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August 4, 2013

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Serving DeKalb County since 1871

Auburn, Indiana

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No rush to expunge criminal records GOOD MORNING Auburn man dies from crash injuries FORT WAYNE — An Auburn man died late Friday afternoon at Parkview Regional Medical Center from injuries he sustained in a vehicle crash Wednesday on Interstate 69, north of Dupont Road. Lloyd E. Myers, 84, suffered multiple blunt-force injuries in the crash at 9:40 a. m. Wednesday, the Allen Myers County coroner’s office said. A news release said investigators do not know if he was wearing safety restraints. The incident remains under investigation by the Allen County Police Department and the coroner’s office. Police said Myers had pulled his pickup truck onto the right shoulder of I-69 southbound, north of the Hursh Road overpass. He then attempted to enter the main lane to get back into the flow of traffic, but another car hit his truck. Myers is the 20th person to die in a traffic accident in Fort Wayne and Allen County in 2013, the coroner’s office said. An obituary for Mr. Myers appears on page A4 of today’s edition.

BY MATT GETTS mgetts@kpcmedia.com

When a state new law allowing people to clear their criminal records took effect July 1, Steuben County Circuit Court Judge Allen Wheat said he expected a mad dash to the courthouse by people seeking to do just that. The rush hasn’t happened. At least not yet. Wheat said he has not had even a single case come before him regarding the new law. “I’m somewhat surprised at that,” Wheat said. “That just hasn’t happened — at least in the circuit court.” The new law allows people who have been convicted of certain misdemeanor and felony

crimes to have their records cleared, as long as specified waiting periods have elapsed. A person who has had a record expunged could claim on a job application that he or she has not been convicted of a felony, a key benefit to the law, officials have said (see related story). Under most circumstances, the law doesn’t allow for the forgiveness of sex crimes, crimes involving serious bodily injury and those committed by elected officials. One attorney estimated the cost of an expungement to range from $750 to $1,000 for attorney fees, with the higher amount required for more serious offenses.

Employment spurs law change BY MATT GETTS mgetts@kpcmedia.com

The lone pending expungement request in LaGrange County is a good example of how the new legislation should be used, according to that county’s prosecuting attorney. A man who was convicted in the mid 1970s of a theft is the process of preparing a petition to have that conviction expunged, or cleared, from his criminal record. Prosecuting Attorney Jeff Wible said it’s the type of case he thinks the new

LAOTTO — One man was killed and a woman was injured in a head-on crash just outside LaOtto Saturday afternoon, DeKalb County Police reported. Thomas E. Schultis, 73, of Churubusco, was pronounced dead at the scene, police said. Elizabeth L. Freeman, 53, of the 11300 block of East S.R. 205, LaOtto, was flown by Samaritan to Parkview Regional Medical Center with a leg injury. The crash happened at 4:46 p.m. at S.R. 3 and S.R. 205.

Info • The Star 118 W. Ninth St. Auburn, IN 46706 Auburn: (260) 925-2611 Fax: (260) 925-2625 Classifieds: (toll free) (877) 791-7877 Circulation: (toll free) (800) 717-4679

Index •

Classified.............................................. D5-D6 Life................................................................ C1 Obituaries.....................................................A4 Opinion ........................................................B6 Business ......................................................B8 Sports.................................................... B1-B5 Weather.......................................................B8 Vol. 101 No. 213

SEE EMPLOYMENT, PAGE A6

SEE RECORD, PAGE A6

Jobs lack quality

Ashley-Hudson Festival

Positions added in July mostly part-time, low pay

DAVE KURTZ

Churubusco man killed in collision

law was created to handle. The Indiana General Assembly’s House Enrolled Act 1482 became law on July 1. It allows for misdemeanor and felony convictions to be expunged, as long as certain criteria are met. Area court officers said the intent of the legislation is to allow people looking for jobs to be able to say they do not have felony convictions on their records. “The whole purpose of this

A flag corps leads DeKalb High School’s Baron Brigade marching band in the Ashley-Hudson

Festival parade Saturday morning.

Grand marshal, 93, enjoys ride BY DAVE KURTZ dkurtz@kpcmedia.com

ASHLEY — At 93 years of age, Clyde McEntarfer of Ashley still rides a lawn mower on a regular basis. Saturday, he got a faster set of wheels. A sleek, new Corvette convertible carried McEntarfer down the main streets of Ashley and Hudson as grand marshal of the towns’ annual festival parade. The Corvette’s chauffeur gave him a taste of its horsepower, throwing him back in his seat, he said. As for the rest of the ride as grand marshal, “That was quite an honor,” he said. “I never thought I’d ever be that.” McEntarfer’s main mode of

transportation in summer is a 60-inch, zero-turning-radius lawn mower. He has “three good-paying jobs” mowing lawns, he said, and he does his neighbors’ lawns for gasoline money. In his full-time working days, McEntarfer rode McEntarfer heavy construction equipment. He served with an engineers unit in the Army, building bridges and airports. He served in the Battle of the Bulge in Europe during World War II and was called up again during the Korean Conflict, but went to Europe for a second tour.

Born in Ashley, he moved back to a home just north of town in the 1950s and settled in town in 1970 at a home he still occupies. He raised two daughters, Patricia Brown of Waterloo and Pam Myers of Spencerville. Now, grandson Aaron Myers lives with McEntarfer. Together, they attend tractor pulls, and McEntarfer won a trophy driving in a competition last year. Relaxing in a beer tent in downtown Ashley after the parade, McEntarfer credited his longevity to “a beer a day,” or occasionally something stronger. He said he leaves the ladies alone, but “I get a lot of kisses and hugs” — including a big one from his whole community on Saturday.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The 162,000 jobs the economy added in July were a disappointment. The quality of the jobs was even worse. A disproportionate number of the added jobs were part-time or low-paying — or both. Part-time work accounted for more than 65 percent of the positions employers added in July. Low-paying retailers, restaurants and bars supplied more than half July’s job gain. “You’re getting jobs added, but they might not be the best-quality job,” says John Canally, an economist with LPL Financial in Boston. So far this year, low-paying industries have provided 61 percent of the nation’s job growth, even though these industries represent just 39 percent of overall U.S. jobs, according to Labor Department numbers analyzed by Moody’s Analytics. Mid-paying industries have contributed just 22 percent of this year’s job gain. “The jobs that are being created are not generating much income,” Steven Ricchiuto, chief economist at Mizuho Securities USA, wrote in a note to clients. SEE JOBS, PAGE A6

DeKalb schools group makes trip to China BY KATHRYN BASSETT kbassett@kpcmedia.com

WATERLOO — As a social studies teacher, Brett Eltzroth hopes students in his classes at DeKalb Middle School have a respect for other cultures and individual differences. “I hope that they have an understanding of different cultures in the world,” said Eltzroth. For some of his students, that understanding has come not only from books but also from immersion. In June, Eltzroth led a group of about two dozen DeKalb Central school district residents on a nine-day visit to China.

The group included Eltzroth’s wife, Neah Eltzroth, who is a second-grade teacher at Rome City Elementary School; DeKalb Middle School associate principal Michelle Molargik; middle school teachers Nora Schwartz and Jarrod Bennett; McKenney-Harrison Elementary School teacher Carrie Bennett; DeKalb High School treasurer Nancy Gurtner; students Rachel Pfafman, Caroline Harlow, Tori Pfafman, Gabe Seltenright, John Gurtner, Emily Jones, Cade Molargik, Devon Winebrenner, Lauren Woodcox and Riley Winebrenner; and parents and patrons Jim Harlow, Russell Emerick, Mary Pfafman,

Mary Seltenright, Brad Woodcox, ClaraMary Winebrenner and Tim Schwartz. The trip marked Eltzroth’s second visit to China. He first made the journey two years ago with a group from Global Indiana with the goal of establishing a relationship with a Chinese sister school. That relationship since has been cemented, and the group visited the sister school in Taizhou. “They had a big welcome for us,” Eltzroth said. This past school year, DeKalb Middle School hosted teacher Cindy Wang and administrator Chen Ronghua from SEE CHINA, PAGE A6

“I hope that they have an understanding of different cultures in the world.” Brett Eltzroth DeKalb Middle School social studies teacher


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THE STAR

AREA • STATE •

kpcnews.com

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

Burned dog gets second chance with new family BY PATRICK REDMOND predmond@kpcmedia.com

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

The Conway family of Whitehouse, Ohio, gathers around the newest member of their family, a labradoodle they found at the Ark Animal Sanctuary in LaGrange. The dog was badly burned when it arrived at the shelter and was nursed back to the health by the Ark staff.

LAGRANGE — For a young, injured dog, roaming through a rural LaGrange County neighborhood, the day she was cornered and captured by residents worried about her health might be the second luckiest day of her life. Her best day has to be a couple of months later, when she was adopted by her new “forever” family in Ohio. The three-month-old lab/poodle mix was found running free this spring in a small community just north of Howe. According to Ark sanctuary director Brian Cochran, neighbors realized the dog was badly injured, suffering with mysterious patches of missing fur. Fearing for the dog’s life, they managed to corner the young puppy and coax her into a travel cage. Thinking the LaGrange animal sanctuary would charge them a fee to rescue the dog, the neighbors then collected $40 from friends and family to pay that supposed fee, said Cochran. “There’s no fee. They told us they often saw the

pup running around their neighborhood, and that one day it was fine, but the next, it looked like it had been to hell and back,” Cochran explained. “She had chemical burns on her stomach, on all four feet, on her ears, her mouth and around her eyes,” he added. The dog also was covered in mud, Cochran said, which the pup may have done to herself, trying to reduce her pain. She was missing large patches of fur where the chemicals had burned through to her skin, including two large patches around her eyes. “She’s just lucky she wasn’t blinded,” Cochran said. The dog was rushed to the LaGrange Veterinarian Clinic for treatment. She was quickly cleaned up, her wounds cleaned, and she was given medication to help control her pain and antibiotics to prevent infections. The staff at the shelter was given topical ointments to gently rub on her burned skin to help her heal. She also was given a name: French Fry. But this story, like so

many stories at the Ark Animal Sanctuary, does have a happy ending. Despite her ordeal, the dog was gentle and loving, Cochran said. While it took time to heal her wounds, French Fry’s fur did grow back, and when the staff thought she was ready to find her new home, pictures of the pup were placed on the website Petfinder. That’s where the next chapter of the dog’s life was written. “It was love at first sight,” said Lisa Conway, of Whitehouse, Ohio, whose family discovered the young dog online. She said their attraction to the puppy was immediate. “We saw her picture and just fell in love, and then to read her story, it was just heart-wrenching,” Conway explained. Conway said she and her family — her husband and two teenage daughters — had been looking for a new dog for nearly a year, but never had been able to agree on the animals they found online. Conway said French Fry was the first dog her family all agreed might be the perfect addition to their family. After contacting the LaGrange shelter, the Conways made the two-hour drive to LaGrange to meet the dog. “We’ve never done anything like this before, but we’re certainly glad we did it this time,” Conway said. “The picture just made us fall in love with her. Her eyes just looked so loving.” Ironically, their first meeting with the young dog didn’t go as planned. When French Fry was led into the room to meet the Conways, she hid under a bench in the shelter’s lobby. Conway said she worried the ordeal of being burned might have emotionally scarred the young dog. She said she also worried the dog might have become fearful, and

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

A young dog, later named French Fry, shows the extent of the chemical burns she suffered around her eyes and her nose.

that trusting humans would be an issue. But the pup, who Conway said seemed to be more legs than body, soon got past her fears and began to bond with her new family. “By the time we got home, she was sitting in the girls’ laps,” Conway said of French Fry’s car ride to Ohio. “It was perfect.” The family decided to keep the dog’s name, French Fry, since Conway had always lovingly called her each of her daughters French Fry when they were growing up. “It was just a term of endearment we had,” she explained Conway said the dog quickly adjusted to life in her new Ohio home. Her fur has grown back, and French Fry has been quick to be housebroken and to learn simple commands such as “sit.” The pup recently was enrolled in dog training class and will start in a few weeks. She’s also become the loving animal Conway said she and her family were looking for. “She’s an absolute love, a dog who loves to cuddle up with you,” she explained. “She is the best thing for my family … we needed her.”

Indiana adds jobs in manufacturing

WORLD-CLASS CARE. COMMUNITY PRIDE. At DeKalb Health, our investments in state-of-the-art facilities and partnerships with top family physicians and specialty groups mean that you never have to look past DeKalb County for the very best care. Our commitment is also reflected in our investments of time, talents and resources in local schools, businesses, charitable organizations and other worthy causes to help ensure a healthier community. We’re proud to be your neighbor, and you can be sure we’ll be here, taking care of you for generations to come.

MUNSTER (AP) — Indiana added 8,020 manufacturing jobs in the 12-months span ending April 2013, marking the second straight year the Hoosier state has added manufacturing jobs, a research firm has found. “Indiana is doing better than the nation as a whole,” said Tom Dubin, president and chief executive officer of Evanston, Ill.-based Manufacturer’s News, told The Times of Munster. Manufacturing News, which has surveys manufacturers across the nation, says Indiana is doing better than

The

the nation when it comes to creating manufacturing jobs, with an increase of 1.4 percent. “Industrial employment in other states grew by about 0.5 percent, but Indiana gained more than 8,000 jobs. The transportation industry in Indiana is especially strong, with Toyota, Subaru and automotive suppliers bouncing back from the economic downturn,” Dubin said. Nearly 9,700 manufacturers operate in Indiana, employing 556,367 workers, Manufacturing News estimates.

Star

The Star (USPS 181-300) 118 W. Ninth St., Auburn, IN 46706 Established 1871, daily since 1913 ©KPC Media Group Inc. 2013 Recipient of several awards from the Hoosier State Press Association for excellence in reporting in 2012.

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(260) 347-0400 Ext. 129 dkurtz@kpcnews.net

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AREA • STATE •

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

KPC News of the Week • These are some of the top news stories that appeared in KPC Media Group daily newspapers that were written by KPC staff or compiled from wire reports.

A3

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Rudy’s hopeful for a hit Looking to take advantage of traffic from Parkview Field, other nearby venues, Rudy’s opens in long-distressed neighborhood BY RICK FARRANT rfarrant@kpcmedia.com

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

Steuben County Sheriff Tim Troyer, left, presents Deputy Rich McCarty with the 2013 Indiana Sheriff’s Association County Police Officer/Deputy of the Year Award from the Indiana Sheriff’s Association.

Steuben deputy earns statewide honor ANGOLA — Veteran Steuben County Sheriff’s Deputy Rich McCarty survived being shot at numerous times during an altercation surrounding a high-profile murder case and was honored for his professionalism last week. McCarty received the 2013 Indiana Sheriff’s Association County Police Officer/Deputy of the Year Award from the Indiana Sheriff’s Association. “As sheriff, I am amazed at the evil our deputies face every day, and they do so unwaivered,� Steuben County Sheriff TimTroyer said. “I am very thankful. Thankful that Deputy McCarty is OK and thankful that Deputy McCarty is one of the many keepers of the peace in Steuben County.� McCarty was cited for his work early June 3, 2012, when he was investigating the murder of 40-year-old Brent Dombroski of Angola. Zao Garth Burrell, 25, who shot at McCarty, was found guilty by a jury and was sentenced to 105 years in prison in early April.

Courier expanding, adding 40 jobs KENDALLVILLE — Courier Corp. announced Wednesday plans to double its digital printing capacity at its Courier Digital Solutions plant in Kendallville through the addition of a second T410 color inkjet web press. The expansion represents about $13 million investment and will create approximately 40 jobs, the company said. With its 42-inch web width, the T410 offers exceptional flexibility in meeting a high volume of diverse printing needs across a full range of run lengths, a Courier news release said. The new press from Hewlett Packard will be set up next to the existing T410 and is scheduled to begin operating later this year, said Christine Bitner, Courier Kendallville Inc. plant manager and vice-president. Courier employs 600 people in two plants on Kendallville’s east edge.

West Nile virus found in DeKalb County AUBURN — This summer’s first sign of West Nile virus in DeKalb County has arrived, the DeKalb County Health Department said Friday. A sample pool of mosquitoes collected July 17 in the county by the Indiana State Department of Health has tested positive for the virus, said Bernie Sukala, the county’s environmental health specialist. Sukala said mosquitoes that carry West Nile virus tend to lay their eggs in ditches and catchbasins with high organic matter, septic system discharge sites, unused wading and swimming pools, vehicle tires and other containers of water. Sukala said to avoid being bitten by mosquitoes, people should avoid heavily wooded areas or tall weeds, if possible.

Former Indiana school chief resigns TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — Florida’s education commissioner resigned Thursday amid allegations that he changed the grade of a charter school run by a major Republican donor during his previous job as Indiana’s school chief. Commissioner Tony Bennett announced his resignation, effective immediately, at a news conference. He said that while he did nothing wrong, he didn’t want to be a distraction to ongoing efforts to overhaul Florida’s education system. Emails published by The Associated Press this week show that Bennett and his Indiana staff scrambled last fall to ensure Republican donor’s Christel DeHaan’s school received an A, despite poor 10th-grade algebra scores that initially earned it a C.

Rudy Mahara Sr., with his well-sculpted Hemingway-esque beard, stout build and blue eyes that have the look of great distances and even greater stories, might pass for a veteran sea captain. But the 60-year-old Mahara is not a sea captain. He is the president of Mahara Wealth Partners in Fort Wayne. And he has chosen to dock his dreams on a land-locked island of 25 mostly worn older homes and buildings on West Brackenridge Street, immediately southwest of Parkview Field. It is a somewhat distressed downtown block the city hopes will one day emerge as a thriving multiuse area, and Mahara is the first since Parkview Field’s debut in 2009 to arrive on the island with a commercial enterprise: the aptly named Rudy’s. It is an unlikely business for the area: a quaint, first-floor retail outlet in a renovated 1891 Queen Anne that will sell Indiana wines, Indiana microbrews, cigars and DeBrand Fine Chocolates. The second floor is zoned residential and will be occupied by a private corporation of cigar aficionados. Mahara, who officially opened Rudy’s on July 31 after investing about $200,000 in the place, has all kinds of reasons for thinking the unique business will be a success, not the least of which is a small, beckoning red neon sign perched near the peaked eaves of the building. “One thing for sure is that the stadium is 250 feet away from me and there’s (thousands) of people 70 times a year that walk by the stadium and when they leave, they can’t help but see the neon sign up there,� he said. “The other thing for sure is that housing is going in across the street and there will be development there. And so that will only enhance this.� But even if the business doesn’t flourish, Mahara believes it could easily be transitioned back to living quarters that in this era might fetch a better-than-decent rental price because of the building’s location. City Redevelopment Director Greg Leatherman is among those rooting for Mahara. “I give Rudy credit for blazing a trail,� Leatherman said. “He’s stepping out. He’s doing it with passion. Time will tell, but I want him to be successful. I’m just hoping the success will be long-term and year-round.� Mahara, one of the founders of the Boys & Girls Clubs of Fort Wayne and in the financial-planning business for 30 years, said the idea for Rudy’s came gradually and pretty much by accident.

RICK FARRANT

Rudy Mahara Sr., with wife Susan, envisions solid patronage for his wine, beer, cigar and chocolate business from people attending Fort Wayne TinCaps games.

I give Rudy credit for blazing a trail. He’s stepping out. He’s doing it with passion. Time will tell, but I want him to be successful. I’m just hoping the success will be long-term and year-round.� Greg Leatherman City Redevelopment Director

• “In no way did I envision anything like this,â€? he said. “It just evolved.â€? He purchased the building at 409 W. Brackenridge three years ago, thinking he might move his financial-planning business there from its location on West Jefferson Boulevard near Jefferson Pointe. One thing led to another. On a whim while he was surfing the internet, he applied for a liquor license and to his surprise received one. Then he bought the assets of the Esquire Cigar Club on Thomas Road, including the club’s inventory of cigars, humidor lockers, couches, tables, chairs, flat-screen televisions and wooden Indian sculptures. The next development was pure serendipity. “My wife (Susan) was tasting some wines in Madison, Indiana, and they gave her a sweet wine and a piece of chocolate,â€? he said. “And her mouth exploded like a chocolate-covered cherry. And she said, ‘We’ve got to see if we can put DeBrand’s in Rudy’s.’â€? DeBrand co-owner Cathy Brand-Beere agreed to offer the Fort Wayne company’s chocolates for sale at Mahara’s enterprise, and the concept for Rudy’s began to take shape. It is more than a quick-transaction business. There is a walk-in cigar humidor, although no smoking is allowed inside the first floor at Rudy’s

or immediately outside; a 15-seat wine-tasting area in a cozy dining room; 60 seats under umbrellas in a spacious “beer garden� at the rear of the business; and about 20 seats on the front porch and lawn bordered by a white-picket fence. On game days, Mahara said, Rudy’s will fire up a grill and offer hot dogs and sausages to patrons. “Beer and wine and chocolates and hot dogs: Who doesn’t like that?� he asked. When baseball is not in season, he envisions Rudy’s as a place where people can settle in for a drink or two, friendly conversation and perhaps a bite of chocolate. “I think the biggest business,� he said, “will be women coming in and tasting a sweet wine and having a piece of chocolate in the afternoon during happy hour. It’s a happy-hour kind of place. “It will be a fun atmosphere and the types of things that we might do with entertainment would include the symphony to some type of acoustic-guitar performances. There are so many possibilities.� Although the impetus for the business was the proximity to Parkview Field and the minor-league

baseball games played there, Mahara also expects to see patrons from the nearby Grand Wayne Convention Center, the Harrison apartment complex, hotels and the soon-to-be-developed four-acre plot across the street from Rudy’s. The city has bought most of the properties on that plot west of Parkview Field between Brackenridge and West Jefferson, and Leatherman said demolition of roughly a dozen structures will be carried out through the end of September. The city will then seek development of multifamily housing, and “we’re going to try to create a situation that provides us with the highest quality housing we can get.� Mahara owns up to the fact that one of his goals with Rudy’s is to plan for his retirement. Money from the retail business will help, as will the lease to the corporation that will use the well-appointed and well-ventilated second floor as a drinking, smoking, TV-watching, card-playing hangout. Mahara identified the corporation as Maduros LLC, but declined to reveal the corporation’s members. He said the corporation’s activities have nothing to do with Rudy’s downstairs and noted that corporation members will access their lair through a private entrance. Money aside, there are other, more altruistic reasons for Rudy’s. Mahara said he wants to be one of the catalysts for a better downtown and encourage others, particularly some of the well-off customers of Rudy’s, to take a similar interest in improving the area while at the same time appreciating the struggles of his neighbors on Brackenridge.

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Deaths & Funerals • Shannon Kathary LIGONIER — Shannon Eugene Kathary, age 38, of Ligonier, passed away on Friday August 2, 2013 at Parkview Regional Hospital in Fort Wayne as the result of a stroke suffered on Saturday morning, July 20, 2013. He was born on June 4, 1975, the son of Eugene and Kim (Miller) Kathary in Goshen, Ind. On August 3, 1996 he Mr. Kathary married Candy Swank, she survives. Also surviving are his five children, Nicholas, Neal, Rebecca, Leah and Noah, all at home; his parents, Eugene and Kim Kathary of Ligonier; a sister, Melinda Kathary, and several nieces and nephews. Shannon graduated from West Noble High School in 1993 and went on to attend Ball State. He later graduated from IPFW with a degree in Music Education. He had a passion for music and the arts. He was currently serving as the full time youth pastor and worship director at Ligonier United Methodist Church. He had been on several domestic mission trips, serving side by side with the people he led. He also helped lead many young people, and others, to fuller lives through the love of Jesus Christ. Shannon loved to camp, play cards and games, and cheer on his beloved Dallas Cowboys. Above all, he was a dedicated family man who deeply loved life, his wife and children, and was a faithful Christian who never hid his passion for Christ. Friends and family will be received at The CrossWalk from 2-8 p.m. today. A funeral service in his honor will be held on Monday, August 5, 2013 at 11 a.m. at The CrossWalk at Ligonier United Methodist Church in Ligonier, with Pastors Byron and Candy Kaiser officiating. Burial will take place at Sparta Cemetery in Kimmell, Ind. Memorial contributions may be directed to the family in care of Yeager Funeral Home, 1589 Lincolnway South; Ligonier, IN 46767. Yeager Funeral Home is assisting the family with arrangements. Online condolences may be sent to the family at yeagerfuneralhome.com.

C. Wayne Sherwood AUBURN — C. Wayne Sherwood, 67, died Friday Aug. 2, 2013, at his home in Auburn. He was born Aug. 12, 1945, in Auburn to Cleo W Sr. and V. Marie (Tarter) Sherwood. Wayne was a commercial artist. He worked for Foley Budget Store in Houston, Texas, before coming back to Fort Wayne where he worked with an advertising agency for five years. He then went to work for Ohio Art in Bryan, Ohio, for a number of years and Martin Graphics for eight years. He retired from Walmart Distribution Center in 2011.

After retiring he became and currently was working as a greeter at Walmart in Auburn, which he enjoyed very much. He is survived by a sister, Judi Terman of Auburn; and two nephews, Cris (Teresa) Davis of Garrett and Corey (Lisa) Hensinger of Auburn. Wayne was preceded in death by his parents and a nephew, Craig Davis. Services are 11 a.m. Tuesday, Aug. 6, 2013, at Feller and Clark Funeral Home, 1860 Center Street, Auburn. Burial is in Woodlawn Cemetery, Auburn. Calling is 2-4 and 6-8 p.m. Monday at the funeral home. Memorials may be directed to the DeKalb County Humane Shelter. To send condolences visit fellerandclark.com.

Neal Sibery AUBURN — Neal A. Sibery, 80, of Sechrist Lake and formerly of Auburn, died Friday, Aug. 2, 2013, at Kosciusko Community Hospital in Warsaw. Neal was born June 6, 1933, in Daleville, to Edwin and Oneita (Dull) Sibery. They both preceded him in death. Neal attended Ball State University before Mr. Sibery joining the United States Army where he served in the Korean Conflict. He returned from the service and married Marjorie A. Starr on Aug. 31, 1952, in Anderson, and she survives. Mr. Sibery owned and operated Sibery Insurance Company/Insurance and Financial Services in Auburn, retiring in 1998. He was a member of the First Christian Church, Disciples of Christ in Auburn where he served as an elder and President of the church board. Neal was a member of several local organizations including, American Legion Post 97 of Auburn where he served as Past Commander, DeKalb Masonic Lodge 214 where he served as Past Master, DeKalb Memorial Hospital Board, Elks Lodge 1978 of Auburn, Greenhurst County Club and also served at Club President, Loyal Order of the Moose Lodge 566 of Auburn, Scottish Rite of Fort Wayne, Mizpah Shriners of Fort Wayne and the Mizpah Shriners Dune Patrol. He was also a member of the Mizpah transportation committee for disabled children and was the lead organizer for the Cedar Creek Shriners Club which organized transportation for local students to attend the Mizpah Shrine Circus. Also surviving are two sons and daughters-in-law, Kevin N. and Karen Sibery of Auburn, and Kerry D. and Theresa Sibery of Auburn; four grandchildren, Travis (Jamie) Sibery, Tara (Grant Rummel) Sibery, Austin Sibery, and Trenton Sibery; two great-grandchildren, Harper Rummel, and Scarlett Sibery; three sisters, Joyce Thayer of Anderson, Roseland Pherson of Madison, Wis., and Myra

Lotteries • INDIANAPOLIS — These winning lottery numbers were drawn Saturday in Indiana and neighboring states: Indiana: Midday: 3-5-1 and 7-1-1-2; Evening: 1-0-9 and 9-7-7-4; Hoosier Lotto: 16-20-29-35-38-48; Cash 5: 2-6-21-25-27; Quick Draw: 1-5-10-14-15-21-24-25-2833-37-38-42-48-49-51-5870-75-79.

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Powerball: 21-24-36-4245, Powerball: 15. Michigan: Midday: 3-9-6 and 7-6-0-5; Daily: 9-2-1 and 4-4-4-6; Keno: 2-5-7-89-11-13-16-17-20-24-3135-44-48-55-56-63-66-6970-72; Fantasy 5: 10-15-1821-27; Classic Lotto 47: 11-12-20-21-26-40. Ohio: Midday: 9-2-8 and 1-2-5-8 and 8-9-1-7-0; evening: 6-3-6 and 7-6-9-0 and 9-0-8-8-6; Rolling Cash 5: 7-9-12-15-37; Classic Lotto: 14-16-18-28-36-38, kicker: 5-7-9-8-0-5. Illinois: Lucky Day: 7-9-22-35-37 and 11-26-2834-38; My 3: 1-8-4 and 0-6-6; Pick 3: 5-7-7 and 2-1-8; Pick 4: 0-0-0-8 and 9-2-9-4; Lotto Extra Shot: 2-3-11-26-27-46, extra shot, 22. VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITE.

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Thompson of Phoenix, Ariz.; and a brother, Rick Sibery of Phoenix, Ariz. Services will be at 7 p.m. Tuesday at Feller and Clark Funeral Home, 1860 S. Center Street, Auburn. The Auburn Elks Lodge 1978, The Rev. Betty Sivis, U.S. Army, and Auburn American Legion Post 97 all will be conducting services. Visitation will be from 4-7 p.m. Tuesday prior to the funeral service at the funeral home. Memorials may be directed to the First Christian Church, Disciples of Christ or the Shriners Hospital for Children in Chicago. To send condolences, visit fellerandclark.com.

Lloyd Myers GARRETT — Lloyd E. Myers, 84, of Auburn, and formerly of Garrett, died Friday, Aug. 2, 2013, at Parkview Regional Medical Center. He was born Feb. 28, 1929 in Garrett to Clarence A. and E. Madeline (Todd) Myers. He married Carol J. Rutter on Dec. 7, 1957, in Deshler, Ohio, and she died Jan. Mr. Myers 3, 1993. He was a U.S. Army veteran. He worked as an engineer on the B & O Railroad for more than 40 years, retiring in 1988. He was a member of the Garrett Masonic Lodge and the Garrett Presbyterian Church. Surviving are his daughter, Sue (Robert) Church of Marshfield, Wis.; his son, Todd Myers of Waterloo; five grandchildren; and six great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, Clarence A. and E. Madeline Myers; his wife, Carol J. Myers; a brother, William Myers; and a grandson. Services will take place at 11 a.m. Wednesday at Thomas Funeral Home, Garrett, with Rev. William Haworth officiating. Calling will be from 4-8 p.m. Tuesday at funeral home. Burial will be in Christian Union Cemetery, Garrett, with military honors by the Garrett American Legion and VFW. Memorials are to American Parkinson’s Association or the DeKalb County Humane Society. Condolences may be left at thomasfuneralhome.org.

John Bianski LAOTTO — John A. Bianski, 57, of rural LaOtto, died at 1:40 p. m. on Friday, Aug. 2, 2013, at his home. Services will be at 10 a.m. on Tuesday at the Sheets & Childs Funeral Home in Churubusco. Calling will be Monday from 4-8 p.m. at the funeral home. The rosary will be recited at 8 p.m. Monday at the funeral home. Burial will be in the Ege Catholic Cemetery, Noble County. Memorials are to Visiting Nurse and Hospice Home, 5910 Homestead Rd., Fort Wayne, IN 46814; or Riley

Hospital for Children, 705 Riley Hospital Dr., Indianapolis, IN 46202.

Ernest Fender WATERLOO — Ernest Adair Fender, 79, of Waterloo died Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013, at Lutheran Life Villages in Kendallville. Mr. Fender worked for Charleston Metal Products in Waterloo from 1969 to 1996, retiring after 27 years of service. He was born March 2, 1934, in Fort Wayne to Perry and Lucile Fender. He married Pauline Dalton on Mr. Fender Sept. 14, 1991, and she died Feb, 14, 2009. Surviving are three sons, Ernest Ervin Fender, Jeffery A. Fender, and Lonnie Lee Fender; two daughters, Sheril Ann Worman, and Laura Lee Madison; two stepsons, Paul Wortham and Edgar Wortham; two stepdaughters, Betty Ford and Sandra Harper; 13 grandchildren; 15 great-grandchildren; three brothers, Hullet Fender, Richard Fender and Harry Fender; and five sisters, Beverly Richerson, Florence Traster, Violet Kurtz, Emma Turner and Janet Maddalone. A graveside service will be conducted Monday at 11 a.m. at Lakeside Cemetery in Fremont, with Pastor Richard Pickard officiating. Memorials may be directed to Riley Hospital for Children. Feller and Clark Funeral Home in Waterloo is in charge of arrangements. To send condolences, visit www.fellerandclark. com.

James Fike GARRETT — James E. Fike, 90, of Garrett, died Saturday, Aug. 3, 2013, at his home. He was born Feb. 24, 1923 in Kendallville to Arthur and Elva (Harter) Fike. He married Dorothy Moore in 1950 and she died March 6, 2004. He was a tool and die machinist at J and P machine until his death. James is survived by two sons and a daughter, Mr. Fike Jerry (Vicky) Fike of Daytona Beach, Fla., and James C. “Bud” (Paula) Fike of Garrett, and Deborah (Denny) Dallas of Garrett; a sister, Beverly Thurman of Garrett; and several grandchildren and great-grandchildren. He was preceded in death by his parents, Arthur and Elva Fike; wife, Dorothy Fike; three brothers, Harold Fike, Arthur Fike Jr. and Charles Fike; and a sister: Edna Schulthess. Services will be at 2 p.m. Tuesday at Thomas Funeral Home, Garrett, with Rev. William Haworth officiating. Burial will follow in Christian Union Cemetery, Garrett.

Calling will be from 4-8 p.m. Monday and 1-2 p.m. Tuesday at the funeral home. Memorials are to the Garrett Presbyterian Church. Condolences may be left at thomasfuneralhome.org.

Reva Clifton ROME CITY — Reva Clifton, 85, of Rome City died Friday, Aug. 2, 2013, at 11:19 p.m. in her residence. She was a member of New Beginnings Community Church in Fort Wayne. She had worked at Essex Wire in Ligonier from 1962 to 1973. She also prepared taxes for the people of the community for numerous years. She was born Feb. 21, 1928, in Hardburley, Ky., to William and Loretta (Ritchie) Barnett. On Feb. 12, 1947, in Kentucky she married John Clifton, Jr. He preceded her in death on Sept. 3, 2005. Surviving are two sons, Mrs. Clifton Tim (Cheryl) Clifton of Rome City and Tony (Wendy) Clifton of Bettendorf, Iowa; two daughters, Jean (Gary) Glenn of Melbourne, Fla., and Sherry (Steve) Siewert of LaGrange; 13 grandchildren; 17 great-grandchildren; and a sister, Marie Fugate of Fisty, Ky. She was also preceded in death by a son, John Clifton, III; a grandson; a sister, Geneva Smith; two brothers, Leslie Barnett and Richard Barnett; and two half-sisters, Hazel Martin and Ruby Barnett. Services will be Tuesday at 2 p.m. in Young Family Funeral Home, Wolcottville Chapel, S.R. 9 North, Wolcottville with Pastor Robert Abels of New Beginnings Community Church officiating. Burial, along with the cremains of her husband John, will be together in Orange Cemetery, Rome City. Calling is Tuesday from noon to 2 p.m. at the funeral home. Memorials are to Cancer Services of Northeast Indiana, 6316 Mutual Drive, Fort Wayne, IN, 46825. View a video tribute after Tuesday or send condolences to the family at youngfamilyfuneralhome. com.

Gratia Must DAYTON, Ohio — Gratia Darlene (Haughey) Must peacefully left her children, family and friends to join husband, Kevin Phillip, and son, Eric Mitchell, as well as her parents, Dwight and Vera, and numerous family and friends in a better place. Born in Hamilton, Ind., on July 25, 1937, she was a cheerleader and basketball player for Hamilton High School, graduating in 1955. Gratia moved to Dayton, Ohio, to work at WPAFB. She met the love of her life and was happily married for 42 years. Together they raised eight children. She was Director of Transportation, Food Service and Housekeeping for the Must Mess. After retiring from Centerville

City Schools, she returned to Hamilton Lake. Gratia lives on through children and grandchildren, Diane and Kevin Hickey (John, Gratia, Jesse, Kyle, Madeline), Kevin Jr. and Melissa (Brandon, Lindsey, Emily, Abigail and Mike Smith, Erin, Kevin Robert), Tammy and Greg Turton (Justin, Derek, and Mindi), Mary and Chuck Wise (Gregory and Garrett, Heidi, Sarah, Terri), Sally and Tony Lamb (Zachary and Shelby, Tony Jr, Jeremy), Bart and Laurie (Griffin, Grant, Addison, Lily), Kelly and Erin (Olivia and Alex); great-grandchildren, Riley Must, Lola and Ella Turton. Arrangements are by The Westbrock Funeral Home, Dayton, Ohio.

Mary Applegate FORT WAYNE — Mary M. Applegate, 89 of Fort Wayne, passed away on Thursday, Aug. 1, 2013. She was born to Robert and Sarah on Feb. 21, 1924 in Fort Wayne and they preceded her in death. She will always be remembered for her wonderful sense of humor, her generous spirit and her outpouring of love and kindness to everyone. She will be forever loved Mrs. and missed. Applegate Surviving are her son Carl (Carolene) Applegate; grandsons Carl W. Applegate III and John N. Applegate; step-granddaughter Lisa D. (Bill) Beber; great-granddaughter Shelby A. Applegate; and three step-great-grandchildren Mathew, Holly and Andrew Beber. She was preceded in death by her husband, Carl Applegate. Funeral service will be at C.M. Sloan & Sons Funeral Home, 1327 N. Wells St., Fort Wayne, on Tuesday at 11 a.m. with calling one hour prior. Calling also will be on Monday at the funeral home from 4-8 p.m. Burial will be in Marion Memorial Park Cemetery. Condolences may be left at sloanandsonsfuneralhome. com.

William Payton KENDALLVILLE — William F. Payton, 72, died Friday, Aug. 2, 2013, at his home in Kendallville. Arrangements are pending at Hite Funeral Home of Kendallville.

Debra Doner FORT WAYNE — Debra Doner, 55, died Friday, Aug. 2, 2013, at her residence. Arrangements are pending at Hite Funeral Home of Kendallville.

Robert Day ANGOLA — Robert E. Day, 79, of Sebring, Fla., and formerly of Angola, died Friday, Aug. 2, 2013, at Good Shepherd Hospice Home in Sebring, Fla. Services are pending with the Weicht Funeral Home, Angola.

Republicans attack others in GOP WASHINGTON (AP) — The barbs are personal, the differences are multiplying among Republicans, a party divided over spending, foreign policy, a willingness to risk a government shutdown in order to defund the health care law and more. “I didn’t start this one, and I don’t plan on starting things by criticizing other Republicans,” Sen. Rand Paul of Kentucky said recently as he and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie likened one another to various cuts of a butchered pig. “But if they want to make me the target, they will get it back in spades.” No matter who started it, in the past few months, one Republican called others “wacko birds,” another said some of the party’s lawmakers were “stale and moss-covered” and a third suggested one member of the GOP was a tool of the White House. A recent flare-up over defunding the health law prompted Texas Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas to question the political manhood of fellow Republicans unwilling to risk closing down the government over the future of “Obamacare,” as GOP critics call the law they want to repeal. “They’re scared of being beaten up politically,” he said.

Not all the disagreements are dipped in acrimony. Some are re-emerging after the party papered over its differences in an unsuccessful campaign to defeat President Barack Obama last year. This spring, 14 Senate Republicans supported legislation that included a chance at citizenship for millions living in the country illegally. The other 32 opposed it, including the entire top leadership. In some cases, though, policy or strategic differences are overshadowed as Republicans simply call one another names, a type of clash that frequently pits newer, tea party-backed lawmakers against more experienced conservatives. Two months ago, Sen. John McCain of Arizona likened Cruz, Paul and others to “wacko birds” for their style of confrontational politics. Republican Rep. Justin Amash of Michigan responded from across the Capitol. “Bravo, senator. You got us. Did you come up with that at #DinnerWithBarack?” he tweeted, a none-toosubtle suggestion that McCain was parroting a line he had heard at the White House. Paul responded a short while later to McCain, the party’s 2008 presidential candidate and a fifth-term senator.

“The GOP of old has grown stale and moss-covered. I don’t think we need to name any names, do we?” he told an audience of conservatives. Other, more recent clashes appear born of political calculations, and fall just shy of personal criticism. Cruz, along with Sens. Mike Lee of Utah and Marco Rubio of Florida, recently urged Republicans to swear off voting for any year-end spending bill that includes money for the health law. Others countered that the result could be a partial shutdown of the government and a political windfall for Democrats. “I think it’s the dumbest idea I’ve ever heard,” said Sen. Richard Burr, R-N.C. “Some of these guys need to understand that if you shut down the federal government, you better have a specific reason to do it that’s achievable.” Burr was in the House nearly two decades ago when Republicans threatened they would shut down the government in hopes of winning spending concessions from President Bill Clinton. They followed through, but were forced into a retreat as the White House held firm and public opinion turned against them.


LOCAL • NATION •

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

Tribute •

E-cigarette marketing uses tobacco’s former playbook

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Companies vying for a stake in the fast-growing electronic cigarette business are reviving the decades-old marketing tactics the tobacco industry used to hook generations of Americans on regular smokes. They’re using cab-top and bus stop displays, sponsoring race cars and events, and encouraging smokers to “rise from the ashes” and take back their freedom in slick TV commercials featuring celebrities like TV personality Jenny McCarthy.

Harold Eugene “Hal” Hey, back row center, is joined by his family. Mr. Hey, 78, of Avilla, died Thursday, July 18, 2013.

Strength and character ‘Our pal Hal’ Hey made many friends BY DENNIS NARTKER dennisn@kpcmedia.com

AVILLA — Someone once said: “A good friend is hard to find, hard to lose and impossible to forget.” When family and friends talk about Hal Hey, the word “friend” is frequently mentioned. A devoted husband, father, grandfather and a friend to all, that was Mr. Hey. Harold Eugene “Hal” Hey, 78, of Avilla, died Thursday, July 18, 2013, at Parkview Regional Medical Center in Fort Wayne. He touched the hearts of many of those he met and left a lasting impression. Friends Buck and Flo Graves said Mr. Hey was very dear to their hearts, adding, “He was there for the fun and the laughter, and would always take the time to talk to us, and help us whenever we had a problem. We were so very blessed to have known him.” “Our pal Hal” is how friends Richard “Smitty” and Joyce Smith remember their friend. They met Mr. Hey and his wife, Connie, 13 years ago poolside in Cocoa Beach, Fla. while on vacation. They described the many happy occasions they had with the Heys, such as trips to the Kentucky Derby and Indianapolis 500, adding, “Hal was a person of strength and great character, acting as the words of wisdom for many of us younger ones.” Son-in-law Thomas DeGroot said Mr. Hey was more than a father-in-law. He was a mentor, a fountain of wisdom and advice, his philosopher and seer. “Most of all he was my friend,” he said. Trinny Parker of Rockville, Va., was a friend of Mr. Hey for over 45 years. “During that time, we’ve shared many happy occasions, a few surprises

and some sad ones,” he said. “Hal was an example of how to do things right — a devoted husband, father, grandfather and friend.” Long-time friend Troy Stark said he only hoped he could live his life as loving and respectful as Hal did. Ernest Gee was stationed with Mr. Hey at a missile base in Kitzingen, Germany when Mr. Hey served in the U.S. Army from 1957-1960. He said their service time together went a little faster because of their friendship, adding, “We shared a lot of good times together.” Mr. Hey served in the U.S. Army from 1957-1960. The word “family” is frequently mentioned when asking those who knew Mr. Hey for their thoughts about him. Reinhold and Betsy Mueller of Avilla often got together with the Heys to play cards, eat at restaurants and take leisurely drives along rural roads in Noble, DeKalb and Steuben counties. “Hal was a great family man,” said Betsy Mueller. “He supported his kids and grandkids in all their sports and activities. He was a great guy.” Grandson Blake Westergaard said he has great respect for his grandfather, who leaves behind a legacy of life lessons. “I will miss the mid-afternoon coffee and stories that lasted for hours when time didn’t matter, and all the life lessons like how to fish and drive just about anything,” he said. Daughter Kim DeGroot recalled how her parents enjoyed sharing in their grandchildren’s activities. She remembers one time they drove all night from South Carolina to watch her girls’ dance recital. “They showed up with flowers, hugs and kisses and watched

“Hal was an example of how to do things right — a devoted husband, father, grandfather and friend.”

would help the company focus attention on The New York Times brand. Times spokeswoman Eileen Murphy confirmed the planned sale of the Globe and other media properties to Henry. The Times said the all-cash sale, expected to close in 30 to 60 days, includes BostonGlobe.com, Boston.com, The Worcester Telegram & Gazette, Telegram.com, the direct mail marketing company Globe Direct and the company’s 49 percent interest in Metro Boston, a free daily newspaper for commuters. Henry cited the “essential role that its journalists and employees play in Boston, throughout New England, and beyond.” “The Boston Globe’s award-winning journalism as well as its rich history

The Food and Drug Administration plans to set marketing and product regulations for electronic cigarettes in the near future. But for now, almost anything goes. “Right now it’s the wild, wild west,” Mitch Zeller, director of the FDA’s Center for Tobacco Products, said in a recent interview with The Associated Press. Electronic cigarettes are battery-powered devices made of plastic or metal that heat a liquid nicotine solution, creating vapor that users inhale.

Trinny Parker Friend of Hal Hey

• for the five minutes the girls were on stage,” she said. Hal and Connie were there for every game when their four grandchildren played T-ball, rag ball and baseball. “Family was their life.” Granddaughter MacKenna Degroot wrote this poem about her grandfather: “Always a story, Always a smile, Too much laughter in a short little while. Never give up, Never sit down, Those that love you are always around. Learn how to love, Learn how to have fun, You never know when your time will come. Work hard for your money, Work hard for your friends, That’s when your life truly begins. Listen to your heart but, Listen to your head, Those will guide you through the end.” Hal and Connie Hey were married May 17, 1958. She survives in Avilla. He was an engineer at WKJG in Fort Wayne from 1955 to 1998, and he and his family have owned Hey’s Tap in Avilla since 1974. Surviving, in addition to his wife, are: two daughters and sons-in-law, Kimberley and Thomas DeGroot of Avilla and Tom and Laura Westergaard of Avilla; and four grandchildren.

and tradition of excellence have established it as one of the most well respected media companies in the country,” Henry said in a statement. Henry, who also owns the English Premier League soccer club Liverpool F.C., said he would reveal details about his plans for the Globe in the next few days. Globe editor Brian McGrory said the newspaper’s Red Sox coverage and its editorial decisions won’t be affected by the sale. “We have no plans whatsoever to change our Red Sox coverage specifically, or our sports coverage in general, nor will we be asked,” McGrory told the newspaper. “The Globe’s sports reporting and commentary is the gold standard in the industry.”

Users get their nicotine without the thousands of chemicals, tar or odor of regular cigarettes. And they get to hold something shaped like a cigarette, while puffing and exhaling something that looks like smoke. So far, there’s not much scientific evidence showing e-cigarettes help smokers quit or smoke less, and it’s unclear how safe they are. But the marketing tactics are raising worries that the devices’ makers could tempt young people to take up something that could prove addictive.

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Red Sox owner enters deal to buy Boston Globe BOSTON (AP) — Businessman John Henry, the principal owner of the Boston Red Sox, has entered into an agreement to buy The Boston Globe for $70 million, a massive drop from its record $1.1 billion price two decades ago. The impending purchase from The New York Times Co. marks Henry’s “first foray into the financially unsettled world of the news media,” the Globe said Saturday. The deal will give Henry the 141-yearold newspaper, its websites and affiliated companies, it said. The Times announced in February it was putting the Globe and related assets up for sale four years after calling off a previous attempt to sell it. The company’s CEO said at the time selling the Globe

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A6

THE STAR

AREA • NATION •

kpcnews.com

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

CHINA: Group meets pen pals in Taizhou for exchange of gifts FROM PAGE A1

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

A group from DeKalb Central schools met with students and faculty at DeKalb Middle School’s sister school in Taizhou during a nine-day trip to China this summer. Other highlights of the trip included visits to

Beijing, Shanghai, Hangzhou and Xian. The group saw The Great Wall, the Terra Cotta Warriors, Tiananmen Square and The Forbidden City.

the school in Taizhou. During a reception at Taizhou, DeKalb students had the chance to meet their Chinese pen pals and participate in a gift exchange. They toured the school and saw classes in session. Chinese students also entertained their U.S. visitors with a talent show. Other highlights of the trip included visits to Beijing, Shanghai, Hangzhou and Xian. The group saw The Great Wall, the Terra Cotta Warriors, Tiananmen Square and The Forbidden City. “I think they really enjoyed it,” Eltzroth said of the DeKalb students. “I think some of them were a little

bit timid at first, but really had a good time with it. I hope that they see it as a trip of a lifetime and appreciate other cultures. I hope everyone enjoyed being immersed in a different culture and also came to appreciate our American culture even more.” Eltzroth said the goal is to continue to develop teacher and student exchanges between the schools. In 2014, a group of Chinese students and teachers will visit DeKalb County. Eltzroth also hopes to lead another group to China in 2015. Anyone interested may contact Eltzroth by email at beltzroth@dekalbcentral. net.

RECORD: Officials report slow start to filings FROM PAGE A1

With the exception of the more serious crimes, as long as the paperwork is filed properly with the court, expungement cases are to be carried out without the discretion of a judge. The law makes the expungement opportunity a once-in-a-lifetime offering, according to a memo sent to all court administrators from the state’s Division of State Court Administration. “It is not open season,” Wheat said. Officials throughout northeastern Indiana have reported the same slow start to filings. Attorneys and judges say the reasons behind the slow initial

period include a lack of publicity for the new law and the complexity of the legislation. “I don’t think the public yet is generally aware of it,” said Jeff Wible, LaGrange County’s prosecuting attorney. “It’s going to take a while to get used to it.” “It is not an easy read by any stretch of the imagination,” Wheat said. There has been some interest. “I’ve talked to a few people about expungement,” Auburn attorney Adam Squiller said. “People have wanted to have old convictions expunged.” “A number of clients have contacted me,”

What is expungement? The Indiana General Assembly passed a law that took effect July 1 allowing certain criminal records to be cleared from court records (expunged) involving these circumstances. 1. an arrest that did not lead to a conviction or juvenile adjudication (one-year waiting period) 2. a conviction for a misdemeanor or

Kendallville-based attorney Tony Kraus said. Kraus said he expected the volume of interest to go up once people become more aware. “It’s so new and untested,” Kraus said. Because of the complexity of the new law, Wheat recommended people contact an attorney and not try to wade through the legislation on their own. Noble County’s chief public defender, Jim Abbs, said he does not anticipate public defenders being heavy involved in these types of cases since laws only require their services be provided when a person’s incarceration is

a Class D felony that has been reduced to a misdemeanor (five-year waiting period) 3. a conviction for a Class D felony, with some exceptions (eight-year waiting period) 4. a more serious felony, with some exceptions (10-year waiting period) Source: Memo sent to all court administrators by the Division of State Court Administration.

EMPLOYMENT: Offers opportunity to clear record FROM PAGE A1

is to make more people employable,” said Auburn attorney Adam Squiller. “It’s good news for the work force and it’s good for us” as a community. “I’m in favor of people working. I’ve had clients … haunted by a previous conviction.” The criteria for petitioning a court to have a record expunged includes a waiting period that varies, depending on the severity of the crime, between 5 and 10 years since the conviction. In the interim, the person can have no other criminal convictions. Someone who has turned his or her life around now can have a second chance, and that includes when applying for work. “The job market is just so competitive,” Steuben County Circuit Court Judge Allen Wheat said. “I do

think it is good legislation.” “It gives them the opportunity to clear their record,” said Kendallville-based attorney Tony Kraus. “These people have paid their debt. “None of us would like to be judged on our worst hours,” he said. “I think they should be given an opportunity to regain that trust. We allow it in our personal lives.” With some convictions ineligible for expungement, such as sex offenses that require sex-offender registration, Squiller said the law does a good job of protecting society and giving people who have made mistakes a new start. He also pointed out that a person can petition for expungement only once in his or her lifetime. “Once you’ve had your bite of the apple, you don’t

get another one — ever,” he said. Noble County Prosecuting Attorney Steve Clouse is taking a wait-and-see approach to the newly enacted legislation. “The concept of giving those who have been rehabilitated a chance to escape from their past criminal conviction is noble indeed,” Clouse said. “However, there are instances when employers, licensing agencies and others may have a legitimate interest in knowing the truth. “I will be anxious to see how the new law balances the need to provide those who have earned it a true second chance versus society’s legitimate need to know of a person’s past,” Clouse said.

JOBS: Schools hired more than 10,000 teachers FROM PAGE A1

That’s one reason Americans’ pay hasn’t kept up with even historically low inflation since the Great Recession ended in June 2009. Average hourly pay fell 2 cents in July to $23.98 an hour. Among those feeling the squeeze is Elizabeth Wilkinson, 28, of Houston. After losing a $39,000-ayear administrative job at Rice University in January, Wilkinson found work at an employment agency for $15 an hour. Yet she’s had to supplement that job with part-time work as a waitress. “This morning I put $1.35 worth of gas in my car because that is all the money that I had,” Wilkinson said via email. “It’s very difficult to survive on $30,000 (a year), and I am living paycheck to paycheck.” Part-time work has made up 77 percent of the job growth so far this year.

The government defines part-time work as being less than 35 hours a week. Analysts say some employers are offering part-time over full-time work to sidestep the new health care law’s rule that they provide medical coverage for permanent workers. (The Obama administration has delayed that provision for a year.) Weak economies overseas have also reduced demand for U.S. goods and, as a result, for better-paying U.S. jobs in manufacturing. Government spending cuts have taken a toll on some middle-class jobs, too. Many employers have also discovered that they can use technology to do tasks more cheaply and efficiently than office workers used to do. And some have found that they can shift middle-class jobs to low-wage countries such as China. By contrast, most

lower-paying jobs — from waiters and hotel maids to store clerks, bartenders and home health care aides — can’t be automated or shipped abroad. “You’re always going to have jobs in the retail sector,” says Michael Evangelist, a policy analyst with the liberal National Employment Law Project, which advocates on behalf of low-wage workers. Consider Mike Ulrich, 30, who earned a master’s degree in public administration in May from the University of Colorado. Ulrich hasn’t been able to find work that requires a college degree. Instead, he works at a hardware store in Spokane, Wash., earning the state’s minimum wage: $9.19 an hour. Not all July’s new jobs were low-paying. Local schools hired more than 10,000 teachers and other employees. Financial firms added 15,000.

AP

A doe and two fawns look up from their grazing in a field in Hastings-on-Hudson, N.Y. The village plans to inject does with a contraceptive to reduce the deer population.

NY village using birth control to trim deer herd HASTINGS-ONHUDSON, N.Y. (AP) — This suburban village overlooking the Hudson River is a mere 2 square miles, home to a hip downtown, neighborhoods of neatly kept homes and an ever-growing population of deer that overrun woods, chew through gardens and cause more than a dozen car crashes a year. Grasping for a way to control the deer without hunting the animals, leaders of this village of 7,900 have proposed an ambitious compromise to shoot them up — not with bullets but with birth control. Scientists and humane groups hope the program, which seeks to capture and inject female white-tailed deer with a contraceptive made from pigs’ ovaries, can become a model for other places that are too congested or compassionate to consider killing. “We’re hearing all about ‘Don’t kill Bambi’ and all the jokes about deer condoms,” Mayor Peter Swiderski said. “People are having their little chuckles. But deer have a pretty big negative effect on the community.” Under the plan, which will begin this winter if approved by the state Department of Environmental Conservation, as many as 90 percent of the does in Hastings will be tranquilized, inoculated with the contraceptive, then tagged and released. The deer population is estimated at up to 120, a density of 60 per square mile. That’s three times the deer density that some studies have tied to a decline in plant and animal species. The goal is a 35 to 40 percent reduction in five years. Stephanie Boyles Griffin, a senior director at the Humane Society of the United States, said, “There are thousands of communities in the U.S. that are looking for alternative ways to manage the deer populations.” If successful, she said, “Hastings would

be the first open suburb in the U.S. to manage deer exclusively through the use of immunocontraception.” Swiderski said he had heard about such experiments and approached expert Allen Rutberg, director of the Center for Animals and Public Policy at Tufts University. Rutberg went for a walk in Hastings, saw plenty of deer and deer damage, and figured the village would make an interesting experiment. “For me the idea is to intervene in the lives of the deer as little as possible, to allow them to mingle with us but not to the level where they become a nuisance,” Rutberg said. “If we can avoid killing things that live in our neighborhoods, then I think we should.” The protein, called zona pellucida, is obtained from pork industry slaughterhouses. It creates antibodies in deer — and elephants and horses — that prevent fertilization. The mayor said dozens of residents have volunteered to monitor deer numbers and travel patterns and measure landscape damage. Among them is Nancy Balaban, 85, who said she’s had to give up gardening in her yard because “the deer just ate everything down to the ground. Hostas, tulips, even holly bushes.” She especially laments the damage to Hastings’ “beautiful treasure,” its village forest, where hardly anything green can be seen from the ground to 6 or 7 feet up the tree trunks. “All the saplings are eaten,” Balaban said. “It’s going to end up being a desert.” Rutberg said the forest damage also affects “the critters that live in the vegetation: ground-nesting birds, small rodents, amphibians.” Some neighbors have erected tall wrought-iron fencing, coupled with netting, to keep the beasts out of their gardens.

Balaban said that’s too expensive. She limits her puttering now to a few pots of flowering begonias and bacopa on a secondfloor balcony. “The deer haven’t learned to fly yet,” she said. The mayor said he suspects most Hastings residents would support a killing program, but opponents could delay or sabotage it. “I’m picturing kids on TV with signs that say ‘Don’t shoot the deer,’” he said. The Humane Society and In Defense of Animals are helping to pay for the experiment, which will probably cost at least $30,000 for the first two years. Although the does have to be treated every two or three years, they don’t have to be captured again once they’re tagged and that will keep labor costs down. Subsequent doses can be delivered by dart, Rutberg said. The Humane Society supports the program because “our major focus is to encourage people to tolerate wild animals and coexist with them,” Griffin said. Barbara Stagno of In Defense of Animals said, “There’s a lot of killing of wildlife under the guise of not being able to cohabit. It happens with geese, it happens with deer. Killing rarely is the answer.” Rutberg has run similar experiments on Fripp Island, S.C., and on the enclosed grounds of the National Institute of Standards and Technology in Gaithersburg, Md. Because Hastings is neither an island nor fenced in, there’s a risk of deer from elsewhere moving in and affecting the numbers. But Rutberg said that makes it more of a real-world experiment. He added, however, that deer tend to stay within a quarter-mile of where they’re born. “They obviously like it here,” he said. “They’re native, they belong in our forests. But maybe not at 60 per square mile.”


AREA • NATION •

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

Briefs • US envoy conducts talks with rival sides CAIRO (AP) — Egypt’s Interior Ministry warned supporters of ousted President Mohammed Morsi on Saturday for a second time to abandon their protest camps as a senior U.S. diplomat met with officials on both sides of the country’s political divide. U.S. Deputy Secretary of State William Burns extended his visit to Cairo by one day so he could meet military leader Gen. Abdel-Fatah el-Sissi and the country’s prime minister on Sunday, an Egyptian Foreign Ministry official said. A member of the pro-Morsi delegation that met Saturday with Burns said the four delegates also would meet again with the U.S. diplomat on Sunday for more talks. At the core of talks is the political future of the Muslim Brotherhood and its Islamist allies following the July 3 coup that ousted Morsi, the country’s first freely elected president. The military coup followed several days of mass protests by millions of Egyptians.

kpcnews.com

U.S. overrules Apple import ban BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

President Obama’s trade representative on Saturday vetoed a ban on imports of some Apple iPads and older iPhones, dealing a setback to rival South Korean electronics company Samsung. U.S. Trade Representative Michael Froman overruled a June decision by the U.S. International Trade Commission, which had banned imports of the iPhone 4 and some variations of the iPad 2. The commission ruled that the Chinese-made Apple devices violated a patent held by Samsung and couldn’t be imported. The ban never went into effect, though, because the Obama administration had 60 days to decide if it would

uphold the commission. Obama is against import bans on the basis of the type of patent at issue in the Samsung case. The White House has recommended that Congress limit the ITC’s ability to impose import bans in these cases. Samsung and Apple are in a global legal battle over smartphones. Apple argues Samsung’s Android phones copy vital iPhone features. Samsung is fighting back with its own complaints. In an email, Apple spokeswoman Kristin Huguet said the company applauded the administration “for standing up for innovation.” A message seeking comment from Samsung was not returned. Froman wrote in a letter to the

commission that he has concerns about patent holders getting too much leverage over competitors that use their technology under licenses. Companies license patented technology to competitors so the devices can communicate as part of an industry standard for cellphones. Under the “standards-essential patent” legal theory prevailing in federal courts, holders of such patents are obligated to license them to all comers on “fair, reasonable and non-discriminatory” terms. U.S. courts have ruled that such patents cannot be the basis for import bans. The International Trade Commission follows a different standard than the courts, but the Obama administration wants

Attack on consulate kills nine Afghans KABUL, Afghanistan (AP) — Three suicide bombers tried to attack the Indian consulate in an eastern Afghan city on Saturday, sparking a shootout with guards on a bustling downtown street that left at least nine civilians dead, official said. The attack, which ended when the militants detonated a car bomb that left charred debris scattered in central Jalalabad near the Pakistan border, did not appear to damage the consulate itself, and Indian officials said all of the facility’s staff escaped unharmed.

People • Pacino movie films in middle of concert LOS ANGELES (AP) — An Al Pacino movie broke out in the middle of a concert by the band Chicago, with thousands of fans serving as extras. Cameras were wheeled onstage during intermission of the group’s show at the Greek Theatre on Friday night to film a scene from Pacino’s upcoming movie “Imagine,” in which he plays aging rock star Danny Collins. With coaching from the director, the crowd chanted the name of Pacino’s character as the 73-yearold actor walked on stage to sing “Hey Baby Doll” in a black suit. The movie co-stars Michael Caine, Annette Bening and Jennifer Garner. “This is an improvisation,” Pacino told the crowd. “You just came in and got it. That’s not easy.” Chicago’s band members remained on stage to watch and clap along during the 25-minute filming. After a few takes, the crowd grew restless and there was scattered booing for the real musicians to resume playing.

it to adhere to the same principles. Froman wrote that he shares the Obama administration’s concerns that the holders of standards-essential patents could get “undue leverage” over their competitors. Last year, a federal court ruled that Samsung owed Apple $1 billion in damages for infringing on non-essential Apple patents. But the judge refused to impose an import ban on Samsung phones and later struck $450 million from the verdict, saying the jurors miscalculated. The case is set for appeals court. Samsung is the world’s largest maker of smartphones. Analysts estimate it outsold Apple nearly 2 to 1 in the first three months of the year.

Mugabe winner in disputed vote

Al-Qaida chief says Egypt coup shows democracy corrupt CAIRO (AP) — Al-Qaida’s leader said the military coup that ousted Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi provides proof that Islamic rule cannot be established through democracy and urged the Islamist leader’s followers to abandon the ballot box in favor of armed resistance. In a 15-minute audio message posted online late Friday, Ayman al-Zawahri also lashed out at the Egyptian military, the country’s secular and liberal elites as well as the Coptic Christian minority, accusing them of conspiring against Morsi solely because he was an Islamist.

A7

AP

Dying boy is wedding’s best man Christine Swidorsky carries her son and the couple’s best man, Logan Stevenson, 2, down the aisle to her husband-to-be Sean Stevenson, during their wedding ceremony Saturday, in Jeannette, Pa. The boy has leukemia and other complications.

The Stevensons moved up their wedding date after learning from doctors late last month that their son had two to three weeks to live. The couple wanted Logan to see them marry and to be part of family photos.

Fort Hood shooter’s trial starts Tuesday DALLAS (AP) — Hundreds of unarmed soldiers, some about to deploy to Afghanistan, were waiting inside a building for vaccines and routine checkups when a fellow soldier walked in with two handguns and enough ammunition to commit one of the worst mass shootings in American history. Maj. Nidal Malik Hasan doesn’t deny that he carried out the November 2009 attack at Fort Hood, Texas, which left 13 people dead and more than 30 others wounded. There are dozens of witnesses who saw it happen. Military law prohibits him from entering a guilty plea because authorities are seeking the death penalty. But if he is convicted and sentenced to death in a trial that starts Tuesday, there are likely

years, if not decades, of appeals ahead. He may never make it to the death chamber at all. While the Hasan case is unusually complex, experts also say the military justice system is unaccustomed to dealing with death penalty cases and has struggled to avoid overturned sentences. Eleven of the 16 death sentences handed down by military juries in the last 30 years have been overturned, according to an academic study and court records. No active-duty soldier has been executed since 1961. A reversed verdict or sentence on appeal in the Hasan case would be a fiasco for prosecutors and the Army. That’s one reason why prosecutors and the military judge have been deliberate leading up to trial.

Berlusconi’s aides seek executive pardon ROME (AP) — A Silvio Berlusconi loyalist warned on Saturday of a possible “civil war” if the ex-premier’s punishment for tax-fraud conviction is not lifted, as his aides maneuvered to win a presidential pardon so he can avoid a prison term and a ban on holding public office. Berlusconi stalwarts also urged the 10 million Italians who voted for the conservative leader in this year’s election to fill the streets of Rome on Sunday. Italy’s highest court on Thursday upheld Berlusconi’s four-year prison sentence, the first time that the media mogul was definitely convicted and sentenced in two decades of trials and other criminal probes. A law to reduce prison overcrowding slashes

his sentence to one year and since he is over 70, he can choose house confinement or perform social services instead of going to prison. Berlusconi insists he is a victim of prosecutors and judges who he says have leftist sympathies. “In this country, democracy has been mutilated” by the high court’s decision, Daniela Santanche, one of Berlusconi’s closest associates, told Sky TG24 TV. His political associates and party officials pressed their “save Silvio” strategy on several fronts after huddling with him on Friday evening. Berlusconi, in a recorded video message a few hours after Italy’s supreme court upheld the conviction, had sounded shaken but defiant, vowing to galvanize his party’s base.

HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — Zimbabwe’s electoral panel on Saturday declared that longtime President Robert Mugabe had won re-election by a landslide, a result that could exacerbate tensions in the country, where the 89-year-old’s chief rival and former coalition partner has accused him of poll-rigging. Mugabe seemed set to strengthen his hold over Zimbabwe after the state Election Commission said his party won 158 of the 210 parliament seats. That gives it a two-thirds majority in the legislature — enabling it to amend a recently approved constitution that provides for democratic reforms. Challenger Morgan Tsvangirai’s party, which had gambled that a high turnout in its favor would overcome any alleged fraud in the vote, captured 50 seats and two went to independent candidates.

According to the results, Mugabe won 61 percent of the vote, compared to 33 percent for Tsvangirai, who had been prime minister in a tense power-sharing deal with the president. Officially, Mugabe, who has been in power for 33 years, gets another five-year term in office. Tsvangirai rejected the results as fraudulent and called for fresh elections. He urged a peaceful response to the alleged massive rigging by Mugabe’s ZANU-PF party, which has the muscle of the security forces to deter any groundswell of street protests. In contrast to an election marked by deadly attacks in 2008, the vote on Wednesday was mostly peaceful and African poll monitors, while expressing some concern about reported irregularities, seemed mostly relieved that it was not violent.


A8

kpcnews.com

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

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Scores •

NATIONAL LEAGUE L.A. DODGERS.........................3 CHICAGO CUBS ....................0 CINCINNATI ...............................8 ST. LOUIS ....................................3 PITTSBURGH...........................5 COLORADO ...............................2 ATLANTA .......................................5 PHILADELPHIA .......................4 WASHINGTON .........................3 MILWAUKEE ..............................0 INTERLEAGUE CLEVELAND...............................4 MIAMI .............................................3 BOSTON.......................................5 ARIZONA......................................2 KANSAS CITY...........................4 N.Y. METS ....................................3 TAMPA BAY.................................2 SAN FRANCISCO ..................1 AMERICAN LEAGUE DETROIT.......................................3 CHICAGO WHITE SOX.......0 SEATTLE.......................................8 BALTIMORE ...............................4 OAKLAND....................................4 TEXAS............................................2

Briefly •

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On The Air • BAS E BALL Arizona vs. Boston, TB S, 1:3 0 p.m. L.A. Dodgers vs. Chic ago Cubs, WG N, 2 p.m. Atlant a vs. Philadelphia, E S P N, 8 p.m. MOTOR S P ORTS Sprint Cup GoBowling.com 4 00, E S P N, 1 p.m. IndyCar Indy 200 at Mid- Ohio, N BCS N, 3 p.m. N H RA Northwest Nationals, E S P N2, 7 p.m. N F L P R E S EASON Hall of Fame Game, Dallas vs. Miami, N BC, 8 p.m. GOLF Women’s British Open, E S P N2, 1 0 a.m. P GA Bridgestone Invit ational, CB S, 2 p.m. TE N N I S ATP Citi Open, E S P N2, 3 p.m. W TA Southern California Open, E S P N2, 5 p.m.

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Tiger keeps control with 68 AKRON, Ohio (AP) — With an elite field chasing the lead, Tiger Woods decided to play keep-away. Already up by a staggering seven shots through 36 holes thanks to a career-tying best of 61 in the second round, Woods shot a solid 2-under 68 on Saturday in the Bridgestone Invitational to maintain that same seven-stroke lead. It was as if he was turning around and daring the world’s best players to come after him. No one really could. “You know, today was a day that I didn’t quite have it,” said Woods, who was at 15-under 195. “But I scored. And that’s the name of the game, posting a number, and I did today. I grinded my way around that golf course.” Now he’s only 18 holes away from making even more history in a career of historic accomplishments. He’ll be competing against the record book as much as the elite field. “It’s kind of tough to pick up seven or eight shots on Tiger around here,” said Henrik Stenson, a distant second after a 67. “It would take something spectacular on my behalf or any of the other guys around me, and obviously a very, very poor round for him.” Woods, by the way, is 41-2 when leading after 54 holes in a PGA Tour event. A victory would be his eighth at Firestone Country Club and in the Bridgestone and its forerunner, the NEC Invitational. That would match the tour-record eight he already has at Bay Hill and the

AP

Tiger Woods hits from the sand to the seventh green during the third round of the Bridgestone

eight wins Sam Snead had at the Greater Greensboro Open. Woods also could capture his 79th victory on the PGA Tour, drawing him within three of Snead’s record of 82.

Invitational Saturday at Akron, Ohio. (AP Photo/ Mark Duncan)

“I’ll just go out there and execute my game plan,” he said. “It all starts with what the weather is doing, and then I build it from there. We’ll see what I do tomorrow.”

Kesolowski wins Nationwide race NEWTON, Iowa (AP) — Brad Keselowski had to overcome a 1,000-mile flight, a pit row violation and an overheating engine just to earn a shot at the lead. Once Keselowski got his chance, it became perfectly clear who the only Sprint Cup regular in the field was. Keselowski took control with 35 laps left to win the NASCAR Nationwide race at Iowa Speedway on Saturday night. The defending Sprint Cup champion has won in his last three Nationwide starts, also topping the field at Richmond in April and Kentucky in June. Keselowski flew in Saturday afternoon from Pocono Raceway in Pennsylvania, where NASCAR’s top series will race on Sunday. Keselowski was then sent to the back after a tire flew outside the box on an early pit stop, and engine issues threatened to derail him about halfway through the race. Keselowski persevered though, emerging with his second win in four tries on Iowa’s .875-mile oval.

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Unlike in a second-round 61 that could easily have been a 59 or even lower, Woods didn’t recover from all of his errant shots. He bogeyed the ninth, 14th and 16th

SEE GOLF, PAGE B2

Scherzer wins 16th

AP

Detroit second baseman Ramon Santiago jumps over White Sox runner Alejandro De

Aza as De Aza steals second during the third inning Saturday.

DETROIT (AP) — Max Scherzer took a shutout into the eighth inning before being pulled, and the Detroit right-hander became baseball’s first 16-game winner when the Tigers held on for a 3-0 victory over the punchless Chicago White Sox on Saturday night. The White Sox have lost nine straight. The Tigers have won 11 of 12, despite playing most of that stretch without slugger Miguel Cabrera. Cabrera has been bothered by hip and abdominal problems and sat out Saturday. Scherzer (16-1) allowed three hits in 7 2-3 innings. Jose Veras got the third out of the eighth, and Joaquin Benoit finished for his 12th save in 12 chances. John Danks (2-9) allowed six hits in seven innings, including solo homers by Torii Hunter, Jhonny Peralta and Jose Iglesias. Scherzer is the first pitcher to win at least 16 of his first 17 decisions since Roger Clemens started 16-1 in 2001, according to STATS. SEE TIGERS, PAGE B2

Football Hall welcomes new class CANTON, Ohio (AP) — Forcefully and emotionally, Cris Carter summed up the 50th induction ceremony for the Pro Football Hall of Fame on Saturday night. The seventh and final inductee from the Class of 2013, Carter honored dozens of people in his life who were “going into the Hall of Fame with me tonight,” as he followed Jonathan Ogden, Dave Robinson, Larry Allen, Bill Parcells, Curley Culp and Warren Sapp in being inducted. More than 120 hall members, a record, and a crowd of 11,500 was on hand at Fawcett Stadium for the golden anniversary celebration of the shrine. “I appreciate the process you have to go through to get to be a Hall of Famer,” Carter said. “To be able to join these men on this stage in football heaven is the greatest day of my life.” Carter needed six tries to make the hall even though he retired as the No. 2 career receiver behind Jerry Rice. He choked back tears as he made his speech after being presented by his son, Duron, and he spoke of his problems with alcohol while playing three years for the Eagles before being released. He hooked on immediately with the Vikings and hooked onto

of the NFL’s most successful coaches. The master of the franchise turnaround as the only coach to take four teams to the playoffs, Parcells won Super Bowls with the New York Giants in the 1986 and 1990 seasons. “Every organization I worked for supported me to the fullest,” Parcells said. “Without that, you’ve got no shot.” Parcells was Coach of the Year honors in 1986 and 1994. He asked to have his bust placed somewhere near Lawrence Taylor in the hall “so I can keep an eye on that sucker.” As relaxed as if he had no one to block, Ogden became the first Baltimore Raven enshrined. The first player drafted by the Ravens after the franchise moved from Cleveland in 1996 and was renamed, Ogden was presented by the man who made that selection, fellow Hall of Famer AP Ozzie Newsome, now Baltimore’s Hall of Fame inductee Dave Robinson poses with his bust during general manager. A former college shot putter at the ceremonies Saturday night. UCLA, the 6-foot-9, 345-pound Parcells also seemingly spoke Ogden starred at tackle for a dozen nearly everything throw his way: for everyone in the Hall of Fame, seasons in Baltimore, winning the Carter finished his 16-season and all the people gathered 2000 NFL championship. career with 1,101 catches for “He is part of the foundation of 13,899 yards and 130 touchdowns. Saturday night. “There’s a kinship created that this franchise, part of the reason “This game gave me identity, gave me a sense of purpose,” he lasts for the rest of your life,” he we have two Super Bowl champiSEE HALL, PAGE B2 said. said about his experience as one


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GOLF: Woods will likely be favorite at PGA next weekend

Peppers not acting his age

FROM PAGE B1

CHICAGO (AP) — While Julius Peppers owns the title of oldest Chicago defender, the seven-time Pro Bowl defensive end spends little time dwelling on how many more years he has left in the NFL. “I feel like I’m 25,” the 33-year-old Peppers said. “Age is just a number that people put on players. It’s really in your heart and your mind how you feel. I think it’s been showing.” Coming off his highest sack total (11.5) since 2008, Peppers plays on a line younger through attrition after the departure of Brian Urlacher (retirement) and Israel Idonije (to Detroit). Four starters are 30 or older, but Peppers doubts the defense will show it. “That’s the thing in this league,” Peppers said. “When you reach 30, that’s the number that everybody wants to put on you and say you’re getting old. But these guys come out and work hard. “We all know what we’re doing. I think we’ve got the right mix of older guys and younger guys. I don’t think it’s a problem as far as age on this team.” If Peppers feels like he’s 25, teammates see someone even younger. “A guy that’s 24,” said defensive tackle Henry Melton. “He looks good. He’s moving well. He hasn’t lost a step.” The Bears defense has been bothered by injuries in training camp. Peppers enter his 12th season healthy after

holes, failing to bounce back from wayward shots. Yet he still was good enough to put himself in position for yet another lopsided victory, one that will likely mark him as the player to beat next week in the PGA Championship at Oak Hill. “Any time you can go into a major tournament or any tournament with a win under your belt, it’s nice,” Woods said. “It validates what you’re working on and you have some nice momentum going in there.” Of course, Woods has failed to win his last 17 major championships. No longer is it a lock that, with 14, he’ll surpass the mark of 18 by Jack Nicklaus. Woods began the third round with a seven-shot lead after rounds of 66 and the career-best 61 — the fourth time he has gone that low, also matching the tournament record originally set by Jose Maria Olazabal in 1990. Jason Dufner was third, eight strokes back after a 67, and Luke Donald (68), Bill Haas (69) and Chris Wood (70) followed at 6 under. Dufner said Firestone isn’t all that unique because it is just one of a number of places where Woods dominates. “Yeah, he has a pretty good track record here,” he said. “There’s quite a few events out here that he does really well. Torrey Pines comes to mind, Bay Hill comes to mind, the Memorial. So he obviously feels comfortable on those courses, and it’s our job to try and chase him down if we can.” Defending champ Keegan Bradley, with a 71, was another shot back along with Miguel Angel Jimenez, who put up a 65. Rounding out the top 10 were 2011 Bridgestone winner and reigning Masters champ Adam Scott and Zach Johnson. Woods has overwhelmed everyone in a glittering field that includes 48 of the top 50 players in the world ranking. Much like he did a day earlier, Woods started out fast. He birdied the first two holes (he had also eagled No. 2 in the second round).

AP

Cardinals runner Jon Jay, right, is safe at home as the ball gets away from Cincin-

nati catcher Devin Mesoraco in the first inning Saturday.

Reds come back strong CINCINNATI (AP) — Devin Mesoraco drove in three runs with a pair of homers, and the Cincinnati Reds finally broke out against a St. Louis team that has held them down all season, beating the Cardinals 8-3 on Saturday night to even their series. The Reds won for only the fourth time in 11 games between the NL Central rivals. Cincinnati had scored fewer than four runs in each of their last nine games head-to-head. Left-handed Tony Cingrani (5-1) and four relievers contained an

offense that had scored 26 runs in the last two games, allowing four hits. Jake Westbrook (7-6) gave up five runs — all with two outs — in five innings. Jack Hannahan singled with the bases loaded in the first inning. Mesoraco’s homer in the fourth made it 4-1. The catcher hit a solo shot in the eight off Michael Blazek for the first multihomer game of his career. Shin-Soo Choo followed with a two-run homer off Blazek. The Cardinals ended a seven-game losing streak by beating the Pirates 13-0

TIGERS: Hunter, Peralta blast early home runs FROM PAGE B1

Scherzer walked three and struck out six — he’s now a strikeout short of 1,000 for his career. Scherzer has been the beneficiary of a lot of run support this year, but he didn’t need much against the White Sox. Hunter opened the scoring with a homer to left in the first. Peralta — who faces a possible suspension from Major League Baseball’s drug investigation — made it 2-0 with a drive to the bushes beyond

the center-field wall in the second. Iglesias, acquired just before the trade deadline — partly as insurance against a possible suspension to Peralta — added a homer of his own in the fourth. This was the second game with the Tigers for Iglesias. He hit one homer in 63 games for Boston this season. The White Sox, meanwhile, got another sold start that they failed to take advantage of. The Chicago

HALL: Ogden made shrine in first year eligible FROM PAGE B1

onships,” Newsome said. Ogden, who was given a 2013 Super Bowl ring by the team, made the hall in his first year of eligibility. He was a six-time All-Pro, made the Pro Bowl 11 times and was the main blocker when Jamal Lewis rushed for 2,066 yards in 2003. “Talent isn’t enough,” Ogden said. “A lot of people have talent, they don’t always live up to it. For me it is about maximizing, striving for perfection.” Allen, who sniffled his way through his speech, was just as dominating a blocker as Ogden. He also was the NFL’s strongest man, once bench-pressing 700 pounds, saying “I did it naturally.” A lead blocker for Dallas as Emmitt Smith became the NFL’s career rushing leader, Allen made six All-Pro squads and 11 Pro Bowls in his 14 seasons, the final two with San Francisco. He won the Super Bowl in the 1995 season and was voted into the Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility, “I just knew I had to win every play,” he said. “That’s the reason I am here. I knew if I lost a play, I had 45 seconds to get even.”

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on Thursday, then came to Cincinnati and drubbed the Reds 13-3 on Friday night. It was the first time since 2003 that they scored 13 runs in back-to-back games. They got off to a fast start against Cingrani, making his first career appearance against the Cardinals. Jon Jay opened the game with a walk and came around on Carlos Beltran’s double. Cingrani bounced his next pitch, letting Beltran move to third, but that’s all the Cardinals would manage as the left-hander escaped the 30-pitch inning down only 1-0.

Sapp became only the second Tampa Bay Buccaneer enshrined, 18 years after Lee Roy Selmon made it. He was elected in his first year of eligibility following 13 seasons in which he went from instant starter after being selected 12th overall in the 1995 draft to Defensive Player of the Year in 1999. That season, he had 12 1/2 sacks as the Bucs won their first division title in 18 years. For his career, Sapp had 96 1/2 sacks, extremely high for a defensive tackle. “I sit here with the greatest among the great,” Sapp said, breaking into tears. “We’re here, baby.” Presented Saturday night by his 15-year-old daughter, Mercedes, Sapp made the NFL’s All-Decade squads for the 1990s and the 2000s. Sapp, who both Ogden and Allen said was as tough to handle as any player they faced, paid tribute to his roots in Plymouth, Fla. “That dirt road was something rough,” he said. “We sure turned it into something special.” Robinson became the 12th inductee from the vintage Packers coached by Vince Lombardi to be

enshrined. Robinson was a prototype outside linebacker who could rush the quarterback, cover tight ends or running backs on pass plays, and stop the run. He made the NFL’s All-Decade team of the 1960s and won three NFL titles, including the first two Super Bowls. “This is the biggest day of the 21st century for the Robinson family,” he said, adding that he “lives 25 miles from here but it took me 38 years to get here. “Now, I am immortalized.” As is Culp, one of the game’s most dominant defensive tackles for much of his 14 pro seasons, including the 1969 season when he helped Kansas City win the NFL title. A five-time Pro Bowler, Culp also played for Houston and Detroit, retiring in 1981, then waiting more than three decades to be enshrined Saturday as a senior nominee. “It gives me joy and inspiration that will last the rest of my life,” Culp said. “I am just overwhelmed by the struggles, joys and tears of those who made it here. I’m happy to join them in the Hall of Fame.”

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starters have a 2.72 ERA during this losing streak. Chicago pinch-hitter Jordan Danks hit a long flyball in the eighth that center fielder Austin Jackson caught at the wall in left-center. When Veras came in, Alexei Ramirez jack-knifed out of the way on his first pitch — only to have the breaking ball drop across the heart of the plate for a strike. The White Sox have scored two runs in their last three games.

playing through nagging injuries the last two seasons. He was bothered by a foot injury last year and a knee injury in 2011. When Peppers came to Chicago, a reputation for taking occasional downs off followed him, despite making big plays. That distinction disappeared long ago. He’s amassed a career sack total if 111.5, second only to Jared Allen among players who came into the league in 2002 or later. “He’s just a role model for the younger guys, for guys like me and for veterans who just go out there and see him working,” Melton said. “He doesn’t take a day off unless the coach makes him take a day off.” Some of the spring in his step comes from playing fewer downs last year than in his first two seasons with the Bears. With Corey Wootton and Shea McClellin also at defensive end, Peppers expects to be rested enough again this season. However, Wootton is sidelined with a hip injury and Turk McBride, brought in for depth at the position, is out for the season with a torn Achilles tendon. Rookie Jonathan Bostic is playing middle linebacker for injured D.J. Williams, who is bothered with a calf strain. “It’s going to be week to week and these things happen during training camp,” new Chicago coach Marc Trestman said.

Fever wins easily INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Tamika Catchings had 17 points and 10 rebounds to lead to lead the defending-champion Fever to a 79-58 win over the short-handed Chicago Sky on Saturday night. Karima Christmas scored 12 points, including two timely 3-pointers in the third quarter for the Fever (9-10). Catchings also had five steals and four blocked shots. “I thought we did a really good job as a team of just continuing to push forward no matter what,” Catchings

said. “Offensively we were able to go off of our defense. That’s the kind of defense that we need consistently.” Courtney Vandersloot had 11 points to lead the Sky (13-6), who were without leading-scorer Elena Delle Donne due to a concussion for the second straight game. Without their star rookie, Chicago struggled to generate enough offense to stay with the Fever. “Tough loss for us,” Vandersloot said. “They outhustled us.”

Dodgers shut down Cubs CHICAGO (AP) — Chris Capuano scattered six hits over 6 1-3 innings and the Los Angeles Dodgers set a team record with their 13th straight road win, 3-0 over the Chicago Cubs on Saturday. The Dodgers, who haven’t lost on the road since July 6 in San Francisco, eclipsed the 1924 mark set by the Brooklyn Robins. Carl Crawford broke open a 1-0 game by driving in two runs with a single in the sixth inning. Jerry Hairston Jr. singled in the first run in the third for NL West-leading Los Angeles, which is 13-2 since the All-Star break and has won 30 of its last 37 overall. Capuano (4-6) came up with his second straight strong start and third in his last four. He struck out five and walked only one before four Dodgers relievers closed it out. Kenley Jansen pitched a perfect ninth to earn his 16th save in 19 chances. Jeff Samardzija (6-10) allowed three runs over six innings in Chicago’s third straight loss. He gave up seven hits, five walks and hit a batter, but was able to get out of jams with nine strikeouts. Dodgers rookie Yasiel Puig had a pair of singles and scored a run. He has hit safely in 12 of his last 14 games, including seven multi-hit games during that span.

AP

Hanley Ramirez of the Dodgers, left, collides with Cubs shortstop Starlin Castro after Castro doubled him up at second base after catching a line drive Saturday.

Puig made a diving catch on Starlin Castro’s line drive into the gap with one out in seventh and a Chicago runner on second to preserve the shutout. He left the game after the inning. Brandon League relieved Capuano with one out in the seventh and runners on first and second but got out of the inning by getting Cody Ransom to ground into a double play. The Dodgers are in the middle of a stretch of 26 games in 27 days, and manager Don Mattingly gave his infield an alterna-

tive look by taking four-time All-Star first baseman Adrian Gonzales, hot-hitting second baseman Mark Ellis and third baseman Juan Uribe out of the starting lineup. Gonzalez is hitting .301 and leads the Dodgers with 105 games played, 120 hits, 15 homers and 66 RBIs. Scott Van Slyke filled his spot at first base, but Gonzales pinch-hit in the ninth. Ellis had extended his hitting streak to 13 games — he is 19 for 47 during that span — on Friday.


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Dad’s tip helps Pocono big for Gordon again Blaney to victory LONG POND, Pa. (AP) — Sitting in the truck, Ryan Blaney got some fatherly advice right before the green flag dropped. Choose the right line on restarts. With more than 570 NASCAR starts behind him, Dave Blaney sure knew what he was talking about. Ryan Blaney pulled away on the second attempt at a green-white-checkered finish to win the Truck Series race Saturday at Pocono Raceway. “It was pretty funny that we were talking about restarts before the race and that’s what it came down to,� Blaney said. Blaney had the truck to beat on both restarts to win his second career Truck race in 20 starts. He dipped low and took the lead off the first restart, then would not be denied a second time. “It was just a matter of being able to get close to make the move,� Blaney said. “Once the final restarts came, I really had to be aggressive.� The 19-year-old Blaney drove a Ford into Victory Lane in the Truck Series for the first time in four years. About the only one who missed out on the fun was team owner Brad Keselowski. Keselowski, the reigning Sprint Cup champion, was off to Iowa to drive in the Nationwide Series race. Blaney gave Keselowski a happy landing. Pole-sitter Miguel Paludo finished a career-best second and German Quiroga matched a career best with a third-place finish. Joey Coulter and Ross Chastain rounded out the top five. Series points leader Matt Crafton was eighth and now leads Jeb Burton by 52 points. “We had the fastest truck on the racetrack all day long,� Paludo said. “It’s a little frustrating to come second but I’ll take it.� The field was set by practice speeds after rain washed out qualifying on Saturday. A third-generation driver, Blaney now has more

AP

Ryan Blaney celebrates after winning the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series race Saturday.

NASCAR wins (2) than his dad. Dave Blaney is winless in 450 career Cup starts, three Truck starts and has one win (2006) in 121 Nationwide starts. “I’ve been really lucky to have my dad at both of my Truck wins,� Blaney said. “Not a lot of guys can say that. I’ve been fortunate enough to have him here and have him give me advice along the way.� Back on asphalt, Blaney made it another fun finish for the Truck Series. The series took a break last week to run at Eldora Speedway for NASCAR’s first dirt race in more than 40 years. Austin Dillon won in the muck in front of 20,000 fans in a race that returned NASCAR to its roots. The surface hardly mattered to Blaney for the scheduled 50-lap race. He needed four more before he could celebrate to win. James Buescher and Todd Bodine connected late on four-wide racing to bring out the caution and ensure a G-W-C finish. Ty Dillon and Johnny Sauter crashed to set up the second attempt of NASCAR’s version of overtime. On the final green, Blaney broke free for good to top Paludo by .270 seconds.

LONG POND, Pa. (AP) — Jeff Gordon made his last win at Pocono a family affair. It was a win to savor. His 86th career victory was the first time his wife and both of his two young children joined him in a Victory Lane celebration. But his Pocono run also thrust Gordon into wild-card contention for the Chase, and he finished 10th in the final standings. Fast forward a season. Gordon enters Pocono still looking for his first win of this season and hoping to hold on to his precarious 10th-place spot in the Chase for the Sprint Cup championship standings. And, he again can make it another win to remember. Once the dominant “Rainbow Warrior,� Gordon turns 42 on Sunday, long removed from the era when he was always the driver to beat at any track. But the birthday boy still knows how to drive — and he hasn’t forgotten how to win. What he’s still chasing is that elusive fifth Cup championship, 11 years after he celebrated his last one. It’s what drives him as he’s changed from the driver who shot NASCAR into the mainstream and made it must-see TV into the sport’s elder statesman. Gordon would love to make another championship push in the No. 24 — as long as he can stay in the field. “This year has been a strange year for us,� Gordon said. “I feel like last year we showed a little bit more speed up to this point and I felt like all we needed were some breaks to go our way, and a few slight changes to get ourselves in. This year, we just can’t seem to really get ahold of it.� He needs to figure it out, fast. Gordon holds the 10th and final locked-in spot in the 12-driver Chase field. Here’s where it gets tricky for the driver known as Four Time: He’s just one point ahead of Tony Stewart, five points ahead of Martin Truex Jr. and six points ahead of Brad Keselowski. The final two wild card spots in the Chase go to the drivers in 11th to 20th place

AP

Drivers Jeff Gordon, left, and Tony Stewart talk in the garage during

with the most wins. Should Gordon fall out of the top 10 and not win a race, he’ll be on the outside of the Chase. “Every year we have gone through this, it’s a different kind of stress level,� he said. “There are stress levels of meeting your full potential, there are stress levels of trying to not let some silly thing happen, or there is the stress level of one little incident.� Gordon worked fast Saturday to defuse a silly incident when one his comments about fan turnout for the NASCAR race at Pocono compared to the crowd at the IndyCar race at the track was taken as a shot at the open wheel series. “I am very, very appreciative of this sport and this series that we are in because when you drive in that tunnel for an IndyCar race, and you drive in here for a NASCAR race, you get a perspective of how big our sport is,� he said Friday. Gordon made the remarks after he said how much he loved attending the Pocono IndyCar race

practice for today’s NASCAR Sprint Cup Go Bowling.com 400.

last month as a fan and how “very cool� the open wheel cars are. With rain washing out Sprint Cup practice on Saturday, Gordon hit Twitter to defend his love for both series. “Never meant to take a shot at anyone,� he wrote. “I love #IndyCar just wanted to recognize how fortunate we are to get the crowds that we get in NASCAR.� Indianapolis 500 winner Tony Kanaan said it was wrong of Gordon to pick on the series. Kanaan called Gordon on Saturday morning to smooth out the misunderstanding. “I apologized to him. I understood his comment and I think he understood mine,� Kanaan said at Mid-Ohio. “It wasn’t like I was trying to pick a fight. He came to Pocono. I gave him a gecko. He came to Brazil. We’re friends. I just want to make sure we’re all right and we’ll laugh about it. It’s over.� Now it’s time to race. No driver has done it better at Pocono than

Gordon. His six wins are the most at the 2½-mile triangle track, and he has 18 top-fives and 28 top-10’s in his 41 Pocono starts. He’ll start 22nd on Sunday. “It’s a good track for us, a good place for us to come and fight and do battle like what we’ve been used to doing this year and last year to claw our way into the Chase,â€? he said. “There’s not enough points that are safe enough and you want to get those wins to try to secure things up for you. We’ve got a lot of tough competitors that we’re racing and battling with for 10th in points, as well as this wild-card spot.â€? Gordon’s seventh-place finish last week at Indianapolis helped him crack the top 10 for the first time since after the second race of the season. He has four top 10s in the last five races and may have hit on the combination that can not only help him keep a Chase spot — but move up in the standings. “We have to make sure that we’re knocking down those top 10s,â€? he said.

PACKED WITH POWER AND SAVINGS.

AP

Ryan Hunter-Reay climbs from his car after qualifying for the Honda Indy 200

at Mid-Ohio Saturday. Hunter-Reay claimed the pole position.

Hunter-Reay captures pole LEXINGTON, Ohio (AP) — Ryan Hunter-Reay knows what it’s like to work on IndyCar’s fringe, a harrowing place that can rob drivers of the instincts that make them want to race in the first place. Rather than focusing on passing the car in front of you, you worry about getting the track around in one piece. You wonder where the next sponsorship deal is going to come from. You fear it’s all going to evaporate with a wrong turn of the wheel. “I remember, back in 2009, it felt like I was living from race to race,� HunterReay said Saturday morning as he prepared to qualify for Sunday’s stop at Mid-Ohio. So forgive the defending IndyCar champion if he’s not too concerned about

chasing down points leader Helio Castroneves over the final six races starting Sunday at the tricky 13-turn track in hilly central Ohio. Survive the ever churning waters in the middle of the pack the way Hunter-Reay did early in his career and you learn not to sweat the small stuff. Don’t misunderstand. Hunter-Reay plans on doing what he can to eliminate the 69-point deficit he faces heading into the final third of the schedule. He just no longer loses sleep over it. If anything, the title he captured last fall when he slipped past Will Power in the season finale to become the first American to win the IndyCar championship since Sam Hornish Jr. in 2006 has freed up Hunter-Reay

to focus on the fun side of his job. It’s the part where he can drive the wheels off his No. 1 Andretti Autosport Chevy free from the anxiety of ticking off his boss and losing his ride. “It’s time to go for broke,� Hunter-Reay said between bites of Raisin Bran. Hours later the 32-yearold went out and backed it up, capturing the pole for Sunday’s Indy 200 at the 2.258-mile track. Hunter-Reay turned a lap in 1:05.3519, edging Power for the top spot. Scott Dixon, attempting to become the first North American open-wheel driver to win four straight races since 2006, will start third. Marco Andretti qualified fourth, followed by Charlie Kimball.

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SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

Royals back on track with 12-inning win NEW YORK (AP) — Pinch-hitter Justin Maxwell homered deep into the left-field seats leading off the 12th inning, and the Kansas City Royals overcame a late blown lead and got back to their winning ways with a 4-3 victory over the New York Mets on Saturday. Kansas City, which had a nine-game winning streak snapped Friday night with a loss in the 11th, improved to 8-2 in extra innings. Maxwell, acquired Wednesday in a trade with Houston, hit a 3-2 pitch from David Aardsma for his fifth career pinch-homer and first overall with the Royals. The New York bullpen had been perfect after starter Jeremy Hefner left after six innings, but Aardsma couldn’t retire the first batter he faced. The Mets lost hours after putting All-Star third baseman David Wright on the disabled list with a hamstring injury. Wright hurt himself running out an infield hit Friday night. Kelvin Herrera (4-5) earned the win with three innings of relief in which he walked one and struck

out three without giving up a hit. Greg Holland got the final three outs in the 12th for his 29th save in 31 chances and 22nd straight. Aardsma (2-1), filling in while closer Bobby Parnell is sidelined with a sore neck, blew the save in the ninth inning Friday night before the Mets came back to win on Eric Young Jr.’s homer. The Mets, 9-3 in interleague play, provided the comeback Saturday by scoring two runs in the eighth on Josh Satin’s two-run single against Aaron Crow. Bruce Chen put the Royals in position to win, pitching six strong innings. He gave up four hits, struck out eight and didn’t walk anyone in his fourth start of the season — all since July 12 — to lower his ERA to 2.03. He is 1-0 with three no-decisions as a starter and has gone exactly six innings in each outing. Chen’s only blemish was Daniel Murphy’s home run leading off the second inning. George Kottaras got that run back to start the Royals’

three-run third by homering off Jeremy Hefner, who was originally scheduled to pitch Sunday. Because of bullpen injuries, the Mets are going back to a five-man rotation until Jonathon Niese returns from a shoulder injury. Hefner also worked six innings, allowing three runs, eight hits — including the 20th homer of the season. He walked no one and struck out six. Hefner is 0-3 with two no-decisions in his past five starts. He gave up a total of 21 runs in his previous three outings. After Murphy gave the Mets a 1-0 lead in the second with his ninth homer, the Royals came right back to grab the lead. Kottaras’ fifth homer just eluded leaping Marlon Byrd in right field. Chen, Lorenzo Cain and Eric Hosmer followed with singles to load the bases, bringing up usual designated hitter Billy Butler, who made a rare start at first base. Hefner struck out Butler, but Alex Gordon gave the Royals their first lead of the series with a sacrifice fly to deep right. Miguel Tejada added an RBI single.

AP

Royals pitcher Bruce Chen delivers the ball to the New York Mets during the

first inning of an interleague baseball game Saturday.

Haren, Nationals blank Brewers BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

AP

Elvis Andrus of the Rangers, right, reacts after striking out on pitches from Oakland’s Jarrod Parker in the first inning Saturday.

Dan Haren pitched seven strong innings and Adam LaRoche and Wilson Ramos hit home runs to lead the Washington Nationals to a 3-0 win over the Milwaukee Brewers on Saturday. Haren gave up just four hits, with six strikeouts and two walks. It was the second straight strong outing for Haren (6-11) as he allowed one run and three hits in seven innings of a 4-1 win over the New York Mets on July 27. Prior to that, Heron had not won a game in more than two months as the Nationals had lost his previous 11 starts. Haren went 0-8 with a 6.18 ERA in that stretch. Tyler Clippard pitched a scoreless eighth inning. Rafael Soriano pitched the ninth inning to earn his 28th save in 32 chances. Mariners 8, Orioles 4 Michael Saunders homered twice and drove in five runs, Erasmo Ramirez retired 18 of the first 20 batters he faced and Seattle beat Baltimore to end a

four-game losing streak. Saunders hit a three-run drive in the fifth and added a clinching two-run shot in the ninth. It was his fifth career two-homer game, the second this season. Justin Smoak homered and went 3 for 3 with two walks for the Mariners. A’s 4, Rangers 2 Yoenis Cespedes hit a two-run home run to help first-place Oakland end Texas’ winning streak at five games and regain some ground in the AL West. Matt Garza (7-2) lost for the first time since June 11 and the Rangers lost ground on the division leader for the first time in nearly a week, falling 3 1/2 games back. Jed Lowrie and Eric Sogard also drove in runs for the A’s, who ended a three-game losing streak. Jarrod Parker (7-6) gave up two runs on six hits over six innings. He walked two and struck out six. Twins 6, Astros 4 Ryan Doumit hit the go-ahead single in the seventh inning and

Minnesota’s bullpen pitched six scoreless innings as the Twins beat Houston. After starter Kyle Gibson allowed four runs and nine hits in three innings, Anthony Swarzak struck out five in the next three and the AL’s second-best bullpen came through. Red Sox 5, D’backs 2 Jake Peavy allowed four hits in seven-plus innings to beat Arizona and win his first start since coming to Boston at the trade deadline. Peavy (8-5) struck out seven and walked two, giving up Paul Goldschmidt’s homer in the fourth and leaving with a 3-1 lead after a leadoff single in the eighth. He walked slowly from the mound as the crowd rose to a standing ovation, tipping his cap to the fans on his way to the dugout. Shane Victorino and Jarrod Saltalamacchia homered and Koji Uehara got his 10th save for Boston. Rays 2, Giants 1 Wil Myers had an RBI single in the bottom of the 10th inning, lifting Tampa

Bay to a victory over San Francisco. Desmond Jennings drew a leadoff walk in the 10th off Jean Machi (2-1) and stole second. Ben Zobrist was intentionally walked and Evan Longoria walked to load the bases on four pitches before Myers won it on his liner that went over the left fielder’s head. Pirates 5, Rockies 2 Francisco Liriano worked seven strong innings, and Jose Tabata homered and drove in two runs to lead Pittsburgh over Colorado. Liriano (12-4) allowed only two hits to offset his five walks and had six strikeouts. The left-hander improved to 7-1 with a 1.65 ERA in his last eight starts for the NL Central leaders. Tabata hit his first home run since May 11 and also tripled while going 3 for 4. Gaby Sanchez had two hits and two RBIs for Pittsburgh, while Jordy Mercer and Andrew McCutchen added two hits each. Jorge De La Rosa (10-6) pitched four-plus innings and gave up three runs.

Baseball rebuffs inquiry from A-Rod Dolphins, Dallas to get NFL started NEW YORK (AP) — Major League Baseball and the New York Yankees turned down requests Saturday to meet with Alex Rodriguez’s camp and the union about the embattled star’s expected drug penalty, two people familiar with the talks told The Associated Press. The overtures were made two days before MLB was poised to hand Rodriguez a lengthy suspension for his part in the Biogenesis case. The two people spoke to the AP on condition of anonymity because no public statements were authorized. Rodriguez, meanwhile, was in Trenton, N.J., playing what could be his last game in a while. He drew four straight walks and scored a run while on a minor league rehabilitation assignment with the Double-A Thunder. He was scheduled to be off Sunday. The All-Star third baseman said Friday night the Yankees’ tentative plan was for him to join them in Chicago for Monday night’s game against the White Sox. Before Rodriguez took the field, his side reached out to the Yankees and union head Michael Weiner contacted MLB Executive Vice President Rob Manfred. The Yankees and MLB said they had no interest in such talks. There was always the chance, however, that

AP

Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez (13) throws to second base to start a double play during the first inning of a Class AA baseball game with the Trenton Thunder Saturday.

further negotiations could take place at the last minute. The New York Post, Daily News and New York Times reported the discussions earlier Saturday. There hasn’t been any definite word on the severity of Rodriguez’s looming penalty, with speculation ranging from a lifetime ban to a suspension through the 2014 season.

Also possible, according to those familiar with the talks, was a suspension lasting until Aug. 31, 2014, the day before all teams are permitted to expand their rosters from 25 players to 40. The 38-year-old Rodriguez hasn’t played in the majors this season. The three-time American League MVP is recovering from

hip surgery and a strained quadriceps. A day after Rodriguez homered for Trenton, Thunder manager Tony Franklin hedged on whether A-Rod was ready to rejoin the majors. “That’s not for me to say,” Franklin said. “His swing is getting better. He’s running better. He’s doing the baseball things OK right now. But that’s a different game up there.” “I think he can handle it because he’s been there for a number of years,” he said. “I don’t think he’ll be surprised by anything on the baseball field despite what’s going on now. He’s been one of the best baseball players I have ever seen. Once they decide he’s ready to go back, I don’t think he’ll have any trouble adapting at all.” Rodriguez certainly had no trouble tracking balls, drawing three of his four walks on full-count pitches against Reading. He swung through a 91 mph fastball on a 3-0 pitch his third time up in the fifth and flipped his bat. A high-and-tight fastball backed him off the plate in the seventh, and he turned and smiled, thankful the pitch didn’t hit him. Rodriguez ran the bases, then left the game after the seventh. He gave his batting gloves and a bat to fans in the sellout crowd of 8,113 before heading into the dugout.

CANTON, Ohio (AP) — The Miami Dolphins could be the only legitimate challenger to New England’s AFC East dominance. The Dallas Cowboys hope they will be a true threat in the NFC East, where both the defending division champion Redskins and the Giants are more highly regarded. For two teams with so many question marks heading toward the 2013 season, an extra exhibition game can’t be a terrible thing — provided no key players get hurt in Sunday night’s Hall of Fame game. Miami already has some injury concerns, with starting receivers Mike Wallace (groin) and Brian Hartline (left calf) hobbled in practice this week. Dallas quarterback Tony Romo had offseason surgery for a cyst on his back, and coach Jason Garrett has been close-mouthed on Romo’s availability for the lone game this weekend. Only Dallas and Miami will play five exhibitions this summer. Five things to look for in Dolphins vs. Cowboys: 1. WHERE ART THOU, ROMO?: After signing a huge contract (six years, $108 million with $55 million guaranteed), Romo is expected to step up his game and become one of

the top few QBs in the league since he is being paid like one. Garrett won’t be putting him in any uncomfortable positions during the preseason, so it’s unlikely he’ll play against Miami. But even with a banged-up offensive line, the Cowboys must find out soon just how healthy their latest franchise quarterback is and how he reacts to taking a hit. And Romo is eager to be behind center as often as possible to work with a strong group of receivers led by Dez Bryant, Jason Witten and Miles Austin. “I think more than anything just getting back into it, getting the body to start, stop, go, quit, that football entails,” Romo said of the importance of practice and game action. 2. DION JORDAN’S ROLE: Miami traded up to the third spot in April’s draft to grab Oregon defensive end Dion Jordan with the idea he could be the Dolphins’ next Jason Taylor. Rookies, once they are signed, usually aren’t held back in the preseason, and Jordan could wind up on special teams, too. “That’s a huge part of our team,” coach Joe Philbin said. “We have the potential to be very, very good on special teams this year.”


SCOREBOARD •

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

National League Standings East Division Atlanta Washington Philadelphia New York Miami Central Division Pittsburgh St. Louis Cincinnati Chicago Milwaukee West Division

W 66 54 50 49 43

L 45 56 60 59 66

Pct GB .595 — .491 11½ .455 15½ .454 15½ .394 22

W 66 64 61 49 46

L 44 45 50 61 64

Pct .600 .587 .550 .445 .418

GB — 1½ 5½ 17 20

W L Pct GB Los Angeles 60 49 .550 — Arizona 56 54 .509 4½ Colorado 52 60 .464 9½ San Diego 51 59 .464 9½ San Francisco 49 60 .450 11 Friday’s Games L.A. Dodgers 6, Chicago Cubs 2 Atlanta 6, Philadelphia 4 Colorado 4, Pittsburgh 2 Arizona 7, Boston 6 Miami 10, Cleveland 0 N.Y. Mets 4, Kansas City 2, 11 innings San Francisco 4, Tampa Bay 1 St. Louis 13, Cincinnati 3 Washington 4, Milwaukee 1 San Diego 7, N.Y. Yankees 2 Saturday’s Games Kansas City 4, N.Y. Mets 3, 12 innings Atlanta 5, Philadelphia 4, 12 innings L.A. Dodgers 3, Chicago Cubs 0 Pittsburgh 5, Colorado 2 Boston 5, Arizona 2 Cleveland 4, Miami 3 Tampa Bay 2, San Francisco 1, 10 innings Cincinnati 8, St. Louis 3 Washington 3, Milwaukee 0 N.Y. Yankees at San Diego, late Sunday’s Games Cleveland (Kazmir 6-4) at Miami (Eovaldi 2-1), 1:10 p.m. Kansas City (E.Santana 7-6) at N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler 4-1), 1:10 p.m. St. Louis (Lynn 12-5) at Cincinnati (Leake 10-4), 1:10 p.m. Arizona (McCarthy 2-4) at Boston (Doubront 7-5), 1:35 p.m. Colorado (Nicasio 6-5) at Pittsburgh (A.J.Burnett 4-7), 1:35 p.m. San Francisco (Moscoso 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Ro.Hernandez 6-11), 1:40 p.m. Washington (Jordan 1-3) at Milwaukee (Lohse 7-7), 2:10 p.m. L.A. Dodgers (Greinke 8-3) at Chicago Cubs (Villanueva 2-7), 2:20 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 4-9) at San Diego (Kennedy 3-8), 4:10 p.m. Atlanta (A.Wood 1-2) at Philadelphia (Cl.Lee 10-4), 8:05 p.m. Monday’s Games Atlanta at Washington, 7:05 p.m. L.A. Dodgers at St. Louis, 7:05 p.m. Milwaukee at San Francisco, 10:15 p.m.

American League Standings East Division Boston Tampa Bay Baltimore New York Toronto Central Division Detroit Cleveland Kansas City Minnesota Chicago West Division

W 67 65 61 56 50 W 63 61 55 47 40

L 45 45 50 52 59 L 45 49 52 60 68

Pct GB .598 — .591 1 .550 5½ .519 9 .459 15½ Pct GB .583 — .555 3 .514 7½ .439 15½ .370 23

W L Pct GB Oakland 64 46 .582 — Texas 61 50 .550 3½ Seattle 51 59 .464 13 Los Angeles 50 58 .463 13 Houston 36 73 .330 27½ Friday’s Games Baltimore 11, Seattle 8 Detroit 2, Chicago White Sox 1 Arizona 7, Boston 6 Miami 10, Cleveland 0 N.Y. Mets 4, Kansas City 2, 11 innings San Francisco 4, Tampa Bay 1 Minnesota 4, Houston 3, 13 innings Texas 8, Oakland 3 L.A. Angels 7, Toronto 5 San Diego 7, N.Y. Yankees 2 Saturday’s Games Kansas City 4, N.Y. Mets 3, 12 innings Oakland 4, Texas 2 Seattle 8, Baltimore 4 Detroit 3, Chicago White Sox 0 Boston 5, Arizona 2 Cleveland 4, Miami 3 Minnesota 6, Houston 4 Tampa Bay 2, San Francisco 1, 10 innings N.Y. Yankees at San Diego, late Toronto at L.A. Angels, late Sunday’s Games Chicago White Sox (Rienzo 0-0) at Detroit (Porcello 8-6), 1:08 p.m. Cleveland (Kazmir 6-4) at Miami (Eovaldi 2-1), 1:10 p.m. Kansas City (E.Santana 7-6) at N.Y. Mets (Z.Wheeler 4-1), 1:10 p.m. Arizona (McCarthy 2-4) at Boston (Doubront 7-5), 1:35 p.m. Seattle (J.Saunders 9-10) at Baltimore (W.Chen 6-3), 1:35 p.m. San Francisco (Moscoso 0-0) at Tampa Bay (Ro.Hernandez 6-11), 1:40 p.m. Houston (Peacock 1-3) at Minnesota (Pelfrey 4-9), 2:10 p.m. Toronto (Buehrle 7-7) at L.A. Angels (C.Wilson 11-6), 3:35 p.m. Texas(D.Holland 8-6) at Oakland (Griffin 10-7), 4:05 p.m. N.Y. Yankees (P.Hughes 4-9) at San Diego (Kennedy 3-8), 4:10 p.m. Monday’s Games Detroit at Cleveland, 7:05 p.m. Boston at Houston, 8:10 p.m. Minnesota at Kansas City, 8:10 p.m. N.Y. Yankees at Chicago White Sox, 8:10 p.m. Texas at L.A. Angels, 10:05 p.m. Toronto at Seattle, 10:10 p.m.

Major League Linescores AMERICAN LEAGUE Texas 001 010 000—2 7 0 Oakland 300 000 10x—4 8 0 Garza and G.Soto; J.Parker, Doolittle (7), Cook (8), Balfour (9) and Vogt, D.Norris. W—J.Parker 7-6. L—Garza 1-1. Sv—Balfour (29). HRs—Texas, Kinsler (10). Oakland, Cespedes (17). Seattle 010 140 002—8 15 0 Baltimore 010 100 200—4 6 0 E.Ramirez, Furbush (7), Farquhar (8) and Quintero; Feldman, McFarland (5), S.Johnson (7), Matusz (8), O’Day (9) and Wieters. W—E.Ramirez 3-0. L— Feldman 2-3. Sv—Farquhar (1). HRs— Seattle, Smoak (10), M.Saunders 2 (10). Baltimore, Wieters (15), Machado (10). ChiSox 000 000 000—0 4 0 Detroit 110 100 00x—3 6 0 Joh.Danks, Lindstrom (8), Veal (8) and Phegley, Flowers; Scherzer, Veras (8), Benoit (9) and Avila. W—Scherzer 16-1. L—Joh.Danks 2-9. Sv—Benoit (12). HRs—Detroit, Tor.Hunter (12), Jh.Peralta (11), Iglesias (2). INTERLEAGUE KanCity 003 000 000 001—4 9 0 NYMets 010 000 020 000—3 8 0 (12 innings) B.Chen, Hochevar (7), Collins (7), Crow (8), K.Herrera (9), G.Holland (12) and Kottaras, S.Perez; Hefner, Germen (7), Feliciano (8), Atchison (9), Rice (11), Aardsma (12) and Recker. W—K.Herrera 4-5. L—Aardsma 2-1. Sv—G.Holland (29). HRs—Kansas City, Kottaras (5), Maxwell (3). New York, Dan.Murphy (9). NATIONAL LEAGUE Atlanta 001 030 000 001—5 5 1 Phila 120 000 100 000—4 7 2 (12 innings) Beachy, Ayala (7), Walden (8), D.Carpenter (9), S.Downs (10), Avilan (11), Kimbrel (12) and Gattis; Lannan, Miner (5), Lu.Garcia (8), Papelbon (9), Bastardo (10), Diekman (11), De Fratus (12) and Ruiz. W—Avilan 4-0. L—Diekman 0-2. Sv—Kimbrel (33). HRs—Atlanta, J.Upton (19). Philadelphia, Mayberry (8). Los Angeles 001 002 000—3 10 1 ChiCubs 000 000 000—0 8 1 Capuano, League (7), Belisario (8), P.Rodriguez (8), Jansen (9) and Federowicz; Samardzija, H.Rondon (7), Guerrier (8), Gregg (9) and Castillo.

W—Capuano 4-6. L—Samardzija 6-10. Sv—Jansen (16). Atl 001 030 000 001—5 5 1 Phila 120 000 100 000—4 7 2 (12 innings) Beachy, Ayala (7), Walden (8), D.Carpenter (9), S.Downs (10), Avilan (11), Kimbrel (12) and Gattis; Lannan, Miner (5), Lu.Garcia (8), Papelbon (9), Bastardo (10), Diekman (11), De Fratus (12) and Ruiz. W—Avilan 4-0. L—Diekman 0-2. Sv—Kimbrel (33). HRs—Atlanta, J.Upton (19). Philadelphia, Mayberry (8). Colorado 000 000 020—2 6 0 Pittsburgh 001 111 10x—5 11 0 J.De La Rosa, Ottavino (5), W.Lopez (7) and W.Rosario; Liriano, Watson (8), Morris (8), Melancon (9) and T.Sanchez. W—Liriano 12-4. L—J.De La Rosa 10-6. Sv—Melancon (6). HRs— Pittsburgh, Tabata (3). St. Louis 100 002 000—3 4 1 Cincinnati 200 210 03x—8 9 0 Westbrook, Maness (6), Choate (7), Blazek (7), K.Butler (8) and Ro.Johnson; Cingrani, Simon (6), M.Parra (6), Hoover (8), Chapman (9) and Mesoraco. W—Cingrani 5-1. L—Westbrook 7-6. HRs—Cincinnati, Mesoraco 2 (8), Choo (15). Washington010 011 000—3 7 0 Milwaukee 000 000 000—0 4 0 Haren, Clippard (8), R.Soriano (9) and W.Ramos; D.Hand, Wooten (8) and Lucroy. W—Haren 6-11. L—D.Hand 0-3. Sv—R.Soriano (28). HRs—Washington, W.Ramos (7), Ad.LaRoche (15). INTERLEAGUE San Fr 001 000 000 0—1 7 0 Tampa 001 000 000 1—2 9 0 (10 innings) Lincecum, S.Casilla (8), Mijares (9), S.Rosario (9), J.Lopez (9), Machi (10) and Posey; Price, Rodney (10) and J.Molina, Lobaton. W—Rodney 4-2. L— Machi 2-1. Cleveland 101 000 200—4 9 0 Miami 000 002 001—3 6 1 McAllister, Allen (6), J.Smith (8), C.Perez (9) and C.Santana; Ja.Turner, Da.Jennings (7), Webb (7), M.Dunn (9) and Brantly. W—Allen 5-1. L—Da.Jennings 1-2. Sv—C.Perez (16). Arizona 000 100 010—2 6 1 Boston 000 010 22x—5 9 0 Corbin, W.Harris (7), Thatcher (7), D.Hernandez (8), Sipp (8) and Nieves; Peavy, Breslow (8), Tazawa (8), Uehara (9) and Saltalamacchia. W— Peavy 9-4. L—Corbin 12-3. Sv—Uehara (10). HRs—Arizona, Goldschmidt (26). Boston, Victorino (7), Saltalamacchia (10).

Major League Leaders NATIONAL LEAGUE BATTING—CJohnson, Atlanta, .344; YMolina, St. Louis, .330; Cuddyer, Colorado, .328; Votto, Cincinnati, .321; Craig, St. Louis, .320; Segura, Milwaukee, .314; DWright, New York, .309. RUNS—MCarpenter, St. Louis, 79; Votto, Cincinnati, 76; Choo, Cincinnati, 73; CGonzalez, Colorado, 72; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 71; Holliday, St. Louis, 71; SMarte, Pittsburgh, 71. RBI—Goldschmidt, Arizona, 89; Craig, St. Louis, 84; Phillips, Cincinnati, 83; Bruce, Cincinnati, 74; FFreeman, Atlanta, 73; PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 71; CGonzalez, Colorado, 70. HOME RUNS—PAlvarez, Pittsburgh, 27; Goldschmidt, Arizona, 26; CGonzalez, Colorado, 26; DBrown, Philadelphia, 24; Bruce, Cincinnati, 22; Uggla, Atlanta, 21; Tulowitzki, Colorado, 20. PITCHING—Zimmermann, Washington, 13-6; Wainwright, St. Louis, 13-6; Corbin, Arizona, 12-3; Liriano, Pittsburgh, 12-4; Lynn, St. Louis, 12-5; Minor, Atlanta, 11-5; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 11-6; SMiller, St. Louis, 11-7. ERA—Kershaw, Los Angeles, 1.87; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 1.87; Harvey, New York, 2.21; Corbin, Arizona, 2.33; Locke, Pittsburgh, 2.36; Fernandez, Miami, 2.54; Leake, Cincinnati, 2.59. STRIKEOUTS—Harvey, New York, 172; Kershaw, Los Angeles, 161; Samardzija, Chicago, 155; Wainwright, St. Louis, 151; Bumgarner, San Francisco, 146; HBailey, Cincinnati, 145; Latos, Cincinnati, 142; Lincecum, San Francisco, 142. SAVES—Kimbrel, Atlanta, 33; Grilli, Pittsburgh, 30; Mujica, St. Louis, 30; RSoriano, Washington, 28; Romo, San Francisco, 26; Chapman, Cincinnati, 25; Cishek, Miami, 23. AMERICAN LEAGUE BATTING—MiCabrera, Detroit, .359; Trout, Los Angeles, .325; DOrtiz, Boston, .322; Mauer, Minnesota, .320; Loney, Tampa Bay, .313; ABeltre, Texas, .312; TorHunter, Detroit, .312. RUNS—MiCabrera, Detroit, 78; CDavis, Baltimore, 78; AJones, Baltimore, 75; Trout, Los Angeles, 73; Bautista, Toronto, 71; Encarnacion, Toronto, 69; DeJennings, Tampa Bay, 69. RBI—CDavis, Baltimore, 102; MiCabrera, Detroit, 99; Encarnacion, Toronto, 85; AJones, Baltimore, 77; Fielder, Detroit, 76; NCruz, Texas, 75; DOrtiz, Boston, 71. HOME RUNS—CDavis, Baltimore, 40; MiCabrera, Detroit, 32; Encarnacion, Toronto, 29; NCruz, Texas, 26; Bautista, Toronto, 25; ADunn, Chicago, 25; Ibanez, Seattle, 24; Trumbo, Los Angeles, 24. PITCHING—Scherzer, Detroit, 16-1; Tillman, Baltimore, 14-3; MMoore, Tampa Bay, 14-3; Colon, Oakland, 14-3; Masterson, Cleveland, 13-7; FHernandez, Seattle, 11-4; CWilson, Los Angeles, 11-6; Guthrie, Kansas City, 11-7; Verlander, Detroit, 11-8. ERA—FHernandez, Seattle, 2.30; Kuroda, New York, 2.38; Colon, Oakland, 2.50; AniSanchez, Detroit, 2.59; Darvish, Texas, 2.66; Iwakuma, Seattle, 2.76; Scherzer, Detroit, 2.85. STRIKEOUTS—Darvish, Texas, 186; Scherzer, Detroit, 170; FHernandez, Seattle, 166; Masterson, Cleveland, 160; Sale, Chicago, 155; Verlander, Detroit, 138; DHolland, Texas, 135. SAVES—JiJohnson, Baltimore, 38; MRivera, New York, 34; Nathan, Texas, 32; GHolland, Kansas City, 29; Balfour, Oakland, 29; Perkins, Minnesota, 26; Frieri, Los Angeles, 26; AReed, Chicago, 26; Rodney, Tampa Bay, 26.

Midwest League Standings Eastern Division W L Pct. GB BoGreen (Rays) 27 14 .659 — GrLakes (LAD) 25 16 .610 2 x-SBend (Ariz) 23 18 .561 4 Dayton (Reds) 23 19 .548 4½ WMich (Tigers) 20 19 .513 6 LakeCo (Indians) 19 22 .463 8 Lansing (Jays) 16 25 .390 11 FtWayne (SD) 14 26 .350 12½ Western Division W L Pct. GB CRapids (Twins) 26 15 .634 — QCities (Astros) 25 15 .625 ½ x-Beloit (A’s) 22 19 .537 4 Peoria (Cardi) 20 21 .488 6 Clinton (Sea) 19 22 .463 7 Burlington (LAA) 17 24 .415 9 Wisconsin (Mil) 16 25 .390 10 Kane Co (Cubs) 14 26 .350 11½ x-clinched first half Saturday’s Games Quad Cities 5, Cedar Rapids 2 Great Lakes 8, Lake County 3 Kane County 6, Clinton 1 Dayton 5, West Michigan 3 Lansing 5, Fort Wayne 3 Peoria 2, Burlington 1 Beloit 9, Wisconsin 6 South Bend at Bowling Green, 8:05 p.m. Sunday’s Games Dayton at West Michigan, 1 p.m. Lansing at Fort Wayne, 2:05 p.m., 1st game Beloit at Wisconsin, 2:05 p.m. Kane County at Clinton, 3 p.m. South Bend at Bowling Green, 3:05 p.m. Quad Cities at Cedar Rapids, 3:05 p.m. Lansing at Fort Wayne, 4:35 p.m., 2nd game Burlington at Peoria, 6 p.m. Great Lakes at Lake County, 7 p.m. Monday’s Games

Dayton at West Michigan, 7 p.m. Great Lakes at Lake County, 7 p.m. Lansing at Fort Wayne, 7:05 p.m. Quad Cities at Cedar Rapids, 7:35 p.m. Burlington at Peoria, 8 p.m. Kane County at Clinton, 8 p.m. Beloit at Wisconsin, 8:05 p.m. South Bend at Bowling Green, 8:05 p.m.

NFL Preseason Standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W LT Pct PF PA Buffalo 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Miami 0 0 0 .000 0 0 New England 0 0 0 .000 0 0 N.Y. Jets 0 0 0 .000 0 0 South W LT Pct PF PA Houston 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Indianapolis 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Jacksonville 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Tennessee 0 0 0 .000 0 0 North W LT Pct PF PA Baltimore 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Cincinnati 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Cleveland 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Pittsburgh 0 0 0 .000 0 0 West W LT Pct PF PA Denver 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Kansas City 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Oakland 0 0 0 .000 0 0 San Diego 0 0 0 .000 0 0 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W LT Pct PF PA Dallas 0 0 0 .000 0 0 N.Y. Giants 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Philadelphia 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Washington 0 0 0 .000 0 0 South W LT Pct PF PA Atlanta 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Carolina 0 0 0 .000 0 0 New Orleans 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Tampa Bay 0 0 0 .000 0 0 North W LT Pct PF PA Chicago 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Detroit 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Green Bay 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Minnesota 0 0 0 .000 0 0 West W LT Pct PF PA Arizona 0 0 0 .000 0 0 San Francisco 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Seattle 0 0 0 .000 0 0 St. Louis 0 0 0 .000 0 0 Sunday’s Game Miami vs. Dallas at Canton, 8 p.m. Thursday, Aug. 8 Baltimore at Tampa Bay, 7:30 p.m. Washington at Tennessee, 8 p.m. Cincinnati at Atlanta, 8 p.m. St. Louis at Cleveland, 8 p.m. Denver at San Francisco, 9 p.m. Seattle at San Diego, 10 p.m. Friday, Aug. 9 N.Y. Jets at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Miami at Jacksonville, 7:30 p.m. New England at Philadelphia, 7:30 p.m. Houston at Minnesota, 8 p.m. Kansas City at New Orleans, 8 p.m. Arizona at Green Bay, 8 p.m. Chicago at Carolina, 8 p.m. Dallas at Oakland, 10 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 10 N.Y. Giants at Pittsburgh, 7:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 11 Buffalo at Indianapolis, 1:30 p.m.

Sprint Cup Qualifying GoBowling.com 400 Lineup After Friday qualifying; race Sunday At Pocono Raceway Long Pond, Pa. Lap length: 2.5 miles (Car number in parentheses) 1. (48) Jimmie Johnson, Chevrolet, 180.654. 2. (18) Kyle Busch, Toyota, 180.639. 3. (99) Carl Edwards, Ford, 180.18. 4. (39) Ryan Newman, Chevrolet, 180.004. 5. (78) Kurt Busch, Chevrolet, 179.695. 6. (22) Joey Logano, Ford, 179.601. 7. (16) Greg Biffle, Ford, 179.533. 8. (9) Marcos Ambrose, Ford, 179.329. 9. (11) Denny Hamlin, Toyota, 179.144. 10. (43) Aric Almirola, Ford, 179.094. 11. (2) Brad Keselowski, Ford, 178.937. 12. (1) Jamie McMurray, Chevrolet, 178.848. 13. (31) Jeff Burton, Chevrolet, 178.667. 14. (29) Kevin Harvick, Chevrolet, 178.508. 15. (51) A J Allmendinger, Chevrolet, 178.501. 16. (15) Clint Bowyer, Toyota, 178.409. 17. (17) Ricky Stenhouse Jr., Ford, 178.264. 18. (5) Kasey Kahne, Chevrolet, 178.26. 19. (42) Juan Pablo Montoya, Chevrolet, 178.056. 20. (14) Tony Stewart, Chevrolet, 178.031. 21. (27) Paul Menard, Chevrolet, 177.982. 22. (24) Jeff Gordon, Chevrolet, 177.658. 23. (93) Travis Kvapil, Toyota, 177.592. 24. (20) Matt Kenseth, Toyota, 177.508. 25. (88) Dale Earnhardt Jr., Chevrolet, 177.441. 26. (56) Martin Truex Jr., Toyota, 177.239. 27. (98) Michael McDowell, Ford, 177.221. 28. (55) Mark Martin, Toyota, 176.991. 29. (13) Casey Mears, Ford, 176.942. 30. (34) David Ragan, Ford, 176.838. 31. (30) David Stremme, Toyota, 176.821. 32. (7) Dave Blaney, Chevrolet, 176.267. 33. (47) Bobby Labonte, Toyota, 176.098. 34. (10) Danica Patrick, Chevrolet, 175.86. 35. (83) David Reutimann, Toyota, 175.743. 36. (36) J.J. Yeley, Chevrolet, 175.179. 37. (38) David Gilliland, Ford, Owner Points. 38. (40) Landon Cassill, Chevrolet, Owner Points. 39. (87) Joe Nemechek, Toyota, Owner Points. 40. (35) Josh Wise, Ford, Owner Points. 41. (32) Timmy Hill, Ford, Owner Points. 42. (19) Alex Kennedy, Toyota, Owner Points. 43. (33) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, Owner Points.

Honda Indy 200 After Saturday qualifying; race Sunday At Mid-Ohio Sports Car Course Lexington, Ohio Lap length: 2.258 miles (Car number in parentheses) All cars Dallara chassis 1. (1) Ryan Hunter-Reay, Chevrolet, 124.385 mph. 2. (12) Will Power, Chevrolet, 124.036. 3. (9) Scott Dixon, Honda, 123.716. 4. (25) Marco Andretti, Chevrolet, 123.432. 5. (83) Charlie Kimball, Honda, 122.345. 6. (10) Dario Franchitti, Honda, 122.081. 7. (19) Justin Wilson, Honda, 123.275. 8. (77) Simon Pagenaud, Honda, 123.273. 9. (78) Simona de Silvestro, Chevrolet, 123.234. 10. (16) James Jakes, Honda, 122.833. 11. (55) Tristan Vautier, Honda, 122.536. 12. (5) E.J. Viso, Chevrolet, 122.409. 13. (27) James Hinchcliffe, Chevrolet, 122.755. 14. (7) Sebastien Bourdais, Chevrolet, 122.818. 15. (3) Helio Castroneves, Chevrolet, 122.74. 16. (14) Takuma Sato, Honda, 122.794. 17. (18) James Davison, Honda, 122.636. 18. (4) Oriol Servia, Chevrolet, 122.771. 19. (67) Josef Newgarden, Honda, 122.176. 20. (11) Tony Kanaan, Chevrolet, 122.692. 21. (6) Sebastian Saavedra, Chevrolet, 121.164. 22. (15) Graham Rahal, Honda,

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122.421. 23. (20) Ed Carpenter, Chevrolet, 120.586. 24. (98) Luca Filippi, Honda, 121.551.

Camping World Trucks Pocono Mountains 125 Saturday At Pocono Raceway, Long Pond, Pa. Lap length: 2.5 miles (Start position in parentheses) 1. (6) Ryan Blaney, Ford, 54 laps, 48 points, $49,185. 2. (1) Miguel Paludo, Chevrolet, 54, 43, $25,075. 3. (4) German Quiroga, Toyota, 54, 42, $18,220. 4. (10) Joey Coulter, Toyota, 54, 41, $15,385. 5. (2) Ross Chastain, Ford, 54, 40, $13,860. 6. (21) Ron Hornaday Jr., Chevrolet, 54, 38, $11,535. 7. (5) Darrell Wallace Jr., Toyota, 54, 38, $11,035. 8. (9) Matt Crafton, Toyota, 54, 36, $10,810. 9. (14) Brendan Gaughan, Chevrolet, 54, 35, $10,760. 10. (22) Brennan Newberry, Chevrolet, 54, 34, $11,960. 11. (7) Todd Bodine, Chevrolet, 54, 34, $10,635. 12. (3) Jeb Burton, Chevrolet, 54, 32, $10,510. 13. (17) Max Gresham, Chevrolet, 54, 31, $10,435. 14. (18) Timothy Peters, Toyota, 54, 30, $10,385. 15. (15) Chad Hackenbracht, Toyota, 54, 29, $11,335. 16. (23) Tim George Jr., Chevrolet, 54, 28, $10,160. 17. (12) John Wes Townley, Toyota, 54, 27, $10,060. 18. (20) Dakoda Armstrong, Chevrolet, 54, 26, $9,935. 19. (13) Johnny Sauter, Toyota, 54, 25, $8,585. 20. (11) Ty Dillon, Chevrolet, 54, 24, $9,160. 21. (8) James Buescher, Chevrolet, 54, 23, $8,385. 22. (29) Kyle Martel, Chevrolet, 52, 22, $7,285. 23. (19) Jeff Agnew, Chevrolet, 52, 21, $7,185. 24. (27) Bryan Silas, Ford, 51, 20, $7,110. 25. (31) Mike Harmon, Chevrolet, 51, 0, $7,225. 26. (25) Sean Corr, Ford, 51, 18, $7,035. 27. (30) Todd Peck, Chevrolet, 51, 17, $7,010. 28. (35) Norm Benning, Chevrolet, 50, 16, $6,985. 29. (32) Dominick Casola, Chevrolet, accident, 46, 15, $6,960. 30. (16) Ryan Sieg, Chevrolet, engine, 23, 14, $7,435. 31. (28) Chris Jones, Chevrolet, rear end, 20, 13, $6,910. 32. (33) Jennifer Jo Cobb, Ford, engine, 13, 12, $6,885. 33. (24) J.J. Yeley, Toyota, vibration, 9, 0, $6,860. 34. (36) Chris Lafferty, Ram, electrical, 4, 10, $6,835. 35. (34) Tony Raines, Chevrolet, engine, 3, 0, $6,810. 36. (26) Ricky Ehrgott, Toyota, accident, 2, 8, $6,759. Race Statistics Average Speed of Race Winner: 128.300 mph. Time of Race: 1 hour, 3 minutes, 8 seconds. Margin of Victory: 0.270 seconds. Caution Flags: 4 for 10 laps. Lead Changes: 9 among 7 drivers. Lap Leaders: R.Chastain 1-9; R.Blaney 10-24; M.Paludo 25-26; J.Coulter 27-28; D.Wallace Jr. 29-30; T.Bodine 31-46; R.Blaney 47-49; G.Quiroga 50-52; R.Blaney 53-54. Leaders Summary (Driver, Times Led, Laps Led): R.Blaney, 3 times for 20 laps; T.Bodine, 1 time for 16 laps; R.Chastain, 1 time for 9 laps; G.Quiroga, 1 time for 3 laps; M.Paludo, 1 time for 2 laps; J.Coulter, 1 time for 2 laps; D.Wallace Jr., 1 time for 2 laps. Top 10 in Points: 1. M.Crafton, 429; 2. J.Burton, 377; 3. R.Blaney, 367; 4. J.Buescher, 365; 5. T.Dillon, 361; 6. B.Gaughan, 354; 7. M.Paludo, 351; 8. T.Peters, 350; 9. D.Wallace Jr., 347; 10. J.Sauter, 345.

NHRA Northwest Nationals Saturday At Pacific Raceways, Kent, Wash. Pairings based on results in qualifying, which ended Saturday. DNQs listed below pairings. Top Fuel 1. Shawn Langdon, 3.765 seconds, 320.58 mph vs. 16. Troy Buff, 3.910, 304.05. 2. David Grubnic, 3.765, 317.57 vs. 15. Brandon Bernstein, 3.884, 313.51. 3. Tony Schumacher, 3.768, 319.29 vs. 14. T.J. Zizzo, 3.851, 317.19. 4. Khalid alBalooshi, 3.781, 320.36 vs. 13. Brittany Force, 3.846, 297.81. 5. Morgan Lucas, 3.790, 320.51 vs. 12. Doug Kalitta, 3.837, 312.64. 6. Antron Brown, 3.799, 315.42 vs. 11. Bob Vandergriff, 3.835, 313.44. 7. Clay Millican, 3.811, 316.90 vs. 10. Tommy Johnson Jr., 3.833, 311.41. 8. Steve Torrence, 3.812, 319.07 vs. 9. Spencer Massey, 3.813, 320.13. Did Not Qualify: 17. Terry McMillen, 3.940, 309.27. 18. Ron Smith, 4.277, 261.17. Funny Car 1. Jack Beckman, Dodge Charger, 4.049, 303.64 vs. 16. Johnny Gray, Charger, 4.719, 175.82. 2. Robert Hight, Ford Mustang, 4.056, 307.09 vs. 15. John Hale, Chevy Impala, 4.539, 263.56. 3. Del Worsham, Toyota Camry, 4.065, 303.84 vs. 14. Cruz Pedregon, Camry, 4.218, 284.75. 4. Matt Hagan, Charger, 4.067, 303.78 vs. 13. Todd Lesenko, Charger, 4.149, 291.76. 5. John Force, Mustang, 4.072, 304.32 vs. 12. Paul Lee, Charger, 4.113, 294.69. 6. Bob Tasca III, Mustang, 4.077, 306.33 vs. 11. Tony Pedregon, Camry, 4.105, 293.03. 7. Tim Wilkerson, Mustang, 4.083, 302.35 vs. 10. Jeff Arend, Charger, 4.100, 307.93. 8. Courtney Force, Mustang, 4.085, 304.74 vs. 9. Alexis DeJoria, Camry, 4.099, 297.88. Did Not Qualify: 17. Ron Capps, 5.058, 247.38. 18. Terry Haddock, 6.797, 110.77. Pro Stock 1. Mike Edwards, Chevy Camaro, 6.526, 212.29 vs. 16. Deric Kramer, Dodge Avenger, 6.623, 208.42. 2. Rickie Jones, Camaro, 6.532, 211.49 vs. 15. Matt Hartford, Avenger, 6.620, 209.98. 3. Allen Johnson, Avenger, 6.533, 211.69 vs. 14. JR Carr, Ford Mustang, 6.614, 208.04. 4. V. Gaines, Avenger, 6.543, 211.49 vs. 13. Shane Gray, Camaro, 6.611, 210.57. 5. Jeg Coughlin, Avenger, 6.560, 210.70 vs. 12. Steve Kent, Camaro, 6.606, 209.36. 6. Vincent Nobile, Avenger, 6.561, 210.18 vs. 11. Chris McGaha, Avenger, 6.595, 209.17. 7. Greg Anderson, Camaro, 6.563, 210.57 vs. 10. Rodger Brogdon, Camaro, 6.592, 210.01. 8. Jason Line, Camaro, 6.566, 211.10 vs. 9.Larry Morgan, Mustang, 6.578, 209.65.

MLS Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE New York 11 7 5 38 36 29 Sporting KC 10 7 6 36 33 24 Montreal 10 6 5 35 33 32 Philadelphia 9 7 7 34 34 32 New England 8 7 6 30 27 19 Houston 8 6 6 30 23 20 Chicago 8 9 4 28 27 31 Columbus 6 10 5 23 24 27 Toronto FC 3 10 8 17 19 29 D.C. 3 15 4 13 13 36 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L T Pts GF GA Real Salt Lake 11 7 4 37 36 24 Portland 8 3 10 34 31 20 Colorado 9 7 7 34 28 24 Los Angeles 10 9 3 33 32 27 Vancouver 9 7 5 32 33 29 FC Dallas 8 5 8 32 27 27 Seattle 8 7 4 28 24 22 San Jose 7 9 6 27 23 33 Chivas USA 4 12 5 17 19 37 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Saturday’s Games New York 3, Sporting Kansas City 2 D.C. United 3, Montreal 1 Chicago 2, Philadelphia 1 Real Salt Lake at Colorado, late

Columbus at Houston, late Chivas USA at San Jose, late FC Dallas at Seattle FC, late Vancouver at Portland, late Sunday’s Games Toronto FC at New England, late Saturday, Aug. 10 Seattle FC at Toronto FC, 7 p.m. New York at Columbus, 7:30 p.m. San Jose at Vancouver, 7:30 p.m. D.C. United at Philadelphia, 8 p.m. New England at Sporting Kansas City, 8:30 p.m. Montreal at Chicago, 8:30 p.m. Houston at Real Salt Lake, 9:30 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 11 Los Angeles at FC Dallas, 8 p.m. Colorado at Chivas USA, 11 p.m.

NWSL Standings W L T Pts GF GA FC KansCity 10 4 5 35 30 17 Portland 10 4 4 34 27 19 Sky Blue FC 10 6 4 34 27 22 Western NY 8 4 7 31 33 19 Chicago 7 7 5 26 27 31 Boston 6 7 6 24 31 31 Seattle 5 11 3 18 21 32 Washington 1 14 4 7 13 38 NOTE: Three points for victory, one point for tie. Saturday’s Games Boston 2, Western New York 2, tie Chicago 3, Seattle FC 1 Sky Blue FC 1, Washington 0 Sunday’s Games FC Kansas City at Portland, 8:30 p.m. Wednesday, Aug. 7 Portland at Boston, 7 p.m. Seattle FC at Western New York, 7:05 p.m. Chicago at Washington, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 10 FC Kansas City at Boston, 6 p.m. Seattle FC at Washington, 7 p.m. Sky Blue FC at Chicago, 7 p.m. Portland at Western New York, 7:35 p.m.

WNBA Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct GB Atlanta 11 5 .688 — Chicago 13 6 .684 -0½ Indiana 9 10 .474 3½ Washington 9 11 .450 4 New York 8 12 .400 5 Connecticut 6 12 .333 6 WESTERN CONFERENCE W L Pct GB Minnesota 15 3 .833 — Los Angeles 12 7 .632 3½ Phoenix 9 10 .474 6½ Seattle 8 10 .444 7 Tulsa 7 14 .333 9½ San Antonio 6 13 .316 9½ Friday’s Games Minnesota 85, San Antonio 63 Tulsa 96, Los Angeles 89 Chicago 85, Washington 78 Saturday’s Games Connecticut 88, New York 66 Indiana 79, Chicago 58 Atlanta at Phoenix, late Sunday’s Games Los Angeles at Washington, 4 p.m. Tulsa at San Antonio, 4:30 p.m. Seattle at Minnesota, 7 p.m.

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SPORTS BRIEFS • Gusting winds force long Sunday at women’s British ST. ANDREWS, Scotland (AP) — Inbee Park wanted tough conditions at St. Andrews to try to make up an eight-shot deficit in her pursuit of a fourth straight major. It turned out to be too tough for anyone. The third round of the Women’s British Open was suspended Saturday by gusts that topped 40 mph and kept golf balls from staying put on the greens. After waiting six hours for the wind to calm, players were told to return today for a marathon finish. Whether that becomes a huge break for the leaders — Na Yeon Choi at 10-under 134 was an hour away from teeing off — won’t be known until Sunday. “It’s still going to be windy tomorrow — not, hopefully, as windy as it’s been today, but there’s no letup in it,” said Susan Simpson, head of operations for the Ladies Golf Union. “It’s still going to be very breezy and equally difficult conditions.” How difficult? Nine players who completed the third round had an average score of 78.2. Cristie Kerr and Lydia Ko each had a 75, the best of those who finished. Rikako Morita shot 86. The cumulative nine-hole scores for the 20 players who at least made the turn was 54-over par. There were 508 holes played, and only 26 birdies. Park is trying to become the first golfer, male or female, to win four straight professional majors in the same season. Her hope was for a steady round in raging wind and for the leading players to lose ground. Park was 1 under through four holes, making a 30-foot birdie putt at No. 3. But it was her par on the fourth hole that helped make officials realize it was time to stop. The ball moved from its position from a gust, and Park called for a ruling to make sure she could replace it as long as she didn’t address the ball.

PGA Bridgestone Invitational Saturday At Firestone Country Club Akron, Ohio Purse: $8.75 million Yardage: 7,400; Par: 70 Third Round Tiger Woods 66-61-68—195 Henrik Stenson 65-70-67—202 Jason Dufner 67-69-67—203 Luke Donald 67-69-68—204 Bill Haas 67-68-69—204 Chris Wood 66-68-70—204 Miguel Angel Jimenez 71-69-65—205 Keegan Bradley 66-68-71—205 Adam Scott 73-68-66—207 Zach Johnson 69-70-68—207 Steve Stricker 71-67-70—208 Rickie Fowler 67-71-70—208 Richard Sterne 70-68-70—208 John Merrick 72-66-70—208 Bubba Watson 67-69-72—208 Jim Furyk 67-69-72—208 Phil Mickelson 72-71-67—210 Ian Poulter 69-72-69—210 Justin Rose 69-72-69—210 Martin Kaymer 74-67-69—210 Rory McIlroy 70-71-69—210 Ryan Moore 66-74-70—210 Hideki Matsuyama 72-68-70—210 Angel Cabrera 72-68-70—210 Jamie Donaldson 70-69-71—210 Harris English 70-68-72—210 Kiradech Aphibarnrat 69-68-73—210 Peter Hanson 70-72-70—212 Matt Kuchar 72-71-69—212 GFernandez-Castano 70-74-68—212 Paul Lawrie 69-72-71—212 Bo Van Pelt 71-73-68—212 Francesco Molinari 70-70-72—212 Webb Simpson 64-75-73—212 Charl Schwartzel 74-74-64—212 Brandt Snedeker 72-70-71—213 Graeme McDowell 71-71-71—213 Lee Westwood 71-71-71—213 Ernie Els 71-72-70—213 Michael Thompson 72-71-70—213 Boo Weekley 73-70-70—213 Nick Watney 71-72-70—213 Paul Casey 70-70-73—213 Thorbjorn Olesen 73-69-72—214 Richie Ramsay 73-69-73—215 Matteo Manassero 71-70-74—215 Branden Grace 70-75-70—215 Stephen Gallacher 74-74-67—215 Nicolas Colsaerts 72-70-74—216 Russell Henley 72-69-75—216 Dustin Johnson 72-69-75—216 Sang-Moon Bae 73-73-70—216

Women’s British Open Saturday At The Old Course St. Andrews, Scotland Purse: $2.75 million Yardage: 6,672; Par: 72 Partial Third Round Play suspended by high wind. a-amateur Leaderboard Na Yeon Choi -10 thru 2R Miki Saiki -9 thru 2R Morgan Pressel -8 thru 2R Suzann Pettersen -7 thru 2R Nicole Castrale -7 thru 2R Jee Young Lee -7 thru 2R Mikaela Parmlid -6 thru 2R Hee Young Park -5 thru 2R Angela Stanford -5 thru 2R So Yeon Ryu -5 thru 2R Stacy Lewis -5 thru 2R Mamiko Higa -5 thru 2R Completed Third Round Cristie Kerr 71-74-75—220 a-Lydia Ko 69-76-75—220 Minea Blomqvist 71-74-76—221 Shanshan Feng 69-76-76—221 Gwladys Nocera 74-71-78—223 Moriya Jutanugarn 72-73-79—224 Mika Miyazato 74-71-80—225 Moira Dunn 71-74-81—226 Rikako Morita 70-75-86—231

Transactions BASEBALL American League BOSTON RED SOX — Optioned RHP Pedro Beato to Pawtucket (IL). Recalled RHP Rubby De La Rosa from Pawtucket. DETROIT TIGERS — Optioned INF Hernan Perez to Erie (EL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS — Sent RHP Felipe Paulino to Northwest Arkansas (TL) for a rehab assignment. MINNESOTA TWINS — Recalled OF Oswaldo Arcia from Rochester (IL). Selected the contract of LHP Andrew Albers from Rochester. Sent OF Wilkin Ramirez to New Britain (EL) and OF Darin Mastroianni to Fort Myers (FSL) for rehab assignments. NEW YORK YANKEES — Assigned C Gary Sanchez and RHP Diego Moreno from Tampa (FSL) to Trenton (EL), C Jeff Farnham from Trenton to Tampa, and LHP Cesar Cabral from Trenton to Scranton/Wilkes-Barre (IL). OAKLAND ATHLETICS — Optioned LHP Tommy Milone to Sacramento (PCL). Recalled RHP Evan Scribner from Sacramento. TAMPA BAY RAYS — Recalled OF Brandon Guyer from Durham (IL) and placed him on the 15-day DL. TEXAS RANGERS — Sent LHP Michael Kirkman to Round Rock (PCL) and RHP Neftali Feliz to the AZL Rangers for rehab assignments. TORONTO BLUE JAYS — Placed OF Melky Cabrera on the 15-day DL.

Perince Jr. shoots 65 for three-stroke lead in 3M BLAINE, Minn. (AP) — Tom Pernice Jr. moved into position Saturday for his second Champions Tour title, shooting a 7-under 65 to take a two-stroke lead over Tom Kite in the 3M Championship. Pernice had a 13-under 131 total at TPC Twin Cities after opening with a 66. The two-time PGA Tour winner had four straight birdies on the front nine, and added two more on Nos. 10 and 12. After making a 40-foot bogey putt on the 14th hole, he birdied Nos. 15 and 18. The 53-year-old Pernice, playing in the tournament for the first time, on the 2009 SAS Championship for his lone senior title. The 63-year-old Kite, trying to become the oldest winner in the history of the 50-and-over tour, also shot 65 — his lowest score at the TPC Twin Cities in five years. He birdied No. 2 and finished his front nine by going eagle-birdie-birdie to get to 9 under, and birdied Nos. 11 and 18, missing a 25-foot eagle putt on the finishing hole by less than a foot. Kite is winless since the 2008 Boeing Classic. Jay Don Blake, Rod Spittle and Corey Pavin were three strokes back at 10 under. Blake and Rod Spittle shot 66, and Pavin had a 69. First-round leader Mark Wiebe, the Senior British Open winner Monday in a playoff, followed his opening 64 with a 71 to fall into a tie for sixth at 9 under. Kirk Triplett, who shot the day’s low round of 64, also was 9 under along with John Riegger (69) and Bart Bryant (69). Kenny Perry, coming off consecutive major victories in the Senior Players Championship and U.S. Senior Open, had a 71 to join Gene Sauers (66), Colin Montgomerie (69) and Jeff Brehaut (70) at 8 under.

Buffalo quarterback Kolb injures knee in slip on mat SFORD, N.Y. (AP) — Quarterback Kevin Kolb’s chances of earning the Buffalo Bills starting job were nearly upended by a wet and slippery rubber mat. Kolb, who is locked in a competition with rookie first-round pick EJ Manuel, avoided serious injury to his left knee when he slipped and stumbled awkwardly while switching fields between practice drills Saturday. Coach Doug Marrone said the injury does not appear to be serious. He called it “a bump,” and listed Kolb “day by day.” Marrone also provided an update on the status of Stevie Johnson, saying the team’s No. 1 receiver will miss at least a week with a pulled left hamstring. Johnson was hurt in practice Friday. Kolb wasn’t available for comment, but showed frustration by angrily tossing his helmet to the ground before being examined by head trainer Bud Carpenter. After a few minutes, Kolb got up got up on his own and was escorted to the locker room. Kolb was joining the quarterbacks and receivers in making their way through a tunnel to work out on an adjoining field. He slipped on a mat laid down over the concrete, and immediately began hobbling in pain. Kolb then put his arm around Carpenter’s shoulder for support. It was a freak accident that happened about 50 minutes into practice at Bills training camp in suburban Rochester.


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Looking Back • Since

Over 100 Years

1911

ing history one day at a time. Writ

100 years ago • Henry Schlotter-

bach was in town, Saturday and stated that his son, the head of the Louis E. Schlotterbach Co. at Newark, N.J. is now employing 100 hands at his automobile factory, where formerly he employed 30. He is making seven cars a week where formerly he only made two. The business is now beginning, he says, to show on the right side of the ledger. Ligonier Banner THE NEWS SUN

25 years ago • The Kendallville

Public Library staff will dress in early 1900s apparel for the open house celebrating the library’s 75th anniversary. Staff members include Ruth Napier, Larry Hathaway, Mark Rensberger, Pauline Butterbaugh, Jane Hartman, Doug Bell, Doris Goins and Vicki Weimer. THE EVENING STAR

25 years ago • Auburn telephone customers voted 1,515 to 1,377 in favor of unlimited local calling to Waterloo numbers, which came with an 80-cent increase in monthly bills. Waterloo customers previously had voted to support the extended service only if Auburn customers joined in paying for it. The service would add $3.06 per month to Waterloo phone bills for the next five years. HERALD REPUBLICAN

25 years ago • Embattled

Fremont Town Marshal Bobby Moore was gunned down outside his Fremont home late Tuesday night. Indiana State Police investigators said Moore, the town marshal since 1984, was shot at his home at about 10:30 p.m., The Herald Republican reported in an Extra edition. Steuben County Coroner Skip Klink said Moore suffered a lascerated aorta and lungs from the bullets of a high-powered rifle.

Letters • We welcome letters to the editor. All letters must be submitted with the author’s signature, address and daytime telephone number. We reserve the right to reject or edit letters on the basis of libel, poor taste or repetition. Mail letters to: The News Sun 102 N. Main St. P.O. Box 39 Kendallville, IN 46755 Email: dkurtz@kpcnews.net The Star 118 W. Ninth St. Auburn, IN 46706 Email: dkurtz@kpcnews.net The Herald Republican 45 S. Public Square Angola, IN 46703 Email: mikem@kpcnews.net

THE NEWS SUN

The

Star

THE HERALD REPUBLICAN

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

Our View •

Savor the days in NE Indiana A young man from Noble County who is living in Florida posted this on Facebook last week: “A lady at work yesterday knew I was from the Midwest. I asked her how she knew. She said, ‘Because you are nice…’ I am really grateful to be raised in Indiana.” We often take for granted our truly wonderful part of the world. Too often meth headlines, a rundown neighborhood — or, increasingly, a harried schedule — divert us from appreciating and enjoying the beauty and excellent opportunities surrounding us. If you take the time to look and explore, you will find magnificent nature areas with wildflowers, lakes, forests and paths. The road less traveled leads to antiques, hand crafts, organic foods, bed and breakfasts, music and even a Lavender Lane. Our schools have numerous exciting programs and activities that can appeal to people of all ages. Our libraries are treasure troves of information and services. Good food, wineries and local theater can be found. And, throughout the late spring through early fall there is a festival or major event (or two … or three) in almost every community. Some of the offerings are ongoing, such as the windmills on Kendallville’s Main Street and the arts activities in downtown Auburn. Saturday the ninth annual KidCity at the Noble County Community Fairgrounds provided free, fun interactive learning opportunities for hundreds of area children. Soon we will have Wolf Lake’s Onion Days, St. Joe’s Pickle Festival, Chautauqua at the Gene Stratton-Porter historic site, ACD Festival, Marshmallow Festival, Bluegrass Festival, Stone’s Trace in Ligonier the Apple Festival of Kendallville. This Tuesday, National Night Out in Fremont and Angola will feature community gatherings. Sponsored by the National Association of Town Watch in the United States, it provides a chance for citizens, law enforcement, businesses and neighborhood organizations to gather with food and neighborhood activities. National Night Out events are meant to increase awareness about local police programs such as drug prevention, town watches, neighborhood watches and other anti-crime efforts. Each of us needs to think every day about reaching out to strengthen connections with people in our neighborhoods and beyond. At the July 20 KPC Newspaper in Education Sprint Triathlon, a referee from the Indianapolis area told Kendallville Mayor Suzanne Handshoe and KPC coordinator Vi Wysong that the setting for the triathlon was the best he has ever seen in the entire state. “You have it all,” he said, referring to Bixler Lake, the park’s forested, rolling terrain and the scenic Windmill Museum trails. “All” also refers to the volunteers who make it happen. Many other triathlons use paid staff. With every event, festival, program and activity, volunteers are the essential ingredient for enhancing and preserving what makes our area special. Savor northeast Indiana. Take time to volunteer. Everyone can volunteer something — even if it’s something as simple as a smile. OUR VIEW is written on a rotating basis by Grace Housholder, Dave Kurtz, Matt Getts and Michael Marturello. Publisher Terry Housholder is also a member of the editorial board. We welcome readers’ comments.

Letters • Support education policies that make sense for all Hoosiers To the editor: It’s time to call the Bennett school letter grade scandal exactly what it is — cheating. Emails obtained by the Associated Press and released Monday show that former Indiana Superintendent of Public Instruction Dr. Tony Bennett and his staff worked furiously last September to artificially raise the letter grade of the Christel House Academy, an Indianapolis charter school created by a prominent donor to both Bennett’s political campaign and to others in his political party. There are no excuses for the actions taken by Bennett and his staff as revealed in the string of emails other than favoritism, cronyism, self-interest and hubris — none of which has a place in public school policymaking. To my fellow educators who have lived, breathed and worked under the long history of Indiana’s string of accountability laws dating back to the A+ program in 1987 there was no joy in the revelations exposed on Monday. There was, however, a degree of affirmation. The emails affirmed to teachers that their palpable unease over how Bennett forced his agenda — the “My way or the highway!” approach without including or trusting the expertise of the people on the frontlines — was founded unease. We felt it last fall when the announcement of school letter grades was delayed. We felt it during the REPA 2 teacher licensure rules changes when Bennett and the State Board tried repeatedly to force licensure revisions without complying with

Indiana’s rulemaking process. And we felt it when we learned that out-of-state takeover companies were being paid $800,000 per school to do nothing more than to observe a school for an entire year without lifting a finger to assist those schools. Sadly, the unease lingers beyond this school letter grade scandal. At the State Board of Education meeting just a few days ago, members of the board openly suggested creating a separate governing and legal structure to operate parallel to the Department of Education and presumably outside the scope of Superintendent Glenda Ritz who was elected to oversee Indiana’s public education system. This new display of audacity is not only unnecessary, but it is a monumental waste of taxpayer resources. As teachers, we often share with our students that adage, “Cheaters only cheat themselves.” Today I understand more clearly how incomplete that simple lesson is. I understand the message, but the damage done by this latest revelation runs much deeper. This disgrace taints and has an impact on the state’s accountability system and Indiana’s local school communities. As the newly-elected president of the Indiana State Teachers Association in my first week of office, I would like to say to Indiana’s legislators from both sides of the political aisle, to Governor Pence and to Superintendent Ritz that it’s time for all of us to turn the page on the aftermath of Bennett and work together to support policies that make sense for all Hoosiers and of which we can all be proud. Let’s talk. Teresa Meredith, president Indiana State Teachers Association

A to F: Taking liberties cheats students, parents, taxpayers NASHVILLE, Ind. — There was a basketball gym-style scoreboard outside of then-Supt. Tony Bennett’s Statehouse office in July 2009. A clock ticked off the time remaining in his term. The score showed Indiana’s high school graduation rate at 77.8 percent. Bennett informed me that by the end of his term in 2012, Indiana would have a 90 percent graduation rate. I found Bennett’s goals ambitious, even aggressive. His confidence was as audacious as NFL Hall of Famer Deion Sanders’. Over three decades of covering Indiana politics and public policy, the high school graduation rate had always been in that 70th percentile. Bennett was promising to reach the 90th percentile in just four short years, coming without any significant increase in school funding. While then-Gov. Mitch Daniels had side-stepped then-Speaker Pat Bauer’s aversion to education reform by seeking changes administratively from 2007 through 2010, the real thrust of the Daniels/ Bennett change didn’t pass until April 2011. It was then that the number of charter schools increased, the voucher program began, and there were mold-splitting reforms in school and teacher grading that included the “A through F” program, and the credentialing of principals and superintendents. Bennett had made other changes early in his term such as ending half days and teacher training changing to emphasize the topics they would teach. Lo and behold, in 2011 the Indiana graduation rate officially stood at 86.61 percent, and in Bennett’s final year in office, at a stunning 88.38 percent. It was

astonishingly close to Bennett’s goal. If these results were too good to be true, when you mined down into other data related to public education, you could see problems in the metrics. In 2006, Indiana University noted that of the 92,624 freshmen entering the state’s higher education system in 2003-04, some 23.3 percent had to take remedial courses. Essentially, this means their prep training was below university standards. In 2011, the HOWEY Indiana Higher CommisPOLITICAL Education sion found that REPORT more than 40 percent of prep graduates were Brian Howey in university remediation, as well as 7 percent with academic honors degrees. For students who graduated with a general degree, it was 83 percent. These past eight months, after one of the most rapid rises in Indiana politics and education, we’ve watched the precipitous fall of Supt. Tony Bennett, culminating with his stunning upset loss to little known Democrat Glenda Ritz last November, and as of Thursday, his resignation as Florida’s education superintendent. Bennett’s ultimate Sunshine State downfall had its roots in Indiana, where emails obtained by the Associated Press’s Tom LoBianco revealed Bennett’s willingness to take liberties with the A through F numbers of Christel House, a charter school founded by Indiana philanthropist Christel

DeHaan. It looked even worse when it was reported that DeHaan had contributed $130,000 to Bennett’s re-election campaign. Bennett had cited Christel House as the poster child for his reforms. But last September, when it became clear the charter school would receive a “C” instead of an “A,” it set off a panic in the superintendent’s office. “Oh crap. We cannot release until this is resolved,” said Heather Neal, an aide to the superintendent, on Sept. 12, 2012. She is now Gov. Mike Pence’s legislative liaison. Bennett would email, saying, “They need to understand that anything less than an A for Christel House compromises all of our accountability work. We may well lose Pence on this as well …” And in a Sept. 13 email to DOE brass Neal, Jon Gubera and Dale Chu, Bennett would write, “I cannot count the number of times we have been in meetings with Christel, the Chamber, (House Speaker) Brian Bosma, (Senate President) David Long and others when I have said that we count Christel House as an A school. Now here we are and they are not an A school. We have two problems. First, I either lied or twisted the truth in order to get what we want. I hope we come to the meeting today with solutions and not excuses and/or explanations for me to wiggle myself out of repeated lies I have made over the past six months.” By the time the A to F numbers were released, Christel House had received an “A” in what the AP would describe as a “weeklong behind-the-scenes scramble” to find a way to “lift Christel House from a C to an A. It’s not clear from the emails exactly how Gubera changed the grading formula, but they do

Bennett had cited Christel House as the poster child for his reforms. But last September, when it became clear the charter school would receive a “C” instead of an “A,” it set off a panic in the superintendent’s office.

• show DeHaan’s grade jumping twice.” “That’s like parting the Red Sea to get numbers to move that significantly,” Jeff Butts, superintendent of Wayne Township schools in Indianapolis, told AP. Hammond Mayor Thomas McDermott Jr., was incensed at the special treatment, noting that the Hammond Academy of Science and Technology received an “F” due to what he called a “data entry problem.” Bennett would acknowledge to education blog StateImpact, “Frankly, my emails portrayed correctly my frustrations with the fact that there was a nuance in the system that did not lend itself to face validity.” When it came to compromising accountability, Bennett and his staff undermined not only his meteoric career, but the entire strata of reforms that may be nothing more than a hollow facade. BRIAN HOWEY is publisher of the Howey Political Report, a weekly briefing on Indiana politics. Contact him at 317506-0883 or at: howeypolitics.com.


VIEWPOINTS •

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

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Once you hit ‘send,’ there are no do-overs with email A colleague once advised that you should never consider email private. This, of course, is one of many ways of looking at email in light of recent news reports about email correspondence from then-Gov. Mitch Daniels and former Superintendent of Public Instruction Tony Bennett. Official emails from these individuals were ferreted out by Associated Press reporter Tom LoBianco and shared with the world in the form of news stories. Daniels has been taking heat for his perceived attack on academic freedoms while Bennett has found the glow of the national spotlight for allegedly changing a grading system to make a school founded by a big Republican supporter receive an “A” grade in Indiana’s school grading system when it should have received a “C”.

When it comes to how Indiana law looks at email, Steve Key, executive director and general counsel for the Hoosier State Press Association (of which this newspaper MICHAEL is a member) has a simple MARTURELLO explanation. “Email is like a letter. If I use my home computer to ‘mail’ a note to a friend or family member at their home, it’s private as long as both parties don’t share with others,” Key said in an email (of course).

Indiana law and the view of the Indiana Commission on Public Records is pretty clear when it comes to official email. “If I’m a public official or employee using taxpayer-paid equipment or mail account, then citizens have a right to know how that individual is using their time and how their decisions and actions will impact Hoosiers,” Key said. I have had discussions with a number of elected officials on whether they should use their personal, home email accounts for official business. Many do. In some locales, public officials or public employees who use their personal email accounts for public business are subject to the open records statutes that apply. And there has been a growing movement of public officials to avoid open records laws by

Once your email is in the hands of others, you never know where it is going to end up.

• conducting public business on private email accounts in order to avoid public scrutiny. (When it comes to government types hiding from the public, where there’s a will, many find a way, unfortunately.) Where things become sticky is when you send out an email to an individual or group of individuals. Once your email is in the hands of others, you never know where it is going to end

up. That’s what my colleague was alluding to. Basically, she said, if you don’t want to see your words used by others for whatever purpose they desire, don’t send your thoughts in an email. Once you hit send, as many of us have learned the hard way, you can’t get that message back. I don’t know how many times I have received emails from officials in government or private business asking to recall a message. OK, so I won’t use incorrect information you sent out, but when it comes to email, there are no do-overs. And now, some of the best and supposedly the brightest of Indiana are learning that message the hard way. MICHAEL MARTURELLO is editor of the The Herald Republican. He can be reached at mikem@kpcnews.net.

How a true democracy is supposed to operate Cokie’s mother, Lindy Claiborne Boggs, was born on a plantation in the segregated South before women could vote. When she died last week at 97, Barack and Michelle Obama celebrated “her legacy as a champion of women’s and civil rights [that] will continue to inspire generations to come.” Protecting the right to vote was the central principle of Lindy’s political career. During the Louisiana governor’s race of 1939, she a COKIE ROBERTS organized group of women prevent a STEVEN ROBERTS to corrupt machine from stealing the election. One of her cohorts stayed through the night “in a rough waterfront precinct” guarding a ballot box. Another was “pasted” by a rival and wound up with “a black eye and a swollen lip,” Lindy wrote in her memoir, “Washington Through a Purple Veil.” Lindy eventually served 18 years in Congress, succeeding her husband Hale, who was killed in a plane crash in 1972. Hale risked his career to support the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and a cross was later burned on their lawn in New Orleans to protest his vote. “Hale and I strongly believed that the freedom to register and to vote were inherent rights of all citizens of the United States, and that only through the exercise of those rights could true democracy operate,” Lindy wrote. Maw Maw — as she was known to the family — was right as usual. That’s why we agree so strongly with Attorney General Eric Holder’s decision to use the full weight of the Justice Department to salvage the law that Hale supported at such cost 48 years ago. That law created a system under which certain jurisdictions with a history of racial discrimination — nine states and parts of six others — were required to “pre-clear” any changes in election law with federal judges or the Justice Department. In June, the Supreme Court struck down that provision, saying the formula that defined the states covered by the law was outdated and unfair. But the court did not touch the law’s basic concept: The federal government has the right to oversee local election rules. It also left intact a section under which the Justice Department can challenge specific rules that are intentionally discriminatory. That’s exactly what Holder is doing, charging Texas with two counts of bias: an election map that diminishes the role of racial minorities, and a law that makes it harder for poorer and less-educated citizens to register and vote.

Fence Post: Weiner can’t cut the mustard Former U.S. Rep. and current New York mayoral candidate Anthony Weiner was a hot topic this past week on The Fence Post, KPC Media Group’s online forum, where members lambasted Weiner in the wake of another sexting scandal.

edeevee posted, “What Weiner did and the way he has responded since is stupid and shows poor judgment. He’s not fit to be a leader.” evilkumquat responded, “As a guy, I want to forgive him because I know how difficult it can be to James Tew ignore what your libido says. Then I remember that, as a guy, I’ve never done any of the things that get other guys in trouble, so maybe that is enough of a character flaw to disqualify some of them from a leadership role.”

ONLINE COMMENTS

Jack Dold commented, “I know that all politicians are subject to the same temptations as their constituents. That’s why we are usually willing to cut them some slack. I guess my disdain comes from the fact that political jobs are no longer ‘public service’ but have devolved to ‘career’ status. As a result, many politicians begin to feel superior to those they have pledged to serve and hence take liberties to which they are not entitled. “Unfortunately, in my opinion, the only means to correction is term limits and we know that will never happen.” To join the discussion, or to start your own, go to kpcnews.com and select More > The Fence Post from the navigation menu.

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

Bev Berkes of Albion sent in this photo of Buddy enjoying a cone from Cougar Cone in Albion for this month’s KPC photo contest. To vote for your favorite photo in the contest, go to kpcnews.com and select More > Photo Contest from the navigation menu.

New on video Steve Kramer of Kendallville, whose father Norm was a scout for the Philadelphia Phillies, was the topic of Monday’s Neighbors profile. Video of some of Steve Kramer’s collection of sports memorabilia was posted on kpcnews.com. Check out Neighbors each Monday in KPC newspapers, and online at kpcnews. com. JAMES TEW (“james_t” on The Fence Post) is

online editor for KPC Media Group. He can be reached by email at jamest@kpcnews.net.

• Texas Gov. Rick Perry railed against Holder’s action, calling it an “end run around the Supreme Court” that shows “utter contempt” for the Constitution. But Perry has it exactly wrong. It’s the attorney general who is following the law and the governor who is showing “utter contempt” for the most basic constitutional right. The real motive behind the actions in Texas is obvious. Sponsors say they are trying to reduce election fraud, but every independent study shows that deliberate voter misconduct is extremely rare. The GOP is facing what Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham calls a “demographic death spiral” — a rising flood of nonwhite voters who could turn large sections of the political map from red to blue. Instead of courting those voters, Republicans are trying to reduce their potential impact. The Texas example is hardly isolated. In about a dozen states last year, Republican-controlled legislatures passed restrictive laws with one purpose: to limit the influence of voting groups that are likely to support Democrats. In one indiscreet but invaluable moment, a Pennsylvania legislator said out loud what everyone knew to be true: the laws had a purely partisan goal, to “allow Governor Romney to win the state of Pennsylvania.” (He lost anyway.) Not only did Hale support the Voting Rights Act of 1965, he spoke for it on the House floor. In the most enduring speech of his long career, he said: “I wish I could stand here as a man who loves my state, born and reared in the South, who has spent every year of his life in Louisiana since he was 5 years old, and say there has not been discrimination … but unfortunately, it is not so.” Things are much better today — thugs don’t stuff ballot boxes or punch out women who try to stop them — but Hale’s warning remains valid. Discrimination still exists, and the recent efforts in Texas and other states are conclusive proof. The Voting Rights Act is weaker but still standing, and the administration is right to use every power it has left to protect the essence of “true democracy.” COKIE ROBERTS AND STEVEN V. ROBERTS are columnists for Newspaper Enterprise Assn. They can be contacted by email at stevecokie@gmail. com.

Commentary •

Photo contest online Entries for this month’s KPC Photo Contest are now online. To vote for your favorite photo in the contest, go to kpcnews. com and select More > Photo Contest from the navigation menu. The winning photo in each month’s contest receives a mug or mousepad with the photo printed on it, and a chance at the $100 grand prize at the end of the year.

The GOP is facing what Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham calls a “demographic death spiral” — a rising flood of nonwhite voters who could turn large sections of the political map from red to blue.

High fives

High5s & Hisses

A reader writes: “High fives to the construction crew that finished resurfacing South Dewey Street with very little inconvenience to homeowners.

Sylvia Widmeyer of Auburn sent the following: High fives to the Auburn Kiwanis Club for years of providing the community with delightful July fireworks … and to Auctions America for taking over the reins of this community tradition. A super high five to Auctions

America for the phenomenal July 5 fireworks display. Start to finish, it was an awesome visual event.

High fives to Steve Rieke and his “team” for the excellent groundskeeping at the Woodlawn Cemetery.

Hisses Hisses to … coupons for (money) off a meal for your birthday, which then only give you half the amount you would regularly get. Hisses to the The Star for not having acknowl-

edged the July 5 fireworks provided by the new sponsor — Auctions America — with even one picture in the paper the following day. (Editor’s note: Our staff took a photo of a hot-dog-eating contest, one of several events preceding the fireworks. The fireworks began at 10 p.m., which would have made it impossible to get a photo processed for The Star’s publication deadlines.) HIGH FIVES AND HISSES is a Sunday feature compiled by this newspaper’s editorial board. If you have a “high five” or a “hiss” to nominate, call or email the editor of this newspaper.


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BUSINESS • TECHNOLOGY •

kpcnews.com

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

Ivy Tech: our hope and, sadly, our state’s failure It will be mostly sunny today, with a high near 75 and north winds 5 to 10 mph. Tonight will be partly cloudy, with a low around 53. Monday will bring a 30 percent chance of showers, then skies will turn partly sunny, with a high near 77. Monday night will see a 30 percent chance of showers, low 60. Saturday’s Statistics Local HI 79 LO 63 PRC. 0 South Bend HI 78 LO 62 PRC. 0 Fort Wayne HI 80 LO 62 PRC. 0.02 Indianapolis HI 83 LO 68 PRC. 0.71

Sunrise Monday 6:40 a.m. Sunset Monday 8:54 p.m.

For a local weather forecast, 24 hours a day, seven days a week, call WAWK at 347-3000.

The Sunday Business Report • Engstrom joins F&M State Bank ARCHBOLD, Ohio — Farmers & Merchants State Bank has announced the hiring of Jamie S. Engstrom as assistant vice president, office manager serving the Butler market. Engstrom has 15 years of banking experience and is available to assist Engstrom customers with consumer, small business and mortgage loans. Engstrom received her Associate’s Degree of applied business/ paralegal from NWSCC and a Bachelor of Science in criminal justice from Defiance College. She is a graduate Hilltop High School, West Unity, Ohio. Engstrom resides in Bryan with her family. She is active in the Kiwanis Club and is president of the

VOTE FOR YOUR FAVORITE.

Northwest Ohio Affordable Housing Board. She enjoys running and spending time with her kids and friends.

Farmers Insurance honors Outman AUBURN — Farmers Insurance said Jerry Outman of Auburn has qualified as a Championship Agent for his outstanding overall performance The honor recognizes Jerry Outman as “among the best of the best at Farmers who have achieved a high sales volume for auto, home, life and business policies, while maintaining high client retention and profitability,” said Farmers president of the Farmers brand, Mhayse Samalya. “Through his excellent customer service, Farmers continues to be his customers’ first choice for their insurance needs. All of us at Farmers are proud of Outman’s commitment and service to his community.” As part of his recognition during Farmers’ 85th year,

Outman and his wife, Daun, attended a Championship Agen conference in Chicago with other qualifying agents and district managers. The group discussed new business strategies and key issues affecting customers and the insurance industry in their communities. Outman operates the Jerry Outman Farmers Insurance Agency, 1041 W. Seventh St., Auburn.

Archbold appoints service manager TOPEKA — Archbold Equipment Co. has chosen Ed Stump as service manager for its Topeka location. Stump joins a staff of more than 10 employees and will be supervising the service technicians. He graduated from West Noble High School and has been active in agriculture for the past 30 years. He is a member of the Noble County Sheriff’s Reserve and lives in Kimmell with his wife, Stacy.

out of high school by their Several years ago, I senior year are deficient in asked the chancellor of Ivy English and math, in history Tech Community College and government, to say in Gary, “Why does your nothing of civility. institution exist?” Whiners in state governThe response was clear ment believe that students and definitive: “We are a second-chance school where should graduate in a given period of time. They forget those who seek additional that most of these students education experiences can are not well-prepared for turn after high school.” learning. He did not say, The mission “We are here to of education, grant degrees and in the minds of certificates.” state government Ivy Tech is officials, has Indiana’s legislachanged from tive answer for the imparting the poor quality work wisdom of civilidone by our high zation to preparing schools. A signifiMORTON youths for that cant portion of Ivy Tech’s resources MARCUS first paycheck. A college is used for remedistudent without ation in English a confirmed and math. What career orientawas not learned tion is considin the primary or ered a wastrel, secondary grades squandering the is offered to young adults to enlarge their resources of his/her family and of the state (to the opportunities in life as well extent that the state provides as in the job market. any resources). As we have lowered Ivy Tech bears the standards in “academic burden of impossible studies” and decreased expectations. It is supposed vocational training in high to prepare young people schools, the burden on Ivy for jobs by certifying they Tech and our traditional colleges and universities has have completed certain requirements satisfactorily. increased. The appropriate metric for Some high-school such an institution is not students are ready by their a graduation rate, but a senior year to take college credit courses. But these are placement rate. What portion of Ivy Tech the few, the academic elite. Many who have not dropped students find employment

within what period of time? Adjusting for the general rate of unemployment, it is success in employment that counts, not some piece of paper stamped with the institution’s logo. A student may be in Ivy Tech for a short period of time and still be counted as a success, if we drop the expectation of certification. The issue is not for the students to meet the demands of the college, but for the college to meet the needs of the students. Over the years, Ivy Tech has made serious errors. It became an employment center for members of the General Assembly. It overreached and built an excessive number of campuses. It built an empire of administrators to exchange memos with other administrators. Meanwhile, many of its students left without necessary job-related skills. These problems can be addressed with time. What cannot be recovered are the lost opportunities of students who have been denied the education/job preparation they sought and did not receive. MORTON J. MARCUS is an independent economist, speaker and writer formerly with Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business.

K P C Contest

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

State Sen. Dennis Kruse, R-Auburn, is inducted into the National Auctioneers Association Hall of Fame. He is joined

by his wife and four sons. From left to right are: Daniel, Kay, Timothy, Dennis, John and Matthew Kruse.

Kruse selected to enter Auctioneers Hall of Fame INDIANAPOLIS — State Sen. Dennis Kruse, R-Auburn, was inducted into the National Auctioneers Association Hall of Fame recently during the association’s 2013 conference in Indianapolis. “The NAA Hall of Fame highlights those individuals who have made excellent contributions to the auction industry, but also made excellent contributions to the National Auctioneers Association. Dennis has done both of those,” said Terry Dunning, NAA Hall of Fame committee chair. Dunning said the committee also considers an individual’s community involvement, adding that Kruse has served in the Indiana General Assembly for nearly 25 years. Kruse has been an

auctioneer since 1964. His career highlights include: president, Indiana Auctioneers Association Foundation, 2013; president and owner of Reppert School of Auctioneering, Auburn, 1996-2011; president, Indiana Auctioneers Association, 2005; president, National Auctioneers Association, 2005-2006; graduate, Reppert School of Auctioneering, 1964; National Auctioneers Foundation Board of Directors, 2009-2011; and Hall of Fame, Indiana Auctioneers Association, 2007. “It’s truly an honor to be inducted into the National Auctioneers Association Hall of Fame,” Kruse said. “Without the support of our auctioneering community, whose international reputation

has endured throughout the decades, my achievements would not be possible. This honor is for our strong and talented auctioneering network, and I’m incredibly thankful to be a part of that.” Established in 1961, the National Auctioneers Association Hall of Fame recognizes leaders within the auction industry. Bronze-etched portrait plaques of Hall of Fame honorees are displayed at the National Auctioneering Museum in Overland Park, Kan. With the addition of the 2013 class, there are 141 members in the Hall of Fame. The association said induction into the NAA Hall of Fame is considered the highest honor given to an auctioneer.

Stocks of Local Interest • Prices as of Aug. 2, 2013 Courtesy of Edward Jones Stock Name

Latest Week’s Price Change

Alcoa 7.98 Amer. Elec. 46.58 Air Products 106.93 Cooper Tire 33.77 Courier Corp. 15.70 CSX Corp 26.04

—0.09 +0.11 +2.86 +0.27 +0.02 +1.37

Eaton Corp. Fifth Third General Elec Ingersoll Rand Interntl Paper Key Corp. Kraft Foods Leggett & Platt Lincoln Natl Masco

66.06 19.69 24.70 62.50 49.38 12.54 57.50 31.91 44.23 21.55

—1.95 +0.32 +0.05 +1.34 +0.27 +0.14 +1.05 +0.20 +2.68 +1.70

McDonald’s 99.16 Altria Group 35.67 Morgan Stanley 27.84 NiSource 31.10 Nucor 47.18 Parker Hannifin 105.20 PNC Financial 77.43 Steel Dynamics 15.77 Wal-Mart 78.73 Wells Fargo 44.47

+1.12 —0.20 +0.15 —0.34 +0.27 +3.05 +1.52 +0.17 +0.73 +0.97

KPC Phone Books REALLY TRULY LOCAL... Steuben, DeKalb, Noble/LaGrange


SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

The

THE NEWS SUN

Star

THE HERALD REPUBLICAN

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INTERACTIVE EXHIBIT

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Area Activities • Tuesday, Aug. 6 PC’S FOR YOUTH: FUNDRAISER BANQUET 5:30 p.m. Monika Stidham, a recent Lakeland High School graduate, will tell her story with PC’s For Youth at the organization’s 4th Annual Fundraising Dinner Banquet and auction. PC’s For Youth gives computers to students in middle/high school, college, and adults trying to obtain their GED to use for educational purposes. The organization serves LaGrange, Noble, Steuben, DeKalb, Elkhart, Kosciusko and Whitley counties. The banquet is their major fundraiser. To purchase tickets, visit their website or e-mail Colton C. Strawser at cstrawser@pcsforyouth.org. LaGrange American Legion, 100 Industrial Parkway, LaGrange.

Representatives from Possibilities, a store on West Ninth Street in Auburn, have decorated this piano that sits outside their business as part of Pianos on the Square.

The Waterloo Girl Scouts decorated the baby grand piano in front of Waterloo Lions Club headquarters, the Lion’s Den. OCTAVIA LEHMAN

OCTAVIA LEHMAN

Wednesday, Aug. 7 WOLF LAKE ONION DAYS 12 a.m. Most events at Noble Township Park in Wolf Lake. Festival opens at 5 p.m. Kids Night begins at 5:30 p.m. Several events at 6 p.m. Silent auction in park’s community building, the Auburn Dixielanders will perform in the gazebo, and Kiddie King and Queen pageant. Registration for the pet show at 6:30 p.m. Show starts at 7 p.m.

Thursday, Aug. 8 OCTAVIA LEHMAN

WOLF LAKE ONION DAYS Portside Pizza will be site of pizza-eating contest at 5:30 p.m. At the same time in the park, registration will begin for pedal pull and the three-onthree basketball tournament. Both competitions begin at 6 p.m. The pedal pull has kiddie and adult divisions.

Thursday, Aug. 8 ST. JOE PICKLE FESTIVAL The St. Joe Pickle Festival returns for its 17th year. There will be a craft tent and food vendors Thursday, Friday and Saturday. The annual art and photo show exhibit opens to the public at 4 p.m. Thursday at the St. Joe Church of Christ. St. Mark Lutheran Church will have a display of kids artwork and a rummage and bake sale all three days. The opening parade is at 5 p.m. Thursday. Children can start decorating their cucumbers for the pickle derby at 5:30 p.m., with racing to begin at 7 p.m. The gospel group Stead Fast, performs at 8 p.m. The annual firefighter blue light parade will be at 9:30 p.m. Thursday.

Friday, Aug. 9 WOLF LAKE ONION DAYS Events start at Wolf Lake Elementary School at 4:30 p.m. with a cruise in for cars, trucks, motorcycles and tractors. Back at the park, onion judging and a cake walk at 5 p.m. Miss Onion Days will be crowned at 6:30 p.m. Variety show at 7 p.m.

Friday, Aug 9 ST. JOE PICKLE FESTIVAL The Mark’s Ark animal show will be featured in the entertainment tent at 4 p.m. Friday, with the Creative Comedy show at 5 p.m. The Concord Township Fire Department will host a fish dinner at 5 p.m. The inaugural pickle festival talent show begins at 7:30 p.m., with categories for children and adults. Cash prizes will be awarded.

Kassie Mettert, center, plays the piano outside Possibilities on Ninth Street in Auburn. Joining her, from left, are Ella

Pianos on the square Free event continues through Sept. 15 in Auburn, Butler, Waterloo and Garrett

The Armstrong Family decorated this piano that is located in front of the old fire station on West Main Street in Butler. The piano is part of the Pianos on the Square outdoor interactive exhibit.

BY KATHRYN BASSETT kbassett@kpcmedia.com

AUBURN — From curious children to talented musicians, the Auburn Arts Commission, Inc., invites anyone and everyone to tickle the ivories on the pianos set out across DeKalb County as part of Pianos on the Square. The free, interactive, outdoor event runs through Sept. 15 and features decorated pianos all over Auburn, Butler, Waterloo and Garrett. Clubs, organizations and individuals have decorated the pianos and the public is encouraged to play them. Pianos on the Square also will present free outdoor concerts and recitals, films, a musical, play reading and lecture in Auburn. Additional events will be held in Butler, Garrett and Waterloo. “Some are done. Some are started. Some are not started yet,” said Nina Bennett who has coordinated the decorating of the Auburn pianos. “Decorating could continue through the summer and be progressive over six weeks.” A baby grand piano takes center stage on the west side of the DeKalb County Courthouse. The piano, which was donated for the exhibit by the Auburn Presbyterian Church, will be decorated by the nonprofit Auburn revitalization group ADAC, with Auburn’s revitalization as the theme. SEE PIANOS PAGE C2

SEE AREA ACTIVITIES, PAGE C6

Coble, Ava Coble and Brody Kawolski, below.

OCTAVIA LEHMAN

Sharon Zonker of the Auburn Garden Club decorates the piano outside the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum Thursday in Auburn.

“Garrett, Waterloo and Butler are all excited to be included, and I hope this project inspires other countywide efforts to bring art experiences to everyone.” Sheryl Prentice, president of the Auburn Arts Commission

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FROM PAGE C1 •

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SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

INTERACTIVE EXHIBIT

Bridal guide seeking photos of flower girls, ring bearers Children assisting with weddings as flower girls and ring bearers are among the most memorable sights of the special day. We invite readers to submit candid or posed photos of flower girls and ring bearers who participated in northeast Indiana weddings so that can be shared with readers in our upcoming bridal guide. SUBMISSION INFO: Photos should be emailed to Jenny Kobiela-Mondor, special publications editor, at jmondor@kpcmedia.com. Please include the names of the people in the photo and the date and location of the wedding. No prints will be accepted. All submissions must be by email. Make sure you receive a reply to your email so that you know that it was received. The deadline for email submissions is Monday, Aug. 5.

Crossword Puzzle Answers •

Travel

PIANOS: Big Brothers Big Sisters, Girl Scouts involved FROM PAGE C1

Pictures of changes and improvements to buildings and storefronts will be applied to the piano using the technique of decoupage. Decorations also include an artist rendering of possible future improvements at Auburn’s Sixth and Main street. The Auburn Garden Club takes credit for the cheery piano located among the plants and flowers in Courtyard Park. As bright as the flowers themselves, the piano is a shade of sunny yellow. “Bloom Where You Are Planted” is painted across the front. Other decorations include illustrations of watermelon, flowers and the sun. Bennett said she will decorate a piano that is outside of her art gallery, Expressions, on South Main Street. “The piano dates to the mid- to late 1930s. It will be decorated with art deco designs and colors,” Bennett said. Children involved in the Big Brothers Big Sisters program will leave their mark on a piano located outside of the Mad Anthony Tap Room on North Main Street. The youngsters have been invited to leave their fingerprint in paint on the piano and artists Leah Whitted and Laurel Steffen will render the impressions into bugs and other designs, Bennett said. “We’re all excited about it,“ Bennett said of the exhibit. “There has been a lot of interest. It’s exciting to see how people have jumped on board.” “Pianos on the Square is the Auburn Arts Commission’s first public art project to have exhibits in multiple communities. This ties in nicely with our mission to serve all of DeKalb County in encouraging the arts,” said commission president Sheryl Prentice. “Garrett, Waterloo and Butler are all excited to be included, and I hope this project inspires other countywide efforts to bring art experiences to everyone,” Prentice said.

OCTAVIA LEHMAN

The Auburn Garden Club has decorated this piano that is in Courtyard Park in downtown Auburn. The piano is accented with illustrations of watermelon, flowers and the sun. “Bloom Where You Are Planted” is painted across the front. The piano is part of Pianos on the Square.

Pianos and their locations AUBURN • Eckhart Public Library, decorated by library representatives. • Schaab’s Insurance, Ninth Street, decorated by Pat and JoDe Payton. • DeKalb Health Hospital (inside), decorated by hospital representatives. • Eckhart Park, decorated by Auburn Rotary Club. • Mad Anthony Tap Room, decorated by Leah Whitted and Laurel Steffen for Big Brothers-Big Sisters. • North Street YMCA, decorated by YMCA representatives. • Auburn Cord Duesenberg Automobile Museum, decorated by museum representatives. • Cupbearer Cafe, decorated by Cher Coburn of Auburn Classic Florist. • Auburn City Hall, decorated by the DeKalb Humane Society. • West side of the DeKalb County Courthouse, decorated by ADAC.

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• Expressions art gallery, decorated by Nina Bennett. • Possibilities, West Ninth Street, decorated by Possibilities representatives. • Courtyard Park, decorated by the Auburn Garden Club. • Busy Brush, decorated by the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Festival representatives.

Michael’s Youth Group. • Baker Insurance, decorated by the Tarbet family of Waterloo. • Eagle Park, decorated by First Beginnings Day Care, New Hope Christian Center. • Library lawn, decorated by the library teens. • Near the Lion’s Den, decorated by Girl Scouts of Waterloo.

GARRETT • Judy A. Morrill Recreation Center, decorated by Courtney Reinhold. • Garrett Public Library, decorated by Cora Myers. • Garrett Museum of Art, decorated by Suzie Chisholm. • Courtyard near City Hall, decorated by Tracy Crocker.

WATERLOO • Between Hart’s Grocery and Warm a Heart food pantry, decorated by St.

BUTLER • Butler Public Library, decorated by Kendall Likes and Sydney Fritch. • In front of the old fire station on West Main Street, decorated by The Armstrong Family. • Corner of Sixth and Main streets, decorated by Bill Graham. • Between the new City Hall building and The Eat’n House, South Broadway, decorated by the Moughler Family. • Between CVS and Kaiser’s Market, decorated by Bill Graham.

Unsealed birth records give adoptees peek at past SPRINGFIELD, Ill. (AP) — Maura Duffy spent a day in Chicago last September with her mother: A walk along Lake Michigan, shared meals, a boat tour highlighting Second City architecture. But this was no typical mother-daughter outing. It was the first time the two women had ever met. Since a handful of states, including Illinois, have unsealed birth certificates, thousands of adoptees have claimed them and learned about their beginnings. The 35-year-old Duffy, adopted at birth, is among 8,800 Illinois residents since 2010 to do so. Not everyone who gets the document goes on a search. But for many, it’s led to heart-rending reunions. “I finally got to see and meet someone who looked exactly like me,” said Duffy, a marketing professional. “It’s a very kind of emotional, strange thing that you grow up your whole life and don’t ever know anything about your background. And it’s the first chapter of your life, that birth certificate.” Obtaining a birth certificate — something most people can do without

much thought — often is a visceral, as much as legal, quest for an adoptee. “The things that people take for granted are enormous, life-changing moments” for adoptees, said Rep. Sara Feigenholtz, a Chicago Democrat and adoptee who sponsored the Illinois law and still breaks down when discussing it. Feigenholtz, who met her birth mother years ago, worked for more than a decade to open birth certificates in Illinois, which like nearly every other state had sealed such records from the 1940s through the 1980s. There are several reasons adoptees want access to those records, including learning medical histories crucial to determining health risks. Many adoptees believe they have a right to such a personal, intimate record. Illinois is one of 11 states to have open birth certificates and one of nine to have unsealed them since 1999, according to the American Adoption Congress. And because of its size, the Prairie State has seen more adoptees get those papers than most. Still, the 8,800 is only 2.5 percent of the 350,000 Illinois adoptees’ records that were sealed beginning in 1946.


RELIGION •

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

kpcnews.com

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Kane to judge, sing at Christian Idol First place will win $500 in contest beginning Saturday GARRETT — National recording artist Spencer Kane will judge and perform during the intermission of the 2013 Christian Idol competition finals Saturday at 6 p.m. at Garrett High School. Finalists will compete for the grand prize of $500 and a chance to sing the National Anthem at a Tin Caps game in Fort Wayne. The finals feature four judges with extensive music industry experience: • Kane, national Christian

pop recording artist and TV actor on the sitcom “iShine Knect,” spencerkanemusic. com • Michael Archambeault, minister of music at New Life Tabernacle, Kendallville, and graduate of IBC with a major in music; • Jenny Fast, 2011 Christian Idol winner and Garrett High School show choir teacher; and • Gralan Early (aka Street Scholar), gospelurban music producer and rap artist, and a Fort Wayne

Community Schools music production teacher; Kendallville-based Kane’s debut EP, “One of The Kind,” hits Christian bookstores nationwide Sept. 1 and is already available on iTunes. He has been touring nationally with iShine and on his own since February and won “Best Emerging Christian Artist” in June at the Lifelight Christian Music Festival in Bethany, Mo. His song “Blue Sky” was released to Christian Hit Radio June 15. Aside from the United States, Kane’s music has been played on radio in Australia, Canada, UK and several South American stations.

Allen Family concert set for Tuesday BUTLER — The Allen Family will perform in concert at Butler United Methodist Church at 7 p.m. Tuesday. Doors will open at 6 p.m., with a pre-show featuring local entertainment at 6:30 p.m. Based in Branson, Mo., the Allen Family is in its 17th year of full-time gospel music

ministry. They have traveled to 35 states in the U.S. and four Canadian provinces, entertaining thousands. Todd and Michelle Allen and their eight children all participate in this endeavor. They live in a bus 365 days a year and perform over 250 engagements each year. Tickets cost $8 each and are available at the church

office, 501 W. Green St., or at the City of Butler Utility Office, 215 S. Broadway. A freewill love offering will also be received to help the Allen Family with travel expenses. Seating is limited to 250, but more than 180 tickets already had been purchased as of Tuesday. For more information, call the church office at 868-2098.

Catholic diocese upgrades website FORT WAYNE — The Catholic Diocese of Fort Wayne-South Bend upgraded its website Thursday, a press release said. The site, diocesefwsb. org, has been completely overhauled, while preserving some of the basic structures in place. “We’re using a new platform and working with a new vendor,” said Sean McBride, diocesan secretariat for communications and the lead in the project. “We were very cognizant from the beginning of the project that there were certain areas in need of great improvement, while some aspects that were already in place were quite sound,” McBride said. “Overall I think we struck a

great balance and hope for positive feedback from the people we serve.” The diocese has moved from a Wordpress format into a custom platform provided by JH Specialty Inc. “Wordpress is a great platform for the creation and management of blogging sites, but clearly the diocesan site is much more than that,” said Nick Murray, project leader for JH Specialty. The site has a new color pallet, is scrollable, and uses larger fonts for an easier read. It also includes better navigation tools, and the search function has been significantly improved. It is also a responsive platform, which means the view will respond to whatever device is being

used, whether a desktop personal computer, tablet or smartphone. Responsive website design is crucial to ensure that the growing number of people who utilize the diocesan website for information from mobile devices have a quick and intuitive experience, a press release said. The site includes better access to the diocesan social media outlets it currently employs. It also contains a quick link at the top right for those wishing to view the page in Spanish. This routes the page through Google Translate. McBride said. “That new functionality, while not perfect, is certainly an upgrade for those preferring Spanish text.”

“Jenny and I have been judging the competition (since she won in 2011),” Archambeault said. “I knew she would be a great fit. We are both really excited to be working with Spencer and Gralan this year. “Apart from being judges, we’re excited to see Spencer perform a concert during intermission which features Gralan (Street Scholar).” When asked about the contestants participating this year, Archambeault said, “There are many different styles and ages; some new faces, as well as a few familiar to us at Christian Idol. The finals should be a lot of fun! “Christian Idol is more

than a competition. It is a chance to show your ministry to others in a way that reflects God’s glory.” The 2013 Christian Idol finals will be at Garrett Schools Performing Arts Center, 401 N Walsh St., Garrett. Admission costs $3 per person. Aside from the Spencer Kane concert at intermission, there will be performances by New Life Music, Jenny Fast, and the contestants. The second-place finisher will receive $300 and third place will earn $100. People’s choice will be chosen the night of the finals and awarded $100. Christian Idol is sponsored by R&J

Promotions. Kane is a national spokesman for PACER Organization through his message of “Be One of a Kind,” a bullying prevention campaign that takes him into schools in the Midwest and online through Skype in the Classroom, through which he visits students in other countries. Kane also is an artistspokesman for Remedy Live, a crisis intervention ministry focused on teens, and for Food for the Hungry, an international ministry helping Third World countries fight hunger. For more information on Kane, go to spencerkanemusic.com.

Jam Session returns to Mennonite church

SHIPSHEWANA — Marion Mennonite Church is holding its second annual Jam Session Saturday from 11:30 a.m. to 8 p.m. at The Trading Place pavilion, located just across from the Shipshewana Auction Barn, S.R. 5. The event raises money for the church’s building fund. The Jam Session will include a day of music, an auction, food and drinks. Musicians from across the area will perform a variety of music styles, including gospel, bluegrass, country and “old time” country. Freewill offerings will be taken throughout the day. Performers donating their time and talent to the jam include the Schwartz Family,

who perform at noon; Nikki Carpenter; The Mast Family; Manny’s Jam Band; Stacey Massey; PaGaJoJi Testimony Band; Conley-Schmidt; Heaven Bound; and Chapel Hill Bluegrass, which kicks off the day’s last set at 7 p.m. Many one of a kind items, including a comforter made by the MMC ladies sewing circle, have been donated by the congregation, community members and area businesses for the auction block between music performances. Auctioneer Jim Zimmerman will handle the gavel. Food will include Nelson’s Porta-Pit Chicken, hot dogs on the grill, popcorn, chips and assorted drinks. Baked goods made by the church ladies

also will be available by donation. U.S. Rep. Marlin Stutzman, R-Howe, is scheduled to speak at 11:40 a.m. The church broke ground for an expansion to its existing facility earlier this summer. The expansion follows a three-year plan. In the first year, nearly $190,000 of the estimated $497,000 cost of construction has been raised through pledges, fundraising and community donations. Marion Mennonite Church is located west of Howe on S.R. 120 at 5460 N. C.R. 450W and is co-pastored by the Revs. Ron and Char Roth. For more information, go to marionmennonite.com.

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Religion Brief • Ice cream social planned at church SHIPSHEWANA — The Scott United Methodist Church will offer its annual ice cream social Saturday from 4-7 p.m. at the church located at 7020 N. C.R. 675W, Shipshewana. The menu will include hot dogs, sloppy joes, baked beans, chips, drinks and ice cream. Flavor choices for ice cream are vanilla, chocolate or butter pecan with choice of pie, cake or cookie. The charge will be a donation. Kids can take advantage of a “bounce house” and dunk tank.

Contact Us • KPC Media Group invites area churches and religious organizations to submit news of regional interest for publication on this Sunday page. News about upcoming events should by submitted by email to religion editor Bob Braley —bobb@kpcnews.net — at least 2 weeks prior to the event. Please make sure that you get a reply to your email so that you know that it was received.

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DEAR ABBY

Teen bemoans the influence boyfriend has on her mother

Jeanne Phillips DEAR ABBY: I am a 17-year-old girl who lives with my mother and my mother’s boyfriend. This man has changed my world, and not for the better. The one person I ever cared about has practically turned against me. My mom tried killing herself for this man and chose him over me after she was released from the institution. I have been diagnosed with depression and have also tried to kill myself. I also have a habit of cutting myself. I stopped, but lately I have been wanting to start again. The only thing that has held me back is her threats of committing me to an institution. She threatened my boyfriend with the police if he ever spoke to me again after we broke up. When I confronted her, she insisted that she was right and someday I’d understand. She has turned into this person I hardly know, and it’s because of her boyfriend’s influence. Before, when she was upset she would just not talk to me, but now she calls me the most horrid things and won’t apologize unless someone besides me tells her. I feel so alone. I honestly do want to kill myself, but I haven’t because I know it isn’t the right thing to do, even if it may seem right. I have tried talking to her. She won’t listen to me. What should I do? — HOPELESS AND ALONE IN FLORIDA DEAR HOPELESS AND ALONE: Because you honestly do want to harm yourself, contact the doctor who diagnosed you with depression. However, if this is about your mother breaking up your romance by threatening to involve the police, you need to understand that the tactic wouldn’t have worked unless he had something to fear. The level of conflict in your home is not healthy. If you are still in school, discuss this with a trusted teacher or school counselor. In one more year you will be 18 and able to make decisions for yourself, but they shouldn’t be based on your mother or her boyfriend. They need to be about what is truly best for you.

DEAR ABBY: I hate funerals. My grandfather died when I was 6, and one of my relatives held me over the casket and made me kiss his cold, dead face. It terrified me, and it’s all I can remember of my grandfather. I force myself to recall any of the good times we had together, but that event still taints the good memory. Since then, every funeral I have been to has had the same poisoning effect, no matter what the service was. Funerals are for the living, and I understand that many people feel the need for closure and the sharing of grief to begin healing. But I need to keep my grief and my faith private in order to heal. I’m sure some people think my not showing up at a service is a sign of disrespect or just not caring. Am I wrong? Selfish or lazy? Weird or crazy? Please let me know because at my age I’m sure more of these events will happen. — KEEPING MY DISTANCE IN WASHINGTON STATE DEAR KEEPING YOUR DISTANCE: You are none of the above. People grieve in different ways. An appropriate way to express your respect for the deceased and your support for the survivors would be to write a condolence letter expressing those feelings and sharing a happy memory with the grieving widow, widower or child. No rule of etiquette demands that you show up to a funeral — unless it happens to be your own. Dear Abby is written by Abigail Van Buren, also known as Jeanne Phillips, and was founded by her mother, Pauline Phillips. Write Dear Abby at DearAbby.com or P.O. Box 69440, Los Angeles, CA 90069. COPYRIGHT 2013 UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE

Canning? Try this pickle relish 3:15 A.M. The alarm goes off. Time to start another day. I pack my husband Joe’s lunch. We close the windows that were open during the night. It’s 50 degrees and the house feels cold. After all the hot weather last week this is a quite a difference. It makes for nice sleeping weather. 3:45 A.M. Joe leaves for work. I go back to bed. 4:50 A.M. I get up again. Daughter Elizabeth is packing her lunch. 5:15 A.M. Elizabeth leaves for work. It’s difficult to believe next week she will have worked there a year already. 5:30 A.M. Daughter Susan and son Benjamin wake up. Susan packs her lunch while I help Benjamin with his. They like meat and cheese roll-ups instead of sandwiches for their lunch. The bread gets soggy so the roll-ups taste better. We take a burrito shell, put ranch dressing on it and then either bologna or ham. Next we put cheese on it and then roll up. Some of us will add tomatoes, green peppers or lettuce to ours. Son Kevin likes peanut butter and jelly roll-ups. 6:15 A.M. Susan and Benjamin leave for detasseling. They wear coats this morning. Usually they wear a poncho in the mornings until the dew dries

DEAR BRUCE: I recently misplaced my mortgage statement and failed to make my mortgage payment on time. I promptly paid it, bringing what I owed current. I called a week later and the mortgage company verified that they had received my payment. Being concerned about my credit rating, I asked if they could not report this to the agencies. They told me it was too late and that, once reported, by law it could not be removed from my credit report. Is this true? Is there anything you can do? How much impact will this have when applying for a loan in the future? Will I still be able to get the best rate available? How long will this be on my

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church services. We also canned 14 quarts of green beans this week. Next week looks like it will be tomatoes to can. 2 P.M. Joe came home a few minutes ago. Now Susan and Benjamin are home, too. It’s easy for them to be home at this time. 3:50 P.M. Elizabeth is home from work. I am making meatloaf to put in the oven. Verena is making cupcakes as Joseph wants cupcakes instead of a cake. The boys are doing chores. Joe is picking cucumbers and tomatoes in the garden. 5 P.M. Joseph’s friends come and also nephews Jacob Jr., Benjamin and Steven come with their pony and cart. 6:30 P.M. We all eat supper which is mashed potatoes, gravy, meatloaf, green beans cucumber salad, tomatoes, cheese, ice cream, strawberries, cupcakes and cereal bars. We put 11 candles on the cupcakes for Joseph to blow out. 7:30 P.M. Joe and all the boys go outside to play croquet while the girls and I clean away supper dishes. 8:30 P.M. Joseph’s friends left for home. They all had a nice time. Jacob, Benjamin and Steven will stay for the night and drive their pony home tomorrow morning. For those of you that do

your own canning, try this pickle relish recipe.

Pickle Relish • 1 gallon ground cucumbers • 1 pint ground onions • 1/2 cup salt • 6 cups sugar • 3 cups vinegar • 1 cup water • 3 teaspoons celery seed (optional) • 3 teaspoons dry mustard (optional) • 3 teaspoons turmeric Take ground cucumbers and onions and add salt and mix well. Let set three hours, then drain well. Boil together water, vinegar and sugar. Add celery seed, dry mustard and turmeric. Pour this over drained pickles and onions. Put in pint jars and cold pack. FOR LOVINA EICHER’S “RECIPE OF THE WEEK” go to theamishcookonline.com. Lovina hand-writes this weekly column by gas lamp light from her Michigan home. Readers with culinary or cultural questions may write Lovina at The Amish Cook, c/o Oasis Newsfeatures, P.O. Box 157, Middletown, Ohio 45044 or visit oasisnewsfeatures. com. Due to volume of mail, personal replies are not always possible.

credit report? This is the first time I’ve ever been late and I’m sick over it. — Reader, via email DEAR READER: I wouldn’t be too concerned. If you had gotten to it SMART immediately, MONEY the mortgage holder would have been to hold Bruce Williams able the report. However, once it’s been reported, it can’t be removed. There is nothing I can do that I know of. As to how much impact it will have when applying for a loan, I can’t tell you that, but it should not be severe if this is the only spot on your report. It will probably remain on your credit report in the order of five years. All in all, it is a minor item, and I wouldn’t lose a lot of sleep over it.

business for the last 20 years — silk and live flowers, wholesale and retail. I left and went into nursing, but found that this is not going to work for physical reasons. I have two children left at home. I have to watch my expenses. My credit is not the best in the world, although I’ve learned my lesson. I recently purchased a new van that is capable of making deliveries and is low in cost to maintain. But I’m not sure if I should run a route or use the Internet, and if I did, how would I ship my products? I’ve explored the different avenues available for shipping. I’m familiar with running routes, but I am ignorant about using the Internet. I thought about eBay, but I’m not sure if this is a route to explore. I’m afraid that demand might become higher than supply. Your thoughts would be very much appreciated. — K.G., via email DEAR K.G.: Let me explore your last comment first, that you are afraid the demand might become higher than supply: From your lips to God’s ear. You should be so lucky. I would start by going out and calling on florists and

gift shops, and establishing a route is one way. You can also advertise on the Internet. How your goods can be shipped depends upon their fragility. Making the assumption that you are going to build up a route, figure out how big an area you want to cover — say, 30 to 40 miles in diameter — and count up how many potential customers there are in that area. Start calling them over and over again. Eventually, you will find enough customers. It’s not easy, it’s frustrating, and it will not be productive at the beginning. But like everything else worthwhile, you have to make an investment, and investing your time is the way to make it work. Send your questions to: Smart Money, P.O. Box 2095, Elfers, FL 34680. Email to: bruce@brucewilliams. com. Questions of general interest will be answered in future columns. Owing to the volume of mail, personal replies cannot be provided. COPYRIGHT 2013, NEWSPAPER ENTERPRISE ASSN.

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off of the corn. Verena is staying home. She hasn’t been feeling well. 7 A.M. Time for the rest to wake up. Joseph is bright awake. He has looked forward to this day for a long time. It’s his 11th birthday and he is having some school friends over tonight. He does the morning chores and lls the THE fihorses’ tank AMISH with water. 8 A.M. COOK Breakfast is oatmeal and Lovina Eicher coffee soup. 9 A.M. Joseph and I leave for town. NOON – We are back from town. After the groceries are put away we make roll-ups for our lunch. 1 P.M. Verena is mopping the floors. She says she can’t relax to rest if she knows we have work to do. Loretta is cleaning the bathroom. I can 11 quarts of dill pickles. Earlier this week I made 16 quarts of freezer pickles. I pack them in ice cream buckets for the freezer. They will be used for our next

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Keeping People Connected

Milk jugs can be reused in your home. You can cut the tops off (keeping the handle intact) and fill the remainder with crayons, pencils, markers or small toys such as Legos. Or cut a hole into the side of a jug and use it to hold plastic grocery bags or dryer lint. You can make a sandwich caddy out of a milk jug, too. For directions, visit makezine.com/2012/10/07/ sandwich-caddy-from-amilk-jug. The first reader shares some more ideas: Reuse plastic jugs: I cut off the bottom of one jug to make a scoop for the dog food. I cut off the top to create disposable buckets or pans for messy jobs. If you create plant cuttings, you can start them in a cut-up plastic jug. If you garden, you can cut the opaque jugs into sections and make plant markers. — Cookie, Mississippi Fels-Naptha: I read that it can be used to deter wasps, hornets and yellow jackets from building nests. The research indicated that birdhouse builders often spray the inside of the birdhouse to deter those stinging pests. I made a solution of Fels-Naptha soap melted into

warm water to spray under my pool decking seven years ago and have not had a single hornet, wasp or yellow jacket nest until this year. I will have to make up a new batch and spray again. — Debbie, email Budget FRUGAL craft LIVING supplies: I used to live in a Sara Noel town where a charity offered a craft supply-recycling center. It was only open once a month, but you could get all sorts of paper, paint and other supplies there. Ask your local newspaper if they have “roll ends” of newsprint. If they print their newspaper in-house (many don’t anymore), they are often more than willing to let you have the end of the roll of paper — which still has TONS of paper on it. This paper makes great drop cloths and table covers. I used my last roll end as packing paper for our big move, and I still

didn’t use it up. There are entire books at the library on making craft projects from paper plates. Use styrofoam egg cartons for paint trays. All sorts of miscellaneous household supplies make great tools for printing and clay crafting (with homemade clay, of course) — forks, spoons, spatulas, etc. Try having the kids make their own beads with salt clay. I love pipe-cleaner crafts. And of course, summer is the best time to start to saving used popsicle sticks. — Cookie, Mississippi Easy button bracelet: Buy lace elastic and string it through the buttonholes on your buttons to make a cute bracelet. You can string them so they’re stacked back-toback or run the elastic through two buttonholes on each button, so all of the buttons are flat on your wrist. — Kristy, Ohio SARA NOEL is the owner of

Frugal Village (frugalvillage.com), a website that offers money-saving strategies. To send tips, comments or questions, write to Sara Noel, c/o Universal Uclick, 1130 Walnut Street, Kansas City, MO, 64106.


HEALTH & LIFESTYLE •

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

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Remedies proposed for over diagnosis of cancer It is well known in the medical community that it is best to avoid the “C word” when talking to a patient about what might be wrong with them. Once we say the word “cancer,” patients frequently do not hear a word we say afterward. Of course, if the diagnosis of cancer is determined, the patient must be told in no uncertain terms. With this in mind, you would think that the disorders that are not “really” cancer should not have cancer or carcinoma in their names. Therefore, a group of experts from the National Cancer Institute has recommended changing the definition of cancer and eliminating the word from some common diagnoses. They recommended, for instance, that some pre-cancerous conditions, like one that affects the breast called ductal carcinoma in situ, which many doctors agree is not cancer, should be renamed to exclude the word carcinoma. The group also suggested that many lesions detected during breast, prostate, thyroid, lung and other cancer screenings should not be called cancer at all. They should be reclassified

as IDLE conditions, which stands for “indolent lesions of epithelial origin.” While it is clear that some or all of the changes may not happen for years, if it DR. TERRY all, and that some cancer GAFF experts will profoundly disagree with the group’s views, their report will most likely change the national conversation about cancer, its definition, its treatment and future research. Those experts are hoping to create a 21st century definition of cancer instead of a 19th century definition of cancer, which is what is now being used. The reason behind the call for change is a growing concern among doctors, scientists and patient advocates that hundreds of thousands of men and women are undergoing needless and sometimes disfiguring and harmful treatments for premalignant and cancerous lesions that

are so slow growing that they are unlikely to ever cause harm. The highly sensitive screening technology of recent years has increased the likelihood of finding incidental things during medical scans or blood tests that most likely would never cause a problem. These are sometimes called “incidentalomas.” Once doctors and patients are aware of these abnormal findings, they typically feel compelled to biopsy, treat and remove the tissue involved, often causing physical and psychological pain as well as risk to the patient. The issue is often referred to as over diagnosis, and the resulting unnecessary procedures to which patients are subjected are called over treatment. However, there has been great resistance to scaling back the screening and treatment as has been shown recently by the outcry, both public and professional, when recommendations were made about the need to cut back on breast cancer and prostate cancer screening. There are even situations where the screening test itself may cause more harm than good as well as the

“Hundreds of thousands of men and women are undergoing needless and sometimes disfiguring and harmful treatments for premalignant and cancerous lesions that are so slow growing that they are unlikely to ever cause harm.” Dr. Terry Gaff

• risk of over diagnosis and over treatment. This might include the new recommendation from a government panel that heavy smokers be given an annual CT scan of the chest. While this policy change has the potential to save 20,000 lives a year, some doctors have warned that there will be significant radiation risk due to repeat scans as well as worries that broader use of the scans will lead to more risky and invasive medical procedures. One way to address the issue is to change the language used to describe lesions found through screening. However, doctors cannot always tell which cancers will not progress and which cancers will kill a patient, and changing terminology does not solve

that problem. I think it can be generally agreed that doctors do need to focus on better communication with patients about precancerous and cancerous conditions. But changing the names can create as many problems as it solves. You cannot go back and change hundreds of years of medical literature by suddenly changing terminology. Researchers depend on statistics for significant areas of cancer research and name changes can lead to confusing results. The National Cancer Institute working group also called for a greater focus on research to identify the differences between benign or slow-growing tumors

and aggressive diseases, including the creation of patient registries to learn more about lesions that appear unlikely to become cancer. From my standpoint, this makes much more sense than changing the names given to disorders. Just as in the cases of musicians Prince and Snoop Lion who have famously changed their names for various reasons, the conditions “formerly known as” cancer will still bring to mind the “C word.” The important thing is to figure out what should be done next, no matter what you call the problem. DR. TERRY GAFF practiced

family medicine in Albion for 17 years and is now medical director of the emergency department at Parkview Noble Hospital in Kendallville and the Noble County EMS. Facebook users can become a fan of the Dr. Terry Gaff page at facebook.com/DrTerryGaff, where he focuses on areas of interest and has a little fun in the process. His email address is drgaff@kpcnews. net. Past columns can be read and comments and questions posted at kpcnews.com/ special/health.

Starting high school later may help sleepy teens NEW YORK (AP) — Quinn Cooney of Mill Creek, Wash., is excited about starting high school in September, but she’s not looking forward to waking up at 5:30 a.m. to arrive on time. Classes for ninth-graders start at 7:30 a.m., 45 minutes earlier than they did in middle school. “I think it is going to be harder to get up,” said Quinn, 13. “I do think it is better to start early so that we can be finished early and do things after school, but I am worried that if I have a boring class for my first period that it will be hard to stay awake.” Decades of sleep research

have confirmed what parents know: It’s hard for teenagers to wake up early. Some high schools have adopted late starts around 8:30 a.m. to improve attendance and performance. But other districts say it’s too complicated to shift schedules because of logistics involving buses and after-school activities. About 40 percent of U.S. public high schools open before 8 a.m., according to the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics, with just 15 percent starting 8:30 a.m. or later. In districts where early starts are necessary

because the same bus does multiple runs for high school, middle school and elementary students, teens often get the early shift. That’s the case in Anne Arundel County, Md., where public high schools start at 7:17 a.m. and buses start running at 5:50 a.m. Lisa Rodvien taught high school there, in Annapolis, and says attendance at her first-period classes was “as low as 50 percent or below.” Among those who showed up, “I would definitely see three or four kids with their heads down. You walk over to them to wake them up and get them to sit up, and you see that

Kate applauded for not hiding new mommy tummy NEW YORK (AP) — As Kate and William showed off the royal baby, what caught the eye of many women was not the new heir to the throne but the Duchess of Cambridge’s post-childbirth silhouette: that little bump under her pretty polka-dot dress. “I love that she came out and there was a mommy tummy. It was there! We all saw it!” said Lyss Stern of New York City, who remembers turning down offers of a girdle and diet pills after her first child was born nine years ago. Stern, whose company Divamoms.com organizes events and product launches, added that Kate was sending “the right message,” in stark contrast to Hollywood celebrities who are shown “three weeks after childbirth with a flat stomach and G-string bikini. That’s not real.” Even those who make a living getting new moms into shape applauded Kate. “I’m thrilled that she went out there like that, because we never see real mommy tummies,” said Helene Byrne, a personal trainer in Oakland, Calif., who specializes in pre- and post-natal exercise. “When you see a magazine or photos of new celebrity moms, they’re Photoshopped. They’re fake! They’re a big lie!” The Daily Beast even ran a headline saying Kate’s “unabashed baby belly busts the last taboo of pregnancy.” Indeed, most celebrity new moms don’t have their pictures taken until their tummies are flat again. And while the stars usually credit diet and exercise with making their bodies bikini-ready so fast, gossip and plastic surgeons often cite something

AP

Britain’s Prince William, right, and Kate, Duchess of Cambridge hold the Prince of Cambridge, July 23, as they pose for photographers outside St. Mary’s Hospital exclusive Lindo Wing in London where the Duchess gave birth on Monday, July 22.

else: the popular procedure known as a tummy tuck. People magazine has an entire online archive devoted to “Body After Baby: Celebrity moms show off shockingly svelt figures after giving birth,” but the magazine declined to comment Wednesday on the example set by Kate. Meanwhile, the summer’s other celebrity mom, Kim Kardashian, has yet to be seen in public. Us Weekly reported that she won’t leave the house untill she’s ready to “debut her post-baby body.” Nobody can say whether Kate consciously chose to send a message that this is what new mothers really look like, or whether she didn’t realize — or didn’t care — how obvious her tummy would be. Either way, she un-self-consciously

handed the baby off to her husband rather than using the newborn to camouflage her figure from the cameras and crowds when she emerged from the hospital. And her form-draping dress was a contrast to the caftan-like outfit that hid Princess Diana’s figure when she appeared publicly for the first time after giving birth to Will in 1982. Nancy Manister, who worked for 20 years as a maternity nurse and now teaches at Fairfield University in Connecticut, even noticed a moment during the photo op when Kate “clasped her hands together underneath the belly, and I thought, ‘She’s not trying to hide it.’” As for anxious new moms wondering when that bump will go away, Manister says, “it takes six weeks to lose 25 pounds, and a full year” to get your old body back. Jennifer Moneta, who works in public relations in Dallas, gave birth nine weeks ago and was especially pleased that Kate made the post-partum silhouette “look very natural, as if that is what all moms can and should expect after having a baby.” Moneta said that when she left the hospital, “I still looked five months pregnant, even though I only gained 20 pounds during pregnancy. My father even lovingly kidded me about it, saying ‘I didn’t realize the baby was still in there.’” Alison Jimenez, a fashion blogger in Astoria, N.Y., said she was “outraged” by comments from some Kate-watchers asking things like “Is she pregnant again?” “This woman has just given birth, what was she supposed to do? Struggle into a pair of Spanx?” Jimenez said.

they’re exhausted.” Earlier this year, Anne Arundel school officials laid out options for delaying start times to anywhere from 7:32 a.m. to 9:45 a.m. along with potential complications, such as additional costs if buses are added, child care issues where late-day schedules might prevent teens from picking up younger siblings after school, and implications for teams if they end up playing in the dark. Bob Mosier, spokesman for Anne Arundel schools, said no decisions have been

made. But the focus on logistics is frustrating for Heather Macintosh, spokeswoman for a national organization called Start School Later that’s headquartered in Annapolis. “What is the priority?” she said. “It should be education, health and safety. All the other stuff may not be perfect — you may have to have your violin lesson before school or install lights on your field (for sports) — but it will work itself out.” Megan Kuhfeld, a graduate

student at the University of California-Los Angeles who’s been studying late-start debates since she was an undergrad at Duke University in North Carolina, surveyed some 35 districts that switched to later starts and found most were glad they’d made the switch. Not only did students benefit, for the most part, but “the things people had feared — how transportation would be affected, how sports would be affected — became the new normal and people adjusted,” she said.


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HAPPENINGS! •

kpcnews.com

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

Retro ‘2 Guns’ a breath of fresh air I never would have thought to put Mark Wahlberg and Denzel Washington together in a movie, but whoever made that brilliant casting decision deserves an award. Of course, their surprising chemistry is a little bit wasted in “2 Guns,” a fairly rote action comedy, but in the end, who cares? It’s fun just to watch the two guys working together. Bobby (Washington) and Stig (Wahlberg) are just a couple of criminals in an JENNY uneasy alliance with a Mexican KOBIELA- drug cartel led by Papi Greco MONDOR (Edward James Olmos). They decide to rob a bank in Texas and steal some of Greco’s money, but when they find out that there’s a lot more money in the bank than they expected, they know something is up. Well, what’s up is that neither of them is actually a criminal. Bobby is an undercover DEA agent, and Stig is in naval intelligence. Neither of them knew the others’ true identity, but they quickly figure out that somebody set them up. Unfortunately, it takes a while for the film to build up to its solid second half. All of the players must be put into place, and there are a lot of convoluted relationships to introduce. Even though the hook of the movie is all of the doublecrossing between the different agencies, it could have used a little bit more streamlining in order to get to the best part of the movie. The movie really picks up steam as Bobby and Stig try to evade the DEA, CIA, Navy and Greco’s drug cartel. That’s when Wahlberg and Washington really mesh. Bobby is charismatic, but he’s tough and wily, especially when he’s in his drug dealer mode. In fact, one of the many little joys of “2 Guns” is watching Washington weave

AP

This image released by Universal Pictures shows Denzel Washington, left, and Mark Wahlberg in a scene from “2 Guns.”

in and out of Bobby’s undercover persona. Meanwhile, Stig is like an overgrown puppy. He is eager to please, but when threatened he does get mean. Together, they’re an absolute riot. There’s something delightful about watching Stig bounce around, needling Bobby on purpose while Bobby tries to stay cool and collected. It’s like watching the old Looney Tunes cartoons featuring Spike the Bulldog and Chester the Terrier — one is big and scowling, and the other is small and happy and kind of annoying, and together they’re hilarious. Most of the supporting characters in “2 Guns” are pretty one-note, save one — Earl (Bill Paxton), a CIA agent on the trail of the stolen money. He’s slimy and scary,

strutting around in a bolo tie playing Russian roulette with other peoples’ kneecaps. Sure, he gets plenty of laughs — it’s clear Paxton is having a blast playing the role — but he’s also intensely focused on his goal and shockingly willing to do anything to reach it. As much as “2 Guns” revolves around Denzel Washington and Mark Wahlberg, Paxton barges in and steals every scene he’s in. “2 Guns” also feature some great action sequences, especially in the second half, including several car chases and shootouts. They don’t break much new ground, but they are solid and entertaining. In that way, “2 Guns” feels a little like a throwback to action movies from the ’80s and early ’90s — one of my

Area Activities • FROM PAGE C1

Friday, Aug. 9 GENE’S 150TH BIRTHDAY GALA 6 p.m. The Gene Stratton-Porter State Historic Site of Rome City will hold her 150th Birthday Gala and Film Festival at the historic Embassy Theatre. All proceeds of the fundraising event will go toward continued conservation of the historic site. The evening will begin with a VIP cocktail reception including Stratton-Porters’ descendants, hors d’oeuvres and music provided by Mark Linehan. The evening will feature music performed on the Embassy’s 85-yearold Grande Page Pipe Organ followed by a screening of the 1940 version of “Laddie.” $75 per person, includes hors d’oeuvres, the film screening and VIP reception. A single ticket to the film screening is $10 and may be purchased in advance or at the door. Doors will open at 7:30 pm for the film screening with an 8 pm showtime. Guests must be age 21 or older for the gala. Seating is limited to 200 guests, and reservations are required. To reserve a seat, call the historic site at 854-3790. Embassy Theatre, 125 West Jefferson Blvd, Fort Wayne.

Saturday, Aug. 10 WOLF LAKE ONION DAYS The corn hole tournament kicks events off at 9 a.m. Pie judging starts at 12:30 p.m. Line-up for the annual parade begins

at the school at 1 p.m., parade at 2 p.m. Inclognito Cloggers at 4 p.m. at the park. A tug-of-war begins at 4:30 p.m. The Nashville Rebels will perform starting at 5:30 p.m. The silent auction closes at 6 p.m. Pies will be auctioned at 7:30 p.m. The festival will conclude with a concert by the Gunslingers at 8 p.m.

favorite eras of action movies. Like its predecessors, “2 Guns” is a violent movie with a fair amount of bad language. In an era of tamer action movies that are mostly rated PG-13 in order to entice bigger, younger audiences, “2 Guns” feels a little over-the-top in some places. But for those of us who like their action movies with a harder edge, “2 Guns” delivers. Still, even with a fair amount of shooting, “2 Guns” keeps things pretty cartoonish and light for the bulk of the movie. There’s a sense of humor that keeps it from becoming too gritty or realistic, and that makes it all the more watchable. It isn’t the best movie of the summer. It isn’t even the best R-rated action-comedy — that title goes to “The Heat.” But the

... “2 Guns” feels a little like a throwback to action movies from the ’80s and early ’90s — one of my favorite eras of action movies.

• imperfect but fun “2 Guns” feels like a breath of fresh air at the end of a long summer at the movies. Jenny’s Take: See it before it leaves theaters. (Rated R for violence throughout, language and brief nudity. Runs 109 minutes.)

Crossword •

Saturday, Aug. 10 ST. JOE PICKLE FESTIVAL The pickle pepper poker walk, a sanctioned Volkswalk event, opens Saturday activities. Participants can start anytime between 6:30-10 a.m. All participants will finish by 1 p.m. The fire department will host its pancake and sausage breakfast from 7-11 a.m. Sechler’s Pickles will be open for factory tours from 9-11:45 a.m. Mark’s Ark returns for an 11 a.m. show. Children can decorate cucumbers for the pickle people contest at noon, with judging to follow. The festival parade begins at 1 p.m. A horseshoe pitching contest begins at 2 p.m. Weigh-in for the kids tractor pull is at 2 p.m., with the contest starting at 3 p.m. The fourth annual pickle festival cruise-in car show is at 3 p.m. Throughout the festival, members of the St. Joe-Spencerville Lions Club will be selling homemade ice cream, including their own special pickle recipe. Terry Lee and the Rockaboogie Band will perform at 8 p.m. Fireworks show by Jack Stemen of S & J’s Fireworks of Butler. A complete schedule of events is available at stjoepicklefestival.com.

Billy Bob Thornton to star in TV’s ‘Fargo’ series BEVERLY HILLS, Calif. (AP) — Oscar winner Billy Bob Thornton will star in the TV version of the film “Fargo.” FX network boss John Landgraf said Friday that Thornton has signed on to a limited series based on the 1996 crime comedydrama. It’s scheduled for a

10-episode run on FX next spring. Thornton will play a rootless con artist. No characters will be carried over from the film, which brought a best-actress Oscar to Frances McDormand. Even so, Landgraf says the series will be “remarkably true to the film.” Its

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creators, Joel and Ethan Coen, are associated with the series. Thornton has had many acclaimed movie performances. He won an Oscar for writing the 1996 drama “Sling Blade,” in which he also starred. No other cast members have been announced.

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D

ENGAGEMENTS • ANNIVERSARIES •

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

kpcnews.com

Hixson — 50th

Warner — 60th John and Phyllis (Koon) Warner of Grove City, Fla., and formerly of Kendallville and Fairfield Township, recently celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary. The couple were married May 23, 1953, in Waterloo. They are the parents of seven children, Diana Pankop of Kendallville, Debbie (Jim) King of LaGrange, Darlene Warner of Albion, Mark (Billie) Warner of Albion, Marsha (Tim) Matheney of New Concord, Ohio, Marilyn (Richard) Shields of Englewood, Fla., and John Jr. (Kathy) Warner of LaOtto. They also have 24 grandchildren and 36 great-grandchildren. They will celebrate with a family gathering later this summer.

Alter — 50th Ronald and Carol (Buell) Alter of Pleasant Lake and formerly of Fort Wayne celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary Saturday by renewing their wedding vows with their immediate family present at St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church in Angola. The couple were married Aug. 3, 1963, at St. John the Baptist Catholic Church in Fort Wayne. Mr. Alter retired from Dana Corp. in Fort Wayne in 1996 after 31 years of service. Mrs. Alter is a homemaker. The couple have four children, Dawn Alter of Chattanooga, Tenn., Rodney Alter of Antwerp, Ohio, Scott Alter of Fort Wayne and Brian Alter of Angola. They also have three grandchildren. The couple plan a trip to Hawaii in the fall.

Larry James and Jeri Kay (Snider) Hixson of Auburn celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary with close family and friends at Pine Hills Church in Fort Wayne. They were married March 16, 1963, at the Church of Christ in Garrett. Mr. Hixson is the retired manager of Hixson Sand and Gravel and the owner of Hixson Auction Service. They have two daughters and sons-in-law, Joy and Guy Thomas of Auburn and Kathy and Henry Chairs of Fort Wayne. They also have five grandchildren.

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Carpenter — 50th Phil and Jane (Walker) Carpenter of Butler celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary on May 28. They were married May 28, 1963, in New Athens, Ill. Mr. Carpenter is the business manager and treasurer at DeKalb Eastern schools. They have seven children and their spouses, Bradly and Mary Carpenter of Maple Grove, Minn., Laura Carpenter of Butler, Brett and Katie Carpenter of Fort Wayne, Brian and Anna Christine Carpenter of Andrews, Bruce and Autumn Carpenter of Fort Wayne, Brooks and Christine Carpenter of Woodstock, Ill., and Kelly and Greg Bercaw of Fort Wayne. They also have 18 grandchildren.

Weir, Kaufman

Kaiser — 50th

Truelove — 35th

Jim and Janet Kaiser of Plymouth and formerly of Noble County celebrated their 50th wedding anniversary Aug. 3. The couple were married Aug. 3, 1963, at the Central Baptist Church in Gary. They have three children, Jeff and Connie Kaiser of Albion, Janelle and Russ Herrington of Oakdale, Calif., and Joel and Laurie Kaiser of Wawaka. They also have six grandchildren. Mr. Kaiser is retired from the Central Noble School system and Mrs. Kaiser retired from Shepherd of the Hill.

Rick and Sheryl (Pankop) Truelove of Waterloo will celebrate their 35th wedding anniversary on Aug. 5. The couple were married Aug. 5, 1978, at the Alton Church in Alton by the Rev. Alvin Banks. They have a son, Chad Truelove, and one grandchild.

Rediger, Beauchamp Fry, Hughes Amy Marie Hughes and Shaun Daryl Fry, both of Fort Wayne, plan to be married Oct. 12 at the Grace Gathering Church in New Haven. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Mike and Judy Nichter of New Haven. She is a 2002 graduate of North Side High School in Fort Wayne. She earned an Associate of Science in nursing from Ivy Tech Community College in 2011. She is employed at Lutheran Hospital in Fort Wayne. Her fiance is the son of Gary and Vickie Fry of Kendallville. He is a 2004 graduate of East Noble High School. He earned a Bachelor of Science in construction engineering technology from Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne in 2012. He is employed by Paul Davis Restoration & Remodeling in Fort Wayne.

Chelsea Beauchamp and Ryan Rediger, both of Indianapolis, plan to marry Sept. 14 at the Joseph Decuis Winery in Roanoke. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Michael and Angela Beauchamp of Wabash. She is a graduate of Wabash High School and received her M.B.A. from Indiana University. She is employed by Premier Family Chiropractics. Her fiance is the son of Carol Rakestraw of Auburn and Randall and Jan Rediger of Leo. He graduated from DeKalb High School and received a bachelor’s degree from Purdue University. He is employed as a civil engineer with E.M.H. & T.

Announcement Policy • The News Sun, The Star and The Herald Republican print anniversary and engagement announcements free of charge every Sunday, and weddings free of charge the first Sunday of every month (and sometimes the third Sunday). You can submit your announcements online at kpcnews.com. At the top of the home page, under Share News, there are links to anniversary, engagement and wedding forms. For anniversaries, we publish with emphasis on every five years. Couples marking anniversaries of 60 years and beyond may run announcements each year.

Photos run each Sunday in color. If you would like your photo returned, please include a self-addressed, stamped envelope upon submission. High-quality, digital photos may be e-mailed to the staff member listed below. For more information, contact: The News Sun: Jan Richardson, 347-0400, Ext. 131, jrichardson@kpcmedia.com The Star: Kathryn Bassett, 925-2611, Ext. 26, kbassett@kpcmedia.com The Herald Republican: Jennifer Decker, 665-3117, Ext. 142, jdecker@kpcmedia.com Deadline for anniversary, engagement and wedding announcements is Monday at noon prior to publication.

Annie Kaufman of Waterloo and Collin Weir of Rockwall, Texas, plan to be married Aug. 31 at Purdue University. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Mike and Shelly Kaufman of Waterloo. She graduated from Purdue University in 2013 and is a registered nurse. Her fiance is the son of Shelby and Laurie Weir of Dallas, Texas. He graduated from Purdue University in 2012 and is employed as an aeronautical engineer at L3 Communications in Greenville, Texas.

Merkling, Huff Jessica Lauren Huff and Zachary Louis Merkling, both of Avilla, plan to be married Oct. 5 at Camp Chief Little Turtle in Pleasant Lake. The bride-to-be is the daughter of Kim Huff of Kendallville and Jeff Huff of Albion. She is a 2008 graduate of East Noble High School. Her fiance is the son of Tom and Machele Merkling of Avilla. He is also a 2008 graduate of East Noble High School.

Bears, humans coexist in Alaskan game park KATMAI NATIONAL PARK AND PRESERVE, Alaska (AP) — Kim Spanjol has seen gorillas in Congo and orangutans in Borneo. But for a honeymoon with her husband Jim O’Brien, she planned a trip to Katmai National Park and Preserve in remote Alaska, where they started seeing brown bears the minute their floatplane landed on the beach. “There’s a bear in the water, and there’s a bear coming down the beach,” said Spanjol, a psychologist from New York. “And then, we were coming in to eat and there was a bear running by, and there were three bears just over there by the river. So, that was amazing to have it so accessible.” About 10,000 people make the difficult trek here each summer to see the bears, some staying at a small lodge or the campground at Brooks Camp, others flying in from elsewhere in Alaska for the day. The 4-million-plus acre (1.6-million hectare) park, a little bigger than Connecticut, is located on the Alaska Peninsula, about 250 miles (about 400 kilometers) southwest of Anchorage. Brooks Camp is only accessible by air. At peak bear-viewing season, the end of July, there will be up to 70 adult bears plus cubs within a one-mile area of Brooks Camp. It’s not uncommon to see brown bears running around the camp, dodging humans as the bruins playfully chase each other. That there have been only two minor mishaps in the last 63 years between the species is a testament to rules put in place by rangers to respect the bears’ right of way. “I don’t think there’s any place quite like Brooks Camp in that we’ve got so many people and so many bears,” said Roy Wood, chief

AP

A tourist takes a photo of a brown bear as it walks on the beach at Katmai National Park and Preserve, Alaska on July 4. At the height of the salmon season, there will be up to 70 brown bears plus cubs within a one-square mile area of Brooks Camp, along with many humans.

of interpretation at Katmai. What draws the bears here are salmon running in the Brooks River. The bears stand patrol at Brooks Falls, about a mile walk from Brooks Camp, and try to catch the jumping salmon. When they snag one, they usually polish it off on a sandbar or off the side of the river — unless an aggressive male brown bear tries to steal the fish. Bear-viewing stands have been built at Brooks Falls, an area about 200 yards (about 185 meters) downstream, called the riffles, and at the lower river, which is prime viewing area in September. “The bears behave differently at that time of the year, they’re really fat,” said ranger Michael Fitz. “Instead of chasing fish actively, a lot of the times they are just cruising up and down the river like battleships. They’re looking for anything

that can’t swim away from them.” The flight here from Anchorage is about a three-hour trip, and if you’re lucky, you can see white beluga whales surfacing in Cook Inlet. The ride also can be bumpy, especially through the narrows of Lake Clark Pass. The pass offers stunning views of mountains and glaciers, but if the ride is rough, you might want to keep the barf bag handy. Air taxis from the Alaska hub city of King Salmon are the cheapest way in, about $200 a person, but you have to get to King Salmon first. Other floatplane flights are available from places like Anchorage, Homer or Kodiak. These can range up to $795 per person from Anchorage for a round trip but if you can afford it, it’s an ideal way to take a day trip to Brooks Camp to see the bears.


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WEDDINGS •

kpcnews.com

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

MARRIED JUNE 29, 2013

MARRIED DEC. 29, 2012

Stephanie Cole and Christopher Swank

Kristin Mahan and Justin Scheumann

LIGONIER — Stephanie Cole and Christopher Swank, both of Thatcher, Ariz., were married in an afternoon ceremony June 29, 2013, at Stones Hill Community Church in Ligonier. Purda Hicks performed the ceremony. Parents of the couple are Lori Downs of Manitou Beach, Mich., and Mike and Michelle Swank of Ligonier. Honor attendants were Yvonne Cole and Alyssa Hanna. Joining them were Stephanie Swank, Erika Mestdagh, Kristie Carnevale, Christina Herndon, Jessica Wagley, Lexi Dudas and Emily Goldberg. Flower girls were Leigha Taine, Jillian Bontrager and Ashlyn Raine. Micah Lunt and Patrick McIlrath were best men. Groomsmen and ushers were Zac Hall, Matt Steed, Rachel Sinkovitz, Rich Hallett, Josh Gulledge, Mike Elfe and Rob Raine. A reception followed at the Mid-America Windmill Museum in Kendallville. The bride is a graduate of Spring Arbor University. She is a kindergarten teacher at

the Ruth Powell School in Safford, Ariz. The groom is also a graduate of Spring Arbor University. He is a math teacher at Safford High School in Safford, Ariz. The couple reside in Thatcher, Ariz.

MARRIED JUNE 2, 2013

Rodica Miti and Zachary Owens ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Rodica Miti and Zachary T. Owens were united in marriage on Sunday, June 2, 2013, at St. Andrew Russian Orthodox church in St. Petersburg. The bride is the daughter of Polina Miti of Tampa and the late Vasiliy Miti. The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Keenis Owens of Clearwater Beach and Ligonier, Ind. Attending the bride at the formal doublering ceremony were her sister, Tatiana Miti, and the groom’s sister, Katie Owens. The groomsmen were Greg Door and Skyler Speakman. The bride’s lifelong friend, Irina Postica, and her husband, Alexandru Postica, of Moldova were the couple’s sponsors, who, in the Russian Orthodox tradition, take responsibility for the well-being of the newly-married couple much as godparents are chosen to take a special interest in children. Following the ceremony, a reception was held at the Tampa Marriott Waterside Hotel & Marina in Tampa. After a wedding cruise to Key West and

Mexico, the couple make their home in Tampa. The groom is an energy analyst with Entegra and the bride is a financial analyst with Greystone Health Care. An open house celebration was held in Ligonier on July 13.

MARRIED JULY 4, 2013

Tiffany Jack and Nick Wolf ANGOLA — Tiffany Jack and Nick Wolf, both of Angola, were married in a 3:30 p.m., July 4, 2013, ceremony at Peace Lutheran Church of Fremont by Pastor Wayne Berkesch. Music was provided by Marium Cook. The bride is the daughter of Mike and Amy Jack of Angola. The groom is the son of Todd and Lori Wolf and Rose Stone-Bair, all of Angola. Nikki Wiegand served as matron of honor. Madison Jack was the flower girl. Cody Jack was best man and ushers were Koty Wolk and Alex Bair. Lucas Winner was ring bearer. The bride will be a senior at Bowling Green State University. The groom is serving in the U.S. Army. A reception will be held next year when the groom returns from Kuwait.

FORT WAYNE — Kristin Claire Mahan and Justin Dean Scheumann, both of Fort Wayne, were married Dec. 29, 2012, at Peace Evangelical Lutheran Church, Fort Wayne. The Rev. Paul Spira officiated. Pianist Mike Woods, vocalist Lance Connolly and trumpeter Joe Morgan provided the music. The bride is the daughter of Kevin and Julie Mahan of Rushville. The groom is the son of Ray and Jayne Scheumann of Auburn. The bride wore a diamond white gown with a modified sweetheart neckline with a fit-and-flair silhouette. The gown featured a French tulle overlay with embroidery accentuated with Swarovski crystals. The back of the gown was accented with crystal buttons, and the chapel-length train was scalloped. Her cathedral-length veil was made of French tulle and accented with bugle beads and crystals. She carried a hand-tied bouquet of garden roses, hydrangeas, Queen Anne’s lace, and brunnia berries in shades of white and ivory. The bride’s rosary was entwined in her bouquet, and she carried an embroidered handkerchief which belonged to her maternal great-grandmother. The bride’s mother and sister also carried this handkerchief at their weddings. Katherine (Kari) McClellan, sister of the bride, was matron of honor. Attendants were Tamra Marks, Jessica Alsman, Lindsey Olsen and Stephanie Christensen, sister of the groom. Clare Christensen, niece of the groom, was the flower girl. The bridesmaids wore floor-length strapless gowns of pewter taffeta featuring sweetheart necklines and A-line skirts. The gowns were accessorized with earrings, a brooch at the waistline and a winter white fur shoulder shrug, which were gifts from the bride. The bridesmaids’ bouquets were styled as a smaller version of the bride’s bouquet with dusty miller accents. Clinton McClellan, friend of the groom and brother-in-law of the bride, was the best man. Groomsmen were David Valdez, Caleb Drane, Digger Alsman and Dustin Deter. Carl Liggett, cousin of the bride, Curt Liggett, cousin of the bride, and Connor Scheumann, nephew of the groom, were ushers. Andrew Christensen, nephew of the

groom, was the ring bearer. Readers were Jim Fuhrman and Barry Kunkle, sponsors of the groom, and Christina Mahan Hall, aunt and godmother of the bride. Elaine King, aunt of the groom, attended the guest register. Grandparents attending were Mr. and Mrs. Wayman Mahan, grandparents of the bride, and Mrs. Jack Thrush, grandmother of the groom. Steve and Joni Alverson, uncle and aunt of the bride, were honored guests. A reception took place at The Landmark Centre, Fort Wayne. The groom’s parents hosted a rehearsal dinner at Don Hall’s Gas House in Fort Wayne on Dec. 28. The couple took a wedding trip to Punta Cana, Dominican Republic, and now live in Fort Wayne. The bride is a 2005 graduate of Rushville Consolidated High School and a 2009 graduate of Purdue University with a bachelor’s degree in retail management. She is employed as an account executive at Asher Agency. The groom is a 2001 graduate of DeKalb High School and a 2011 graduate Ashford University with a bachelor’s degree in organizational management. He is employed as a technical sergeant in the fuels management branch of the Indiana Air National Guard.

MARRIED APRIL 6, 2013

Jaime Boswell and Clynt Walker AUBURN — Jaime Boswell and Clynt Walker, both of Montpelier, Ohio, were married April 6, 2013, in a 4 p.m. ceremony at the County Line Church of God near Auburn. The bride’s aunt, N. Jean Schendel, officiated at the ceremony and Kevin and Erica McIntire provided music. Emily Disbro registered guests. The bride is the daughter of Mike and Joyce Boswell of Auburn. The groom is the son of David and Susan Walker of Edon, Ohio. The bride wore a full-length ivory gown with sweetheart neckline, lace, beading and a jewel-encrusted bodice. She wore her mother’s three-tier veil with lace edges. Connie Phillips was matron of honor. Katie Geiger and Wendy Stamper were bridesmaids. They wore different colored floor-length flowing gowns. Kirk Haase was the best man. Erik Boswell and Jimmy Reitzel were groomsmen. Carson Stamper, the groom’s nephew, was the ring bearer. A reception took place at Glendarin Hills Golf Course at Angola. The Jones Band provided music. The bride’s father used to be the band’s sound technician. The band

reunited to perform at the wedding and also featured Grammy-nominated guitarist Audie Blaylock. The bride attended Indiana University and is employed by the Steuben County REMC. The groom attended Northwest State Community College and is employed by AgriDry, LLC. The couple reside in Montpelier.

Beauty, serenity call visitors to Hatteras Island HATTERAS, N.C. (AP) — Hatteras Island along North Carolina’s Outer Banks is a fickle but alluring place. The island juts into the Atlantic, making it a bull’s-eye for high winds, waves and the occasional hurricane. Cautious vacationers listen to weather reports regularly to make sure they don’t need to evacuate ahead of an approaching storm. In August 2011, Hurricane Irene closed the only road across a bridge to the island, N.C. S.R. 12, for weeks, and Superstorm Sandy did the same again last fall. Without the road, getting to and from the island requires two ferry rides — one from the mainland to Ocracoke Island, and a second one from Ocracoke to Hatteras. And yet the island’s appeals are irresistible — its beauty, its serenity, its calm. Yes, you can find plenty to do, such as fishing and wind surfing. But Hatteras also is the place to sit on the beach, walk on the beach and nap on the beach. The best part about Hatteras? Most of what makes it special is free.

The beach The Cape Hatteras

National Seashore makes up much of Hatteras Island, meaning there’s no development except in the seven villages — Rodanthe, Waves, Salvo, Avon, Buxton, Frisco and Hatteras. Some beaches are so narrow that waves lap under homes, while others are so wide that you’re out of breath by the time you get to the water, even if you’re lucky enough to stay in an oceanfront home. Vehicles are generally allowed on the beach, although not on the beaches in front of the villages during tourist season. Rules protecting birds and turtles mean driving is banned along some popular fishing areas at times so be sure to check. Details at nps. gov/caha/index.htm.

Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum Some 600 shipwrecks litter the Hatteras coastline, giving rise to its nickname, Graveyard of the Atlantic. Most of the wrecks have been blamed on Diamond Shoals, an area of shifting sand bars that extends 14 miles (22.5 kilometers) into the Atlantic. The Graveyard of the Atlantic Museum in Hatteras is dedicated to local seafaring history.

Bird walks and moving islands

AP

A woman walks along the beach in Frisco, N.C., on Hatteras Island. The Cape Hatteras National Seashore makes up much of Hatteras Island, meaning there’s no development except in the seven villages — Rodanthe, Waves, Salvo, Avon, Buxton, Frisco and Hatteras.

The museum’s focal point is a 12-foot-tall (3.6-meter) lens made in 1854 for the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. It’s known as the first-order Fresnel lens (first order refers to size, Fresnel was the name of its designer). Other artifacts include an Enigma machine from a German U-boat, used to encrypt and decode messages, and a display about Billy Mitchell, who proved in the

1920s that airplanes could sink battleships, an idea that other military leaders of the time openly ridiculed. In September 1923, Mitchell’s bombers sank two obsolete warships off Cape Hatteras from the air to prove his point. The local airfield is named after him. Admission is free; donations are encouraged. Details at graveyardoftheatlantic.com/index.htm.

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service offers numerous opportunities to learn about nature, many of which are free. One new program teaches visitors (and maybe some residents) about barrier island migration and why the ocean keeps cutting into N.C. S.R. 12, creating new inlets. About 400 species of birds live in the Pea Island National Wildlife Refuge, and the USFWS offers free tours three days a week from late spring to mid-autumn and at least once a week the rest of the year. Details at fws.gov/ alligatorriver/spec.html.

Lighthouses The National Park Service charges admission to climb both the Cape Hatteras and Bodie (pronounced bah’-dee) Island lighthouses. But nothing stops visitors from looking at the lighthouses and admiring them from the ground. Bodie Island just underwent a $5 million makeover and was opened to the public in April for the first time in its 141-year history. The Cape Hatteras

Lighthouse, recognized by its famous black-and-white barber pole stripes, is the tallest brick lighthouse in the United States. It was moved in 1999 to protect it from beach erosion. Details at nps.gov/caha/ planyourvisit/climbing-thecape-hatteras-lighthouse.htm and nps.gov/caha/historyculture/bodie-island-light-station. htm.

Ferry to Ocracoke At the end of Hatteras Island, near the museum, you can take a free ferry from Hatteras Island to Ocracoke Island, which is still part of the national seashore. The ferry takes about 40 minutes. On Ocracoke, you can visit a British cemetery and the Ocracoke Lighthouse, built in 1823 and noted for its white exterior. The Ocracoke cemetery has four of the 34 victims from the HMS Bedfordshire, which a German torpedo struck and sank on May 12, 1942. A fifth body washed up on Hatteras Island and is buried there, next to a British sailor from the merchant vessel San Delfino, which was also torpedoed by the Germans.


SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

THE NEWS SUN

The

HERALD Star REPUBLICAN THE

GARRELL ASSOCIATES, INC.

Gorgeous stone around the entry and a gabled facade create impressive curb appeal for this home.

Traditional, yet bright and open EPLANS.COM

Details: Plan HOTW130020

BEDROOMS: 5 BATHS: 4 MAIN LEVEL: 1,567 sq. ft.

SECOND LEVEL: 1,487 sq. ft.

TOTAL LIVING AREA: 3,054 sq. ft.

DIMENSIONS: 55’ 0” x 51’ 0”

FRAMING: 2 x 4 FOUNDATION OPTIONS: Slab, Unfinished Basement EPLANS.COM

Luxurious details of the layout include the sunroom (and its optional fireplace), two sets of double doors from the grand room to the back porch, and the master suiteís sitting nook. See images of the plan online at ePlans.com/HouseOfTheWeek.

D

Algae growth not hard to remove

HOUSE OF THE WEEK

Looking for a home with a good mix of tradition and contemporary relaxed living? Discover this beautiful home, which is full of great details like a sunroom and optional third garage bay. The foyer and grand room display dramatic two-story ceilings, while the generous kitchen and the breakfast nook offer spaces for more casual meals. An optional covered back porch allows for outdoor living. Inside the master suite, a sitting room, enormous walk-in closet, and luxurious master bath create a private oasis. Three family bedrooms on this floor and a guest suite downstairs complete the sleeping quarters. To build this home, you can order a complete set of construction documents by calling toll-free 866-772-1013 or visiting ePlans.com/ HouseOfTheWeek. Enter the design number to locate the plan and view more images and details. At ePlans. com/HouseOfTheWeek, you can view previously featured plans, browse other specialty collections, or use our search filters to help you find exactly what you want from over 28,000 home designs. Most plans can be customized to suit your lifestyle.

kpcnews.com

Q. I have algae growth on my roof and deck. How do I remove it and keep it away? Paul from Angola. A. Well, Paul, algae growth has been around since the beginning of time. It grows wherever there is a lack of sunshine and the presence of moisture. Shaded roof and deck areas are common locations for algae growth, making them unsightly and looking as though they have not been taken care of. Algae growth is not hard to get rid of, but with shade and moisture it will return. I have installed several cedar shake roofs where we installed a copper metal ridge cap or simply installed copper flashing under the wood SQUARE ridge pieces. As it the water runs CORNERS rains across the copper the tiny metal Jeff Deahl and atoms are deposited down the roof. Algae will not grow in the presence of copper or zinc. You can use a pressure washer to remove algae but special care has to be given to not damage roof, siding or decking. Bleach is another way to kill algae but chlorine bleach is toxic, making it harmful to plants and pets. It can also be destructive to the coloring of siding and wood decking. One type of oxygen bleach, which comes in a powder form, will not affect wood or siding and is friendly to plants and shrubbery. You will want to mix the powder oxygen bleach with water and apply with a common hand pump sprayer. If you’re spraying algae on your roof, use extra caution. Damp algae can be very slippery, and you could find yourself on the ground moaning. Once you coat the algae, you can spray off with a water hose and the surface will look original.

JEFF DEAHL is president of the Builders

Association of Northeast Indiana. Questions for the Square Corners column may be submitted at ba-ni.com or email info@ba-ni.com

Appraisal shows include surprises, humor I have been serving as America’s appraiser for many years now. Many people attend my appraisal events with family heirlooms or flea market finds. My appraisal style is unlike anything you’ve seen in the antiques world or on TV. My audiences partake in my rapid fire, funny, educational and totally unscripted events. Here are some of the stories that I recall from my latest round of Dr. Lori’s Antiques Appraisal Comedy Show Tour. Some objects are worth big bucks and other objects have big stories to tell. I present about 150 events every year and I am in my 15th year of touring. Seattle: Kelly worked as a waiter. One night, he served a big table of diners and did not receive a tip. Instead, the diners left a small bag on the table with a Native American turquoise and silver squash blossom necklace in it. After a month of waiting for the owners to return to the restaurant to pick up the necklace, the owner told Kelly that the necklace was his tip. It was worth $5,000. Portland, Ore.: While cleaning out her aunt’s house, Cathy discovered a Walt Disney animation cel from Dumbo, dating to the 1940s. I told her to be sure to keep it somewhere out of direct sunlight as these early animation cels can fade. Appraised value: $9,000. Mt. Carmel, Pa.: A woman showed me her circa 1920s platinum, diamond and sapphire ring that was an anniversary gift from her husband. She said that her husband got it from “A guy

named Blackie at the pool hall.” I did not ask any more questions! Would you? Her Art Deco ring was worth $25,000. State College, Pa.: A gentleman in his 90s whose family had links to the Plimoth. Mass., colony brought a teapot that over on ART & came the Mayflower. ANTIQUES With significant information and the documenPHOTO CONTRIBUTED Dr. Lori tation to prove it, the silver Dr. Lori is shown presenting at an appraisal event in St. Louis. teapot was worth $150,000. that was used to make Apollo from ancient Egypt that dated Bloomsburg, 13 astronaut Fred Haise’s moon back to the time of Cleopatra, Pa.: I will never forget the man boot to my appraisal event. Now circa 50-30 BC. who yelled at me when I told him that’s what I call a rare object. Hazelton, Pa.: A couple in that his glass Ball canning jar Unfortunately, he only had the was not rare. It was marked 1858 their 80s brought an American left boot mold. The right one had Impressionist landscape painting on the side. The owner believed already sold online. Left moon to my event. While waiting for it was the first one ever made — boot value $10,000. the event to begin holding their it wasn’t! Value: $8. Kansas City, Mo.: A woman painting, they were approached Lynchburg, Va.: At a named Joan purchased an ugly by two young men who offered corporate appraisal dinner drawing of an eagle with a to buy the painting on the spot. event, a man brought me one Picasso signature on it that she They offered the couple $8,000 of the oldest objects that I have and the estate sale organizer for the painting and urged them appraised. It wasn’t the oldest, thought was a print. Joan bought not to have me appraise it. The but it was old — really old. The the print at the estate sale for elderly couple rejected the offer object was a portrait bust from stating that the painting had been $2.50. It wasn’t a print but the ancient Roman empire. It actually an original, signed Picasso in the wife’s family for decades was acquired from an antique drawing worth $50,000. store and purchased by the man’s and they wanted me to appraise Akron, Ohio: A woman named it. I told them it was worth mother in the 1950s. Today’s Ginger purchased a very old sock value: $25,000. Note: The oldest $100,000. Lewes, Del.: A former NASA monkey at an estate sale. She object that I appraised at an event didn’t like it when I told her my engineer brought the boot mold was a mascara jar of stoneware

evaluation of it. I said, “If you can smell it, you can’t sell it.” Value: Smelly! Glastonbury, Conn.: An original campaign button from George Washington’s campaign in the form of a brass car coat button. The piece was dug up from the ground while its owner was doing some light gardening. He dug up an object from the Revolutionary War period worth $2,200. Virginia Beach, Va.: A few strong members of a military family struggled to bring their object to my appraisal event. It took three big guys to lift it. Why? Because the object they asked me to appraise was a giant piece of reinforced concrete covered in graffiti. It was a piece of the Berlin Wall… Priceless! I have been appraising people’s stuff at a rate of approximately 20,000 objects a year for years. Once a guy from Wisconsin recognized me from TV and came running toward me in the streets of St. Petersburg, Russia, holding up his cell phone with a photo of a vase on it for me to appraise. Everybody’s got something. DR. LORI VERDERAME (“Dr. Lori”), a Ph.D. antiques appraiser, author, and award-winning TV personality, presents antique appraisal events nationwide. Dr. Lori is the star appraiser on the hit TV show, Auction Kings on Discovery channel. For information about your antiques, visit DrLoriV.com, Facebook.com/ DoctorLori or call 888-431-1010.


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HOMES TO OWN •

kpcnews.com

FEATURE HOME DEKALB COUNTY

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

FEATURE HOME STEUBEN COUNTY

PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED

There is a great floor plan throughout this home. The large living area features a cathedral ceiling, built-in cabinetry, a gas-log fireplace and floor-to-ceiling windows. The kitchen/dining area is also open. The laundry and mud room, full bath and den/study are all on the main level. The unbelievable master suite has a large bedroom, master bath with double vanities, ceramic shower and jetted tub. The family room is located on the lower level and has a wet bar, theater area and game table.

PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED

This house is located in a quiet cul-de-sac and has an open floor plan and a finished basement. The beautiful, new, eat-in kitchen has stainless steel and granite. There is a huge, secluded, fenced-in backyard that is nicely landscaped. Your kids can walk to school safely on the walkway provided. This house is generator ready.

HEATING: Gas baseboard

SUBDIVISION: Greenbriar

ADDRESS: 168 Lane 150A, Jimmerson Lake, Angola

CENTRAL AIR: Yes and wall

SIZE: 2,522 square feet BEDROOMS: Four

SCHOOLS: MSD of Steuben County

BATHROOMS: Four

DIRECTIONS: In Greenbriar, go right onto Brentwood Circle.

YEAR BUILT: 1969

GARAGE: 3-car attached

BEDROOMS: Four

SCHOOLS: DeKalb Central School Corp.

PRICE: $153,900

STYLE: Traditional

SIZE: 4,214 square feet

GARAGE: Two-car attached

BATHROOMS: Two-and-a-half

CENTRAL AIR: Yes

SUBDIVISION: Tree Harbour

STYLE: Two-story

DIRECTIONS: Orland Road to C.R. 425W, north to Tree Harbour, Lane 150 to Lane 150A.

PRICE: $469,000 YEAR BUILT: 2001

Anne Thomas 1560 Shook Drive Auburn, IN 46706 ROTH WEHRLY GRABER

260-908-0294

Each Office Is Independently Owned and Operated.

G

K E Y

D > DeKalb

A > Allen

N > Noble

W > Whitley

S > Steuben

K > Kosciusko

L > LaGrange

M > Michigan

E > Elkhart

O > Ohio

ST W NE

723 A Arcadia Court, Kendallville

Peaceful condo living! Come take a look at this updated 2 bedroom, 2 bath condo in Friendly Village! Completely updated throughout. Natural light streams in through the central skylight. New paint, ceramic tiles, new AC & roof last year. Enjoy the beautiful landscaping and nature preserve along the back while sitting under the new pergola! $97,500. MLS#9005421.

260-349-8850

The Hess Team

The Hess Team

N L

N D

The fisherman and nature lover will appreciate the great fishing, the large site & private wooded location. This year-round lake home is on a LaGrange County maintained road. The 3 BR, 2 BA house is completely remodeled from top to bottom and has been lived in gently. Extra large deck, and no close neighbors! Garage has the length for boat on trailer. $153,900

Spacious 2-story built in the 1930’s. 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths. Limestone fireplace. BIG kitchen. HUGE living room. Partial basement. NGFA heat. Attached 2-car garage. 5 city lots with a corner location. Property Sold “AS IS”. $55,900

2143 W. Maple Lane, Kendallville Large ranch in established subdivision looks new! Includes new furnace, additional insulation and new AC compressor. Features all new flooring including ceramic tile, laminate and carpet. Also includes a new 30x10 deck! Move right in. Seller to pay up to $3,000 of buyer’s closing costs. With USDA financing, you can move in for very little down! MLS#9005525. $119,900.

Andy Treesh

Big Long Lake

260-854-2414

260-242-7366

1501 S. Main St., Kendallville

All the work is done on this charming 3 bedroom, 1 bath home. The kitchen is new, the floors have been refinished and the entire upper level has been made into a 396 sq. ft. bedroom with new carpet and insulated walls! There’s new wiring, plumbing and siding. The home sits on a large lot w/the backyard fenced in next to the 840 sq. ft. 3-car garage. $84,900. MLS#9005466.

260-349-8850

The Hess Team

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ON T CK RKE A B A M

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1422 Garden Street, Kendallville

Garden park beauty! Convenient to schools & YMCA, Bixler Lake and walking paths. Well-kept 3 bedroom, 2 bath ranch ready for new owners. $98,000. MLS#9004705.

260-349-8850

The Hess Team

L O C A T O R

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3 BR, 2 BA home w/all the modern touches you’ve dreamed of: stainless steel appliances, hardwood floors, vaulted ceilings, skylit entryway and open concept eat-in kitchen w/island! Step outside onto the wooden deck and enjoy the fenced-in poolside escape. $214,500. MLS#9005512.

Craig A. Walker 2535 N. C.R. 200 W, Angola, IN 46703

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ADDRESS: 713 Brentwood Circle, Auburn

Awesome lakefront home on Jimmerson Lake

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Move-in ready in a great subdivision

Ashley

260-854-2414

200 N. Main St., Wolcottville

200 N. Main St., Wolcottville

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Absolutely beautiful 4 bedroom, 2-½ bath Victorian home on historic West Michigan St.! This home has been maintained with love and it shows! Breathtaking original woodwork throughout the home! Plus - a 25 x 57 barn - a rare find in town! $148,000

Calling all investors!! 3 bedroom, 1 bath ranch-style home. Built in 1997. Nice lot. Attached garage. Close to the school and YMCA. Property Sold “AS IS.” $49,500

Come make this 3 bedroom home your own. Just on the outskirts of downtown Ligonier sitting on .55 acre. Close to shopping, schools and the park. Fenced-in backyard for privacy and a fire pit for fun. Nice location. Home is being sold in “as is” condition. Needs some TLC. $54,900

3 bedrooms and 1 bath in Big Turkey Lake country. 1.5-story with 1,500 plus sq. ft., 2.5-car detached garage. Immediate possession. $35,900

LaGrange

260-854-2414

Kendallville

260-854-2414

200 N. Main St., Wolcottville

Ligonier

260-854-2414

200 N. Main St., Wolcottville

260-854-2414

200 N. Main St., Wolcottville

200 N. Main St., Wolcottville

4675 W 370 N, ANGOLA

Open Homes S

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104 MACTAVISH CT., ANGOLA

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Built by A & D Specs. New condo with maintenance free living. 2 bedrooms, 2 baths, 1,534 sq. ft. Located just a short distance from the YMCA, hospital, shopping, walking trails and much more. $129,900. Directions: Williams Street to Henney Street to Krebs Court. Listed by Don Wise • 260-905-6162 Hosted by Kay Kunce • 260-316-1422

This brand new 3,750 sq. ft., 4-5 BR, 3 BA, daylight basement home is in scenic Glendarin Hills golf community. Beautiful kitchen with maple cabinets and stainless steel appliances. 9’ ceilings, whirlpool tub and walk-in shower, wet bar in basement with pre-wired surround sound. Rear deck and patio, 3-car finished garage. This is an Energy Star home with builder’s full warranty. $255,000 includes lot.

Sievers Builders LLC

(260) 668-4458 Custom Built Homes Come See The Difference

833-4947

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WHY RENT!? A principal & interest payment on this property is $303.50! (30-yr. loan @ 4.5% interest) Immaculate home in town South Milford. Brand new kitchen and bathroom floors...2 bedrooms and 1 full bath. Turnkey and ready to call home. $59,900. MLS#9005179. DIRECTIONS: SR 3 north, to South Milford, go right on 750 south to property.

Michelle Eggering

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Completely redesigned floor plan & remodeled 3 BR, 2-1/2 BA on a double lot in Ashley. Oversized 3-car gar. w/workshop area. Wood privacy fence & gazebo. New updates! Fresh new floor plan with attention paid to detail. Maintenance-free for years to come. DIRECTIONS: State Road 4 to N. Harrison (North) to W. Lincoln, turn right to home.

Hosted By: Tammy Johnson

8025 E 750 S, SOUTH MILFORD

260-318-4118

310 W. LINCOLN ST., ASHLEY AY ND PM SU 2-4

Over 5,000 sq. ft. of beautiful living. Four bedrooms, 3-1/2 baths, walk-out finished basement. Three-car attached garage. Also garage lot detached for storage of your toys. Access to a private lakeside beach club with storage lockers and docks. $475,000. MLS#9003322. Directions: 200 W to Orland Rd., follow to Crooked Lake Beach Club.

e-mail: blwagner@hotmail.com

1711 KREBS CT., ANGOLA

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Brenda Wagner 260-572-0437 • 260-316-6041 CELL

Big Turkey Lake Area

260-667-7636 Office: 260-854-2414

1514 SHADOW LAKE DR., ANGOLA S E US M HO 1-3 P EN Y OP NDA U S

Well maintained 4 bedroom, 3 bath home with nicely landscaped lot. Kitchen is open to the great room. Full basement. New Andersen sliding doors, dishwasher new in 2010, refrigerator and water softener new in 2013. $244,900. Directions: Angola south on Old 27 to Kankamp Rd. (fork to the left), left on Shadow Lake Drive to property. Hosted by:

Mark Pontecorvo

R E S U LT S

260-905-6909 cell 260-665-2414 ext. 245


HOMES TO OWN •

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

Bad soil? No soil? Plant in straw bales

kpcnews.com

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FEATURE HOME STEUBEN COUNTY

THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Bad soil? Not enough soil? Maybe even no soil? Skip the ground and try planting fruits and vegetables in straw bales instead, suggests Joel Karsten, author of “Straw Bale Gardens” (Cool Springs Press, 2013) and guru of one of this year’s gardening trends. The idea behind straw-bale gardening is simple. “It’s basically a different type of container garden,” says Karsten, of Roseville, Minn. Only the vessel is a bale of straw and the medium, a nutrient-rich compost created by the straw and a bit of fertilizer, is weed-free. That’s right. No weeds. Perhaps that’s what’s drawn tens of thousands of people to Karsten’s Facebook page on straw-bale gardening. Marketing executive Patricia Baker tried the technique as a way to avoid the weeds that abound in the heavy, clay soil at her home in the Berkshire mountains of Massachusetts. “I found that some plants did better than others — basically the ones that like the heat, like peppers,” says Baker, 51, who also had success growing tomatoes. “Overall, there are very few weeds to contend with and you don’t have a backache at the end of your gardening day. Also, after you harvest, you can use the leftover straw for mulch.” Straw-bale gardening

PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED

Enjoy the quiet neighborhood of Country Club Estates, plus the convenience of being only a few minutes from town. The appealing open floor plan features a cathedral ceiling in the great room. A gas fireplace adjoins the breakfast nook and large kitchen with an island. There is a spacious, main floor, master suite. The upper level offers two large bedrooms, a full bath and a loft overlook. There is a newly finished basement. The sprawling lower level family room has a second gas fireplace, a workshop and storage.

AP

Minnesota author and gardener Joel Karsten picks tomatoes from his straw bale garden.

lengthens the growing season in colder climates because the straw releases heat as it decomposes. In Jamestown, R.I., gardener and freelance writer Roger Marshall, 65, planted tomatoes in April and expected to begin picking his Earl Greys and beefsteaks in mid-July — about a month ahead of schedule. “Right now the plants are lush and about twice the

size of the control tomatoes I planted directly in front of the bales,” he says. For Karsten, a 43-yearold graduate of the University of Minnesota’s horticulture program, the idea sprang from his days on the family farm. As a child, he was intrigued by the thistles and other plants he’d see sprouting from wet bales of straw, and he wondered how they grew.

Quiet neighborhood in Country Club Estates ADDRESS: 2070 N. C.R. 110W, Angola

HEATING: Natural gas

SUBDIVISION: Country Club Estates

CENTRAL AIR: Yes

SIZE: 3,765 square feet

STYLE: Two-story

BEDROOMS: Three

GARAGE: Two-car attached

BATHROOMS: Three-and-a-half

SCHOOLS: MSD of Steuben County

PRICE: $219,900

DIRECTIONS: North Wayne Street to C.R. 200N, west to C.R. 110W, north to home.

YEAR BUILT: 2003

BANI Standard of the Week • Too often, undefined expectations create problems between builders and customers before, during and after their building and remodeling projects. Addressing some of the most prevalent issues, a set of Quality Assurance Builder Standards provide new and remodeling homeowners a way to measure the quality of their projects against an industry-approved set of standards. These standards help eliminate problems before the project even begins.

3. Never use an extension cord to power a sump pump. Always make certain that the pump has a 3-prong plug and has a continuous power supply. Should you ever unplug a sump pump for any reason, the pump will not pump. It Background is the homeowner’s responSUMP PUMPS A sump pump is used to sibility to make sure that the remove subsurface water pump is always plugged into that is collected in building the electrical outlet. subdrains, generally called 4. Read the manufaca sump pit. The discharge turer’s manual regarding Sump pump is from the sump pit should special information about not working not be discharged into the the pump. sanitary sewer, and therefore STANDARD: Sump pump DISCUSSION: In the it is usually piped to a splash should be able to pump out event of consequential block outside the home, a water from the sump pit damage caused by sump swaled area, a storm sewer to within 90% of its rated pump failures beyond opening, or a holding pond mechanical limits. the builders control, the of some sort. Sump pump BUILDER’S RESPONSIBILITY: homeowner should contact lines are usually equipped The builder will repair or their homeowner’s insurance with a check valve, a device replace any deficiency in the carrier who will subrogate that prevents the previously pump which does not meet or inform the homeowners pumped water from running the standard. to subrogate the appropriate back down the discharge HOMEOWNER’S parties for repairs and pipe and refilling the sump RESPONSIBILITY: claims against damages. pit. 1. Keep the sump pit Homeowners are encouraged Sump pumps are mechan- and screened openings free to carry insurance regarding ical devices that can and will from debris. Debris in the sump pump failure. This fail for a variety of reasons. pit can affect the float, the coverage is not always Numerous things can cause switch, and the operation of automatically included in a a sump pump failure: are the pump. Sump pumps are homeowner’s policy and the electrical problems, debris designed to pump water and homeowner should request in the pit causing the pump not foreign objects such as proof of coverage or obtain inlets to be clogged, clogged mud, straw, pea gravel, or additional coverage from discharge line, mechanical other debris. their insurer. problems, etc. 2. Keep the discharge Because of this, and pipe, outside, open and free For more information about because of the extensive flowing. In order for the the Quality Assurance Builder consequential damages that pump to discharge the water, Standards, contact the Builders can result from a failure, no blockage can be in the Association of Northeast back-up sumps, battery discharge line. This includes Indiana at 877-665-8921 for back-up pumps, and/or mud, debris, ice, snow and a list of builders who belong alarm systems are strongly other foreign matter that to the association and agree to recommended for sump slows down or impedes adhere to the Quality Assurance pump installations. pumping action. Builder Standards.

D > DeKalb

A > Allen

N > Noble

W > Whitley

S > Steuben

K > Kosciusko

L > LaGrange

M > Michigan

E > Elkhart

O > Ohio

260-665-2414 260-336-9090

Dayflowers are pretty but recall something sad dayflower’s pale, relatively inconspicuous petal. More generous accounts say the third brother died young, before he was able to leave his mark on botany. At any rate, what a sad thing to be immortalized for one’s deficiencies.

BY LEE REICH The Associated Press

The cheery blue color of dayflowers (Commelina communis) — so named because each flower lasts but a day — does nothing to dispel pity I feel for them. Not that the petals cry out for sympathy. You have to get fairly close to the plant, or really stop and look at it, to even see its blossoms. Its stems and leaves, though, are bold, seemingly ready to gobble up any piece of ground they can grab with their succulence and lushness. Aggressive growth coupled with almost inconspicuous flowers could categorize any plant as a “weed.” And many species of dayflower are considered just that, especially in parts of the South and Southwest. But name calling is not what stirs up my sympathies for this plant.

The Brothers Commelina Take an even closer look at a dayflower. Zoom in on

AP

The dayflower is so named because each flower lasts but a day.

the flower, and below the two prominent, azure petals you’ll see a third petal, pale compared to the other two and much smaller. The petals are what give dayflower its botanical name. Carl von Linnaeus, the founder of our system of plant nomenclature, gave dayflowers the botanical name Commelina to honor two 18th century Dutch brothers who were stars in botany at the time. But there was a third brother too, less successful than the other two and represented by the

Good kin for dayflower Despite being called a weed and memorializing someone’s lack of accomplishment, dayflowers keep good company. Among their kin is the popular houseplant called wandering Jew, appreciated for the way its drooping, purple-tinted stems impart a tropical lushness to heated homes in the winter. Another dayflower relative is Moses-in-a-boat, with lurid purple, spiky leaves. Among outdoor plants in colder regions, dayflowers’ best known relatives are spiderworts. Spiderworts look much like dayflowers, except the flowers are larger and have only two petals.

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Linda Mynhier The Todd Stock Team 100 Growth Parkway, Suite D, Angola, IN 46703

OpenHomes

439 W. Greenwood Dr., Kendallville Private location in a great neighborhood south of Kendallville! Ranch home with 3 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms with over 1,300 square feet of living space! 1.2 acres with many mature trees at the back! One-car garage with an extra garage/workshop! Oversized shed with a basement/ shelter! MLS#9003293. $104,900 $95,000.

260-302-6404

207 Station House Pass, Garrett

Built by Granite Ridge in 2008. This 3 BR, 2 BA home has been freshly painted and is move-in ready. There is a partially fenced backyard and a large corner lot that is not enclosed. All kitchen appliances stay and an HMS warranty is iincluded from the seller. MLS#9005490. $125,000.

260-349-8557 Dawn Hurley

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610 WARREN DRIVE, KENDALLVILLE

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124 N. MAIN STREET, AVILLA S 2- UND 4P A M Y

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Gregg Pyle

2898 C.R. 28, Waterloo

Peaceful country life could be yours. Private 30 acres of outdoor paradise. This 4 BR, 2-1/2 BA home on a full partially finished basement is situated in the PERFECT country setting. The home has a large kitchen w/all the appliances including a double oven, refrigerator and dishwasher. The living room has a custom wood fireplace w/a fieldstone chimney. MLS#9005516. $299,500.

260-349-8557 Dawn Hurley

Magnificent period home restored and remodeled. High ceilings, huge rooms, three sets of French doors, and a wonderful flow to the rooms. New high-efficiency furnace, AC ready and all new thermal-pane windows. 19th century carriage house has been converted in a 2-car garage and work area. MLS#9004905 $119,900. DIRECTIONS: Albion St. to Main. North on Main to 2nd house on right.

Exceptional ranch in Hollybrook Heights. 3 BR, 2 BA, bonus room over garage wired for surround sound, could be 4th BR/family room. Great room with dining and living room open. Property backs up to a pond/bird sanctuary! Great family-oriented neighborhood. MLS#9003864. $156,900. DIRECTIONS: US 6 east to Kammerer Rd., north to Laramie Trace, turns into Warren Dr., to home.

Hosted By: Robert Muller

Hosted By: Gregg Pyle

260-318-2595

260-302-6404


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HOMES TO OWN •

kpcnews.com

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

Right at Home: Crisp geometrics shape decor THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Quadrilaterals, cubes, polyhedrons … sound like 10th grade math class? Perhaps, but they’re also examples of one of this fall’s biggest trends in home decor. Crisp, contemporary and pleasing to the eye, geometrics work well for tables, lighting, accessories and soft furnishings. Nate Berkus is a fan of these modern motifs, as his fall collection at Target attests. One of his favorites is a wall-mounted art piece made of hexagonal metal. His inspiration came out of a trip to a gem and mineral show, where he saw a table of crystallized honeycombs. “They were breathtaking,” he said. A series of polyresin marble trays are emblazoned with a scattering of rhombuses. Check out the zig-zagged enamel photo frames here as well. (target. com ) Restoration Hardware’s curated “Curiosities” collection includes some Belgian “maquettes” — wooden scale models used to teach architecture. The large polygonal star or pyramidal cone would make a striking accessory. (restorationhardware.com ) Canadian design duo Gabriel Kakon and Scott Richler have created the Welles light fixture, a cluster of blackened steel polygons with interiors available in nickel, brass or copper. (gabrielscott.com ) Also in lighting, Seattlebased design house Iacoli and McAllister offers open-framed rhomboid pendants, available in different configurations, crafted in metallics as well as fun, powder-coated colors like tomato, blue and white. (iacolimcallister.com ) Ridgely, a Toronto studio, welds cut steel rods into crisscross shapes on screens that can be left raw or powder-coated with several different colors. They can be

AP

A bespoke global lacquered crab cabinet by Antoine Schapira. Artisanship meets whimsy in Shapira’s two-door Brazilian rosewood lacquered cabinet. The “body” of the crab is fashioned from lacquered Brazilian rosewood, enhanced with arching cast brass “legs” wrapped with palm wood. Luxe finishes like lacquer and metallics are on trend this fall.

wallpaper takes non-Euclidean geometry to the next level, with a range of papers printed with lines radiating from points, like a compass gone wild. They’re available in several color combinations, including Red Eye (white on black) and CandyLand (white on red). Her Luci Della Cita wallpaper evokes city lights at night, with spherical shapes playing across a moody, out-of-focus background. (jillmalek.com )

used as room or landscape dividers, or as wall art. (ridgelystudioworks.com ) Flor.com has a range of carpet tiles that replicate graphic patterns like zigzags and rectangles. (flor.com ) At overstock.com , circles are the focus on the Metro wool rug, with disc shapes in vibrant fall shades of rust, olive and steel blue on a charcoal background. The retailer’s Ivory Geometric Circles rug has a midcentury vibe with concentric seafoam, magenta, gold and olive swirls on a background of cream. Another Canadian talent, Renato Foti, makes tables, accessories and other home decor elements out of colored glass; his Martini tables and Geo Square basins feature geometric shapes embedded in the hand-worked glass. (triodesignglassware. com ) New York designer Jill Malek’s Voyageur

You can solve for “x” with one of Modshop’s side tables, with zebrawood, hickory, rosewood or oak veneer tops on sleek, chrome, X-shaped legs. (modshop1.com ) Finally, if you’re the crafty type, check out Brett Bara’s tutorial on creating your own geometric patchwork wall art using triangle fabric shapes in an Ikea frame. It’s so simple that you’re guaranteed an easy “A” in this geometry class, at least. (brettbara.com )

AP

Restoration Hardware shows a black Belgian wooden maquette, a scaled replicas of a model used by an architect to study form, structure and proportion. Geometric shapes are strong décor elements for fall 2013.

AP

Aerin.com shows Aerin Lauder’s geo bowls that are made of porcelain then either dipped or painted with 18K gold.

Restoration Hardware shows scale models called maquettes which are used by architects studying form, structure and proportion. These replicas from Belgium are an interesting way to introduce one of fall’s strongest décor elements, geometrics.

Creativity by the yard: thinking beyond grass Slow gardening: a lifestyle THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Grass isn’t always the best groundcovers for a yard: It’s thirsty at a time when water is becoming scarce; it attracts fewer pollinators; it requires expensive chemicals to maintain, and it must be disposed of if you bag as you mow. That’s why many property owners are downsizing their lawns or simply eliminating turf grass in exchange for something more functional and less demanding. “We’re recommending ecosystem changes provided by a more productive landscape, instead of a monoculture from grass,” says Susan Barton, an extension horticulturist with AP the University of Delaware. “A lawn should not be a In this June 25 photo, the front entry of this home has more eye appeal after the default vegetation, but it lawn was reclaimed using shrubs, trees, flowering perennials and a walkway rather should be more purposeful. than turf grass, in Langley, Wash. A heavy mulch cover helps minimize weeds. More diverse.” She suggests four Use ecological grasses if alternatives to turf grass: “Look first at areas where the grass is already you don’t want to eliminate landscape beds, meadows, Penick says. “Fine woods and paved, permeable suffering — that strip along the street that’s hard turf, fescue lawns grow slowly hardscapes. can get by with less “All of these provide to water or trampled by people getting off the bus.” and rainfall and less mowing. more ecologic service,” she Those are good options for says. “We’re talking clean people who want to fit in water. More habitat for with their neighborhoods but insects. More oxygen taken Pam Penick don’t want to be slaves to in and less carbon dioxide their lawns,” she says. given off.” Garden designer from Austin, Texas Or “consider ornamental Barton helped get a grasses,” she adds, or “some county landscape ordinance of the new groundcovers passed a decade or so (aromatic herbs, succulents, ago allowing “managed low-growing shrubs, ferns, proper plants, they can meadows” to replace grass turf isn’t simple or cheap, hosta). Edibles. Larger moderate (water) runoff.” but it can be done in in residential front yards. shrubs. You can have a nice Other replaceable stages. Start with your These no-mow areas filter looking yard yet be conseroptions include boulevards, toughest-to-grow or water, encourage the vation-minded.” driveways and pockets hardest-to-mow sections. return of native plants that Any lawn renovation overgrown by weeds or “Use the 80-20 plan provide food and cover for project should be regionally moss. wildlife, and still have curb where 20 percent of your appropriate, however. “Look first at areas area requires 80 percent appeal. “What we’re really where the grass is already of your maintenance,” “A managed meadow talking about is using native suffering — that strip says Evelyn Hadden, a isn’t simply a matter of vegetation,” says the Univeralong the street that’s hard founding member of the letting your grass grow sity of Delaware’s Barton. to water or trampled by Lawn Reform Coalition long,” she says. “It means “Xeriscaping is a great people getting off the bus,” and author of “Beautiful mowing paths through it concept for the Southwest or says Pam Penick, a garden No-Mow Yards” (Timber and adding edges where designer from Austin, Texas, areas that are dry, but those Press, 2012). needed. If people think and author of “Lawn Gone!: kinds of plants would drown “Hillsides are a good about it and make it look here. Rain gardens would be Low-Maintenance, Sustainexample,” Hadden says. good, there’s no reason able, Attractive Alternatives a better addition given the why it shouldn’t be part of “The steeper they are, the amount of moisture we’ve for Your Yard” (Ten Speed more difficult they are to suburbia.” had recently.” Press, 2013). Downsizing or replacing mow. Replaced with the

rather than a race THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Felder Rushing is not a man to be hurried. This former county extension agent turned folklorist, author and lecturer is an advocate of slow gardening — emphasizing the process over the product. “Life has a lot of pressures,” Rushing says. “Why include them in the garden?” Slow gardening is an offshoot of the international Slow Food Movement, which, in its words, aims “to strengthen the connection between the food on our plates and the health of our planet.” Think of it as mixing ecology with gastronomy, promoting wellness over the high-calorie fare of many fast-food menus. The way Rushing looks at it, fast food gardening means outsourcing most gardening pleasures. “A lot of people feel they’re too busy to maintain their lawn and shrubs, so they hire ‘mow and blow crews’ to get it done,” he says. “That’s fine, but it’s product-oriented. Others like eating out regularly. That’s OK, too, but it’s not home cooking or enjoying what you grow.” Slow gardeners, on the other hand, look forward to whatever needs doing. “They’re anticipating, performing and sharing the process,” he says. Slow gardening is more psychological than horticultural. “Some people make their beds every morning even if they live alone and nobody’s there to notice,” he says. “They do what they do because it makes them feel good.” Yet slow gardening is not lazy gardening; there are no shortcuts or how-to lists. “Sometimes it can get pretty intense and long on gadgets,” Rushing says. “But if you’re able to get into the rhythm of that, you’re practicing slow

gardening.” Susan Harris, a garden coach and blogger (GardenerSusan, GardenRant) from Greenbelt, Md., also subscribes to the slow-gardening philosophy, and recommends it to her students, readers and clients. It’s “doing what I’m passionate about, not being a purist about anything, using hand tools, not power tools, tolerating some pest damage or just growing some other plant rather than bothering with products (organic or otherwise),” Harris said in an email. “Applying pesticides is not gardening in my book, at least not the slow kind.” Some suggestions from Rushing’s book “Slow Gardening, A No-Stress Philosophy for All Senses and Seasons” (Chelsea Green Publishing, 2011): — Take it easy. Gardening doesn’t have to be stressful or a rush to reach harvest. Go slow while you grow. — Don’t try keeping up with the Joneses. “A lot of gardeners are scared they’re going to mess up,” Rushing says. “What are the neighbors going to say? I’m saying hold your head up and go on. Make mistakes and savor them. People are going to talk about you anyway.” — Don’t be penny-wise and flavor-foolish. “Slow gardeners don’t mind spending a little more trying to grow tomatoes over what they’d buy at the store, just for that first, hot-off-the-vine bite in the summer,” he says. — Get together. Share your harvests. Teach. “If you like going to farmer’s markets, great. But take some kids along with you the next time and show them the difference between a yellow (summer) squash and a zucchini. To me, slow gardening is passing along a favorite plant or some of your knowledge.”


D5

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STEAM & GAS 32ND ANNUAL ANTIQUE FARM POWER SHOW

AUGUST 8 - 11 4-H Fairgrounds 1030 E 075 N LaGrange, IN Featuring: CASE Working demonstrations, flea markets, trading post, arts & craft, entertainment & more. 888-277-3184

FOUND FOUND: 2 wheel hand cart at corner of 175 N and 200 W near Lake James on July 22. 260-316-9581

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Automotive

AUTOMOTIVE SALES BURNWORTH ZOLLARS Auto group is seeking an energetic, conscientious individual to join our sales team. We are an established dealership providing Two new auto lines and a well-stocked inventory to sell from. Sales experience is not necessary.

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11 yr old black lab & chow mix. All black. Short & wirey hair. Short tail like chow. White muzzle, no tags or collar. Her name is Molly. Lost Tuesday, July 9 in afternoon. Lost on CR 54 & 39 260-925-1950

TUTORS Reading Individual diagnosis and teaching. Licensed and experienced. Call Kathy 260-833-1697

Training and benefits, including 401K & health insurance are provided. To take advantage of this opportunity, Send resume to: P.O. Box 179 Ligonier, IN 46767

Or stop in at 309 US HWY 6 in Ligonier to see Ken Cook.

Cleaning

Part Time Janitorial

AUCTION Auction! August 6 @ 3pm 9115 E 480 S Pretty Lake, Wolcottville, IN 46795 Paddle boat, riding lawnmower, furniture, appliances and much more! 260-580-3400 smauctioneers.com AU11000012

position available, must be flexible, in the Topeka area, 15-20 hours a week, $9.00 per hour. Call

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Drivers $2,500.00 Sign-On Bonus! Get Home Weekly & Weekends running Dedicated Account. Werner Enterprises: 1-888-567-4862

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LAB TECH Immediate Opening To work in a quality lab performing basic wet chemistry techniques. No experience required, will train. Hours are every other weekend from 8am to 2 pm for a total of 24 hours per month @ $13/hr for a total of $312/mo Tech must also fill in during the week as needed on rare occasions. Position is located near Butler, IN 10 miles East of Auburn off Hwy 8 Reply to: Lab Manager hollandr@quakerchem. com ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

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Pro Resources has partnered with several companies in LaGrange and Noble Counties to hire you for immediate positions in GENERAL LABOR , FORKLIFT AND MANY MORE. • FULL-TIME • BENEFITS • COMPETITIVE WAGES • CLIENT SPECIFIC INCENTIVES, SUCH AS ATTENDANCE BONUSES, GAIN SHARE BONUSES, DIRECT HIRE OPPORTUNITIES

JOIN US MONDAY, AUGUST 5th 1 PM TO 4 PM PRO RESOURCES STAFFING 102 Progress Drive West, Kendallville, IN

OPPORTUNITIES AVAILABLE AT: *ASHLEY INDUSTRIAL MOLDING* *DOMETIC* *GUARDIAN* *MANY OTHERS

Qualified candidates must meet client specific requirements prior to placement.

MANUFACTURING PROCESS ENGINEER

General

Bartender Mon-Sat. * 3:45 til close 32-38 hr/wk P/T Dinner Cook Tues.-Thurs., some weekends 15-20 hr/wk. Please stop by the Lodge after 4pm to complete the application. Pay based on experience. Angola Elks Lodge 2398 2005 N Wayne St. Angola, IN 46703 260-665-6408 General

LOST

EMPLOYMENT

Become a member of team Champion!

Assistant Zone Manager Candidate should possess aggressive marketing skills Windows 7, Office 2010, Navision computer experience preferred Apply in person or send resume College degree desired, but not required

Production / Manufacturing Full time employment in many phases of manufacturing homes Piece rate work in fast paced environment Work Monday - Friday, guarantee 8 hours per day, first shift Must Apply in Person Previous experience preferred Excellent benefits package including: medical, dental, prescription, vision, life and more Drug Screen Required

Champion Home Builders, Inc. PO Box 95 308 Sheridan Drive Topeka, IN 46571 (260) 593-2962 General Brokaw Theater hiring nights & weekends. Apply in person.

General Machine Operators Wire Drawing 2nd/3rd shift



Apply in person at Accel 302 Progress Way Avilla, IN General

Part Time Bartender Must be able to work from 3 - 11 pm & weekends. Bring resume to:

Garrett American Legion 515 W. 5th Ave.

General

RN or LPN with good interpersonal skills, knowledge of Medicaid Waiver services preferred. Some driving required. Forte Residential, Inc. Syracuse Corporate Office Send resume to Tom: tom@forteresidential .org

✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ General

THE BLUE GATE GARDEN INN is now

HIRING PART-TIME & FULL TIME team Members for the following positions:

•HOUSEKEEPING •FRONT DESK •FOOD SERVICE Please apply at the Craft Barn located across the street from the Blue Gate Restaurant in Shipshewana. Ask for John. Download an application at:

20-25 hrs/wk 3-4 days/wk Please email resume & salary requirements to: crestline@crestline communities.com

INDEPENDENT Route available in Kendallville.

CONTRACTORS Circulation Department

Contact: Misty Easterday

• VALID DRIVER’S LICENSE • Responsible Adult • Reliable Transportation • Available 7 days a week.

102 N. Main St., Kendallville Phone: 800-717-4679 ext. 105 E-mail: newssundm@kpcmedia.com

If interested in this opportunity, please apply at http://Metaldyne.balancetrak.com/FREMO00012 Metaldyne offers an excellent compensation and benefits package. Metaldyne is an Equal Opportunity Employer

Carriers are independent contractors and not employees.

aaaA

Sudoku Puzzle

CARRIER

OPPORTUNITIES INDEPENDENT

Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

3

CONTRACTORS

2 8

Circulation Department

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Albion/Brimfield motor route. Contact: Misty Easterday Earn over $1,000 per month in 2+ hr/day. • VALID DRIVER’S LICENSE • Responsible Adult • Reliable Transportation • Available 7 days a week.

102 N. Main St., Kendallville Phone: 800-717-4679 ext. 105 E-mail: newssundm@kpcmedia.com Carriers are independent contractors and not employees.

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★ ★ ★ ★ ★ General

THE BLUE GATE RESTAURANT is now

HIRING PART-TIME & FULL TIME team members for the following positions: • SERVERS • COOKS • RETAIL STAFF •PART TIME 3rd SHIFT CLEANERS • BARISTA/CASHIER Please apply at the Craft Barn located across the street from the Blue Gate Restaurant. Ask for John.

IMMEDIATE OPENINGS!!! Excellent career opportunities! If you’re not registered with us, you are MISSING out! • Engineering Manager • Quality Engineering Supervisor • Purchasing • Auto Cad Operators • Mig & Tig Welders • Production Associates/Machine Operators • Shipping/Packers/General Labor Please apply in person at our Angola Branch or online at www.peoplelinkstaffing.com and select the Angola Branch. E.O.E.

Bored? Check out Happenings in Friday’s newspaper!

• Plan and conduct the analysis, inspection, design, test and/or integration to ensure the quality of the product or component • Use practical problem-solving methodology to address production-related issues • Develop new approaches to solve problems identified during quality assurance activities. • Communicate with employees, customers and management in an effort to keep quality at a high level. BA Degree or 3 to 5 years related experience. ASQ Certified, familiarity with AIAG, PPAP, FMEA, and knowledge of TS16949 is a plus. The ideal candidate will be self-motivated, independent, creative thinker, who likes scientific root cause analysis and myth-busting. Qualified applicants, please forward your resume to: CTA Acoustics, Inc. 9670 Maple St., Orland, IN 46776 Attn: HR Department or Hrinfo@ctaacoustics.com

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Difficult rating: VERY DIFFICULT 8-04

Inspired Careers At American Senior Communities, our people deliver the kind of care that you would want for your family members. In an atmosphere that welcomes compassionate, talented individuals, our team members are able to deliver inspired care at the highest possible level. Now is a great time to join our team.

Experienced Full-Time Cook For information or to apply:

237 S. Grandstaff • 260-927-1842

Auburn, Indiana

Several area clients looking for: Manufacturing/Forklift/Assembly Butler-Auburn-Hamilton-Waterloo

All Shifts Available Production openings $8-$13/hr. Skilled Positions up to $22 /hr. Applications accepted Monday-Friday 8 a.m. - 4 p.m. E.O.E.

CTA ACOUSTICS, INC.,

for our Orland Facility to:

8

We offer competitive compensation and affordable benefits.

a manufacturer of acoustical and thermal insulating products for the automotive and industrial markets, is seeking a highly-motivated

QUALITY ENGINEER/SUPERVISOR

7

Day Shift ~ 5am to 1:30pm

Download an application at

★ ★ ★ ★ ★

1

7 210 Growth Parkway, Angola, IN Phone (260) 624-2050

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✦ ✦ ✦ ✦ ✦

P/T MANAGER

The ideal candidate will be a self-starter with the ability to implement outreach marketing ideas that allow you o connect with members of the surrounding community and lease all available apartments on site.

OPPORTUNITIES

Riegsecker.com

Riegsecker.com.

for a small senior property in Ligonier.

CARRIER

Metaldyne is a leading global designer and supplier of low cost, high quality metalbased components, assemblies and modules for the automotive industry. Due to increased capacity, we currently have an excellent opportunity available for the right candidate at our Fremont, IN, facility. The responsibilities for the Manufacturing Process Engineer include designing, developing plans, executing, and improving manufacturing processes in the plant through process system design, machine design, selection and automation. The Manufacturing Process Engineer will be responsible for new program launch items, timelines and project management. Qualified candidates will possess a bachelor’s degree and minimum five years experience in an industrial manufacturing environment, preferably automotive. The ideal candidate will have experience with high precision, mid- to high-volume machining and assembly equipment, tooling, fixturing, and gauging. Must have experience with and have ability to program CNC controlled machining equipment. Experience with PFEMA, SPC and GD&T is also required. Qualified candidates will also be proficient in MS office and AutoCAD. Candidates must be able to function in a “team” environment; have excellent verbal and communication skills; and proven experience with problem solving techniques and applications.

is now accepting applications for

NEW OPPORTUNITIES IN ASHLEY, IN FOR

SMALL SWITCH ASSEMBLY WORKERS! All Shifts – Mostly 2nd and 3rd $9.40/hour

Attend our Job Fair! WHEN: Thursday, August 8th and August 15th • 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. WHERE:

TRIN, Inc. 803 HL Thompson Jr., Dr. Ashley, Indiana (Enter the main entrance by the flagpoles) Call 260-927-9034 if you are unable to apply during these times. Kelly Services is an equal opportunity employer.

Betz Nursing Home 116 Betz Road, Auburn, IN 46706; Ph: 260-925-3814

ASCSeniorCare.com

MELT DEPARTMENT GENERAL LABOR OPENING

Metal Technologies, Auburn Casting Center (MTA) is located in Auburn, Indiana. MTA is a well-maintained, modern green sand, iron foundry that utilizes DISAmatic molding technology to produce both gray and ductile iron castings serving a diverse customer base. We have immediate employment opportunities for full-time Melt Department General Laborers. This position’s responsibilities include casting and maintaining refractory linings of ladles, furnaces and other molten iron handling surfaces. Delivering molten iron from the holding furnace to the tram ladle and the addition of alloys as required. Operation of molten iron transport system. Assist with furnace charging and slagging activities. Starting wage for this position is $14.59/hr. reaching $15.94/ hr. within approximately 12 months with an additional $.35/hr shift premium for 2nd and 3rd shift positions. Benefit package includes medical, dental, vision, 401k with match, bonus program, educational reimbursement, 10 holidays, vacation plan and others. Requirements include: • High school diploma or equivalent • Effectively organizing multiple tasks • Overtime required • Must complete drug screen and background check Applications are available on-line at www.metal–technologies.com Qualified individuals should mail completed applications to:

METAL TECHNOLOGIES AUBURN Attention: Human Resources 1537 West Auburn Drive • Auburn, Indiana 46706 Equal Opportunity Employer


D6

kpcnews.com

100% Employee owned company has openings for RN OR LPN’S 2nd and 3rd shift Full and Part Time.

1367 S. RANDOLPH GARRETT, IN NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE

We are accepting applications for the following positions:

Janitorial JANITORIAL/AUBURN $8-$9HR start. Part time, Monday thru Friday, approx. 25 hrs/wk. Must have clean background. Questions? Call 1-888-832-8060 M-F between 8:00 - 4:00 only

Bon Appetit Management Company

At Trine University Now Hiring for:

ALL POSITIONS Please call:

(260) 665-4811

Apply on line at:

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Just your cup of tea!

PRESENCE SACRED HEART HOME

RN Nursing Team Leader FT Day shift

Apply In Person at:

â?– â?– â?– â?– â?– â?– Restaurants

www.presencehealth .org/lifeconnections

â?– â?– â?– â?– â?– â?– â?–

900 Griswold Ct., Auburn, IN 46706 www.griswoldestates@ mrdapartments.com

Driver MCT LOGISTICS-Flatbed driver wanted. Home weekends. $1,000 week. 260-760-6095. (A)

âœŚ ✧ âœŚ ✧ âœŚ ✧ Napa Auto Parts Chainseeking experienced Automotive Parts Counter people and delivery drivers. Email resume to: shiser@ridegcompany. com or call 260-459-1654, ext. 244. (A)

Sunny Summer Savings

Restaurant

• FREE Heat & Hot Softened Water • Low Security Deposits* • Pet-Friendly Community* • On-site Management & Maintenance Sta

Sunday

*Restrictions apply

CALL TARA TODAY! NELSON ESTATES 260-349-0996 1815 Raleigh Ave., Kendallville 46755 nelsonestates@mrdapartments.com mrdapartments.com

S Star

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All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD Toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

Angola 2 BR 1 BA apt. $550/mo. + util. Laundry facilities on site. 260 668-5994

Angola

Lakeland Apts. IMMEDIATE OCCUPANCY

Large 1 BR, 62 & Over Handicapped or Disabled Rent based on income

FREE Utilities. 201 Fox Lake Rd. Angola, IN 46703

Call 260 665-9491

APARTMENT RENTAL

1212 W. Maumee St. Angola, IN

The

HOMES FOR SALE

Angola 2 BR apartments available now. $525/mo 260-243-0057

Timbers Steak House & Seafood Now Hiring Exp. Cooks & Servers

THE

GRISWOLD ESTATES (260) 927-0197

EOE

THE NEWS SU SUN

2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS ALMOST 1,000 SQ FT!

to schedule an interview

Or Contact Angie Smith Dir. of Nursing 260-897-2841 for an interview

LIFE

NOW OPEN TILL 7 PM ON TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS

Garrett Owner financing starting at $400 down + lot rent & with the lease to own option. We help you save while you live in your new home! Call Katt @ 260-357-3331 for more information and to view your new home!

SECOND SHIFT ADVANCED MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN

Powers and Sons LLC is in need of an Advanced Maintenance Technician. We are looking for someone who has extensive knowledge with industrial controls in soft-start, VFDs, PLCs, and other types of industrial process and motor controllers. Troubleshooting drives, PLC, and CNC master control circuit boards (MCCR) and I/O cards along with CNC setup and programming skills required. Also a strong general maintenance background in heavy machining equipment including: mechanical, PLC, hydraulic/pneumatic, electrical and electronics is necessary. We are a manufacturing facility serving the auto industry and offer a wage of $20-$22/hr. with a competitive beneďŹ t package.

260-868-2843 www.whereUmatter .com ◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆

BUNDLERS Entry level into press room operations. Fast track to becoming press operators in future. Mechanical aptitude helpful, must be able to lift up to 50 lbs. on a continuous basis. 12 hour shifts. Day and night openings. 5% shift premium for nights. $11.50 base rate; raise consideration in six months. We offer a very competitive beneďŹ t package. Air-conditioned, smoke-free environment. Apply at any Work One location (Indiana Workforce Development). No phone calls to Courier please.

Directions to home: Wolf Lake: 33 N just past SR 109 in Wolf Lake to 100 N. left to 400 W, right on to 200 N, Rt. on 350 W left on W. Vacation Way. Left on Quiet St. Home on the left. Hosted by: Greg Fahl 260 609-2503 Price: $84,900. MLS# 201301903

Auburn 2 BR SENIORS 50+ $470. No Smokers/Pets (260) 925-9525 Avilla 1 & 2 BR APTS $450-$550/ per month. Call 260-897-3188 Avilla Recently remodeled 2 BR 1 BA up, $525 + elect. 260 242-0567

Auburn 201 Yukon Pass Auburn Hills OPEN HOUSE AUGUST 4 * 2-4 3 BR, 2.5 BA 1,890 sq. ft. $172,500 260-925-8444

Ligonier 2 BR A/C, $500/mo. + util. Call 260 894-2849 lv. msg.

Auburn

COURIER KENDALLVILLE

Courier Kendallville has been recognized for the last thirteen years as a “BEST WORKPLACE IN AMERICAâ€? by the Printing Industries of America, a graphic arts association of more than 14,000 members. As our operation continues to grow, we are seeking to ďŹ ll the following positions immediately.

Beautifully maintained 3 BR, 2 BA ranch with 1 yr. old 1-car 18x24 attached garage on a spacious 100x200 lot with fenced yard. Lot 20 B is an owned 14� (frontage) x 25 lakefront owned boat on Lower Long Lake. No pier but sandy beach. Very clean property with immediate possession.

Spacious 1 & 2 BR, Peaceful, Clean, Pet Friendly. No appl. fee.

Angola Room for rent. Within walking distance to college and the Angola circle. $350/mo. (260) 668-4192

Courier Digital Solutions announced this week that the Kendallville location will double its capacity by 2014. We are seeking applicants who have worked in the printing industry in a variety of capacities - pre-press, printing, binding, customer service/job planning. Visit our website at www.courier.com/careers for a full listing of available jobs.

OPEN HOUSE 3378 W. Quiet Rd. Sunday, Aug. 4 • 1 - 3

$49 Moves You In!

1613 Magda Drive, Montpelier, Ohio 43543

LATEST EXPANSION ANNOUNCED

OPEN HOUSE 512 Hawthorne Place Sunday Aug. 4 • 2 - 4 3 BR plus den. Corner ranch with 2,320 sq. ft. 2 full BA, open floor plan. Large kitchen, FR with FP & many updates. MLS# 201212085 $159,900. Directions: 7th Street to Division, North and straight to Hawthorne, left to house. Hosted: By Barb Sanderson 260 413-8688

HOMES FOR RENT Auburn 4 BR, 1 1/2 BA, in-town. $700/mo. + util. (260) 226-0451 Garrett Land contract, 4 BR Handyman special, $500/mo. 615-2709

MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE

MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT

â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â–  Angola

Wolcottville 2 & 3 BR from $100/wk also LaOtto location. 574-202-2181

BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL

BANKRUPTCY FREE CONSULTATION

$25.00 TO START Payment Plans, Chapter 13 No Money down. Filing fee not included. Sat. & Eve. Appts. Avail. Call

Collect: 260-424-0954 act as a debt relief agency under the BK code

Divorce • DUI • Criminal • Bankruptcy

HOME IMPROVEMENT

LAKE RENTALS Several newer Model Homes Priced to Sell -

Golden Lake Golden Lake Get - A Away, furnished & AC. Pontoon boat use. $250/wk. Avail. now. 928-727-2178

Terms available

EHO Coachlight MHC Angola (260) 833-2731

COMMERCIAL Kendallville

â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â– â–  Angola Will finance, 2 BR homes. $450 down. $450/mo. 260-687-8049

Retail Building FOR RENT Building is 36 x 60

Garrett Beautiful doublewide lease to own! $1,400 moves you in! More homes available to choose from. We also have 3 handyman specials for sale with $400 down + lot rent. Call Katt @ 260-357-3331 for more information and to view your new home!

PLEASE CALL RICK 260-341-8894

@sk

THE EXPERT

All Phase Remodeling and Handyman Service - No Job too Big or Small !!! Free Estimates Call Jeff 260-854-9071 Qualified & Insured Serving You Since 1990

100 gallon pig tank with 66 gallons of propane. Must sell $199 260-490-5187 Angola area 24x4 above ground pool. Complete with filter, pump ,solar cover, winter cover and optional wood deck. All for $400. 260-490-5187

FURNITURE

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260-925-0200 or 800-381-5883 A debt relief agency under the Bankruptcy Code.

County Line Roofing

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PETS/ANIMALS

CARS

ADOPTABLE CATS 676-DSH,F,3 yrs., Blk/Tan/Org.(Crystal) 675-DSH,F,born 3/13,Blk/Tan tiger (Skittles) 670-DSH,Org.,M,born 5/13 (D.J.) 669-DSH,F,Gry.Tiger,2 yrs. (Vanna) 668-DSH, F, 1 yr.,Tan/Blk tiger (Crystal) 667-DSH, F,1 yr., Org. (Peach) 653-DMH,SF,White/ Blk.,5 yrs.(Nellie) 652-DMH,NM,3-4 yrs.,Bro/Blk.,declawed (Thatcher) 650-DSH,F,born 4/13, Gray (Lulu) 633-DSH,M,3 yrs., Blk (Allen) 631-DSH,F,Delute Calico,born 5/13 (Sahaira) 630-DSH,M,Blk/Tan tiger,5/13 (Ben) 629-DSH,SF,Blk/white, 2yrs.,declawed(Cutie) 627-DSH,M,born 5/16/13,Org.(Tom) 626-DSH,M,Org. tabby, bon 5/16/13 (Alex) 623-DLH,M,born 2/12,Blk.(Asher) 622-DSH,Blk/Tan/ White,F,born 4/13 (Penny) 619-DSH,4 yrs., Gry.,F (Sugar) 616-DMH,Org.,M,born 4/13(Kojak) 613-DSH,M,3yrs.,White w/Blk.(Bongo) 608-DSH,M,born 5/13,Gry/white(Mozart) 607-DSH,M,born 3/13,seal point(O’Brien) 606-DSH,F,born 3/13,gry/tan/wt(Lyssa) 605-DSH,F,born 3/13,seal point(Jubilee) 601-DSH,M,born 5/13,Yellow/wh(Chump) 600-DSH,F,1 yr, White/Gry. (Clare) 597-DSH,M,born 2/13,Org/white(Dozer) 596-DSH,M,born 2/13,Org(Dugger) 595-DSH,M,born 2/13,Buff/white(Doodle) 594-DSH,M,born 2/13,Buff/white(Echo) 593-DSH,Blk/Tan tiger,F,born 6/30/13 (Miylee) 592-DSH,M,2 yrs., Blk.(Mack) 591-DSH,2 yrs.,Blk.,M (Kalub) 565-DSH,F, 3 yrs., Blk. (Tilly) 562-Himalayan,SF, declawed,5 yrs,Chocolate (Madaline) 557-DSH,M,DOB 2/13, Blk/Tan tiger(Bonkers) 552-DSH,NM,White/Blk/ Tan,3-4 yrs.(Tucker) 543-DSH,F,DOB 2/13, Blk/white(Meowzer) 494-DSH,F,DOB 4/28/13,Blk/Tan(Darcy) 467-DSH,Org/White, M, 1 yr. (Max) Humane Society of Noble County, Inc. 1305 Sherman St. Kendallville, IN 46755 260-347-2563

ADOPTABLE CATS 453-DSH,M,3 yrs., Gry/white(Barley) 442-DSH,F,born 2/13,Gry/Tan/org. (Violet) 425-DSH,F,born 4/8/13,Tortoiseshell (Delancy) 422-DSH, M, born 4/8/13,Buff/white(Leo) 380-DSH,M,born 4/12,Blk.(Sparrow) 371-DSH,2-3 yrs., F,Blk/white(Josie) 343-DSH,M,Gry/ white,2-3 yrs.(Maxwell) 338-DSH,M,born 4/13, Blk. (Vinny) 336-DSH,F,2 yrs., blk/tan tiger(Liberty) 335-DSH,Gry. Tiger,M,3 yrs.(Fievel) 334-DSH,White/Gray, NM,2 yrs.(Pickles) 332-DSH,brn 4/2/13, org.,M(Pistol Pete) 328-DSH,Calico,F,born 5/8/13(Lacy) 327-DSH,Bro/Tan tiger, brn 5/8/13,F(Shiann) 326-DSH,Bro/Tan/wh, born 5/8/13,M(Marlow) 325-DSH,Blk/Tan/ Org.,brn 5/8/13,f(Josie) 320-DSH,M,born 4/24/13,Blk/wh(Dozer) 315-DSH,NM,1 yr.,Org.(Dusty) 310-DSH,F,born 2/26/13,Blk/Tan tiger(Purr-kins) 304-DSH,Blk.,F,born 5/3/13(Twizzler) 303-DSH,Blk/Tan,M, born 5/3/13(McCoy) 302-DSH,Blk/Tan, F,born 5/3/13(Lena) 301-DSH,Blk.,M,born 5/3/13(Zippy) 300- DSH,Blk/Tan,F, born 5/3/13(Ashlynn) 299- DSH,Blk.,M,born 5/3/13(Gordy) 268-DSH,Born 4/21/13,M,Blk.(Myles) 265-DMH,M,Born 4/21/13,Blk/Tan tiger(Channing) 264-DSH,F,Born 4/21/13,Blk/Tan tiger(Zoey) 258-DMH,F,4-5 yrs., blk/tan tiger(Saddie) 255-DSH,F,Calico,1 yr. (Tonya) 254-DSH,Blk/Tan tiger, born 4/16/13,F(Macey) 253-DSH,Blk/Tan tiger, born 4/16/13,M(Oakley) 251-DSH,Blk/Tan tiger, born 4/16/13,F(Candy) 249-DSH,F,2 yrs., Blk/Tan tiger (Sandy) 235-DSH,F,1 yr., White w/Gray. (Sonja) 216-DSH,NM,born 8/12,Org.(Bridge) 199-DSH,born 4/2/13,Blk.M,(Magic) 198-DSH,born 4/2/13,Blk.F,(Luna) 196-DSH,born 4/2/13,Blk.F,(Mocha) 195-DSH,born 4/2/13,Blk/wh,F(Latta) 177-DSH,F,born 3/24/13,Blk/wh(Annie) 173-DSH,M,Tan/Blk/ Gry.brn 3/24/13 (Atlas) 150-DSH,SF,2-3 yrs.Bro/Blk/wh(Whimsy) 136-DSH,F,Blk/Tan tiger,3 yrs.,(Loveina) 133-DSH,Bro/Blk. Tiger,F,2-3 yrs.(Nollie) 130-DSH,Blk/White,F, born 3/6/13 (Carmen) 128-DSH,Gry/white,F, Born 5/3/12(Lilly) 105-DSH,F,1 yr., Blk/ Tan/Org.(Apricot) 57-DSH,Blk/white,2 yrs.,SF(Star) 1183-DMH,F,2-3 yrs., Blk (Joni) 1079-DMH,2 yrs., Blk/white,F(Tinker) 1003-DSH,F,2 yrs.,Blk/Tan/Org(Jenna) 995-DSH,SF,1-2 yrs.Blk/white(Myra) 986-DSH,F, 2 yrs,Blk/Tan tiger(Vivien) 773-DSH,F,Tortoiseshell,1 yr.(Princess) 543-DSH,SF,Blk/ Tan/Org,2-3 yrs.(Kira) 327-DSH, Blk/ Tan, SF,DOB 5/9/12(Keeki) Humane Society of Noble County, Inc. 1305 Sherman St. Kendallville, IN 46755 260-347-2563

1 & Only Place To Call--to get rid of that junk car, truck or van!! Cash on the spot! Free towing. Call 260-745-8888. (A)

Brand NEW in plastic!

QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET Can deliver, $125. (260) 493-0805 Broyhill sofa, chair and ottoman. All leather-color taupe. Only 18 months old $700. 260-319-4181 Like new to antique furniture, must empty storage unit. Call to see 260-833-1697

BUILDING MATERIALS PIONEER POLE BUILDINGS Free Estimates Licensed and Insured 2x6 Trusses 45 year Warranted Galvalume Steel 19 Colors Since 1976 #1 in Michigan Call Today 1-800-292-0679

TOOLS

FIREWOOD 2 ton Summerset Premium Grade wood fuel pellets. $175/ton or $3.50/bag No tax 260-215-5691

EXERCISE EQUIPMENT

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HERALD REPUBLICAN THE

Steuben County

THE NEWS SUN LaGrange & Noble Counties

347-0400

Star

DeKalb County

925-2611 357-4123

TIMBER WANTED All species of hard wood. Pay before starting. Walnut needed. 260 349-2685

PETS/ANIMALS

ENJOY THE NEWSPAPER WITH YOUR FAMILY

1999 Jeep Grand Cherokee Larado 4x4. Fully serviced, new brakes on front & rear, 4.0 Litre inline 6 cyl., good tires, battery tested good, no rust, Burgundy in color, factory Alloy wheels, CD/cassette player, factory power moon roof, Navigation system, cold A/C, Keyless entry, luggage rack, gauge package, tilt/cruise, P.W., P.D.L., 118K miles, has been well maintained, very good cond. Comes with warranty. $5,900. (260) 349-1324 May see at 720 1/2 Arcadia Court, Friendly Village, Kendallville. 1998 Jeep Grand Cherokee, runs good, $2,500. or make offer. 260 316-3263

VANS 2005 Chevy Venture. 53,000 miles. $7200. Call 260-636-3293.

CAMPERS/RV R Vision 2005 MaxLite pull behind camper. 30’ 1 slideout. Very good condition $8,500 260-668-9515

MERCHANDISE UNDER $50 1 pr. Mens Reebok Football Shoes. Very good cond. Worn 1 season. Size 10 1/2. $20.00. (260) 349-9282 1950’s Modern Dresser Nine Drawer Nine Drawer, Dark Wood. $50.00. (260) 925-1499 1963 Kendallville Yearbook. Excellent with no markings. $20.00. (260) 357-4466 2 Small White Coke Glasses, $15.00. (260) 357-8009 200 Assorted Golf and Range Balls. Used and cleaned. $25.00. (260) 347-8479 24� TV. Excellent picture, 7 yrs. old. Sylvania. Includes remote. $15.00. Lake George, (260) 833-9896 25 Dozen Golf Balls for $24.95 (260) 242-3689 3 Turned Wooden Porch Posts. Size 4�x4�x8’ tall. Never used, $50.00. (260) 347-1380 6 ft. Picnic Table made with metal tubing stands and 2x8 wood. Hole cut in the middle for umbrella. $50.00. (260) 665-6673 Antique China Cabinet $50.00 (260) 357-8009

Antique Printers Box $30.00 (260) 357-8009 Bailey’s Black Tx Longhorn Hat size 6 3/4, in box with rain protector. $25.00. (260) 333-0420 Boys Arizona Jeans Size 14 Husky, never worn. $4.00. (260) 925-0221

KPC LIMITATIONS

SETSER TRANSPORT AND TOWING USED TIRES Cash for Junk Cars! 701 Krueger St., K’ville. 260-318-5555 ATTENTION: Paying up to $530 for scrap cars. Call me 318-2571

IVAN’S TOWING (260) 238-4787

READ TOGETHER

SUV’S

$ WANTED $ Junk Cars! Highest prices pd. Free pickup. 260-705-7610 705-7630

CARS

kpcnews .com

1998 GMC Sierra 1500 Ext Cab 163,693 miles with cap. Good condition. $4,200.00. Call 00348812(260) 573-9571

Boys Bike with Training Wheels. $18.00. (260) 854-4574

up to $1000.00

BREAKING NEWS

TRUCKS

AUTOMOTIVE/ SERVICES

Junk Auto Buyer 2 Black Lab Puppies. 8 weeks old. $100/each 260-357-5682

Guaranteed Top Dollar For Junk Cars, Trucks & Vans. Call Jack 260-466-8689

Antique Dresser 34� high, 2 drawers on top, 2 large drawers on bottom, dark oak wood. $50.00. (260) 665-6673

kpcnews.com

The

WANTED TO BUY

FREE to good home. 2 1/2 yr. old American & English bulldog mix. Great personality. 260-303-1156

Check us out online at

665-3117 Schwinn, computer controlled stationary bike, $250 260-750-4936

Sudoku Answers 8-04

General Practice KRUSE & KRUSE,PC

Tear offs, wind damage & reroofs. Call (260)627-0017

MERCHANDISE

1 - 10 In. Tablesaw, 1- 10 in. bandsaw, table/belt sander, 2 Sears routers. 260 854-2777

EOE

AT YOUR SERVICE

Albion 4260 State Road 9 August 5 & 6 * 9-3 Loft bed, (4) 12’ gates, & more.

Albion

APARTMENTS

ROOM FOR RENT

Attention: Human Resources or e-mail: kbaker@powersandsonsllc.com

GARAGE SALES

OPEN HOUSES Angola ONE BR APTS. $425/mo., Free Heat. 260-316-5659

Please submit your resume to:

Powers and Sons LLC

Mobile Homes for Sale in Waterloo, Rome City & Butler. Small parks. No big dogs. Ref req’d. (260) 925-1716

PETS/ANIMALS

WHEELS

MILLER’S MERRY MANOR GARRETT

âœŚ ✧ âœŚ ✧ âœŚ ✧ Health

MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE

GARAGE SALES

Medical

APARTMENT RENTAL

STUFF

â??â– â??â– â??â– â??â– 

EMPLOYMENT

HOMES

EMPLOYMENT

RENTALS

EMPLOYMENT

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

2002 Subaru Outback LL Bean Edition 1 owner, 96k mi., to settle the estate of Father James Rose $6,800. 260 349-2668

LIMITATIONS OF LIABILITY: KPC assumes no liability or financial responsibility for typographical errors or for omission of copy, failure to publish or failure to deliver ad vertising. Our liability for copy errors is limited to your actual charge for the first day & one incorrect day after the ad runs. You must promptly notify KPC of any error on first publication. Claims for adjustment must be made within 30 days of publication and, in the case of multiple runs, claims are allowed for first publication only. KPC is not responsible for and you agree to make no claim for specific or consequential damages resulting from or related in any manner to any error, omission, or failure to publish or deliver.


kpcnews.com

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

D7

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D8

kpcnews.com

SUNDAY, AUGUST 4, 2013

EXTENDED SATURDAY HOURS: 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM WE DO A

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See our entire inventory online at www.DruleyInvestmentsInc.com FEATURED CAR OF THE WEEK

FEATURED CAR OF THE WEEK 1992 Buick Regal Limited

2006 Ford Taurus SEL

Elderly-Owned By The Same Couple For The Last 20 Years, “3800” V6

Local Trade, Leather Seats, Power Seat, All Power, Alloy Wheels

2,200

5,995

$

$

2008 CHEVROLET IMPALA LS One-Owner, Power Seat, Traction Control, Side Airbags, 18,000 Miles

12,995

$

2008 Chevrolet Cobalt LT

2006 Dodge Grand Caravan SE

Local Trade, Automatic, Air, All Power, Side Airbags, Keyless Entry

One-Owner, Stow ‘N Go Rear Seat, Rear Air, All Power, 66,000 Miles

2011 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT 2007 Ford Five Hundred Limited AWD Local Trade, Navigation, Sunroof, Heated Leather, Chrome Wheels

6,995

$

15,995

$

6,995

$

2005 Ford Taurus SE

Automatic, Air, All Power Options, Alloy Wheels, 34,000 Miles

One-Owner, V6, Automatic, Air, All Power, ABS, 35,000 Miles

8,995

2004 Dodge Ram 1500 SLT Crew Cab 4x4 Local Trade, Hemi V8, Power Seat, Auto, Air, All Power, Tow Package

2002 Honda Odyssey EX-L DVD Player, Leather, Heated Seats, Dual Power Sliders, Quad Buckets

8,995

$

8,995

$

$

Power Seat, Remote Start, Alloy Wheels, Factory Warranty, 15,000 Miles

3.2L V6, Leather, Dual Power Seats, All Power, Alloy Wheels, 50,000 Miles

2005 Ford Focus ZX4 SE

8,995

8,995

$

1999 Chrysler Concorde LXi

$

8,995

$

2007 Chevrolet HHR LT

2010 Chevrolet Impala LS

2009 Chevrolet Impala LS

2009 Ford Fusion SE

2009 Pontiac G6 Sedan

2007 Chrysler Town & Country Touring

One-Owner, Power Seat, Automatic, Air, All Power, 58,000 Miles

One-Owner, Power Seat, All Power, Factory Warranty, 39,000 Miles

One-Owner, Auto, Air, All Power, Factory Warranty, 39,000 Miles

Sunroof, Power Seat, Spoiler, Alloy Wheels, All Power, 47,000 Miles

One-Owner, V6, Auto, Air, All Power, Spoiler, Alloys, 30,000 Miles

Power Sliders & Liftgate, Full Stow ‘N Go, Power Seat, Alloy Wheels

11,995

$

12,995

$

12,995

$

12,995

$

12,995

$

$

12,995

FEATURED CAR OF THE WEEK 2007 Honda Accord LX Coupe

2006 Chevrolet Silverado 1500 Reg. Cab

2006 Dodge Grand Caravan SE

4 Cylinder, Automatic, Air, All Power, Alloy Wheels, 65,000 Miles

One-Owner, 5.3L V8, Long Bed, Automatic, Air, Tilt, Cruise, 20,000 Miles

One-Owner, Stow ‘N Go Rear Seat, Rear Air, All Power, 27,000 Miles

12,995

$

12,995

$

$

12,995

2006 Ford F-150 XLT Ext. Cab 4x4 Local Trade, 5.4L V8, Matching Cap, Power Seat, Tow Package

12,995

$

2012 CHEVROLET IMPALA LT 2006 Hyundai Azera Limited

2006 Mercury Grand Marquis LS

One-Owner, 3.8L V6, Sunroof, Leather, Heated Seat, 58,000 Miles

One-Owner, Leather, Dual Power Seats, Alloy Wheels, 59,000 Miles

12,995

$

12,995

2010 Dodge Grand Caravan SE

One-Owner, 9-Passenger, Power Seat, Running Boards, 41,000 Miles

One-Owner, Full Stow ‘N Go, Quad Buckets, All Power, Warranty

13,995

2012 Volkwagen Jetta SE One-Owner/Off-Lease, Leather, Automatic, Air, All Power, 13,000 Miles

16,995

$

17,995

$

$

2004 Ford Expedition XLT 4x4 $

Sunroof, Power Seat, Rear Spoiler, Remote Start, Warranty, 17,000 Miles

14,995

$

2011 Ford Flex SE 3rd Seat, Power Seat, Rear Air Conditioning, Reverse Sensing, Alloys

$

16,995

One-Owner, DVD Player, Power Sliders, Power Seat, Alloys, 34,000 Miles

13,995

$

2010 Toyota Camry LE

One-Owner, Leather, Heated Power Seats, Chrome Wheels, 61,000 Miles

Sunroof, Power Seat, Rear Spoiler, Sync, Factory Warranty, 23,000 Miles

One-Owner, Power Seat, Side Airbags, Factory Warrranty, 30,000 Miles

14,995

$

$

15,995

15,995

$

2011 Ford Fusion SEL

2008 Ford F-250 XL Ext. Cab

2009 Mercury Mariner Premier 4x4

Monochrome Pkg., Sunroof, Heated Leather, Sony Audio, 22,000 Miles

One-Owner, Super Duty, 5.4L V8, Long Bed, Tow Package, Auto, Air

Navigation, Sunroof, Heated Leather, Reverse Sensing, 59,000 Miles

16,995

$

16,995

$

17,995

$

13,995

$

2008 Dodge Ram 2500 ST Reg. Cab 4x4 One-Owner, Heavy Duty, Matching Cap, Hemi V8, Auto, Air, Tilt, Cruise

15,995

$

2011 Ford Escape Hybrid 4x4 30 MPG, Power Seat, All Power Options, Alloy Wheels, Warranty

18,995

$

FEATURED CAR OF THE WEEK 2011 Ford Taurus SEL AWD

2012 Ford Fusion SEL

Leather Seats, Heated Power Seats, Reverse Sensing, Factory Warranty

Sunroof, Heated Leather, Rear Camera, BLIS, Sony Audio, 6,000 Miles

18,995

$

19,995

2012 CHEVROLET MALIBU LS

16,995

Power Seat, Automatic, Air, AdvanceTrac, Side Airbags, Alloy Wheels

2011 Ford Fusion SE

$

$

2006 Chevrolet Uplander LT Ext. AWD

2008 Ford Taurus Limited

FEATURED CAR OF THE WEEK

Automatic, Air, All Power, Side Airbags, Factory Warranty, 11,000 Miles

2012 Ford Fusion SE

2012 CHEVROLET MALIBU 2LT 2006 Chevrolet Silverado 2500 HD Crew Cab 4x4 One-Owner, Long Bed, Matching Cap, All Power Features, 47,000 Miles

20,995

$

2008 Ford Edge Limited AWD Panoramic Roof, Power Liftgate, Leather, 20” Chrome, 43,000 Miles

22,995

$

LOWEST MILES, LOWEST PRICE, OR BOTH!

DRULEY INVESTMENTS, INC. 100 S. Main Street, LaOtto •

897-3858

www.DruleyInvestmentsInc.com

Sunroof, Heated Leather, Remote Start, Chrome Wheels, Warranty

17,995

$


The Star - August 4, 2013