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INSIDE THIS ISSUE Classifieds..............................................................................A4 Community Calendar .................................................B4,5,6,7 Healthy Times .....................................................................A10 Valentine’s Day .............................................................A12,13

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January 24, 2014

Holland’s Caywood hopes he’s made a difference By Garth Snow

“I don’t know what’s out there. … Like everybody, I’ve got this book in the back of my mind that I’d like to write.” Michael Caywood, retiring after 41 years in Fort Wayne Community Schools

gsnow@kpcmedia.com

For decades, Michael Caywood has asked himself why his name graces a principal’s office while other men’s names grace war memorials. Even as he shrugs off his honor as Indiana elementary principal of the year — even as he says how much he will enjoy retirement — even as he says he is blessed to have spent 41 years in education, the Vietnam veteran asks why the stroke of a pencil sent him to a support role and sent many of his generation into combat. The Holland Elementary School Veterans Day program has provided an outlet for the lessons that Caywood takes from his life and his studies. “We have Korean War vets in, we have World War II vets in, they speak to our kids,” said Caywood, of Huntertown. “I’ve really tried to teach boys and girls that those veterans have sacrificed something — some of them gave everything — to give the kids the opportunity to do what they’re doing right now.” “The most recent book I read was ‘The Boys of ’67,’ and it tells about guys my age that were drafted the same time I did, who went to the same base camp I did, who landed in Vietnam at the same port that I did,” he said. “The difference was they ended up in an infantry company. I ended up in a support

PHOTO BY GARTH SNOW

Principal Michael Caywood reads a book from a collection once owned by Mabel K. Holland, for whom the Fort Wayne elementary school is named. Caywood will retire in June, after 31 years at Holland.

company. And that made the difference. I never sell that short. I just value that experience, but I don’t dwell on it.” Caywood reflected on that experience again Nov. 24 when he accepted his award from the Indiana Association of School Principals, about 46 years after his return from Vietnam. He shared that he and his wife, Nancy, visited Vietnam memorials across the country a few years ago. “And every time I would leave one of those, and

Jeweler says life is easier ‘as long as you like people’ By Garth Snow gsnow@kpcmedia.com

PHOTO BY GARTH SNOW

Steve and Diana Shannon are closing Shannon Jewelers in Northbrook Village. Steve Shannon opened his first Fort Wayne-area jewelry store in March 1982.

you might say.” He said “big grand ideas about building a business” can be at odds with “a big heart.” A customer asked Shannon’s help to remove a ring from his mother’s finger. Rather than charge for the service in the store, Shannon lent the man his tools. “He took them home with him, and put

her at ease to take it off her finger,” he said. Shannon said two generations of some families now have come to him for wedding rings and other jewelry. Shannon worked at International Harvester for more than 18 years, and See JEWELER, Page A4

3306 Independence Drive, Fort Wayne, IN 46808

Times Community Publications

The sign on the door reads “Shannon Jewelers,” but Steve Shannon speaks of his work in terms of people, not products. As he prepares to retire from his fourth location and a 32-year jewelry career, Shannon serves a steady stream of customers at the Northbrook Village store. “It’s one person at a time,” he said early in the close-out sale. “As I’ve always told my son and other people I’ve worked around, ‘When that door opens, that’s my boss coming through the front door.’ It’s as simple as that.” After closing the store, Shannon and wife, Diana, will move to the Nashville, Tenn., area. “I’ve always been about people, rather than business and dollars and cents,” he said. “To my detriment,

they would have a whole list of men who had been killed, the question kept coming up,” he said. “Why did I get out of there after a year, unscathed, untouched, having the experience that I did but being able to come back?” “Shortly after we got back from that trip,” he said, “I had a phone call from a young lady. It was a girl from back at Bloomingdale School, some years ago. And I asked her, ‘Why are you looking for me? Why did you search

me out?’ And her words were, ‘Because you made a difference in my life.’ And somehow or other that struck a chord with me. That was the answer to that question that I asked every time I left one of those memorials. ‘Why did I get out of it unscathed?’ To me, it was to be able to make a difference in the lives of boys and girls over the course of these 41 years. And I’ve impacted thousands of kids and hundreds if not thousands of staff members, and I think for the most part it’s been a pretty positive impact.” Caywood entered first grade at Wallen School, which he explained is now Washington Center School. He does not recall the name of his first-grade teacher, or the first name of his second-grade teacher. “I can tell you my third-grade teacher, it was Dolly Miller,” he said. “She was very demanding. And I tell my third-grade students often, as we are trying to get them to memorize their multiplication tables, I tell them about the time that Dolly Miller, with my parents’ blessing, turned me over her knee and gave me a few swats on the rear end for not learning my multiplicaSee CAYWOOD, Page A5


A2 • INfortwayne.com

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Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

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Gift from Carroll Carroll High School Assistant Principal Courtney Veith presents Allen County Sheriff Ken Fries with a check for $4,329.15 during halftime of the Holiday Hoops staff vs. seniors basketball game. The Carroll High School family annually raises money and collects canned food items ahead of the holiday season to be donated for various community needs.

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Business Weekly

LEGEND of LEADERSHIP AWARD Honoring Irene Walters Breakfast Thursday, February 27 7:30 AM Landmark Centre Join community leaders as they pay tribute to this legendary leader.

Master of Ceremonies: Ben Eisbart, Steel Dynamics Featuring remarks by: Marilyn Moran-Townsend, CVC Communications Larry Lee, Leepoxy Plastics Cheri Becker, Leadership Fort Wayne Mike Cahill, Tower Bank Sharon Eisbart, Sharon Eisbart Corporate Art Tickets $25 each • Table of eight $150 Visit fwbusiness.com or call 260.426.2640 ext. 313

COURTESY PHOTO

Embassy silent film series features 1928 Page organ By Garth Snow gsnow@kpcmedia.com

Two Sundays of silent films will allow the Embassy Theatre to spotlight the historic Grand Page Pipe Organ. The silent film series was launched in January 2013. “I heard wonderful things about it, which is why we’re doing it again,” said Barb Richards, who joined the Embassy as marketing director last summer. “It really gives the theater a chance to spotlight that Grand Page Organ in the way it was meant to be, by making that silent film not silent, and really come to life,” Richards said. Clark Wilson will play the organ to accompany the films. On Jan. 26, the double-feature begins at 2 p.m. with “Sherlock Jr.” (1924), a Buster Keaton comedy, to be followed by

COURTESY PHOTO

A 1924 Buster Keaton comedy kicks off the Embassy Theatre’s silent film series.

“The Freshman” (1925), a Harold Lloyd comedy. On Feb. 16, the program begins at 8 p.m. with “The Haunted House” (1921), a Buster Keaton comedy, to be followed by “The Mark of Zorro” (1920), an action adventure starring Douglas Fairbanks.

Tickets are $8 for adults, $5 for children 12 or younger with valid student ID. Tickets are on sale through Ticketmaster. The Embassy Theatre is at 125 W. Jefferson Blvd. Richards said the same 1928 organ provided the music for a silent film during a children’s theater camp at the Embassy last summer. She said many of the children were not accustomed to watching a projection movie screen, especially in black-andwhite, but the children were fascinated by the movie and music. “There are only four of these organs in the world, and we have one of them,” Richards said. She said organ enthusiasts played a major role in preserving both the instrument and the Embassy itself. For more on the history of the theatre and the organ, visit fwembassytheatre.org.

Fort4Fitness announces Fall Festival, other dates Registration has begun for the seventh annual Fort4Fitness Fall Festival, to take place Sept. 26-27 at Parkview Field. Events include a half-marathon, a 10K, a 4-mile run/walk, a kids marathon and a seniors marathon. In a news release, sponsors said more than 10,000 people registered for 2013 events. This year’s participants may register at Fort4Fitness.org, which also offers a training blog and 2013 photos and results. Early-bird registration rates for the half-marathon, 10K and 4-mile run/walk are available online, with the best rates offered through May 5. Visit the site for details. Rates are as low as $10 for the kids and seniors marathons.

“Fort4Fitness has always focused many of our efforts on the first-time participants,” the nonprofit organization said in a news release. “Last year, 25 percent of our participants said that Fort4Fitness 2013 was their first road race ever. We look forward to welcoming thousands of newcomers to Fort4Fitnes again in 2014.” The fall festival again will host the Road Runners Club of America Central Regional Half Marathon Championship. Plans are also being made for the third annual F4F Spring Cycle, on May 17 in downtown Fort Wayne. Event and registration details will be announced closer to the event. Fort4Fitness promotes healthy living and fitness in northeast Indiana.

Dwenger offers ACT/SAT prep help Bishop Dwenger High School will offer an ACT/SAT prep course open to any high school student in the area. Classes will be held Tuesdays and Thursdays from 6-7:30 p.m. Classes began Jan. 21. The final class is on March 5, a

Wednesday. These sessions include test familiarity, pacing, strategies and a review of English, math and science concepts. The Tuesday sessions will focus on critical reading, writing and grammar, while the Thursday sessions will

address math and science. The class fee is $195 and includes both an ACT text and SAT text for the course. For more information and registration, call Bishop Dwenger High School at 496-4700 or visit bishopdwenger.com.


Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

INfortwayne.com • A3

Event’s focus is LGBTQ health issues

COURTESY PHOTO

Max and his dog, Munch, lead visitors in a journey through nutrition at Science Central.

Science Central serves ‘MyPlate and Beyond’ Science Central serves up some healthy fare for visitors with the traveling exhibition “To MyPlate and Beyond,” which opened Jan. 18 and continues through May 4. Developed by Purdue University, the interactive exhibit illustrates the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s tool, “MyPlate,” that emphasizes the five food groups that are part of a healthful diet: fruits, vegetables, grains, proteins and dairy. Visitors to the exhibit will learn how easy it is to shop for food and grow their own, plan meals and eat together. The exhibit features tips and ideas for everyone to build

a healthful plate, using interactive hands-on activities. Participants will “travel” with Max and his dog, Munch, in a flying saucer as they explore simple reminders and other information about eating well. Included in the exhibit is a short quiz that will help visitors to understand the exhibit’s key messages, such as making half of the food on your plate fruits and vegetables, switching to fat-free or low-fat milk, and enjoying your food, but eating less. The exhibit was created by the Purdue Agricultural Communication Exhibit Design Center and specialists and faculty in

the Department of Nutrition Science. The exhibit was constructed through funding provided by the American Dairy Association and Indiana’s Dairy Farm Families. The exhibit’s run at Science Central is being sponsored in part by Heritage Food Service Group Inc. “When the New Year arrives, everybody turns their focus to eating healthy and getting in shape,” said Science Central Executive Director Martin S. Fisher. “This exhibit arrives at the perfect time to help educate our community on how to eat the right foods to stay healthy.”

A two-day national health conference at IPFW will focus on the physical, mental and environmental health needs and challenges that LGBTQ students face on a daily basis. Queer Health on Campus: Addressing the Health Needs of LGBTQ Students will take place Feb. 7 and 8 in Walb Union, Room 116. Registration opens Feb. 6, from 4-6 p.m., in Walb Union, Room 116. The health conference features sessions on transgenderism and HIV, a performance by the IPFW Student Theatre Organization, six keynote speakers, and

more. Caitlin Ryan, the author of Lesbian and Gay Youth: Care and Counseling, will begin the conference, with a presentation on The Family Acceptance Project. Registrations may be made online. The registration fee is $25 for students; others pay $124. For registration assistance, call 481-6619, from 8 a.m.-5 p.m. MondayFriday. The IPFW Resource Center will sponsor the program. For more information, contact Jeannie DiClementi, associate professor of psychology, at 481-6397 or diclemej@ ipfw.edu.

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Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

A4 • INfortwayne.com

Concordia leads Christmas Bureau drive A Division of KPC Media Group

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Concordia Lutheran High School students and staff again collected gifts and food for their Allen County Christmas Bureau families, and loaded the band truck with wrapped presents and boxed items. In addition to canned foods, personal supplies, new clothing items for each family member, and toys for children, the classes also raised money for gift certificates — between $3,000 and $4,000 total in gift certificates for fresh food and gifts for the families’ Christmas dinners. “The entire Concordia community comes together to help Christmas Bureau families. This year we adopted 29 families and we literally filled the truck to capacity — 431 boxes and a dozen bicy-

cles,” said Diane Lewis, assistant principal. “It is great to see the generosity of so many students and staff.” For more than 35 years, Concordia has had a major role in this program. Jane Surbeck, the president of the Christmas Bureau board, said the work dates back to 1936. The agency served 373 families in 2013. “They were our largest adopter, and they do a wonderful job. They go great guns,” Surbeck said of Concordia. “To see kids doing this is just amazing to me,” Surbeck said. “And they do a great job and they just enjoy doing it.” The second-largest adopter was the Parkview Hospital group. Surbeck said the ware-

COURTESY PHOTO

Concordia Lutheran High School students fill a truck with donated gifts for 29 Allen County families.

house would be filled and emptied twice in one week. “And then we’re done for the season,” she

said. The warehouse space is donated each year, she said.

The Christmas Bureau does not distribute directly to families, but works through case managers.

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was among the managers released in 1981. He opened his first jewelry store in New Haven, in March 1982. Shannon found another location in Washington Square, and stayed there 19 years. In 1999 he opened a second store — in Northbrook Village — and operated two locations for a while before closing the Clinton Street store. After 10 years, he moved the store across the parking lot in Northbrook Village. He has offered engraving, repair, custom manufacturing and custom

designing, in addition to jewelry sales. The arrival of larger warehouse stores forced jewelry stores to focus less on other sales and more on service, he said. “You used to go into a jewelry store and they would have leather goods, they would have plates and spoons and other things like that.” Other forces also caused changes. Shannon still sells monogrammed pen sets, but he said changing attitudes toward smoking have all but snuffed out sales of cigarette lighters. Shannon said he still has

the hand-eye coordination and the confidence required of an engraver, and he still knows the importance of planning. “Of course you didn’t start out on your customers’ jewelry,” he said of his early career. “I was doing a job and I had this all figured out. It said ‘Welcome’ and I had left the ‘C’ out. Those are the kind of things you’ve gotta watch out for. It’s like cutting 2x4’s; you measure twice and cut once.” The Shannons said they look forward to the next chapter, in Tennessee. Diana said she has learned a lot in 14 years at the store. “I take care of the billing and the books and things like that,” she said. Still, she enjoys matching customers with the right jewelry. “Some of

Good news for your neighborhood.

In brief Shannon Jewelers, Northbrook Village, 1505-A W. Dupont Road, Fort Wayne, IN 46825. The store will close Feb. 15. Hours are 9:30 a.m.-7 p.m. Monday, Wednesday and Friday, and 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday. For more information, call 416-0645 or visit shannonjewelers.net. these special pieces you get attached to after a while, and it’s nice to find them a new home,” she said. She said the couple will create a new life in Tennessee. “He’s had his dreams and I’ve had my dreams, and now we’re going to have our dreams together,” she said. “I’ve got grandkids to catch up on.” She also looks forward to having more time to read; she enjoys fiction. “We’ve got seven acres down there. I’ve already got a house built,” Steve said. “I will complete the rest of the house. Then I will probably go into Dickson and get my

application in at Lowe’s or someplace like that, where I can still work with people. That’s what I really enjoy. Just like when I was driving school bus for four years, I enjoyed that. It was a lot of giggles and grins. But I enjoy that. But as long as you like people, I think you can get along pretty much anywhere.” “My hands are still in good shape as far as being able to do everything that you have to do,” he said. “But there comes a point in time when it would be good to just to get away from all the headaches, all the responsibility, just do a good job, come home and take it easy.”

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Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

CAYWOOD from Page A1 tion tables. Guess what? I learned my multiplication tables.” Caywood went on to graduate from Garrett High School in 1964. He was married, and soon afterward found himself in the U.S. Army. He received his discharge papers on Nov. 30, 1967. “And I wasn’t sure what I wanted to do,” he said. “I knew I would be going to college. I thought about being a veterinarian, or a doctor.” Then he visited his wife in the classroom at Hoagland Elementary School, which was on West Butler Street. “I saw how much fun she was having and the impact it made on boys and girls,” he said. “That made me decide to go the route that I did.” His first teaching job was at Bloomingdale Elementary. “Actually, I did my student teaching in second grade, my first teaching job was third grade, and then my next year was fourth grade, so I had some kids second, third and fourth, and you really develop some relationships with those kids,” he said. After five and a half years, he moved into administration. “I was in nine different schools in six years, which was again just a real growing experience, getting to work with a whole variety of people on different staffs, and different socio-economic groups,” he said. “Over the years, having hired a number of teachers and brought them from other schools, I know what they go through as they make those moves.” His full 41-year career has been with the Fort Wayne Community Schools. He is nearing completion of his 31st year as principal at Holland Elementary. Alice Pettit has been school secretary most of those years. “I have worked with Mr. Caywood for 29 years, and I’ve known him since my son was in fourth grade,” Pettit said. “Before he became principal, he went around the neighborhood. My family lived in Crestwood.

INfortwayne.com • A5

He didn’t go to every home, but he went to various homes to introduce himself, which was something I was really impressed with as a parent.” Lori Sumner has taught in Fort Wayne Community Schools for 28 years, most of it at Holland Elementary under Caywood. Like Caywood, she worked at several schools in a few years. “He’s very supporting. He’s a great leader,” Sumner said of her principal. “I feel like he does feel for the teachers,” she said. “He sees it from our perspective, and he makes it as good as he possibly can for the teachers in our building. Sumner said Caywood started the Holland tradition of a summer environmental studies trip to the coastal area of North Carolina. About 30 or 40 fifthgraders earn the right to go by getting good grades, demonstrating good citizenship, writing an essay, and helping to raise money to offset the cost. “He’s made this the kind of school that people want to work in, and people want to send their kids here,” Sumner said. Caywood came to Holland Elementary in 1983. He never met the school’s namesake, Mabel K. Holland. “But I’ve talked with a number of people who knew her,” he said. “She was a fantastic lady. She is the only woman after whom a building was named in the Fort Wayne Community Schools. All the others are named after places, or men. As I understand, she was just an outstanding lady.” Caywood keeps reminders of Holland in the principal’s office. “A few years ago some gentleman came in and said, ‘I have something you might want,’ ” Caywood said, pointing to a shelf on the wall beside his desk. “Those are all books that belonged to Mabel K. Holland. They have her name in them, in her handwriting. To have her writing in it, her name, that really was an important thing,” he said. “It’s just interesting to see and know that she touched these books. These were hers.”

PHOTO BY GARTH SNOW

Art on the wall of the Holland Elementary School lobby illustrates the school’s affection for its principal.

Caywood put his environmental beliefs into action before he even arrived at Holland. In January 1971, he helped to launch Project RID — Recycle Individual Disposables — at Forest Park United Methodist Church. “And we said we would do it until the city started curbside recycling, and we must have been recycling for close to 25 years,” he said. “It was a great time the second Saturday of every month. My involvement in that led to Holland School being identified as an environmental studies special emphasis program back in the 1980s.” Recycling continues districtwide, he said, with collections of paper and aluminum. “It’s interesting to see our kids recycling and being pretty persistent about it,” he said. “The thing we wanted to happen actually did happen. They actually took those ideas home and got their families to recycle.” Even Caywood admits that sometimes his trademark smile doesn’t come as easily some days. A Holland student was killed about three years ago, and the story made national headlines. “It was just about this time of year,” Caywood said. “That was one of our kids. It was a terrible, terrible Christmas break for me, for our school family. But even in that dark moment, I looked at my staff and they just pulled together, they supported each other. Every day’s a great day to be alive, and I think they have to keep that attitude. We could be ‘woe is me,’ but

Eeyore is not one of my favorite characters. I’d rather be a Tigger guy.” Looking back, Caywood said education was the right choice and administration was the right path. “I’d have been happy as a teacher. I decided early on to become a principal. I started my master’s my second year in teaching. And part of it was because of a really wise principal, John Wilhelm,” he said of his Bloomingdale mentor. “And I had been fortunate in those formative years to be able to work with some excellent mentors who guided me in this direction.” Caywood’s work was recognized by his peers in the 10-county District 3 of the principals association, and then by the statewide association. Nancy Caywood also will retire at the end of the school year. She teaches second grade at Lincoln Elementary School. “I will continue my ties with the district and do some things related to the Principal of the Year thing,” he said. That will include participating in a national conference, in the fall. “I don’t know what’s out there,” he said. “We have some grandchildren we want to spend time with, and do some traveling. Like everybody, I’ve got this book in the back of my mind that I’d like to write.” “I feel blessed. I often share with people that I’m doing exactly what I want to do,” Caywood said. Should he look back again, and ask that question that has nagged him since he returned from Vietnam, he will know that he has made a difference. “As I walk away in June,” he said, “I will walk away with a good feeling, knowing that I’ve done the very best that I can over the years, having a positive impact on the boys and girls and my staff.” “I love Mr. Caywood and I will miss him so, so much,” said Sumner, the firstgrade teacher. “He’s had a huge impact on my life, and my career.”

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A6 • INfortwayne.com

Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014 PAID ADVERTISMENT

(ALLEN COUNTY) The nationwide credit crisis may have turned “the American dream” into an extended nightmare for many Indiana home buyers and sellers. Banks and mortgage lenders (who are not going out of business) have tightened up their lending requirements to the point where many home buyers today can no longer qualify for a mortgage. Record foreclosures, rising unemployment, losses in the financial markets and the current credit crunch have not only reduced the number of buyers who can buy but have also increased the number of houses that sellers need to sell. Prices are under pressure as home sellers lower their asking price to attract a buyer, and as lenders resell their foreclosed homes below market value. And it’s turning into a vicious cycle -- as many buyers need to sell their current home first -- and many sellers (unless they plan to rent) need new financing to get into their next home. As a result, a sea of real estate agents, mortgage brokers and home builders are going out of business. These professionals are in the business of serving buyers and sellers. But that’s hard to do with the credit crisis when the entire real estate industry traditionally relies on mortgage lending to finance buyers and get houses sold. What can homeowners do to sell their homes? How can buyers get financing if they can’t meet the tougher lending criteria on credit scores, income verification, down payment amounts and debt ratios?

There’s one local real estate professional who has found a way to make things work even with the present banking crisis. Mike MacDonald is the president of Summit City Investments, Inc. Since 1999, his private investment company has been buying houses throughout the Allen County, IN region without ever relying on banks. MacDonald’s company takes over existing mortgages or brings in private lenders allowing him to pay homeowners all cash for the properties. He then offers his properties for rent or “for sale by owner” using a variety of unique seller financing programs. By taking a long term approach and never relying on banks, business has never been better for MacDonald and his company. “Most sellers are unaware of the options we offer. What they need most is a qualified buyer... and we might just be that buyer. We can buy houses in as-is condition, pay top dollar and close in just a few days… or whenever they’re ready.”

Mike says it’s normal for people to think

they must be desperate before calling him to buy their house. “It’s a very common misconception. But until I look at a house and do some research, I won’t know my game plan for the property or what I can offer. But after a single visit to the property and meeting with the homeowners I can let them know exactly what I can do. My offer is good for 7 days and it’s only at that point, with my offer on the table, that a seller can decide if I’m going to become their buyer.” In fact, price is not an issue for MacDonald. As an investor, what’s important to him is the determination of what income the property can produce. “It’s easy to determine. I also do an appraisal and look at the recent comparable sales. Then I do whatever I can to offer a seller up to full price today -- or about what they might net sometime in the future pursuing a more conventional route. What I can pay depends on the condition, location and financing options available for that type of property. It only takes about 10 minutes to prescreen a property over the phone and to set an appointment. We typically buy 1 out of every 4 properties we see. In fact, for about half of those I have purchased, the seller pursued their other options and then came to realize that my offer was the best all along.” MacDonald believes the three biggest reasons a house doesn’t sell are: 1) it is overpriced, 2) it is poorly marketed, or 3) it is not fixed up to show well. “I can pay a fair price on a home that needs work. I might even plan to increase the value or marketability by adding a bedroom or bath, finishing a basement or installing a new heating system. Brand new carpet and paint will go a long way to attract a qualified buyer. But I understand that many sellers don’t have the time, inclination or money to remodel a house... just to get it sold. We solve that problem for sellers.” Overpricing a home could be the biggest mistake. Listing agents sometimes suggest (or a seller might decide) to ask for a higher price than needed. This might be to test the market or leave wiggle room to negotiate. However, this can backfire if the seller wants (or needs) a quick sale, or when the “days on the market” stacks up causing buyers to wonder what’s wrong with the property. Another misconception about how Mike MacDonald buys houses is the idea that he’s probably looking for sellers in financial distress. “Look, when a seller is out of time or out of options, then I’m usually their best solution -- if their property is not over-financed. But most people headed for foreclosure are either overleveraged or actually looking to save their house. If I buy the house the seller must move. They really need to get into a more affordable home... but sometimes I can help by swapping properties.” MacDonald warns about companies and real estate investors who target distressed homeowners. “Recent laws have been passed in Indiana that apply to any business and investor who targets people in foreclosure. Be cautious, do your research and perhaps seek legal advice when anyone wants to charge you an upfront fee for helping to get your loan modified, or... if they’re promising to lease the home back to you. That rarely works out like the borrower expects and can lead to accusations of fraud. Perhaps rightly so.” What does a real estate investor like Mike MacDonald do with the houses he

buys each month? What about the hundreds of houses his company has bought throughout Allen County, Indiana over the last 14 years? Simple. He rents them out or resells them. “We’re usually managing 80 to 100 properties at any given time -- making us one of the largest owners of single family homes in the area. Each month we may have 10 to 15 houses for sale. Some we’ve owned for years and others we have recently bought.” With a reasonable down payment, MacDonald says he can sell you one of his properties using his popular owner financing programs -- even if you have damaged credit or a short job history. His most popular owner financing “If you can afford a first month’s rent, a last month’s rent and a security deposit, then I can probably sell you one of my houses.”

out some sellers who have found themselves in over their head.” “We do everything we can to get our buyers permanent bank financing. It’s a win-win because we pay sellers all cash and fund our deals with private lenders. Our lenders are mostly local individuals seeking alternatives to low bank CD rates. They earn 8 to 10% interest on real estate notes well-secured by our properties. When we get our buyer cashed out, we finally make our money and can payoff our investor. These investors usually want to reinvest allowing us to buy even more houses.” Unfortunately many of the mortgage programs once available are now gone. It’s reported that 75% of the available lending disappeared when FHA changed their rules last October and again early this year. But, if you have money to put down and can prove your income, there are still loans available now. In fact, some rural development loans and VA loans still allow qualified buyers to borrow with no money down. “We help all of our buyers get a bank loan as quickly as possible... or we finance them ourselves. But we’ve never relied on banks. That keeps us in control and maintains our sanity. But we get those loans done every chance we get. In fact, sometimes a buyer can qualify and doesn’t even know it. Other times they can qualify but need a flexible seller. We’re one of the most creative and flexible sellers you’ll ever find,” says MacDonald. Does buying or selling a home have to be difficult? Maybe not! “President Obama says today's economy is the worst since the Great Depression and it may take many years to recover. Unfortunately I think he’s right and so do many sharp economists.” Interested in selling your property quickly and easily? Looking to buy a new home without bank qualifying? It may be worth checking in with Mike MacDonald and his staff at Summit City Investments, Inc. Call them at (260) 267-0760 or visit them online at www.SummitCityInvestments.com. They’re in a unique position to help buyers and sellers overcome the new challenges created by the recent mortgage market meltdown and credit crisis. And if you’re looking for a conservative way to earn 8-10% interest on your idle cash savings or retirement funds, call and ask for info on becoming one of their private lenders.

program includes the opportunity to build “sweat equity.” Before repairing or remodeling a newly acquired house, MacDonald offers it in “as-is” condition to his buyer’s list. This allows his client to do the work (to suit their own preferences) in exchange for all or part of a down payment. “I have a lot of buyers who check my website each week looking for these ‘fixer upper’ deals. But if the home is not under contract within 10 days or so then I’ll hire my contractors to fix it up completely.” His next most popular program is a down payment assistance plan. Many buyers turn to MacDonald’s company because they don’t have the down payment required by today’s cautious lenders. Mike helps buyers build up equity or a down payment over time with his rent-to-own (or lease with the option to buy) program. In this program you can rent the property you’ve decided to buy, but have the option to close anytime over the next 1, 2... or even 5 years. A portion of the rent each month is credited toward buying. Additional amounts can be paid monthly for more rapid equity build up plus other promised amounts can be made later... like proceeds from the sale of another property or a pending tax refund. Once the buyer has enough “skin” in the deal, MacDonald can close with owner financing at the predetermined, mutually agreed upon price and terms. Or the buyer SUMMIT CITY INVESTMENTS, INC. is can close with a new bank loan. According located at 2200 Lake Avenue, Suite 123 in to MacDonald, “There are so many reasons Fort Wayne, IN, holds a Certificate of my buyers like some time before qualifying Good Standing from the Indiana Secretary for a mortgage. They may need to sell their of State, and is a BBB Accredited business house, work on their credit, establish more with the Indiana Better Business Bureau time on a job or establish two years of with an A+ rating, provable income on tax returns when self-employed. All our buyers are put in Mike MacDonald is the President of touch with a sharp mortgage broker who Summit City Investments, Inc. He is a creates a plan for them. We can recommend an affordable credit repair company that can 37-year resident in the local community, do unbelievable things given even a short 6 to and has been a long term partner in his 12 months to work on a file. This also helps family’s independent insurance agency and tax & accounting firm (G. A. MacDonald Associates, Inc.) For more information or to view a list of properties for sale, just visit www.SummitCityInvestments.com 2200 Lake Avenue, Suite 123 Fort Wayne, IN 46805 Phone (260) 267-0760 -----------------


Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

INfortwayne.com • A7

Polar Plunge seeks Feb. 8 participants Special Olympics of Allen County seeks plungers for the 2014 Fort Wayne Polar Plunge starting at noon Saturday, Feb. 8, at Parkview Field. Plungers can commit to participate in the 2014 Polar Plunge by visiting firstgiving.com/soindiana to register. A minimum $50 for students and $75 for adults is required to plunge in the event. Participants can raise pledges in person or can create their own online personal fundraising page through the registration process. Those who cannot attend the event can also register to be a virtual plunger by mailing a tax-deductible check payable to Special Olympics Indiana or by visiting

soindiana.org. Registration begins at 10 a.m. and closes at 11:30 a.m. All participants must complete and sign an event waiver and bring their pledges and a copy of online fundraising totals to the event. Children ages 12-17 must have a signed waiver from a parent or guardian. Plungers are encouraged to bring costumes, old tennis shoes or water shoes, robe, towel and a change of clothes to have after the plunge. After the event, there will be an After Splash Bash at the Lincoln Financial Event Center for the entire family. Food and beverage, and an awards ceremony will be provided.

‘To Whom it May Concern’

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Young poets accept recognition in a ceremony at the Allen County Public Library. Almost 700 students in kindergarten through 12th grade submitted works for the library’s 31st annual poetry contest. Students accepted their awards in a Dec. 7 ceremony at the main library. Poems were judged by area professors, teachers and poets. Families, friends, and teachers of the winning poets were invited to hear the winning poems read aloud. Entrants represented 40 public, private, parochial and home school settings. A booklet of winning poems has been published and will become a permanent part of the Allen County Public Library’s collection.

Agency has tips on winter pet care back of the door opening. Use straw or cedar chips for bedding. Towels, blankets and hay are insufficient because cloth draws moisture and hay will mold. Insulate the animal’s house and raise it several inches above the ground with concrete blocks to prevent snow from drifting inside. Frame the elevated area with boards or sand bags to prevent winds from gusting under the animal’s house. Animals living inside an unheated garage must have a shelter inside the garage. Animals need extra food to help generate enough body heat to stay warm and must have unfrozen water to drink at all times. A heated water bucket serves that need. Bring dogs inside during extreme cold spells. Animals are very susceptible to frostbite and can quickly die of hypothermia if left outside unsupervised. Puppies and senior dogs do not tolerate the cold, so make walks and playtime short. Thoroughly wipe off your dog’s legs and stomach after cold weather walks. Dogs can easily ingest salt, antifreeze or other potentially dangerous chemicals while licking their paws. Check paws for cuts caused by snow or encrusted ice.

ASCENSION

LUTHERAN SCHOOL

An A-rated, accreditated school for preschool through eighth grade where home, church, and school are partners in children’s spiritual and academic growth.

WOULD YOU LIKE TO LEARN MORE ABOUT OUR A-RATED LUTHERAN SCHOOL?

You are cordially invited

Please come to our Open House Sunday, Jan. 26, anytime between noon & 3 p.m. We’ll serve a light lunch around noon and lead tours of our facility throughout the afternoon.

Mary Haverstick’s

OPEN HOUSE

Retirement Celebration Friday, January 31, 2014 from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. in the Courtyard Conference Room & Café at Saint Anne Home & Retirement Community Special presentation by The Most Reverend Bishop Kevin Rhoades at 3 p.m. Please join us to honor Mary’s 27 years as administrator

SAINT ANNE HOME RETIREMENT COMMUNITY 1900 Randallia Drive, Fort Wayne, IN 46805

260-484-5555 www.saintannehome.com

I

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Animal Care & Control is offering free straw to any Allen County resident in need of animal bedding during these cold days of winter. Pet owners are urged to continually monitor the needs of pets whenever the animals are outdoors. The straw is being offered through private donation, to be used for bedding and to keep the ground surrounding a doghouse mud-free. Visit Animal Care & Control, 3020 Hillegas Road, during general business hours Monday-Friday, 11 a.m.-5:30 p.m. and until 7 p.m. Wednesdays. Call the shelter regardless of the day or time to report an animal in need of help within the city. Call 427-1244. The shelter offers these additional winter pet care tips: An animal that spends time outside must have access to a proper shelter specifically designed for an animal. The shelter must be free of leaks to wind, snow and rain. Face the opening of the shelter to the east or south, away from prevailing wind, or fasten a heavy door flap to the top of the door frame. Locate the animal’s home to a warmer location in the sun. Create a snug inner room by making a removable partition inside the doghouse in

Grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. 2 Peter 3:18

Preschool through 8th grades Daily chapel services and Learn By Heart Bible memory program

Vocal music, handbells, band, strings HUKÄULHY[ZPUZ[Y\J[PVU Integrated technology in all classrooms

Up-to-date curriculum, library and facilities

Before and after school care and enrichment program

National Lutheran School and state of Indiana Accreditation

Extracurricular sports for grades 4 through 8

8811 St. Joe Rd., Fort Wayne, Indiana 46835 (near I-469 and Maplecrest Rd.) (260) 486-2226 · school@alcsfw.org · www.alcsfw.org


A8 • INfortwayne.com

Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

Local corrections chief earns Sagamore of Wabash Allen County Community Corrections Executive Director Sheila Hudson has Hudson received a Sagamore of the Wabash award. Indiana Gov. Mike Pence selected Hudson to receive one of the

honorary awards for 2013, for her work in the criminal justice field. Indiana Senate President Pro Tem David Long and state Rep. Phil GiaQuinta bestowed the honor upon Hudson at a formal ceremony Dec. 12 at Allen County Community Corrections. Hudson paved the way for many corrections agencies, implementing

electronic monitoring equipment, educational, substance abuse, cognitive and motivational-based programs, and providing support to problem-solving court programs such as the ReEntry Court and Restoration Court. Community Corrections hosts the first and only dispatching center in the state to monitor offenders on real time, with fully deputized

home detention officers, another first. It also hosts the first and only modified therapeutic community at the Kelley House, which houses men with mental illness and addiction disorders. At the ceremony, she was recognized by her colleagues across the state of Indiana and 74 like community corrections agencies with the first ever Leader in the Field award. The Allen County Board of Commissioners issued a special proclamation for Hudson for her service

to the county, and for saving taxpayers millions of dollars by keeping offenders from jail and other court services. Since 2003, Hudson has served on the Indiana Sentencing Policy Study Committee. She is a founding member of the Criminal Justice Partnership of Indiana, which addresses statewide criminal justice reform, evidence-based interventions and standardized performance measures. She was an advisory

board member of Blue Jacket Inc., a nonprofit organization that provides an employment services program for ex-offenders; and a member of the faith and character-based Department of Correction task force. She received a Hidden Heroine award from the Fort Wayne Women’s Bureau; the Liberty Bell from the Allen County Bar Association; and a Community Achievement Award from the IPFW School of Public and Environmental Affairs.

Lutheran Health CEO Bauer recognized for achievements Lutheran Health Network CEO Brian Bauer has received one of Indiana’s highest honors. State Sen. Jim Banks, R-Columbia City, on behalf of Gov. Mike Pence, bestowed upon Bauer the rank and title of Bauer Sagamore of the Wabash at the conclusion of a joint meeting of the Northeast Indiana Regional Partnership and the Indiana Chamber of Commerce at Sweetwater Sound in Fort Wayne. More than 100 regional leaders attended. “His substantial impact on our region during the short time he has been here makes this distinction well-deserved,” Banks said. “Brian is among the youngest recipients to receive a Sagamore of the Wabash from our governor and that is a testament to his effectiveness as a servant leader who is shaping the future of our region in healthcare and beyond.” Bauer was unanimously selected by the Lutheran Health Network board of directors in October to become the network’s new chief executive officer, a position he’d

held on an interim basis since June. He has also served as CEO of Lutheran Hospital since June 2011. Bauer received his undergraduate degree in finance from Butler University in Indianapolis where he played center on the Bulldogs’ football team. He earned an MBA, with a healthcare emphasis, at Indiana Wesleyan University. He served as chief executive officer of Terre Haute Regional Hospital in his hometown. Bauer has represented the interests of the Lutheran Health Network through extensive community involvement. He was selected as the honorary chairperson for northeastern Indiana’s March of Dimes’ 2012 March for Babies, the National Kidney Foundation’s 2012 Kidney Walk and the American Heart Association’s 2013 Heart Walk. Bauer has recently joined the board of Greater Fort Wayne Inc. and the Region 3 Works Council, a governor-appointed position. During his time as a hospital administrator, Bauer has also worked at the state level as a governor’s appointee to advance the effectiveness and utilization of health information technology.

McComb chairs state funeral license board The Indiana Professional Licensing Agency announced that David McComb has been elected as the 2014-2015 chairman of the Indiana State Board of Funeral and Cemetery Service.

The board oversees licensing and regulatory aspects of funeral and cemetery McComb operations in Indiana. “Mr. McComb’s servant leadership and experience is welcomed at a time in Indiana history when we are striving to promote economic development and remove barriers to practice to make Indiana a state that works,” said Nick Rhoad, IPLA executive director. McComb has more than 25 years’ experience in the funeral home business. He was first appointed to the board by Gov. Frank O’Bannon in 2000 as a funeral director representative member, and then again in 2008 by Gov. Mitch Daniels as a cemetery owner member. He is the fourth generation to operate family-owned D.O. McComb and Sons Funeral Homes, which is the second-largest funeral home in Indiana. McComb is a licensed funeral director and has a bachelor’s degree in business from Indiana

University, and a degree in mortuary science from Mid-America College of Funeral Service in Jeffersonville, Ind. McComb is an entrepreneur, with businesses including Eagle’s Wings Air, Birkmeier Monument Co., Premier Preneed, Estate Security, Riverview Cemetery, Tributes.com and Fort Wayne Financial. He is very active in representing death care professionals as a member of Indiana State Board of Funeral and Cemetery Service and acts as liaison to the attorney general. A lifelong resident of Fort Wayne, McComb serves in various organizations. These include vice chair of the Fort Wayne Urban League board of directors, Junior Achievement, Erin’s House for Grieving Children, Allen County Drive Alive steering committee, the Business Forum, and St. Francis College School of Business. He is also a member of the board of directors of Salin Bank & Trust Co. He enjoys spending time with his three children, Jessica, Nicole and David Jr., and with his, Cheryl.


Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

INfortwayne.com • A9

Men work, women enjoy Graceful Night Out By Garth Snow gsnow@kpcmedia.com

Mike McGuire will help the men of Grace Episcopal Church to pamper about 110 women at Graceful Night Out. “This is their turn,” McGuire said of the seventh annual night of fun and fundraising, beginning at 5:45 p.m. Friday, Feb. 28, at the church at 10010 Aurora Place. Women from outside the church also enjoy the hearty hors d’oeuvres, sweets and relaxation. Tickets are $40, and may be reserved by calling the church office at 432-9221. Highlights include a keynote speech, followed by raffles and live and silent auctions. Guests will visit pampering stations, including a

COURTESY PHOTO

Men work the auction and serve food while women enjoy Graceful Night Out, a fundraiser at Grace Episcopal Church.

massage station and a jewelry station. “Anything to help the ladies feel special,” he said. “We usually have from 15 to 20 guys,” McGuire said. “Our whole thing is to pamper the ladies. We bring them food, we bring them drink, we take their

coats, we’ll walk them in — whatever needs to be done.” McGuire said his wife, Gail, is in charge of the food. “My guys are in charge of setup,” he said. “The only thing the ladies do is the artistic setup of the table. We’re not too

Winterval, Last Saturday celebrate arts, outdoors Instead of hiding from the cold, Fort Wayne will celebrate the season with Winterval. The Jan. 25 celebration coincides with the Downtown Improvement District’s Last Saturday exploration of the arts. For updates and details, visit fortwayneparks.org. Allen County Public Library, 900 Library Plaza, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.: Ice carving, kids’ crafts and freezing fun on the plaza. Botanical Conservatory, 1100 S. Calhoun St., 10 a.m.-3 p.m.: Ice carving, crafts, “High Places, Hidden Spaces” exhibit. Science Central, 1950 N. Clinton St., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Hands-on activities for children from 11 a.m.-4 p.m., including making “Glacial Gak” and liquid nitrogen ice cream. National Weather Service meteorologist Sam Lashley will also be on-site to conduct demonstrations in the Lincoln Financial Foundation Demonstration Theater, including “ Minutes with a Meteorologist – Accurately Measuring Rain and Snow;” and “Cooking Up Thunderstorms and Tornadoes.” Admission will be $4 for ages 3 to adult, and children 1 and under are admitted free. The Old Fort (Historic Fort Wayne), 1201 Spy Run Ave., 10 a.m.-5 p.m.: Nouvelle Annee 1754, bake sale, hot cocoa and coffee. Experience a winter with the French of Fort Miamies. Re-en-

actors re-create actual events that occurred in and around what is now Fort Wayne in the year 1754 as taken from letters written by the fort’s commanders. Headwaters Ice Rink, 333 S. Clinton St., 11 a.m.-10 p.m.: public skating; exhibitions at 1:15, 2:15, 3:15 and 4:15 p.m. History Center, 302 E. Berry St., noon-5 p.m.: Half-price admission. Randy Harter will be at the History Center at 2 p.m. to share his Fort Wayne postcard collection and to autograph copies of his book “Postcard History Series: Fort Wayne (IN).” Harter’s work is also available in the History Center gift shop. Lawton Park, 1999 N. Clinton St., 1-3 p.m.: Polar Bear rugby game. Free. (Tentative: Visit fortwayneparks.org to confirm.) Community Center, 233 W. Main St., 1-4 p.m.: Winter Carnival, with ice carving, carriage rides and Youtheatre presentation. Grand Wayne Center, 120 W. Jefferson Blvd., 1 and 4 p.m.: Ice carving, free concerts. Auer Center for Arts & Culture, 300 E. Main St., 1 and 4 p.m.: “The People Could Fly!” performance; tickets, $5. Last Saturdays allow visitors to experience diverse social, arts and cultural opportunities. For more information about Last Saturdays, visit downtownfortwayne. com.

great on that, but they set the tables up with a different theme every year. We have some very talented women in our congregation.” Julie Boyd shares the event co-chair duties with Toni Ingram. “It started out originally as a kind of Valentine present, so the men of the church would serve women and they would have a night out,” Boyd said. “Our men are a big part of the event,” Boyd said. “They’re a very active and involved part of the event for us.” She said the joy and the money from the project are poured into church outreach programs, including supporting a Fort Wayne homeless shelter for families, an interfaith meals program, a food bank, and a shawl

ministry. “We nurture women’s minds, bodies and spirits,” Boyd said. More than 120 businesses donated items for last year’s raffle and silent auction, Boyd said. “We have great support from the community. We have over $5,000 worth of goods and coupons,” she said. “It started out very small and became our main fundraiser for the church,” McGuire said. “It’s gotten better every single year, and we’ve had some great speakers.” “It’s a lot of fun,” he said. “It’s a good thing for the guys. We all get together, there’s good camaraderie, and the guys have a great time, and the ladies are so appreciative of what we’re doing for them, and they do feel

special on that night.” Fort Wayne attorney, teacher and author Laurie Gray will present this year’s address, on the topic “Living with Intentional Gratitude and Kindness.” For her charity, Gray has chosen the Dr. Bill Lewis Center for Children, which offers a safe place where children who have been abused can be interviewed. The Fort Wayne center also provides expertise to more than 700 child advocacy centers across the nation. For details, visit LewisCenterforChildren.org. For more information on Grace Episcopal Church, visit gracefwi. org. “We’re a small church, but we do a lot with the numbers that we have,” Boyd said.


A10 • INfortwayne.com

Healthy Times

Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

Let’s Talk guides parents on teaching babies United Way of Allen County has launched an education initiative in partnership with Parkview Health and PNC Bank. The “Let’s Talk” initiative provides resources and guidance to parents, which helps them better connect with their children. In a news release, the partners said: “Research shows that foundations of lifelong health are built in early childhood. By simply talking with or reading to their children, parents can improve their child’s brain development, school readiness and overall learning capacity. Studies indicate achievement gaps can begin as early as age 9 months.”

“Young children are born learning; they drink up all of the attention, love and knowledge that you give them,” said Jeanne Zehr, director of community impact, United Way of Allen County. “Talking to your baby can help them grow an amazing mind.” “By implementing the Let’s Talk initiative in Allen County, we will strive to improve brain development and outcomes in young children,” said Patti Brahe, senior vice president, women’s and children’s services, Parkview Health. “Not only do we want to give as many children as possible the chance for success as they grow, but we want to

Wissman Stroke Center earns AHA gold rating Parkview’s Stanley Wissman Stroke Center has received the Get With The Guidelines – Stroke Gold Quality Achievement Award from the American Heart Association. This achievement recognizes Parkview’s commitment to a high standard of care by ensuring stroke patients receive treatment according to nationally accepted best practice guidelines. This is the third consecutive year the center has been recognized with the award. Parkview’s program has also qualified to be recognized as a recipient of the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association’s Target: Stroke Honor Roll.

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Jeanne Zehr, director of community impact, United Way of Allen County, says children are born learning.

give parents the support they need as they raise their children.” The program will be

implemented at Parkview Family Birthing Centers in Allen County. New parents will receive a package

of educational materials including a board book and more. The items will be assembled by volunteers from Lamplight Communities. The materials will cover resources in the community for infants and toddlers as well as suggestions for parents on how they can interact with their children to help them learn and grow. Suggestions for parents include: Singing to your baby while you do laundry or cook. Even at an early age, babies respond to and imitate the sounds you make. Talking to your baby during bath time by describing the colors and

shapes of the bath toys. Speaking in the language you know best. Babies learn from the variety and number of words and sounds that they hear. Additional opportunities will be made available to parents beginning when their child is 3 months old. Those items will include another board book, a list of physical and developmental milestones and more to be mailed to participating parents. Parents can also sign up for weekly text message tips by texting Talk2Baby to 99000. For more information on the Let’s Talk initiative, visit unitedwayallencounty.org or parkview.com/letstalk.

IPFW offers help quitting smoking IPFW is offering two programs designed to help people stop smoking. Natalie McLaughlin, an RN from Parkview Hospital Community Nursing Program, instructs a Freedom from Smoking program and leads the tobacco-free support group. Freedom from Smoking classes meet once a week for seven weeks, continuing through Wednesday, Feb. 26, from 5:30 to 7 p.m. in Walb Union, Room G 21. The tobacco free-support group meets on the third Thursday of each

month. Remaining dates for the support group are Feb. 20, March 20, April 17 and May 15. The group meets from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. in Walb Union, Room G 21. Both the class and the support group are free and open to the public. Topics and dates include: “Wanting to Quit,” Jan. 29; “Quit Day,” Feb. 5; “Winning Strategies,” Feb. 12; “The New You,” Feb. 19; and, “Staying Off,” Feb. 26. The program teaches participants

how to live a tobacco-free life, including how to make a plan of action to quit, follow relaxation techniques, and handle triggers and cravings. To enroll, contact Judy Tillapaugh, IPFW health and wellness coordinator, at 481-6647 or tillapau@ipfw.edu. Additional tobacco cessation assistance is available at the IPFW Center for Healthy Living: Campus Clinic and Wellness Programs. To set an appointment, call Heather Krull at 481-5748.


Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

INfortwayne.com • A11

Farm Bureau honors Hadley

COURTESY PHOTOS

Crosses will line the walks near the New Haven United Methodist Church.

Free crosses offer outlet for pre-Easter inspiration By Garth Snow gsnow@kpcmedia.com

People from other churches and surrounding communities are invited to take part in the annual Easter season Cross Walk program through New Haven United Methodist Church. The crosses are available for free, thanks to Bob and Mary Richhart. Participants may pick up a cross, decorate it, and return it to be included in the Lenten display. Crosses are available now. Each comes with helpful information. Those interested may contact the church ofďŹ ce at 749-9565. The deadline to return the cross and have a corresponding description in the Cross Walk booklet is Sunday, Feb. 16. The New Haven United Methodist Church is at 630 Lincoln Highway East. Crosses will line Lincoln Highway and the church frontage on Maury Street. Crosses will be put in place for Ash Wednesday, March

5, and taken down after Easter, April 20. After that, each participant may pick up their cross and take it home. “We usually do 40 crosses, representing the 40 days of Lent,� Mary Richhart said. This marks at least the eighth year for the program, she said. Crosses are uniform in size. Each is made from a 2x4, and stands 4 feet above the ground and 3 feet wide. The Richharts pay for the lumber. “That’s part of the ministry. We enjoy doing that,� Mary Richhart said. A devotional book with descriptions of each cross will be available on each end of the walk. “This year, we are inviting those in the New Haven and surrounding area who are interested in decorating a cross to join us,� the couple said in a news release, issued through the church. “This is a fun project for individuals, families, church groups, etc.� Participants are asked

to share a message, devotion, Bible verse or their inspiration in making their cross. The information packet includes guidelines and suggestions. “I’ve picked a lot of verses out of the Bible about Jesus,� she said. “The true vine. He is risen. There are so many themes that you can pick from the Bible.� Mary Richhart said the public’s response has been positive. “They park their cars in the church parking lot and walk the cross walk,� she said. After The United Methodist Reporter published a description of the New Haven church’s 2007 project, Mary Richhart was asked to help start similar projects at two other churches. The project grew from an idea offered by the church evangelism committee several years back, Mary Richhart said. “We just wanted to spread the message of Jesus’ love and what he did for us with the rest of the community,� she said.

Zoo board has ďŹ ve new members The Fort Wayne Zoological Society elected ďŹ ve new members to its board of directors for 2014. Joining the board are: Jim Kelley, vice president, Kelley Automotive; Kristin Marcuccilli, senior vice president and chief operating ofďŹ cer, STAR Bank; Roberto Munoz, vice president and general manager, Zimmer Inc.; Cindy Riemersma, chief operating ofďŹ cer, 80/20 Inc.; and Theresa Wagler, executive vice

president and chief ďŹ nancial ofďŹ cer, Steel Dynamics Inc. The Fort Wayne Zoological Society is a nonproďŹ t organization that operates the Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo under a cooperative agreement with the City of Fort Wayne Park & Recreation Department. More than 500,000 people visit the award-winning Fort Wayne Children’s Zoo each season.

ArtsLab dedicated

PHOTO BY BARRY ROCHFORD

Arts United dedicated its new ArtsLab with a reception Friday, Jan. 17, that featured short performances by the Fort Wayne Civic Theatre, Fort Wayne Youtheatre and the Fort Wayne Ballet. ArtsLab is part of a $1.6-million, 8,000-square-foot addition to the Auer Center for Arts & Culture in downtown Fort Wayne. The “black-box� space can be used for various activities such as music and theatrical productions, exhibits and expositions.

Indiana Farm Bureau members from across the state were honored during IFB’s annual convention in Fort Wayne. Roger Hadley of Allen County was among those honored for recruiting six or more new voting members during 2013. The President’s Award for Outstanding Leadership went to Jerry Canada, who is retiring as executive vice president and CEO of Indiana Farm Bureau Insurance, a position he’s held since 2002. The President’s Distinguished Service Award went to Maurice Williamson, former executive director of the Purdue Ag Alumni Association, a position he held for 37 years, and former manager of the Pioneer Village at the Indiana State Fair.

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Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

A12 • INfortwayne.com

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The Fort Wayne Parks Department invites ages 12 or older to print their own Valentine cards. The program will be 1-4 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 8, at Franke Park Nature Lodge, 3411 Sherman Blvd. Jan. 30 is the registration deadline. Visit fortwayneparks.org. The class requires a minimum of eight participants. Instructor Julie Wall Toles has a bachelor of fine arts degree from IPFW. She owns Hedgehog Press, an artistic print studio where she offers classes and workshops for all ages. “We will be using an antique letterpress that is over 100 years old but

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455-9471 from 8 a.m.-4 p.m. weekdays. Dinner and lodging at the inn for one night, for two people, is $199. For details about the restaurant and nearby shops, visit essenhaus. com. Hear the three-time winner of the Top Gigmasters Big Band Singer Award. His performances have taken him to New York, Chicago, Scottsdale, Ariz., Palm Springs, Calif., and Boston. His music includes the Big Band standards of Frank Sinatra, Tony Bennett, Nat King Cole, Elvis Presley, Bobby Darin and other legends. He has opened for the current Glenn Miller Orch-

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stra, has sung with the current Tommy Dorsey Orchestra. For over 10 years, he has performed for corporate events, anniversaries, weddings, receptions, birthdays, holiday shows and for dinner entertainment at fine restaurants. For more information, visit singermattwalch.com. Walch also will perform at the Cottage Event Center in Roanoke at 7:30 p.m. Friday, April 11. For information on that show, visit cottageeventcenter.com.

Eubanks brings Van Wert show Bob Eubanks will present his live Not-So-Newlywed Show at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15, at the Niswonger Performing Arts Center of Northwest Ohio. The Niswonger is at 10700 Ohio 118 S., Van Wert. Tickets range from $17 to $27. Get tickets through the box office at (419) 238-6722, from noon-4 p.m. weekdays. Or visit npacvw.org to buy tickets or to get a taste of the bloopers from the original TV show. The show follows the original format of the television show using four local “celebrity” married couples who are either newlyweds or feel like newlyweds. The show consists of Eubanks narrating clips from the television show and then playing a half-hour version of the game. TV Guide voted Eubanks one of the top five game show hosts of all time. He is the author of “It’s in the Book, Bob.” For more about his career and current projects, visit bobeubanks. com.

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Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

INfortwayne.com • A13

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A14 • INfortwayne.com

Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

Business magazine to honor Walters Greater Fort Wayne Business Weekly announced it will present its 2014 Legend of Leadership Award to Irene Walters. The award recognizes long-term leadership in northeast Indiana. Walters serves as executive director of university relations at IPFW and has been active in this community for more than four decades. Mastodons on Parade, Kids Crossing playground, Francine’s Friends, Women United, and RiverFest are some of the projects that were either a result of her vision or benefited from

Eisbart, Steel Dynamics, will serve as the master of ceremonies and will be joined by Marilyn Moran-Townsend, CVC Communications; Larry Lee, Leepoxy Plastics; Cheri Becker, Leadership Fort Wayne; Sharon Eisbart, Sharon Eisbart Corporate Art; and Mike Cahill, Tower Bank, to highlight Walters’ accomplishments. “Irene Walters is exactly the kind of leader this award was meant to honor,” said Terry Ward, COO, KPC Media Group. “A leader who uses their skills and connections to

Walters

her efforts. Walters will be honored at a breakfast event Thursday, Feb. 27, at the Landmark Centre in Fort Wayne. Ben

socially influence many in order to achieve a common goal. She’s in impressive company. She will share this distinction with the two past winners of the award, Ian Rolland and Keith Busse, and we are proud to honor her for all she has done for this community.” Tickets are $25 each or tables of eight for $150. To buy tickets, visit FWBusiness.com or call 426-2640. Event sponsorships are also available by contacting Maryann Ulmer, 426-2640, ext. 324, or mulmer@ kpcmedia.com.

Classes address keeping checking accounts The Purdue Cooperative Extension Service in Allen County continues to host the Get Checking workshop for the Bank On Fort Wayne initiative. This workshop is for

clients and families who have never had checking or savings accounts at a bank or credit union, or have mismanaged accounts at banks and credits unions so those

accounts are now closed without committing fraud, or have accounts, but continue to still use predatory lenders. All workshops will be held at the Allen County

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IPFW’s Kalamaras begins two years as state poet laureate The Indiana Arts Commission has selected IPFW professor George Kalamaras as the new Indiana state poet laureate. Kalamaras is a professor of English at IPFW, a post he has held since 1990. Among his degrees, he holds a doctorate in English from the State University of New York at Albany. He was born in Chicago and grew up in Cedar Lake, Ind., in Lake County. Kalamaras began his two-year term as state poet laureate Jan.1. “I am deeply honored with this appointment and absolutely thrilled to serve the people and state of Indiana in this way,” Kalamaras said. “The vocation of poetry is not about individual accolades, although I am humbled and most pleased with this honor. However, I see poetry as an act of loving service — to people, to animals and the planet, and to the culture at large. Poetry grants us the opportunity to practice a meaning-making activity in which the smaller sense of self eventually dissolves into a more expansive Self with a larger sense of purpose beyond the individual. I look forward to serving as poet laureate and am grateful beyond words for the faith the Indiana Arts Commission has already shown in me.” Kalamaras has published six books of poetry and one of scholarship including “Kingdom of Throat-Stuck Luck,” winner of the Elixir Press Poetry Contest, “The Recumbent Galaxy,” co-authored with Alvaro Cardona-Hine and winner

COURTESY PHOTO

George Kalamaras has published six books of poetry. The IPFW professor will serve as Indiana poet laureate through 2015.

of the C&R Press Open Competition, and “The Theory and Function of Mangoes,” winner of the Four Way Books Intro Series; six poetry chapbooks; numerous articles in scholarly journals; and more than 725 poems in anthologies and magazines in the United States and abroad. In 1994, Kalamaras received an Indo-U.S. Advanced Research Fellowship (from the Fulbright Foundation and the Indo-U.S. Subcommission on Education and Culture) to conduct research in India, with joint affiliations at Banaras Hindu University and Deccan College. In 1993, he received a Creative Writing Poetry Fellowship Grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, and has twice received an Individual Artist Fellowship Grant from the Indiana Arts Commission. In 2009, he won the Outstanding Researcher Award at IPFW. He has presented numerous poetry readings throughout the United States and in India.

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Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

INfortwayne.com • A15

Artlink begins sign-up for kids’ spring classes Artlink plans a series of kids’ art classes for spring 2014. Dates and fees vary. Artlink is a not-for-proďŹ t art gallery whose mission is to showcase artwork by diverse visual artists and to provide educational programming. Artlink is a funded partner of Arts United of Greater Fort Wayne, 300 E. Main St. Get details and download registration forms, at artlinkfw.com. Artlink’s gallery hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Tuesday through Friday, noon-6 p.m. Saturday, and noon-5 p.m. Sunday. Classes include: Creative Construction with LEGO. Wednesdays, Feb. 19, 26, March 5, 12, 19 and 26, 6-7:30 p.m. Artlink, Design Collaborative, and the American Institute of Architects present Creative Construction with LEGO, a class for kids who want to learn about creative design and construction using LEGO bricks. Design Collaborative architect Ron Dick will take kids on an architectural learning experience, appropriate for ages 9 to 13. The cost is $75 for six weeks. The teacher is Ron Dick, AIA, principal registered architect with Design Collaborative. Dick worked on the original drawings and design of the building when it was a gas company and again when it was renovated for Arts United as the Auer Center for Arts and Culture in 2010. Kids’ Art Exploration. Wednesdays, Feb. 19, 26, March 5, 12, 19 and 26, 6-7 p.m. This program will be all about building. The young artists will explore 3D techniques and artists from all over the world. Beginning with African beads, students will create jewelry or sculptures

COURTESY PHOTO

Children will explore 3D techniques, LEGO construction and more through a series of classes at Artlink.

with paper bead forms. Students will explore clay and organic slab forms in the style of Hungarian designer Eva Zeisel, and create Louise Nevelson assemblage designs from things that normally are recycled. Wrapping up the spring session will be an exploration of ancient Chinese

shadow puppets, with a grand ďŹ nalĂŠ performance during the last class. All supplies are provided. The cost is $80 for six weeks. Erin Patton-McFarren is the teacher. Classic Teen Art Club. Saturdays, March 8, 15, 22 and 29, 1-3 p.m. Students will study under local professional artist Karen Moriarty. Students will learn acrylic painting techniques and charcoal drawing using the principles of two-dimensional design and color. Students will work from a still life and copy a master painting in order to learn from them. Students who have already taken this class are encouraged to attend again in order to build on prior knowledge and skills. The class is appropriate for ages 13 through 18. All supplies are provided. The cost is $55 for four weeks. LEGO Exploration Junior. Wednesdays, April 9, 16, 23 and 30, 6-7 p.m. The class is appropriate for children ages 5 to 8, who will collaborate to create LEGO projects. Artlink will provide LEGO bricks. The cost is $50 for four weeks. Artist Paul Demaree is the teacher. Teen Street Art Club. Saturdays, April 26, May 3, 10 and 17, 1-3 p.m. Students will study under a local professional artist, Jerrod Tobias. Subjects will include local and national movements of street and urban art. Tobias will explore the technique of wheat pasting with students. Wheat pasting is an outdoor, impermanent art form. Tobias’ wheat pasted paintings can be seen at Fort Wayne locations such as on the front of the Auer Center, on the northwest corner of the Allen County Public Library and on the back of the Firey Coffee House. The class is appropriate for ages 13 through 18. All supplies are provided. The cost is $55 for four weeks.

Parkview wellness center plans open house The Parkview Women’s Health Center, on the campus of Parkview Regional Medical Center, is expanding and will now be known as the Parkview Center for Healthy Living. The center will offer new wellness services and expand current services and classes. The center will

continue to be a resource for educational programs, free and reduced cost screenings, exercise classes and wellness coaching. To learn more about the Parkview Center for Healthy Living, the public is invited to an open house Tuesday, Jan. 28, from 4-7 p.m. Representatives

from numerous services throughout Parkview and Parkview Physicians Group will be on hand to answer questions. Those who are not members of the center can join at no cost and receive access to discounts, screenings and more. Call (866) 784-6706 to reserve a space by Jan. 24.

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a place to go for information about wellness — and it means more than going to the doctor, eating right and exercising. The Center for Healthy Living will help to meet those needs.� The Center for Healthy Living also will introduce a new online, interactive

assessment tool that can help people ďŹ nd personal answers about health and wellness. The assessment evaluates a person’s physical and emotional health, resiliency and strength, along with his or her ability to cope with stress and control over health-related matters.

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A16 • INfortwayne.com

Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

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Section

B

January 24, 2014

INfortwayne.com

Serving Northwest Fort Wayne & Allen County

Rotarians here help Africa school By Garth Snow

Bigger but familiar circus in town through Sunday

gsnow@kpcmedia.com

By Garth Snow A West African village is watching a middle school rise one classroom at a time, thanks to an initiative of the Rotary Club of Fort Wayne. Club members recently reviewed the progress of the project in Gléi, Togo. The adjoined wooden buildings that previously formed a village middle school were “not really a structure,” said Jason Daenens, who attended the dedication of four new classrooms on Oct. 22. Daenens, who manages a manufacturing plant in northwest Fort Wayne, led the club’s recent discussion. “It’s tattered, falling apart, and we knew that it would be at least another 10 years before the government would get around to being able to fund anything for this school,” he said, pointing to an on-screen projection. “Imagine, during the rainy season, trying to study under those types

gsnow@kpcmedia.com

COURTESY PHOTO

Jason Daenens visits a middle school in Glei, Togo, West Africa. Daenens helped to lead an effort by the Fort Wayne Rotary Club to build four rooms of the new school. Daenens is CEO of Commercial Filter Service in Fort Wayne.

of conditions. Oftentimes the students didn’t end up going to school.” Daenens said the club’s International Service Committee took on the school program in the fall of 2012. “We looked hard for a way to fund, and we finally decided we could do this if we did it one classroom at a time,” he said. The local parents group

also stepped forward. “They wanted to get their hands dirty and make sure we were able to get this project done,” he said. “So what was a $50,000 project, with the assistance of the other groups, we were able to bring down to a $20,000 project, because of all the volunteer labor that went into it.” New York Rotarian

COURTESY PHOTO

Sisters Samantha, left, and Sarah Hadley have been competing in log rolling since they were in kindergarten. They will compete again Jan. 24-26 at the Outdoor Sports Lake & Cabin Show in Fort Wayne. “It’s all good-natured, no hard feelings,” Samantha said.

Lumberjills tackle outdoors By Garth Snow gsnow@kpcmedia.com

Samantha Hadley said she and her younger sister, Sarah, are accustomed to throwing axes and balancing on spinning logs. The Wisconsin natives will demonstrate those skills through Sunday at the Outdoor Sports Lake & Cabin Show at the Allen County War Memorial Coliseum. Hours are noon-9 p.m. Friday, Jan. 24; 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 25; and 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 26. Admission is $10 for adults, free for kids 12 and under. For details, visit outdoorsportslakecabinshow.com. “Lumberjills have been around for a while,” said Samantha Hadley, who started practicing her sport in Hayward, Wis., at the age of 5, and who was an emcee at last year’s outdoors show. She is now ranked among the top 10 in her

sport. She is in marketing for a property management company. Her sister is still in high school in Wisconsin. Two lumberjacks also will compete in Fort Wayne, she said. Despite the axes and chainsaws, it’s friendly competition and a family-friendly show, she said. The sports of log rolling and log climbing weren’t just created, she said, but grew from a fun approach to actual labor. “It came from work that was done by a lumberjack,” she said. “This was work that had to be done in order to build homes. And over the years it’s been modernized by the invention of the chain saws. A lot of people still do the stuff you’ll see us doing.” The tools have changed with the sport, she said. Lumberjacks wield axes that weigh six to 10 pounds to chop trees. See OUTDOORS, Page B3

and former Peace Corps volunteer Jane O’Sullivan has worked in Togo for more than four years. O’Sullivan shared in the Fort Wayne update. She said the Rotary Club has been a good steward of the resources designated to Togo. “Having lived in that village for 27 months, and seeing the poverty — and the death — I believe See AFRICA, Page B2

The 2014 Mizpah Shrine Circus is about 20 percent larger than the 2013 show, says Larry Solheim, the general manager of the touring Tarzan Zerbini Circus. Performances began Thursday at the Allen County War Memorial Coliseum. Performances continue: Friday, Jan. 24, 7 p.m.; Saturday, Jan. 25, 10 a.m., 2:30 p.m. and 7 p.m.; and Sunday, Jan. 26, at 1 p.m. and $5:45 p.m. Tickets range from $12 to $20. The Mizpah Circus Fair is in the basement of the Coliseum and opens one hour before the first show of the day and continues until one hour after the last show ends. Admission is free. Guests ride elephants and children ride ponies, and get a closer look at other circus animals. For commonly asked questions and details on the show and the tour, visit tzproductions.com. “We’re really excited,” Solheim said. “Last year was a big year for us, with the 250th anniversary of the Zerbini circus tradition. And this year we’re going to be bigger and better. We’re bringing in even more animal acts this year. We have a new horse act, we have alligators, we have high wires, motorcycles, all sorts of things that are new this year.” “We still have tigers and elephants,” he said. “And the bareback riding horse act is exceptional, a completely different look.” “We’re also going to be featuring The World Famous Wallendas on the high wire, which is going to be a big act,” the circus manager said from his winter home in Arkansas. “Rick Wallenda is the grandson of the great See CIRCUS, Page B3


B2 • INfortwayne.com

Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

AFRICA from Page B1 what you are doing is helping create a better future for that country,” she said. “And Togo in 2013 when I went back was in better shape than when I arrived in 2009.” O’Sullivan also served as the Fort Wayne Rotarians’ translator in the French-speaking country. Daenens became aware of Gléi’s conditions when he attended the sixth West Africa Rotary Fair in Accra, Ghana, in 2010. Since then, with the assistance of Northern Indiana Rotary District 6540, Daenens has helped to secure playground equipment and more textbooks for that village. Daenens said the local international service committee decided to do a smaller project first, and bought playground equipment. “What we were embarking on was a very small project — just a few hundred American dollars — but it did make a great difference,” he said. “It was very heartwarming to see the children out there playing and enjoying themselves.” For its second step, the club chose a project specifically related to education. Only 15 percent of the Togo village’s students had textbooks. With Rotary’s purchase, that ratio improved to 50 percent. Holli Seabury, a co-presenter who was

PHOTO BY GARTH SNOW

Jason Daenens, from left, Holli Seabury, and Jane O’Sullivan told the Rotary Club of Fort Wayne about progress on a new school in Togo, West Africa. Club President Jeff Krull, right, commended the dedication and commitment to service.

heavily involved in the project over the past three years, said she was on the Fort Wayne club’s International Service Committee when Daenens first proposed projects in Gléi. That proposal led to research and startling findings, she said. The country of 6.8 million people has an infant mortality rate of 48 in 1,000, she told the club. Togo’s per-capita income ranks 171st out of 180 countries, she said. Agriculture is the main livelihood. “But unlike Indiana, we’re not talking about megafarms and big farms — we’re talking about subsistence farming,” Seabury said. “People are relying on their farm just to grow enough that they are able to live.” Seabury is the CEO of McMillen Center for

Health Education in Fort Wayne. Rotarian Barb Wachtman, in her introduction of the program, said Daenens lives the service-above-self code by his service to the club and to the community. “And this fall he returned to Africa and was greeted by more than 1,000 Gléi villagers to celebrate the new middle school’s first four rooms, which is the focus of this program, and which this club helped to build,” she said. Rotary Club President Jeff Krull said the service project is a big part of the club’s centennial celebration in 2015. “And it never would have happened if we hadn’t had people with that kind of dedication and commitment to helping other people in this world,” he said.

Daenens is CEO of Commercial Filter Service, 3510 Metro Park Drive N., Fort Wayne, where a staff of 20 fulltime employees and some contractors manufacture and service air filtration services in seven states. He also works with Junior Achievement, serves on Rotary boards and as club vice president, and serves on the boards of the IPFW Alumni Association and Creative Women of the World. “It’s about finding that special connection with humanity and building friendships,” Daenens said of the international service project. “It’s my avocation. I love the work. I love the people, and I learned so much about myself, and hopefully I can be a better person because of those people. “How do you find the time? You make it. You’re up at midnight working on projects, early in the morning, whenever it’s needed. You make it all work. No excuses.” “This story’s really, truly about engaging people and humanity. It’s about the friendship connection in humanity, and that piece of humanity that so many of us don’t really understand, living in the developed world,” Daenens said. “Going over to West Africa, meeting the people, sitting down with them, beginning to understand their

Rotary projects The Rotary Club of Fort Wayne, also known as the Downtown Rotary, was incorporated in 1915. It is an organization of more than 140 business, professional and community leaders. The club has three dimensions to its 2015 Centennial activities: Local service project: Installing 100 Little Free Libraries around Fort Wayne by June of 2015. Those interested in sponsoring a Little Free Library should contact Candace Schuler, (260) 418-6142 or clschuler@comcast.net, for information about the benefits and assistance partners will receive. The first Little Library was installed at Washington Elementary School. The 12th and most recent Little Library was installed at 1702 S. Fairfield. Gift to community: The Rotary Centennial Tower at Allen County Public Library Plaza, to be installed in 2015. The 22-foot (not including its base) structure will be built along the south side of West Wayne Street on the “library green” adjacent to the Allen County Public Library. It will feature four backlit clocks visible night and day. International service project: The Rotary Club of Fort Wayne leads the effort among several Rotary Clubs in the United States and Africa to build a new middle school in Gléi, Togo, Africa. The Rotary Club of Fort Wayne meets at noon every Monday (except holidays) at Parkview Field. For membership information, contact Mike Kelly at (260) 4381690 or kellym@ipfw.edu, or visit fortwaynerotary.org. needs, engaging with them, and then doing what we can to give them a leap forward.” Daenens attended the ninth annual West Africa Rotary Fair, in October, and convinced conference leaders to tour the Gléi Middle School. Rotarians from North America donated $1,800 for doors for the new classrooms. The president of the Rotary Club of Lome-Lumiere, Togo’s capital city, pledged that

her club would pay for the construction of two more classroom. Daenens presented gifts from Washington Elementary School, the Downtown Rotary’s “adopted school,” and a proclamation from Fort Wayne Mayor Tom Henry, declaring Oct. 22 as “Children of Gléi Day” in Fort Wayne. Construction on the last four classrooms of the eight-room Gléi school is scheduled for 2014-15.

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Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

INfortwayne.com • B3

CIRCUS from Page B1

OUTDOORS from Page B1 “The throwing axes are a lot lighter,” she said. Still, learning to throw an axe at a target 20 feet away “just takes a lot of practice,” she said. “It takes a lot of training,” she said of her sport. Lumber sport athletes wear protective glasses, earmuffs and chaps, but still suffer some bruises. “Any time you’re swinging an axe or throwing an axe at a target or climbing up a 45-foot pole, it’s dangerous,” she said. “Log rolling is when the log is in the water and two people roll on either end, and the idea is to stay on longer than your opponent,” she said. Competitors navigate four different sizes of logs, each with a time limit. Pole climbers scramble up poles 60- to 90-feet tall. The round trip takes about 10 seconds, she said. “We have a belt and a gaffe, similar to a lineman’s gaffe; we just modify them a bit,” she said. “The audience gets very into the show,” she said. “We split the crowd up into two logging camps for a lumberjack cheer. They love it. They’re hooting and hollering.” The show includes a bit of comedy, and a giveaway for one child. The lumberjill sisters work through STIHL Timberworks Lumberjack Show. The circuit includes the Lumberjack World Championships in July in Hayward, Wis., and Klondike Days, which will play out in the snow of early March in Eagle River, Wis. Most of the competitions, though, are in warm weather or in indoor venues such as the Coliseum, Hadley said. “For some people, this is their full-time job,” the lumberjill said. The group will perform: Friday, Jan. 24, at 5 p.m., 6:30 p.m., and 8 p.m.; Saturday, Jan. 25, at 1:30 p.m., 3:30 p.m., and 5:30 p.m.; and Sunday, Jan. 26, at 12:30 p.m. and 2:30 p.m. David Marquart, who operates the outdoors show in Fort Wayne, said

he added the professional lumberjack show last year. “It went over so well — standing room only — so we’re bringing them back,” Marquart said. “But it’s going to be lumberjacks and lumberjills.” “They’re very interesting. They do log rolling and chopping and climbing. They go up to the ceiling of the Coliseum,” said Marquart. He is the president of the sponsoring Coliseum Productions, which is presenting the outdoors show for the fifth year. “We’re constantly updating,” Marquart said. Other outdoors show features include: More than 150 exhibitors will offer products and services relating to biking, hiking, camping and fitness, hunting and fishing, boats and water sports, vacation and travel, recreational vehicles and motor sports, and cottage living. Two large fishing ponds stocked with hundreds of bluegill will offer several contests. A fishing derby fundraiser costs $4, with $1 going to St. Jude’s Children’s Research Hospital. Live bait and fishing poles will be provided. Children can feel the sand between their toes at a 400-square-foot indoor beach, sponsored by WAJI. Marquart said the artificial beach will hold 30 tons of sand. Ehlerding River City Harley-Davidson will offer free simulated motorcycle rides. Novice hunters can learn to shoot a precision air rifle for just $5. The fundraiser led by Gregg Rice, coach of the state champion Bishop Dwenger Rifle Team, and one of only two USA/ NRA Level 3 rifle coaches in Indiana, will benefit The X Count and help the team become a USA Shooting Certified Training Center for northeast Indiana. Safari Club International, Northeast Indiana Chapter, will offer a hunt of faux, life-size targets of elk, mountain lion, bear and even a dinosaur. Top prize is a Mathews Genesis Bow.

Karl Wallenda. He performs in the style of this grandfather.” The circus sells tickets to seven shows, but also invites schoolchildren from throughout northeast Indiana to two weekday shows. Steve Trump coordinates the circus on behalf of the Mizpah Shrine. Hundreds of volunteers operated a separate ticket office through Jan. 22. Other volunteers bring the clown troupe to life and staff the Shrine Circus Fair. Erika Zerbini, the youngest of the circus owner’s four daughters, will work with the show’s six Asian elephants. Erika has worked with both horses and elephants for 26 years. Tarzan Zerbini again will visit Fort Wayne, which for years has been the circus’s first stop on its ninth-month tour of North America. In an earlier interview,

Zerbini told this newspaper about his early years in America and the frequent television appearances. “I was unusual because of the relationship between the animal and myself,” he said. “No whip, no gun. I was completely opposed to the American style of animal trainer. I think that changed through Tarzan, the friend of the animal.” Zerbini, who was born Jean Charles Zerbini and changed his name to Tarzan Zerbini, no longer works with the big cats. “When I was young I used to chase the lions and tigers,” he said in that earlier interview. “But now they started to chase me, so I quit.” Solheim said audiences will recognize the ringmaster. “We love Richard Curtis. He’s a great spokesperson for the show,” Solheim said. Piolita the Clown and his sons return with their unicycle act.

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Community Calendar

B4 • INfortwayne.com

Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

FRIDAY, JAN. 24 Mizpah Shrine Circus. Allen County War Memorial Coliseum, 4000 Parnell Ave. In the Arena. 7 p.m. Tickets are on sale at the Coliseum. Ticket prices range from $12 to $20. For details and photos, visit mizpahshrinecircus.com. The Mizpah Circus Fair is in the basement of the Coliseum, and opens one hour before the ďŹ rst show of the day and continues until one hour after the last show of the day ends. Outdoor Sports Lake & Cabin Show. Allen County War Memorial Coliseum, 4000 Parnell Ave. Expo Center. Noon-9 p.m. Admission is $10 for adults, free for kids 12 and under. Parking is $5 in the main lot or $8 in the preferred lot. Fish fry. Fort Wayne Sport Club, 3102 Ardmore Ave. 4:30-7 p.m. $8 for adults; $4 for children 6 to 10; free to ages 6 and under. All-you-can-eat ďŹ sh, baked potato or scalloped potatoes, coleslaw, applesauce, roll and butter, and dessert. Service Corps of Retired Executives Chapter 50 monthly meeting. Andorfer Building, Indiana Tech campus, 1600 E. Washington Blvd. 9 a.m.-noon. Michelle Gladieux of Gladieux Consulting will be the guest speaker. No fee to attend. The public is welcome, but RSVPs are appreciated due to limited space. Call 422-2601. “Treesâ€? — an all-media group exhibition. The Orchard Gallery of Fine Art, 6312-A Covington Road. Free. See tree-inspired paintings and photographs, plus jewelry, pottery and art dolls with a tree theme. Also see ďŹ nely crafted wooden boxes and turned vessels. The exhibit continues through Jan. 30. Hours are 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday, Wednesday, Friday and Saturday, and 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday. Learn more at theorchardgallery.com. Smart Start Storytime. Woodburn Branch Library, 4701 Indiana 101 N., Woodburn. 10:30 a.m.

Fanny Freeze 5k

TUESDAY, JAN. 28

COURTESY PHOTO

The Fort Wayne Track Club will run its ďŹ rst points race of 2014 on Saturday, Feb. 8. The Fanny Freeze 5k begins at 2 p.m. at Shoaff Park, 6401 St. Joe Road. Registration will be from 12:45-1:45 p.m. For registration costs and other details, visit fwtc.org. SUNDAY, JAN. 26

SATURDAY, JAN. 25 Mizpah Shrine Circus. Allen County War Memorial Coliseum, 4000 Parnell Ave. In the Arena. 10 a.m., 2:30 p.m., and 7 p.m. Tickets are on sale at the Coliseum. Ticket prices range from $12 to $20. For details and photos, visit mizpahshrinecircus.com. The Mizpah Circus Fair is in the basement of the Coliseum, and opens one hour before the ďŹ rst show of the day and continues until one hour after the last show of the day ends. Outdoor Sports Lake & Cabin Show. Allen County War Memorial Coliseum, 4000 Parnell Ave. Expo Center. 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Admission is $10 for adults, free for kids 12 and under. Parking is $5 in the main lot or $8 in the preferred lot. Merge Christian singles group. Taylor Chapel United Methodist Church, 10145 Maysville Road. 6-11 p.m. This nonproďŹ t organization holds a potluck dinner, games and a disc jockey for dancing, plus ice-breakers to allow Christian singles of all denominations to get together. Events are held the last Saturday of each month. Locations vary. “Schubert Symphony No. 4.â€? IPFW Auer Performance Hall, 2101 E. Coliseum Blvd. 8 p.m. Tickets start at $17. The Fort Wayne Philharmonic’s Masterworks Series presents a night of Franz Schubert’s symphony and songs. This is the ďŹ fth installment of the season, which has expanded from eight to 10 dates. The Phil performs with Andrew Constantine at the helm, with guest concertmaster Susie Park. Tickets can be purchased by calling 481-0777, online at fwphil.org, or at the Embassy box ofďŹ ce. For more information about the program, the artists and the series, visit fwphil.org.

PAWS to Read. Grabill Branch Library, 13521 State St., Grabill. 4 p.m. Anyone needing reading practice is invited to share a story with a book-loving dog. Smart Start Storytime. Monroeville Branch Library, 115 Main St., Monroeville. 3:30 p.m. Internet Basics Class. Shawnee Branch Library, 5600 Noll Ave., Fort Wayne. 2 p.m. A class for learning the basics of Internet searching and email. Please register by calling 421-1335. Family Fun Night. Georgetown Branch Library, 6600 E. State Blvd., Fort Wayne. 7-8 p.m. Tonight, enjoy board games.

Mizpah Shrine Circus. Allen County War Memorial Coliseum, 4000 Parnell Ave. In the Arena. 1 p.m. and 5:45 p.m. Tickets are on sale at the Coliseum. Ticket prices range from $12 to $20. For details and photos, visit mizpahshrinecircus.com. The Mizpah Circus Fair is in the basement of the Coliseum, and opens one hour before the ďŹ rst show of the day and continues until one hour after the last show of the day ends. Outdoor Sports Lake & Cabin Show. Allen County War Memorial Coliseum, 4000 Parnell Ave. Expo Center. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission is $10 for adults, free for kids 12 and under. Parking is $5 in the main lot or $8 in the preferred lot. Black-and-white ďŹ lms. The Embassy Theatre, 125 W. Jefferson Blvd. 2 p.m. “Sherlock, Jr.â€? (1924), a Buster Keaton comedy, and “The Freshmanâ€? (1925), a Harold Lloyd comedy. Clark Wilson accompanies both ďŹ lms on the Grand Page Pipe Organ. Tickets are $8 for adults, $5 for children 12 or younger with valid student ID. Tickets are on sale through Ticketmaster.

MONDAY, JAN. 27 Million Dollar Quartet. The Embassy Theatre, 125 W. Jefferson Blvd. 7:30 p.m. This Tony Award-winning Broadway musical is inspired by the true story of the famed recording session where Sam Phillips, the “Father of Rock ‘n’ Roll,â€? brought together icons Elvis Presley, Johnny Cash, Jerry Lee Lewis and Carl Perkins for one unforgettable night. Box ofďŹ ce hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday through Friday. Call 424-5664. Tickets also are available by through Ticketmaster, (800) 745-3000.

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Fort Wayne Women’s Midday Connection. Orchard Ridge Country Club, 4531 Lower Huntington Road. 11:30 am.-1 p.m. The January topic is “New Adventures,â€? featuring the Fort Wayne Parks and Recreation travel program. The cost is $15.50, inclusive. RSVP by Jan. 21 to Meridith at 672-3414. Born to Read. Grabill Branch Library, 13521 State St., Grabill. 10:30 a.m. For babies and their care-givers. Smart Start Storytime. New Haven Branch Library, 648 Green St., New Haven. 10:30 a.m. Enjoy 30 minutes of stories, songs, ďŹ ngerplays and an easy craft just right for preschoolers Classics adult book group. Dupont Branch Library, 536 E. Dupont Road, Fort Wayne. 7 p.m. Adults gater to discuss the classics that you’ve always wanted to ready or would enjoy reading again. This month the group will discuss “Women in Loveâ€? by D.H. Lawrence.

WEDNESDAY, JAN. 29 Free community dinner. Parkwood Church of God, 3320 Trier Road. 5:45 p.m. Free community dinner each Wednesday, except holiday weekends. Call 483-4662. Smart Start Storytime. Grabill Branch Library, 13521 State St., Grabill. 10:30 a.m. Preschoolers and their grown-ups are invited to attend a storytime to help them as the preschoolers begin to read. Smart Start Storytime. New Haven Branch Library, 648 Green St., New Haven. 10:30 a.m. Enjoy 30 minutes of stories, songs, ďŹ ngerplays and an easy craft just right for preschoolers. Today, “Sâ€? is for “Soup-er Storytime.â€?

THURSDAY, JAN. 30 Babies and Books. New Haven Branch Library, 648 Green St., New Haven. 10:30 a.m. Adults and their little ones, from birth through age 2, are invited to a storytime just for them. Teen Thursday. New Haven Branch Library, 648 Green St., New Haven. 3:30 p.m. Today the program YouTube mania. Yarn Lover’s Gathering. Woodburn Branch Library, 4701 Indiana 101 N., Woodburn. 7 p.m. This program is for those who know how to knit or crochet, and those who would like to learn. Family Movie Night. Hessen Cassel Branch Library, 3030 Paulding Road, Fort Wayne. 6:30 p.m. Families enjoy a fun movie, with popcorn and pop. Children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. The Lab. Tecumseh Branch Library, 1411 E. State Blvd., Fort Wayne. 3:30 p.m. For ages 12 to 18. Young adults express themselves by creating and sharing digital videos, music, photography, websites, graphic design, podcasts, presentations and other forms of digital media.

UPCOMING AMERICAN RED CROSS BLOOD DRIVES To schedule an appointment, call (800) 733-2767. Or visit redcrossblood.org. (This list has been shortened to ďŹ t this space.) • Sunday, Feb. 2, 8 a.m.-1 p.m., Pine Hills Church in the gymnasium, 4704 Carroll Road, Fort Wayne. • Monday, Feb. 3, 2-7 p.m. North Eastern Group Realty, 10808 LaCabreah Lane, Fort Wayne. • Tuesday, Feb. 4, 8-11 a.m., Indiana Department of Transportation, 5333 HatďŹ eld Road, Fort Wayne. • Tuesday, Feb. 4, 1-3:30 p.m.,

ProBuild, 12727 Lima Road, Fort Wayne. • Friday, Feb. 7, 8-11 a.m., Mill Supplies Inc., 5105 Industrial Road, Fort Wayne. • Friday, Feb. 7, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Accu Temp Products Inc., 8415 N. Clinton Park Drive, Fort Wayne. • Saturday, Feb. 8, 8 a.m.-noon, Our Lady of Good Hope in the gymnasium, 7215 St. Joe Road, Fort Wayne. • Tuesday, Feb. 11, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., IPFW Science Building, 2101 E. Coliseum Blvd., Fort

Wayne. • Wednesday, Feb. 12, 8:30-11 a.m., Walmart Chapel Ridge, 10420 Maysville Road, Fort Wayne. • Wednesday, Feb. 12, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., IPFW Science Building, 2101 E. Coliseum Blvd., Fort Wayne. • Wednesday, Feb. 12, 1-3:30 p.m., Dupont Hospital, 2520 E. Dupont Road, Fort Wayne. • Thursday, Feb. 13, 12:45-3:15 p.m., Partners 1st Federal Credit Union, 1314 Minnick Road, New Haven.

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Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

INfortwayne.com • B5

Community Calendar

FRIDAY, JAN. 31

THURSDAY, FEB. 6

Smart Start Storytime. Woodburn Branch Library, 4701 Indiana 101 N., Woodburn. 10:30 a.m. This storytime features ďŹ ngerplays, songs, stories of various lengths, and crafts. Skilled labor hiring event. WorkOne Northeast, 480 W. Plaza Drive, Columbia City. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Whitley Manufacturing, a maker of custom commercial modular buildings and temporary portable buildings, is looking to ďŹ ll 20 skilled labor positions. The positions include electricians, plumbers, welders, carpenters and steel fabricators. The pay ranges from $12 to $15 an hour and the company is seeking workers with varying levels of experience, generally ranging from two to ďŹ ve or more years. Additional wage consideration will be given to people with more experience. “The Addams Family Broadway.â€? Niswonger Performing Arts Center of Northwest Ohio, 10700 Ohio 118 South, Van Wert, Ohio. 7:30 p.m. Dark Horse Productions presents this macabre musical comedy. Tickets range from $22 to $47, and are on sale through the Niswonger box ofďŹ ce, (419) 238-6722, or NPACVW.org. The box ofďŹ ce is open noon-4 p.m., Monday through Friday. Winter Homecoming. Bishop Luers High School, 333 E. Paulding Road. All are welcome to attend this special evening, which combines three events. The evening welcomes back the Bishop Luers dance teams from 2000 to 2013. At 4:30, enjoy Casa Knight dinner in he cafĂŠ; reservations are required. Luers varsity girls and boys basketball teams will take on North Side a 6 p.m. During halftime of the boys game (approximately 8 p.m.), enjoy a performance by the Luers dance teams. An adult reception in the cafĂŠ follows the games.

SATURDAY, FEB. 1 Fort Wayne Farmers’ Market. Lincoln Financial Event Center, 1301 Ewing St. Enter from Douglas Street, near Harrison Street. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free admission. The winter market will be held the ďŹ rst and third Saturdays, from October through May. The market features more than 40 vendors. More than half of the booths will offer items from the “farm category,â€? which comprises fresh local meats, free-range eggs, and products such as organic or chemical-free honey, maple syrup, wine, locally roasted coffee and plants. Today, see cooking demonstrations by Parkview chefs. For details, visit ftwaynesfarmersmarket.com. Pancake and sausage breakfast. Our Hope Lutheran Church, 1826 Trinity Drive, Huntertown. 7-11 a.m. $6 for adults, $2 for children 5-12, free for age 4 and under. The Our Hope Lutheran Church Ladies Guild and Thrivent Financial for Lutherans sponsor this breakfast as a fundraiser for missions projects and kitchen equipment. The all-you-can-eat breakfast includes whole-hog sausage, buttermilk pancakes, hash browns, applesauce, orange juice, coffee and milk. Commemorating the Anniversary of the First Sit-In. Pontiac Branch Library, 2215 S. Hanna St., Fort Wayne. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Your chance to sit-in and learn about the importance of Feb. 1, 1960, to the American Civil Rights Movement.

SUNDAY, FEB. 2

Bridge engineers

COURTESY PHOTO

Local students will test their ability to build bridges from Popsicle sticks and Elmer’s Glue at the 15th annual Middle School Bridge Design Competition on Saturday, Feb. 15, at Science Central. Registration begins at 10 a.m., with tests beginning at 10:30 a.m. in Science Central’s Lincoln Financial Foundation Demonstration Theater. For details, call 424-2400 or visit sciencecentral.org. a.m. and 11 a.m. A storytime featuring songs, rhymes and short stories just right for 2-year-olds.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 5 Free community dinner. Parkwood Church of God, 3320 Trier Road. 5:45 p.m. Free community dinner each Wednesday, except holiday weekends. Call 483-4662. 4-H Information Night. Allen County Extension OfďŹ ce, 4001 Crescent Ave., on the east side of IPFW. 7-8:30 p.m. No charge. Parents and young people interested in learning more about the Allen County 4-H Program are invited. 4-H is for youths in Grades 3 through 12. Direct questions to 481-6828, Option 1. Smart Start Storytime. Grabill Branch Library, 13521 State St., Grabill. 10:30 a.m. Preschoolers and their grown-ups are invited to attend a storytime to help them as the preschoolers begin to read. Smart Start Storytime. New Haven Branch Library, 648 Green St., New Haven. 10:30 a.m. Enjoy 30 minutes of stories, songs, ďŹ ngerplays and an easy craft just right for preschoolers.

Disorderly Bear Den. Community Center, 233 W. Main St. 6:30 p.m. This not-for-proďŹ t gives teddy bears and other stuffed animals to children in trauma situations. The group is active all year, and always needs new or gently used plush animals, both manufactured and homemade. For details, contact Donna Gordon-Hearn, 409-9886. Visitors are welcome. Groundhog Open indoor golf tournament. Downtown Fort Wayne. Flights at 8:30 a.m., 11 a.m., 1:30 p.m. and 4 p.m. $100 f0r single registration or $400 per foursome. Proceeds beneďŹ t downtown beautiďŹ cation through the Downtown Planter Program. For details, visit GroundhogOpen.com. Teen Thursday. New Haven Branch Library, 648 Green St., New Haven. 3:30 p.m. Yarn Lover’s Gathering. Woodburn Branch Library, 4701 Indiana 101 N., Woodburn. 7 p.m. This program is for those who know how to knit or crochet, and those who would like to learn. The Lab. Tecumseh Branch Library, 1411 E. State Blvd., Fort Wayne. 3:30 p.m. For ages 12 to 18. Young adults express themselves by creating and sharing digital videos, music, photography, websites, graphic design, podcasts, presentations and other forms of digital media. Smart Start Storytime. Dupont Branch Library, 635 E. Dupont Road. 10:30 a.m. Preschoolers may take advantage of stories, rhymes, songs and early literacy fun.

FRIDAY, FEB. 7 All-you-can-eat ďŹ sh fry. Knights of Columbus Council 451, 601 Reed Road. 5-7 p.m. the ďŹ rst Friday of each month. The public is welcome. $8 for adults, $4 for ages 12 and under. Meal includes ďŹ sh, two sides and beverage. Smart Start Storytime. Woodburn Branch Library, 4701 Indiana 101 N., Woodburn. 10:30 a.m.

SATURDAY, FEB. 8 Ohio Has Talent 2014. Niswonger Performing Arts Center of Northwest Ohio, 10700 Ohio 118 South, Van Wert, Ohio. 7 p.m. Tickets range from $10 to $25, and are on sale through the Niswonger box ofďŹ ce, (419) 238-6722, or NPACVW.org. The box ofďŹ ce is open noon-4 p.m., Monday through Friday. Fort Wayne Philharmonic Masterworks presents “Scottish Fantasy.â€? The Embassy Theatre, 125 W. Jefferson Blvd. 8 p.m. Andrew Constantine conducts “Les Preludesâ€? by Franz Liszt, “Scottish Fantasyâ€? by Max Bruch and “Romantic Symphonyâ€? by Howard Hanson. Tickets start at $28. Box ofďŹ ce hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Monday through Friday. Call 424-5665. Heartland Sings: Family. Bridgewater Country Club, 1818 Morning Star Road, Auburn. 2:30 p.m. Adult seats are $10, students 13 to 17 pay $5, and children 12 and under are admitted free with a paying adult. Call 436-8080 for child tickets. To reserve seats, call the Heartland ofďŹ ce at 436-8080, or visit heartlandchorale.org. Internationally acclaimed storyteller Valerie Tutson joins the Heartland Chamber Chorale. Tutson draws much of her repertoire from biblical stories, traditional African songs and African folk tales she learned in her travels to West Africa and South Africa.

Super Bride Sunday. The Monogram Shoppe and M0re, Covington Plaza, 6410 W. Jefferson Blvd. Noon-4 p.m. Free tote bags ďŹ lled with goodies for the ďŹ rst 50 future brides. Also, door prizes, discounts and photos and music. For details, call 436-3138 or visit monogramshoppe.com.

MONDAY, FEB. 3 Smart Start Storytime. Monroeville Branch Library, 115 Main St., Monroeville. 3:30 p.m. Enjoy the latest books, some old favorites, and a craft each week. LEGO Mania. Monroeville Branch Library, 115 Main St., Monroeville. 6:30 p.m. Bring your own LEGOs or use the library’s.

MONDAY, FEB. 3 Born to Read Storytime. Dupont Branch Library, 635 E. Dupont Road. The 10:15 a.m. session is for lap-sitters, and the 10:45 a.m. session is for walkers up to 24 months. Bring your baby in for ďŹ ngerplays, rhymes, songs and stories.

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Born to Read. Grabill Branch Library, 13521 State St., Grabill. 10:30 a.m. For babies and their care-givers. Smart Start Storytime. New Haven Branch Library, 648 Green St., New Haven. 10:30 a.m. Enjoy 30 minutes of stories, songs, ďŹ ngerplays and an easy craft just right for preschoolers. Appleseed Quilters Guild. The Classic CafĂŠ, 4832 Hillegas Road. Socializing at 6:30 p.m., meeting at 7 p.m. Members and guests can circulate at will among the various tables, picking up tips and instruction sheets. There also will be a show-and-tell on the approaching Gathering of Quilters 2014, 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, March 15, at Wayne High School. For more information, visit appleseedquiltersguild.com. Baby Steps Storytime. Dupont Branch Library, 635 E. Dupont Road. 10:15

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B6 • INfortwayne.com

Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

Community Calendar

SUNDAY, FEB. 9

Casting Crowns

Heartland Sings: Family. University of Saint Francis North Campus, 2702 Spring St. 2:30 p.m. Adult seats are $10, students 13 to 17 pay $5, and children 12 and under are admitted free with a paying adult. Call 436-8080 for child tickets. To reserve seats, call the Heartland office at 436-8080, or visit heartlandchorale.org. Internationally acclaimed storyteller Valerie Tutson joins the Heartland Chamber Chorale. Tutson draws much of her repertoire from biblical stories, traditional African songs and African folk tales she learned in her travels to West Africa and South Africa.

MONDAY, FEB. 10 Smart Start Storytime. Monroeville Branch Library, 115 Main St., Monroeville. 3:30 p.m. Enjoy the latest books, some old favorites, and a craft each week. Woodburn LEGO Club. Woodburn Branch Library, 4701 Indiana 101 N., Woodburn. 4 p.m. Grades 3 and up can create with LEGOs. The fun includes snacks. Born to Read Storytime. Dupont Branch Library, 635 E. Dupont Road. The 10:15 a.m. session is for lap-sitters, and the 10:45 a.m. session is for walkers up to 24 months. Bring your baby in for fingerplays, rhymes, songs and stories.

TUESDAY, FEB. 11 Born to Read. Grabill Branch Library, 13521 State St., Grabill. 10:30 a.m. For babies and their care-givers. Smart Start Storytime. New Haven Branch Library, 648 Green St., New Haven. 10:30 a.m. Enjoy 30 minutes of stories, songs, fingerplays and an easy craft just right for preschoolers. Baby Steps Storytime. Dupont Branch Library, 635 E. Dupont Road. 10:15 a.m. and 11 a.m. A storytime featuring songs, rhymes and short stories just right for 2-year-olds.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 12 Free community dinner. Parkwood Church of God, 3320 Trier Road. 5:45 p.m. Free community dinner each Wednesday, except holiday weekends. Call 483-4662. Ants in Your Pants. Dupont Branch Library, 635 E. Dupont Road. 10:30 a.m. A program for active preschoolers who don’t like to sit still.

THURSDAY, FEB. 13 Teen Thursday. New Haven Branch Library, 648 Green St., New Haven. 3:30 p.m. Yarn Lover’s Gathering. Woodburn Branch Library, 4701 Indiana 101 N., Woodburn. 7 p.m. This program is for those who know how to knit or crochet, and those who would like to learn. Yarn Lover’s Gathering. Woodburn Branch Library, 4701 Indiana 101 N., Woodburn. 7 p.m. This program is for those who know how to knit or crochet, and those who would like to learn. Smart Start Storytime. Dupont Branch Library, 635 E. Dupont Road. 10:30 a.m. Preschoolers may take advantage of stories, rhymes, songs and early literacy fun.

FRIDAY, FEB. 14 F.U.N. (Folks Uniting Nowadays) Fridays. Link’s Wonderland, 1711 Creighton Ave. 1-2:30 p.m. It Is Well With My Soul invites guests to come dressed as their favorite people in African-American history. RSVP to Ruby Cain at rcain@bsu.edu or (765) 285-8546. Lunch is available, ranging in price from $6 to $10. A fee of 50 cents will be added to the food bill for the cost of room setup.

COURTESY PHOTO

Grammy and Dove Award winning contemporary Christian musicians Casting Crowns will bring their “Thrive” tour to the Allen County War Memorial Coliseum at 7 p.m. Friday, Feb. 21. Reserved tickets are $25 in advance or $30 the day of the show. Tickets are on sale at the Coliseum Ticket Office. Special guests Laura Story and For King and Country will also perform. For details, visit trinitycommunications.org or memorialcoliseum.com. SATURDAY, FEB. 15 Fort Wayne Philharmonic Pops presents “Behind the Mask.” The Embassy Theatre, 125 W. Jefferson Blvd. 8 p.m. Enjoy the shows of Sir Andrew Lloyd Webber, including music from “The Phantom of the Opera,” “Cats,” “Evita,” “Sunset Boulevard,” “Jesus Christ Superstar,” “Wicked,” “Chicago,” “A Chorus Line” and “Spamalot.” Featuring guest vocalists Edward Watts and Sarah Pfisterer. Tickets start at $28. Box office hours are 10 a.m.-6 p.m., Monday through Friday. Call 4245665. Bob Eubanks’ Not-So-Newlywed Show. Niswonger Performing Arts Center of Northwest Ohio, 10700 Ohio 118 South, Van Wert, Ohio. 7:30 p.m. The live Not-So-Newlywed Game Show follows the original format of the television show using four local “celebrity” married couples who are either newlyweds or feel like newlyweds. Tickets range from $17 to $27, and are on sale through the Niswonger box office, (419) 238-6722, or NPACVW.org. The box office is open noon-4 p.m. weekdays. Fort Wayne Farmers’ Market. Lincoln Financial Event Center, 1301 Ewing St. Enter from Douglas Street, near Harrison Street. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free admission. The winter market will be held the first and third Saturdays, from October through May. The market features more than 40 vendors. More than half of the booths will offer items from the “farm category,” which comprises fresh local meats, free-range eggs, and products such as organic or chemical-free honey, maple syrup, wine, locally roasted coffee and plants. Watch the calendar for special cooking demonstrations. For details, visit ftwaynesfarmersmarket.com.

SUNDAY, FEB. 16 Black-and-white films. The Embassy Theatre, 125 W. Jefferson Blvd. 8 p.m. “The Haunted House” (1928), a Buster Keaton comedy, and “The Mark of Zorro” (1920), an action adventure starring Douglas Fairbanks. Clark Wilson accompanies both films on the Grand Page Pipe Organ. Tickets are $8 for adults, $5 for children 12 or younger with valid student ID. Tickets are on sale through Ticketmaster. IPFW Run It Walk It For Chris Brown 5k. IPFW Athletics Center, 2101 E. Coliseum Blvd., Fort Wayne. The seventh annual event will benefit

the Chris Brown Endowed Scholarship Fund, maintained by the IPFW men’s cross country program. The scholarship honors Chris Brown, who lost his battle to cancer on Dec. 1, 2007. Brown was an IPFW student majoring in public and environmental affairs. He also ran on the men’s cross country team. The 5k prediction run/walk begins at 2 p.m., with registration and check-in from noon-2 p.m. A silent auction in the Walb ballroom begins at noon and continues until 3 p.m. Refreshments will be available from 1-3 p.m. Anthony Gaff and Steve Brady will present live music from 1-3 p.m. Register online at ipfw.edu/fitness.

MONDAY, FEB. 17 Born to Read Storytime. Dupont Branch Library, 635 E. Dupont Road. The 10:15 a.m. session is for lap-sitters, and the 10:45 a.m. session is for walkers up to 24 months. Bring your baby in for fingerplays, rhymes, songs and stories.

TUESDAY, FEB. 18 Get Checking workshop. Allen County Extension Office, 4001 Crescent Ave., on the IPFW Campus. 5-9 p.m. The series of workshops is part of the Bank On Fort Wayne initiative. The workshop is for clients and families who have never had checking or savings accounts at a bank or credit union, or have mismanaged accounts at banks and credits unions so those accounts are now closed without committing fraud, or have accounts, but continue to still use predatory lenders. All workshops are free and open to the public. Advance registration is required. At the completion of the workshop, the participants will receive a certificate that will allow them to open an account at a participating bank or credit union. A $50 incentive is available for opening an account, if qualified. For further information, to register or to receive a registration form, contact Vickie Hadley at the Allen County Extension Service, at 481-6826 or hadleyv@purdue.edu. Baby Steps Storytime. Dupont Branch Library, 635 E. Dupont Road. 10:15 a.m. and 11 a.m. A storytime featuring songs, rhymes and short stories just right for 2-year-olds.

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Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

INfortwayne.com • B7

Community Calendar

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 19 Free community dinner. Parkwood Church of God, 3320 Trier Road. 5:45 p.m. Free community dinner each Wednesday, except holiday weekends. Call 483-4662. Smart Start Storytime. New Haven Branch Library, 648 Green St., New Haven. 10:30 a.m. Enjoy 30 minutes of stories, songs, fingerplays and an easy craft just right for preschoolers. Those Witty Brits. New Haven Branch Library, 648 Green St., New Haven. 7 p.m. A book club devoted to British humor. Smart Start Storytime. Grabill Branch Library, 13521 State St., Grabill. 10:30 a.m. Preschoolers and their grown-ups are invited to attend a storytime to help them as the preschoolers begin to read. Smart Start Storytime. New Haven Branch Library, 648 Green St., New Haven. 10:30 a.m. Enjoy 30 minutes of stories, songs, fingerplays and an easy craft just right for preschoolers. Ants in Your Pants. Dupont Branch Library, 635 E. Dupont Road. 10:30 a.m. A program for active preschoolers who don’t like to sit still.

THURSDAY, FEB. 20 Teen Thursday. New Haven Branch Library, 648 Green St., New Haven. 3:30 p.m. Yarn Lover’s Gathering. Woodburn Branch Library, 4701 Indiana 101 N., Woodburn. 7 p.m. This program is for those who know how to knit or crochet, and those who would like to learn. Yarn Lover’s Gathering. Woodburn Branch Library, 4701 Indiana 101 N., Woodburn. 7 p.m. This program is for those who know how to knit or crochet, and those who would like to learn. Smart Start Storytime. Woodburn Branch Library, 4701 Indiana 101 N., Woodburn. 10:30 a.m. This storytime features fingerplays, songs, stories of various lengths, and crafts. AARP informational meeting. The Community Foundation, 555 E. Wayne St. (at the corner of Monroe Street). 2 p.m. Free. Jason Kissel, the executive director of the ACRES Land Trust, will share information about irreplaceable nature preserves in the area. This illustrated illustration is open to all seniors. Smart Start Storytime. Dupont Branch Library, 635 E. Dupont Road. 10:30 a.m. Preschoolers may take advantage of stories, rhymes, songs and early literacy fun.

FRIDAY, FEB. 21 A night of magic and comedy. Cottage Event Center, 966 Locust Drive, Roanoke. Doors open 6:30 p.m., and the show starts at 7:30 p.m. Enjoy comedy with magician Jim Barron. Plus, see Vaudeville style comedy by Bower North Productions funnymen Larry Bower and Scott Nedberg. Tickets are $10. Buy tickets online at cottageeventcenter.com. Or, call 483-3508. Casting Crowns, with special guests Laura Story and For King & Country. Allen County War Memorial Coliseum, 4000 Parnell Ave. Concert at 7 p.m.; doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets are $20 to $45. Children age 1 and under are admitted free. An optional $27 VIP add-on ticket is good for early entry at 5 p.m., a Q&A with Casting Crowns from 5:15-5:45 p.m., and an autographed copy of the “Thrive” CD. Only 200 VIP add-ons are available. The concert is part of Casting Crowns’ Thrive tour. Trinity Communications offers a spring season package, with tickets to six concerts for $85. For more information, visit TrinityCommunications.org or call 484-1029.

SUNDAY, FEB. 23 Orion Samuelson. Niswonger Performing Arts Center of Northwest Ohio, 10700 Ohio 118 South, Van Wert, Ohio. 3 p.m. Tickets are $20 for adults, $10 for students. The longtime voice of agriculture has served as

Submit your Community Calendar items Publicize your event through InFortWayne.com and Times Community Publications. Submit your calendar entries online, or email gsnow@kpcmedia.com, or call (260) 426-2640, ext. 321. Please submit your items by Feb. 20 to be considered for publication in the Feb. 28 edition of the Dupont Valley Times. THURSDAY, FEB. 27

Visit InFortWayne.com We round up the best of the best each weekend, so you can spend less time planning, and more time doing. agribusiness director of WGN Radio since 1960. Buy tickets through the Niswonger box office, (419) 238-6722, or NPACVW.org. The box office is open noon-4 p.m., Monday through Friday.

Teen Thursday. New Haven Branch Library, 648 Green St., New Haven. 3:30 p.m. Yarn Lover’s Gathering. Woodburn Branch Library, 4701 Indiana 101 N., Woodburn. 7 p.m. This program is for those who know how to knit or crochet, and those who would like to learn. Yarn Lover’s Gathering. Woodburn Branch Library, 4701 Indiana 101 N., Woodburn. 7 p.m. This program is for those who know how to knit or crochet, and those who would like to learn. Smart Start Storytime. Dupont Branch Library, 635 E. Dupont Road. 10:30 a.m. Preschoolers may take advantage of stories, rhymes, songs and early literacy fun.

FRIDAY, FEB. 28

Smart Start Storytime. Monroeville Branch Library, 115 Main St., Monroeville. 3:30 p.m. Enjoy the latest books, some old favorites, and a craft each week. Born to Read Storytime. Dupont Branch Library, 635 E. Dupont Road. The 10:15 a.m. session is for lap-sitters, and the 10:45 a.m. session is for walkers up to 24 months. Bring your baby in for fingerplays, rhymes, songs and stories.

Fish fry. Fort Wayne Sport Club, 3102 Ardmore Ave. 4:30-7 p.m. $8 for adults; $4 for children 6 to 10; free to ages 6 and under. All-you-can-eat fish, baked potato or scalloped potatoes, coleslaw, applesauce, roll and butter, and dessert. Trivia Knight. Bishop Luers High School gymnasium, 333 E. Pauling Road. 7-11 p.m. Doors open at 6 p.m. Gather a table of 10 adults to play trivia against other tables of 10. Table reservations are $100 (limited to 10 adults). Soft drinks and water are complimentary; beer, wine and margarites are available for purchase. Contact 625-5605 for reservations.

TUESDAY, FEB. 25

SATURDAY, MARCH 1

MONDAY, FEB. 24

Born to Read. Grabill Branch Library, 13521 State St., Grabill. 10:30 a.m. For babies and their care-givers. Smart Start Storytime. New Haven Branch Library, 648 Green St., New Haven. 10:30 a.m. Baby Steps Storytime. Dupont Branch Library, 635 E. Dupont Road. 10:15 a.m. and 11 a.m. A storytime featuring songs, rhymes and short stories just right for 2-year-olds. “Classics” adult book group. Dupont Branch Library, 635 E. Dupont Road. 7 p.m. Adults discuss those classics you always wanted to read or would enjoy reading again. This month the group will discuss “Jude the Obscure” by Thomas Hardy.

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 26 Free community dinner. Parkwood Church of God, 3320 Trier Road. 5:45 p.m. Free community dinner each Wednesday, except holiday weekends. Call 483-4662. Smart Start Storytime. Grabill Branch Library, 13521 State St., Grabill. 10:30 a.m. Preschoolers and their grown-ups are invited to attend a storytime to help them as the preschoolers begin to read. Smart Start Storytime. New Haven Branch Library, 648 Green St., New Haven. 10:30 a.m. Ants in Your Pants. Dupont Branch Library, 635 E. Dupont Road. 10:30 a.m. A program for active preschoolers who don’t like to sit still.

The Spinners. Niswonger Performing Arts Center of Northwest Ohio, 10700 Ohio 118 South, Van Wert, Ohio. 7:30 p.m. The legendary R&B recording artists have sold millions of records and topped both the pop and R&B charts. Tickets range from $27 to $37, and are on sale through the Niswonger box office, (419) 238-6722, or NPACVW.org. The box office is open noon-4 p.m., Monday through Friday. Fort Wayne Farmers’ Market. Lincoln Financial Event Center, 1301 Ewing St. Enter from Douglas Street, near Harrison Street. 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free admission. The winter market will be held the first and third Saturdays, from October through May. The market features more than 40 vendors. More than half of the booths will offer items from the “farm category,” which comprises fresh local meats, free-range eggs, and products such as organic or chemical-free honey, maple syrup, wine, locally roasted coffee and plants. For details, visit ftwaynesfarmersmarket.com. “Audience Choice 2013/14.” IPFW Auer Performance Hall, 2101 E. Coliseum Blvd. 8 p.m. Tickets start at $17. For the third year in a row, Fort Wayne Philharmonic conductor Andrew Constantine is leaving it up to The Phil’s patrons to program an evening of beautiful and exciting music. Anticipations run high throughout the Masterworks Series, leading up to the concert as patrons cast their votes for a unique program. Tickets can be purchased by calling 481-0777, online at fwphil.org, or at the Embassy box office. For more information about the program, the artists and the series, visit fwphil.org.

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B8 • INfortwayne.com

Dupont Valley Times • January 24, 2014

Dupont Valley Times - Jan. 2014  

Free-distribution newspaper serving communities in the Dupont area of Allen County, Indiana.

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