement families and enable us to fully integrate House In The Wood into the Rowe Elementary School math and science curriculum. Improvements will also generate greater rental income from other schools and groups, which will provide a return on the additional investment in camp and help underwrite our own program expenses going forward. Facility improvements include the following:  Create a state-of-the art Outdoor Education Center ($750,000),  Double the capacity of the dining hall to 140 and create new shower facilities to accommodate full capacity ($500,000), and  Build new housing to accommodate teen and adult family campers ($430,000). In addition, we plan to:  Winterize all cabins by installing new HVAC systems throughout ($125,000),  Renovate the White Pines building; relocate the Administration Building and add a Health Center to it ($175,000),  Acquire furniture, equipment, and exhibition materials ($250,000), and  Address other site and mechanical issues ($225,000). The first project of the master plan, the purchase of an adjacent house and property, was completed in 2012 ($250,000). The second project to improve and expand dining hall and shower facilities was fully funded in August 2013 and will break ground in September 2013. Capital improvements will increase capacity by 50% to 100 overnight campers and 35 staff during the school year time period, and will double the total number of children served annually to 800 beginning in 2014. Winterization of the cabins and the new shower facilities will greatly improve the summer experience for campers and increase non-seasonal use by outside rental groups. Already, Rowe Elementary School scholars in grades 3, 4, 6, and 8 spend one week at House In The Wood as part of the STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) curriculum, but the expansion will allow whole grades to come at the same time – much better for learning and school continuity. By expanding and improving the Outdoor Education Center, we will strengthen STEM learning for Rowe scholars and 3


CAMPAIGN PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS Aug - 13 all Chicago school children who come to House In The Wood. In standardized testing during the 2012-2013 school year, Rowe science scores increased dramatically - the camp experience was noted as a significant contributing factor. The new Center will be a vital resource and fieldwork site for all of our education programs. Beyond the significant educational merits, House In The Wood is an invaluable resource for self-discovery and community building. Children and families who have never experienced the safety and expanse of the outdoors are transformed by camp. While House In The Wood is costly to run, the outcomes are powerful and investment is worthwhile. Through the expansion, hundreds more Rowe scholars, Settlement families, and low-income youth from across Chicago will be inspired each year by camp and outdoor education programs. As more than one camper has said about House In The Wood, “It changed my life.� This work is indeed transformative.

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CAMPAIGN PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS Aug - 13 Head Start Expansion

$2,000,000

Studies demonstrate that investment in a child’s education before kindergarten pays the greatest dividend, which is why we are committed to providing the best Head Start program possible. Since 1994, we have served more than 1,000 children and their families through an integrated model that connects Head Start families to multiple layers of Settlement services and opportunities. With thoughtful investment, we can do so much more. Our current space is challenged to accommodate additional classes or Early Head Start (toddlers and infants), for which there is documented need. (Early Head Start programs in West Town currently have the capacity to serve less than 15 percent of children age 0-2 who qualify.) Our plan is to invest $2 million to acquire/build out enough space to more than double the number of children in our Early Childhood Program (infant through 5 years old). At this time the Settlement continues to explore turning all or some of the first floor of Evanston Hall into an Early Childhood Center and move forward with the renovation of the Main House’s second floor for additional classroom space. In the future, there may be an opportunity to lease or purchase a vacant CPS school building, which would accommodate additional Head Start growth and other opportunities. In either scenario we will also create a Parent Center, and we are hopeful that we can create a setting to provide mental health services to children and families as well. These additional family services would be available to all participants in all programs. With the new Head Start, Early Head Start, and Parenting Center, hundreds more children will be prepared for life success, and hundreds more families will move closer to self-sufficiency.

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CAMPAIGN PROJECT DESCRIPTIONS Aug - 13 Building Reserve Fund

$1,000,000

Some organizations do not rely on significant physical infrastructure. Northwestern Settlement does. We have the awesome responsibility of caring for the Main House (a city landmark), Evanston Hall, House In The Wood, and Rowe. This caretaking requires thoughtful stewardship and ongoing investment. While it is no surprise to anyone that maintaining facilities costs money, the dollars for this are hard to come by. Even our most loyal and generous donors often prefer to support programming, which puts us in a bind when our physical plant needs repair, as it does now. The immediate creation of a building reserve fund will protect the value of our capital assets going forward and ensure the continuity of our programs and services. Best practices dictate that an organization such as ours, which depends on significant facilities to implement its activities, should have a building reserve fund. We never want to have to choose between program continuity and infrastructure needs, be it computers, carpeting, faucets, or roofing. Facilities and equipment are essential to serving our constituents as we plan for our next 125 years. The creation of a Building Reserve Fund for the Settlement is a critical investment.

Campaign Expenses

$400,000

All campaigns require resources to be successful. The Northwestern Settlement Campaign will have modest expenses to operate but does need resources beyond the period of time in which it operates. There will be several consultants working with us to guide the campaign, assist in financial modeling, and prepare engineering and architectural analysis of buildings.

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Campaign Details


CAMPAIGN TIMELINE Aug-13

Activity Campaign Committees Planning Committee Steering Committee Facilities Committee PR/Marketing Committee Campaign & 125th Event Committee

Soliciting of Gifts Level 1 Gifts (250K & above) Level 2 Gifts (25K-249K) Level 3 Gifts (5K-24K) Level 4 Gifts (under 5K) Direct Mail Clean Up

Events Cultivation Events Campaign Kick-Off ("going public") Various Building Unveilings - TBA Campaign Celebration 125th Celebration Rowe's First Graduation

2013 2014 2015 2016 Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun


NUSA Campaign Structure Campaign Steering Committee • 2-4 co-chairs • 15-20 people including heads of subcommittees • Meets every 3 months throughout the campaign and other times when necessary

• • •

Campaign & 125th Event Committee • Chair and 10-15 committee members • Meets as necessary over the next 3 years

Plans campaign kickoff, cultivation events, and campaign completion celebration • Plans 125th year events including major celebration Spring 2016

Oversees campaign progress Reports to board Leads fundraising for campaign

PR/Marketing Committee* • Chair and 6-8 committee members • Meets as necessary over the next 3 years

Facilities Committee* • Chair and 4-6 committee members • Meets every three months until major construction is completed

• • •

Finalizes campaign case for support Develops campaign and 125th materials Oversees PR plan for campaign and 125th year

Oversees all construction and renovation projects of the campaign

*NOTE: These are expanded versions of board committees that have a larger number of non-board members on them. Friday, August 30, 13


Northwestern Settlement Pattern of Giving

Lead Gifts

Advance Gifts General Gifts

70%

60%

20%

25%

10%

15%

Narrow Base Young or Highly Specialized Organization

Friday, August 30, 13

Mid-sized Base More Mature Organization with Broader Appeal

50%

30% 20%

Broad Base Mature Organization with Extensive Donor Base


CAMPAIGN GIFT RANGE CHART Aug-13 Level 1 Gifts: $250,000 and above = 60% of campaign Level 2 Gifts: $25,000 and above = 25% of campaign Levels 3 & 4 Gifts: under $25,000 = 15% of campaign Note: Gift levels are for that amount or above. Though calculations are made at that gift level, in fact many gifts are above the various levels but not at the next level (i.e. $75,000, $15,000). So, in fact the number of gifts needed in total is actually a bit less than identified below.

$14,000,000 Number of Gifts 3 5 9 10 24 32 60 85 400 628

$ Amount $1,000,000 $500,000 $250,000 $100,000 $50,000 $25,000 $10,000 $5,000 under $5,000

Total in Range $4,500,000 $2,500,000 $2,250,000 $1,000,000 $1,200,000 $800,000 $600,000 $425,000 $725,000 $14,000,000

Cumulative $4,500,000 $7,000,000 $9,250,000 $10,250,000 $11,450,000 $12,250,000 $12,850,000 $13,275,000 $14,000,000

% of Goal 32% 18% 16% 7% 9% 6% 4% 3% 5% 100%

Cumulative % of Goal 32% 50% 66% 73% 82% 88% 92% 95% 100%


CAMPAIGN NAMING OPPORTUNITIES Main House Child Education Center Rowe Principal Chair HITW Road Rowe Special Education Chair HITW Nature Center HITW Dining Hall HITW Waterfront New HITW Residence Hall Rowe Gymnasium Rowe Auditorium Rowe Main Hall (2) Rowe Library Rowe Lunchroom HITW President’s House HITW Main Hall of Vittum Lodge Main House Guild Hall (to rename it) HITW LIT Cabin (2) HITW Staff Retreat & Housing HITW Dining Hall Main Room HITW Pavilion HITW Parking Lot Evanston Hall Main Lobby HITW LIT Meeting Building HITW Nature Center Classrooms (2) HITW Nature Center Display Areas (2) Head Start Classrooms (5) HITW Dining Hall Kitchen HITW Shower Facility Rowe Auditorium Stage HITW Garage & Storage Building HITW Infirmary HITW Main Office HITW Camper Cabin (7) HITW Arts Center Rowe Classrooms (X) Evanston Hall Main Stair to Theater Burnside Hall Lobby Main House President’s Office Main House Library HITW Nature Center Office HITW Nature Center Patio Rowe Auditorium Balcony HITW Trails (2) Rowe Conference Room Evanston Hall Offices (8) Vittum Theater Green Room Adventure Stage Chicago Office Adventure Stage Chicago Production Office Executive Secretary’s Office Emergency Services Office Main House Second Floor Rooms (3)

$2,500,000 $1,000,000 $1,000,000 $1,000,000 $750,000 $500,000 $500,000 $500,000 $500,000 $500,000 $500,000 $250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $250,000 $150,000 $150,000 $150,000 $150,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000* $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $100,000 $75,000 $75,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000* $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000 $50,000

*Depends on final scenario for Head Start expansion NOTE: Gift recognition opportunities under $50,000 have yet to be designed, and will be part of the complete donor recognition plan to be developed over the summer.


Campaign Financials


CAMPAIGN FINANCIALS REPORT 13-Aug Sources

* Rowe Elementary School

Campaign Goal

$

Actual through 6/30/2013

$

Head Start Expansion

Building Reserve Fund

Campaign Expenses

$

$

$

$

$0 $0

$3,064,831 $900,000 $3,964,831 $1,070,169

$275,000 $25,000 $300,000

$104,175 $895,825 $1,000,000

$379,175 $920,825 $1,300,000 $2,987,000

Cash Pledges Subtotal Left To Raise for Main House

$15,000 $0 $15,000

Cash Pledges Subtotal Left To Raise for Head Start

$20,611

$0 $0 $0

$15,000 $0 $15,000 $1,020,000

2,020,611

$20,611

$0 $0 $0

$20,611 $0 $20,611 $2,000,000

1,000,000 Cash $0 Pledges Subtotal $0 Left To Raise for Deferred Maintenance

$0 $250,000 $250,000

Cash $55,000 Pledges $0 Subtotal $55,000 Left To Raise for Campaign Expenses

$0 $0 $0

$0 $250,000 $250,000 $750,000

403,000

$ 13,780,611

* Rowe Campaign started 1.1.2011

$3,064,831 $900,000 $3,964,831

1,035,000

Total Cash Total Pledges Total

Left to Raise

4,287,000 Cash Pledges Subtotal Left To Raise for HITW

Main House & Evanston Hall

Totals To Date

5,035,000 Cash Pledges Subtotal Left to Raise for Rowe

HITW

Current Period

$55,000 $0 $55,000 $348,000

$3,430,442 $925,000

$104,175 $1,145,825

$3,534,617 $2,070,825

$4,355,442

$1,250,000

$5,605,442

$8,175,169


CAMPAIGN CASH FLOW REPORT Aug-13

CASH SOURCES Individuals Foundations/NFP Corporations Government Total Cash Sources by Period

Actuals As of July 1 - Sep Oct 1 - Dec Jan 1 -Mar 31, Apr 1 - June Jul 1 - Sep 30, Oct 1 - Dec Jan 1 - Mar Apr 1 - June Jul 1 - Sep 30, Oct 1 - Dec Jan 1 - Mar Apr 1 - Jun 30, Beyond June June 30, 2013 30, 2013 Goal 31, 2013 Goal 2014 Goal 30, 2014 Goal 2014 Goal 31, 2014 Goal 31, 2015 Goal 30, 2015 Goal 2015 Goal 31, 2015 Goal 30, 2016 Goal 2016 Goal FY 2017 Goal FY 2018 Goal 30, 2018 $1,925,753 $750,000 $1,025,000 $895,825 $800,000 $1,200,000 $1,300,000 $300,000 $530,000 $200,000 $200,000 $200,000 $300,000 $1,100,000 $200,000 $73,422 $1,173,500 $220,000 $50,000 $0 $100,000 $50,000 $50,000 $0 $100,000 $0 $50,000 $0 $100,000 $0 $0 $106,500 $131,189 $0 $0 $0 $100,000 $0 $0 $0 $180,000 $0 $0 $0 $100,000 $100,000 $20,000 $68,811 $200,000 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $100,000 $3,430,442 $970,000 $1,075,000 $895,825 $1,000,000 $1,250,000 $1,350,000 $300,000 $810,000 $200,000 $250,000 $200,000 $500,000 $1,200,000 $220,000 $348,733

CASH USES Rowe Elementary School Rowe Operating

$2,800,000

$243,750

$243,750

$243,750

$243,750

$165,000

$165,000

$165,000

$165,000

$75,000

$75,000

$75,000

$75,000

$300,000

TOTALS $11,000,000 $2,000,000 $700,000 $300,000 $14,000,000

$5,035,000 $5,035,000

HITW Director's House Dining Hall Nature Center Nature Center special exhibit LIT Blg Shower house Infrastructure/ site work Office / white pines Furnishings Winterization cabins / HVAC/ baths Health Center Allowance Architectural design fees Permit fee allowance Project Manager Contingency 10% Launch Outdoor education Program TOTAL HITW NEEDS

$250,000 $210,000

$210,000

$0 $40,000 $20,000 $162,000 $25,000

$250,000 $40,000 $60,000

$250,000 $60,000

$50,000

$50,000

$50,000 $60,000

$100,000

$50,000 $10,000

$50,000

$50,000 $10,000

$50,000

$500,000

$25,000

$250,000 $420,000 $850,000 $150,000 $600,000 $80,000 $275,000 $162,000 $225,000 $180,000 $200,000 $300,000 $20,000 $75,000 $300,000 $200,000 $4,287,000

$350,000 $150,000 $100,000 $60,000

$60,000

$60,000 $200,000

$50,000

$25,000 $25,000

Main House & Evanston Hall

$15,000

Head Start Expansion

$20,611

$100,000 $25,000

$25,000

$0

$50,000

$25,000 $100,000 $25,000

$25,000

$25,000

$100,000 $25,000

$25,000

$25,000

$168,750

$0

$0

$0

$56,250

$0

$250,000

$250,000

$500,000

$500,000

$250,000

$250,000

$0

$0

$56,250

$450,000

$288,750

$1,035,000 $1,035,000 $2,020,611 $2,020,611

Building Reserve Fund

$1,000,000

$1,000,000 $1,000,000

Campaign Expenses Personnel Material Special Events Interest allowance Update written history

$55,000

Total Cash Needs by Period Total Cash Sources by Period Accumulated Excess/Shortfall

$3,165,611 $3,430,442 $264,831

Reconciled to Actual on a Quarterly Basis

$15,000 $1,000

$334,750 $970,000 $900,081

$15,000 $5,000 $1,000

$906,750 $1,075,000 $1,068,331

$15,000 $2,000

$970,750 $895,825 $993,406

$15,000 $5,000 $5,000

$1,792,500 $1,000,000 $200,906

$15,000 $2,000

$1,282,000 $1,250,000 $168,906

$15,000 $5,000 $2,000 $0

$15,000 $35,000 $25,000 $0 $25,000

$15,000

$15,000

$15,000

$15,000

$982,000 $1,350,000 $536,906

$1,015,000 $300,000 -$178,094

$586,250 $810,000 $45,656

$355,000 $200,000 -$109,344

$15,000

$15,000

$15,000

$235,000 $50,000 $63,000 $30,000 $25,000 $403,000

$25,000

$90,000 $250,000 $50,656

$90,000 $200,000 $160,656

$146,250 $500,000 $514,406

$0 $775,000 $1,200,000 $939,406

$1,288,750 $220,000 -$129,344

$0 $348,733 $219,389

$13,780,611 $14,000,000


NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY SETTLEMENT ASSOCIATION HOUSE IN THE WOOD FINANCIAL MODEL

ACTUAL 2013

Fiscal Year 2014

Projected Fiscal Year 2016

Fiscal Year 2015

Fiscal Year 2017

Fiscal Year 2018

SUMMER CAMP FUNCTION Summer Camp Revenue

$

460,897

$

462,100

$

469,372

$

476,789

$

484,355

$

492,072

Summer Camp Personnel Expenses Summer Camp Non Personnel Expenses Summer Camp Allocated Administration Exp Summer Camp Allocated Facility Expenses Total Expenses: Net

$ $ $ $ $ $

199,301 198,442 36,134 55,789 489,667 (28,769)

$ $ $ $ $ $

156,020 188,193 18,429 43,112 405,753 56,347

$ $ $ $ $ $

159,559 191,957 18,797 64,788 435,101 34,271

$ $ $ $ $ $

163,194 195,796 19,173 66,084 444,247 32,543

$ $ $ $ $ $

166,927 199,712 19,557 67,406 453,601 30,754

$ $ $ $ $ $

170,761 203,706 19,948 68,754 463,169 28,904

OUTDOOR EDUCATION ROWE Number of scholars served

148

245

245

343

343

392

OEC Revenue

$

55,297

$

148,819

$

173,822

$

191,864

$

210,437

$

222,124

OEC Personnel Costs OEC Non Personnel Expenses OEC Allocated Administration Exp OEC Allocated Facility Expenses Total Expenses: Net

$ $ $ $ $ $

38,787 39,642 11 78,440 (23,144)

$ $ $ $ $ $

67,257 59,338 6,655 15,568 148,819 -

$ $ $ $ $ $

83,113 60,525 6,788 23,396 173,822 -

$ $ $ $ $ $

84,797 76,280 6,924 23,864 191,864 -

$ $ $ $ $ $

101,228 77,805 7,062 24,341 210,437 -

$ $ $ $ $ $

103,166 86,927 7,203 24,828 222,124 -

OUTDOOR EDUCATION OUTSIDE GROUPS Number of students served

n/a

60

60

60

60

60

OEC Revenue Outside Groups

$

-

$

64,800

$

83,430

$

137,493

$

177,022

$

182,332

OECOG Personnel Costs OECOG Non Personnel Expenses OECOG Allocated Administration Exp OECOG Allocated Facility Expenses Total Expenses: Net

$ $ $ $ $ $

-

$ $ $ $ $ $

57,405 23,869 6,655 15,568 103,497 (38,697)

$ $ $ $ $ $

60,163 27,799 6,788 23,396 118,146 (34,716)

$ $ $ $ $ $

70,702 40,083 6,924 23,864 141,572 (4,079)

$ $ $ $ $ $

83,898 49,194 7,062 24,341 164,495 12,527

$ $ $ $ $ $

91,395 50,138 7,203 24,828 173,564 8,768

RENTAL Rental Income

$

104,434

$

125,000

$

130,000

$

135,000

$

140,000

$

145,000

Rental Personnel Expenses Rental Non Personnel Expenses Rental Allocated Administration Exp Rental Allocated Facility Expenses Total Expenses: NET

$ $ $ $ $ $

32,729 31,578 22,007 86,315 18,119

$ $ $ $ $ $

49,296 40,679 5,119 11,976 107,070 17,930

$ $ $ $ $ $

51,193 41,493 5,221 17,997 115,904 14,096

$ $ $ $ $ $

52,580 42,323 5,326 18,357 118,586 16,414

$ $ $ $ $ $

54,559 43,169 5,432 18,724 121,885 18,115

$ $ $ $ $ $

56,031 44,032 5,541 19,098 124,703 20,297

LIT REVENUE

$

23,200

$

11,000

$

11,000

$

11,000

$

11,000

$

11,000

LIT Personnel Expenses LIT Non Personnel Expenses LIT Allocated Administration Exp LIT Allocated Facility Expenses Total Expenses: NET

$ $ $ $ $ $

1,699 4,524 6,223 16,977

$ $ $ $ $ $

6,666 5,124 11,790 (790)

$ $ $ $ $ $

6,733 5,227 11,960 (960)

$ $ $ $ $ $

6,800 5,331 12,131 (1,131)

$ $ $ $ $ $

6,868 5,438 12,306 (1,306)

$ $ $ $ $ $

6,937 5,547 12,484 (1,484)

Overall Revenue Summary

$

643,828

$

811,719

$

867,624

$

952,146

$ 1,022,814

$ 1,052,529

Overall Personnel Costs Overall Non Personnel Costs Overall Allocated Administration Overall Allocated Facility Expenses Total Expenses Summary

$ $ $ $ $

272,516 274,186 36,134 77,808 660,645

$ $ $ $ $

336,645 317,204 36,857 86,224 776,929

$ $ $ $ $

360,761 327,001 37,594 129,577 854,932

$ $ $ $ $

378,073 359,812 38,346 132,168 908,400

$ $ $ $ $

413,480 375,318 39,113 134,812 962,723

$ $ $ $ $

428,290 390,350 39,895 137,508 996,043

Overall Net *

$

(16,817) $

34,789

$

12,692

$

43,746

$

60,091

$

56,486

LEADERS IN TRAINING

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1 2 3

Business Model Summary for Rowe Elementary Charter School

4 5 6 7 8

2008-2009 Start-up

9 10 11 12 13 14 15 17 18 19 20 21 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 46 47

CPS Base Allocation $ Special Education Teachers Reimbursement $ Small Schools Supplement $ State Government Student Assistance (SGSA) $ CPS, ISBE, ERATE Start UP Grants $ CPS Growth Grant $ English Language Learners (ELL) $ CPS In Kind Services $ Supplement for Facility Year I only, and SS Reimbursement Year$IV Sub-Total State Revenue $ Percentage change in Base Per Capita Funding Federal Revenues No Child Left Behind Title I/II Funds (NCLB) Sub-Total Federal Revenues

RSF/Bain DOE/ Special Grant Naming Rights Music Program Support Rowe Chartitable Trust On Going Support Fundraising Goal Sub-Total Contributions

Student Fees & Miscellaneous Sub-Total Other Income

EXPENDITURES

65 66

69

Salaries Bonus Employee Benefits Professional Development/Training Sub-Total Personnel Expenses % of total expenses Direct Student Expenses Student Services Food Expenses snacks and In-Kind from CPS

73 74 75 76 77 78 79

82 83 84 85 86 87

95 96 97 98 99 100 101 102 103 104 105 106 107 108 109 110 111 112 113 114 115 116 117 118 119 120 121 122 123 124 125 126 127 128 129 130 131 132 133 134 135 136 142 143

9

10

2017-2018 Year 9

11

2018-2019 Year 10

12

2019-2020 Year 11

13

2020-2021 Year 12

2021-2022 Year 13

15,000 15,000

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

920,610 88,177 45,150 88,383 330,902 8,558 78,000 63,963 1,623,743 4%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,506,212 163,532 76,950 161,935 369,233 92,328 1,071,413 3,441,603 -4%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,043,804 195,310 104,400 231,840 35,965 84,800 39,334 1,205,363 3,940,816 0.00%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,949,611 246,929 314,345 10,000 90,000 46,015 45,962 3,702,863 3.34%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $$ $

3,621,467 249,399 378,378 10,000 90,000 58,393 51,170 4,458,806 2.00%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $$ $

4,116,958 251,893 421,714 10,000 90,000 65,080 62,149 5,017,794 2.00%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $$ $

4,630,820 254,412 465,049 10,000 90,000 71,768 62,771 5,584,819 2.00%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

5,019,061 256,956 494,155 10,000 76,260 63,398 5,919,831 2.00%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

5,420,980 259,525 523,261 10,000 80,752 64,032 6,358,551 2.00%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

5,440,547 262,120 514,853 10,000 79,454 64,673 6,371,647 2.00%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

5,423,870 264,742 503,210 10,000 77,657 65,319 6,344,799 2.00%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

5,489,681 267,389 499,330 10,000 77,058 65,973 6,409,431 2.00%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

5,577,715 270,063 497,389 10,000 76,759 66,632 6,498,559 2.00%

$ $

110,662 110,662

$ $

113,016 113,016

$ $

136,038 136,038

$ $

151,619 151,619

$ $

167,199 167,199

$ $

177,664 177,664

$ $

188,128 188,128

$ $

185,105 185,105

$ $

180,919 180,919

$ $

179,524 179,524

$ $

178,826 178,826

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

45,014

$

62,350

$

45,014

$

62,350

$

199,500

$

106,500

$

132,487

$

318,000

$

682,000

$ $

580,000 25,000

$ $ $ $

80,665 500,000 25,000

$ $ $

110,000 500,000

$

300,000

$ $

405,349 1,142,836

$ $

704,648 1,310,313

$ $

525,000 1,135,000

300,000 360,000 660,000

300,000

272,953 1,061,453

$ $ $

$

$ $

300,000 675,000 975,000

300,000

38,898 556,398

$ $ $

$

$ $

$

300,000

$

300,000

$

300,000

$ $ $ $ $ $ $

$ $

29,082 29,082

$ $

52,046 52,046

$ $

79,553 79,553

$ $

73,900 73,900

$ $

88,750 88,750

$ $

98,800 98,800

$ $

108,850 108,850

$ $

115,600 115,600

$ $

-

$ $ $ $ $ $ $

-

$ $ $ $ $ $ $

-

$ $ $ $ $ $ $

-

$ $

-

122,350 122,350

$ $

120,400 120,400

$ $

117,700 117,700

$ $

116,800 116,800

$ $

116,350 116,350

$

571,398

$

2,759,292

$

4,698,835

$

5,441,344

$

5,024,779

$

5,658,594

$

5,928,212

$

6,160,868

$

6,513,094

$

6,969,029

$

6,677,152

$

6,643,418

$

6,705,755

$

6,793,735

$ $ $ $ $

367,492 82,225 20,279 469,996 85%

$ $ $ $ $

1,519,532 73,140 301,460 32,106 1,926,238 70%

$ $ $ $ $

2,148,581 99,611 423,005 19,198 2,690,395 57%

$ $ $ $ $

2,700,931 128,694 558,464 42,552 3,430,641 63%

$ $ $ $ $

2,965,277 114,719 652,361 59,250 3,791,607 79%

$ $ $ $ $

3,391,682 128,688 746,170 67,750 4,334,289 79%

$ $ $ $ $

3,719,799 141,007 818,356 72,750 4,751,912 72%

$ $ $ $ $

3,950,939 149,690 869,207 77,500 5,047,335 80%

$ $ $ $ $

4,007,431 151,824 881,635 78,500 5,119,389 80%

$ $ $ $ $

4,214,742 159,613 927,243 81,500 5,383,098 80%

$ $ $ $ $

4,256,889 161,209 936,516 81,500 5,436,114 80%

$ $ $ $ $

4,097,642 155,253 901,481 78,250 5,232,626 80%

$ $ $ $ $

4,081,183 154,652 897,860 77,250 5,210,946 80%

$ $ $ $ $

4,121,995 156,199 906,839 77,250 5,262,283 79%

183,253

-

$

24,314

$

$

244,885

-

$

8,012

$

-

$

2,030

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

703

$

1,318

$

-

$

2,604

$

3,197

$

3,635

$

4,088

$

4,431

$

4,786

$

4,803

$

4,788

$

4,846

$

4,924

Classroom Supplies (Chalk, Markers, etc.) Curriculum Instructional Equipment (Projectors, chalkboards, etc.) Sports Equipment Band Equipment Music Supplies Gym Equipment Art Supplies Classroom Furniture Computer Leases (installation, software, equipment)

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

-

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

20,965 57,958 9,382 4,900 53,704 46,391

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

27,711 83,788 21,919 4,000 1,486 157,715 13,259

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

35,737 64,304 145 6,632 1,514 48,733 26,982

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

50,896 82,914 5,412 4,162 2,935 45,938 43,183

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

62,325 95,503 5,520 4,245 3,604 46,857 52,936

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

70,543 104,958 5,631 4,330 4,097 36,814 71,273

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

79,638 114,754 5,743 4,417 4,609 37,551 89,901

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

85,508 89,515 5,858 4,505 4,995 15,454 97,339

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

92,775 96,683 5,975 4,595 5,395 27,415 104,814

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

93,521 97,032 6,095 4,687 5,414 4,193 104,228

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

91,338 96,735 6,217 4,781 5,398 4,277 105,070

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

91,998 97,908 6,341 4,876 5,463 4,363 104,506

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

93,567 99,478 6,468 4,974 5,551 4,450 106,068

Science & Outdoor Education After school Field Studies (including transportation) Graduation Celebrations Summer PD Stipends Summer Orientation Supplies Parental Programming

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

-

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

33,710 -

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

49,355 6,453 6,049 1,126

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

39,809 8,330 411 13,780 353 1,237

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

83,678 15,256 1,082 2,165 14,017 6,495 2,225

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

109,658 18,731 1,104 2,208 16,340 6,624 2,732

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

112,034 21,293 1,126 2,252 18,751 6,757 3,106

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

138,538 23,951 2,297 2,297 21,251 6,892 3,494

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

141,546 25,959 2,343 2,343 21,676 7,030 3,786

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

156,950 28,038 5,975 2,390 22,109 7,171 4,090

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

149,992 28,139 6,095 2,438 22,551 7,314 4,104

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

152,841 28,053 6,217 2,487 23,002 7,460 4,092

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

155,640 28,393 6,341 2,536 23,462 7,609 4,142

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

158,753 28,849 6,468 2,587 23,932 7,762 4,208

$ $ $ $

3,428 3,428 1%

$ $ $ $

25,225 4,295 3,600 293,159 11%

$ $ $ $

13,336 5,162 3,961 579,891 12%

$ $ $ $

44,591 18,281 1,625 559,379 10%

$ $ $ $

26,303 35,471 4,124 428,862 9%

$ $ $ $

32,294 43,976 4,207 512,063 9%

$ $ $ $

36,713 50,818 4,291 558,422 8%

$ $ $ $

41,295 59,065 4,376 644,158 10%

$ $ $ $

44,757 62,315 4,464 623,826 10%

$ $ $ $

48,341 67,780 4,553 689,837 10%

$ $ $ $

48,516 69,135 4,644 662,903 10%

$ $ $ $

48,367 63,934 4,737 659,794 10%

$ $ $ $

48,954 62,975 4,832 665,188 10%

$ $ $ $

49,739 64,234 4,929 676,940 10%

5,934 12,789 8,465 1,314 33,658 73,205 2,645 5,818

$ $ $ $ $ $

13,616 16,549 6,470 1,560 25,500 440

$ $ $ $

11,247 96,810 9,780

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

9,015 1,073 2,281 36,716 475 17,780 65,370 13,480

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

7,036 14,072 6,473 2,946 29,175 6,050 11,246 30,000 3,247 13,585

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

12,697 14,353 6,602 3,617 30,666 7,428 11,471 30,000 3,312 16,350

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

12,951 14,640 6,734 4,112 32,096 8,444 11,701 30,000 3,378 18,091

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,723 14,933 6,869 4,625 32,669 9,498 11,935 30,000 3,446 19,606

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,757 15,232 7,007 5,013 31,273 10,294 12,174 30,000 3,515 19,998

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,793 15,536 7,147 5,414 33,033 11,119 12,417 30,000 3,585 21,298

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,828 15,847 7,290 5,434 31,380 11,159 12,665 30,000 3,657 21,724

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,865 16,164 7,435 5,417 32,008 11,124 12,919 30,000 3,730 20,910

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,902 16,487 7,584 5,483 32,648 11,259 13,177 30,000 3,805 21,010

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,940 16,817 7,736 5,571 33,301 11,440 13,441 30,000 3,881 21,430

1,756

6,212

$

5,412

$

5,520

$

5,631

$

5,743

$

5,858

$

5,975

$

6,095

$

6,217

$

6,341

$

Other Uniforms Performance Assessment (testing, tracking, etc.) Student Recruitment Sub-Total Direct Student Expenses % of total expenses Administrative Expenses Office Furniture Office Supplies Printing & Copying Postage & Shipping Copier Rental & Maintenance/Tech Equipment Technology Software Telecommunications Equipment Telecommunications Usage IT infrastructure costs Website Development Payroll Processing Teacher Recruitment CMO Charge Professional Audit Services Professional IT Services Fundraising Expenses Board Expenses Bank Charges Principal discretionary fund Legal fees Sub-Total Administrative Expenses % of total expenses Occupancy & Facility Expenses Taxes Facility rent 1st. Year Only , CPS In Kind year 2 + Northern Trust Financing IFF Loan Utilities Additional Utilities Maintenance Services Outsourced Janitorial Supplies Fire & Security Protection Services Security Personnel Services General Liability Insurance Building Insurance Building Repairs/Improvements/Depreciation Ongoing Maintenance Reserve Additional facilities costs (capital expenditures) Sub-Total Occupancy & Facility Expenses % of total expenses

TOTAL EXPENDITURES TOTAL OPERATING BUDGET GAP (Revenues - Contributions - Costs) 145 NET SURPLUS/(DEFICIT) 144

8 2016-2017 Year 8

Programming

81

92 94

7 2015-2016 Year 7

$

Health/first aid Classroom Expenses

72

88 89 90 91

6 2014-2015 Year 6

$

Student Transportation

70 71

80

5 2013-2014 Year 5

Personnel Expenses

67 68

4 2012-2013 Year 4

Other Income

53 54 55

63 64

3 2011-2012 Year 3

Contributions

TOTAL REVENUES

58 59 60 61 62

2 2010-2011 Year 2

REVENUES State Revenues

48 50 51 52

56 57

1 2009-2010 Year 1

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

3,245 3,585 365 1,061 8,200 31,145 2,040

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

$

5,586

$

$

10,138

$

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

249 120 2,361 23,260 81,217 15%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

11,220 509 797 812 235,111 394,033 14%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

11,670 2,068 581 24,255 230,684 5%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

12,020 1,588 174 317 3,032 169,533 3%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

11,907 5,412 796 1,624 5,412 154,392 3%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

12,145 5,520 811 1,656 5,520 167,671 3%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

12,388 5,631 828 1,689 5,631 173,945 3%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

12,636 5,743 844 1,723 5,743 167,737 3%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

12,888 5,858 861 1,757 5,858 169,344 3%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

13,146 5,975 878 1,793 5,975 175,085 3%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

13,409 6,095 896 1,828 6,095 175,402 3%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

13,677 6,217 914 1,865 6,217 176,679 3%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

13,951 6,341 932 1,902 6,341 179,164 3%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

14,230 6,468 951 1,940 6,468 182,081 3%

$ $ $

-

$

-

$ $ $ $ $

80,004 -

$ $ $ $ $

882,190 53,827 82,157

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

-

$ $ $

8,398 493 -

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

73,263 13,716 9,591 10,825 65,320 1,190,889 25%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

906,456 122,110 82,200 67,760 21,659 2,357 20,667 58,806 1,282,015 24%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

162,126 84,430 56,286 25,777 5,412 21,042 5,412 48,709 409,195 9%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

162,126 86,118 57,412 31,648 5,520 25,835 5,520 49,684 16,000 439,864 8%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

162,126 87,841 58,560 35,979 5,631 29,370 5,631 50,677 712,256 1,148,070 17%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

162,126 89,597 8,960 59,732 40,469 5,743 33,036 5,743 51,691 457,098 7%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

162,126 91,389 9,139 60,926 43,862 5,858 35,806 5,858 52,725 467,690 7%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

162,126 93,217 9,322 62,145 47,375 5,975 38,673 5,975 53,779 478,587 7%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

162,126 95,082 9,508 63,388 47,546 6,095 38,813 6,095 54,855 483,506 7%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

162,126 96,983 9,698 64,655 47,400 6,217 38,694 6,217 55,952 487,942 7%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

162,126 98,923 9,892 65,949 47,975 6,341 39,163 6,341 57,071 493,781 8%

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

162,126 100,901 10,090 67,268 48,744 6,468 39,791 6,468 58,212 500,069 8%

$ $ $

554,641 $ (539,641) $ 16,757 $

$ $ $ $ $ $ 0%

450 32,092 121,437 4%

2,734,867 $ (1,037,028) $ 24,425 $

4,691,859 $ (1,135,860) $ 6,976 $

5,441,568 $ (1,310,537) $ (224) $

4,784,057 $ (894,278) $ 240,722 $

5,453,888 $ (770,294) $ 204,706 $

6,632,349 $ (1,364,137) $ (704,137) $

6,316,328 $ (455,459) $ (155,459) $

6,380,248 $ (167,154) $ 132,846 $

6,726,607 $ (57,578) $ 242,422 $

6,757,926 $ (80,774) $ (80,774) $

6,557,041 86,377 86,377

$ $ $

6,549,078 156,677 156,677

$ $ $

6,468

6,621,372 172,363 172,363


Northwestern University Settlement Association Main House Cost Projections - note that Noble Street will be charged as much as 25% as a share under the lease agreement for capital improvements 14-Aug-13 regular maintenance budget items Trade / Building

Current Condition

Year Previous Work

Current 2013

1996

$20,000

1 2014

2 2015

3 2016

4 2017

5 2018

Comments

Mechanical Main Building Boiler Radiators Window Unit A/Cs

Poor/Functional Good/Functional Functional

Maintenance/Inspections Evanston Hall Air Cooled Chiller - Roof Mech Main Water Pump Boilers AHU - Basement AHU - Ground Floor AHU - 2nd Floor Theater RTU Maintenance/Inspections

$4,000

Good Fair / Functional Fair / Functional Poor / Functional Fair / Functional Poor / Functional Good

$500,000

$4,000

$4,000

$4,000

$4,000

$4,000

1990s $5,000 $100,000 $75,000 $75,000 $10,000 $4,000

$75,000 $4,000

$4,000

$4,000

$4,000

$4,000

Plumbing/Fire Protection Main Building Fire Protection - 6" Domestic Water Service - 3" Fire Pump 100 gal Water Heater - Basement Recirc Pump Kitchen sewer

Good Good 1993 Good 2005 Good - 4 years left; valve 1999 Good flooding occurs 2000

Maintenance/Inspections Evanston Hall Fire Protection - 6" Domestic Water Service - 3" Sump Pump Sanitary / Storm - 6" Sewage Ejector-Locker Room 75 gal Water Heater - Basement 40 gal Water Heater-Theater Recirc Pump

$4,000 $40,000 $1,000

Good Good Fair - Replace Valve Good Good Good - 2 years left Good - 4 years left Good

$14,000

$1,000

$1,000

$1,000

$1,000

$1,000

1991 1990s $5,000

2005

$10,000 $8,000

Maintenance/Inspections

$1,000

$1,000

$1,000

$1,000

$1,000

$1,000

Electrical Main Building 1200A, 208/120V,3ph,4wire

Good

1992

Evanston Hall 2500A, 208/120V,3ph,4wire

Good

1990s

Architectural Main Building Enclosure Roof Walls-Tuckpoint Windows Maintenance/Inspections Interior Flooring Ceiling Lighting Evanston Hall Enclosure Roof Walls-Tuckpoint Windows Maintenance/Inspections Interior Flooring Ceiling Lighting Theater lighting/sound Nobel Street Enclosure Roof Walls-Tuckpoint Windows Maintenance/Inspections Interior Flooring Ceiling Lighting TOTALS Regular Maintenance Cost Subtotal without Regular Maintenance Cost 25% For Noble Contribution for Capital Projects Net Capital Cost

2005 1989 2010

$80,000 $130,000 $4,000

$4,000

Includes 1400 and Gym $4,000

$4,000

$4,000

$4,000

2011 2003 2000s

2005 1991 1991

$65,000 $20,000 $2,000

1990s 1990s 1990s

$2,000

$2,000

$2,000

$2,000

$2,000

$35,000

$100,000

2000 2000 2000

$65,000

2000 2000 2000 $60,000 $40,000 $20,000 $5,000 $15,000

$241,000 $16,000 $225,000 $56,250 $168,750

$101,000 $26,000 $75,000 $18,750 $56,250

$91,000 $16,000 $75,000 $18,750 $56,250

$638,000 $38,000 $600,000 $150,000 $450,000

$401,000 $16,000 $385,000 $96,250 $288,750

$1,532,000 $152,000 $1,380,000 $345,000 $1,035,000


CAMPAIGN GIFT AND FISCAL POLICIES

CAMPAIGN GIFT POLICIES Purpose of Capital Campaign Gift Policies Capital Campaign Gift Policies are additional policies which are specific to the campaign that are above and beyond the Settlement’s standing gift policies.

Donor Recognition All donors will be publicly recognized for contributing to the Settlement’s Capital Campaign unless donor instructs the Settlement otherwise. The Settlement will respect the confidentiality of donors who do not want to be publicly recognized.

Pledged Gifts Gifts to the Capital Campaign may be pledged over a term not to exceed five years from the pledge date, and preferably within three years of the pledged date. Unless other arrangements are made, pledged gifts are payable in equal, annual installments on the anniversary of the pledge date. In good faith The Settlement will publicize these gifts and recognize them with the appropriate level of donor recognition, including physical naming opportunities. In the event that a pledge is not paid in full within the pledge period, the Settlement reserves the right to remove the donor’s name from any permanent recognition, physical or otherwise. A pledged gift must be documented in writing and signed and dated by the donor. The pledge agreement must include the payment terms, including dates and amounts of payments to be received in a form acceptable to the Settlement’s auditors for revenue recognition on the Settlement’s financial statements. Verbal pledges or informal written pledges will not be accounted for in the Capital Campaign and cannot be recognized publicly or otherwise.

Gift Counting Period Capital gifts and pledges made starting in April 2011and up to the yet-to-be-determined closing date of the campaign will be included in the Capital Campaign totals.

Term of Naming Opportunities Physical designations will be valid for a minimum of 25 years. At that time, the Settlement will have the prerogative to rename that physical designation for another donor. If a physical designation is sold or destroyed before the 25 years have passed, the donor will have the option to have another physical designation named in its stead for the remainder of the 25 years.

Annual Fund Gifts Gifts to the Annual Fund will not be counted toward campaign totals. Donors will be encouraged to maintain and possibly increase their Annual Fund contributions during the Capital Campaign and, when possible and advisable, both commitments will be solicited at the same time.

1


CAMPAIGN GIFT AND FISCAL POLICIES

Trusts, Annuities, & Life Insurance Charitable remainder trusts and gift annuities should generally be credited at fair market value, i.e., the full amount of the assets given. Charitable lead trusts will record only the income received from the trust during the period of the campaign. Insurance gifts must name the Settlement as both beneficiary and irrevocable owner of the policy. When a new or existing policy is given, the Settlement should report the cash value of the policy rather than its face value, as the amount of the gift. If the donor is paying further premiums on the policy it may add this amount to the donor's gift totals.

Planned Gifts Irrevocable planned gifts will be accepted at present value and can be designated either for a named designation of a pre-existing space or to augment a reserve fund or the Settlement’s endowment. In order to be included in the campaign total, the dollar amount of the bequest needs to be stated and written documentation of the intent must be provided. Irrevocable planned gifts cannot be accepted as funding for new or renovated space and will only be credited toward reserve fund goals. Further, planned gifts can only be used for naming opportunities for spaces that do not require new construction or substantial renovation. Revocable planned gifts cannot be counted in campaign totals and donors of these gifts are not entitled to a naming opportunity. However, all planned gift commitments made during the Capital Campaign will be publicly acknowledged as a separate list of donors.

Parties to be Solicited It is expected that all current and former donors, board members, auxiliary board members and other people associated with the Settlement will be solicited during the course of the campaign at the discretion of staff under the guidance and direction of President and/or the Campaign Steering Committee.

2


CAMPAIGN GIFT AND FISCAL POLICIES CAMPAIGN FISCAL POLICIES Commitment to Specific Construction Projects The Settlement will embark on a specific construction project only when not less than 80% of the required funds have been identified (received or pledged). It will be a priority to complete the funding of a particular project that is underway before embarking on additional construction projects. Interest The Settlement will finance short-term funds and incur interest charges for construction and renovation projects of the campaign under the following set of circumstances:    

The incremental borrowing is not expected to cause the total campaign budget for short term interest ($30,000) to be exceeded; and It is borrowing against signed pledges amounts not exceeding 3 years; and It makes sense financially to get a project underway rather than delaying it avoid potential future escalations in cost; and It makes sense strategically due to programmatic needs or in deference to donor relationships and expectations.

When borrowing funds for capital construction projects, the Settlement will first access its unused capital lines of credit. All recommendations to borrow funds to support campaign initiatives must be pre-approved by both the Campaign Steering Committee and the Audit and Finance Committee of the Settlement’s Board. Priority Uses of Unrestricted Gifts Unrestricted gifts will typically be designated for use according to the following order of priorities:  Campaign expenses  Construction projects underway and not fully funded  Rowe operating funds  Main House and Evanston Hall renovations  Unfunded HITW and Head Start renovations and construction projects  Building reserve fund Monitoring of Financial Status of the Campaign The Chair of the Campaign Steering Committee shall oversee the updating of the Campaign Cash Flow & Capital Project Expenditure Model in advance of each Settlement Board of Director’s meeting and make a report on the status of the Campaign at each Board meeting.

3


Campaign Planning Committee


CAMPAIGN PLANNING COMMITTEE ROSTER

Glenn Dalhart – Chairman Vice-Chairman - Board of Directors Email - gdalhart@ameritech.net

Patty Johnson Board of Directors/North Shore Board Email-pj314@aol.com

Anna Atkinson President – Evanston Woman’s Board Email - annatatkinson@gmail.com

Connie Magnuson Board of Directors/Winnetka Board Email-magnusonbylake@aol.com

Beth Boehrer North Shore Board Email - bboehrer@comcast.net

Amy O’Donnell Board of Directors/North Shore Board Email - amystewart13@yahoo.com

Kathy Elliott Board of Directors Email - khe1323@aol.com

Bill Welnhofer Board of Directors Email - bwelnhofer@rwbaird.com

Mike Elliott Mike’s Email - mbe1323@sbcglobal.net

Ron Manderschied President – Northwestern Settlement Email - rmanderschied@nush.org

Brian Saber Consultant Email - brian@askingmatters.com

Ray Crosland Chief Development Officer Email - rcrosland@nush.org

Katie Taylor Manager – Development & Communications Email - ktaylor@nush.org

Campaign Portfolio  

Draft