Page 1

wc

INSIDE

WhitleyCounty County Whitley wc

Sports ...........12-16

inwhitleycounty.com

inwhitleycounty.com

Community Calendar.............19

CityAutoMall.com 260-244-5111 DEALERSHIP 1-866-654-3424 TOLL FREE November 2, 2017

Local business, motorcycle club help revitalize park By Megan Knowles mknowles@kpcmedia.com

FORT WAYNE – A Columbia City business is playing a part in revitalizing a Fort Wayne park with the help of a local motorcycle club. Warrior Breed Motorcycle Club, founded about five years ago, is “a club with a mission,” president Gary Perkey said. “Our mission is to take care of veterans,” he said. Warrior Breed helps veterans with a variety of issues, from post-trau-

matic stress disorder to helping to pay for groceries and utilities when veterans fall ill. As another way to support veterans, the club has decided to replace about 70 trees in Memorial Park. The trees were originally part of a grove to honor 125 World War I veterans in the park, which was created in 1918. While a handful of the original 125 remain standing and about 50 were replaced in 2002,

Warrior Breed approached the city about paying to replace and replant the remaining trees, Perkey said. “There was no doubt in my mind, I had no fears whatsoever that the public and business would step up and provide the money necessary to do the trees,” Perkey said. Not only has Warrior Breed been able to raise the funds for the trees with the support of local SEE TREES, PAGE 7

MEGAN KNOWLES

Workers from Shade Trees Unlimited plant trees at Memorial Park on Oct. 28. The Arthur Smith monument, part of Memorial Grove, can be seen in the background.

Chamber honors the best in business By Nicole Minier nminier@kpcmedia.com

Staff reports

COLUMBIA CITY — The Whitley County Treasurer’s Office will be closed on what is typically the tax due date for the fall installment — taxes are due on or before Monday, Nov. 13. Additionally, Treasurer Laurell Schroeder reminds residents that the office will be closed Friday, Nov. 10, to observe Veterans Day. “Pay early and avoid the last-minute rush,” Schroeder says. To accommodate taxpayers, there is a drop box for payments, located at the north side of the County Government Center, 220 W. Van Buren St., Columbia City. Several options for making payments are available: • E-payment online at SEE TAXES, PAGE 7

INFORMATION INWhitley County 123 N. Main Street, Churubusco, IN 46723

Telephone: (260) 693-3949

Vol. 1 No. 31

NICOLE MINIER

Nicole Trier was excited after her organization, TROY Center Alternative School, was named Jewel of the Community.

show appreciation to their employees. “In a time when finding good employees can be a struggle, Gary and Heather Parrett seem to have cracked the code on not only finding good employees, but keeping

them,” Romano said. “When you visit their restaurants, you’re greeted by the same friendly, familiar faces. A sense of family is at the core of all they do.” TROY Center was named “Jewel of the Community,”

the Chamber’s recognition for nonprofit organizations. TROY Alternative School offers a unique opportunity for students to achieve their goals—a high school diploma. “TROY Center is much more than a place to

SEE CHAMBER, PAGE 3

Hagan Park name to remain unchanged By Tyler Roebuck troebuck@kpcmedia.com

SOUTH WHITLEY — After debating the issue for nearly a month, the South Whitley Town Council decided that the name of Gale Hagan Memorial Park will remain unchanged. Tonya Porter requested the council consider making a change at a council meeting in

Potential new zoning in S. Whitley September, citing painful memories from an incident in August 2015. Porter’s son, Adam Porter, was shot and killed by David Hagan Aug. 14, and later convicted and sentenced the following May. While the park is technically named Gale Hagan Memorial Park,

INWhitley County

Treasurer’s Office to be closed on tax due date

123 North Main Street,Churubusco, IN 46723

888-616-1159

COLUMBIA CITY — Whitley County’s growing Chamber of Commerce celebrated the best in business in Whitley County at its annual recognition night last week, hosted at the Eagle’s Nest Event Center. Fort Wayne Metals was selected as Large Business of the Year, and Running Around Screen Printing was Small Business of the Year. The Chamber had a new award this year, Employer of the Year, which was awarded to Downtown on the Square and Big G’s owners Gary and Heather Parrett. “With unemployment at low levels, valuing and retaining a company’s workforce is key,” Chamber Director Jennifer Romano said of the new award. The Parretts own two restaurants in Columbia City, and were honored for paying good wages and going above and beyond to

get an education — it’s a place where students and their families receive the support they need to reach their goals — goals that for many of us might seem insurmountable,” Romano said. “It’s hard to focus on academics when you’re homeless, or there are addiction or emotional issues in the family to deal with. TROY provides opportunities students might not have, helping them graduate and become productive members of our workforce and our community.” Five entities were honored as Chamber Champions: the Humane Society of Whitley County, Columbia City, Reelcraft, Bones Theatre and Teghtmeyer Ace Hardware. The Chamber itself had many accomplishments in the past year, moving its location to downtown Columbia City and welcoming many new

it is commonly referred to simply as Hagan Park. Gale was David’s mother. The council thought long and hard about the decision, Town Council President Randy Cokl said. “I’ve known Tonya and Dave for a long time and I can’t imagine the pain of going through all this, but I have struggled with this decision because I knew Gale as well because I knew the things she did for our community,” he said. Councilmen Bill Boggs and Les Hoffman echoed Cokl, citing Mrs. Hagan’s significant contributions to

town, including the establishment of the first EMS service. While several additional options were discussed, including changing the signage around town to reflect the park’s true name, no action was taken. Zoning issues Jorell Tucker came to the council to discuss a zoning snafu currently halting the construction of a deck on his property. While trying to obtain a permit, Tucker discovered that his house, as well as several neighbors’, is zoned heavy industrial. Due to this zoning, new construction faces substantial setbacks from

property lines, including 30 feet from the rear property line. After he spoke with Executive Director of Planning and Building Nathan Bilger, Tucker came to the council to request a green light to allow Bilger and county staff to inspect and recommend zoning changes in town. The council agreed to have Cokl send Bilger an email giving the town’s informal approval. Also at the Town Council meeting • Council appointed five members to the South Whitley RedevelSEE S. WHITLEY, PAGE 7


A2 • INwhitleycounty.com

Whitley County • November 2, 2017

Heart of Gold extended Staff reports

COLUMBIA CITY — There’s still a chance to thank that special someone. The Community Foundation of Whitley County has extended the deadline for submitting Heart of Gold nominations. The new deadline is Friday Nov. 3. The Heart of Gold Awards is an annual event that recognizes “everyday” people living in Whitley County who make our community a better place to live and work. Any person living in Whitley County, regardless of age, who enhances another’s life is eligible to be nominated. Whitley County residents may nominate someone for a Heart of Gold Award simply by filling out a nomination form which can be found on the Community Foundation’s website at cfwhitley.org/ heartofgold.html. People who have been nominated

in years past are eligible for nomination again in 2017, as long as they are recognized for a different act of kindness. This is not an essay contest and anyone needing assistance filling out a nomination form should contact the Community Foundation at 244-5224. Hard copies of the nomination form are available upon request. Excerpts from actual nomination forms may be reprinted in local newspapers and should be suitable for sharing with the public. All nominees will receive a heart-shaped medallion inscribed with their name. Three overall winners will be chosen and each will have the opportunity to direct a grant to their favorite Whitley County charity or service organization currently working to enhance our community. When considering

overall winners, the selection committee will take into account whether the nominee identified a need and filled it; recognized an opportunity and acted upon it; shared his/her time and energy for the sake of others; overcame unusual challenges to serve others; rendered a service which changed a life; worked to create positive change; inspired others to volunteer; or performed an exceptional act of kindness. A festive reception honoring all nominees and revealing the identity of their nominators will take place during the Community Foundation’s Annual Meeting on Thursday evening, November 16th at the Eagles Nest Event Center in Columbia City. For additional information, contact the Foundation’s communication coordinator, Chelsey Barrell at 244-5224.

Whitko Marching Pride goes to state finals

CONTRIBUTED

For the first time in Whitko history, the Whitko Marching Pride will be marching in Lucas Oil Stadium for the Indiana State School Music Association State Finals for High School Marching Bands. The 22-member band advanced past semi-state last weekend at Franklin High School and will be one of 40 Indiana bands going to State Saturday. Look for a full story in next week’s IN|Whitley County. Pictured are, from right, Nicole Lawson, Bailey Ruckman and Malarie Puterbaugh.

Expect to see bearded law enforcement officers this month By Nicole Minier nminier@kpcmedia.com

COLUMBIA CITY — Year-round, Whitley County Sheriff’s deputies and Columbia City Police officers are limited on the amount of facial hair they’re allowed to have. This month, both departments will be participating in their own versions of “No Shave

November” to raise money for important causes. The Sheriff’s Department is raising money for Relay for Life of Whitley County, and the CCPD is raising funds for its annual Patrolling for Presents program. Participants can pay a $25 fee to be allowed to have facial hair. Deputy Brandon Smith brought the idea to Sheriff

Marc Gatton last year, but Gatton didn’t have time to formulate a plan. This year, he was ready. “I am encouraging and challenging all staff to participate this year,” Gatton said. At the sheriff’s department, deputies, confinement officers, dispatchers, courthouse security officers and other

divisions can sport their new looks, with Gatton providing an exemption to the facial hair guidelines. Gatton said women can participate by choosing not to shave or going without a haircut for a month. Supporting cancer treatment and research is fitting for the WCSD, as several employees have

family members who face cancer diagnoses. Recently, Courthouse security officer Ron Glassley was diagnosed and treated for prostate cancer. “This is the chance to raise money for an important cause. It will also give the staff a chance to rib and laugh at each other,” Gatton said.

The sheriff encourages the public to view the fundraiser participants on the Whitley County Sheriff’s Department’s Facebook page. The CCPD began No Shave November a week early, allowing the department to raise extra money. As of last week, Chief Tony Hively said the department raised $120.

7207 Engle Road Fort Wayne, IN 46804 9830 Auburn Road, Suite 102 Fort Wayne, IN 46825 1301 State Road 13 W North Manchester, IN 46962

(260) 436-2255 Dr. Bussick has been creating dazzling, healthy smiles since 1997 in the Fort Wayne area. Dr. Bussick & the American Association of Orthodontists recommend all children be seen by the age of 7; however, it’s never too late to have straight teeth and a healthy smile. • Clear Braces • Invisalign • Accelerated Treatment • “0” to Low Down Payments • All Insurances Accepted • No Referral Needed • 260.436.2255

Dr. Timothy J. Bussick, D.D.S., M.S. Specialist in Orthodontics for Adults, Adolescents & Children

www.bussickortho.com

Now accepting new patients at both Fort Wayne locations! Call Today for your Free Orthodontic Exam!

Present this coupon for

$500 OFF

New Orthodontic Treatment


INwhitleycounty.com • A3

Whitley County • November 2, 2017

A large group of attendees socialize prior to the start of the annual awards banquet last week.

PHOTOS BY NICOLE MINIER

Representatives from Fort Wayne Metals pose for a photo with Chamber Executive Director Jennifer Romano. Fort Wayne Metals was named Large Business of the Year.

Employees and Running Around Screen Printing Owner Jo Ann Bird pose for a photo with Chamber Executive Director Jennifer Romano after being named Small Business of the Year.

Representatives for TROY Center Alternative School pose for a photo with Chamber Director Jennifer Romano. From left are Kathy Heuer, Nicole Trier, Romano and James Heuer.

CHAMBER from Page 1

members — at least one per week. The Chamber worked with the city of Columbia City to open a Visitor’s Center, and since opening the new office downtown, has welcomed 875 people from around the world — literally. “This year has been exhausting and exhilarating, challenging and critical to putting the Whitley County Chamber of Commerce and Visitor’s Center in a position of strength moving forward,” Romano said. Romano was named Chamber director just over a year ago, and much has been accomplished through her leadership. “When I stood before you last year, just days into my role as your new executive director, I had a lot of doubts and fears,” Romano said. “Today, a year later, I am emboldened by our success and ready to move this organization forward in the year ahead.”

Mike DeFreeuw presents Gary and Heather Parrett with the Employer of the Year award.

Fall Harvest BeneFit

HURRICANE RELIEF HOG ROAST

saturday, novemBer 4 • 3-6 pm Community Bible Church 325 North Elm St., Columbia City, IN

All the food, fixings and desserts are on a free will offering basis and all the proceeds will go to World Compassion Network, a disaster relief mission located in Warsaw, IN. First come, first serve until the food is gone. Come on out and enjoy some great food for a great cause! For questions call 260-248-4566. KingAuction_79411 3x7.5 INWC 11/2

23/Melissa sz 2017

Websites * Online Marketing * Social Media Advertising * Video Production & Photography KPC Digital Services | marketing@kpcmedia.com | 260-426-2640 x 3324


A4 • INwhitleycounty.com

Whitley County • November 2, 2017

HALLOWEENFEST FUN

PHOTOS BY NICOLE MINIER

Brody and Jack-Henry Schilling pose for a photo near the iconic turtle at “The Point” in downtown Churubusco.

Jeremiah Huesman, 3, and Jonah Hudson, 6, posed for a photo in front of the Churubusco News office.

Main Street in Churubusco was filled with goblins and ghouls during the annual Halloweenfest, hosted by the Churubusco Chamber of Commerce.

Hay rides began at St. Bosco Catholic Church and cruised part of the town.

Rachel Sonam was stationed near the Churubusco American Legion, wearing a humorous costume.

Christina Tidwell passed out candy from Ranney’s Body Shop, dressed as a witch.

Jordan Sanchez and his dog, Reggie, were dressed as Mario and Yoshi.

Jenny Hall passed out candy, dressed as Mrs. Potato Head.

Terry G. Housholder, President Randy C. Mitchell, CEO S. Rick Mitchell, CFO

wc

Whitley County inwhitleycounty.com

PHONE (260) 693-3949 (USPS 009-385) Periodical Postage Paid at Churubusco, IN 46723

Nicole Minier, Editor

Articles appearing in the INWhitley County do not necessarily represent the views of this paper.

free paper for local businesses and residents, we do charge a mail subscription fee to those out of our area. This fee must be paid in advance and is as follows: InState $26 one year, Out-of-state $39 one year. You may also call our office during regular business hours to subscribe at (800) 717-4679.

INWhitley County is a FREE direct mailed newspaper delivered to over 13,000 homes and businesses in Whitley County. The paper is mailed to addresses in Columbia City, Larwill, and South Whitley. While we are a

POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: INWhitley County, P.O. Box 39, Kendallville, IN 46755. Published on Thursday throughout the year.

Located at 123 N. Main Street, Churubusco, Indiana 46723. www.inwhitleycounty.com

Jyllian Keener was dressed as Moana, with her candy basket as Moana’s sidekick, Hei Hei.

Keaton Blessing’s mother made him a creative Inspector Gadget costume, complete with a spinning rotor.

McKenzie and Brad Holmes were dressed as Belle and the Beast from Disney’s “Beauty and the Beast.”


INwhitleycounty.com • A5

Whitley County • November 2, 2017

OBITS

John Halt

COLUMBIA CITY— John Henry Halt, 68, of Columbia City, died at his home at 8:35 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 28, 2017. Funeral services were Wednesday at Smith & Sons Funeral Home Columbia City. Burial was in the South Park Annex Cemetery. Memorials are to Humane Society of Whitley County.

Rick Gaff COLUMBIA CITY — Rick Eugene Gaff, 57, of Columbia City, died at 1:38 a.m. Thursday, Oct. 26, 2017 at Parkview Regional Medical Center, Fort Wayne. Services were Sunday at Smith & Sons Funeral Home, Columbia City. Burial will be at a later date at Oak Grove Cemetery. Memorials are to the Humane Society of Whitley County.

Phillip Shew COLUMBIA CITY — Phillip E. Shew, 77, formerly of Columbia City, died at 11:45 a.m. Tuesday, Oct. 24, 2017, at Jupiter Medical Center, Jupiter, Florida. There will be no service. Burial will take place at a later date in the Merriam Christian Chapel Cemetery. Memorials are to the Salvation Army. Arrangements are by Smith & Sons Funeral Homes, Columbia City.

Obituary Policy INWhitley County does not charge for death notices that include notice of calling hours, date and time of funeral and burial. An extended obituary, which includes survivors, biographical information and a photo, is available for a charge. Deadline for funeral homes to place obituaries is 9 a.m. Tuesday. The email address is: obits@ kpcmedia.com. Submitted obituaries must contain the name and phone number of the funeral home. For information, contact Kathryn Bassett at 260-347-0400, ext. 2526.

Have a story idea? Email news tips to nminier@ kpcmedia.com

Intoxicated driver sentenced to 21 years By Tyler Roebuck troebuck@kpcmedia.com

COLUMBIA CITY — “This boy will never grow up. He’ll be 17 forever. There’s a giant hole in his family where he used to be, and you put it there,” Judge Matthew said while holding up a picture of Jack Burchett. “While I heard you say the word ‘sorry’ today, I can’t say I think it was sincere.” Chaise Belcher, 26, of Pierceton, received a 21- year sentence to the Indiana Department of Corrections on charges of operating while intoxicated causing death and two counts of OWI causing bodily injury after running a red light in April. The resulting accident killed Jack

Burchett and severely injured the other occupants. A breathalyzer showed Belcher had Belcher a blood-alcohol content of 0.22, well above the legal limit of 0.08, according to court documents. Prosecutor DJ Sigler pushed for a lengthy sentence, saying “only a significant sentence will do justice.” Belcher has “a substantial history of substance abuse” and has “failed spectacularly multiple times while on probation,” Sigler said. “With this many chances to do the right

thing, he turned his back every single time,” Sigler said. Rentschler pulled no punches with Belcher, naming eight different aggravating circumstances. Among these were Belcher’s criminal history, probation violations and the fact that his license was suspended when he caused the accident. Most troubling to Rentschler, however, was that Belcher grew up with a first-hand understanding of the adverse effects of alcoholism and yet still chose to drink and drive. “You have an uncle that killed three in a drunk driving accident and had an absent father who was out of your life from being an alcoholic, and

yet you still drank,” he said. Belcher will serve his 21-year sentence consecutive to charges in Elkhart County. Additionally, Rentschler suspended his lisence for 24 years. “When you get out, and you will someday get out,” Rentschler told Belcher, “you will not drive.” In other Whitley Circuit Court news: • Alec Wikins, 24, of Columbia City, received a three-year sentence on charges of battery causing bodily injury to a person under the age of 14, a level 5 felony. Wilkins will serve two years at the Indiana Department of Corrections, with one year suspended.

“You need to understand that there are consequences to treating a child like this,” Rentschler said. • Brenda Bailey, 57, of Hudson, and Charles Sheets, 56, of Coldwater, Mich., pleaded guilty to dealing in and possession of methamphetamine, respectively. Their sentencing hearing is Dec. 4. • Warren Davies, 35, of Syracuse, pleaded guilty to committing theft in Kosciusko County, a violation of probation. The remainder of his suspended sentence was revoked. • Colton Cabiya, Billy Crowe, Justin Hammond and Kristine Hart had their respective hearings continued to later dates.

WHITLEY COUNTY JAIL BOOKINGS The following people were booked in the Whitley County Jail: Warren Davies, 35, of Syracuse, was arrested Oct. 21 by the Whitley County Sheriff’s Department, charged with probation violation. Jordan Langston, 20, of Warren, was arrested Oct. 21 by the Whitley County Sheriff’s Department, charged with aggravated battery and leaving the scene of a property damage crash. Dustin Braunsdorf, 18, of Columbia City, was arrested Oct. 22 by the Columbia City Police Department, charged with minor in possession of alcohol. Chandler Young, 19, of Columbia City, was arrested Oct. 22 by the Columbia City Police Department, charged with minor in possession of alcohol. Austin Blocher, 19, of Columbia City, was arrested Oct. 22 by the Columbia City Police Department, charged with maintaining a common nuisance and minor in possession of alcohol.

Gradey Hicks, 18, of Columbia City, was arrested Oct. 22 by the Columbia City Police Department, charged with visiting a common nuisance and minor in possession of alcohol. Logan Wait, 19, of Columbia City, was arrested Oct. 22 by the Columbia City Police Department, charged with visiting a common nusiance. Andrew Platt, 20, of South Whitley, was arrested Oct. 22 by the Columbia City Police Department, charged with visiting a common nuisance. Jeffery Ochenas, 18, of Columbia City, was arrested Oct. 22 by the Columbia City Police Department, charged with visiting a common nuisance. Nathan Slater, 23, of South Whitley, was arrested Oct. 22 by the Columbia City Police Department, charged with possession of marijuana and maintaining a common nuisance. Racquel Sanchez, 18, of Fort Wayne, was

arrested Oct. 23 by the Whitley County Sheriff’s Department, charged with reckless driving. Danny Maggart, 55, of Fort Wayne, was arrested Oct. 23 by the Churubusco Police Department, charged with OWI and OWI per se. William Harrell, 60, of South Whitley, was arrested Oct. 23 by the Columbia City Police Department, charged with leaving the scene of a property damage crash. Michael Marini, 31, of Columbia City, was arrested Oct. 24 by the Whitley County Sheriff’s Department, charged with probation violation and driving while suspended. Jose Contreras, 30, of Fort Wayne, was arrested Oct. 24 by the Indiana State Police, charged with driving while suspended. Tiayana Blair, 19, of Warsaw, was arrested Oct. 26 by the Indiana State Police, charged with possession of marijuana, possession of paraphernalia and OWI controlled substance. Crystal Funnell, 44, of Pierceton, was arrested

Oct. 26 by the Whitley County Sheriff’s Department, charged with violation of suspended sentence. Daniel Fredbloom, 24, of Fort Wayne, was arrested Oct. 26 by the Indiana State Police, charged with possession of marijuana, possession of paraphernalia and OWI controlled substance. David Gaffney, 30, of Chicago, was arrested Oct. 26 by the Whitley County Sheriff’s Department, charged with possession of marijuana and possession of paraphernalia. Shandar Hunter, 31, of Columbia City, was arrested Oct. 26 by the Whitley County Sheriff’s Department, charged with dealing a controlled substance. Joseph Todd, 54, of Cromwell, was arrested Oct. 26 by the Churubusco Police Department, charged with his second OWI and OWI per se. Colton Huff, 22, of Warsaw, was arrested Oct. 26 by the Indiana State Police, charged with OWI controlled

substance, OWI per se, possession of marijuana and possession of paraphernalia. Aaron Shephard, 24, of Columbia City, was arrested Oct. 27 by the Whitley County Sheriff’s Department, charged with probation violation. Dallas Jones, 25, of Pleasant Lake, was arrested Oct. 27 by the Whitley County Sheriff’s Department, charged with probation violation. Peter Farrar, 41, of Tampa, Fla., was arrested Oct. 28 by the Indiana State Police, charged with OWI. Dominique Jackson, 24, of Harvey, Ill., was arrested Oct. 28 by the Indiana State Police, charged with invasion of privacy. Davin Lawrence, 20, of Columbia City, was arrested Oct. 28 by the Whitley County Sheriff’s Department, charged with probation violation. Leopold Blakley, 30, of Chicago, was arrested Oct. 29 by the Indiana State Police, charged with possession of marijuana.

APARTMENT HOMES NOW AVAILABLE! Hurry in now for a special you will be THANKFUL for!

HISTORIC BLUE BELL LOFTS

SALT SALE

SENIOR LIVING APARTMENTS

YOU MAY QUALIFY IF YOUR HOUSEHOLD INCOME IS AT OR BELOW*

Mon. - Fri. 7:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Sat. 8:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

50% MEDIAN INCOME 60% MEDIAN INCOME

Fri. & Sat., November 3 & 4

1 person $22,050 2 people $25,200 3 people $28,350 4 people $31,450 2 BDRM: Rents starts at $560

Next Salt Sale December 1 & 2

40# SOLAR SALT ...................... $5.35 40# PELLET SALT ...................... $5.99 40# RED-OUT ............................ $6.99 50# CUBE SALT ......................... $8.29 Sale price honored only on these dates ~ Not valid with any other offers or promotions

CULLIGAN WATER CONDITIONING

675 Business 30 East, Columbia City • 244-5850

SPACIOUS 2 BEDROOM APARTMENTS FOR AGES 55+

1 person $26,460 2 people $30,240 3 people $34,020 4 people $37,740 2 BDRM: Rent starts at $600

*Restrictions apply. Leasing rates and Apartment Homes subject to availability

WHAT YOU NEED TO QUALIFY

• Monthly income of at least 2.5 times rent • Favorable criminal background check • Favorable or positive prior landlord reference • Meet income qualifications • Favorable credit score

$20 application fee per adult. $100 to hold home off the market. $300 minimum security deposit

Call Today

(260) 224-2867

OFFICE: 307 S. WHITLEY ST., COLUMBIA CITY, IN 46725 HOURS: MON. - THURS. 10-4, FRI. 9-1, SAT. BY APPT. ONLY

Opening Doors to Opportunity


A6 • INwhitleycounty.com

OPINION

LETTER TO THE EDITOR Sometimes the things that come into our lives are used to mold us, and shape us into a better person. We should not get caught up in the worldly sorrows but use the tragedy like we have experienced, to strengthen our faith and our dependence on God and our appreciation to our friends, family and church family. We would like to sincerely thank all of the people that came to support us, with cards, hugs and just showing up with a smile. You thought of all our needs with monetary donations, food and gifts. You all truly thought of everything. We would like to express our appreciation for all the donated items to the silent auction and the live auction, to people who worked shifts and put together a wonderful benefit in such

a short time, and to our auctioneer who donated who donated his time. All of you wonderful people have shown our family the true meaning of compassion and live. You have all been examples of Jesus in the flesh. We have found a new love for each one of you and praise God for you and continue to lift all of you up in prayers. Thank you does not seem to be enough; we are forever indebted to our communities, friends and extended family. 2 Corinthians 7:10 “For sadness as intended by God produces a repentance that leads to salvation, leaving no regret, but worldly sadness brings about death.” — In God’s love, Kert and Julie Resler and family

Whitley County • November 2, 2017

The Chamber deserves a pat on the back The Whitley County Chamber of Commerce is making great strides. Moving the Chamber downtown, creating a beautiful visitor’s center and growing by at least one new member a week for most of the past year. Chamber Director Jennifer Romano is keeping the business community engaged with residents. We love the Chamber’s new location, in the heart of downtown Columbia City. We love the Chamber’s effort to reach out to the Churubusco and South Whitley communities. The addition of the monthly artist feature is wonderful. An active Chamber is essential to a growing community

like Whitley County. Doug Brown was doing great work as the Chamber director, and when he left just over a year ago, he shared his excitement to see Romano bring fresh, new ideas to the organization—and that she has done. While a chamber’s mission is to support the local business community, advocating and in some cases lobbying, on behalf of those businesses, we are fortunate to live in a county where the chamber members view service to the public as a core function of its duties. The chamber members and its leaders deserve a thank-you from the community at-large due

Our View

to the efforts they are making to create a better place to live - a quality place that will attract and retain talent. The Chamber’s effort is evident when looking at the success of local businesses. For example, the Chamber’s Large Business of the Year award winner, Fort Wayne Metals, recently invested $12 million into its Whitley County facility. The company

employs 1,000 people and is a great asset to the community, but it’s the company’s work with the Chamber that makes it special. Fort Wayne Metals is present at many ribbon cuttings and open houses, supporting other businesses in the community. From the hard work of member relations coordinator Carol Flowers to the work of all the board members and the guidance of Jennifer Romano, we can’t wait to see what’s in store for the future of the Whitley County Chamber of Commerce — next time you see a Chamber employee or board member, be sure to give them a pat on the back!

Republican canaries chirp their warnings As the Republican deficit hawks molt into deficit doves, the GOP canaries – President George W. Bush and Sens. John McCain, Bob BRIAN Corker HOWEY and Jeff Flake – have chirped out their warnings. It comes on the heels of President Trump’s bizarre criticism of one of the nation’s newest Gold Star mothers. It comes as a third U.S. Navy carrier strike force heads toward to Korean peninsula, with the USS Nimitz joining the USS Ronald Reagan and USS Theodore Roosevelt. A week ago Bush43 said, “We have seen our discourse degraded by casual cruelty. We’ve seen nationalism distorted into nativism; forgotten the dynamism that immigration has always brought to America. Bullying and prejudice in our public life sets a national tone, provides permission for cruelty and bigotry, and compromises the moral education of children. The only way to pass along civic values is to first live up to them.” From McCain, we heard, ”To fear the world we have organized and led for three-quarters of a century, to abandon the ideals we have advanced around the globe, to refuse the obligations of international leadership and our duty to remain ‘the last best hope

of earth’ for the sake of some half-baked, spurious nationalism cooked up by people who would rather find scapegoats than solve problems is as unpatriotic as an attachment to any other tired dogma of the past that Americans consigned to the ash heap of history.” From Senate Foreign Relations Chairman Corker, not only sounding alarms about Trump igniting a nuclear World War III, on Tuesday he said Trump was “debasing” American politics, explaining, “I don’t know why he lowers himself to such a low, low standard and is debasing our country,” adding that Trump “purposely has been breaking down relationships around the world. It’s unfortunate that our nation finds itself in this place.” And from Flake on the Senate floor, we heard: “We have again forgotten who we are supposed to be. There is a sickness in our system – and it is contagious. How many more disgraceful public feuds with Gold Star families can we witness in silence before we ourselves are disgraced? How many more times will we see moral ambiguity in the face of shocking bigotry and shrug it off? How many more childish insults do we need to see hurled at a hostile foreign power before we acknowledge the senseless danger of it? How much more damage to our democracy and to the institutions of American liberty do we need to witness in silence before we count ourselves as complicit in that damage?”

As the chirping fades, the reality is that Trump, Steve Bannon and Vice President Pence’s chief of staff, Nick Ayres, have won the opening round of the GOP civil war. “There is zero appetite for the ‘Never Trump’ movement in the Republican Party of today,” Andy Surabian, an adviser to Great America Alliance, told the New York Times. “This party is now defined by President Trump and his movement.” Pro-Trump talk show host Laura Ingraham adds, “We’re not an element. We’re the party.” It could be a Pyrrhic victory. If you want Exhibit A in how an intraparty civil war looks like, check out Indiana circa 2012 when Republicans jettisoned U.S. Sen. Richard Lugar for Richard Mourdock. Lugar’s 36-year hold on that Senate seat ended with the election of Democrat Joe Donnelly. It was totally predictable. In a Howey Politics/ DePauw Indiana Battleground Poll conducted in March 2012, Lugar had a 50-29% lead over Donnelly in a general election head-to-head, whereas Mourdock and Donnelly were tied at 35%. While Mourdock won a landslide primary victory over Lugar, he spent the following weeks alienating the Lugar wing of the party and, along with controversial quotes, it cost him the election. Heading into the 2018 mid-terms, the data sets are dismal for Trump and the Republicans. Trump’s approve/disapproves are 36/58% in the latest Gallup tracking, 38/58% in Ipsos/Reuters, 38/54%

in Marist, and 43/56% in Rasmussen. All are at or near historic lows for a first-year incumbent president. Direction of the country? Marist has it 31/63% wrong/right track; Rasmussen puts it at 33/61%. The Congressional job approval stands at 13%/80% approve/ disapprove in Gallup, while the Economist/ YouGov puts it a 8/71%. Ipsos/Reuters puts it at 19/68%. And the Congressional generic? CNN has it 54% Democrat and 38% Republican. In the GOP wave election year of 1994 when it picked up 54 House seats, Democrats actually led the generic ballot 47-42% in an ABC News Poll just prior to the election. In 2010, when Republicans picked up 63 House seats (including two in Indiana) Republicans had a 49-45% lead that October. So a 16% lead heading into 2018 portends a Republican congressional blowout. It’s backed up by strong third quarter FEC reports from Democrats Liz Watson and Daniel Canan in the 9th CD, William Tanoos in the 8th and Courtney Tritch in the deep red 3rd CD. Indiana is a fascinating study in Trumpism. He won the 2016 primary here with 53% of the vote, with the support of Bob Knight, Gene Keady and Lou Holtz, but with none of the Republican establishment. They came around when Gov. Mike Pence was added to the ticket in July, and Trump won the state by 19% that November. But that is beginning to fade with Mark It Red

putting Trump’s approve/ disapprove at 47/50% and Morning Consult at 49.8/44.9%, a 17% dropoff from its January tracking. While Indiana U.S. Senate candidates Luke Messer and Todd Rokita are openly embracing Trump (whose favorability among Hoosier Republicans stood at 87% in the Mark It Red survey), and State Rep. Mike Braun is courting Steve Bannon’s insurgency, U.S. Sen. Todd Young did not discredit Flake’s warnings, telling WNDU-TV on Tuesday, “He said some powerful things. He is a principled person who says that he wasn’t going to give up on principle. He indicated that character counts. He said that integrity counts in leaders, and he also pointed out some specific policy areas continuing to be supportive of free markets, continuing to embrace peoples from a variety of backgrounds. He thinks that’s what our party should stand for; I happen to agree with him. To this U.S. senator, his message was one that I would I embrace.” Young added, ”With respect to comments about our commander in chief, Hoosiers didn’t send me here to engage in back and forth about those sorts of things. I’m focused on trying to create jobs that pay better and do what I can to keep Americans safe and secure.” Mike Allen observes in Wednesday’s Axios: “President Trump enjoys public support (despite private gripes) from most of the 49 other Senate Republicans and 239 House Republicans, including

every person in elected leadership. Trump got standing ovations from Senate Republicans, with Corker in the room. This flows from his strong, sustained support of GOP voters. Corker is right, Republicans in private cringe at the thought of President Trump. But it’s meaningless if they publicly bow to him, routinely vote for him and never condemn him. With few accomplishments, countless petty GOP fights and slights, Trump is strong as ever. Flake is the proof. While cable lapped up his anti-Trump retirement speech (‘I will not be complicit’), the truth is he was forced out because he wrote a book critical of the president and saw his base turn on him. If Flake ran, he was toast. Once Corker turned, he was probably toast, too. Tennessee Republicans prefer Trump to Corker, too.” Allen adds, “For all the warnings of how harshly history will judge the Trump enablers, that history will need to be told in an exceptionally long book – because the vast majority of Republicans are forever marked as Trump Republicans.” But you can always find yet another canary who warns of Mourdockian implications, with Republican strategist Alex Conant explaining, “To be successful, Trump needs a united Republican Party. A divided party loses elections.” — Brian Howey is publisher of Howey Politics Indiana at www. howeypolitics.com. Find him on Facebook and Twitter @hwypol.


INwhitleycounty.com • A7

Whitley County • November 2, 2017

City looks ahead for more reliable power By Nicole Minier nminier@kpcmedia.com

COLUMBIA CITY — A bird and a faulty battery system were the causes of a four-hour power outage in Columbia City two weeks ago. Fortunately, the city will only have to pay about $2,000 to repair the substation, and officials were already looking into a looping project that would likely prevent future extended outages. The power outage on Oct. 22 was relatively short considering its destruction. A bird caused the initial power issue. Breakers in the substations operate off of 48-volt battery systems, one of which, at the substation near Columbia City High School, failed. “It kept failing and faulting into one spot, which sent fault currents down the line,” said Shawn Lickey, Columbia

City Electric Department superintendent. About seven utility poles caught on fire and three sections of power lines burned to the ground — it took eight fire extinguishers to put out the fires, Lickey said. Though the cost of replacing poles and paying five employees to work four hours on a weekend will be costly for the city, the actual cost to fix the substation is about $2,000, Lickey said. Lickey did not have a total cost estimate of the incident. The city has four substations in total and plans to retire the substation near the high school in the next four to five years. The Electric Department is looking to create a closed-loop system, which would drastically lower the chances of power outage. Closed-loop systems have two power

Updates begin at SWCPL

feeds into the city. “With a closed loop, there’s no outage if one of the lines goes down — it makes service more reliable,” Lickey said. The city is working with AEP to upgrade its system from 34,500 volts to 69,000 volts to support the growing city. “I got a call about a month ago that they’re looking into the project,” Lickey said. There would be some financial responsibility for the city, but Lickey said that would be a prime time to convert the city to a closed-loop system. Councilmen thanked Electric Department employees for their quick work putting out fires and getting the power back online. “Thank you for handling that quickly for our citizens,” Councilwoman Jennifer Romano said.

CONTRIBUTED

The front entrance remodel at South Whitley Community Public Library began this week. The entrance is being revamped to include a ramp from the street to the doors. Electronic doors will replace the current doors and interior electronic doors will be added. The project is expected to be completed by Nov. 7, weather permitting. Patrons are asked to use the rear entrance on the north side of the library. A temporary drop box for material returns has also been placed along Maple Street, near the sidewalk.

TAXES from Page 1 whitleygov.com; • In person at the Treasurer’s Office on the second floor of the Government Building; • By mail. All payments must be postmarked by Nov. 13; • With a credit card. Call (800)272-9829. Those making payments online will need to provide their parcel number, as well as Whitley County’s jurisdiction code: 2429. There is a fee charged for this type of transaction. Electronic payments at whitleygov.com are encouraged. “It’s quick, easy and free,” Schroeder said. If paying via mail,

receipts will be mailed back only if there is a self-addressed, stamped envelope included with the payment. Late payment of taxes will incur penalties. Those with questions should contact the following:

• Exemptions: Auditor’s Office, 248-3100 • Assessed values: Assessor’s Office, 248-3109 • Drainage assessments: Engineer’s Office, 248-3107 • Tax payments: Treasurer’s Office, 248-3105

Voted #1 in Whitley County

MEGAN KNOWLES

The trees for Memorial Park are transported by Shade Trees Unlimited out of Columbia City. The business provides all the trees for the city of Fort Wayne, General Manager Michael Hollis said.

TREES from Page 3 businesses, unions and individuals, its members also plan to establish a trust to “take care of these trees for generations to come,” Perkey said. Warrior Breed reached out to Shade Trees Unlimited of Columbia City, which supplies all the trees for Fort Wayne’s parks department, General Manager Michael Hollis said. After selecting the plants from Shade Trees Unlimited, the motorcycle club decided to bring the trees into Fort Wayne in style. On Oct. 28 members of Warrior Breed, as well as other local motorcycles clubs, joined Shade Trees Unlimited, Fort Wayne’s fire and police departments and members of the 1st Battalion, 293rd Infantry Regiment of Fort Wayne to escort the trees from Columbia City to their new home at Memorial Park. Along the way, they also stopped at the Hearth of Sycamore Village so veterans there could pay their respects

to what the trees represent. “It felt so good to come through town that way and see everyone just stop what they were doing and just watch us come through because they knew what it was, they knew what we were honoring today,” Perkey said at a gathering of people at Memorial Park. “To forget them and to not do what we’re all doing to honor and support them would be a shame. But we are. We’re all stepping up and making this happen and we appreciate your support. … This was more than we could have expected to honor these trees, which represent the fallen of World War I.” Hollis said being able to participate in the parade through town was “exciting.” But they weren’t done yet: Shade Trees Unlimited planted trees throughout Memorial Grove. Many members of the public and motorcycle group members helped

S. WHITLEY from Page 3 opment Commission. The members - Karen Jordan, Tim Campbell, Chris Shoemaker, Bryan Rose and Nathan Haywood - will be sworn into office in January, and will receive advice

from Whitley County Economic Development Corp. President Jon Myers. Myers recommends the appointed members sit in on either a county or Columbia City rede-

Experience the charm, food and music March 7-17, 2018 Your travel experience will include:

buchananautomotive@embarqmail.com

Tour Highlights:

• Luxury motorcoach transportation • Lodging as listed on itinerary • Luggage handling for one suitcase per person • Tickets/admissions to listed attractions • Gratuities for local guides • Meals as listed on itinerary • Guidance of a professional tour manager • Travel Protection Plan

$700 deposit per person due at booking.

2525 East Business 30, Columbia City, Indiana 46725 www.buchananbodyshop.com Ph: (260) 244-6105

velopment commission meeting between now and January to gain understandings of how they work. • The council approved a pay raise increase for all county employees.

New Orleans

Single — $4,189 Double — $3,429 Triple — $3,199 Quad —$3,089

Complete Car & Truck Collision Repairs and Refinishing

with the planting. “I wish we had more shovels,” Hollis said with a laugh, adding he expected all the trees to be planted before the end of the day. The trees will be formally dedicated 2 p.m. Nov. 11 at the park, Perkey said. The day before, Warrior Breed is partnering with the Fort Wayne Mad Ants to allow military personnel and their families to attend the game for free. Perkey emphasized, however, that Warrior Breed is not done with the park yet. “I don’t want anybody to think that because we got to the goal of the trees, this effort is not done. There is still a lot of money to raise,” he said, adding the motorcycle club wants to help with other needs at the park as well. Those interested in donating or learning more about the project can look up Operation Mp-125 on Facebook or visit warriorbreedmc.com.

Final payment due January 19, 2018.

• Tour Sun Studio in Memphis • Visit Elvis’s Graceland • Tour antebellum homes in Natchez, MS • See where Tabasco is made on Avery Island • Four nights in the French Quarter of New Orleans • Visit Oak Alley Plantation • Take a tour through the Louisiana swamps • Evening at the New Orleans School of Cooking • Visit the WWII Museum • Cruise the Mississippi aboard the Steamboat Natchez • Take a shrimping trip in Biloxi, MS • Visit Bellingrath Gardens near Mobile, AL • Have breakfast aboard the USS Alabama

Edgerton Travel - Ft. Wayne 9111 Lima Rd., Ft. Wayne, IN (800)873-3437 • (260)497-8747


A8 • INwhitleycounty.com

Whitley County • November 2, 2017

SALE DATES: NOVEMBER 2-NOVEMBER 8

Coffee Shop

DRIVE THRU OPEN!

The

in Sav-U-Mor

Take coffee with you!

“Small town feel, corporate quality”

Open: Monday-Friday 6-4 • Saturdays 6-12 Offering grab-n-go lunches, coffee and tea beverage, baked good and bulk coffee bean sales.

NEW STORE HOURS: 6 A.M. - 10 P.M. SUNDAY: 7 A.M. - 10 P.M. Ore Ida Potatoes All Varieties

299

4

2/$

$

8

Pepsi

OZ.

Betty Crocker Cake Mix

10

4/$

16.9

Yoder’s Shredded Cheese

OZ.

6

PKS.

Super Dip Ice Cream

5

15.25

5

2/$

.5

.5

GAL.

Shurfine Powdered or Brown Sugar

3

2/$

OZ.

10

99

99

15

EA.

OZ.

PRODUCE Red Potatoes

5

2/$

LBS.

Red Delicious Apples

2

99

5

LBS .

Mini Carrots

Boneless Chuck Roast

3

$

3

8

OZ .

LB.

Beef Sirloin Patties

3

$

99 LB.

399

$

LB.

Essenhaus Noodles

99

¢

16

5

LB.

Reeser’s Baked Side Dishes

Green Cabbage

39

¢

OZ.

6

2/$ 20

OZ.

Family Pack

599

$

5

2/$

GAL.

1

$ 49 LB.

Boneless Sirloin Pork Chops

1

$ 79 LB.

Yoder’s Sour Cream

Shurfine Beef or Chicken Broth

Sugarland Bone In Butt or Shank Hams

1

16

3

14

OZ.

Blue Bonnet Margarine

OZ.

Pillsbury Grands Biscuits

1

$ 89

99

¢

16

1

2/$

2/$

16.3

OZ.

OZ.

QTRS.

$ 49

99¢ 16

Shurfine Saltine Crackers

OZ.

LB.

LB.

Pine Mountain Ham Slices

1

$ 69 LB.

Eckrich Bologna Reg. or Thick

3

2/$

Eckrich Franks

Reg., Bunsize, Cheese or Jumbo

5

4/$

269

$

FULL SERVICE DELI

349

$

Dairymen’s 1% or Skim Milk

GAL.

Sav U Mor’s Platter Style Bulk Bacon

LB .

Eckrich Smoked Sausage

Frito Corn Chips or Cheetos

Family Pack

Boneless Top Sirloin Steak

Whole White Mushrooms

2/$

69

2/$ 1

248

$

Boneless Chicken Breast

¢

OR

$

Sav U Mor Homemade Bratwurst Made in House

Chef Boyardee Pasta

2/$

5

40

card, get the 6th drink FREE after the purchase of 5. Gift certificates also available during shop hours.

Dairymen’s 2% Milk

VARIETIES

Frito Lay Potato Chips

5

18 pk.

5

GAL.

2/$

Pepsi

$

OZ.

OVER

Dairymen’s Chocolate Milk

2/$

7-8

5

4/$

MEAT SALE!

Promotional: With your punch

Eckrich Oven Roasted Turkey Breast

429

$

LB.

Provolone Cheese

369

$

Kentucky Legend Ham

429

$

LB.

Yellow or White American Cheese

349

$

LB.

LB.

Macaroni Salad

1

$ 89 LB.

Eckrich Pepperoni

429

$

LB.

OUR NAME SAYS IT ALL! QUALITY YOU EXPECT AT PRICES YOU CAN AFFORD.

SAVE UP TO 40% EVERYDAY CHECK US OUT ON FACEBOOK

308 South Main Street, Churubusco, Indiana • 693-2708 STORE HOURS: 6 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Sunday 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. • Cash, Checks, Credit Cards, Money Orders & Food Stamps Now Accepting WIC and Manufacturer Coupons • We reserve the right to correct printed errors.


INwhitleycounty.com • A9

Whitley County • November 2, 2017

HALLOWEEN PHOTOS SUBMITTED VIA FACEBOOK

PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, composed of Adley, Ryka and Marklyn Addison, Harker, Sutton, Liston and Kulter Lowen and Maddox Downing. Bianca Bartoli

Eli, Bently and Tyler Clupper

Harlie Sproles

Hadley Martin

Autumn Slain

Kenna and Teagen Baldwin

Jaxon, Keely and Ellie Fox

Anatonya Koshurin

Kevin Coyle

Lily Lemon

Oakleigh Steel

Jenna and Shane Wagaman

Ella, Maddie and Kenzie Arnold

Monica, Vivian, Lillian, Chad and Eli Ralston


A10 • INwhitleycounty.com

Whitley County • November 2, 2017

Old-Fashioned Meat Counter To Serve You Better!

Bone-In

Rib Steak $ 99

6

lb.

Stew Meat $ 19

4

Whole Chickens $ 39

Canadian Style

Pork Roast $ 29

3

lb.

1

lb.

Self-Serve Case

Only Deli in Town Eckrich

Roasted Turkey Breast

529

$

lb.

Yoder’s

Rotelli Pasta

2

$

29 lb.

Eckrich

Eckrich Reg. or Thick

Virginia Ham

4

$

Bologna

139

$

99

14 oz.

lb.

Yoder’s

All Flavors Eckrich

Smoked Sausage

Cookies & Cream

4

$

269

$

79 lb.

Cheddar Cheese

4

$

lb.

79 lb.

Eckrich

Smok-Y-Links

249

$

609 S. MAIN ST., CHURUBUSCO • OPEN 7 A.M. TO 10 P.M. EVERY DAY • 260.693.2909


INwhitleycounty.com • A11

Whitley County • November 2, 2017

Southeastern Mills

IGA Cocktail Sauce or

Peppered Gravy Mix

Chili Sauce

Chef Boyardee Chili Mac, Lasagna or

3

IGA

Chocolate Chips

Spaghetti & Meatballs

177

5

12 oz.

IGA

15 oz.

IGA Chili Beans or

Cherry or Apple Pie Filling IGA

Prairie Farms

Tomato Juice

1

2/$

99

15 oz.

20 oz.

2% or Skim Milk

1

$

Kidney Beans

1

$

2

29

$

46 oz.

Ragu

49

Jiffy

Corn Muffin Mix

gal.

Extra Large Red or Green

Dole

Seedless Grapes

Celery

Spaghetti Sauce

1

$

1

129

$

49

Doritos Morton

Salt Pellets

1

89

IGA Powdered Sugar or

Brown Sugar

3

2/$

2 lb. bag

24 oz.

2/$

Fresh Produce

5

2/$

Diet Pepsi, Mt. Dew, or

Pepsi

899

3/$

6 packs

5

$

lb.

29

40 lbs.

Fresh

Red Raspberries

Avocados

149

$

2

$

2.75 oz. envelope

12 oz.

$

5/$

$

99¢

2/$

99

6

$

Russet Potatoes

White Mushrooms

Cottage Cheese

Pepsi

6 oz.

Whole or Sliced

Prairie Farms

Diet Pepsi, Mt. Dew or

99

239

$

24 pk.

Prairie Farms

Yogurt

1

2/$

6 oz.

24 oz.

188

$

200

$

5 lbs.

8 oz.

Prairie Farms

Fresh

Green Bell Peppers

Real Butter

Green Cabbage

66

¢

3

$

59¢

each

49

16 oz.

IGA

Sour Cream & Dip

Prairie Farms

Orange Juice

3

2/$

16 oz.

229

$

lb.

1/2 gal.

Bakery Hamburger or Hot Dog Buns

1

8/$

Donut Holes

1

12/$

49

99

BAKERY WINDOW OPENS AT 6:00 AM DONUTS & COFFEE TO GO

Pumpkin Pies

4

$

59

Florida Natural

Orange Juice

Shredded Cheese

Coffee Creamer

2

$

IGA Mozzarella or Cheddar

Coffee Mate Hazelnut or French Vanilla

29

199

$

299

$

59 oz.

8 oz.

32 oz.

Banquet Beef, Chicken, or Turkey

All Regular Cookies

399

13/$ ★ We bag & carry your groceries to your car ★ Name brands you know & trust

Pot Pie

79

¢

IGA Rolled

Pie Shells

222

$

15 oz.

IGA

Water

200

$

24 pk.

7 oz.

BAKED IN OUR STORE

PRICES EFFECTIVE 10/30/17 TO 11/5/17

We reserve the right to correct printed errors


SPORTS

A12 • INwhitleycounty.com

Whitley County • November 2, 2017

Eagles come up short in sectional semifinal By Justin Hunter jhunter@kpcmedia.com

CHURUBUSCO – Adams Central sneaked past host Churubusco, 17-14, in Friday night’s tough sectional semifinal football game Friday. The loss ended the Eagles’ season at 9-2. Adams Central, now 10-2 for the year, moves on in sectional competition, Friday versus Southwood. “Offensively, we did not play our best game,” said Churubusco head coach Paul Sade. “We made some plays, but came up short a few times. We lost to a great football team. Adams Central is one of the best teams in the state. I’m proud of how we played every week. The players always did what we asked and played hard.” The Jets’ offense opened up an early 7-0 lead, taking the ball down the field for 99 yards in just nine plays. An Adams Central running back scampered for a 37-yard touchdown

to complete the drive. The Churubusco offense could not gain momentum but the Eagles’ defense kept pressure on the Jets quarterback, sacking him twice in the last minutes of the first quarter. One sack was recorded by Parker Curry, the other tallied by Reese Wicker. The Churubusco offense scored to open the second quarter. Joey Emenhiser took the punt to the Adams Central 25-yard-line. Quarterback Tom Richards connected to Mason Anderson for a first down. Running back Nathaniel Keener scored on a 10-yard run and tied the game, 7-7, with 11:13 left in the first half. A field goal by Adams Central female kicker Bailea Sprunger cleared the uprights by inches in the final seconds of the half, giving the Jets a 10-7 lead at intermission. Adams Central started the second half with the ball and scored on

Churubusco’s Austin Lehman and Trevor Holloway chase after an Adams Central ball carrier.

FINAL SEASON STATS

a 30-yard-run with 9:53 left in the third quarter. The extra point was good, including the Jets’ lead to 17-7. The Churubusco offense was held to a three and out on its next drive. Adams Central drove the ball down the field all the way to the Churubusco eight-yardline, but was halted on third and goal with a loss. The Jets came up short on fourth and 20 with Parker Curry making the tackle. With 6:03 left in the game, Churubusco’s Richard scored on a quarterback keeper. The extra point was good and the Eagles were within three points at 17-14. quarterback sneak and moved the ball crossed the plane. The Eagles still trailed 17-14 with 6:03 remaining. The Eagles’ defense forced a much needed three and out. But ’Busco’s offense fell short in the closing minutes.

PHOTOS BY JUSTIN HUNTER

Head coach Paul Sade speaks to his team after their sectional loss.

Adams Central got the ball back with 2:48 remaining. In a crucial third down and three, the Jets picked up the first down and held on for the victory. Sade said that even though the Eagles lost, he will remember the

way the seniors led this year’s team. “The seniors provided tremendous leadership and work ethic,” said Sade. “They set the bar high with their preparation and hopefully the younger guys learned from them.”

Rushing yards N. Keener, 1,288 G. Kelly, 338 S. Wood, 300 J. Emenhiser, 220 J. Fulk, 170 A. Lehman, 141 Receiving yards M. Anderson, 322 S. Wood, 104 G. Kelly, 112 J. Emenhiser, 72 N. Keener, 52 B. Geiger, 35 Passing T. Richards 56-101 726 yards Tackles A. Lehman, 96 M. Anderson, 70 T. Holloway, 83 P. Curry, 76 R. Wicker, 73 J. Leazier, 71 S. Wood, 54 T. Allen, 54 C. Lemper, 36 Sacks R. Wicker, 4 T. Allen, 3.5 A. Lehman, 2 P. Curry, 2 M. Anderson, 1 J. Leazier, 1 I. Smith, .5 Interceptions G. Kelly, 4 S. Wood, 3 J. Emenhiser, 3 B. Hilkey, 2 M. Anderson, 1 B. Simmons, 1 Kickoff yards J. Emenhiser, 2,799 Punt yards kicked J. Emenhiser, 992 Punt returns J. Emenhiser, 362 S. Wood, 276 Points N. Keener, 102 J. Emenhiser, 90 G. Kelly, 66 S. Wood, 48 M. Anderson, 30 J. Fulk, 18 PATs J. Emenhiser, 51-55

The Churubusco football team runs onto the field before the sectional semi-final game.

FOLLOW WHITLEY COUNTY SPORTS Thursday, November 2 No events scheduled

Friday, November 3

Saturday, November 4

Whitko girls basketball at North Side, 7:45 p.m. Columbia City girls basketball hosts Carroll, 6:15 p.m.

Monday, November 5 No events scheduled

WhitleyCounty County Whitley wc wc

inwhitleycounty.com

inwhitleycounty.com

Tuesday, November 6 No events scheduled

Wednesday, November 7 Columbia City girls basketball at West Noble, 6 p.m. Churubusco girls basketball hosts Lakewood Park, 7:30 p.m. Whitko girls basketball at Central Noble, 7:30 p.m.

Submit your sports stories or photos to Justin Hunter at jhunter@kpcmedia.com


SPORTS

Whitley County • November 2, 2017

INwhitleycounty.com • A13

Soaring Eagles fly to nationals By Justin Hunter jhunter@kpcmedia.com

CHURUBUSCO – Hard work pays off. That’s what the Soaring Eagles has proven, as the Churubusco elementary girls cross country team heads to nationals. In only its third season of competition, the Soaring Eagles will compete at AAU nationals Dec. 2 in North Carolina. What started as 12 girls on the 3rd grade team, doubled to 24 girls the next year, and has risen to 28 girls this year. Churubusco had never had a girls elementary cross country team until head coach Elaine Kolvoord moved from Fort Wayne to Turtle Town. “No one had been running before we got here,” said Kolvoord. “It took a while to build a base and become competitive. Going to nationals this year is really just for the experience. Next year I believe we’ll place really well, since they’ll have another year under their belt.” The elementary distance is typically one mile, but the AAU distance is nearly twice as long, at 1.9 miles. The team has been preparing for the longer distance, as they have run at AAU races before. The Soaring Eagles will travel in two vans to North Carolina for the national race. The team will fundraise for the trip, which includes hotel, food and cost to participate. The team had time standards to hit in order to be competitive at the national race. They hit those marks and every

Soaring Eagle runner is planning to make the trip. A member of the boys cross country team will also board a van and run at the event. The Soaring Eagles will have national running experience when they reach North Carolina. The team went to New Albany, Indiana, in September and ran a state qualifying meet in hopes to advance to the YES nationals. The 11-12 year-olds placed first and the 9-10 yearolds placed fourth. Everyone advanced to the YES nationals that will happen Nov 18 in Westchester, Ohio. “That will give them good experience in a national meet,” said Kolvoord. “We won’t peek for that one. Our goal is to peek for the AAU nationals come December.” In addition to excelling on the course, the girls strive to be good citizens. Each year the team picks a community service project to support the community that supports them. They held a food drive to aid the local food bank; they earned money to build Build-ABears for the children’s hospital; they picked up trash at the park and held a hat and glove drive for the veterans, as well as made them cards thanking, them for their service. “My runners are great at what they do, and they’re great kids, too, “ said Kolvoord. “I have loved watching them grow from third to fifth grade. We do community projects together, they

CONTRIBUTED

The Churubusco Soaring Eagles are focusing on getting ready for the upcoming national meet in North Carolina. Pictured standing from left is Lilly Rinker, Mikaella Shull, Amalia Bulmahn, Mak Kolvoord, Jaelie Longardner, Ella Elias, Emma Walters, Kayleigh O’Hair, Isis Bohde, Astoria Smith, Jaylynn Shively and Eryn Savieo. Those kneeling from left is Ali Frye, Taylor Miller, Morgan Miller, Gabby Orth, Katy Dreibelbis, Naomi Bohde, Phoenix Smith and Kiera Vanhouten.

are not just great runners, and they’re amazing girls.” The Soaring Eagles don’t just have Dec. 2 on their mind; they have dreams and aspirations that go much farther. The girls have both high school and college in mind. “Their other long-term goal is to advance to state in 2021; that’s when they’ll be freshmen. It’s something that’s never been done at Churubusco,” said Kolvoord. “They improved so much over the few years. One

of their long-term goals are to get running scholarships for college. The girls get so excited when we talk about college.” The team philosophy is that they’re a team, and they’re in it for each other, Kolvoord said. “The working concept for us is that we’re a team. I tell them that not one runner is more important than another. This past year, in our first five races, we have put 10 different girls in the top five scoring positions.” Now that’s teamwork.

For the best sports coverage on the field, on the court, on the track, on the course, on the mat, and on the ice.

TYLER ROEBUCK

The Soaring Eagles pose with the Smith-Green school board after being presented with achievement certificates for their season success.

Send your sports article ideas, results and photos to Justin Hunter at jhunter@kpcmedia.com

Print Online Mobile

CONTRIBUTED

Former Superintendent Galen Mast took time away from the awards ceremony to pose for a picture with the Eagles.

★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ ★ ATHLETE OF THE WEEK ★ SPONSORED BY ★ ★ ★ ★ 7207 Engle Road ★ Fort Wayne, IN 46804 ★ ★ (260) 436-2255 ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ ★ Mason Anderson wide receiver Mason Anderson ★ ★ Churubusco six passes for 55 yards in the Eagles’ ★ caught sectional semi-final loss to Adams Central ★ ★ ★ last week. ★ ★ ★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★


SPORTS

A14 • INwhitleycounty.com

Whitley County • November 2, 2017

PHOTOS BY JUSTIN HUNTER

Whitko’s Ella Danner dribbles the ball against Columbia City.

Columbia City’s Lindsey Hoskins gets set to hit the ball.

Taylor Osborn spikes the ball over the net for Columbia City.

FALL SPORTS SEASON RECAPS CROSS COUNTRY

Columbia City Columbia City’s cross country team advanced three individuals to the semistate run in Fort Wayne. Landon Wakeman, Nathan Mills and Lillian Oddou competed in the semistate race, but could not advance to state. The entire girls cross country team advanced to regionals. Eden Oddou finished 42nd in the race; Lauren Keller, 51st; Bailie Brown, 57th; Jaslyn Cook 61st; Ally Wilson, 72nd and Carolyn Shelton 75th. Churubusco Four runners from the Churubusco cross country team advanced to the regional race. The Eagles’ top runner, Sam Keily finished 50th and Levi Skinner took 78th. The Lady Eagles also had a pair of runners in the regional. Allie Basinger placed 71st and Maggie Burita came in 79th. Whitko Whitko’s cross country team finished its first season under head coach Tara Jackson. The Wildcats were low

in numbers with five boys and three girls participating. Whitko did not advance any runners out of the sectional, but the team had fun regardless. “This is the most fun I’ve had in many years,” said Jackson. “They are a great group of kids. The first practice was great because I would tell them to do anything, and they’d go out and do it. They were in good spirits after practice as well. I was just impressed with their maturity. They’re much easier to coach, and you see it in the results.” FOOTBALL

Columbia City Columbia City’s football team had a winning streak earlier in the season that Eagles fans may remember for a long time. The Eagles beat Whitko, Bellmont, Huntington North and DeKalb consecutively, in a streak that started Aug. 25 and lasted till Sept. 15. The Eagles ended the regular season in blowout fashion, defeating Norwell, 40-7. Columbia City fell on the road to Wayne, 62-20, in

the first round of sectional play. The Eagles (6-5) went 5-3 in the Northeast 8 Conference, and placed a respectable fourth place. Quarterback Jacob Bolt completed eight passes for 199 yards and a pair of touchdowns. Jacob Bolt also rushed for 183 yards and two touchdowns. Running back Jacob Wigent led the Eagles with 226 rushing yards and tallied three touchdowns. Ethan Christen led with 81 receiving yards in three receptions. Linebacker Solomon Barrera led the defense with 14 tackles, followed by defensive end Curtis Winebrenner’s 13 tackles. Churubusco Churubusco’s football team had a successful winning season and won a share of the Northeast Corner Conference, but also fell in a pair of close, heartbreaking losses. The most heartbreaking loss of the season may have come in a 56-0 win against Whitko in week one. Star running back Garrett Horn broke his leg in the opener and could not play for the

rest of the season. The Eagles followed by defeating Lakeland, 42-12. In week three, the Eagles downed rival Garrett on the road, then won victories over Eastside, Prairie Heights and Fremont. Churubusco lost its rivalry game to Central Noble, 19-17. Churubusco bounced back with win against West Noble and Fairfield and then won over Northfield in the first round of sectional play. The Eagles fell in the sectional semifinal to back-to-back sectional champion Adams Central,17-14. Quarterback Tom Richards was second in conference with 726 passing yards. Nathaniel Kenner was first in conference with 1,288 rushing yards, twice as many as his nearest competitor. Gage Kelly was fifth in rushing, with 338 yards. Wide out Mason Anderson was second with 322 receiving yards. Churubusco swept the top three players in total points. Keener scored 102 points, Joey Emenhiser scored 90 and Kelly had 66 points.

SPORTS EDITOR The Herald Republican of Angola, Indiana, is hiring a sports editor to cover local sporting events, including four high schools and Trine University. Candidates should be able to write quickly and accurately, take action photographs and create sports pages using InDesign. Applications should include samples of the candidate’s writing.

Please designate Sports Editor in the subject line.

Send cover letter, resume and writing samples to HR@kpcmedia.com.

THE

HERALD

REPUBLICAN

KPC Media Group is an Equal Opportunity Employer and values the benefits of diversity in our workplace.

Keener was also first in conference with 17 touchdowns. Kelly scored 11 touchdowns and Sam Wood scored eight. Austin Lehman was second in conference with 96 tackles, and Trevor Holloway wasn’t far behind with 83. Reese Wicker had five sacks in the season and Tanner Allen had 3.5. Kelly tied for first with four interceptions. Emenhiser and Wood both had three interceptions. Whitko Whitko’s football team finished a difficult, winless season with a young team. The highlight of the season was when the Wildcats fiercely competed against Wabash in the last week of the season. The Apaches defeated Whitko, 28-22, on the Wildcat’s senior night. Whitko lost its first round sectional game, 56-8 ,to Central Noble. Mason Lehman led the Three Rivers Conference with five sacks. Zakk Neer was second with four sacks. Jaiden Babb had 1.5, which was third most in the conference. Quarterback Cade Bechtold was fifth in the conference with 218 passing yards. Running back Hunter Reed was fifth in rushing yards, with 559. GOLF

Columbia City The Columbia City girls golf team advanced an individual to the regional. Leah Bechtold was to lone Lady Eagle to advance. Bechtold started the season as the No. 2 golfer, but was the only Eagles team member to advance in the IHSAA sectional. Bechtold shot a personal high of 89 in the regional, but could not advance. Columbia City was low on numbers, but managed a 7-8 season, and finished 3-4 in the Northeast 8 Conference. The team was led by Bechtold and Katie Hoag; the pair posted the lowest scores throughout this past season. Bechtold was listed as NE8 honor-

able mention. Churubusco Churubusco’s girls golf team was back in action for its third season after disbanding in the 1990s. Terra Mayer set a school and individual records this past season that have stood for over 20 years. The highlight of the season came when the team shot 183 in a match against Fremont and Garrett at Eel River’s front nine. Mayer, a sophomore, co-medaled with a score of 43 and set the individual record by two strokes. Junior Jada Kirkpatrick and sophomore Makenzie Tonkel were often the No. 2 and No. 3 positions in the lineup. Kaitlynn Shull was also a sophomore who played a role in Churubusco’s historic season. Kira Creech is the lone senior that won’t return to next year’s lineup. Whitko Whitko’s girls golf team had more losses than wins, but improved as a young squad. The Lady Wildcats did not have any seniors, but still managed to win a pair of games. The highlight of the season came when the Lady Wildcats all shot their individual highs for the season. “We had one match where everyone shot their season’s best,” said head coach Mike Hanback. “In my opinion, that was the highlight of the season. It was in the middle of our season at home and everyone was just so happy despite losing. The team started to think they were capable of getting better. It was a positive moment and they were proud of themselves.” Whitko was led by sophomore Bailey Wright, the No. 1 golfer for the Lady Wildcats this season. Hanback believes the results this season will move the program in the right direction. “They like the sport and have great enthusiasm,” SEE BRIEFS, PAGE 15


SPORTS

Whitley County • November 2, 2017

INwhitleycounty.com • A15

PHOTOS BY JUSTIN HUNTER

Columbia City’s Garrett Anspach prepares to hit his serve in play at the sectional against Whitko.

Whitko’s Ezra Miller ran despite his arm injury.

Whitko’s Kaige Michael bends forward and reaches for the ball late September against Churubusco.

BRIEFS from Page 14 he said. “They want to keep playing and I think we’ll develop into a much stronger program. We’ll build off this season and we aren’t losing anyone.” BOYS SOCCER

Columbia City Columbia City’s boys soccer team had aspirations to win its first sectional title in school history, but fell short by falling to a tough Concordia Lutheran team, 11-0, in the Maconaquah sectional title. The Cadets advanced all the way to the state championship, falling in the title game. The Eagles (6-9-2) went 3-4 in Northeast Hoosier play. Columbia City finished in sixth place out of eight teams in conference. Columbia City opened the season by crushing Central Noble, 9-0. The Eagles went on to win five more against a good Bellmont team, New Haven, Norwell, Garrett and Tippecanoe Valley in sectional play. Frank Planchon finished fourth place in conference with 13 goals. Colin Wood had the second most amount of assists, with 10. Goaltender Logan Bachelder allowed less than 2.4 goals a game, which was third best in conference. Bachelder also was third in saves with 72. GIRLS SOCCER

Columbia City Columbia City’s girls soccer team played in many tight games this season, and ended the season with a winning record. The Lady Eagles (7-6-3) went 2-5 in a talented Northeast Hoosier Conference. Columbia City placed seventh out of nine conference teams. Goaltender Hannah Behm was best in conference, making 124 saves in the season. Columbia City relied on a pair of playmakers to score goals and assists. Skye Roberts was fourth in conference with 50 points. Grace Cotter was right behind in fifth with 38. Roberts was also fourth in goals

scored with 20. Cotter had 12 assists and was good enough for fifth place. Columbia City defeated Manchester, Garrett, Norwell, New Haven, Wawasee, South Side and Whitko. The Lady Eagles hosted a sectional and had a first round, but fell, 4-3, to Leo in the semifinals. Leo went on to win the sectional. Whitko Whitko’s girls soccer team finished a difficult season with a young and inexperienced team. The Lady Wildcats were still won a pair of conference games against Maconaquah in overtime, and against Peru. Whitko finished in fifth place out of seven teams in the Three Rivers Conference. The team lost to Woodlan, 5-0, in the first round of the Blackhawk Christian sectional. Goaltender Stephanie Baughman tallied 168 saves in the season, which was first most in conference. Freshman Breanna Keirn led the team with five goals and 10 points. TENNIS

Columbia City Columbia City’s boys tennis team capped off its regular season and cruised past Whitko, 5-0, in the Warsaw sectional after a first round bye. The Eagles lost to sectional hosts Warsaw, 5-0, in the sectional championship game. Whitko Whitko’s tennis team was young and struggled this season. But the team will return many netters and improvement is promising for the program under coach Ben Ogden. Whitko had a first round bye in sectional play, then dropped to Columbia City, 5-0, at the Warsaw sectional. Churubusco The Churubusco boys tennis team showed some fight in the regular season, but lost more matches than it won. The team fell to Leo, 5-0, in the first round of the Carroll sectional.

VOLLEYBALL

Columbia City Columbia City’s volleyball team won an invitational this past season, but couldn’t pull off a sectional win in Suzanne Taylor’s first season with the team. Taylor had previously coached the Churubusco volleyball team. The Lady Eagles went 12-18 this season. Their only Northeast 8 Conference win came against New Haven, in which they won, 3-0, Sept. 21. The Lady Eagles defeated North Side to open their season. Two days later They Lady Eagles swept county rival Whitko. Columbia City won a fifth set against Garrett to narrowly defeat the Lady Railroaders, 3-2, on the road. The Lady Eagles won their next game as well by sweeping South Side. Columbia City went on to also beat Churubusco, 3-1, and swept Manchester. The Lady Eagles went for a winning streak in the Wawasee Invitational Tournament and left champions. The Lady Eagles defeated Wawasee, Culver Academies, Garrett and Wabash to secure the invitational. Columbia City picked up a pair of games against New Haven and Canterbury late in the season. The Lady Eagles fell to Leo in the first round of the Angola sectional. Taylor Osborn led the Northeast 8 Conference with 133 blocks. Osborn also had a .201 hitting percentage, which was fifth best in the conference. Osborn led the team with 181 kills. Sarah Pepple had 371 digs, which was fourth best in conference. Shianne Brooke led with 369 assists. Churubusco It was Caitlin Starkey’s first year with Churubusco volleyball, after leaving the Columbia City program. The Lady Eagles went 9-18 this season, and tallied a win in the sectional. Churubusco placed seventh and a record of 4-6 in the

Northeast Corner Conference. The Lady Eagles had a better record than conference foes Garrett, Eastside, Fremont, Lakeland and Hamilton. Melanie Geiger had 283 digs, which ranked fifth in the conference. The Lady Eagles had a pair of winning steaks when they defeated county rival Whitko, 3-2, and beat Bluffton, 3-1, two days later in August. In September, Churubusco traveled to Hamilton and won, 3-0. The Following day, the Lady Eagles won against Canterbury, 3-0. The Lady Eagles hit a difficult stretch of the season when they

dropped five straight games in late September to early November. All in were sweeps to Angola, West Noble, two games to Fairfield and Garrett. Churubusco had a bye in round one of sectional play. Churubusco swept LaVile in the semifinal. The Lady Eagles advanced to the Central Noble sectional final, but fell to Prairie Heights, 3-0. Brooke Nondorf led the Lady Eagles with 102 kills. Senior Ashlie Martz led by hitting 92.9 percent of her serves in play. Martz also led with 36 blocks. Senior Cora Pence racked up 382 assists for the season.

Whitko Whitko’s volleyball had a difficult season as they finished 4-22 for the year. The highlight of the season was when Lady Wildcats topped Peru to jump the Tigers in the Three Rivers Conference standing. Whitko defeated county rival Churubusco, 2-1, September 2 for their first win of the season. They beat Peru, 3-2, three days later. Whitko tallied another win by sweeping Hamilton on the road September 21. The Lady Wildcats were ousted by Wabash in the first round of sectional play. Compiled by Justin Hunter

Book of Lists 2018 BANKING & FINANCE · RE AL E STA TE

·T EC NG HN PLANNI ENT OL · EV OG Y· ARE SER TH C VICE C HEAL OMPANIES ·

$19.95

SPONSORED BY:

The hottest national Indiana Companies ranked with their competitors. A valuable tool for Sales, Prospecting, Job Searches, Fundraising, and Business Research.

Is that the audience you want to reach? Advertise in one of the most widely used and respected business resources in the region, providing year-long exposure for your company. To find out more or to place an ad, call (260) 426- 2640 x3324 Issue date: 12/22/17 Ad deadline: 11/16/17 Sponsored By:

Your advertising can reach a larger audience for less! KPC Marketing Solutions marketing@kpcmedia.com • 260-426-2640 x 3324


SPORTS

A16 • INwhitleycounty.com

Chris Paul is ‘all in’ By Nicole Minier nminier@kpcmedia.com

CHURUBUSCO — Joining the Churubusco community was one of the most life-changing decisions Chris Paul has made. Last year’s new basketball coach is now the school’s athletic director. Just over a year ago, Paul was released as the Indiana University-Purdue University Fort Wayne women’s basketball head coach. At

that time, he faced a wide range of emotions. “When you spend 15 years at one place and all of the sudden they go in a different direction, you have all kinds of emotions,” Paul said. “I was angry, confused, disappointed, scared, embarrassed — you really don’t know what’s happening.” After giving it some thought, Paul decided he would try to be a high

Smart Employers trust the largest recruitment marketing company in northeast Indiana. > Delivering your recruitment needs to more homes than any other media. > Get your recruitment needs on the top recruitment job boards. > Digital Recruitment plans that directly target your recruitment needs to those with the skills you need. > Social media recruitment. > Direct mail business to consumer opportunity. > Biannual Job Fairs held throughout the region.

Let our employment experts customize a plan for you to reach the largest single audience in northeast Indiana and beyond.

CONTACT US TODAY! 260-347-0400 classifieds@kpcmedia.com

MARKETING

SOLUTIONS

school boys basketball coach somewhere. When the position in Churubusco opened up, he applied and was picked for the job. At the time, he didn’t know the positive impact it would have on his family. “It was tough for us a little over a year ago, and this place gave us a home,” Paul said. Paul’s oldest son, Jalen, was a senior basketball star at Canterbury High School, and decided to switch to Churubusco to play for his father. Paul’s younger children, Jackson and Jersey, also changed schools to Smith Green Community School Corp. Paul led the Eagles’ basketball team to the school’s first ever sectional championship, a feat in its own, but he’s even more excited about the opportunity his new career has given him as a father and husband. As a Division I head coach, Paul traveled often and worked evenings and weekends. Now, he’s always off on Sundays, and drives his children to school every morning with him. He’s even able to have lunch with them every day. “When I look back on it, I know this change was a blessing,” Paul said. “I’ve always been a believer that things happen for a reason, but now I’m 100 percent positive that I wasn’t supposed to be at IPFW anymore — I was supposed to be here. Everything is falling into place better than I could ask for.” After former athletic director Paul Sade stepped down from the athletic

Whitley County • November 2, 2017

New AD continues growth in Churubusco community

director position, Paul decided to throw his hat in the ring. Although Paul didn’t have direct experience as an athletic director, his role as a Division I coach was similar — balancing budgets, athletic paperwork, being in charge of a program. “I felt like I was prepared for it and I looked at it as stepping outside of my normal box of being a basketball coach,” Paul said. “I was excited about the challenge and I feel very fortunate they felt like I could do this job.” SGCS Superintendent Dan Hile said he is especially impressed with the passion and dedication Paul brings. “It is important that he knows what it takes to lead our athletic program,” Hile said. “When he joined us as basketball coach last year, he was committed right off the bat. All three of his kids moved to our district and it’s awesome having them here. They’ve been super involved in all of our programs.” Hile said Paul leads by example and works hard. “The phrase he uses a lot — ‘I’m all in’ — he expects it of his players and he expects it of himself,” Hile said. When Paul came to Churubusco last basketball season, he told the community his goal was to win a sectional championship. “Most people probably didn’t think the sectional would happen so fast, but he told the boys that was his goal,” Hile said. Paul said the transition has been smooth, espe-

NICOLE MINIER

Chris Paul addresses paperwork in the athletic director’s office. Paul took the AD position in September, and is now preparing the boys basketball team for the upcoming season.

cially with the assistance of former AD Paul Sade and athletic secretary Shonda Hogeston, who are all just steps from his office. Sade has returned to his teaching position and continues as ’Busco’s head football coach. “Coach Sade is three steps down the hall from me,” Paul said. “Without him and Shonda, the transition would not be so smooth.” It’s still a learning experience for Paul. He noted two important things he’s learned so far: “You never run out of singles in the ticket booth and you never run out of Mountain Dew in the concession stand,” Paul joked. Paul loves how accepting and helpful the Churubusco community has been to his family. “Everyone around here is so willing to go out of their way to help,” Paul

said. “If I had a nickel for every time someone offered to help, I could have retired already.” Now, he wants to give back. Paul looks at his new position as an opportunity to help students and athletes — an area he has much experience in. “When some talk to me about the issues they’re having, in most cases, I’ve been through similar things,” Paul said. “I can share my experiences with them — what worked and what didn’t work. I’m looking forward to helping them.” More than helping coaches and players, he wants to continue to be part of the community. “It’s not just winning basketball games,” Paul said. “I wanted this job because I felt like I could help more people. I want to be involved in the community. I owe it to the town to give back.”

‘World-famous’ ’Busco pork burgers raise money for athletic teams By Tyler Roebuck troebuck@kpcmedia.com

CHURUBUSCO — As you walk into a Churubusco football game, it is nearly impossible to avoid the wafting smell of meat on the grill and the delectable smoke rising above the field. Every year since the early 2000s, ’Busco football fans have enjoyed the “world-famous” pork burgers at home games. The burgers are not only delicious — they help raise funds for the sports teams that grill them. “Many coaches don’t like doing traditional fundraising,” Athletic Director Chris Paul said. “The teams get a dollar for every one they sell, and people will be buying them anyway. Having the kids do it gives them a sense of accomplishment, especially a month ago

when it was 90 (degrees) out.” While only adults do the grilling, the team members help unwrap the burgers before they go on the grill, place grilled burgers into buns and wrap them in foil. “It’s hard work, but if it gets them an extra shirt or maybe some more softballs, it’s worth a Friday night’s work,” Paul said. Former baseball coach Mark Grove remembers the beginning of the pork burger story. “The Pork Producers of Noble County met with our AD many years ago and they started cooking and then it grew from there,” he said. As the burgers grew in popularity, so too did the energy around them. Announcer Scott Duffett has been a driving force for the burgers.

TYLER ROEBUCK

Members and parents of the Churubusco softball team cook pork burgers at the last football game of the season.

“We’ve been doing pork burgers here for years, and they cook ‘em up just right and they’re delicious. I announce them as the world-famous delicious Churubusco pork burgers because it gets the crowd fired up,” he said. The popularity, Grove

says, is because, “they’re different.” “When they first started out, nobody had ever heard of a pork burger or knew what it was,” he said. “After that, people started liking them, and on a good fall night they taste pretty good going down.”


INwhitleycounty.com • A17

Whitley County • November 2, 2017

Manchester, Whitley YMCA plant the college dream Staff reports

NORTH MANCHESTER — The lawns of Manchester University were filled Sept. 22 with elementary students, each interacting with college students through games, songs, and a multitude of other activities. The event introduced students, some for the very first time, to the dream of becoming a college student. Age-appropriate activities included playing with the Manchester baseball team, improvisational games with the drama department and water games “splashed” throughout the afternoon to keep cool in the hot sun. The event ended with the largest dance party ever held on the Manchester

campus with the 3,000 kids in attendance from the area schools. Most activities intentionally engaged multiple senses to help generate excitement about going to college. Amanda Daniel, community outreach coordinator for the Whitley County YMCA, along with a host of volunteers from both Manchester and the YMCA, as well as parents and teachers, collaborated to emphasize the importance of helping a child realize the dream of going to college. First grade classes from Pierceton Elementary and South Whitley Elementary School were among the students at the event. Megan Downs, a first and

second grade teacher at PES, shared that the event was really about starting the conversation with the students. “The over-arching purpose is to get kids excited about their future and that college is one way to fulfill their dreams,” she said. “It’s a good starting point for the conversation so they know their options when they are ready to go to college.” In addition to attending a college campus visit in first grade, “the community foundation will make available the option to the schools for another college visit in the eighth grade, and every school has College Go Week,” Daniel said.

PHOTOS CONTRIBUTED

Pierceton Elementary School first grade teacher Jasmine Baum gets her class ready for the culminating event “the largest dance party on campus.”

Whitko fall play is Nov. 3-4 Staff reports

SOUTH WHITLEY — Whitko High School and Whitko Middle School will present the play “Fools” by Neil Simon on Nov. 3 and 4. The comedic play takes place in the small village of Kulyenchikov in Ukraine during the late 19th century. This small village has been cursed for 200 years of chronic stupidity and is in desperate need of saving. Coming to save the village is Leon Tolchinsky (Sam Rickerd), a schoolteacher who has landed a job to educate Sophia Zubritsky (Hannah Porter), the daughter of Doctor Zubritsky (Caden Compton) and his wife, Lenya Zubritsky (Rozlyn Bishop). The other cursed characters in this village include: Snetsky (Madi Dyck), the shepherd; Magistrate (Jayda Gregory); Slovitch (Nicole Lawson), the

South Whitley Elementary School students Aylah Grostephon, Lucy Morgan, Kate Long and Jarad Richey listen to a Manchester university student explain the next activity.

CONTRIBUTED

“Fools” stars Hannah Porter and Sam Rickerd pose for a photo during rehearsal.

butcher; Mishkin (Cozette Mengerink), the postwoman; Yenchna (Sophia Eiler), the vendor; Count Gregor Yousekevitch (Isiah Huber); Baklavasky (Dreama Doggendorf), the baker; Broomsky (Zoe Goggin), the street sweeper; Olga (Claire Brandenburg), the wash woman; Katerina (Audra Brandenburg), the veterinarian; Natasha

(Willow Deneve), the dance teacher; Galina (Jessica Ness), the bird catcher; and Anastasia (Mackenzie Licata), the nurse. Take a seat and enjoy the show, but don’t fall under the spell. The show will take place in the Whitko High School Auditorium on Nov. 3 and 4 at 7 p.m. The cost for students is $5 and adults $7.

Banks launches ‘Hoosier Federalism Initiative’ Staff reports

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Congressman Jim Banks, R-Indiana, launched the “Hoosier Federalism Initiative,” a new project he is leading to return power to states and promote federalism. “During my time as a state senator, I worked with Hoosier legislators to advance conservative ideas that have helped Indiana grow and prosper,” Banks said in a recent statenebt. “I am proud of the work we did in Indiana, and the results speak for themselves. However, there is only so much that can be done at the state level. Our founding fathers saw the danger in centralizing

Laura Deckena, a South Whitley Elementary student, smiles bright and is excited for the dance party.

power in one branch of government, and they designed a system that empowers our states to be laboratories of democracy. Unfortunately, we’ve moved away from that model and today Washington has too much power over the lives of every American citizen. We need to return power back to the states and promote federalism. I hope that the Hoosier Federalism Initiative will encourage more state legislators to contact Congress with their ideas on how we can empower our states.” As part of the Hoosier Federalism Initiative, Banks wrote to every member of the Indiana

General Assembly and asked for ideas on how to improve the relationship between the federal government and the states. Banks introduced two bills this year that originated from concerns raised by members of the Indiana General Assembly. Both bills would return power to the states. The first, H.R. 1921, would allow states to award Head Start funding to the pre-K institutions that best fit the needs of low-income children in their state. The second, H.R. 1990, would allow states to commercialize rest areas to create additional funding for state infrastructure.

Business Editor Wanted KPC Media Group Inc. is seeking an editor to oversee the production of a newspaper in northeast Indiana in print and online. Based in Fort Wayne, IN the role is one that requires an organized multitasker who is sociable, deadline driven and has a general interest in data-driven news, community-based journalism and local industries and topics. The editor will be expected to get involved in the community outside the office and represent the publication and company at various events and engagements. The editor will serve as a mentor and resource to a team of reporters. The editor will be a working editor, writing stories weekly as well as editing reporters’ material and coordinating coverage. The editor will be responsible for overseeing the publication’s website in terms of news content, ensure and maintain an active social media presence and coordinate the production of a daily newsletter. The editor will work closely with other KPC Media Group Inc. editors to support, promote and build news coverage across the company. The ideal candidate has a bachelor’s degree in Journalism or equivalent experience, at least seven years of industry experience, excellent problem solving skills and at least two years of management experience. The candidate should have a solid understanding of AP style, Excel and social media. Skills in photography, videography, InDesign and Photoshop are a plus. To apply, please submit resume and cover letter to: hr@kpcmedia.com and list “Editor” in the subject line. KPC Media is a family-owned company offering competitive pay and benefits. EOE/Drug free workplace

We can print anything! Just ask. Satisfaction guaranteed. KPC Print & Design • marketing@kpcmedia.com • 260-347-0400 x 1170


A18 • INwhitleycounty.com

Whitley County • November 2, 2017

Toll Free 1-877-791-7877

E-mail classifieds@kpcmedia.com

KPC Classifieds wc

Open Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Place your ad 24/7 online or by e-mail

AGE GAR LE

Whitley County

SA

inwhitleycounty.com

DEADLINE: 12:00 noon Monday

Serving Whitley County To ensure the best response to your ad, take the time to make sure your ad is correct the first time it runs. Call us promptly to report any errors. We reserve the right to edit, cancel or deny any ad deemed objectionable or against KPC ad policies. Liability for error limited to actual ad charge for day of publication and one additional incorrect day. See complete limitations of liability statement at the end of classifieds.

■ HOMES FOR SALE

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD Toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.media. com

Indiana Classified Advertising Network

■ KPC LIMITATIONS LIMITATIONS OF LIABILITY:

ADOPTION

Classified Line Ads All New Ads, cancellations, and corrections require payment in advance. No Refunds.

ADOPT: Nurturing couple will provide a stable, secure home, full of unconditional love for your baby. Expense paid. Call/ Text 646-983-1623. Lisa and Brian

Check Your Ad Advertisers should check their classified ads in the 1st issue and report errors immediately. No allowance can be made when error(s) do not materially affect the value of the ad. KPC Media is not responsible for damages resulting from error(s). We reserve the right to edit, cancel, or deny any ad deemed objectable or against KPC ad policies. KPC assumes no liability or financial responsibility for typographical errors or for omission of copy, failure to publish or failure to deliver advertising. KPC is not responsible for and you agree to make no claim for specific or consequential damages resulting from or related in any manner to any error, omission, or failure to publish or deliver.

(Your Ad Here)

BUILDING SUPPLIES

■ LAND WANTED Whitley County Wineland Farms is looking for land to rent for 2018 and beyond. Paying top dollar! Please contact: Matt Wineland 260-610-1176 winelandfarms.com

Subscribe Today! 1-800-717-4679

DISCOUNT ROOFING Dimensonal shingles: Only $36 per square ($12 per bundle), Delivery Available. www. CardwellHomeCenter.com, 3205 Madison Avenue, Indianapolis (317) 788-0008.

■ GARAGE SALES Churubusco 8910 E. 375 North Oct. 26, 27 - 8 to 5 Oct. 28 - 8 to 3 Estate Sale 2 Homes Antiques, furn., cherry cabinets, appl., clawfoot tub, kitchen items, Home Decor, great stuff! Cash only.

CAREER TRAINING

Don’t get left in the dark, advertise with us today!

1-877-791-7877 classifieds@kpcmedia.com

AIRLINE CAREERS start here - Get FAA approved Aviation Tech training. Job placement assistance Delta, Southwest, Boeing and many others hire AIM grads. CALL AIM. 888-2423197 FOR SALE MERCHANDISE, SERVICES & MISCELLANEOUS DISH TV. 190 channels. $49.99/mo. For 24 mos.

Ask about exclusive Dish features like Sling and the Hopper. PLUS HighSpeed Internet, $14.95/mo. (Availability and Restrictions apply.) TV for Less, Not less TV! 1-855551-9764 DIRECTV. NFL Sunday Ticket (FREE!) w/Choice All-Included Package. $60/mo for 24 months. No upfront costs or equipment to buy. Ask about next day installation! 1- 800-319-1528 SAVE on internet and TV bundles! Order the best exclusive cable and Satellite deals in your area! If eligible, get up to $300 in Visa Gift Cards. CALL NOW! 1-800-609-2743

Patients Call Health Hotline Now! 1-800-478-7594. Smart Health Dental Insurance. Most dental procedures covered. No waiting periods! Most plans start at about $1 a day! FREE no obligation quote. Call now! 1-866-9712603 HELP WANTED - DRIVERS HOME EVERY WEEK! $5,000 Sign On Bonus, Dedicated Customer, $65K+ Annually and Excellent Benefits Plan! CALL 888-409-6033 www.Drive4Red.com (6 months experience and CDL A required).

HughesNet: Gen4 satellite internet is ultra fast and secure. Plans as low as $39.99 in select areas. Call 1-800-970-2068 now to get a $50 Gift Card!

Class A Flatbed Drivers, 2016 and newer Peterbilt 389’s, Excellent Mileage Bonus Program, Starting up to .52 cpm, Excellent Benefits, Home Weekends, Call 800-648-9915 or www. boydandsons.com

HEALTH

SERVICES

Got Knee Pain? Back Pain? Shoulder Pain. Get a painrelieving brace at little or NO cost to you. Medicare

Struggling with DRUGS or ALCOHOL? Addicted to PILLS? Talk to someone who cares. Call The

Addiction Hope & Help Line for a free assessment 888331-1847 SPORTING GOODS / GUNS & HUNTING / MISCELLANEOUS GUN SHOW!! Greenfield, IN - Oct. 28th & 29th, Hancock County Fairgrounds, 620 North Apple Street, Sat. 9-5, Sun. 9-3 For information call 765993-8942 Buy! Sell! Trade! STEEL BUILDINGS PIONEER POLE BUILDINGS - Free Estimates - Licensed and insured - 2x6 Trusses - 45 Year Warranty Galvalume Steel - 19 Colors - Since 1976 - #1 in Michigan-Call Today 1-800292-0679

You haven’t worn that in three years... It’s time to move on.

Contact the Classified Department today to place your ad.

Fax: 260-347-7281 Toll Free: 877-791-7877 classifieds@kpcmedia.com

■ STORAGE AFFORDABLE BOAT & RV STORAGE. Indoor & Outdoor. Call for details: (574) 371-6255

Turn Your Clutter Into

CASH! Advertise it in the KPC Media Group *SHZZPÄLKZ Just call 1-877-791-7877 or email JSHZZPÄLKZ' RWJTLKPHJVT [VZ\ITP[`V\YHK VUSPUL

BUSINESS SERVICES DIRECTORY

wc

Whitley County inwhitleycounty.com

Call 877-791-7877 to advertise.

SELL YOUR STUFF FAST! Only $12 a week REACH OVER 30,000+ READERS IN WHITLEY COUNTY EACH WEEK BY PLACING YOUR MERCHANDISE FOR SALE AD IN IN WHITLEY COUNTY & THE CHURUBUSCO NEWS. All merchandise for sale ads must be pre-paid. One item per ad, merchandise only. Up to 4 lines for only $12.00 per week. No refunds. Private party only.

Ad deadline: Every Monday at 11 a.m. CALL: 260-347-0400 Today!

Jerry’s Tire Service, Inc. Mastercraft, Firestone & Most Other Brands Family Owned & Operated Since 1977 1045 Business 30 East Columbia City, IN 46725 (260) 244-5927

Margie’s Place

Now on

Celebrating 19 years in business!

Sept. 28 thru Oct. 28

25% off in-stock regular priced Merchandise 20% off in-stock regular priced Furniture (Excluding Daisy Mae’s Merchandise)

Come in and register (w/Purchase) for Drawing

Located at 4380 S 500 E, Columbia City, IN

260-248-8660

Hours: Thurs., Fri., Sat. 10am-5pm

WELL DRILLING 4”-5”-6”-8”-10”-12”

In State Plumb. Lic. No. CP81026273

Kim Wheeler

• Plumbing • Well Repair & Service

Well Service 2”up to12”

Water Well Contractors 7055 N 350 W • Columbia City, IN 46725

(260) 799-5511 800-552-3660

Mossburg Bulldozing 7666 E 900 S, South Whitley, IN 46787

260-229-6909

mossburg.bulldozing@yahoo.com Land Clearing, Fence Rows, Ponds, Water Retention Ponds, Waterways, Wet Lands, Building Pads, Driveways, Drag Line Service, Demolition Work


INwhitleycounty.com • A19

Whitley County • November 2, 2017

Community Calendar Include news of your group, too

Send news of your group to nminier@kpcmedia.com. Items will be selected and edited as space permits.

Nov.

1

3

4

Nov. 1

• Churubusco Town Council holds its regular monthly meeting. Meetings take place the first Wednesday of the month at 6:30 p.m. at Town Hall. • It’s community movie night at the Peabody Public Library at 6 p.m. This month’s movie is “Flubber” staring Robin Williams. Popcorn will be provided.

Nov. 3

• A Holiday bazzar and quilt show sponsored by Whitley County Extension Homemakers will take place at the Whitley County 4-H Center in Columbia City from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. • 80/20 for home-school families comes to the Peabody Public Library at 11 a.m. They will bring products for kids to assemble and reassemble, with several engineering kits available. Register on the library’s website. • The Huntertown Lions Club Benefit Fish and Tenderloin Dinner for Amelia Brinker is 5-7:30 p.m. The all-you-can-eat meal will be held at Lifehouse, formerly The Third Place, at 1601 W. Cedar Canyon Road, Huntertown. The cost is $10 for ages 11 and up, $5 for children ages 2-10 and free for children 2 and under. There will also be single serving fish or tenderloin sandwiches and chips for $5, as well as a silent auction, bake sale and hand-painted signs by Amelia. • The Churubusco American Legion will host a shrimp, tenderloin and bake sale fundraiser from 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Proceeds will go the the Elite Dancers of CSDA to compete in Chicago and Columbus. Delivery is available to local businesses by calliing 693-6263. • Join staff genealogist Tara Simons at the South Whitley Community Public Library for two sessions on family history Nov 3 at 7 p.m. and Nov. 4 at 10 a.m. Nov. 4

• Churubusco H.S.’s senior fundraiser fish fry is 4-7 p.m. in the high school cafeteria. Carry-out is available. The cost is $10 for ages 13 and over, $5 for students ages 5-12 and children 5 and under are free. • Feather Bingo, hosted by American Legion Post 157, begins at 6 p.m. with ham, turkey and chicken prizes. The cost is 50 cents per card or three for $1. Sloppy joes and chips will be served for $3 a plate. Must be 18 years or older to attend. Call 693-6263 for more information. The Legion is located at 115 S. Main St. • The Whitley County Extension Homemakers are hosting their annual Holiday Bazaar and Quilt Show 9 a.m.–3 p.m. on Saturday, Nov. 4, at the Whitley County 4-H Center in Columbia City. Free parking. Free admission. Food provided by Eberhard Lutheran Church to support missions. Over 70 vendors will be selling their craft and holiday items at the Holiday Bazaar. Booth space is still available. One space, 6-feet wide by 8-feet long, is $25. Two spaces are $50. Electrical outlets will be limited. Reservations are accepted on a firstcome, first-serve basis. For more information contact Sheila Schilling, committee chairwoman, at 248-6555. For a copy of the registration form, contact the Purdue Extension Office, 244-7615, 625-3313 or visit extension.purdue.edu/whitley. • A presentation on Post Traumatic Stress Disorder will be hosted at St. John’s Lutheran Church in Columbia City, 2465 W. Keiser Road, 9-11 a.m. The event will address the following questions: What is PTSD? How can I help those going through it? To register, call the church at 244-3712 or email deaconess intern.stjohns@ gmail.com by Oct. 28. Light refreshments will be provided. • A chili dinner hosted by Zion Lutheran Church is 4-7 p.m., hosted by the Board of Outreach. Funds will go toward the LCMS Disaster Fund. The event is open to the public and free-will offerings will be accepted. The meal includes chili, cornbread, drink and

6 7

9 10 11

12

dessert. The church is located at 101 E. North St., Columbia City. • A pancake and sausage breakfast fundraiser will be held at the AmVets in South Whitley from 7:30-10:30 a.m. Tickets are $5 per person, but children under the age of five eat free. Contact Eli Henson at eli.henson@whitko. org for more information.

Church. The meetings are open to the public to receive ideas, or anyone wanting to volunteer in any capacity. There are still openings for costumes and cast organization. Contact Craig or Ginger Crosson at 327-3708. • Churubusco United Methodist Church welcomes veterans for a special recognition during worship at 8:15 and 10:30 a.m. No registration is required. Senior Pastor Kent Lundy is a twice-deployed U.S. Air Force veteran and invites those who can, to wear their military uniform.

Nov. 6

• Whitley County Commissioners holds their regularly scheduled meeting at 1 p.m. in the Whitley County Government Center. The commissioners meet the first and third Monday of the month. Nov. 7

• Whitley County Council holds their regularly scheduled meeting at 8 a.m. in the Whitley County Government Center. Council meets the first Tuesday of the month. • Whitley Water Matters will be the topic of discussion at the Whitley County Patriots meeting, held at the Columbia City Church of the Nazarene, 506 N. Main St., starting at 7 p.m. Whitley Water Matters advocates for responsible stewardship of land, lakes, air and waterways in Whitley County. There will be a discussion on legislation to protect health and environment, and to keep a prosperous economy. • Meet author Kayleen Reusser at the South Whitley Community Public Library at 6:30 p.m. Reussler’s most recent book, “They Did it for Honor: Stories of American WWII Veterans,” was just released. She has also done previous works about Northeast Indiana veterans, including in Whitley County. Nov. 9

• Books & Booze meets at Chapman’s Brewing Company and will discuss the book “Good Omens” by Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman. This event is for ages 21 and over, and will take place at 7 p.m. • Chess Club meets at the South Whitley Community Public Library at 4:30 p.m. Chess players of all abilities and ages are welcome.

14 15 16 18

Nov. 10

• Churubusco’s Student Council will be hosting a Veteran’s Day assembly starting at 2 p.m. The assembly will be in honor of the men and women who have served and who are currently serving in our nation’s armed forces. All military branch veterans and family members are welcome to attend. Veterans are asked to arrive through the front doors of the High School at 1:30pm to check in. Contact Kelsie Graves at GravesK@sgcs.k12.in.us for more information. Nov. 11

• Peabody Public Library holds a movie night at 2 p.m., where they will be showing “Ace in the Hole” starring Kirk Douglas and Jan Sterling. • A dedication for the Vietnam Memorial on the Whitley County Courthouse Square will be held 11-11:30 a.m. at the memorial, on the north side of the Courthouse. Lunch will follow at VFW Post 5582 on East Chicago Street. All are invited. • The Tri-Lakes Lions Club is hosting a Fish and Tenderloin Fry as a fundraiser, 4-7 p.m. at the Tri-Lakes Lions Hall. The cost is $10 for adults, $5 for children ages 6-12 and children 5 and under are free. The price includes an all-you-can-eat dinner, beverage and dessert. Carryout dinners are also available. Gaerte’s Frying Service is providing the meal. Proceeds generated from the event will go toward the Lions District projects and other local Lions’ projects. • Art in the Alley takes place the second Saturday of each month adjacent to the Whitley County Government Center from 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. The event features local artisans and their hand crafted artwork for sale. For more information, email jenniferbeezley@hotmail.com. Nov. 12

• The Whitley County Community Christmas Celebration will host a meeting at 4 p.m. at Columbia City United Methodist

19 24 25 26

Nov. 14

• Columbia City Common Council holds their regularly scheduled meeting at Town Hall. Meetings are on the second and fourth Tuesday of every month at 6 p.m. Nov. 15

• Cook Talk and Taste at the Peabody Public Library features a lesson by Jill Daniel on cooking for a crowd. The event starts at 6 p.m. in community rooms A&B, and registration is required. • Classics at the Library brings the 1939 film “Mr Smith goes to Washington,” to the South Whitley Community Public Library. The movie starts at 12:15 p.m. Nov. 16

• Passport to taste at the South Whitley Community Public Library brings kids to Greece to learn about Greek culture and try to make a Greek-inspired recipe at 4 p.m. Nov. 18

• Churubusco Main Street will sponsor a bus trip to Chicago. The bus leaves the PNC Bank parking lot at 7:30 a.m. and will travel to downtown Chicago in the Michigan Avenue area for shopping, sight seeing or take other transportation to other areas of Chicago. En-route, donuts, coffee and water will be served. There will also be raffles, including a 50/50 drawing. The bus will depart for Churubusco at 6 p.m. The cost for the trip is $40 per person. Tickets can be purchased at K&K Video and Books, 128 N. Main St., Churubusco. • The Duchy of Somerset, part of the Adrian Empire comes to the Peabody Public Library to demonstrate classical knights and ladies from 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. • A thanksgiving dinner for all Whitko school district residents will be held at the former Brownstone on State Restaurant from 11 a.m.- 1 p.m. While the dinner is offered free of charge, reservations are required. To reserve a spot, call Marta Hawkins at 229-4002 or email her at mvhawk44@gmail.com. • A biscuits and sausage gravy breakfast will be hosted by West Point United Methodist Church, 4980 N. Etna Road, 7:30-10:30 a.m. The meal is offered for a free-will donation and also includes scrambled eggs, fried potatoes and a drink. Nov. 19

• Churubusco United Methodist Church will host Tim Bloom, of Bloom, Gates, Shipman and Whiteleather, to discuss the basics of wills and estates, and will give valuable information on how to leave the most assets to the people and institutions you care about. The event is 9:30-10:20 a.m. at the church. Nov. 24

• Small Business Friday and Saturday in the Churubusco occurs on Nov. 24-25. Nov. 25

• A tree lighting ceremony starts at 6 p.m. in downtown Churubusco. Nov. 26

• The Whitley County Community Christmas Celebration will host a meeting at 4 p.m. at Columbia City United Methodist Church. The meetings are open to the public to receive ideas, or anyone wanting to volunteer in any capacity. There are still openings for refreshments, publicity, costumes and cast organization. Contact Craig or Ginger Crosson at 327-3708.


A20 • INwhitleycounty.com

Whitley County • November 2, 2017

Fine Dining • Lunch & Dinner Steaks • Ribs • Pasta • Seafood

Full Bar with Daily Drink & Lunch Specials

111 South Main Street Downtown Columbia City

260-244-4011

Hours: Sun. 11 a.m.-8 p.m.; Mon.-Wed. 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; Thurs.-Sat. 11 a.m.-10 p.m.

VOTED WHITLEY COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE’S EMPLOYER OF THE YEAR! Thank you to all of our employees and patrons!

WHERE FOOD AND FRIENDS BECOME FAMILY THURSDAY NIGHT All-You-Can Eat Spaghetti FRIDAY NIGHT All-You-Can Eat Fish SATURDAY NIGHT Dinner Specials Breakfast Served ALL DAY EVERYDAY 602 S. Main Street, Columbia City

(260) 244-6388 Serving Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner Mon.-Wed. 5:30 a.m.-2:00 p.m. Thurs.-Sat. 5:30 a.m.-9:00 p.m. Sun. 5:30 a.m.-2:00 p.m.

In|Whitley County Nov. 2, 2017  
In|Whitley County Nov. 2, 2017