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HOLIDAY EDITION

Duck Dynasty character to make appearance at weekend car show in Auburn

Weather Cloudy, high 31. Tonight’s low 20. Friday’s high in the mid-30s. Page A11

Page A10

Angola, Indiana

THURSDAY & FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 28 & 29, 2013

GOOD MORNING Fremont library to host holiday events FREMONT — The Fremont Public Library is gearing up for the holidays with free events. On Saturday, Dec. 7, library staff will be at the Fremont American Legion from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. after Santa rolls into town. Children can make a craft and a gift book. The event is sponsored by the Fremont Chamber of Commerce. Afterward that day, the library will show the 91-minute long PG-rated movie, “Planes,” at 1 p.m. Free popcorn will be served. Bring blankets and pillows for comfort. A major day of activity will take place Saturday, Dec. 14 starting with a holiday movie fest from 2-4 p.m. Titles will include “The Night Before Christmas,” “Merry Madagascar,” “How the Grinch Stole Christmas,” “Christmas with the Chipmunks” and more. Popcorn will be provided. Bring blankets and pillows. At 2 p.m. that day, guitarist and singer Mike Conley will perform a selection of Christmas music in his own mellow jazzy style near the fireplace. Reindeer will visit the library as part of a holiday workshop 2-4 p.m. also. Children can see live reindeer and then have fun making seasonal crafts and activities. For more details, call 495-7157 or visit fremont.lib. in.us.

More people cozy up to idea of bus travel CHICAGO — With comfy seats that have more leg room than airplanes and Wi-Fi Internet connections, more people are finding that bus travel, particularly this holiday season, suits them just fine, especially with tickets costing as little as $1. READ MORE ON PAGE A6

ONLINE CALENDAR Find out what’s going on in the area this weekend kpcnews.com

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Travelers slowed, not stopped PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — A wet and blustery storm along the East Coast made driving hazardous and tangled up hundreds of flights Wednesday in the middle of the Thanksgiving travel frenzy but didn’t cause the all-out gridlock many had feared. Many travelers marveled at how orderly and anxiety-free the airports were during what is typically one of the busiest days of the year.

One big question lingered in New York: Will high winds ground Snoopy and the other giant cartoon-character balloons at the Macy’s parade today? The storm for the most part unleashed wind-driven rain along the Northeast’s heavily populated Interstate 95 corridor from Richmond, Va., to the tip of Maine. Emerging from the weather gantlet was Katie Fleisher, who

made it by car from Portsmouth, N.H., through rain and fog to Boston’s Logan Airport with little trouble and discovered to her amazement that the panicked, cranky crowds she expected were nonexistent. “We thought it would be busier here. But there’ve been no lines, and it has been really quiet all morning,” said Fleisher, whose plan was to fly to Pittsburgh. “Our flight is still on time, but

we are checking the app every couple minutes,” she said. “We are nervous, as we are traveling with two 1-year-olds, and any extra time on a plane would be horrible.” The storm was expected to heap around 6 inches of snow onto parts of West Virginia and western Pennsylvania and up to a foot in a pocket of upstate New York. On Wednesday, damaging SEE TRAVELERS, PAGE A11

Steuben home sales remain strong

Shooting For Saturday Shoppers

FROM STAFF REPORTS

MIKE MARTURELLO

Tracy Boyer, owner of Calicos & Collectibles, Angola, poses in her shop on Tuesday. Boyer will be taking part in Small Business Saturday to kick off the holiday shopping season. This

year, Boyer is marking her 25th year of offering shopping at Christmastime in downtown Angola.

Small businesses hope to lure customers into their stores BY LINDA LIPP llipp@kpcmedia.com

They won’t be open on Thanksgiving and they can’t afford to offer the kind of door-buster holiday bargains the chain stores do, but small, independent merchants are luring customers by offering joint promotions, niche products and a level of service the majors can’t match. “With us, the building of the relationship is first and foremost,” said Kristi Moeller, owner of Moe’s Bikes & More in Auburn. Moe’s is one of a number of northeast Indiana businesses

participating in Small Business Saturday on Nov. 30. This is the fourth year for the American Express Co. promotion nationwide, and the second year for Moeller. “It was not as good as we hoped it would be last year, but then it’s still fairly new. This year, it seems like people are talking more about it,” she said. Cindy Shay, owner of Peekers in Auburn, had a better experience in 2012. “It was a very busy day. It was a very good day,” she said. “It seems like it gets bigger and better every year,” agreed Tracy Boyer, owner of Calicos

& Collectibles in downtown Angola. This year, as it happens, all of Angola’s businesses also are holding their holiday open houses on Nov. 30, “so it really worked out nicely,” Boyer said. Thanksgiving weekend, the official start of the holiday sales season, can be problematic for small businesses, Boyer reflected. In her 25 years of experience in retail, shoppers are more likely to flock to the big-box stores for the bargains that small businesses can’t even begin to match, “and then we get busier the closer it gets to SEE SMALL, PAGE A11

INDIANAPOLIS — The existing home market in Indiana is showing strong signs of recovery, said the president of the Indiana Association of Realtors. The number of existing, singlefamily homes sold statewide last month increased 3.7 percent when compared with October 2012. The median sale price of those 6,318 homes is $121,000 – a 3 percent increase from the same month of last year, said the monthly Indiana Real Estate Markets Report released by the association on Tuesday. “With just two months left in the year, it’s safe to say 2013 has been remarkable for residential real estate,” said Kevin Kirkpatrick, 2013 president of the state association. “Significant gains in both sales and prices were made in many markets across the state. Consumers feel empowered by low prices and interest rates, but on the other hand, sellers are starting to have an advantage.” Locally, for the year to date through October, LaGrange and Steuben counties continue to show gains over 2012 while DeKalb and Noble counties are lagging behind. Home prices locally are mixed, with DeKalb and Noble counties showing increases and LaGrange and Steuben showing slight declines. For the year, Steuben County has seen 419 existing home sales compared to 368 for the same period in 2012, an increase of 13.9 SEE REAL ESTATE, PAGE A11

45 S. Public Square Angola, IN 46703

Recyclone returns!

Phone: (260) 665-3117 Fax: (260) 665-2322 Classifieds: (toll free) (877) 791-7877 Circulation: (800) 717-4679

Unlike the real action hero, new book doesn’t come with tights

Index • Classified...............................................C5-C6 Life.................................................................A8 Obituaries.....................................................A4 Opinion .........................................................A5 TV.................................................................. C4 Sports.................................................... B1-B3 Weather.....................................................A11

BY DAVE KURTZ dkurtz@kpcmedia.com

Vol. 156 No. 328

LOU ANN HOMAN

Lee Sauer of Angola has published a book marking the 25th anniversary of his Recyclone cartoon character, which inspired a live show that ran for 12 years.

GATSBY

29th Annual

Saturday, December 7, 2013 at 8:30 PM

ANGOLA — Twenty-five years ago, Lee Sauer drew his first Recyclone cartoon for KPC Media Group newspapers. Sauer, of Angola, is marking the occasion by publishing “Recyclone Returns,” a 180-page, large-format book collecting all of his cartoon panels along with amusing stories involving the imaginary superhero. Along the way, Recyclone became more than imaginary. A physical representation of

the environmental muscleman appeared at hundreds of school assemblies and other gatherings to promote recycling for a dozen years before retiring. As a new reporter for KPC in 1988, Sauer found inspiration for Recyclone when he covered a recycling group started by Karen Farlow of Auburn. She asked if he could place weekly reminders about recycling in the newspaper. “On the walk back … I thought of a bumbling superhero. I even had the name Recyclone in my SEE RECYCLONE, PAGE A11

Cameron Hospital Benefit Ball Potawatomi Inn, Pokagon State Park

Hors d’oeuvres & Cash Bar Entertainment by Trine Jass Band followed by Blammo Make reservations at www.cameronmch.com


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THE HERALD REPUBLICAN

AREA • STATE •

kpcnews.com

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

Prairie Heights students learn to stay safe Grants honor Taylor Fourth-grade students at Prairie Heights Elementary School learned about safety on Friday. Practicing cardio-pulmonary resuscitation on a mannequin are, from left, Jazlyn Green, Karlie Hartman, Skylar Clingan, a Prairie Heights High School senior, and Meiah Penick.

BY JENNIFER DECKER jdecker@kpcmedia.com

BRUSHY PRAIRIE — Safety was the focus of Prairie Heights Elementary School fourthgraders’ lessons Friday. The LaGrange County American Red Cross Advisory Council and various LaGrange County emergency and law enforcement agencies taught students various hands-on safety pointers. The lessons were coordinated with grade-level new curriculum. Stroh Fire Department Assistant Chief Tyler Terry and two of his colleagues taught fire safety. “We talked about smoke detectors and basic things to do before we get” to an emergency, he said. He reminded students to change the batteries in their smoke detectors twice a year in spring and fall during the time changes. Jo Schrader, LaGrange County American Red Cross Advisory Council operations coordinator, taught students how to help a choking victim. While standing behind the victim, Schrader instructed students, “Find their bellybutton and make your fist and put your hand over the fist. If it’s a bigger person, what would be a better thing? Get a chair.” One boy was working on a choking simulation with a girl as a victim. He grimaced at having to touch her bellybutton for the exercise and laughed. This is the second year the safety day was held at Prairie Heights. All LaGrange County fourth-graders receive the instruction. “My eye-opener last year was kids who didn’t know their addresses,” said Jean

JENNIFER DECKER

McKinley of the LaGrange County American Red Cross Advisory Council. “It’s a group effort to go to all the elementary schools in LaGrange County.” Another popular lesson involved dogs and safety. Members from Ark Animal Sanctuary brought their rescue dogs to mingle with students. Sue Keenan with the rescue sanctuary brought Buddy, a salt-and-pepper-colored schnoodle, that was getting sleepy from all the student attention. She was accompanied by Patrick Redmond, who brought along his two rescue pugs, Pip and Daphne. The pair talked about dog nutrition and health, how to approach a dog and what to do if

one is chased by a dog. Members of Prairie Heights High School’s National Honor Society accompanied groups of fourth-graders to different safety classes. Schrader said she hoped students learned during an emergency “to get a sense to stay calm, and then they can act as a group.” LaGrange County Sheriff’s Deputy Chief Deputy Jeff Campos co-coordinated the day with help from Schrader and Carol Malott, Parkview Emergency Medical Services. “It’s about comfortability with officers and dispatchers so (students) don’t get scared and are more comfortable,” Campos said. “We’re here to help them 90 percent of the time.”

Police Blotter • Woman arrested for contempt of court ANGOLA — A Jackson, Mich., woman was arrested by a Steuben County Sheriff’s deputy on a civil charge of contempt of court on Tuesday. Merissa L. Pinson, 35, was arrested at the Steuen County Jail. Bail was set at $1,000.

THE HERALD REPUBLICAN The Herald Republican (USPS 521-640). 45 S. Public Square, Angola, IN 46703 Established 1857, daily since 2001 ©KPC Media Group Inc. 2013

DELIVERY SERVICE — MISSED/ DAMAGED NEWSPAPERS If your newspaper was damaged or had not been delivered by 6:00 a.m. Monday through Friday or 7 a.m. Saturday and Sunday, call customer service by 10 a.m. and we will ensure a replacement copy is delivered to you.

CIRCULATION CUSTOMER SERVICE TELEPHONE HOURS 1-800-717-4679 Monday through Friday 6 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday 7 a.m.-10 a.m. Published by KPC Media Group Inc. at 102 N. Main St., Kendallville, IN 46755. Published every day except New Year’s Day, Memorial Day, July 4th, Labor Day, day after Thanksgiving and Christmas Day. Periodical postage paid at Kendallville, IN 46755 and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to: The Herald Republican, P.O. Box 39, Kendallville, IN 46755

Booth Christmas Tree Farm Open Nov. 29 through Dec. 23 Open 9:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m. Everyday • Fresh Christmas Trees (Pre-cut or U-cut)

• Wreaths

• Boughs

• Garlands • Live Potted Trees • Tree Moving

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

Students donate to Turning Point

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Hendry Park Elementary School students held their annual food drive to benefit the Turning Point Homeless Shelter of Steuben County. Each year the student council organizes a school-wide donation program where all students are encouraged to bring in food items to the stock shelter’s pantry for homeless people looking for temporary room and board,

as they make a turning point in their lives. Pictured on Friday with a cart loaded with boxes of food to be transported to the shelter are students, from left, Aubree Craig, Chloe Park, and Devin Mitman. Behind them are John Stevenson, Turning Point Director, and board members Barbara Yoder, Fred Wooley and Mike Hesterman.

BY JENNIFER DECKER jdecker@kpcmedia.com

ANGOLA — Two conservation grants are available at the Steuben County Community Foundation for public charities, including school systems. Ralph Taylor Conservation Fund offers two $1,000 grants to those eligible in Allen, Adams, DeKalb, Huntington, LaGrange, Noble, Steuben, Wells and Whitley counties. The grant program intends to distribute funds to nonprofit organizations and/or school teachers interested in introducing outdoor recreation and conservation to young people who have limited or no experience with natural resource opportunities. Eligible projects should engage middle school or high school-aged students in learning about Indiana’s fish, forest, wildlife and natural habitats and their conservation. The approved grant activities should be completed between April 1Nov. 30, 2014. The fund was established in 2003 in recognition of Ralph Taylor’s dedicated service of more than 30 years as an Indiana Conservation Officer with the Indiana Department of Natural Resources. It is designed as a lasting and meaningful tribute to his dedication and passion to conserve our natural resources for the benefit of outdoor recreational activities. The grant application submitted should have the following information: Organizations name, address, and phone number; grant facilitator’s name; grant project name; project summary and budget; how the project relates to outdoor recreation and/or conservation; how the project will actively engage students with hands-on experiences and how the project will support science and other academic concepts. Grant proposals should be submitted by Feb. 21, 2014, to: Jennifer Danic, Steuben County Community Foundation, 1701 N. Wayne St., Angola, IN 46703. Grants will be evaluated and awarded no later than March 21, 2014. For more details, call 665-6656 or email jdanic@ steubenfoundation.org.


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AREA • NATION •

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

Deaths & Funerals • Richard Gienger

New Haven; and a sisterin-law, Annette Anglin of AVILLA — Richard Kendallville. Joseph ‘‘Dick’’ Gienger, He was also preceded age 76, of Avilla died on in death by his sister and Tuesday, November 26, brother-in-law, Dorothy 2013, at his home. and Ben Edsall; a brother, Mr. Gienger was born Merlin “Mert” Gienger; in Kendallville, Indiana, his granddaughter, Tracey on May 2, VanScoder; and a brother1937, to the in-law, Lloyd Heller. late John Visitation will be Friday, Frederick November 29, 2013, from Gienger and 4-8 p.m. at Hite Funeral Berniece Home in Kendallville. Clara (Keck) Funeral services will Gienger. be Saturday, November He Mr. Gienger 30, 2013, at 11 a.m. at attended Immanuel Lutheran Church Kendallville in Avilla. There will be an High School where he was hour of calling before the on the basketball team. He funeral service. Officiating married Billie Jean Heller the funeral service will be on June 14, 1958, at the Pastor Patrick Kuhlman. Immanuel Lutheran Church Burial will be at in Avilla and she survives Immanuel Lutheran him. Cemetery in Avilla. Dick worked for Newnam Preferred memorials Foundry in Kendallville for may be made to Immanuel 19 years. He was a truck Lutheran Church Cemetery driver with Gage Brothers Fund or to Parkview Noble Construction in Albion Hospice. for ten years and Klink Casketbearers will be Trucking of Ashley for Joshua Hovarter, Jason seven years before retiring Hovarter, Adam King, Ryan in 1997. Gaerte, Darion Turner and He was an active member Shawn Pfefferkorn. of the Immanuel Lutheran Send a condolence to the Church in Avilla where family at hitefuneralhome. he served as an usher and com. a trustee. Dick was also member of the Fraternal Beverly Rickel Order of Eagles Lodge #2455 in Albion where he SEMINOLE, Fla. — held all offices throughout Beverly (Herberger) Rickel the years including Past of Seminole died Friday, Worthy President in the mid Nov. 22, 2013. 1990s. Mrs. Rickel was born He enjoyed bowling, in Kendallville March 18, fishing and camping, 1923, to Frank and Matia NASCAR, IU basketball, (Pankop) Herberger and and Colts football. was a graduate of Avilla Survivors include his High School and North wife, Billie Gienger of Manchester College. Avilla; three daughters, She taught music and Shelia and Randy Hovarter English and played the organ of Kendallville, Johnna and for Lutheran churches in Bob Miller of Avilla and Indiana, Florida and North Pam and Mike Gaerte of Carolina. Avilla; 12 grandchildren: Surviving are her Jamie and Chris Rorick of husband, James; her children, New Haven; Josh Hovarter Garry (Liz), Lynette (Steve), and Tiffani Lemish, both of Renee (Jimmy), and Todd; Kendallville; Jason Hovarter and four grandchildren. and Amanda Cousino, A service was held both of Whitehouse, Ohio; Tuesday at Bethel Lutheran Tiffany and Donte Turner Church in Clearwater, Fla. of Muncie; Joe VanScoder Memorials are to the of Avilla; Sandy and Shawn music ministries at Bethel Pfefferkorn of Auburn; Lutheran Church in Stacy Miller of Fort Wayne; Clearwater, Resurrection Elizabeth and Alex Perry of Lutheran Church, Box 2215, Cleveland, North Carolina; Franklin, N.C., 28744 or Adam and April King of Suncoast Care Center, 6770 Albion; Ryan Gaerte of 102 Ave. N., Pinellas Park, Fort Wayne; Ashlee and Fla. 33782. Lucas Anglin of Albion; and Emilee Gaerte of Avilla; Lynnae Figel 20 great-grandchildren; 2 HOWE — Lynnae E. great-great-grandchildren; Figel, 37, of Howe died two sisters, Carolyn and Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2013, at Wilbur Getts of Kendallher home. ville and Joan and Frank Visitation will be from 3-6 Young of Churubusco; a p.m. Saturday at Carney-Frost sister-in-law, Patty Gienger Funeral Home in LaGrange. of Kendallville; his motherFuneral services will be at in-law, Marie Heller of 11 a.m. Sunday at the funeral Avilla; a brother-in-law, home. Robert and Jean Heller of Burial will be in Kentucky LaGrange; sister-in-law, at a later date. Linda and Larry Thiele of

Stephen Binkley

Linda Wenger

CORUNNA — Stephen Lawrence Binkley, 58, of Corunna died Tuesday, Nov. 26, 2013, at his home. Mr. Binkley was a graduate of Franklin High School in Coldwater, Mich. He was born in Angola on Jan. 21, 1955, Mr. Binkley to James Franklin and Alice Carolyn (Williams) Binkley Survivors include his spouse, Holly Marie Jefferson of Corunna; two daughters, Nancy Binkley of Corunna and Martha Binkley of Corunna; a son, James Binkley of Catonsville, Md.; nine grandchildren; a brother, Wayne Binkley of Battle Creek, Mich.; two sisters, April Conley of Coldwater, Mich, and Nancy Binkley of Tennessee; and his motherin-law, Bonnie Jefferson of Corunna. He was also preceded in death by his son, Levy Lane Binkley, who died July 29, 2013, and his grandson, Austin Michael Hayes, who died in 2005. Funeral services and visitation will be Saturday at Hite Funeral Home in Kendallville. Visitation will be from 11 a.m. to noon, with the funeral service beginning at noon. Burial will be at Orange Cemetery near Rome City. Preferred memorials are to family. Send a condolence to the family at hitefuneralhome. com.

MIDDLEBURY — Linda R. Wenger, 66, of Middlebury died Monday, Nov. 25, 2013, at the Maples at Waterford Crossing, Goshen. Visitation will be from 5-8 p.m. Friday at MillerStewart Funeral Home in Middlebury. Funeral services will be at 10 a.m. Saturday at the First United Methodist Church, Middlebury. Burial will be in Grace Lawn Cemetery, Middlebury. Memorials are to the American Cancer Society.

Rev. Charles Smith Sr. NEW PORT RICHEY, Fla. — Rev. Charles Smith Sr. of New Port Richey and formerly of Fort Wayne, Ind., died Friday, Nov. 22, 2013, in Trinity, Fla. Rev. Smith was the pastor of Fellowship Baptist Church of New Port Richey. He had served Fort Wayne Baptist Temple for 38 years before moving to Florida. Surviving are a brother John of Palm Bay, Fla.; his wife, Betty Smith; a son Charles Jr. (Karen) of Huntertown; three daughters, Deborah Smith and Connie (Larry) Elder of Fort Wayne and Tammy (David) Cook of Garrett; eight grandchildren; and one great-grandchild. A celebration of life will be Sunday at 4 p.m. at Pathway Community Church, 11910 Shearwater Run, Fort Wayne. Memorials are to the family.

Janet Baylis MIDDLEBURY — Janet Charlene Baylis, 70, of Middlebury died Monday, Nov. 25, 2013, at the Maples Rehabilitation Center at Waterford Crossing, Goshen. Visitation will be from noon to 3 p.m. Monday, followed by a memorial service, at Miller-Stewart Funeral Home in Middlebury. Memorials are to Riley Children’s Hospital.

Obituary Policy • KPC Media Group daily newspapers (The News Sun, The Star and The Herald Republican) do not charge for death notices that include notice of calling hours, date and time of funeral and burial, and memorial information. An extended obituary, which includes survivors, biographical information and a photo, is available for a charge. Deadline for funeral homes placing obituaries is 5 p.m. for next day publication. The email address is obits@kpcmedia.com. Submitted obituaries must contain the name and phone number of the funeral home. For information, contact Jan Richardson at 347-0400, ext. 131.

Wall Street • BY THE ASSOCIATED PRESS

Thursday’s Close: Dow Jones Industrials High: 16,107.99 Low: 16,057.34 Close: 16,097.33 Change: +24.53 Other Indexes Standard&Poors 500 Index: 1807.23 +4.48 NYSE Index: 10,182.99 +15.09 Nasdaq Composite Index: 4044.75 +27.00 NYSE MKT Composite: 2371.46 —0.35 Russell 2000 Index: 1141.33 +6.80

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Cleveland and Lisa Cox talk to their attorney, as they turn themselves in to the Butler County Jail in Hamilton, Ohio, Nov. 15. Authorities say the couple returned their 9-year-old adopted son to the county after raising him since infancy. Both been charged with abandoning the child.

Court papers: Ohio boy not told he’d be given up HAMILTON, Ohio (AP) — A couple accused of abandoning the adopted 9-year-old son they raised from infancy didn’t tell him they were giving him to child welfare officials, according to documents filed by a prosecutor. Court documents filed in Butler County Common Pleas Court in Hamilton say the boy’s mother thought he was a threat to the family’s safety. Lisa Cox, 52, and her husband, Cleveland Cox, 49, pleaded not guilty Wednesday to misdemeanor charges of nonsupport of dependents. Authorities allege the couple, from Butler County’s Liberty Township, left the boy with children’s services after saying he was displaying aggressive behavior and earlier threatened the family with a knife. Documents filed by the prosecutor say the parents didn’t tell the boy when they left him with children’s services on Oct. 24 that he wouldn’t be returning home. The boy believed he was going to a hospital to be “fixed,” according to the documents. The boy was left with a bag containing some clothes and a handwritten letter from Lisa Cox in which she said that she loved him and would never forget him. “It breaks my heart that you can no longer be a part of our family,” she wrote. She also said she was praying that God would

Lotteries • INDIANAPOLIS — These are the winning numbers drawn Wednesday: Indiana: Midday: 8-6-2 and 6-8-8-2. Evening: 8-2-7 and 9-1-8-7. Complete lottery results were not available at press time.

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take care of the boy and would find the “perfect family” to love him. County prosecutor Michael Gmoser declined to comment on Wednesday. The couple’s attorney, Anthony VanNoy, said the case involves “very difficult issues.” The couple also had been scheduled for a hearing in juvenile court Wednesday on a civil complaint filed by the county’s children’s services agency. The magistrate granted VanNoy’s request to delay that hearing until after the criminal case is concluded. National adoption advocates say failed adoptions or dissolutions are rare in cases in which children were raised from infancy and such discord seems to occur more often with youths adopted at older ages. People within the adoption community say they worry about emotional trauma to the boy. They say giving up a child after so much time is rare and undermines the stability and commitment that adopted children need. Attorney Adolfo Olivas, appointed by the court to protect the boy’s interests, declined to comment Wednesday. He has said the emotionally hurt and confused child is now receiving help that the parents should have gotten for him. Each parent could face up to six months in jail and a $1,000 fine if convicted. Trial is scheduled for Feb. 10.

Powerball: 18-25-50-5557. Powerball: 17. Ohio: Midday: 4-1-1, 1-1-8-9 and 6-4-8-0-2. Evening: 9-5-2, 5-7-0-8 and 7-6-9-1-5. The Kicker: 1-1-1-9-7-1. Rolling Cash 5: 19-20-26-27-36. Classic Lotto: 9-18-21-23-25-39. Michigan: Midday: 1-2-3 and 4-6-8-2. Daily: 7-6-0 and 3-4-3-5. Fantasy 5: 04-12-15-21-22. Classic Lotto 47: 13-17-19-34-3847. Keno: 15-16-23-27-2830-33-36-45-49-50-52-5761-63-64-65-67-71-73-7577.

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

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Lincoln proclaimed ‘day of Thanksgiving and Praise’ The following is the “Proclamation of Thanksgiving” issued by President Abraham Lincoln on Oct. 3, 1863. The year that is drawing towards its close, has been filled with the blessings of fruitful fields and healthful skies. To these bounties, which are so constantly enjoyed that we are prone to forget the source from which they come, others have been added, which are of so extraordinary a nature, that they cannot fail to penetrate and soften even the heart which is habitually insensible to the ever watchful providence of Almighty God. In the midst of a civil war of unequaled magnitude and severity, which has sometimes seemed to foreign States to invite and to provoke their aggression, peace has been preserved with all nations, order has been maintained, the laws have been respected and obeyed, and harmony has prevailed everywhere except in the theatre of military conflict; while that theatre has been greatly contracted by the advancing armies and navies of the Union. Needful diversions of wealth and of strength from the fields of peaceful industry to the national defence, have not arrested the plough, the shuttle or the ship; the axe has enlarged the borders of our settlements, and the mines, as well of iron and coal as of the precious metals, have yielded even more abundantly than heretofore. Population has steadily increased, notwithstanding the waste that has been made in the camp, the siege and the battle-field; and the country, rejoicing in the consciousness of augmented strength and vigor, is permitted to expect continuance of years with large increase of freedom. No human counsel hath devised nor hath any mortal hand worked out these great things. They are the gracious gifts of the Most High God, who, while dealing with us in anger for our sins, hath nevertheless remembered mercy. It has seemed to me fit and proper that they should be solemnly, reverently and gratefully acknowledged as with one heart and one voice by the whole American People. I do therefore invite my fellow citizens in every part of the United States, and also those who are at sea and those who are sojourning in foreign lands, to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next, as a day of Thanksgiving and Praise to our beneficent Father who dwelleth in the Heavens. And I recommend to them that while offering up the ascriptions justly due to Him for such singular deliverances and blessings, they do also, with humble penitence for our national perverseness and disobedience, commend to His tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers in the lamentable civil strife in which we are unavoidably engaged, and fervently implore the interposition of the Almighty Hand to heal the wounds of the nation and to restore it as soon as may be consistent with the Divine purposes to the full enjoyment of peace, harmony, tranquility and Union. In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and caused the Seal of the United States to be affixed. President Abraham Lincoln

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All letters must be submitted with the author’s signature, address and daytime telephone number. We reserve the right to reject or edit letters on the basis of libel, poor taste or repetition. Mail letters to: The News Sun 102 N. Main St. P.O. Box 39 Kendallville, IN 46755 Email: dkurtz@ kpcmedia.com The Star 118 W. Ninth St. Auburn, IN 46706 Email: dkurtz@ kpcmedia.com The Herald Republican 45 S. Public Square Angola, IN 46703 Email: mmarturello@ kpcmedia.com

Letters to The Editor • Program director for Common Grace thankful for many blessings To the editor: It has been one year since my official start date as the program director of Common Grace Ministries of Noble County. The year has flown by and I have remembered the Rev. Dr. Dan Barker’s words to me when I was first hired. He said I would be as blessed by the work as those receiving the services. He was so right. The stories are many of people being touched by the services of Common Grace and I am touched by the generosity of the people of Noble County and the people who come to our offices. I am blessed with a staff that will not stop until they have exhausted every avenue to assist the people who come. The partnerships that we have formed with other agencies and organizations in the past year have given me the absolute pleasure of working with the leadership of Noble County and that is a blessing. I have had the opportunity to worship with many congregations of several denominations and I can tell you that when it comes to reaching out to people in need, there are no denominational lines. Recently I worshiped with St. Mark’s Lutheran Church in Albion. They not only

give us office space in their building, but the entire congregation laid hands on me and prayed for my leadership and for Common Grace. Here is where I run short on words. How do you put that kind of blessing into words? All I can say is “Thank you, Jesus!” I have been blessed to the depth of my soul this year. I look forward to a life of service, in the name of the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit. Angie Kidd Program director, Common Grace Ministries of Noble County

grateful to everyone. Thank you to Steuben County EMS, Angola Fire Department, Volley 4 A Cure, Stick it for a Cure, Delta Waterfowl/DeKalb County Penny’s from Heaven, Wild Turkey Federation, high school soft ball teams, Angola American Legion, Fremont American Legion, Fremont Moose Riders, Ashley/Hudson Lions Club and Fremont Women of the Moose. Candy Oliver and the Board of Directors of the Steuben County Cancer Association Angola

Steuben County Cancer Association gives heartfelt thanks

Thank you to Save the Strand 5K supporters

To the editor: The month of November is rolling along and Christmas is around the corner. The Steuben County Cancer Association would like to take this time to give our heartfelt thanks to everyone that has donated, volunteered, had a fundraiser or just sent a card to tell us you were thinking about us. Our association has grown this year by leaps and bounds. We could not take care of the local cancer patients if it wasn’t for the giving hearts of Steuben County and surrounding counties. Thank you to each and every one of you. If we miss a name, please realize that we are

To the editor: I would like to thank the community for their support of the Save The Strand 5K Saturday, Nov. 23! We had an amazing turn out, especially with the extra cold temperatures. It was great seeing so many people come together for a great cause! Special thanks to the following sponsors: Kraft Foods Group, Campbell & Fetter Bank, Staffmark, RunID, City Of Kendallville and Mr. B’s Sports & Design Inc. Teela Gibson, race coordinator Kendallville

Well-kept home has a certain ‘aire’ Stacy tries to keep her house neat and clean. When a neighbor girl came over to play with Josh, 8, and other kids, she said to Josh, “You guys have such a nice place. Your mom must be a thousand-aire!” (Less than a millionaire, but still quite substantial!) — Gale Spence (grandmother of Josh) of Angola

Deegan, 6, said, “Mom, we need to talk about this shirt.” Beth asked, “What do we need to talk about … I love that shirt.” Deegan replied, “Mom, the arms are freakishly short. This is the last time I’m wearing it.” — Beth Munk of rural Kendallville

Bev’s nephew was approximately 6 or 7 at the time of State-ranked golfer Katie this story. He would come Sharp graduated from East Noble spend the weekend with Aunt last spring. Around the time of Their routine on Sunday GRACE Bev. high school and college graduamorning would be to go to tion ceremonies, First Christian followed by lunch at HOUSHOLDER church Church in Kendallville invited all McDonald’s before driving him the graduates to go to the front of home 45 minutes away. One the church and share their name Sunday on the way home about and future plans. When she was 5 or 10 minutes after leaving handed the microphone, Katie said, “I’m McDonald’s Bev pulled over into a rest Katie Sharp and I’m going to Michigan area. As she looked for a parking spot, her State University to play golf and I don’t nephew asked what they were doing. She know what I’m going to do — my mother told him that she had to use the restroom. always did everything for me!” Needless to From the back seat comes this advice, say, that brought much laughter from the “You should have gone before we left congregation, according to her grandfather McDonald’s.” — Aunt Bev of Syracuse who shared the story. We are happy to report that Katie is doing well in college. Thanksgiving blessings to all readers. — Burt DeRusha of Lake of the Woods in I am grateful for all your stories and kind LaGrange County comments. If you have a story share please

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

Susie Schneider sent this photo. She wrote, “This is my granddaughter Alexia Inman and her dog Rusty sitting on the porch swing smiling for Grandma.

call 347-0738; my new email address is ghousholder@kpcmedia.com. You can also mail stories to me at 816 Mott St., Kendallville, IN 46755. Thank you in advance! GRACE HOUSHOLDER is a columnist and editorial writer for this newspaper. Contact her at ghousholder@kpcmedia.com.

Recovering drug addict creates website of hope On Jan. 13 this year Randy Wooten, 59, of Kendallville, an admitted drug addict, was jailed on drug charges and faced 18 years in prison. “I thought I would never see the outside world, my family or friends ever again,” he said. Wooten started using drugs when he was 17 and continued off and on for about 30 years. He managed to quit most of them on his own except for crystal methamphetamine. “Meth has a way of getting a hold of you and it won’t let go. It drags you down into a dark hole. Though it destroys you physically, it makes you think you feel great and makes you think you can accomplish anything.” He was deep in the dark hole of a jail cell unemployed,

unemployable, no friends, lost Wooten spent 64 days in love, lost family with jail and told his fellow no new beginning in inmates something about the foreseeable future. him had changed. “I won’t say I was ever He learned about a a religious man. I did program that gives a not go to church every second chance for those Sunday, but I did always willing to work at it. believe in God,” said He went to a counseling Wooten. center and lived in a One night while lying house for five INSIDE recovery in his jail cell bunk he months. COMMENT Wooten is now free began to pray. “I asked God to come into my life from meth’s hold on his and take control of my life. He has a full-time life because I had done Dennis Nartker job at a local manufacsuch a lousy job.” turing facility, and his God apparently employer said he’s a responded, according good worker. to Wooten. “It was a That’s not the end of miracle,” he said. “A feeling of this success story. complete peace fell over me. I An idea came to Wooten one was at peace with myself and day how to help other recovering where I was.” drug addicts like him meet

He was deep in the dark hole of a jail cell unemployed, unemployable, no friends, lost love, lost family with no new beginning in the foreseeable future.

• people in similar situations. “No one understands a person in recovery better than a person in recovery,” he said. Wooten searched online forums for people to connect and help each other with their issues. He thought there should be a website where people can

be open and honest with each other. “We will be the passage light for each other, helping each other through our issues by understanding there is hope for tomorrow,” he said. He decided to put a website together for friendships — www.passagelight.com. A relative financially supported Wooten’s venture. He hopes the website can connect people with resources such as recovery and rehabilitation centers. “Bottom line for me is even if I help just one person make a change for a brighter future, passage light will be a success. Everyone deserves a second chance at life.” DENNIS NARTKER is a reporter for The News Sun. He can be reached at dnartker@kpcmedia.com.


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Travelers catch the bus for the holiday CHICAGO (AP) — As millions of Americans hurtle through the jumble of transportation arteries for Thanksgiving, many are discovering that bus travel may be the cheapest, comfiest and even coolest way to stay Zen during the nation’s largest annual migration. After nearly half a century of decline in the bus industry, a new breed of sleek, Wi-Fi-pumping intercity coach is transforming the image of buses as the much-ridiculed travel option of last resort. With free Internet connections, tickets as cheap as $1 and decent legroom, companies such as Megabus.com and BoltBus are luring holiday travelers disenchanted with the hair-pulling rituals of airports and driving. “I’ve been doing it for a couple of years and it is a nice ride,” said theater student Natalie Sienicki, 22, sitting inside a blue double-decker Megabus idling on a windy, snowy street corner near the grand colonnades of Chicago’s Union Station. Her journey on Tuesday was not only cheaper than flying ($56 roundtrip) but also took her all the way to her destination in Ann Arbor, Mich. If she had traveled by air, Sienicki would have had to make a side trip through Detroit.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

Holiday travel blitz on to Sunday FROM STAFF REPORTS

INDIANAPOLIS — Stepped patrols on highways across northeast Indiana and the rest of the Hoosier state will be in effect through Sunday, the Indiana State Police reminded residents in a news release issued Tuesday. The effort to make the upcoming Thanksgiving Holiday travel period safer, the ISP partnered with approximately 250 other law enforcement agencies AP statewide in participating Passengers board a Megabus headed to St. Louis, and Memphis, Tuesday, in the annual Safe Family Travel, Operation Pull in Chicago. Millions of Americans are hurtling along the nation’s jumble Over campaign. The of transportation arteries for Thanksgiving, and more of them are discovering that a bus, of all things, is the cheapest, comfiest and coolest way to campaign began Nov. 8. Police will be stay Zen during the nation’s largest annual human migration. conducting high visibility The new bus services are capitalenforcement efforts each seat. Megabus.com has slapped izing on generational and technological including sobriety check GPS tracking devices on its fleet of shifts: younger urbanites are espousing points and saturation 300 double-decker buses, allowing a car-free lifestyle, and gadget-wielding patrols looking for travelers and the people waiting for travelers of all ages increasingly expect impaired drivers and them on the other end to track the trip to buy tickets online and stay connected unrestrained motorists. in real time with a smartphone app. for the duration of their trip. To help ensure the “Those kinds of things we feel “Young people have no great psycho- really matter,” said Mike Alvich, safety of all motorists during this holiday period, logical connection with the car,” said Megabus.com’s vice president for transportation trends researcher Joseph the Indiana State Police marketing. Such innovations along will also be participating Schwieterman of DePaul University in with the prices, he said, are why in Operation CARE, Chicago. “They just want to get from Megabus.com has enjoyed so much Combined Accident Point A to Point B, and being able to use success pulling people out of their Reduction Effort. The their electronic device on the way is a cars. The company says 30 percent of bonus.” its customers are people who otherwise operation is a federally funded program and will Many new bus carriers offer free would have taken a car for the same allow additional troopers Wi-Fi and have electrical outlets at trip.

to patrol Hoosier roadways through the upcoming holiday weekend. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, safety belt use is the most effective strategy a person can employ to prevent death and minimize injury resulting from traffic collisions. Make the Thanksgiving holiday travel period safe by observing the following safety rules: • when planning to travel, make sure you are well rested; • increase your following distance; remember the two-second rule; • decrease your speed according to traffic and road conditions; • beware of bridges, overpasses and intersections where ice tends to form first in cold inclement weather; • don’t use cruise control on slick roads; • make sure everyone in your vehicle is properly restrained; • pull over and stop to use electronic devices; • have a designated driver; and • move over and slow down for emergency and highway service vehicles.

Let Us Give Thanks This Holiday Season

Thanksgiving in Plymouth In September 1620, a small ship called the Mayflower left Plymouth, England, carrying 102 passengers—an assortment of religious separatists seeking a new home where they could freely practice their faith and other individuals lured by the promise of prosperity and land ownership in the New World. After a treacherous and uncomfortable crossing that lasted 66 days, they dropped anchor near the tip of Cape Cod, far north of their intended destination at the mouth of the Hudson River. One month later, the Mayflower crossed Massachusetts Bay, where the Pilgrims, as they are now commonly known, began the work of

establishing a village at Plymouth. Throughout that first brutal winter, most of the colonists remained on board the ship, where they suffered from exposure, scurvy and outbreaks of contagious disease. Only half of the Mayflower’s original passengers and crew lived to see their first New England spring. In March, the remaining settlers moved ashore, where they received an astonishing visit from an Abenaki Indian who greeted them in English. Several days later, he returned with another Native American, Squanto, a member of the Pawtuxet tribe who had been kidnapped by an English sea captain and sold into slavery before escaping to London and returning to his homeland on an exploratory

expedition. Squanto taught the Pilgrims, weakened by malnutrition and illness, how to cultivate corn, extract sap from maple trees, catch fish in the rivers and avoid poisonous plants. He also helped the settlers forge an alliance with the Wampanoag, a local tribe, which would endure for more than 50 years and tragically remains one of the sole examples of harmony between European colonists and Native Americans. In November 1621, after the Pilgrims’ first corn harvest proved successful, Governor William Bradford organized a celebratory feast and invited a group of the fledgling colony’s Native American allies, including the Wampanoag chief Massasoit. Now

remembered as American’s ���first Thanksgiving”—although the Pilgrims themselves may not have used the term at the time—the festival lasted for three days. While no record exists of the historic banquet’s exact menu, the Pilgrim chronicler Edward Winslow wrote in his journal that Governor Bradford sent four men on a “fowling” mission in preparation for the event, and that the Wampanoag guests arrived bearing five deer. Historians have suggested that many of the dishes were likely prepared using traditional Native American spices and cooking methods. Because the Pilgrims had no oven and the Mayflower’s sugar supply had dwindled by the fall of 1621, the meal did not feature pies,

cakes or other desserts, which have become a hallmark of contemporary celebrations.

Thanksgiving Becomes an Official Holiday Pilgrims held their second Thanksgiving celebration in 1623 to mark the end of a long drought that had threatened the year’s harvest and prompted Governor Bradford to call for a religious fast. Days of fasting and thanksgiving on an annual or occasional basis became common practice in other New England settlements as well. During the American Revolution, the Continental Congress designated one or more days of

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Menus, food change to satisfy finicky eaters NEW YORK (AP) — Three different types of stuffing will be offered on Stacy Fox’s table this Thanksgiving: traditional, glutenfree and vegan. There will be steak for people who don’t like turkey. No eggs will be used in the latkes, or Jewish potato pancakes. And the sweet potato pie will be topped with vegan marshmallows she buys at a health food store. “My life used to be simple,� said Fox, who’s entertaining 18 guests in Suffern, N.Y. At homes across the country today, tables will be set to accommodate everyone from vegans and vegetarians to those trying to eat like cavemen. The increasingly complicated feasts reflect the growing ranks of Americans who are paying closer attention to the food they put into their bodies. The reasons vary. With two-thirds of the U.S. population either overweight or obese, many find setting rules helps ward off temptation. In other cases, people steer clear of ingredients such as dairy to alleviate bloating or to boost energy. Others worry about the long-term impact of artificial dyes, preservatives and antibiotics in their food. While the dietary quirks of relatives or friends may seem like a mere curiosity on Thanksgiving, they’re reshaping the food industry. Sales of organic packaged foods rose 24 percent to $11.48 billion over the past five years, according to market

AP

This Oct. 15, 2012, file photo, shows a vegetarian Thanksgiving dinner, in Concord, N.H. In homes across the country on Thanksgiving Day, tables will be set to accommodate everyone from vegans and vegetarians to those trying to eat like a caveman. Increasingly complicated Thanksgiving feasts reflect the growing ranks of Americans who are paying closer attention to the food they put in their bodies.

researcher Euromonitor International. Gluten-free packaged foods, made for those who are sensitive to wheat, more than doubled to $419.8 million. And the broader market of packaged foods targeted toward people with food intolerances to things like wheat, dairy or sugar rose 12 percent to $2.89 billion. By introducing gluten-free varieties of Chex cereal in recent years, General Mills says it was able to reverse years of declines and get sales growing again. So far

this year, the company says sales are up 6 percent from the same time last year, although it did not give the actual figure. Hillshire Brands has expanded the number of sausages and meatballs made without antibiotics under its higher-end Aidells brand, which has been a bright spot for the company. And sales of Tofurky, the tofu-based turkey alternative for vegetarians, have grown each year since it was introduced in 1995, said founder and president Seth Tibbott.

Back when Tofurky was rolled out, only about 500 were sold in health food stores in Portland and Seattle. This year, Tibbott expects to sell about 350,000 of the loaves, which resemble round, boneless turkey breasts filled with stuffing. “People do say it’s close to turkey,� Tibbott said, noting that the company has worked to achieve the hint of gaminess that distinguishes turkey from chicken. Even with all the new food options, however, many remain Thanksgiving traditionalists. As a result, some with dietary restrictions find that they still have to make concessions when eating at relatives’ houses. Alison Johnson, for instance, realizes it would be unreasonable to expect her in-laws to cater to her many preferences this holiday. She’s a vegetarian and she and her husband are on a Paleo diet that shuns processed foods, legumes and most sugars. So for Thanksgiving, she plans to relax her rules a bit, stick to the side dishes and bring along her own Paleo-friendly pumpkin bars for dessert. “When you start saying you’re diabetic and Paleo and vegetarian, they would just throw their hands up and give up,� said Johnson, who runs a recruiting firm in the Albany, N.Y., region. “I have to accommodate myself.� In other households, those with dietary restrictions have taken control. Daniel Albaugh, personal trainer in Houston, said his family feasts on Tofurky and stopped bothering with a turkey a few years

ago. He and his fiance are vegans, as are his mother and sister. “We outnumber them now,� said Albaugh, 31, of his stepfather and grandmother. “They don’t mind it. We gradually stopped accommodating the meat eaters.� Making special dishes for those with dietary restrictions isn’t just about pacifying the squeaky wheel either. When one family member makes a change to their diet, it can have a ripple effect, particularly during the holidays when food is center stage. Eddie Garza, a sustainability coordinator for a real estate company in Dallas, said he became a vegan 10 years ago after growing up on the “typical American diet.� Over the years, he made it a point to educate his family about the health, environmental and ethical reasons for his lifestyle. And while there will still be a turkey on the table this year, a tofu alternative is now a staple too. In fact, Garza, 36, is bringing four Gardein-brand tofu alternatives to dinner because his relatives always end up eating some. His mother, Emma Martinez, says she grew up on a meat-centric diet in Mexico. But the retired school nurse has cut down on significantly on meat and other animal products, even when Eddie isn’t at home. She even likes the tofu roast as much as the turkey. “I don’t really see too much of a difference, it’s just a matter of getting used to something,� said Martinez, 64.

Happy Thanksgiving Continued from xx

thanksgiving a year, and in 1789 George Washington issued the ďŹ rst Thanksgiving proclamation by the national government of the United States; in it, he called upon Americans to express their gratitude for the happy conclusion to the country’s war of independence and the successful ratiďŹ cation of the U.S. Constitution. His successors John Adams and James Madison also designated days of thanks during their presidencies. In 1817, New York became the ďŹ rst of several states to ofďŹ cially adopt an annual Thanksgiving holiday; each celebrated it on a different day, however, and the American South remained largely unfamiliar with the tradition. In 1827, the

noted magazine editor and proliďŹ c writer Sarah Josepha Hale—author, among countless other things, of the nursery rhyme “Mary Had a Little Lambâ€?—launched a campaign to establish Thanksgiving as a national holiday. For 36 years, she published numerous editorials and sent scores of letters to governors, senators, presidents and other politicians. Abraham Lincoln ďŹ nally heeded her request in 1863, at the height of the Civil War, in a proclamation entreating all Americans to ask God to “commend to his tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers in the lamentable civil strifeâ€? and to “heal the wounds of the nation.â€? He scheduled Thanksgiving for the

ďŹ nal Thursday in November, and it was celebrated on that day every year until 1939, when Franklin D. Roosevelt moved the holiday up a week in an attempt to spur retail sales during the Great Depression. Roosevelt’s plan, known derisively as Franksgiving, was met with passionate opposition, and in 1941 the president reluctantly signed a bill making Thanksgiving the fourth Thursday in November.

Thanksgiving Traditions In many American households, the Thanksgiving celebration has lost much of its original religious signiďŹ cance; instead, it now centers on cooking and sharing a bountiful meal with family and

friends. Turkey, a Thanksgiving staple so ubiquitous it has become all but synonymous with the holiday, may or may not have been on offer when the Pilgrims hosted the inaugural feast in 1621. Today, however, nearly 90 percent of Americans eat the bird—whether roasted, baked or deep-fried—on Thanksgiving, according to the National Turkey Federation. Other traditional foods include stufďŹ ng, mashed potatoes, cranberry sauce and pumpkin pie. Volunteering is a common Thanksgiving Day activity, and communities often hold food drives and host free dinners for the less fortunate. Parades have also become an integral part of the holiday in cities and towns across the United States. Presented

by Macy’s department store since 1924, New York City’s Thanksgiving Day parade is the largest and most famous, attracting some 2 to 3 million spectators along its 2.5-mile route and drawing an enormous television audience. It typically features marching bands, performers, elaborate oats conveying various celebrities and giant balloons shaped like cartoon characters. Beginning in the mid-20th century and perhaps even earlier, the president of the United States has “pardonedâ€? one or two Thanksgiving turkeys each year, sparing the birds from slaughter and sending them to a farm for retirement. A number of U.S. governors also perform the annual turkey pardoning ritual.

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A8

THE HERALD REPUBLICAN

kpcnews.com

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

Know the magic word and the magic number BY BILL MADDOCK

As we enter the holiday season, all of us are busy and we think that we just don’t have time to exercise. We may want to, we think we should, but with the commitment of work and time spent with family, we just can’t seem to fit it in. So as we enter the holiday season, I want you to remember the magic word and the magic number. The magic word is, START. Don’t wait until after the first of the year, start an exercise program now, today, ASAP, as soon as possible. You will feel better about yourself and you will have made that important first step. By the first of the year you will be weeks into your program and have a sense of confidence because of your commitment. The magic number is 10. Ten represents a commitment of 10 minutes. During this time of the year, or then again during much of the year we don’t have an hour or more to set aside for exercise. All of us have 10 minutes, when

you think about it. First when you get up, commit yourself to doing 10. These are 10, one-minute exercises before you take your morning shower. They could be stretches, sit ups, push-ups, dumbbell curls, jumping jacks, etc. You can do these as you watch your favorite morning news show. They can require little or no equipment and you will have started your day off right. In a few weeks it will be a daily routine — one that can easily fit your schedule. Next take 10 minutes during your lunch hour to get away from your desk and if possible get outside and go for a walk. You can do it with another coworker or better yet by yourself. You will feel refreshed and be a more productive worker for the rest of the day. After

work, take 10 minutes to walk your dog, I am sure he will appreciate it, or walk with your spouse or children and catch up on the news of their day. This quality time with family can be priceless. So the magic word is START. Don’t put it off, don’t delay. You will feel better for it. The magic number is 10. For many of us finding an hour or more to workout is unrealistic but if we don’t work out at all, it is easy for us to become stressed. We all have 10 minutes at different times of the day. If you do three sets of 10 minutes at different times throughout the day, you will get in a good 30 minutes and feel empowered. With everyone’s schedule during this holiday season, the goal is to do something every day. Three sets of 10 makes for a good day. Happy Holiday! BILL MADDOCK is the

president of Shape Up Steuben, an initiative to increase the health and fitness of people in the community.

Community Calendar • Friday, Nov. 29 • Move It to Improve It: 10:15 a.m. Steuben County Council on Aging, 317 S. Wayne St., Angola. • Bingo: 6 p.m. Angola Kids League Bingo Hall, 1409 N. Wayne St., Angola. (260) 665-2900 • Bingo: 6 p.m. Orland American Legion, 211 N. Bronson St., Orland. • New Beginnings for Narcotics Anonymous: 7 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous, 412 S. John St., Angola. • Alcoholics Anonymous Open Discussion Meeting: 7:30 p.m. First Congregational United Church of Christ, 314 W. Maumee St., Angola.

Saturday, Nov. 30 • Bingo: 6 p.m. Angola Kids League Bingo Hall, 1409 N. Wayne St., Angola. 665-2900

Sunday, Dec. 1 • Bingo: Noon. Orland

American Legion, 211 N. Bronson St., Orland. • Narcotics Anonymous: 6 p.m. Narcotics Anonymous, 412 S. John St., Angola. • New Beginnings for Narcotics Anonymous: 6 p.m. First Congregational United Church of Christ, 314 W. Maumee St., Angola. • Alcoholics Anonymous Open Meeting: 7:30 p.m. Holy Family Episcopal Church, 909 S. Darling St., Angola.

Monday, Dec. 2 • GED Classes: 9 a.m. Steuben County Literacy Coalition, 1208 S. Wayne St., Angola. 665-3357 • Weight Watchers: 9 a.m. Angola United Methodist Church, 220 W. Maumee St., Angola. • Move It to Improve It: 10:15 a.m. Steuben County Council on Aging, 317 S. Wayne St., Angola. 665-9856

• GED Classes: 8 p.m. Steuben County Literacy Coalition, 1208 S. Wayne St., Angola. 665-3357 • Weight Watchers: 5:30 p.m. Angola United Methodist Church, 220 W. Maumee St., Angola. • Angola Rotary Meeting: 6 p.m. Elks Lodge, 2003 N. Wayne St., Angola. • Alcoholics Anonymous Big Book Meeting: 7:30 p.m. First Congregational United Church of Christ, 314 W. Maumee St., Angola. • Independent Order of Odd Fellows: 7:30 p.m. Odd Fellows Lodge, 501 S. John Street, Angola.

Tuesday, Dec. 3 • GED Classes: 9 a.m. Steuben County Literacy Coalition, 1208 S. Wayne St., Angola. 665-3357 • ImagiKnit: 10 a.m. Carnegie Public Library of Steuben County, 322 S. Wayne St., Angola.

JENNIFER DECKER

Students learn sports skills Lucas Nelson, a Pleasant Lake Elementary School fifth-grader, moves a soccer ball around defender Jordyn Rogers, Trine University sophomore Friday. Students from Pleasant Lake and Carlin Park elementary

schools learned some sports skills in the campus Athletic Recreation Center from Trine University students in a class taught by Bill Maddock. The opportunity was in cooperation with Shape Up Steuben.

YMCA starts after-school childcare program Jan. 6 ANGOLA — The YMCA of Steuben County will offer an after-school program for school-aged children starting in January. Registrations are being accepted now by contacting Kaleena Escallier, youth development coordinator, at 668-3607. The program starts Jan. 6. Providing youth with opportunities to continue to learn and engage in meaningful activities at the end of the school day can boost their academic success, said a news release from the YMCA. The Y’s after-school program

combines academics with play and offers a safe environment for youth who would otherwise be left unsupervised. “At the YMCA of Steuben County, we believe all kids deserve the opportunity to discover who they are and what they can achieve,” said Krista Miller, CEO. “In the Y’s afterschool programs, youth are cultivating values, skills and relationships and have an extra support system that encourages them to achieve success.” Studies show participation in afterschool

programs helps boost school attendance and academic performance and reduces gaps in academic achievement among children from disadvantaged households. YMCA afterschool programs are geared to promote a love for learning, social and emotional development, and character and creativity. In the YMCA of Steuben County’s afterschool program youth receive help with homework and tutoring and there will be activities like Active Science, Swim Academy, and the YMCA’s national Food and Fun program.

Brief • Bloodmobile coming to area in December ANGOLA — The following blood donation opportunities are being provided through the American Red Cross. The Bloodmobile will be available: • Wednesday, Dec. 4, from 11 a.m. until 5 p.m.

at Trine University in the Witmer Clubhouse, 1 University Ave., Angola. • Monday, Dec. 9, noon to 6 p.m., Kid’s League Bingo Hall, 1409 N. Wayne St., Angola. Appointments can be made at 800-RED CROSS (800-733-2767) or redcrossblood.org. All blood types are

needed to ensure a reliable supply for patients. A blood donor card or driver’s license or two other forms of identification are required at check-in. Individuals who are 17 years of age (16 with parental consent in Indiana and Ohio), weigh at least 110 pounds and are in generally good health may be eligible to donate blood.

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Outdoor

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

THE NEWS SUN

The

Star

THE HERALD REPUBLICAN

CONTACT THE OUTDOOR PAGE EDITOR AMY OBERLIN AT outdoorpage@kpcnews.net

kpcnews.com

A9

TheOutdoorPage.com

The best fly ever invented? If anyone of lesser stature had made the statement, I would have dismissed it. But Rick Robbins is the most talented fly fisherman I know. He is as familiar with the trout streams in Idaho, Montana, Wyoming and Colorado as he is with the classic waters in JAMES H. Pennsylvania, New York PHILLIPS and other eastern locales. He has practiced the art of fly fishing for decades. He also makes exquisite bamboo fly rods that sell for $2,500 apiece — and every year turns down prospective buyers because he has more orders than he can handle. (For an example of his rod-building artistry go to RickRobbinsbambooflyrods. com.) Thus, when Robbins casually mentioned in recent conversation that in his judgment a certain fly “may be the single best trout fly ever invented,” it set my angling antenna quivering. I am always keen to discover a hot, new pattern. Coming from Robbins, the fly had to be stellar. Of course, naming one fly as the “best” is closely related to a more familiar question encountered occasionally in fishing magazines: “If you had to fish with only one fly, which one would you choose?” Phrased in this manner, the question allows for too much personal bias to enter into the equation.

Nearly all of us harbor the false illusion of a magic fly (or lure) that will catch fish after fish, day after day, season after season. It does not exist – and never will. Various elements come into play in getting a trout to strike – presentation, fly color, fly shape, fly size and so on. If I had to choose one as the most important, it would be presentation. In my opinion, it matters more than pattern or size or color. Trout are picky about the behavior of the food they eat. Having said this, I will confess that my fly vest contains more flies than I need, and many whose names I have forgotten. Robbins “best fly ever” wasn’t one of the usual candidates – an Adams, a Royal Coachman, a Wooly Bugger, a Muddler Minnow, a Pheasant-tail Nymph or a Gold-Ribbed Hare’s Ear. Nor was it particularly new. But I had never heard another angler mention it. Robbins’ choice is known as the “Firefly.” It is basically a somewhat elongated beetle pattern with a fluorescent yellow butt like a lightning-bug, It is the invention of Harrison Steeves III, a highly talented, wonderfully creative and unique fly designer. A retired biology professor, he eschews traditional trout-angling biology by ignoring the aquatic insects, minnows and crustaceans that are the daily diet of a fish, the foods that most flies try to imitate. Instead, Steeves focuses on terrestrial insects, land-dwelling bugs like ants, beetles and grasshoppers that occasionally fall into the water to be preyed

upon by hungry trout. Steeves also shuns the fur-and-feathers that are the building blocks of traditional patterns. He crafts easy-to-tie patterns mostly from closed-cell foam, needlework braids and tinsels. In the world of fly-design, there is Steeves – and then there is everyone else. What separates the Firefly from the also-rans is its efficacy. Catches of 100 or more trout a day on are not uncommon, and these are educated trout brought to net on hard-fished streams, not freshly released, easy-tocatch stockers. The one drawback involves visibility. As Robbins says, “It can be difficult to detect a strike.” The fly, generally tied in sizes ranging from 14-19, rides low in the water and under certain conditions can be difficult to see. In his book, Steeves recalled one fellow who “missed 27 strikes in a row.” This produces a somewhat steep learning curve for beginners. But once you have mastered the art of fishing the fly, the difficulties disappear. Is it really the “best” trout fly ever invented? I cannot answer that with authority. I can tell you that I am now at my vise tying a bunch of them. You can tie some for yourself. Order a copy of Steeves’ book from Amazon.com for instructions. The results could amaze you. JAMES H. PHILLIPS is a columnist for this newspaper. He can be reached at jahoph@ aol.com.

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

Bressler gets big deer On opening weekend for deer season, Steven Bressler downed a 10-point buck while hunting with his father, Chris, on their

Gift package for outdoors lovers A package providing access to Indiana’s state parks, reservoirs, state park inns and Outdoor Indiana magazine is available. The $99 State Park Holiday Gift Pack includes a 2014 resident annual entrance permit to all Indiana Department of Natural Resources parks and reservoirs, an Indiana State Park Inns gift card worth $70, a one-year subscription to Outdoor Indiana magazine and a 2014 Outdoor Indiana full-color

calendar. The buyer saves $26 over the regular price of the items purchased separately. The $129 State Park Holiday Gift Pack upgrades the $99 State Park Holiday Gift Pack to include a $100 Indiana State Park Inns gift certificate. The packs can be ordered at InnsGifts.com. Orders ship within three to five business days. Orders received by Dec. 11 will ship by Dec. 18. The offer is available through Dec. 31.

Solunar Table •

2013 Nov. 28 Thu 29 Fri 30 Sat

PHOTO CONTRIBUTED

Herman gets 14-point Zack Herman of Ashley killed a 14-point buck on Nov. 19 in Steuben County with a muzzle loader.

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A10

THE HERALD REPUBLICAN

kpcnews.com

AREA • STATE •

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

Public Meetings •

Helping out Each year members of the Potawatomi Snowmobile Club collect food from the membership to donate to Project Help of Steuben County, the local food pantry located in Angola. Pictured are Sheri Frank, left, Project Help executive director, and club officials Denny and Garna Jones. The snowmobile club maintains more than 30 miles of trail in Steuben County for the use of registered snowmobiles.

Monday, Dec. 2 • Steuben County Drainage Board, Steuben Community Center, 317 S. Wayne St., Angola, 10 a.m. Commissioners meet at 1 p.m. • Metropolitan School District of Steuben County Board of Education, McCutchan Administrative Center, 400 S. Martha St., Angola, 2 p.m. Executive session. • Angola Common Council, 210 N. Public Square, Angola, 7 p.m. Board of Public Works and Safety meets at 6 p.m. • Hamilton Town Council, 900 S. Wayne St., Hamilton, 7 p.m.

Tuesday, Dec. 3 MIKE MARTURELLO

• Angola Historic Preservation Commission, city hall, 210 N. Public Square, Angola, 5:30 p.m.

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AUBURN — Carl Casper’s 50th Anniversary Charity Auto Show will take place this weekend at the National Military History Center south of Auburn. Casper created some of the best-known television and movie cars in the world. The show will feature celebrity appearances by Mountain Man from the hit TV series “Duck Mountain Dynasty,” Man WWE Hall Of Fame wrestler Ted “The Million Dollar Man” DiBiase, SpongeBob SquarePants, Indianapolis Colts cheerleaders and others. Organizers said proceeds from the event will benefit families of wounded military personnel in northeast Indiana. The show takes place Saturday from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. and Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. Admission costs $12 for adults and $5 for children ages 6-12. Children ages 5 and under will be admitted free. The National Military History Center is just to the west of Interstate 69 exit 326 with an entrance off DeKalb C.R. 11-A. The schedule for celebrity appearances includes: • “Duck Dynasty’s” Mountain Man, Saturday 1-4 and 6-8 p.m.; • Ted DiBiase “The Million Dollar Man,” Saturday noon to 4 p.m. and 6-9 p.m.; Sunday noon to 5 p.m.; • Indianapolis Colts Cheerleaders, Saturday 2-4 p.m.; • SpongeBob SquarePants, Saturday, noon to 4 p.m. and 6-8 p.m; Sunday noon-5 p.m.; • Monster Truck Driver “Wildman” Jeff Cook and his son, J.J., billed as the world’s youngest monster truck driver; • Singer Fonda, Saturday 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Cars on display during the Charity Auto Show will include: a Batmobile from the movie “Batman Returns;” General Lee from the TV show “Dukes of Hazzard;” NASCAR legend Dale Earnhardt Sr.’s No. 3 Monte Carlo; K.I.T.T. from the TV show “Knight Rider;” B.A. Baracus’ van from the TV show “The A-Team;” Fonzie’s motorcycle from the TV show “Happy Days;” WASP No. 32, winner of the first Indianapolis 500 race in 1911; and Bigfoot No. 1, billed as the original monster truck. Hoosier Charities Inc. is sponsoring the show. Its website lists Casper as its CEO and Jeff Cook of Auburn as its president.

Really Truly Local


AREA • NATION •

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

kpcnews.com

THE HERALD REPUBLICAN

A11

SMALL: Event creates awareness for small shops FROM PAGE A1

Cloudy skies today with a high of 31 degrees. Low tonight of 20. Partly cloudy Friday with daytime highs in the mid-30s. Overnight low of 23 expected. A little warmer Saturday with partial cloud cover. High of 40 and a low temperature of 30 degrees. Precipitation possible Sunday and Monday.

Sunrise Friday 7:45a.m. Sunset Friday 5:13 p.m.

National forecast

Forecast highs for Thursday, Nov. 28

Wednesday’s Statistics Local HI 28 LO 21 PRC. 0 Fort Wayne HI 30 LO 21 PRC. 0

Sunny

Pt. Cloudy

Today's Forecast

City/Region High | Low temps

Forecast for Thursday, Nov. 28

MICH.

Chicago 37° | 23°

South Bend 32° | 19°

Fort Wayne 30° | 18° Fronts Cold

Warm Stationary

Pressure Low

High

OHIO

Lafayette 36° | 18°

ILL.

Cloudy

South Bend HI 27 LO 21 PRC. 0 Indianapolis HI 27 LO 19 PRC. 0

-10s

Indianapolis 39° | 21°

-0s

0s

10s

20s 30s 40s

50s 60s

70s

80s

90s 100s 110s

Today’s drawing by:

Terre Haute 36° | 16°

Zenna Tarlton

Evansville 43° | 18°

Louisville 39° | 19°

KY.

© 2013 Wunderground.com

Submit your weather drawings to: Weather Drawings, Editorial Dept. P.O. Box 39, Kendallville, IN 46755

Ritz, Pence take first step toward settling differences INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — Indiana Schools Superintendent Glenda Ritz is calling a meeting she had with Gov. Mike Pence a first step toward working out an ongoing power struggle, but says much more needs to be done. Pence and Ritz issued a statement Wednesday saying they have agreed to have the National Association of State Boards of Education help mediate a talk among Indiana State Board of Education members regarding roles, responsibilities and the operations of the board. Ritz, a Democrat, chairs the board, but Pence, a

Republican, has appointment power over 10 of the 11 board seats. Two weeks ago, Pence asked the national school boards group to step in, but Ritz said that would be meaningless unless Pence dealt directly with her. Pence made the request two days after Ritz walked out of a State Board of Education meeting when a Pence appointee tried to transfer certain student assessment powers from her office to a second education department created by the governor earlier this year. Pence said he is pleased Ritz is willing to work with his administration.

“I also appreciate the Superintendent’s willingness to work with members of the Indiana State Board of Education and NASBE to resolve differences that have arisen on the board,” he said. Ritz filed a lawsuit earlier this year against other board members, claiming they violated state law by going around her to shift calculation of the state’s school grades from her office. The other members, a bipartisan group, said she had been dragging her feet in releasing the grades she has openly opposed. A Marion County judge dismissed the lawsuit.

TRAVELERS: Philly-bound flights have worst delays FROM PAGE A1

winds gusting up to 60 mph are expected to rip through Boston and other coastal areas. Safety rules enacted in New York after a spectator was killed in 1997 in an accident involving a windblown balloon could prevent the giant inflatables from taking flight this year at the Macy’s parade. Flight cancellations piled up at East Coast hubs. By midday Wednesday, around 250 flights to, from or within the U.S. had been canceled, according to the tracking website FlightAware.com.

But that was a small fraction of the thousands of planes airborne over the U.S. at any given moment. Most of the cancellations involved Newark, N.J., Philadelphia and New York’s LaGuardia Airport. The longest delays affected Philadelphia-bound flights, which were being held at their points of origin for an average of about two hours because of the weather, according to the website. The Philadelphia area was under a flood watch, with 2 to 3 inches of rain forecast before falling temperatures turn precipitation to snow.

Roads there were snarled. A multi-vehicle crash closed the westbound lanes of the Schuylkill Expressway for a while, and the eastbound lanes were closed temporarily because of flooding. The storm, which developed in the West over the weekend, has been blamed for at least 11 deaths, five of them in Texas. But as it moved east, it wasn’t as bad as feared. “This is a fairly typical storm for this time of year,” said Chris Vaccaro of the National Weather Service.

A Patriotic Christmas Starring #1 Recording Artist

Todd Allen Herendeen And World Famous Bass Singer of The Jordanaires Grammy Award winner Ray Walker Special Guest: Ronnie Knight Sang with: Elvis 16 years, Patsy Cline, Ricky Nelson, one of the most recorded voices in history! Honoring all Veteran’s present! Operation gratitude: Bring a small gift to send overseas to our heroes serving!

In the Cole Auditorium at East Noble High School, 901 Garden St., Kendallville, IN Friday, December 13, 2013 at 7 PM • Doors open at 6:15PM Sponsored by:

Auburn, IN 95.5 FM

General Admission: $25 in advance & $30 day of show. Purchase tickets online visit: www.ToddAllenShow.com. Tickets also available at Kendallville Chamber of Commerce: 260-347-1554 Paradise Buffet, Auburn, IN 260-925-6966 Rome City American Legion Post 381, 260-854-2477

Christmas.” “We don’t have the profit margins the big companies do. We don’t have people lining up at the door before we open for bargains,” agreed Kristy Jo Beber, one of 20 artists who own and operate the Orchard Gallery at 6312-A Covington Road in Fort Wayne. The gallery was launched by a group of artists 30 years ago as a temporary store at Glenbrook Square Mall and now features the works of its owners as well as creations by 40 other artists, most of them from in and around northeast Indiana. “We support 60 artists who are all small businesses themselves,” Beber said. The Downtown Improvement District in Fort Wayne is offering free trolley rides in the downtown area on Nov. 30, another happy coincidence of timing with Small Business Saturday. Some 100 businesses — about half already established and the rest sharing space in temporary, or “pop-up” stores, will participate in the event. Olivia Fabian, owner of O’Fabz Swimwear, is one of the organizers of Holly Pop, which will have 22 vendors in a space at 127 W. Wayne St., more than twice as many as last year. That building is owned by Scott and Melissa Glaze, who are making the entire first floor available to the temporary vendors this year. “Some of the people don’t have retail space, some people already have physical stores but are maybe looking at opening another location or moving downtown,” Fabian said. “It gives them a way to test the waters without any big risk.” One of those is Lori Berndt, co-owner of the Olive Twist, which has permanent stores in Auburn and in Covington Plaza and

will be one of the vendors at Holly Pop this year. She declined an invitation from the Glazes to participate last year, “but then I went just to check it out and I could not believe the number of people down there.” While Berndt is not ready to commit to opening a downtown Fort Wayne store just yet, “I think the downtown is really developing. There are still some things that need to happen, but I am keeping my eye on it closely,” she said. The Foxy Ladies Art Posse will offer a number of vendors at Artlink, in the Auer Center for Arts & Culture at 300 E. Main St.; and a group of artisans will participate in a third pop-up at Columbia Street West that also will offer a wine tasting for those over 21. The Wells Street merchants group will have its own trolley to connect its business district to downtown, and Citlink will offer free fares on its buses citywide. Most of the pop-ups will operate one day only, on Nov. 30, but Holly Pop will be open the Wednesday before Thanksgiving, when downtown Fort Wayne has all its official holiday lightings, and the Friday and Saturday afterward. “Last year, on Wednesday, we had a line out the door that was overwhelming — in a great way,” Fabian said. A lot of people dropped in Wednesday to browse, and then came back on Friday or Saturday to buy. “The trolley was very good for us because the drop off was right in front of our door,” she added. Events like Holly Trolley create awareness of what the downtown has to offer, said DID President Bill Brown. “It gives people a chance to come downtown for a fun

Angola Saturday participants ANGOLA — Small Business Saturday will be celebrated Saturday in Angola. Go Angola Downtown Alliance and downtown businesses invite the public to experience holiday open houses that day. Many businesses will have special discounts. Open house hours will vary by store. Retailers scheduled to participate include: A Wild Hare Antique Mall, Ahi Chihuahua, Angola Sportscenter, Annice’s Attic, Ashtin Antiques, Bella Mia Salon, Cahoots Coffee Café, Calico’s & Collectibles, Coachlight Coffee House, Etagere Antique Mall, Family Video, fitt4life, Gallery 65, In a Flash Photographic Studio, Lake Shore Design Center, Mitchell’s Menswear and Tuxedos, Our Storage Front, Pint & Slice, Rockin’ Productions, Shabby Chic Boutique, Sutton’s Deli, The Bent Fork, The Hair Center, The Porch, The Yarnery, Then & Now Antique Mall, Three Sisters, Touch of Lace, Lady of the Lake Salon and Day Spa and Li’l Britches Unique Boutique for Pets.

event.” With all the new housing available or promised for downtown Fort Wayne, businesses are warming to the idea of operating there. “It’s no longer a chicken-and-egg thing,” Brown said. “It’s getting to the point now where it’s more of a ying-yang relationship. One supports the other.”

REAL ESTATE: Median home price dips in Steuben FROM PAGE A1

percent. The median price of homes declined to $125,000 from $128,750, a drop of 2.9 percent. LaGrange County has had 240 home sales this year compared to 222 last year, a gain of 8.1 percent. Median home prices slipped to $105,000 from $113,700, a decline of 7.7 percent. Noble County has experienced the greatest decline, through October, compared to the prior year. There have been 382 home sales this year, compared to 460 last year, a drop of 17 percent. The median price of these sales were up, hitting $93,450 this year compared to $85,500 year to date in 2012, a gain of 9.3 percent. DeKalb County has had

248 existing homes sold so far in 2013, compared to 291 in 2012, a decline of 14.8 percent. The median value of homes sold is $92,000 so far this year compared to $89,900 last year, an increase of 2.3 percent. Statewide, other year-over-year comparisons from the report show: • the average sale price of homes increased 3.6 percent to $144,815; • the percent of original list price received increased 1.3 percent to 91.7 percent; • the number of pending home sales increased 1.4 percent to 5,637; and • the number of new listings increased 3.3 percent to 9,059. The report said year-todate comparisons indicate

2013 should finish well ahead of 2012. Including October, the number of existing, single-family homes sold statewide this year increased 15.9 percent when compared with the same period of 2012. The median sale price of those 64,876 homes is $122,800 — a 4.1 percent increase from the first 10 months of last year. The average sale price is $145,977 — a 4.2 percent increase. “Statewide, we are well past the recovery stage and are moving toward a stable, balanced marketplace,” Kirkpatrick said. “Whether we fully achieve that status depends on real employment and wage growth, as well as consumer confidence.”

RECYCLONE: Hero appeared on stage with Bayh FROM PAGE A1

mind,” Sauer recalled. That night, he sketched the first of his 133 Recyclone cartoons. All of the cartoons appear in the book, thanks to Farlow, who neatly clipped and preserved every one. Heavily muscled and masked, Recyclone could spy a pile of trash, turn himself into a tornado and leave it neatly stacked and sorted. Farlow’s “radical approach to recycling” inspired Recyclone’s female sidekick Moonbeam, Sauer said, although he drew the character to resemble his sister, Jane. Sauer said Farlow impressed him with her methods such as neatly

folding margarine foils and reusing them to wrap baked potatoes. “I never imagined anyone going to those lengths,” he said. Farlow portrayed Moonbeam in Recyclone’s live presentations two or three times before his then-coworker, Sheryl Prentice, took over the role. Recyclone’s live shows continued even after he left journalism, extending from 1988 through 2000. “I used to do six a day, sometimes” at schools, Sauer said. He has no idea how many shows he presented in total. Recyclone once shared the stage with Indiana Gov. Evan Bayh. All three of

Sauer’s daughters, very young at the time, participated in the very last show. “I certainly look back on it fondly,” Sauer said. “My mom got to see one show, which was nice, because she made the costume.” Sauer has left open the possibility of Recyclone making a comeback, “but it’s still a mystery,” he said. Sauer will appear in person at book signings Friday from 1-3 p.m. at Jeremiah’s Brewed Awakenings in downtown Auburn and Saturday from 10 a.m. to noon at Coachlight Coffee Shop in Angola. “Recyclone Returns” also is available on amazon.com.

Underground gas lines to be replaced EVANSVILLE (AP) — Vectren Corp. has proposed replacing more than 1,000 miles of aging, underground natural gas lines across much of Indiana in a project costing some $865 million. The project is aimed at improving safety by removing bare steel and cast iron distribution mains and installing new pipes, most of which will be plastic,

the Evansville-based utility company said. Vectren’s pipeline infrastructure meets current safety guidelines, but the upgrades are need to meet new, stricter federal safety regulations, said Carl Chapman, the company’s chairman, president and CEO. “The first priority is safety and reliable service,” Chapman told the Evansville

Courier & Press. Vectren has submitted the plan to the Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission for approval. It is broken into two proposals — a $650 million project involving about 800 miles of pipeline in its north territory covering much of central Indiana and $215 million to replace 300 miles of pipeline in southwestern Indiana.


A12

kpcnews.com

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

Scores •

WEDNESDAY’S GAMES INDIANA ....................................99 CHARLOTTE ........................... 74 CHICAGO..................................99 DETROIT....................................79 L.A. LAKERS............................99 BROOKLYN .............................94 MEMPHIS .............................100 BOSTON....................................93 ORLANDO .............................105 PHILADELPHIA ....................94 MIAMI ..........................................95 CLEVELAND............................84

WEDNESDAY’S GAMES DETROIT.......................................6 BOSTON.......................................1 NASHVILLE.................................4 COLUMBUS ..............................0 MONTREAL.................................3 BUFFALO .....................................1 CAROLINA...................................4 NEW JERSEY ............................3 WINNIPEG ..................................3 N.Y. ISLANDERS .....................2 OTTAWA ........................................6 WASHINGTON .........................4 TAMPA BAY.................................4 PHILADELPHIA .......................2 N.Y. RANGERS .........................5 FLORIDA.......................................2 PITTSBURGH...........................6 TORONTO....................... 5 (SO)

Briefly • Bulls rout Pistons AUBURN HILLS, Mich. (AP) — Taj Gibson had a career-high 23 points and the Chicago Bulls pulled away in the fourth quarter to beat the Detroit Pistons 99-79 Wednesday night. The Pistons stayed close for most of the game, but managed only seven points in the first 10 minutes of the fourth quarter. That allowed Chicago to increase their lead to as many as 24 points as they ended a four-game losing streak. Luol Deng led the Bulls with 27 points. Rodney Stuckey finished with 25 off the bench for Detroit but no one else had more than 13. Josh Smith had 13 points and 11 rebounds and Andre Drummond had 10 points and 11 rebounds for the Pistons. Neither team played much defense in the first half, with the Pistons shooting 58.5 percent to Chicago’s 52.4 percent. Stuckey and Gibson both had 15 points off the bench, and each team also had two starters in double figures by halftime.

Area Events • FRIDAY GIRLS BASKETBALL Eastside at Churubusco, 6 p.m. Lakeland at Angola, 6 p.m. West Noble at Fremont, 6 p.m. Westview at Prairie Heights, 6 p.m. Woodlan at Garrett, 6 p.m. Northrop at DeKalb, 6:15 p.m. WRESTLING Angola, Prairie Heights at Harrison Invitational, 11 a.m.

THE HERALD REPUBLICAN

kpcnews.com

B

Pacers thrash Charlotte CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — C.J. Watson needed a night like this. The sixth-year NBA pro wasn’t knocking down shots and didn’t feel like much of a contributor this season for the Indiana Pacers. That all changed Wednesday night. Watson hit five 3-pointers in the fourth quarter and finished with a season-high 18 points to help the Pacers to their fifth straight victory, a 99-74 win over the Charlotte Bobcats on Wednesday night. “I have been struggling and I knew I’d been struggling,” Wilson said. “But I just stayed in the gym, stayed focused and just kept working and stayed confident. I tried to go out there, be aggressive and take what the game gave me.” Watson had made just 6 of 29 3-pointers this season coming into the game. He was 6 of 8 against the Bobcats. “I think he was just looking for it and we drew some plays up for him,” Pacers coach Frank Vogel said. “One of them was in transition and we got him one early when we got him a corner flare. Sometimes, when you hit the first shot, it changes your momentum of the game. He’d been struggling with his shot but he’s kept working.” Lance Stephenson had 15 points and 10 rebounds and Roy Hibbert added 14 points and 10 rebounds for the Pacers. Paul George had 15 points to surpass 3,000 for his career. Al Jefferson had 16 points and nine rebounds for the Bobcats, who have lost six of their last seven at home. The NBA’s best defense limited

AP

Indiana Pacers’ C.J. Watson, left, and Charlotte Bobcats’ Ramon Sessions, right, chase a loose ball during the first half of an NBA basketball game in Charlotte, N.C., Wednesday.

the Bobcats to 31 percent shooting as the Pacers improved to 14-1, the best start in franchise history. Indiana held Charlotte’s backcourt duo of Kemba Walker and Gerald Henderson to a combined 6 of 32 from the field. “They keep you from getting into the paint and they have long, strong defenders on the perimeter,” Henderson said. “And then they really protect the basket well with Hibbert. Playing a team like that, if your jump shot is not falling then it’s going to be tough to beat them.” Indiana led 60-52 entering the

fourth quarter despite shooting just 28 percent from the field. That’s when Watson caught fire. He knocked down three 3-pointers in the opening three minutes to help push the lead to 12. His fourth 3-pointer helped stretch the lead to 17 with 6:45 left in the game. “That’s when we went haywire,” Bobcats coach Steve Clifford said. The Pacers would finish 14 of 20 from the field in the fourth quarter, including 7 of 9 on 3-pointers to outscore the Bobcats 39-22.

“Good Indiana Pacers-style win with offensive balance and different guys stepping up each night and dominating with defense and rebounding,” Vogel said. “C.J. Watson obviously was the star of the game tonight. It seems like it’s a different guy every night for us.” It was a rough night offensively for the Bobcats (7-9), who had more fouls (27) than field goals (26). The Pacers set the tone early, holding the Bobcats to 4-of-22 shooting from the field in the first quarter to jump out to a 22-11 lead. Clifford said after the game he’s still a little “concerned” about his team’s offense. “We have to continue to develop our post-up game with Al and we have to be more diligent about staying with what we’re doing,” Clifford said. Charlotte would hang tough and cut the lead to five at the break behind 10 first-half points from Jefferson, who was able to challenge Hibbert in the low post. Jefferson’s presence helped minimize the effects of Henderson and Walker, who struggled to find their stroke and were a combined 3 of 16 from the field in the first half. George entered the game averaging 26.8 points over the previous four games and had 12 points at halftime. But he picked up his third and fourth fouls in the opening two minutes of the second half, sending him to the bench. Notes: The Pacers have only allowed 100 points once this season, that coming in a 110-94 loss to Chicago earlier this month. … George has scored in double figures in every game this season.

Red Wings ambush Bruins, 6-1 DETROIT (AP) — Niklas Kronwall, Henrik Zetterberg, Gustav Nyquist and Tomas Tatar each a goal and an assist in the Detroit Red Wings’ 6-1 win over the Boston Bruins on Wednesday night. Justin Abdelkader and Drew Miller and also scored for Detroit. Johan Franzen had three assists, Joakim Andersson two assists and Jonas Gustavsson made 16 saves. Jarome Iginla scored for Boston and Tuukka Rask stopped 22 shots. Abdelkader opened the scoring at 11:49 of the first period when he put in a loose puck from the bottom of the left circle off the rush, 11 seconds after Detroit killed off a high-sticking penalty to Franzen. It was Abdelkader’s third goal of the season. The Red Wings scored three goals in less than four minutes in the second period. Tatar made it 2-0 at 6:05 of the second period. He scored on a wraparound after carrying the puck from just outside the Red Wings’ blue line and falling down and getting back up — while maintaining control of the puck — in the right circle. It was Tatar’s

AP

Detroit Red Wings left wing Tomas Tatar (21), of the Czech Republic, scores against Boston Bruins goalie Tuukka Rask (40), of Finland, in the

third goal. Zetterberg made it 3-0 at 8:47 when he scored from the left circle for his 11th goal. Kronwall scored

second period of an NHL hockey game in Detroit on Wednesday.

on the power play, just 1:14 later. Miller scored his second goal of the season at 8:38 of the third period and Nyquist got his third

goal of the season with 2:53 remaining in the game. Iginla spoiled Gustavsson shutout attempt with 2:25 left.

Colts ignoring critics, focused on fixing INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — The complaints are coming in loud and clear at the Colts complex. Players and coaches don’t like what they’re seeing on tape. Fans are so unhappy with what they’ve witnessed, some are calling for firings. Even owner Jim Irsay is urging his team to “wake up.” And all these complaints are over a 7-4 team that is closing in on its eighth division title in 11 seasons. Strange? Not in today’s sports world, where criticism has become part of the daily routine. “That’s expected. People are always going to criticize you,” defensive end Cory Redding said Wednesday. “But if I walked around worried about what other people think of me, I’d

AP

Indianapolis Colts head coach Chuck Pagano, left, talks with Samson Satele (64) during the second half of an NFL football game with Arizona Sunday in Glendale, Ariz. The Cardinals beat the Colts 40-11.

(stink). We’ve got to go out and play a game, regardless of what they say.” Instead, the Colts

are focused on finding a solution to the list of growing and glaring problems.

The transition to a power-running team looked good when Indy topped 120 yards rushing in each of the first four games. It did so despite losing starting running back Vick Ballard with a season-ending knee injury, and his replacement, Ahmad Bradshaw, with a season-ending neck injury after only three games. In the last six games, Indy has rushed for 120 or more yards only twice. Andrew Luck, who completed more than 60 percent of his passes four times in the first six weeks, has seen that percentage drop to 55.5 over the last four games. The dip coincided with losing Pro Bowl receiver Reggie Wayne, his favorite target, with a torn ACL in his right knee.

The defense, which Irsay spent more than $100 million rebuilding in free agency, has struggled mightily to get off the field early the last four weeks. The result: Indy has been outscored 93-12 in the first 30 minutes of those four games, yet somehow managed to win twice thanks to Luck’s incredible penchant for comebacks. That’s not the payoff Irsay expected. So after Sunday’s 40-11 debacle at Arizona, Irsay expressed his frustration publicly. “Must find a way 2 win Division,no excuses,no explanations.. hide weaknesses,accent strengthens/We gotta … WAKE UP!” the team owner wrote Tuesday on SEE COLTS, PAGE B2


THE HERALD REPUBLICAN

SPORTS •

kpcnews.com

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

Local Sports Brief • Prep Swimming Hornet girls, Baron boys win WATERLOO — DeKalb’s boys defeated Angola 116-36 Tuesday at the YMCA of DeKalb County while the Hornet girls got past the Barons 95-75. The DeKalb boys won all three relays. Brycen Spangler (200- and 500-yard freestyles) and Seth Gillespie (50 and 100 freestyle races) each won two events for the Barons. Freshman Nathan Bourne won the 200 individual medley and the 100 breaststroke for the Hornets in their season opener. In the girls’ dual, Mackenzie Simmons (50 freestyle, 100 breaststroke) and Sydney Robinson (500 freestyle, 100 butterfly) won two events each for Angola. The Hornets won the 200 medley relay and the 200 freestyle relay. Nicole Gillespie won the 100 breaststroke and the 200 individual medley and was part of DeKalb’s winning 400 freestyle relay team. On Saturday, the Hornet girls were fourth in the Goshen Relays with 64

points. The host Redskins won with 152 points. Angola took third-place finishes in the 200 freestyle relay, the 400 medley relay and the 600 freestyle relay.

Girls: Angola 95, DeKalb 75 200 medley relay — 1. AHS (M. Clemens, Simmons, Robinson, Beckwith) 2:11.74, 2. DeKalb (N. Gillespie, Rieke, Vonholten, R. Ramos) 2:16.06, 3. AHS (Olson, McMillen, Watkins, Blue) 2:24.59, 4. DeKalb (High, Blair-Lewis, S. Edmonds, K. Snyder) 2:36.97, 5. AHS (C. Merritt, Schmidt, Raugh, McElroy) 2:40.69, 6. DeKalb (Liberty, McKinly, A. Bainbridge, T. Jones) 3:05.18. 200 freestyle — 1. Robinett (D) 2:22.17, 2. Raugh (A) 2:27.54, 3. Lounds (D) 2:45.1, 4. Stanley (A) 2:51.36, 5. Frederick (D) 3:07.21, 6. C. Merritt (A) 3:11.1. 200 indiv. medley — 1. N. Gillespie (D) 2:38.8, 2. Watkins (A) 2:47, 3. McMillen (AQ) 2:49.86, 4. Beckwith (A) 2:59.25, 5. Blair-Lewis (D) 3:14.36, 6. A. Bainbridge (D) 3:40.49. 50 freestyle — 1. Simmons (A) 28.27, 2. R. Ramos (D) 30.49, 3. Rieke (D) 32.06, 4. J. Stadtmiller (A) 32.15, 5. K. Snyder (D) 32.16, 6. Sauer (A) 35.48, 7. Bell (D) 35.64, 8. McKinly (D) 37.92, 9. T. Jones (D) 40.94, 10. Ballard (D) 46.36, 11. Ricketts (D) 46.69. 100 butterfly — 1. Robinson (A) 1:15.8, 2. Beckwith (A) 1:16.93, 3. Vonholten (D) 1:17.26, 4. Watkins (A) 1:22.26, 5. High (D) 1:29.22, 6. S. Edmonds (D) 1:36.97. 100 freestyle — 1. M. Clemens (A) 1:02.72, 2. R. Ramos (D) 1:08.66, 3. Blue (A) 1:09.25, 4. Blair-Lewis (D) 1:13.17, 5. K. Snyder (D) 1:14.37, 6. McElroy (A) 1:22.19, 7. McKinly (D) 1:29.67, 8. T. Jones (D) 1:38.89. 500 freestyle — 1. Robinson (A) 6:26.63, 2. Robinett (D) 6:32.76, 3. Raugh (A) 6:42.5, 4. Schmidt (A) 8:07.03, 5. Bell (D) 8:32.78. 200 freestyle relay — 1. Angola (M. Clemens, Beckwith, Watkins, Raugh) 1:58.03, 2. DeKalb (Lounds, Rieke, K. Snyder, Robinett) 2:07.67, 3. Angola (McMillen, Schmidt, Stanley, Simmons) 2:09.63, 4. Angola (Sauer, C. Merritt, Olson, J. Stadtmiller) 2:14.62, 5. DeKalb (Liberty, McKinly, S. Edmonds, A. Bainbridge) 2:37.29, 6. DeKalb (Ricketts, Ballard, Camarena, T. Jones) 2:58.27.

100 backstroke — 1. N. Gillespie (D) 1:11.94, 2. M. Clemens (A) 1:15.86, 3. Vonholten (D) 1:21.25, 4. Olson (A) 1:21.28, 5. High (D) 1:22.62, 6. Stanley (A) 1:32.75. 100 breaststroke — 1. Simmons (A) 1:24.6, 2. Rieke (D) 1:27.91, 3. Lounds (D) 1:34.38, 4. McMillen (A) 1:37.21, 5. Frederick (D) 1:39.63, 6. J. Stadtmiller (A) 1:40.28. 200 freestyle relay — 1. DeKalb (N. Gillespie, R. Ramos, Vonholten, Robinett) 4:36.15, 2. Angola (Blue, Stanley, J. Stadtmiller, Robinson) 4:54.97, 3. Angola (Sauer, C. Merritt, Schmidt, Olson) 5:15.76, 4. DeKalb (Blair-Lewis, Lounds, Frederick, High) 5:24.05, 5. DeKalb (A. Bainbridge, Liberty, S. Edmonds, Bell) 6:15.11.

Boys: DeKalb 116, Angola 36 200 medley relay — 1. DeKalb (Turner, M. Burris, Goldsmith, S. Gillespie) 1:55.2, 2. Angola (Crody, K. Stadtmiller, Bourne, B. Thompson) 2:12.61, 3. DeKalb (G. Burris, W. Edmonds, Lockwood, S. Kennedy) 2:17.86. 200 freestyle — 1. Spangler (D) 2:10.33, 2. J. Bainbridge (D) 2:16.76, 3. B. Thompson (A) 2:19.74, 4. D. Ramos (D) 2:45.18. 200 individual medley — 1. Bourne (A) 2:15.35, 2. Turner (D) 2:19.19, 3. Goldsmith (D) 2:28.36, 4. M. Burris (D) 2:57.32. 50 freestyle — 1. S. Gillespie (D) 24.21, 2. Crody (A) 27.34, 3. G. Burris (D) 28.7, 4. B. Thompson (A) 29.65, 5. Lockwood (D) 30.72, 6. Ridenour (A) 32.03, 7. S. Kennedy (D) 32.98, 8. Ta. Elkins (D) 40.45, 9. M. Elkins (D) 46.94. 100 butterfly — 1. Goldsmith (D) 1:05.97, 2. W. Edmonds (D) 1:24.81. 100 freestyle — 1. S. Gillespie (D) 54.75, 2. Crody (A) 1:01.69, 3. M. Burris (D) 1:03.08, 4. G. Burris (D) 1:13.69, 5. K. Stadtmiller (A) 1:14.23, 6. S. Kennedy (D) 1:21.34, 7. Albers (D) 1:50.68. 500 freestyle — 1. Spangler (D) 6:08.64, 2. J. Bainbridge (D) 6:10.31, 3. Lockwood (D) 7:26.63, 4. K. Stadtmiller (A) 8:04.06. 200 freestyle relay — 1. DeKalb (M. Burris, J. Bainbridge, W. Edmonds, Spangler) 1:52.8, 2. AHS (Bourne, Ridenour, Crody, B. Thompson) 1:55.32, 3. DeKalb (Lockwood, G. Burris, Albers, D. Ramos) 2:07.12. 100 backstroke — 1. Turner (D) 1:02.97, 2. Ta. Elkins (D) 1:32.79. 100 breaststroke — 1. Bourne (A) 1:10.01, 2. W. Edmonds (D) 1:23.33, 3. D. Ramos (D) 1:36.38, 4. Ta. Elkins (D) 1:52.72. 200 freestyle relay — 1. DeKalb (S. Gillespie, Spangler, Turner, Goldsmith) 3:57.6, 2. DeKalb

COLTS: Owner Irsay voices displeasure for team on Twitter FROM PAGE B1

Twitter. It’s not the first time the boss has complained about his team’s performance. Irsay used his Twitter account to offer fans an apology after another blowout loss in the preseason opener, and urged Indy’s rebuilt offensive line to deliver a “better effort” following a 21-17 win over Oakland in September’s season opener. While Irsay’s words resonate within the locker room, most players keep the comments in perspective. “He’s writing the checks, he can do what he wants to do,” NFL sacks leader Robert Mathis said. “He’s a winner, he likes winning. But if you’re not motivated by your job, you shouldn’t

Johnson’s crew chief Chad Knaus rises to the top of his class with sixth Sprint Cup championship

NOTEBOOK

Wix Filters to sponsor Newman at RCR Wix Filters is moving its sponsorship dollars from Stewart-Haas Racing to Richard Childress Racing, continuing its relationship with Ryan Newman, who is moving from Stewart-Haas to RCR, where he will replace Jeff Burton as driver of the No. 31 Chevrolet. Wix will be the primary sponsor of the No. 31 for three Cup races as well as another for Brendan Gaughan in the Nationwide Series.

Crew member Curtis Martin Jr. suspended Curtis Martin Jr., a crew member in the Camping World Truck Series, has been indefinitely suspended from NASCAR for violating the sanctioning body’s substance abuse policy. The violation was discovered on Nov. 12, according to a statement from NASCAR.

Getty Images for NASCAR

Jimmie Johnson’s sixth Sprint Cup championship moved him to within one title of NASCAR’s all-time leaders, Richard Petty and the late Dale Earnhardt, and it also moved his crew chief, Chad Knaus, to just two behind Dale Inman, who has eight championships — seven with Petty and one with Terry Labonte. But just as it’s difficult to compare the accomplishments of Johnson’s to Petty’s because they came in different eras of the sport, the jobs performed by Knaus and Inman bear few similarities. “I’m not even close to [Inman],” Knaus said during the champion’s interview at Homestead-Miami Speedway. “He’s an amazing individual. He actually stopped me [Sunday]. “He’s like, ‘Son, you don’t know what hard work is.’ I said, ‘You’re exactly right, sir. I have no idea.’ ” Knaus pointed out that Inman won titles with different drivers and different teams, and did it in a time when crew chiefs actually were hands-on mechanics and often hauled the race cars to the tracks themselves. “Yeah, we work hard,” Knaus said of crew chiefs today. “We get headaches. I work on a computer. That dude was in there cutting with a torch; cutting, building, stuff like that. No matter what we’re able to do with the 48 car, it will never surpass what those guys did.” Veteran team owner Eddie Wood, who co-owns his family’s No. 21 Ford, has lived through both eras of crew chiefs. He’s watched his own uncle, Leonard Wood, and Inman, as both went through their Hall of Fame careers. And he’s seen Knaus and his generation at work. “I wouldn’t want to be a crew chief in either era,” Wood said. “The jobs were different, but in many ways, they’re the same. And the pressure is the same for both of them.” For today’s crew chief, there’s the added pressure of the spotlight that surrounds a Cup team, Wood said. “If you make a mistake now — or do something good — everybody knows about it within seconds because of TV and Twitter and things like that,” he said. Wood said that early crew chiefs did far more hands-on work. “Leonard

be in this league.” There’s no doubt the Colts have not been the same without Wayne, and there’s no question in coach Chuck Pagano’s mind they have to find a way to overcome Wayne’s loss before it’s too late. Indy already blew one chance to put away the division. A win at Arizona would have put the Colts in position to wrap up things with a win Sunday against Tennessee (5-6). Now, they’ll have to settle for trying to take a three-game lead with four to play and earning a season sweep of the Titans. That would leave them one win, or one Titans loss or tie, from wrapping up their first division title of the post-Peyton Manning era.

Chad Knaus, right, crew chief for 2013 Sprint Cup champion Jimmie Johnson, left, is a big part of the success of the No. 48 team. changed tires on pit stops until he was 55, and I think Inman was in his 40s before he stopped,” Wood said. “But I’m also amazed at what Knaus has been able to do. It’s something to win six Cup championships, as competitive as this series is today.” Wood is not alone in saying that Knaus, who once changed tires, too, early in his career, has risen to the top of his class in the current environment. His driver is the first to acknowledge that he’s a big part of the No. 48 team’s success. It’s evident, Jimmie Johnson said, when one considers that the other three teams at Hendrick Motorsports, as well as the three at Stewart-Haas Racing, all have the same tools and technology as Johnson and Knaus, but haven’t achieved nearly as much. “We all have the same equipment,”

Johnson said. “We do develop our own styles as far as a driver, a crew chief, the way we set our cars up. We kind of migrate off into different directions, although they are close together. We do end up with differences in our cars. That boils down to the crew chief and driver styles.” Johnson, like many in the sport, appreciates the positive results that come from good chemistry between driver and crew chief. “Over the years, we’ve seen pairings that work, and I feel fortunate to have that happen with me and Chad,” he said. “There’s something magical there and it works. “I say this confidently: I would not have the success I’ve had in this sport if it wasn’t for Chad and our relationship together.”

Crew chief shuffle underway among Sprint Cup teams for 2014 Tony Stewart isn’t the only driver getting a new crew chief next season. Stewart-Haas Racing, in addition to pairing Stewart with Chad Johnston, has promoted Daniel Knost from race engineer for Ryan Newman’s No. 39 to crew chief for the No. 41 and incoming driver Kurt Busch. Rodney Childers, who, like Johnston, most recently worked at Michael Waltrip Racing, will be crew chief for Kevin Harvick. Tony Gibson will return as crew chief for Danica Patrick. Stewart’s former crew chief, Steve Addington, has moved to the No. 51 Chevrolet at Phoenix Racing. The driver lineup for that car has not been announced. At Roush Fenway Racing, Mike Kelley, who has been crew chief for the team’s No. 6 Nationwide Series car, will move to the Cup Series and serve as crew chief for Rookie of the Year Ricky Stenhouse Jr., who worked with Kelley when he was in the Nationwide Series. Chad Norris will take Kelley’s old job at the No. 6 team, where he will work with Trevor Bayne. Scott Graves, who worked with Stenhouse in Cup this year, will return to the

Nationwide Series and work with Chris Buescher. Seth Barber will work with Ryan Reed on the No. 16 Nationwide team. Jimmy Fennig will remain as Carl Edwards’ crew chief, and Matt Puccia returns to Greg Biffle’s team. “As with any season, we always sit down at the end of the year and evaluate where we are, what we have and what we think are the best options to put our teams in the best position to compete for wins and championships,” team owner Jack Roush said in a release announcing the changes. “In this case, a reorganization that realigns Ricky and Mike, allows Scott to work with Chris, and reunites Chad with Trevor, made the most sense. “Scott will help provide Chris with the type of guidance that helped Ricky improve throughout this season and close out the rookie award. Chad will bring veteran leadership and a steady hand to the No. 6 team with Trevor that we feel will be beneficial, and Seth and Ryan have exhibited a strong chemistry that the team is excited to build on in 2014.”

Chase Elliott named Driver of the Year by Georgia Auto Racing Hall of Fame Chase Elliott has been named Driver of the Year by the Georgia Racing Hall of Fame. Elliott, the 17-year-old son of former Sprint Cup champion Bill Elliott, won a Camping World Truck Series race at Canadian Tire Motorsport Park. He became the youngest superspeedway winChase Elliott ner in ARCA history with a victory at Pocono Raceway and won numerous Late Model races, including the All American 400 at the Nashville Fairgrounds, which gave him victories in all four of Late Model racing’s major events.

Chase Elliott

B2

NUMERICALLY SPEAKING

9 Top-10 finishes for Sprint Rookie of the Year 3 Cup Ricky Stenhouse Jr. Top-10 finishes for Sprint champion Jimmie 24 Cup Johnson, tops among all Top-20 finishes this season for Danica Patrick.

drivers.

4

Top-5 finishes for Greg Biffle, the fewest of any driver who made the 2013 Chase for the Sprint Cup.

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Bowling Auburn Bowl High scores for the week of Nov. 18 MEN Booster – Jeff Griffith 277, Kevin Likes 257, John Cain 257, Jeffrey Griffith 257, Ty Cobbs 258, Gary Gatchell 253, Rob Wilson 258, 740 series; Greg Silberg 267, 714 series; Jeff Campbell 258, Terry West 250, Alex Knight 279, 733 series Industrial – Mike Hasselman 268 Friday Morning Trio – Jim Boyle 256 Friday Night Recreation – Donny Fike III 274, Joe Cope 263, 757 series Masters & Slaves – Billy Zink 257, Bob Carper 257 WOMEN Thursday Night Ladies – Liz Winsley 208, 599, Tonia Carper 230, 606 series Friday Night Recreation – Cindy Schuller 203 Masters & Slaves – Tonia Carper 207 YOUTH Majors – Destin Kuhn 230, 621 series, Nick Colgate 623 series, Keaton Turner 242 Papa John’s Bowlers of the Week Men – Joe Cope +148 pins over average Women – Liz Winsley +122 poa Youth – Charissa Delaplane +107 poa High scores for the week of Nov. 11 MEN Moose – Mike Casselman 258, Joe Stephens 253, Jeff Griffith 268 Booster – Nick Payton 267, Tim Perkins 701 series, Rob Wilson 255, 702 series, Gary Bolton 257 Friday Morning Trio – Dan Hartleroad 254 Friday Night Recreation – Donny Fike III 257, 718 series WOMEN Moose – Naomi Hoeppner 207 Booster – Golda Wheadon 206 Industrial – Sue Shaffer 201 Thursday Night Ladies – Tonia Carper 204, 217, 581 series, Paula Witte 213, Malinda Lilly 222 Adult/Youth – Jyl Mesteller 248, 601 series YOUTH Majors – Tommy Etgen 249, Keaton Turner 616 series, Kody Rice 233, Spencer Crim 266, 628 series, Courtney Redden 203, 204, 210, 617 series, Makayla Lilly 203 Papa John’s Bowlers of the Week Men – Gene Cramer +128 pins over average Women – Kathy Pepple +87 poa Youth – Kody Rice +188 poa Kendallville USBC Bowling Assoc. Weekly High Scores Nov. 17-23 SUNDAY NITERS Team Gutter Ratz 943 game Pinseekers 2669 series Individual Ashley Terry 231 game, 640 series Sam Anglin 286 game, 707 series Doug Terry 707 series 1st place Gutter Ratz 33.5-10.5 MONDAY NIGHT SALLIES Team Breakfast House 1150 game, 3243 series Individual Tina Marcelles 213 game Teri Fitzgibbon 537 series 1st place We Five 4-0 MONDAY NITE FOOTBALL LEAGUE Team Sparely Legal 710 game, 2019 series Individual Zula Findt 139 game, 399 series Dean Gillespie 246 game Bob Campbell 663 series 1st place Average Joes 27-13 A Toddler 27-13 BUD CAMPBELL MEM. LEAGUE Team Dependable Metal 1287 game, 3498 series Individual Rebecca Godsey 226 game Lisa Terry 584 series Aaron Ackerman 269 game Keith Schmidt 717 series 1st place Team #2 8-0 INDUSTRIAL LEAGUE Team Campbell’s by Shadow Bowl 1226 game, 3456 series Individual Brian Nodine 269 game Jim Jarman 710 series 1st place Campbell’s by Shadow Bowl 29-15 BUD & MAXINE CAMPBELL MEMORIAL YOUTH LEAGUE Bantam League Individual Jessica Willavize 112 game, 305 series Christopher Willavize 97 game, 254 series JR/SR LEAGUE Team Team #5 1059 game, 2958 series Individual Melinda Smith 188 game Morgan Campbell 459 series Matthew Sparkman 224 game, 523 series 1st Place Team #4 33-11

Local College Sports Mich. Intercollegiate Athletic Assoc. 2013-14 Commissioner’s Cup (after fall sports season) Overall standings: 1. Calvin 99, 2. Hope 98, 3. Adrian 50, 4. Alma 49, 5. Albion 46, 6. Olivet 44, 7. Trine 43, 8. Kalamazoo 39. Men’s All-Sports Standings: 1. Hope 49, 2. Calvin 40, 3. Albion 34, 4. Adrian 26, 5. Kalamazoo 25, 6. Olivet 20, 7. Trine 19, 8. Alma 11. Women’s All-Sports Standings: 1. Calvin 59, 2. Hope 49, 3. Saint Mary’s 44, 4. Alma 38, 5. Adrian 24, 5t. Olivet and Trine 24, 8. Kalamazoo 14, 9. Albion 12.

Winning Hand Tri-State Duplicate Bridge Club Oct. 15 results Winners were: 1. John Mowry and Grant VanHorn, 2. Jan and Paul

Baldwin, 3. Loren Jackemyer and Patty Weber, and 4. Fara Lee Baidinger and Barbara Faulkner. Oct. 8 Mitchell Game results North-South winners were: 1. Ken Bisson and Marcy Marose or LaRose, 2. Loren Jackemyer and Sally Priest, 3. Gil Fox and Mary Booth, and 4. Jan and Paul Baldwin. East-West winners were: 1. Al Guilford and Grant VanHorn, 2. Sarah Bir and Jean Watson, 3. John Mowry and Mike Mellinger, and 4. Lana Jackemyer and Donna Detro. Oct. 1 results Winners were: 1. John Maurer and Mike Mellinger, 2. Loren Jackemyer and Sally Priest, 3. Jan and Paul Baldwin, 4. Chet Pinkham and Helen Brown, and 5. Jean Watson and Sarah Bir. Sept. 24 Mitchell Game results North-South winners were: 1. Barbara Faulkner and Fara Lee Baidinger, 2. Sally Priest and Loren Jackemyer, and 3. Jan and Paul Baldwin. East-West winners were: 1. Mike Mellinger and Grant VanHorn, 2. Chet Pinkham and Helen Brown, and 3. Betty Kersten and Sue Waite. Sept. 17 Mitchell Game results North-South winners were: 1. John Mowry and Mary Booth, 2. Gil Fox and Ruth Fitzgerald, and 3. Jan and Paul Baldwin. East-West winners were: 1. Al Guilford and Fara Lee Baidinger, 2. JoAnne Dean and Shorty Hauska, and 3. Ken Bisson and Mike Mellinger.

Prep Basketball Scores BOYS BASKETBALL Adams Central 58, Churubusco 56, OT Argos 49, Bremen 46 Barr-Reeve 53, Washington 42 Bloomfield 50, Union (Dugger) 33 Bluffton 56, Eastbrook 52 Carmel 54, Brownsburg 41 Cass 83, N. Miami 41 Clay City 85, S. Vermillion 59 Columbia City 49, Whitko 31 Connersville 51, Union Co. 44 Covington 50, Western Boone 45 Crawford Co. 48, Forest Park 42 Crown Point 78, Andrean 43 Culver 60, Rochester 45 Danville 57, S. Putnam 41 Delphi 61, Clinton Central 38 Eastside 64, Garrett 43 Ev. Central 71, Terre Haute North 50 Ev. North 71, N. Posey 50 Fountain Central 56, Riverton Parke 33 Frankfort 78, Clinton Prairie 44 Franklin Central 36, Martinsville 34 Frankton 83, Eastern (Greentown) 44 Ft. Wayne Concordia 69, Woodlan 56 Ft. Wayne Northrop 59, DeKalb 46 Ft. Wayne Wayne 93, Bellmont 56 Greencastle 62, Crawfordsville 57 Hamilton Hts. 60, Lebanon 37 Huntington North 69, Homestead 53 Indpls Park Tudor 90, University 52 Indpls Pike 67, Indpls N. Central 63 Indpls Scecina 62, Indpls Lutheran 39 Indpls Tech 67, Warren Central 65 Indpls Washington 62, Indpls Arlington 45 Knightstown 70, Tri 18 Kokomo 72, Western 50 Lafayette Jeff 71, Pioneer 41 Logansport 91, Peru 47 Madison 85, Southwestern (Jefferson) 34 Madison-Grant 52, Northwestern 50 Manchester 68, Mississinewa 62, 2OT Marion 102, Indpls Irvington 42 McCutcheon 86, W. Lafayette 51 Monroe Central 63, Northeastern 58 Monrovia 52, Eminence 44 Munster 68, Hammond Gavit 27 N. Judson 67, Knox 44 N. Putnam 56, Southmont 40 Noblesville 74, Indpls Northwest 57 Northridge 73, Elkhart Central 72 Peoria Manual, Ill. 54, Michigan City Marquette 42 Portage 54, Highland 36 Rossville 82, Sheridan 61 Rushville 67, Shelbyville 64, OT S. Bend Adams 73, Carroll (Ft. Wayne) 64 Scottsburg 67, Austin 61 Shenandoah 57, Daleville 31 Southwood 70, Southern Wells 42 Speedway 63, N. Montgomery 24 Sullivan 61, S. Knox 46 Tippecanoe Valley 54, Warsaw 52 Tri-West 72, Cascade 41 Triton 74, Oregon-Davis 30 Triton Central 61, Morristown 52 Union City 64, S. Adams 57 W. Vigo 47, N. Vermillion 46, OT W. Washington 63, Salem 52 Wabash 68, Oak Hill 55 Wes-Del 63, Cambridge City 49 White River Valley 72, Shoals 35 POSTPONEMENTS AND CANCELLATIONS S. Bend Clay vs. Glenn, ppd. GIRLS BASKETBALL Bloomfield 56, Union (Dugger) 29 Covenant Christian 75, S. Putnam 29 Decatur Central 59, Whiteland 54 E. Central 75, Greensburg 36 Greenfield 61, Avon 51 Hagerstown 41, Winchester 30 Hamilton Southeastern 37, Fishers 27 Indpls Ben Davis 60, Indpls Perry Meridian 43 Indpls Chatard 60, Indpls Cathedral 51 Indpls Pike 49, Indpls N. Central 43 Indpls Roncalli 69, Indpls Ritter 41 Indpls Shortridge 64, Indpls Attucks 37 Knightstown 51, Tri 41 Lapel 74, Alexandria 34 Lowell 66, Hanover Central 44 Madison 71, Southwestern (Jefferson) 41 Monroe Central 62, Northeastern 27 Monrovia 64, Eminence 17 Morgan Twp. 46, Hebron 28 N. Harrison 54, Silver Creek 38 Northridge 46, Elkhart Central 21 Plainfield 57, Greenwood 54, OT Providence 69, S. Central (Harrison) 48 S. Bend Washington 102, Gary West 20 Triton Central 76, Morristown 52 Union (Modoc) 72, Seton Catholic 32 Vincennes Rivet 66, Washington Catholic 17

NBA Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division W L Pct Toronto 6 8 .429 Philadelphia 6 10 .375

GB — 1

Boston 6 11 .353 1½ Brooklyn 4 11 .267 2½ New York 3 10 .231 2½ Southeast Division W L Pct GB Miami 12 3 .800 — Atlanta 8 8 .500 4½ Washington 7 8 .467 5 Charlotte 7 9 .438 5½ Orlando 6 9 .400 6 Central Division W L Pct GB Indiana 14 1 .933 — Chicago 7 7 .500 6½ Detroit 6 9 .400 8 Cleveland 4 11 .267 10 Milwaukee 2 12 .143 11½ WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division W L Pct GB San Antonio 13 2 .867 — Houston 11 5 .688 2½ Dallas 10 6 .625 3½ Memphis 8 7 .533 5 New Orleans 6 8 .429 6½ Northwest Division W L Pct GB Portland 13 2 .867 — Oklahoma City 10 3 .769 2 Denver 8 6 .571 4½ Minnesota 8 9 .471 6 Utah 2 14 .125 11½ Pacific Division W L Pct GB L.A. Clippers 10 5 .667 — Golden State 9 7 .563 1½ L.A. Lakers 8 8 .500 2½ Phoenix 7 7 .500 2½ Sacramento 4 9 .308 5 Tuesday’s Games Washington 116, L.A. Lakers 111 Brooklyn 102, Toronto 100 Orlando 109, Atlanta 92 Golden State 102, New Orleans 101 Wednesday’s Games Orlando 105, Philadelphia 94 Indiana 99, Charlotte 74 L.A. Lakers 99, Brooklyn 94 Memphis 100, Boston 93 Miami 95, Cleveland 84 Chicago 99, Detroit 79 Denver 117, Minnesota 110 Houston 113, Atlanta 84 Oklahoma City 94, San Antonio 88 Washington 100, Milwaukee 92, OT Dallas 103, Golden State 99 Portland at Phoenix, late New York at L.A. Clippers, late Thursday’s Games No games scheduled Friday’s Games San Antonio at Orlando, 7 p.m. Milwaukee at Charlotte, 7 p.m. Miami at Toronto, 7 p.m. Cleveland at Boston, 7:30 p.m. Dallas at Atlanta, 7:30 p.m. L.A. Lakers at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. Brooklyn at Houston, 8 p.m. Golden State at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. New Orleans at Philadelphia, 8 p.m. Washington at Indiana, 8 p.m. New York at Denver, 9 p.m. Phoenix at Utah, 9 p.m. L.A. Clippers at Sacramento, 10 p.m.

NBA Pacers Summary INDIANA (99) George 6-15 2-3 15, West 3-9 5-8 11, Hibbert 4-14 6-7 14, G.Hill 2-10 2-2 7, Stephenson 5-10 5-7 15, Johnson 0-1 0-0 0, Scola 3-6 2-2 8, Watson 6-9 0-0 18, Copeland 0-3 0-0 0, Mahinmi 0-4 3-3 3, Sloan 2-2 0-0 5, S.Hill 0-0 0-0 0, Butler 1-1 0-0 3. Totals 32-84 25-32 99. CHARLOTTE (74) Kidd-Gilchrist 2-4 1-1 5, McRoberts 2-4 0-4 4, Jefferson 7-15 2-4 16, Walker 3-17 7-7 15, Henderson 3-15 4-4 10, Taylor 2-7 0-0 4, Adrien 0-1 0-0 0, Zeller 2-7 3-4 7, Sessions 2-5 0-0 4, Tolliver 0-4 0-0 0, Biyombo 1-1 2-4 4, Pargo 2-3 0-0 5. Totals 26-83 19-28 74. Indiana 22 21 17 39—99 Charlotte 11 27 14 22—74 3-Point Goals—Indiana 10-25 (Watson 6-7, Butler 1-1, Sloan 1-1, George 1-4, G.Hill 1-5, Johnson 0-1, Copeland 0-3, Stephenson 0-3), Charlotte 3-9 (Walker 2-4, Pargo 1-1, Taylor 0-1, McRoberts 0-1, Tolliver 0-2). Fouled Out—None. Rebounds—Indiana 71 (Stephenson, Hibbert 10), Charlotte 54 (Jefferson 9). Assists—Indiana 20 (George, G.Hill 4), Charlotte 13 (Walker 3). Total Fouls—Indiana 23, Charlotte 27. Technicals—Indiana delay of game, Charlotte Coach Clifford, Charlotte delay of game. A—15,170 (19,077).

NHL Standings EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division GP W LOT Pts GF GA Boston 25 16 7 2 34 69 52 Tampa Bay 24 15 8 1 31 72 61 Detroit 26 12 7 7 31 69 71 Montreal 25 14 9 2 30 67 52 Toronto 24 14 9 1 29 66 60 Ottawa 25 10 11 4 24 74 81 Florida 26 7 14 5 19 58 86 Buffalo 26 5 20 1 11 45 82 Metropolitan Division GP W LOT Pts GF GA Pittsburgh 25 15 9 1 31 72 58 NY Rangers 25 13 12 0 26 53 61 Washington 25 12 11 2 26 76 74 Carolina 25 10 10 5 25 53 70 New Jersey 25 9 11 5 23 53 62 Philadelphia 23 10 11 2 22 50 56 Columbus 25 9 13 3 21 62 75 NY Islanders 25 8 14 3 19 70 85 WESTERN CONFERENCE Central Division GP W LOT Pts GF GA Chicago 25 17 4 4 38 92 71 St. Louis 23 17 3 3 37 82 50 Colorado 22 17 5 0 34 69 45 Minnesota 25 15 6 4 34 64 58 Nashville 25 13 10 2 28 60 69 Winnipeg 27 12 11 4 28 72 78 Dallas 23 12 9 2 26 67 68 Pacific Division GP W LOT Pts GF GA Anaheim 27 17 7 3 37 83 71 San Jose 23 15 3 5 35 79 52 Los Angeles 25 16 6 3 35 67 53 Phoenix 24 14 6 4 32 80 78 Vancouver 26 12 9 5 29 67 68 Calgary 23 8 11 4 20 64 84 Edmonton 25 7 16 2 16 65 89 NOTE: Two points for a win, one point for overtime loss. Tuesday’s Games Dallas 6, Anaheim 3 Wednesday’s Games Pittsburgh 6, Toronto 5, SO

Braun regretful MILWAUKEE (AP) — Ryan Braun ended his silence Wednesday, speaking to the media for the first time since accepting a season-ending, 65-game suspension for violating Major League Baseball’s anti-drug agreement. Braun was taking part in a holiday food drive at Miller Park and said he was “deeply remorseful” for his actions but declined to offer specific answers to most questions. “The goal for me is just being able to move forward,” Braun said. “I wish that I could go back and change things but I don’t have that opportunity to do that, so I’m just going to do everything in my power to move forward.” Braun was the first star to be suspended as part of the doping scandal surrounding the now-closed Biogenesis of America anti-aging clinic in Florida.

THE HERALD REPUBLICAN

SCOREBOARD •

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

The five-time All-Star tested positive for elevated testosterone in October of his 2011 NL MVP season, but his 50-game suspension was overturned when an arbitrator ruled the urine sample was mishandled. All along, Braun maintained his innocence and heavy criticism fell on the urine sample collector, Dino Laurenzi Jr. Braun said he reached out to Laurenzi and the two are moving forward. “I have not made any payments to him,” Braun said. “I’ve had some really productive and positive conversations with him. The Laurenzi family was actually gracious and kind enough to have my fiancee Larisa and I over to their house for dinner last night, and we had some really good conversation. We’ve made amends and I think we’re both excited to be able to move forward and put this behind us.”

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Montreal 3, Buffalo 1 Carolina 4, New Jersey 3 Winnipeg 3, N.Y. Islanders 2 Ottawa 6, Washington 4 Nashville 4, Columbus 0 Detroit 6, Boston 1 Tampa Bay 4, Philadelphia 2 N.Y. Rangers 5, Florida 2 Phoenix 3, Minnesota 1 St. Louis at Colorado, late Chicago at Calgary, late Los Angeles at San Jose, late Thursday’s Games Vancouver at Ottawa, 7:30 p.m. Edmonton at Nashville, 8 p.m. Friday’s Games Winnipeg at Philadelphia, 11:30 a.m. N.Y. Rangers at Boston, 1 p.m. Pittsburgh at Tampa Bay, 4 p.m. Detroit at N.Y. Islanders, 4 p.m. Calgary at Anaheim, 4 p.m. St. Louis at San Jose, 4 p.m. Montreal at Washington, 5 p.m. Colorado at Minnesota, 6 p.m. New Jersey at Carolina, 7 p.m. Edmonton at Columbus, 7 p.m. Toronto at Buffalo, 7:30 p.m. Chicago at Dallas, 8:30 p.m.

NFL Standings AMERICAN CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA New England 8 3 0 .727 288 230 N.Y. Jets 5 6 0 .455 186 287 Miami 5 6 0 .455 229 245 Buffalo 4 7 0 .364 236 273 South W L T Pct PF PA Indianapolis 7 4 0 .636 263 260 Tennessee 5 6 0 .455 250 245 Jacksonville 2 9 0 .182 142 324 Houston 2 9 0 .182 199 289 North W L T Pct PF PA Cincinnati 7 4 0 .636 275 206 Pittsburgh 5 6 0 .455 243 256 Baltimore 5 6 0 .455 227 215 Cleveland 4 7 0 .364 203 265 West W L T Pct PF PA Denver 9 2 0 .818 429 289 Kansas City 9 2 0 .818 270 179 San Diego 5 6 0 .455 269 260 Oakland 4 7 0 .364 213 269 NATIONAL CONFERENCE East W L T Pct PF PA Dallas 6 5 0 .545 298 279 Philadelphia 6 5 0 .545 276 260 N.Y. Giants 4 7 0 .364 213 280 Washington 3 8 0 .273 252 338 South W L T Pct PF PA New Orleans 9 2 0 .818 305 196 Carolina 8 3 0 .727 258 151 Tampa Bay 3 8 0 .273 211 258 Atlanta 2 9 0 .182 227 309 North W L T Pct PF PA Detroit 6 5 0 .545 286 277 Chicago 6 5 0 .545 303 309 Green Bay 5 5 1 .500 284 265 Minnesota 2 8 1 .227 266 346 West W L T Pct PF PA Seattle 10 1 0 .909 306 179 San Francisco 7 4 0 .636 274 184 Arizona 7 4 0 .636 254 223 St. Louis 5 6 0 .455 266 255 Thursday’s Game New Orleans 17, Atlanta 13 Sunday’s Games Minnesota 26, Green Bay 26, OT Jacksonville 13, Houston 6 San Diego 41, Kansas City 38 St. Louis 42, Chicago 21 Pittsburgh 27, Cleveland 11 Tampa Bay 24, Detroit 21 Baltimore 19, N.Y. Jets 3 Carolina 20, Miami 16 Tennessee 23, Oakland 19 Arizona 40, Indianapolis 11 Dallas 24, N.Y. Giants 21 New England 34, Denver 31, OT Open: Buffalo, Cincinnati, Philadelphia, Seattle Monday’s Game San Francisco 27, Washington 6 Thursday, Nov. 28 Green Bay at Detroit, 12:30 p.m. Oakland at Dallas, 4:30 p.m. Pittsburgh at Baltimore, 8:30 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 1 Chicago at Minnesota, 1 p.m. New England at Houston, 1 p.m. Tennessee at Indianapolis, 1 p.m. Jacksonville at Cleveland, 1 p.m. Tampa Bay at Carolina, 1 p.m. Arizona at Philadelphia, 1 p.m. Miami at N.Y. Jets, 1 p.m. St. Louis at San Francisco, 4:05 p.m. Atlanta vs. Buffalo at Toronto, 4:05 p.m. Cincinnati at San Diego, 4:25 p.m. Denver at Kansas City, 4:25 p.m. N.Y. Giants at Washington, 8:30 p.m. Monday, Dec. 2 New Orleans at Seattle, 8:40 p.m.

College Football Top 25 Slate Friday, Nov. 29 No. 12 Oregon vs. Oregon State, 7 p.m. No. 15 LSU vs. Arkansas, 2:30 p.m. No. 16 Fresno State at San Jose State, 3:30 p.m. No. 17 UCF vs. South Florida, 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 30 No. 1 Alabama at No. 4 Auburn, 3:30 p.m. No. 2 Florida State at Florida, Noon No. 3 Ohio State at Michigan, Noon No. 5 Missouri vs. No. 19 Texas A&M, 7:45 p.m. No. 6 Clemson at No. 10 South Carolina, 7 p.m. No. 8 Stanford vs. No. 25 Notre Dame, 7 p.m. No. 9 Baylor at TCU, 3:30 p.m. No. 11 Michigan State vs. Minnesota, Noon No. 13 Arizona State vs. Arizona, 9:30 p.m. No. 14 Wisconsin vs. Penn State, 3:30 p.m. No. 22 UCLA at No. 23 Southern Cal, 8 p.m. No. 24 Duke at North Carolina, Noon

NAIA Football Playoffs First Round Saturday, Nov. 23 St. Francis (Ind.) 20, Faulkner 13 Cumberlands (Ky.) 56, St. Ambrose 28 Missouri Valley 38, Northwestern (Iowa) 13 Morningside 40, Rocky Mountain 21 Grand View 38, Ottawa (Kan.) 13

Tabor 14, Benedictine (Kan.) 13 Baker 10, Sterling 7 Carroll (Mont.) 38, Georgetown (Ky.) 28 Quarterfinals Saturday, Nov. 30 Saint Francis (Ind.) (9-2) at Cumberlands (Ky.) (11-0), Noon Morningside (10-1) at Baker (11-1), 2 p.m. Missouri Valley (9-2) at Carroll (Mont.) (11-1), 2 p.m. Tabor (10-2) at Grand View (11-0), TBA

Transactions BASEBALL American League LOS ANGELES ANGELS — Agreed to terms with RHP Joe Smith on a three-year contract. Designated RHP Juan Gutierrez for assignment. TEXAS RANGERS — Claimed OF Rafael Ortega off waivers from Colorado. Frontier League WINDY CITY THUNDERBOLTS — Signed OF Andrew Brauer, RHP Michael Click, C Doug Joyce, and RHP Reese McGraw to contract extensions. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association SACRAMENTO KINGS — Recalled G Ray McCallum from Reno (NBADL). FOOTBALL National Football League DENVER BRONCOS — Placed DT Kevin Vickerson on the injured reserve list. Signed DT Sione Fua. DETROIT LIONS — Signed G Rodney Austin from the practice squad. Released DE Austen Lane. GREEN BAY PACKERS — Signed LB Victor Aiyewa from the practice squad. Placed RB Johnathan Franklin on the injured reserve list. NEW ENGLAND PATRIOTS — Signed DT Sealver Siliga from the practice squad. Signed TE D.J. Williams. Signed OT Patrick Ford to the practice squad. NEW YORK GIANTS — Signed DB Ross Weaver to the practice squad. NEW YORK JETS — Signed TE Chris Pantale from the practice squad. Signed WR Michael Campbell to the practice squad. OAKLAND RAIDERS — Activated OT Jared Veldheer from the injured reserve-return list. Waived QB Tyler Wilson. SAN FRANCISCO 49ERS — Signed QB McLeod Bethel-Thompson to the practice squad. Released LB D’Aundre Reed from the practice squad. SEATTLE SEAHAWKS — Released CB Perrish Cox. Signed CB Deshawn Shead From the practice squad. Signed CB Akeem Auguste to the practice squad. TENNNESSEE TITANS — Signed S Shann Schillinger. Signed OL Tyler Horn to the practice squad. Waived OL Oscar Johnson from the practice squad. TAMPA BAY BUCCANEERS — Signed TE Kyle Adams. Placed TE Tom Crabtree on the injured reserve list. Canadian Football League B.C. LIONS — Announced the club and offensive co-ordinator Jacques Chapdelaine have mutually agreed to part ways. EDMONTON ESKIMOS — Named Chris Jones coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League BUFFALO SABRES — Claimed F Matt D’Agostini off waivers from Pittsburgh. Placed RW Corey Tropp on waivers for assignment to Rochester (AHL). DETROIT RED WINGS — Signed D Jonathan Ericsson to a six-year contract extension. MONTREAL CANADIENS — Agreed to terms with assistant general manager Rick Dudley on a multiyear contract extension. Reassigned D Magnus Nygren to Farjestad BK (Swedish Hockey League). NEW JERSEY DEVILS — Placed C Stephen Gionta on injured reserve, retroactive to Nov. 23. Recalled D Seth Helgeson from Albany (AHL), then returned him to Albany. PHOENIX COYOTES — Recalled F Chris Brown and D Connor Murphy from Portland (AHL). Announced D Rostislav Klesla cleared waivers and will report to Portland (AHL). TAMPA BAY LIGHTNING — Recalled F Dana Tyrell from Syracuse (AHL). TORONTO MAPLE LEAFS — Signed F Frederik Gauthier to a three-year entry level contract. WASHINGTON CAPITALS — Recalled D Tyson Strachan from Hershey (AHL). American Hockey League SPRINGFIELD FALCONS — Recalled F Jeremy Langlois from Evansville (ECHL). ECHL SOUTH CAROLINA STINGRAYS — Signed G David LeNeveu. Central Hockey Legue DENVER CUTTHROATS — Signed D Jeff Neitenbach. ST. CHARLES CHILL — Signed D Brock Wilson. WICHITA THUNDER — Announced Oklahoma City (AHL) assigned F Erick Lizon to the team. Announced the retirement of D Travis Wight. LACROSSE National Lacrosse League BUFFALO BANDITS — Agreed to terms with D Derek Suddons on a two-year contract. OLYMPICS U.S. ANTI-DOPING AGENCY — Announced cyclist Jason Rogers tested positive for a prohibited substance and accepted a nine-month suspension. COLLEGE BIG EAST CONFERENCE — Named Jackie Finn interim project manager for social media. EASTERN COLLEGE ATHLETIC CONFERENCE — Named Jim Huetter, Jon Levinson, Kathy Lynch and Tom Reinisch basketball officiating coordinators. MONTANA — Signed football coach Mick Delaney to a contract extension through the 2014 season. OREGON — Signed men’s basketball coach Dana Altman to a three-year contract extension through the 2019-20 season.

B3

SPORTS BRIEF • No. 3 Wildcats beat EMU LEXINGTON, Ky. (AP) — Aaron Harrison scored 22 points, Willie CauleyStein added 15, and third-ranked Kentucky earned its 500th Rupp Arena win by beating Eastern Michigan 81-63 on Wednesday. Two days after escaping Cleveland State with a late rally, the Wildcats (6-1) was more methodical in improving to 500-62 lifetime in the 37-year-old home named for legendary coach Adolph Rupp. Leading just 35-32 at halftime, Kentucky steadily built it to double digits with 12:52 left and led by as many as 21 with 2:39 remaining. Kentucky controlled the glass, outrebounding the Eagles 52-33 including 19 offensive and scoring 23 second-chance points.

On The Air • TODAY C OLLEG E BAS K ETBALL Old Spice Classic Purdue vs. Oklahoma St ate, E S P N2, noon Butler vs. Washington St ate, E S P N2, 2 p.m. Memphis vs. Siena, E S P N2, 6:3 0 p.m. LS U vs. Saint Joseph’s, E S P N2, 8:3 0 p.m. Wooden Legacy Marquette vs. Cal St ate-Fullerton, E S P N2, 4:3 0 p.m. Creighton vs. Arizona St ate, E S P N2, 11 p.m. Battle 4 Atlantis Xavier vs. Iowa, E S P N2, 7 p.m. Tennessee vs. UTE P, N BCS N, 9:3 0 p.m. N F L FO OTBALL Green Bay vs. Detroit, Fox, 12:3 0 p.m. Oakland vs. Dallas, CB S, 4:3 0 p.m. Pittsburgh vs. Baltimore, N BC, 8:3 0 p.m. SO C CE R U E FA Europa, Tottenham vs. Tromso, Fox Sports 1, 1 p.m. U E FA Europa, Zulte Waregem vs. Wigan, Fox Sports 1, 3 p.m. C OLLEG E FO OTBALL Mississippi St ate vs. Mississippi, E S P N, 7:3 0 p.m. Texas Tech vs. Texas, Fox Sports 1, 7:3 0 p.m. F R I DAY C OLLEG E FO OTBALL Iowa vs. Nebrask a, ABC, noon S M U vs. Houston, E S P N2, noon Ark ansas vs. LS U, CB S, 2:3 0 p.m. Florida International vs. Florida Atlantic, Fox Sports 1, 3 p.m. Miami vs. Pittsburgh, ABC, 3:3 0 p.m. Washington St ate vs. Washington, Fox, 3:3 0 p.m. Oregon St ate vs. Oregon, Fox Sports 1, 7 p.m. South Florida vs. Central Florida, E S P N, 8 p.m. C OLLEG E BAS K ETBALL Fairfield vs. Providence, Fox Sports 1, 12:3 0 p.m. Old Spice Classic semifinals, E S P N, 1:3 0 p.m.; and E S P N2, 5:3 0 p.m. Ark ansas-Little Rock vs. Oklahoma, F S N, 3 p.m. Barclays Center Classic, Georgia Tech vs. Mississippi, N BCS N, 4:3 0 p.m. N IT Season Tip- Off championship, E S P N, 6 p.m. Battle 4 Atlantis semifinals, N BCS N, 7 p.m. Florida St ate vs. Florida, E S P N2, 7:3 0 p.m. Wooden Legacy semifinal, E S P N2, 9:3 0 p.m. Las Vegas Invit ational, Northwestern vs. UCLA, E S P N2, 11:3 0 p.m. N H L HO CK EY N.Y. Rangers vs. Boston, N BC, 1 p.m.

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B4

HAPPENINGS! •

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THE HERALD REPUBLIAN

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

At The Movies • Kendallville

Today-Sun. at 10:15, 12:35, 2:55, 5:15, 7:35 and 9:55, Mon.-Thurs. at 10:15, 12:35, 2:55, 5:15 and 7:35. THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG-13) — NCG Cinemas. Fri.-Sun. at 10:45, 11:45, 2, 3, 5:10, 6:10, 8:20 and 9:20,Mon.-Thurs. at 10:45, 11:45, 2, 3, 5:10 and 6:10. FROZEN (PG) — NCG Cinemas. Fri.-Sun. at 11, 12:45, 3:10, 4 and 9, Mon.-Thurs. at 11, 12:45, 3:10 and 4. FROZEN 3D (PG) — NCG Cinemas. Fri.-Thurs. at 1:30 and 6:30. HOMEFRONT R (R) — NCG Cinemas. Fri.-Sun. at 11;15, 1:50, 4:25, 7 and 9:35, Mon.-Thurs. at 11:15, 1:50, 4:25 and 7.

FROZEN (PG) — Strand I. Tonight at 7:15, Fri.-Sun. at 2 and 7:15, Mon.-Thurs. at 7:15. THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG-13) — Strand II. Tonight at 7, Fri.-Sun. at 2 and 7, Mon.-Thurs. at 7.

Auburn JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (R) — NCG Cinemas. Fri.-Sun. at 10:35, 5:35, 7:45 and 9:55, Mon.-Thurs. at 10:35, 5:35 and 7:45. FREE BIRDS (PG) — NCG Cinemas. Fri.-Thurs. at 11:35 and 1:50. LAST VEGAS (PG-13) — NCG Cinemas. Fri.-Sun. at 4, 6:40 and 9:25, Mon.-Thurs. at 4 and 6:40. THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (PG-13) — NCG Cinemas. Fri.-Thurs. at 11, 4:25 and 7:10. THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG-13) — NCG Cinemas. Fri-Sun. at 1:40 and 9:50, Mon.-Thurs. at 1:40. DELIVERY MAN (PG-13) — NCG Cinemas.

Garrett CATCHING FIRE (PG-13) — Silver Screen. Fri. at 7, Sat. and Sun. at 2 and 7, Mon.-Thurs. at 7.

Fort Wayne 12 YEARS A SLAVE (R) — Carmike. Today through Tues. at 1, 4, 7

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and 10. BLACK NATIVITY (PG) — Carmike. Today-Tues. at 12:30, 3, 5:20, 7:40 and 10; Coldwater Crossing. Today, Sun.-Tues. at 11:55 a.m., 2:25, 4:55, 7:25 and 10:05, Fri. and Sat. at 9:10 a.m., 11:55 a.m., 2:25, 4:55, 7:25 and 10:05. CAPTAIN PHILLIPS (PG-13) — Carmike. Today, Sun.-Tues. at 1:45, 4:45 and 7:45, Fri. and Sat. at 1:45, 4:45, 7:45 and 10:45. CLOUDY WITH A CHANCE OF MEATBALLS 2 (PG) — Carmike. Today-Tues. at 1:25 and 4. DALLAS BUYERS CLUB (R) — Coldwater Crossing. Today, Sun.-Tues. at 1, 4:10, 7:05 and 10:15, Fri. and Sat. at 10:10 a.m., 1, 4:10, 7:05 and 10:15. DELIVERY MAN (PG-13) — Carmike. Today, Sun.-Tues. at 12:30, 1:20, 3, 4, 5:30, 6:30, 8 and 9, Fri. and Sat. at 12:30, 1:20, 3, 4, 5:30, 6:30, 8, 9 and 10:30; Coldwater Crossing. Today, Sun.-Tues. at 11:50 a.m., 2:20, 4:50, 7:20 and 9:50, Fri. and Sat. at 9:15 a.m., 11:50 a.m., 2:20, 4:50, 7:40 and 9:50. ENDER’S GAME (PG-13) — Carmike. Today, Sun.-Tues. at 12:30, 3, 5:30 and 8:15, Fri. and Sat. at 12:30, 3, 5:30, 8:15 and 11. FREE BIRDS (PG) — Carmike. Today-Tues. at 1:10, 3:20, 5:30 and 7:50. FROZEN (PG) — Carmike. Today-Tues. at 1, 1:45, 4, 4:40, 7, 7:30 and 9:35; Coldwater Crossing. Today, Sun.-Tues. at 11:40 a.m., 12:40, 2:10, 3:10, 4:40, 7:10 and 9:40, Fri. and Sat. at 10 a.m., 11:40 a.m., 12:40, 2:10, 3:10, 4:40, 7:10 and 9:40. FROZEN 3D (PG) — Carmike. Today-Tues. at 12:30, 3, 5:30 and 8; Coldwater Crossing. Today, Sun.-Tues. at 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40 and 10:10, Fri. and Sat. at 9:30 a.m., 12:10, 2:40, 5:10, 7:40 and 10:10. GRAVITY (PG-13) — Carmike. Today-Tues. at 12:35, 2:55, 5:10, 7:30 and 10.

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HOMEFRONT (R) — Carmike. Today-Tues. at 1:50, 4:25, 6:55 and 9:25; Coldwater Crossing. Today, Sun.-Tues. at 11:40 a.m., 12:40, 2:10, 3:10, 4:40, 7:10 and 9:40, Fri. and Sat. at 9:20 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 2:15, 4:45, 7:15 and 9:45. JACKASS PRESENTS: BAD GRANDPA (R) — Carmike. Today-Tues. at 6:30 and 9. LAST VEGAS (PG-13) — Carmike. Today-Tues. at 1:40, 4:15, 6:50 and 9:20; Coldwater Crossing. Today-Tues. at 6:40 and 9:15. THE BOOK THIEF (PG-13) — Coldwater Crossing. Today, Sun.-Tues. at 12:50, 3:55, 6:55 and 9:55, Fri. and Sat. at 9:50 a.m., 12:50, 3:55, 6:55 and 9:55. THE BEST MAN HOLIDAY (R) — Carmike. Today-Tues. at 1, 4, 7 and 10; Coldwater Crossing. Today, Sun.-Tues. at 12:45, 3:40, 6:45 and 9:35, Fri. and Sat. at 9:45 a.m., 12:45, 3:40, 6:45 and 9:35. THE CHRISTMAS CANDLE (PG) — Coldwater Crossing. Today-Tues. at 11:35 a.m., 1:55, 4:15, 6:35 and 9:10. THE HUNGER GAMES: CATCHING FIRE (PG-13) — Carmike. Today, Sun.-Tues. at 12:45, 1:15, 1:45, 4, 4:30, 5, 7:15, 7:45 and 8:45, Fri. and Sat. at 12:45, 1:15, 1:45, 2:15, 4, 4:30, 5, 7:15, 8:15, 9, 10:30 and 11; Coldwater Crossing. Today, Sun.-Tues. at 11:30 a.m., 12, 12:30, 3, 3:30, 4, 6:30, 7, 7:30, 10, 10:30 and 11, Fri. and Sat. at 9 a.m., 11:30 a.m., 12, 12:30, 3, 3:30, 4, 6:30, 7, 7:30, 10, 10:30 and 11. THOR: THE DARK WORLD (PG-13) — Carmike. Today, Sun.-Tues. at 2, 5 and 8, Fri. and Sat. at 2, 5, 8 and 11; Coldwater Crossing. Today, Sun.-Tues. at 1:10, 7:35 and 10:20, Fri. and Sat. at 10:30, 1:10, 7:35 and 10:30. THOR: THE DARK WORLD 3D (PG-13) — Carmike. Tonight-Tues. at 10; Coldwater Crossing. Today-Tues. at 4:20.

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In this 2005 file photo, country music legend Willie Nelson performs at the 20th anniversary Farm Aid concert in Tinley Park, Ill. Nelson’s famous guitar “Trigger,” a Martin N-20 nylon-string acoustic, is so worn from strumming over the years that there’s a hole in the body. The guitar is among those featured in a book entitled “108 Rock Guitars” by Lisa S. Johnson.

‘108 Rock Star Guitars’ reveals battle-ax beauty NEW YORK (AP) — Sometimes, a picture is worth a thousand songs. The supersized book “108 Rock Star Guitars” (Glitterati Inc.) demonstrates that six-stringed instruments owned by celebrities and virtuoso sidemen can look as good as they rock. The 17-year undertaking by photographer Lisa S. Johnson partly benefits the Les Paul Foundation. Paul, the Rock Hall musician-inventor, wrote the foreword before he died. Not a guitar geek? Don’t fret. Whether you define “pickup” as a truck, a dating technique or a guitar part, you can revel in the glitz-and-grit world where these prized possessions reside. The instruments (one’s named Baby) evoke tender talk from macho musicians. But some of these battle-ax beauties have seen more action than a roller derby queen: They bear the gashes and sweat stains to prove it. The author, who grew up in a musical family, underscores musicians’ emotional attachment to their instruments. “I don’t believe any serious musician feels that his instrument is an inanimate object,” Tom Scholz of the group Boston tells Johnson. Steve Vai, who went solo after playing with Frank Zappa’s band, once described his guitar as “the voice of my heart” in moments of depression, euphoria and “divine love. … I have cried, screamed, prayed and bled through that instrument.” The book lauds the instrument-makers, called luthiers, and the techs, along with the guitars. Pawnshop wallflowers blossom into unbridled stardom. There are kaleidoscopic, patriotic and wildcat patterns; gorgeous maple and mahogany; delicate carvings of leaves and acorns; a stuck-on Chinese cookie fortune; python skin; fake fur; little-girl superheroes.

Some seem to revel in musical masochism: — Zakk Wylde (Ozzy Osbourne Band) — blowtorch burns, hammered-on bottle caps. — Slash (Velvet Revolver, Guns N’ Roses) — cigarette carelessness. As the story goes, the guitarist was “one with the music” while accidentally inflicting a “charred reminder of rock ‘n’ roll nirvana.” John Rzeznik (Goo Goo Dolls) resurrected a broken Stratocaster into a 4-string. The word “OUCH!” is splayed over its torso; it’s now named Halfcaster. “I was amazed when I threw the guitar in the air and the top portion split right off,” Rzeznik recalled via email. “I had my guitar tech take it to a luthier in LA who sanded off the rough edges and fixed the electronics. “I used it on a song called ‘Big Machine’ for a couple years after that. Surprisingly, the tone didn’t really change; it was a cheap guitar that didn’t sound that great to begin with. Haha!” The appreciation of instruments as visual art is an age-old concept. They “may evoke status, identity, or indicate events — sacred or profane,” comments J. Kenneth Moore, the Frederick P. Rose curator in charge of the Department of Musical Instruments at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. “They become sounding, tangible works of art — telling many stories of the life and times of those who used them,” he said. A guitar owned by James J.Y. Young of Styx bears an elaborate carving of Cerberus, ancient mythology’s three-headed Underworld guard dog. A double-neck owned by Cheap Trick’s Rick Nielsen has a quirky folk art feel. Its two-pronged top forms the legs of Nielsen’s upside-down caricature. The figure, named Uncle Dick, displays a thumbs-up, but his expression looks maniacal.


B6

AREA • STATE •

kpcnews.com

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

Black Friday is like ‘a retail arms race’ Fremont that will be open for shopping all night long, starting at 10 p.m. today Black Friday, which is still an important day for retailers, is losing its claim as the unofficial start to the holiday shopping season. “When does it actually begin? No one really knows any more,� said John Talbott, associate director for the Center for Education and Research in Retailing at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business. Thanksgiving used to be one of the few days when retailers remained closed. But based on retail-industry data, shopping may be turning into a new Thanksgiving Day tradition. According to a National Retail Federation survey, the number

BY SARA ANNE CORRIGAN Evansville Courier & Press AND STAFF REPORTS

EVANSVILLE — In the Black Friday of the not-so-distant past, shoppers lined up for store openings at 6 a.m. the day after Thanksgiving. If a retailer was really pushing the envelope, its stores might open at 5 a.m. That seems pretty quaint now. In recent years, retailers have pushed opening hours ever earlier, and this year is no exception. Retailers in the area and nationwide are experimenting with a variety of approaches, including Thanksgiving Day openings and pre-Thanksgiving special events, in an attempt to maximize holiday sales. There are even stores, like those at the Outlet Shoppes at

of Thanksgiving Day shoppers climbed dramatically in recent years. In 2009, the survey said, 18.1 million people shopped on Thanksgiving Day. That number has increased every year, hitting 35.4 million last year. Talbott described Black Friday as “a retail arms race� that has retailers extending their hours and offering big doorbusters in a competition for consumer dollars. “Once one guy gets the weapon, the other guy has to get the same thing.� The competition is fierce for a couple of reasons, Talbott said. For one thing, he said, consumers have a set amount of money to spend on holiday shopping. In other words, someone with a gift budget of $500 will spend about the same amount no

matter when the stores open. So retailers may choose to open early in hopes of getting some of those sales before the customer’s wallet runs dry. “It’s effectively a zero-sum game,� Talbott said. Another factor, he said, has to do with the fact that most major U.S. retailers are public companies. How does this make a difference? First, a bit of background: In the retail industry, a metric called comparable-store sales is considered an important measure of performance. This measures a retailer’s sales only at its stores that have been open for the past 12 months, which eliminates the year-to-year variance caused by store openings and closings. Black Friday is not an

especially profitable day for retailers, Talbot said, because much of the merchandise is offered at a discount. But it is a day when retailers typically see higher-than-normal sales numbers. So retailers always want their stores to sell more than they did a year ago. If they don’t have a good sales day on Black Friday, same-store sales for the month may decline. If same-store sales decline, Wall Street will take notice and the retailer’s stock price will likely drop. Even if the retailer comes back with good results on its next quarterly earnings report, Talbott said, by that time the stock price has already been affected. “Once you take a hit like that, sometimes it’s tough to get it back.�

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AREA • STATE •

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

kpcnews.com

B7

Better Business Bureau offers holiday shopping tips BY JENNIFER DECKER jdecker@kpcmedia.com

‘Tis the holiday season, which officially starts on Black Friday, traditionally the busiest shopping day of the year. Many retailers have already been aggressive with pre-Black Friday sales. The Better Business Bureau of Northeast Indiana has some tips to help take the madness out of holiday shopping, whether it is this weekend, Cyber Monday or any of the other myriad holiday promotions: • After compiling a shopping list, decide what purchases to make and

scour advertisements for deals. Also, check online for price comparisons. • Know the store’s return policies. • Determine a budget in advance and stick to it. • Dress comfortably. Plan to be walking and standing a lot. • Carry some beverages and/or snacks for long waits. • Request gift receipts for purchases to enclose with the gift, in case the receiver wants to return or exchange it. • If gift wrapping is offered at the store, take advantage of it. It can save time. • Become an expert on

big ticket items. Research the product and its different models. It’s also important to shop with businesses that embody integrity. Visit bbb.org for details. • Consider gifts that help friends and family make money through a side job or hobby. Provide younger family members with financial gifts, such as a contribution to a college fund. • Use reward points with online shopping. Look for unique opportunities to save on items. Read the fine print and make sure such gifts are transferable and returnable.

• Begin early. Look for deals early in the year, and don’t be afraid to buy gifts far in advance and store them somewhere at home until the holiday season approaches. The biggest online shopping day of the year is the approaching Cyber Monday. In addition to following the above tips online, the BBB also recommends: • Is there an “httpsâ€? and a secure padlock in the Internet browser on the purchase page? If not, think twice about submitting any credit/debit card information. Hackers are dominate anytime, but worse during holidays.

• Check for shipping details. With the busy holiday season, items may need to be ordered a few weeks in advance to be sure they are delivered on time. • If shopping by smart phone make sure a business’s WiFi is secured. • It is recommended a credit card is used before a debit card. A credit card’s liability is $50 or less, should a card be stolen and it is reported in a timely manner. Keep track of all shopping receipts and shipping dates from all of your purchases in one place.

Kid tested Children tested toys this year and online sources said the following were rated tops: LeapPad Ultra, Furby Boom, Monster High doll, Squigs, Skylanders, Big Hugs Elmo, Spirograph and Nerf guns. Other sources said hot items are: Dunck bath toys, Emu Australia boots, Eco-dough, Barbie glam boat, Playskool kids’ digital camera, Singing One Direction dolls, lowercase ABC blocks, hand-knitted toys and a Batman clock.

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B8

THE HERALD REPUBLICAN

AREA • STATE •

kpcnews.com

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

China says it monitored defiant US bomber flights

JENNIFER DECKER

Steelworkers donate to Project Help The 200-member United Steelworkers Local 101-L, Angola, does charitable work throughout the year. From gathering school supplies to recently delivering food to Project Help of Steuben County, members of the union also adopted four families for holiday assistance in providing groceries, hats and gloves. Those presenting collected items include,

from left, Nikki Taylor, Grace Alexander, Mark Hankey, Lisa Chapin, Jen Rogers, Kelly Pelletier and Project Help Executive Director Sheri Frank. Other union committee members who helped with the effort and not pictured included Dennis Michael, Cindy Peterson, Rosie Crody, Bonnie Diehl, Marcella Mullins and Tim Squire.

Italian Senate expels Berlusconi ROME (AP) — The Italian Senate on Wednesday expelled three-time ex-Premier Silvio Berlusconi from Parliament over his tax fraud conviction, ending his two-decade legislative run for now, but not his political career. Berlusconi has warned that the unprecedented move would embarrass Italy internationally, and he maintained his defiance even as the Senate voted, addressing a cheering crowd outside of his Roman palazzo a short walk away. “We are here on a bitter day, a day of mourning for democracy,” Berlusconi declared. Even though he won’t hold a seat in Parliament for at least six years, the 77-year-old Berlusconi pledged to remain

involved in politics and urged his followers not to despair — noting that other political leaders are not lawmakers. He has relaunched his Forza Italia party and he still commands millions of loyal supporters. “Also from outside the Parliament, we can continue to fight for our liberty,” he said, citing the founder of the 5 Star Movement, Beppe Grillo, who is not a lawmaker, and Matteo Renzi, the Florence mayor who is a Democratic Party star widely tipped as a future premier candidate. Supporters, including Berlusconi’s 28-year-old girlfriend, who had a Forza Italia flag wrapped around her shoulders against the cold, were treated to a video

montage of Berlusconi’s greatest political hits from a career that began in 1994 when he first came into power with a political party named for a soccer chant “Let’s Go Italy.” “For us, he will always be there,” said Marilda Antonello as she held a banner reading “The law is not equal for everyone. Sick justice.” “He is our only leader. He is the only man who can take Italy forward,” she said. The Senate vote on whether to remove Berlusconi from the chamber stems from a 2012 law that bans anyone sentenced to more than two years in prison from holding or running for public office for six years.

BEIJING (AP) — China acknowledged Wednesday it let two American B-52 bombers fly unhindered through its newly declared air defense zone in the East China Sea despite its earlier threat to take defensive measures against unidentified foreign aircraft. The U.S. flights, which tested the Chinese zone for the first time since it was declared over the weekend, raised questions about Beijing’s determination to enforce its requirement that foreign aircraft identify themselves and accept Chinese instructions. China’s lack of any action suggested that it was merely playing out a diplomatic game to establish ownership over the area rather than provoke an international incident. The flights followed days of angry rhetoric and accusations over Beijing’s move, designed to assert Chinese claims to a group of uninhabited islands controlled by Japan. The U.S. and Japan have said they don’t acknowledge the zone, and Taiwan and South Korea, both close to the U.S., also rejected it. A Chinese Defense Ministry statement said the

U.S. planes were detected and monitored as they flew through the area for two hours and 22 minutes. It said all aircraft flying through the zone would be monitored and that “China has the capability to exercise effective control over the relevant airspace.” Asked repeatedly about the incident at a regularly scheduled briefing, Foreign Ministry spokesman Qin Gang said it had been handled according to procedures laid out in the Saturday statement but offered no specifics. “Different situations will be dealt with according to that statement,” Qin said. The U.S., which has hundreds of military aircraft based in the region, described the flights as a training mission unrelated to China’s announcement of the zone. U.S. officials said the two unarmed B-52 bombers took off from their home base in Guam around midday and were in the zone that encompasses the disputed islands for less than an hour before returning to their base, adding the aircraft encountered no problems. The bomber flights came after State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said

China’s move appeared to be an attempt to change the status quo in the East China Sea. “This will raise regional tensions and increase the risk of miscalculation, confrontation and accidents,” she told reporters. Australia, meanwhile, said it called in the Chinese ambassador to express concern about the sudden zone declaration. “The timing and the manner of China’s announcement are unhelpful in light of current regional tensions, and will not contribute to regional stability,” Australian Foreign Minister Julie Bishop said in a statement. Beijing’s move fits a pattern of putting teeth behind its territorial claims and is seen as potentially leading to dangerous encounters depending on how vigorously China enforces it — and how cautious it is when intercepting aircraft from Japan, the U.S. and other countries. China is sending its sole aircraft carrier to the South China Sea for its first sea trial, alarming the Philippines, which has conflicting claims with Beijing over parts of the region.

Ukrainian protesters demand the release of Tymoshenko KIEV, Ukraine (AP) — Thousands of people on Wednesday kept up their nearly week-long protest against the Ukrainian government’s decision to ditch an agreement with the European Union in favor of closer ties with Russia, but officials showed no signs of relenting to their demands. About 5,000 people gathered on Independence Square despite freezing temperatures, listening to

music and singing. A couple of thousand demonstrators also rallied earlier in the day outside the Ukrainian government building to call for the release of jailed former Prime Minister Yulia Tymoshenko. The EU had made the release of Tymoshenko, the political rival of President Viktor Yanukovych, a condition for signing the association agreement at a summit that begins Thursday in

Vilnius, Lithuania. But Yanukovych has made no move to do so and says that Ukraine wants a better deal than the one offered by the EU. He still plans to attend the summit. In an open letter released late Wednesday, Tymoshenko urged European leaders to ink the deal with Ukraine without linking it to her release if Yanukovych changes his mind at the last moment.

Together,

WE SUCCEED. Help us improve the Steuben County Fairgrounds

We’re not just building a new Farm Credit office. We’re helping build the community. When it comes to achieving our goals in the community, every dollar counts. That’s why Farm Credit Mid-America will match every dollar donated (up to $5000) between now and the opening of our new LaGrange office on December 13th to help improve the Steuben County Fairgrounds. Our new LaGrange office will be located at the corner of US 20 and CR 250W. Stay tuned for more information about our Grand Opening, where we will present the results of our funding drive.

If you have questions or would like to donate, please call us at 888-823-2718 or stop by our office.

“Van’s is growing, and we are looking for quality team members! Please drop off your resumes. Thank you.” STORE HOURS: Exit 129

I-69

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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

AUTO

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According to the Automobile Association of America, the cost of owning a vehicle is on the rise. In its 2013 “Your Driving Costs” study, AAA determined the cost of owning a vehicle is somewhere between $7,000 and $11,000 annually depending on the type of vehicle. That’s a substantial amount of money and may leave many motorists looking for ways to reduce the cost of automobile ownership. Driving is a way of life for many people left with little choice but to keep a vehicle. Thanks to mass transportation, city dwellers might be able to get by without owning a vehicle, but those who live in rural communities or even the suburbs often find that public transportation runs too infrequently or inefficiently to meet their needs. There are ways for those who need their own automobiles to reduce the financial burden of vehicle ownership. • Downsize your vehicle. In its study, AAA found that the average METRO cost of owning a vehicle varied considerably depending on the size Driving a smaller car instead of an SUV can save course of a year. of that vehicle. That should come as drivers a considerable amount of money over the no surprise, as larger vehicles tend to consume more fuel and, as a result, insurance rose by nearly 3 percent • Drive safe and cash in on cost more money. But drivers might surprising thing from the AAA in 2012 from the year before. But lower insurance premiums. Though study might be its findings as to the be surprised to learn just how much numerous factors, including individ- drivers who can avoid accidents and costs of owing a large sedan. Such less it costs to own a small sedan citations are likely to see their rates uals’ driving histories, influence the than it does a four-wheel-drive sport vehicles are nearly as expensive decrease from year to year. cost of auto insurance, drivers with utility vehicle. Small sedans cost the as larger SUVs, costing drivers • wBuy a used car. Buying a used clean track records might be able to more than $11,000 per year. So least amount of money to own at drivers who downsize their vehicles buck the industry trend and pay less car may not give buyers the initial $6,967 annually, while four-wheelexcitement of driving off a car lot for their auto insurance policy next to a small sedan will likely save drive SUVs cost nearly twice that behind the wheel of a brand new year than they did this year. In its themselves a substantial amount of amount, setting their owners back vehicle, but it might prove quite study, AAA found that the cost of money over the life of the vehicle. $11,599 per year. But the most

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Over the course of their lifetimes, men and women can expect to spend thousands of dollars on insurance. People insure their vehicles, homes, health, lives, and a host of other things, and the cost of such security can be significant. Considered essential by many men and women, insurance is unlike any other product or service, as people will pay for it all the while hoping they never need it. That reality leaves many policy holders wondering if there are any ways to save on their insurance policies without diminishing their coverage. Though insurance companies consider a host of factors when determining the cost of each individual policy, there are some ways that all men and women can reduce their insurance bills. • Bundle your policies. Multi-policy discounts, which many insurance companies offer to policy holders who combine two or more policies, can save men and women substantial amounts of money. Purchasing homeowners’, automotive and life insurance policies from the same provider saves consumers an average of 10 percent, and such a discount can add up to a significant amount of money over the life of your policies. • Comparison shop. Though shopping for insurance might not be as fun as finding your next television or test driving cars, comparison shopping when buying insurance can save policy holders a significant amount of money. The cost of insurance often varies significantly from provider to provider, and consumers should exercise due diligence when looking to cut their insurance costs. Comfort level with an existing insurance provider

should not outweigh the savings you might earn elsewhere, especially if another provider can offer you the same exact coverage at a much lower price. You may even be able to lower your existing policy if you contact your current provider and inform them you have received a more affordable estimate with another company. • Consider specialist companies. A handful of insurance companies specialize in particular types of insurance. For example, one company might specialize in motorcycle insurance and might be more capable of tailoring your policy to your particular driving habits, offering you discounts depending on how many years you have been riding motorcycles. However, a more general company might simply lump you into one big group, meaning you’re likely to earn similar rates as novice riders without your experience. There are specialist companies offering various types of insurance, so look into such companies if you have special needs or less popular hobbies that require insurance. • Stop paying for duplicate coverage. Many people can trim some of their monthly insurance costs by combing their existing coverages to determine if they are paying for duplicate coverage. For instance, your auto insurance policy may include health coverage, but chances are your existing health insurance will trump the health coverage offered by your auto insurance policy, meaning you’re paying for the same thing twice. Examine each of your policies to determine if you are paying for any duplicate coverage, and then contact your provider to remove such items if you find them.

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exciting for your bank account. Revisiting a study they conducted in 2001, in 2013 experts at automotive Web site Edmunds.com examined three different financing methods and the cost of each over a six-year period, which the global market intelligence firm Polk estimates is the average car ownership period. The study examined the costs, including interest rates and fees, of leasing or buying a 2013 Honda Accord EX and buying a used 2010 Accord EX. The total cost of buying used after six years was $20,960, while the cost of leasing was $24,768 and the cost of buying new was $28,330. Buying used even saves buyers money when factoring in equity. Of course, leasing saves drivers the cost of maintenance and repairs, which can be considerable when buying used vehicles. However, an older used car won’t cost as muchto insure as a vehicle that is being leased or financed. • Drive less. Of course, the easiest way for automobile owners to trim the costs of owning their vehicles is to drive less. Though vehicle manufacturers have improved fuel economy in recent years, driving less will save money on fuel, the cost of which hinges on a host of factors, including petroleum demand and economic conditions. Such factors may cause a dip in fuel prices one day, but a sharp increase in price the next day. Regardless of those fluctuations in fuel prices, drivers who can cut back on their driving are certain to save money.

Max Platt

Jeff Platt

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kpcnews.com

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

2013’S HAVE TO GO!

SALES EVENT OPEN FRIDAY 8 AM - 5:30 PM

1,000

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as a prepaid MasterCard® award card or apply it against your purchase

The All New Burnworth-Zollars is here to serve you NOW!

New Showroom JUST ANNOUNCED: ANNOUNCED: WAC New Toasty Warm Service Drive In rates as low as 0% + no payments up to 90 days Experienced Staff • Huge Inventory 2013 FORD F-150

2013 FORD SUPER DUTY

2013 FORD EDGE

2013 FORD FUSION

3 FUEL OPTIONS

12 IN STOCK UP TO $6,250 FORD REBATE + $2,500 INCENTIVE PACKAGE

11 IN STOCK UP TO $5,000 FORD REBATE

2013 FORD EXPLORER

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2013 FORD C-MAX

ONLY 1 LEFT UP TO $1,500 FORD REBATE OR 0% FOR 60 MOS. WAC + $500 FORD REBATES

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Gas, Hybrid, Energi 37 MPG, 47 MPG, 108 MPG

4 IN STOCK UP TO $3,000 FORD REBATE OR 0% FOR 60 MOS. WAC + $1,500 FORD REBATE

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2013 FORD TAURUS

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2010 FORD F-250 SUPER CAB DIESEL

2009 LINCOLN MKS 18,000 Miles

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2013 FORD FLEX AWD, ECOBOOST 9 4, $2

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kpcnews.com

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

C3

HOLIDAY BONUS CASH ON SELECT MODELS! FIRST EVER BLACK FRIDAY EVENT Black Friday Deals on All New & Pre-Owned Now Through December 2

ALL 2013’s MUST GO!

2013 CHEVROLET MALIBU 1LT

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2014 CHEVROLET CRUZE LS

$25,210.00 $24,201.78 $ 2,500.00 $ 500.00

$21,201.78* MSRP $19,805.00 Black Friday Sale $19,237.58 Rebate $ 1,000.00 Bonus $ 500.00

$17,937.58*

2013 CHEVROLET CAMARO ZL1

2014 CHEVROLET EQUINOX

Was $27,485.00 Black Friday Sale $26,262.16 Rebate $ 500.00 Bonus $ 500.00

Just in time for Christmas!

$25,262.16 2013 CHEVROLET SILVERADO 2500 CREW CAB

2013 CHEVROLET TAHOE

Up to $6,000 In Rebates 0% APR for 60 mos.

Up to $5,000 In Rebates 0% APR for 60 mos. ED

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2012 CHEVROLET COLORADO • Hard To Find

2003 CHEVROLET CORVETTE Z06 • Only 7,000 Miles

2005 CHEVROLET COLORADO Low Miles

2005 CHEVROLET EXPRESS VAN • Hightop, Only 36,000 Miles

2011 CHEVROLET CRUZE LTZ

2011 CHEVROLET SILVERADO • Low Miles

2008 CHEVROLET MALIBU LTZ • SALE

2010 CHEVROLET EQUINOX AWD LTZ • Local Trade

2013 CHEVROLET MALIBU 1LT • Local Trade

2013 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN LT • Leather, DVD Player

2013 GMC ACADIA

2012 CHEVROLET EQUINOX

2011 BUICK LUCERNE CXL

2012 BUICK LACROSSE

2012 CHEVROLET K2500

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2012 CHEVROLET 2500 EXT CAB • Long Bed, Rare Find

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COMICS • TV LISTINGS •

kpcnews.com

DUSTIN BY STEVE KELLEY & JEFF PARKER

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

Fake pregnancy lures man into relationship DEAR ABBY: A friend of mine faked a pregnancy to get a man to stay with her. Once he moved in, she told him she’d had a miscarriage. She even went so far as to name this so-called baby. He now has the baby’s name tattooed on his arm! She goes on Facebook and talks about how she misses her “little baby boy,” and counts every month as though it is his birthday. Every time I read it I get a sick feeling. I want to tell this man the truth. I know for a FACT she was not pregnant. I’m not sure how to go about this. If I say something, I know I will end up the bad guy. Should I mind my own business or let this man know he’s living with a maniac? — WANTS TO TELL THE TRUTH DEAR WANTS: Your friend may have told this lie

FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE BY LYNN JOHNSTON

GARFIELD BY JIM DAVIS

BLONDIE BY YOUNG AND MARSHALL

DEAR ABBY: My

problem is my mother. My entire life (I am 50) she has made me choose between her and Dad for the holidays. They have been divorced for 30 years, and she still speaks ill of him. She is now doing the same thing with my boyfriend of four years. She refused to spend this past Easter with us, including my children, if he was around. I told her that it was her choice and she is always welcome to attend. With Christmas fast approaching, I don’t want all the drama and blackmail to continue. Help! — WEARY IN WISCONSIN DEAR WEARY: You handled Easter appropriately and you should do the same with Christmas. If your mother chooses not to attend, the choice is hers. Consider asking your father to join you if she won’t be there.

THURSDAY EVENING 5:00 (15) WANE (16) WNDU (21) WPTA (21.2) CW (33) WISE (33.2) MNT (39) WFWA (39.2) KIDS (39.3) CRE (39.4) YOU (55) WFFT (22) WSBT (25) WCWW (28) WSJV (34) WNIT (46) WHME (57) WBND (63) WINM

BEETLE BAILEY BY MORT WALKER

AMC A&E CNBC CNN COM DISC DISN E! ENC ESPN ESPN2 FAM FNC FS1 FSMW HALL HBO HBO2 HBOS HGTV HIST LIFE MAX MTV NICK SYFY SHOW SPIKE STARZ TBS TLC TMC TNT TVLND USA VH1 WGN

ALLEY OOP BY JACK AND CAROLE BENDER

FRANK & ERNEST BY BOB THAVES

5:30

NOVEMBER 28, 2013 6:00

Slower heart rate normal for those in good shape supposed to work. The heart is a fist-sized muscle. It has four chambers, each with walls of muscle. Each chamber pumps when the muscle of the chamber gets an electrical signal to do so. When everything is working properly, an electrical ASK signal DOCTOR K. initiates a heartbeat. This signal from Dr. Anthony comes the heart’s node, Komaroff sinus located in the right atrium (one of the two upper chambers of the heart, the atria). From the sinus node, the signal travels through bundles of cells that carry

the signals as if they were a copper wire. The signal first travels to the atrioventricular (A-V) node, located between the atria. Then the signal travels through another bundle of cells (called the bundle of His) that is located between the ventricles (the heart’s lower chambers). From there, the signal travels to the muscular walls of the ventricles, which respond to the signal by pumping. A problem in the sinus node can cause bradycardia. Or it can result when signals don’t properly pass through the A-V node and bundle of His. Bradycardia also can be a side effect of certain medications. Treatment depends on what is causing the bradycardia. If your heartbeat is slow because you’re a healthy athlete, you probably don’t need treatment. Most people don’t need treatment unless they

7:00

7:30

8:00

8:30

9:00

9:30 10:00 10:30

BigBang CrazyOne CrazyOne CrazyOne Elementary Extra A. Dream News News InsEd. Access PreGame Football NFL Pittsburgh vs Baltimore (L) 21 Alive News News News Season Sound Charlie Brown Modern Lady Gaga & Muppets (N) 

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You Again ('10) Kristen Bell. 2½Men 30 Rock Simps. FamilyG Modern Modern The X Factor (N) Glee (N) FOX 28 News Wild K. News PBS NewsHour Michiana Steves' O.House House Antiques Rd. Antiques Rd. America Spotlight Star Trek: NG Hogan America Sumrall Studio B The Harvest Show Paid Life News News News News Feud ET Charlie Brown Modern Lady Gaga & Muppets (N) Hope for Hurting Hearts Faith H. Faith News Today Fellow. B.Hinn Life J. Hagee Bible (3:30) 

The Godfather II ('74) Al Pacino. 

The Godfather ('72) Al Pacino, Marlon Brando. The First 48 Duck Dy Duck Dy Duck Dy Duck Dy Duck Dy Duck Dy Duck Dynasty Duck Dy Duck Dy Profit "Eco-Me" The Profit The Profit American Greed American Greed American Greed The Assassination of President Kennedy Anthony "Libya" Anthony "Congo" A. Bourdain (N) Anthony Bourdain (4:20) Bill Cosby (:55) Dunham (:55) Jeff Dunham Spark of Insanity Jeff Dunham Alaska/Frontier Alaska/Frontier Alaska/Frontier Punkin Chunkin 2013 (N) Alaska/Frontier Jessie Austin Dog Blog Jessie GoodLk GoodLk 

Despicable Me (:45) Ferb GoodLk Dog Blog 

Mrs. Doubtfire ('93) Sally Field, Robin Williams. Kardashians 

Maid in Manhattan 4:40  Charlie's ... (:20) 

Elf ('03) Will Ferrell. 

Rush Hour (:40) 

Men in Black 3 Poker World Series SportsC. Football NCAA Mississippi vs Mississippi State (L) SportsC. (4:30) Basketball NCAA Basketball NCAA Old Spice Classic (L) Basketball NCAA Old Spice Classic LSU/St. Jo. (L) (4:00) 

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire  Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince The Five Special Report On the Record The O'Reilly Factor The Kelly File Hannity 20 Years of the UFC College Football NCAA Texas Tech vs. Texas (L) PrepZone Dodgeb. West Customs Icons Insider College Football SEC Gridiron LIVE! Homers Big 12 4:  Love at the...  The Thanksgiving House  Fir Crazy ('13) Craig Pryce.  A Bride for Chr... 4:25  The Three... Sport in America Making Get On 

Pitch Perfect Anna Kendrick. Ja'mie 4:15  Garden S...  Madagascar 3: Europe's... (:35)  Chronicle 

Identity Thief Jason Bateman. 4:10  Mr. & Mrs.... (:15)  The Watch ('12) Ben Stiller. The Sopranos Bill Maher Boardwalk Empire Property Brothers Property Brothers Property Brothers Property Brothers Property Brothers HouseH House Swampsgiving Pwn Star Pwn Star Pwn Star Pwn Star Pwn Star Pwn Star Swampsgiving 2 Pwn Star Pwn Star 4:  Because I S... 

A Walk to Remember 

The Switch ('10) Jason Bateman.  The Breakfast ... (4:25) 

Heat ('95) Al Pacino. (:20) 

The Campaign Strike Back Origins  Les Misérables Ridicu. Ridicu. Ridicu. Ridicu. Ridicu. Ridicu. Ridicu. Ridicu. Ridicu. Ridicu. 

Jackass 3D Sponge Sponge  Scooby Doo 2: Monsters Unleashed  Cloudy With a...  Cloudy With a... Friends Friends 3:30  The World... 

Die Another Day ('02) Halle Berry, Pierce Brosnan. 

Casino Royale Daniel Craig. 4:30  Jay Z: Mad... (:15)  Against the Tide (Doc)  The Words Bradley Cooper. (:15) 

Killing Them Softly (:10) Cops (:45) Cops (:15) Cops (:50) Cops (:25) Cops (:55) Cops Cops Impact Wrestling (4:30) 

Looper 

Independence Day ('96) Will Smith.  The Call ('13) Halle Berry. Movie Queens Queens Seinfeld Seinfeld Seinfeld FamilyG FamilyG FamilyG BigBang BigBang Ground Ground Undercover Boss Undercover Boss Undercover Boss Undercover Boss Boss "Fatburger" Undercover Boss 

Pieces of April  Spy Kids 4: All the Time ... 

Lincoln ('12) Sally Field, Daniel Day-Lewis. Movie Castle "Ghosts" Castle Castle Castle Castle Castle (:20) A. Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith Griffith Cosby Cosby Ray Ray Ray (:35) Ray Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern Modern (4:30)  Sixteen Candles VH1 Rock Docs "Michael Jackson's This Is It" Crazy Sexy Cool: The TLC Story Home Videos Home Videos Home Videos 

The Matrix ('99) Laurence Fishburne, Keanu Reeves.

On this date Nov. 28: • In 1942, nearly 500 people died in a fire that destroyed the Cocoanut Grove nightclub in Boston. • In 1961, Ernie Davis of Syracuse University became the first African-American to win the Heisman Trophy. • In 2001, officials recovered the body of CIA officer Johnny “Mike” Spann from a compound in Mazar-eSharif, Afghanistan, after rebels quelled an uprising by Taliban and al-Qaida prisoners.

THE BORN LOSER BY ART & CHIP SANSOM

6:30

(4:30) Football NFL Oakland Raiders vs. Dallas Cowboys (L)

Almanac •

DEAR DOCTOR K: Last time I went to the doctor, my heart rate was 55 beats per minute. What could be causing my slow heartbeat? Is it dangerous? DEAR READER: A normal heart rate at rest is between 60 and 100 beats per minute. A slow heart rate, of less than 60 beats per minute, is called bradycardia. You have just a slight bradycardia. Bradycardia can be normal if you’re a well-conditioned athlete. A patient of mine bicycles 50 miles a week and has a resting heart rate of 50. Regular exercise improves the heart’s ability to pump blood efficiently. As a result, the heart doesn’t need to beat as often to supply the body’s needs. But sometimes bradycardia is caused by an abnormal heart condition. To understand what can go wrong, you need to understand how the heart is

so often that she has come to believe it herself. Or, she may be acting this out in order to hang onto the man. While I don’t think she is a maniac, I do think she may be unbalanced. I agree the man DEAR has a right know. ABBY to Wouldn’t you want to be told Jeanne Phillips if you were him? The way to do it is face-toface. And be prepared for the friendship to end afterward. Frankly, that may be for the best because the woman has more problems than you can cope with.

have bothersome symptoms. When I see a patient with an unusually slow pulse at rest, I often have him walk up two flights of stairs. If his heart is healthy, the heart rate will jump in response to exercise. Bradycardia can be caused by certain medicines (the most common of which are beta-blockers), or by certain diseases (such as an underactive thyroid). Bradycardia resulting from certain cardiac arrhythmias can be treated with a permanent pacemaker. When implanted in the body, this device generates electrical impulses that regulate the heartbeat. When it’s abnormal, a slow heart rate almost always has an effective treatment. But I’ll bet it’s not abnormal in you, just healthy. DR. KOMAROFF is a physician and professor at Harvard Medical School. His website is: AskDoctorK.com.

Crossword Puzzle •


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THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

KPC ClassiďŹ eds To place an ad call 260-347-0400

Toll Free 1-877-791-7877

Open Monday - Friday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Place your ad 24/7 online or by e-mail

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EMPLOYMENT

ADOPT: A warm loving home hoping to adopt your newborn. Expenes paid. Please call Anne-Michele 1 877-246-1447 www.amadopt.info �� ADOPTION: �� A Creative, Financially Secure Couple, LOVE, Laughter, Travel, Sports awaits baby. Expenses paid. 1-800-557-9529 �� Lisa & Kenny �� ADOPTION--Art Classes at Zoo Trips, Everything in between. 1st baby will be our King/Queen. 1-800-966-3065. Expenses paid. (A)

General

Lennard Ag Company Howe, IN Skilled F/T and P/T Labor needed for farming business.

Operators Mechanics Graders/Sorters Graders must be able to shovel and lift up to 50 lbs. regularly. Must have strong work ethic, attention to detail, and leadership qualities. Pay based on skill set.

NOTICES AUCTION

JOBS Drivers

Delivery Drivers Now adding Class A Drivers at Kendallville Distribution Center. Scheduled dedicated team routes delivering to America’s finest restaurants. Four dispatches weekly. Guaranteed weekly pay and excellent benefits. EOE

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located at I-69 and Baker Rd. has positions open for Part Time Store Fuel Cashiers. To apply, please go on line to the following website:

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â–  âœŚ â–  âœŚ â–  Janitorial OFFICE CLEANING Immediate Openings P/T Positions in Albion & Auburn, IN Call Our Job Line @ 1-888-395-2020 ext 3336 or Apply @ 5020 Executive Blvd. Ft. Wayne, IN Mon - Fri • 9 - 3 pm Must have clean police record.

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Drivers Driver Trainees Needed Now! Learn to drive for US Xpress! Earn $800+ per week! No experience needed! CDL-Trained and Job Ready in 15 days! 1-800-882-7364 Drivers GORDON TRUCKING CDL-A Truck Drivers. Up to $5,000 Sign-on Bonus & $.56 CPM! Solo & Teams. Dedicated/Home Weekly Available! Call 7 days/wk! EOE 888-757-2003 GordonTrucking.com

APARTMENTS $49 Deposit 12 Month Lease Nov. & Dec. $200. OFF full month’s rent.

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Immediate Job Openings in LIGONIER starting at $10.00!

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• Basic rent starting at $391 • Security Deposit $200 • Water, sewer & trash pickup included in rent

Rental assistance is available for qualiďŹ ed applicants. ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS: 62 years & older or disabled of any legal age may apply. Rent based on all sources of income and medical expenses.

Rosedorf Park Apartments Phone/Fax 260-357-5180 For hearing impaired only call TDD 1-800-743-3333 “This institution is an Equal Opportunity Provider & Employer�

Auburn $99 First Month 2BR-VERY NICE! SENIORS 50+ $465 No Smokers/ No Pets (260) 925-9525 Auburn Studio/efficiency apt. completely remodeled & updated, W/D, stove, fridge, AC included. Ideal for single retired person. No Smoking, No Pets allowed. $400/mo. + util. 260 927-5351 Avilla 1 & 2 BR APTS $450-$550/ per month. Call 260-897-3188 Kendallville 1 Room Apt. $75/wk. $200 dep. Call (260) 319-6816 Sylvan Lake 2 BR, 1 BA, Year round rental, C/A, $650/mo. + util. 260-336-1705

Angola-Crooked Lake $500 mo.+ Deposit, New Flooring/ No pets 260-432-1270

EXPO DATES DECEMBER 19-21 “NEW LOCATION� The December auction will be held at The Michiana Event Center in between Sturgis, MI and Howe, IN on State Road 9 or M66 in Michigan in conjunction with the Midwest Farm Expo (7605 N. State Road 9, Howe, IN 46746)

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2013 For free advertising, call or email your consignments to us by December 4th. Call Robert at 260-336-9750 or email rbtauctnr@gmail.com.

THE EARLIER YOU CONSIGN, THE MORE ADVERTISING YOUR ITEMS WILL RECEIVE! AUCTIONEERS Jerry O. Grogg AU01002223 LaGrange Dallas Martin AU01029776 Topeka Robert Mishler AU08701553 LaGrange Jeff Burlingame

Freed Farm Equipment Auction Located north of Wolcottville, IN 1 mile on St. Rd. 9 to CR 700 S, then east 3-½ miles (6560 E 700 S, Wolcottville, IN 46795) on:

Saturday, November 30, 2013 Beginning at 9:00 a.m. Tractors CIH 7220 IH 1066 • Combine JD 6620

• Heads farm equipment Ford 7.3 diesel pickup • Camper • Yamaha 4-wheeler Shop equipment • Power equipment IH weights • Farm misc. • 250 bales of straw Antique snowmobile • Generator

Antiques * Collectibles

from

Seeking qualiďŹ ed candidates for numerous positions: Labor • Welding • Production Design • Purchasing and Many More!

Mrs. Betty (Gary) Freed 6560 E 700 S, Wolcottville, IN 46795

AUCTIONEERS Jerry O. Grogg AU01002223 LaGrange Dallas Martin AU01029776 Topeka Robert Mishler AU08701553 LaGrange Jeff Burlingame

260-624-2050 Thank you to all our clients & associates! Wishing everyone a Happy Holiday Season!

thenus call our office to find out more! Ask about our referral bonus!

TEL: 1-866-993-5513

need holiday cash? Sell your unwanted items and pocket the cash. Prices starting at $26 Call ClassiďŹ eds Today 1-877-791-7877

Kiss it...

G

dbye

NIFTY FIFTY with KPC’s

Sell your merchandise priced $50 or less for FREE in KPC Classified. Kiss it Goodbye, Make some FAST CASH with the nifty fifty program. Up to 12 words plus phone number.

Clip and mail in or drop off at any KPC office.

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Sudoku Puzzle

HERALD REPUBLICAN THE NEWS SUN THE

The

S Star

SmartShopper

Complete the grid so that every row, column and 3x3 box contains every digit from 1 to 9 inclusively.

Name: Address: City/State/Zip: Telephone #: MAIL TO: KPC Nifty 50 PO Box 39 • Kendallville, IN 46755 Limit six per family or household per month, not to exceed 24 in a 12 month period. NO multiple phone numbers. Used merchandise only. Must be mailed or dropped off. No phone calls please. Will begin within one week of receipt. One item per ad. Same item 2 times only. When space available.

DIFFICULTY: 4 (of 5) 11-28

WANA AUTO SALES

REAL ESTATE & PERSONAL AUCTION Due to ill health, the owner will sell the following at auction located on the west side of SR 9 approximately 3 miles north of LaGrange, IN and 5 miles south of the 80/90 Toll Road exit at auction on:

SATURDAY, DEC., 14, 2013 BEGINNING at 10:00 a.m.

REAL ESTATE This commercial building is approximately 5,008 sq. ft. with a n o ff i c e a n d kitchen area, a general retail area, auto service area & utility storage area. The building was constructed in 1972, is located on 2 acres, and has its own well & septic. Property is currently zoned agriculture and is acceptable for any ag-related business. Any other usage will require a land use variance from LaGrange County. AUCTIONEER’S NOTE: This is a growing commercial area with a new John Deere store being built a little south of this property. A great location for your business in a KLJKWUDIÂżFDUHD Terms: $10,000 non-refundable down payment day of VDOH EDODQFHGXHLQIXOODWÂżQDOFORVLQJLQDSSUR[LPDWHO\  GD\V 7D[HV WR EH SURUDWHG DV RI ÂżQDO FORVLQJ DQG SRVVHVVLRQ XSRQ ÂżQDO FORVLQJ $XFWLRQ FRPSDQ\ LV exclusively the agent of the seller. Property sold “as is, where isâ€? based solely on buyer’s own inspections & due diligence. Property sold subject to seller’s approval. Seller to retain driveway ingress and egress for adjoining property. For more information, contact Jerry Grogg Inc. at 260-463-2828 or 1-800-548-9905.

Call (260)925-3663

Find more stories & pictures and submit your own at

Avilla Country, 3 BR, 1 BA newly remodeled. $550/mo.+ dep. 318-2440

ADVERTISING DEADLINE DECEMBER 4TH! PLATO Consignment Auction

Come see us at the Angola ofďŹ ce Apply Applyonline online at www.spherion.com/jobs www.spherion.com/jobs (Use ofďŹ ce code D514240), (Use office code D514240) then call our ofďŹ ce to ďŹ nd out more!

Waterloo Land contract, 3 BR garage, $450/mo. 260 615-2709

MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT

Mercury Hurricane Mark II snowmobile; Craftsman 5600 generator

or apply in person at: JEFFS AUTO REPAIR & TOWING 4513 CR 19 Auburn, IN 46706

TheOutdoorPage.com

HOMES FOR RENT

260-868-2843 www.whereUmatter .com ◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆◆

• Free Heat & Hot/ Softened Water • Low Security Deposits • Pet Friendly Community

GIVE US A CALL TODAY! NELSON ESTATES

HOMES FOR RENT

CONSIGNMENTS WANTED!

PER MONTH PLUS FREE COVERED PARKING!

Operator

0450 W. 750 N. Howe, IN 46746 (Turn West off of SR 9 at the Valero Gas station)

Angola ONE BR APTS. $425/mo., Free Heat. 260-316-5659

This special is good until 12/31/13.

Must have own tools.

WATERJET OPERATOR

PETRO STOPPING CENTERS

YOU DON’T WANT TO MISS THIS WINTER SPECIAL!

APARTMENT RENTAL

DEERFIELD APARTMENTS

EXPERIENCED MAINTENANCE PERSONNEL PART TIME

or apply in person to:

HELP WANTED

APARTMENT RENTAL

Must sign lease by Dec. 31, 2013.

Daisy Meadows Apts. 802 Gloriosa Circle Kendallville, IN 260 242-5311

EOP

Engineering Multiple Mechanical Engineering & Drafting Positions

Tri State Maintenance

Sundays required.

General

Drivers WANTED--Immediate positions for full-time drivers. Fort Wayne area. Dedicated Routes/Home Daily. Full benefits including 401K, Dental/Vision, Paid Vacations, Holidays. CDL Class A Required. 2 years experience. Good MVR. Call: 419-733-0642. (A)

Office Cleaners Needed at

Please send resume to: daisymeadows580 @yahoo.com

careers@ lennardag.com

EMPLOYMENT

Janitorial

Ability to work a varied schedule and long hours, depending on the season.

Send resume to

EMPLOYMENT

EMPLOYMENT

RENTALS

ADOPTIONS

$8726 758&.6‡75$9(/75$,/(56  5(&5($7,21$/9(+,&/(6 6+23(48,30(17 722/6‡ MISCELLANEOUS Terms: Cash, Good Check or Credit Card Not Responsible for Accidents Country Gourmet Kitchen Lunch Wagon

Wana Auto Sales 1RUWK65‡+RZH,1 Jerry O. Grogg Dallas Martin Jeff Burlingame Robert Mishler

AU01002223 AU01029776 AU19300021 AU08701553

LaGrange Topeka Angola LaGrange

260-499-0474 260-463-6173 260-499-1083 260-336-9750

For more information go to www.jerrygrogg.com


kpcnews.com

Wolcottville 2 & 3 BR from $100/wk also LaOtto location. 574-202-2181

OFFICE SPACE

HOMES

Auburn Office -1100 sq. ft., nice 100 N. Clark St. Call 925-4660

USDA 100% HOME LOANS--USDA 100% Home Loans. Not just 1st time buyers! Low rates! Buy any home anywhere. Academy Mortgage Corporation, 11119 Lima Road, Fort Wayne, IN 46818. Call Nick Staker 260-494-1111. NLMS-146802. Some restrictions may apply. Largest Independent Mortgage Banker. Indiana Corp State License-10966. Corp NMLS-3113 LO License-14894. Equal Housing Lender. (A)

Garrett MOBILE HOMES FOR AS LOW AS $550.00 A MONTH - LEASE TO OWN! WE HAVE 2 & 3 BR TO CHOOSE FROM. WE ALSO DO FINANCING. CALL KATT TODAY 260-357-3331

GARAGE SALES Crooked Lake 55 Lane 150 Sunday, Dec. 1 • 12-2 Home Remodeling Sale Furniture, vanities, sinks, faucets, cabinets, misc. household items. KENDALLVILLE North Sawyer RoadGry Barn, just N. Hwy 6 Thanksgiving Day * 4pm Fri-Sat * 8-? Christmas & Misc. sale Lots of new Items, toys, tools, furniture, like new coats, name brand clothes, collectible, antiques, lawn tools, landscape stone & blocks, jewelry,

AT YOUR SERVICE BUSINESS & PROFESSIONAL

BANKRUPTCY FREE CONSULTATION

$25.00 TO START Payment Plans, Chapter 13 No Money down. Filing fee not included. Sat. & Eve. Appts. Avail. Call

Collect: 260-424-0954

HOME IMPROVEMENT

All Phase Remodeling and Handyman Service - No Job too Big or Small !!! Free Estimates

SPORTING GOODS

PETS/ANIMALS

GUN SHOW!! Richmond, IN – Nov. 30th & Dec. 1st, Wayne Co. Fairgrounds Kuhlman Center, 861 Salisbury Rd., Sat. 9-5, Sun 9-3 For information call 765-993-8942 Buy! Sell! Trade!

Adoptable Animals DOGS • CHLOE JO-5 YR OLD FEMALEBOXER MIX SPAYED •ROCKY YR OLD MALE BOXER MIX •DARLA - YR OLD FEMALEBEAGLE •ANNIE-8 MONTH OLD FEMALEPITT MIX •GINGER-3YR FEMALE BOXER MIX •ZULU-1YR FEMALE LAB/PITT MIX •APSEN-1YR FEMALE PITTBULL •MILLIE-2 YR OLD FEMALE SHIH ZHU/TERRIER MIX •DUKE-PITTBULL MALE 5YR OLD •BUDDY-2YR OLD MALE BEAGLE MIX •ARIES-4YR OLD PITTBULL FEMALE •SPUNKY-4YR OLD MINI PN MALE •PRECIOUS12WEEKS OLD ROTT MIX FEMALE •STEEL-MALE 3 YR OLD MALE •ASHLY-7 YR OLD FEMALE LAB •SHYLO-7 YR OLD LAB •CURLY-2 YR OLD MALE TERRIER •DJ-3 YR OLD NEUTERED MALE GERMAN SHEPHERD •MOLLY--2 YR OLD FEMALE BORDER COLLIE MIX •JACKIE-NEUTERED MALE 7YR OLD JACK RUSSEL Humane Society of Noble County, Inc. 1305 Sherman St. Kendallville, IN 46755 260-347-2563

WANTED TO BUY TIMBER WANTED

MERCHANDISE Event, Silver Satin Chair Covers, 200 Total. $1 Each (260)665-1574

All species of hard wood. Pay before starting. Walnut needed. 260 349-2685

Glass beads & jewelry making items. Best Offer Some completed items. 260 347-2391

FURNITURE Brand NEW in plastic!

QUEEN PILLOWTOP MATTRESS SET Can deliver, $125. (260) 493-0805

BUILDING MATERIALS PIONEER POLE BUILDINGS Free Estimates Licensed and Insured 2x6 Trusses 45 year Warranted Galvalume Steel 19 Colors Since 1976 #1 in Michigan Call Today 1-800-292-0679

AGRIBUSINESS • Every Saturday read up on the latest trends, technology and predictions for the future of farming.

The

Star

THE NEWS SUN

FIREWOOD FIREWOOD FOR SALE Large truck load $65.00. Can deliver 260 927-4138

REALLY TRULY LOCAL...

KPC Phone Books Steuben, DeKalb, Noble/LaGrange

HERALD REPUBLICAN THE

Call 1-800-717-4679 today to begin home delivery!

  

WHEELS

2 BR, updated, large kitchen & LR, one block to lake, nice park, others available. $450/mo. (260) 488-3163

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination." Familial status includes children under the age of 18 living with parents or legal custodians; pregnant women and people securing custody of children under 18. This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination call HUD Toll-free at 1-800-669-9777. The toll-free telephone number for the hearing impaired is 1-800-927-9275.

MOBILE HOMES FOR SALE



Hamilton Lake

HOMES FOR SALE

STUFF

MOBILE HOMES FOR RENT

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

GARAGE SALES

C6

   

Sudoku Answers 11-28

AUTOMOTIVE/ SERVICES

Call Jeff 260-854-9071 Qualified & Insured Serving You Since 1990

$ WANTED $ Junk Cars! Highest prices pd. Free pickup. 260-705-7610 705-7630

(And the list goes on...)

ROOFING/SIDING

SETSER TRANSPORT AND TOWING

Call Today

County Line Roofing FREE ESTIMATES

USED TIRES Cash for Junk Cars! 701 Krueger St., K’ville. 260-318-5555

act as a debt relief agency under the BK code

Accountants, Lawyers, Contractors, Service Centers... BeneďŹ t from ClassiďŹ ed Advertising.

877.791.7877

Tear offs, wind damage & reroofs. Call (260)627-0017

AUTOMOTIVE/ SERVICES

MERCHANDISE UNDER $50

MERCHANDISE UNDER $50

ATTENTION: Paying up to $1000 for scrap cars. Used tires 4 sale also. 318-2571

28� Radiator for 1967-1972 Chevy/GMC Truck. $50.00. (260) 579-7569

Creative Memories Border Maker. Still in box, $20.00. (260) 925-6084

IVAN’S TOWING

3 Collage Frames Same size, 18x14. $10.00 for all (260) 316-2266

Junk Auto Buyer

up to $1000.00 (260) 238-4787

Cuisinart Carbonation System. Sparkling Beverage maker. Brand new in box, $50.00. (260) 833-2918 Drawing Board $30.00 obo (260) 349-0874

CARS

3 Pairs Boys Boots Size 9, 10 & 11, 2 pr. Snow boots. All for $15.00. (260) 316-2266

1999 Buick Century, 2 owner, V6, also 2003 Dodge Durango, 1 owner, Magnum V8. 260 925-5749

8’x11’ Area Rug Burgundy & multi other colors. Oriental in style. $50.00. (260) 833-4964

George Foreman GR35TMR Extra Large Lean Mean Fat Grilling Machine. Barely used, $25.00. (260) 410-9600

Guaranteed Top Dollar For Junk Cars, Trucks & Vans. Call Jack @ 260-466-8689

Accent/Occassional Table. Medium oak. Has drawer & shelf. $35.00. (260) 488-4835

Green Wrought Iron Table with wood top. 48�x25�, $45.00. (260) 347-4993

Antique Crystal Cut Glass Stemware. 11 wine & 12 Champagne glasses, $50.00. Call or text, (260) 316-6177

Jewel Tea Bowl Autumn pattern, $30.00. (260) 347-4993

VANS 1993 Chevy Conversion Van, 3/4 ton, 7 pass, 4.3 liter V6, 144 K, nice clean interior, some rust on body, runs good, drives great, good tires. $1,195. Wolcottville 260-854-2766.

CAMPERS/RV 25’ Airstream Camper Solar system, New tires, New flooring, 1989 Show model! (260)636-7487

MERCHANDISE UNDER $50 1993 Ford Ranger Bed Cover Kit. Used kit, $35.00. (260) 920-4044 1993 Ford Ranger Bed Cover Kit. New kit, $50.00. (260) 920-4044 2 Matching Jar Style Table Lamps. $25.00 for both. (260) 925-6084 2011 27� Panasonic Silver, works great. $50.00. (260) 347-4049

Antique Single Bottom Plow. $40.00 firm. (260) 347-3388 Black, long, leather coat. Women’s large. Like new. $40.00 obo. (260) 761-2054 Box of Boy Clothes & Leather Jacket. 3T-5T, $20.00. (260) 316-2266 Box of Girls Clothes Sizes 7-8 & 10-12 $20.00. (260) 316-2266 CAT Toy. 10 wheel wire remote crane, excellent cond. $30.00. (260) 761-2054 Coach iPhone 5 case, no phone, case only. New in Coach gift box. Metallic Gold Sig. C’s on clear case. Coach #66359B. $35.00. Call/text(260) 515-3468 Coach iPhone 5 case. No phone, case only. New in Coach gift box. Black/tan Leopard Coach #66367B. $35.00. Call/text, (260) 515-3468 Corner TV Stand with shelves and cabinets. Oak finish. $35.00. (260) 488-4835

Kid Kraft White Shelf 36�, great shape. $10.00. (260) 316-2266 Lazy Boy oversized chair with matching ottoman. Neutral color, good cond. $50.00. (260) 347-4841

KPC LIMITATIONS LIMITATIONS OF LIABILITY: KPC assumes no liability or financial responsibility for typographical errors or for omission of copy, failure to publish or failure to deliver ad vertising. Our liability for copy errors is limited to your actual charge for the first day & one incorrect day after the ad runs. You must promptly notify KPC of any error on first publication. Claims for adjustment must be made within 30 days of publication and, in the case of multiple runs, claims are allowed for first publication only. KPC is not responsible for and you agree to make no claim for specific or consequential damages resulting from or related in any manner to any error, omission, or failure to publish or deliver.


kpcnews.com

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

Y

C7

E S E H T T EA B T ’ N A OU C

Y A D I R F K C LA

B

S L A E D

WEEK LONG BLACK FRIDAY EVENT PRICES ONLY GOOD THROUGH MONDAY, DEC. 2 SAVE

SAVE $

2013

3 9 8 , 6

2013

4,968

In St

SAVE

3

Buick LaCrosse

4

Buick Regal Turbo

$

In St

ock

ock

$

2013

B13093

3,115 5

Buick Verano

B13026

In St

ock

B13106

$

MSRP ...................................$33,930 Jim’s Discount ........................$3,393 Rebates ..................................$3,500

27,037

SAVE

515 , 4 Chevy Malibu 1 2013

30,447

tock

325

per mo.* for 75 mo.

SAVE

SAVE

2013

,699 1 Chevy Cruze 5

3 In S

$

MSRP .................................. $23,975 Jim’s Discount ....................... $1,615 Rebates ................................. $1,500 Sale Price ............................ $20,860

2013

$

C13226

$

MSRP ...................................$35,415 Jim’s Discount ........................$2,468 Rebates ..................................$2,500

$

Chevy Sonic

$

2,162

4

In St

ock

C13180

In St

ock

C14056

MSRP ...................................$23,375 Jim’s Discount ........................$1,515 Rebates ..................................$3,000 Sale Price .............................$18,860

$

294

per mo.* for 75 mo.

MSRP ...................................$19,280 Jim’s Discount ........................$1,199 Rebates .....................................$500 Sale Price .............................$17,581

$

5 00

E R O M SAVE

In St

ock

$ 4,576

2014

28,015

$

2014

SAVE

$

per mo.* for 75 mo.

9

T14087

MSRP ...................................$31,670 Jim’s Discount ........................$2,155 Rebates ..................................$9,500

292

per mo.* for 75 mo.

$

3,655

Chevy Traverse

275

$

R OU Y OR OU F L EA IVE Y D EST ’LL G B E BRING US TH WE D N TRADE-IN A ANEED H E T ANT D A TR UAR R G U FOR YO SE ... ANYONE EL

SAVE 2014

$

MSRP ...................................$20,845 Jim’s Discount ........................$1,662 Rebates .....................................$500 Sale Price .............................$18,683

Chevy Silverado

Chevy Equinox LT

9

In St

ock

T14120

45

In St

ock

T14055

MSRP ...................................... $27,485 Jim’s Discount ........................... $2,171 Rebates ........................................ $500 Bonus Cash .................................. $500 MSRP ...................................... $25,750 Jim’s Discount ........................... $1,826 Rebates ..................................... $1,750 Truck Loyalty ............................. $1,000

3,171

$

21,174

$

24,314

*Buy payments figured at 4.99% for 75 months plus tax and title. See dealer for complete details.

SEE OUR SALES PROFESSIONALS

Terry Ayers • Chip Baker Al Ehlinger • Brad Karris • Kim Langham Harold McDougle • Tod Perry Deb Gloor • Rudy Straley

575 W. HIGH ST., HICKSVILLE, OHIO • 1-800-686-2438 • ✓out our inventory at www.jimschmidtchevy.com


C8

kpcnews.com

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 28, 2013

*24 Mo. Ford Lease. 21,000 Miles. With Approved Credit. Plus Tax. Security Deposit waived. $2,537 trade or cash due at signing. Ends 12/2/13.

*24 Mo. Ford Lease. 21,000 Miles. With Approved Credit. Plus Tax. Security Deposit waived. $2,530 due at signing. Ends 12/2/13.

*24 Mo. Ford Lease. 21,000 Miles. With Approved Credit. Plus Tax. Security Deposit waived. $2,537 trade or cash due at signing. Ends 12/2/13.


The Herald Republican – November 28, 2013