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Jacob C. Cassel 915 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa Manufacturer

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AQUARIUMS Aquarium Ornaments Floral Terra Cotta, Etc.

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September, 1919

Wm.

No. 13

international monthly magazine devoted to the study, care and breeding of fishes and other animals and plants in the home aquarium and terrarium.

An

W. A. POYSER JOSEPH E. BAUSMAN

EDITOR PUBLISHER

542 East Girard Avenue

Philadelphia

as second-class matter, September 2d, 1915, at the Post Office, Philadelphia, Pa., under Act of March 3d, 1879. Topular and scientific artic'es and notes on subjects pertaining to the aquarium and terrarium. and to the habits of fishes in general, are always wanted for "Aquatic Life." Readers are invited to join in making it a medium of mutual help by contributing to it the results of their studies. The pages are always open to anyone having information of interest to the aquarist and student of Manuscripts, books for review aquatic biology. general correspondence should be addressed to the editor. "Aquatic Life" has the largest circulation of any magazine in the world devoted to aquatic It offers to advertisers a market nature-study. that can be reached through no other medium. Rates made known on application.

Entered

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Payments should be made by money order, draft If local checks are sent, ten or registered letter. cents should be added for collection charges. Foreign remittances should be by international money order. Copyright 1919 by Joseph E. Bausman

aquarium requisites. Send for Catalog.

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aquatic JUfe Vol. IV.

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Platypoecilus maculatus I

WALTER LAKfNOT

«*

BRIMD,

Z. S.

F.

p

T

2. Platypoecilus maculata nigra. 1. Platypoecilus maculatus. 3. Hybrid from Platypoecilus maculatus rubra and Xiphophorus helleri. 4. Xiphophorus Photographs by Dr. E. Bade. helleri, female above, male below.

Down America,

in

the

in

the

countries

of

same general

frequented by the swordtails, the

members

Central

not

difficult to

accomplish.

Meek

in his

localities

work, "The Freshwater Fishes of Mex-

we

ico," lists P. maculatus, P. variatus

find

of the genus Platypoecilus.

P. nelsoni.

and

Platypoecilus quitzeoensis B.

swordtails, but lack their characteristic

A. Bean (1898) having previously been made the type of a new genus, Zoogone-

"sword," though some

ticus,

These

fishes

resemble small, short-bodied

fine

specimens of

Platypoecilus maculatus rubra occasionally exhibit a

and

this

tendency in this direction,

without

having been

crossed

with Xiphophorus which, by the way,

is

need not be mentioned.

Most

us

are

acquainted with P.

maculatus, the

first

species of the genus

of

secured by aquarists, and, in

we

fact, unless

consider the variants developed by


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Aquatic

168 aquarists

nominal species, the only

as

The ground

one.

common

color of the

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

form of this little fish the largest specimens never exceed two inches in length is

olivaceous, shading to pearly white on

At

the belly.

the base of the

tail

is

a

dark crescent-shaped patch, and several similar marks about the middle of the

JLtte

All the varieties are excellent aquarium

and

fishes

will thrive

temperature

is

plenty of plants.

ed; other fins clear save that the anal

male when the fry

The

der.

two or three rays of

first

the anal of the male are modified to per-

mit

it

function

to

an intromittant

as

Some handsome males show

organ.

alone

patch of metallic turquoise blue

a

on the

and occasionally a female is so marked. Meek remarks that the color markings of this species are more variable than any other species he had examined. This substantiated by the several forms is now so well-known and distinct as to have been given names. The red form The (rubra), is the most attractive.

in

a

small)

aquarium,

Make

providing

observations at

frequent intervals, and remove the fe-

narrow black bor-

of the female has a

the

and 80 degrees, Fahrenheit. The prois the same as with other livebearing species. Merely place the female, when she indicates by distended abdomen that a brood may be expected,

may be prominent or and in some specimens wanting. In the male the dorsal fin is russet-markof which

all

if

cedure

indistinct

body,

and breed

maintained between 70

is

arrive.

For the young the food par excellence Daphne, following later with enchy-

traeids, but

it

is

entirely possible to raise

young on prepared foods, making

the

certain that the granules are suitable in size.

some

In

sides

aquarists

the

sections

Platypoecilus the moon-fish, the

call

forms

being distinguished as red, black, blue

and

spotted.

-

Philadelphia Exhibition The recent public exhibition of the sociated aquarium and goldfish

Philadelphia, held

of

as-

societies,

Horticultural

in

bodies in both sexes are orange-vermil-

Hall,

and most intense in the Specimens not marked with tiny male. black dots are considered most desirable. In nigra (sometimes incorrectly called

years as far as the goldfish was concern-

pulchra), a velvety-black blotch, varying

imens.

lion in color,

in size, appears is

on the

similar to the

aquarium

common

otherwise

form.

body color

is

straw

cold

Brunning,

gisches

in

his

Ichthyolo-

The forms

indiscriminately,

forms of tions.

all

sorts are

and

common

in the general excellence of

species

the spec-

Considering each aquarium as a unit originality

was lacking save with one.

hogany frame, was the gem of the show. In it several black-banded sunfish, Meso-

overlaid

considered mere color variants, and in

breed

and

established for

number of

(pulchra)

maculatiis, the others being

this the writer concurs.

new mark was

exotic fishes, both in

This tank, with a simple, polished ma-

Handlexicon mentions but one

species, P.

quite equal to those of past

with

with black spots more or less evenly distributed.

ed, while a

it

In the

splendidly

contrasts

In the spotted form

rubra. the

it

sides,

was

inter-

transient in collec-

gonisteus chaetodon,

among species,

swam

unobtrusively

well arranged plants of several

making a picture not

to be for-

gotten.

of Philadelphia were and not a small part ot the attendance was due to this form of publicity, augmented by window posters and cards. .

The newspapers

quite generous


Observations on tne Chelonians

DR.

of

North America. V.

R.

W. SHUFELDT,

C. M. Z.

S.

Large male specimen of the Florida Terrapin, Chrysemys floridana, seen upon ventral view and much reduced. I

We able

have

in the

South a very remark-

terrapin that,

in

so

far

as

aware, appears to be confined in to the Peninsula of Florida

Georgia.

It

semys and

its

before

range

and Southern

known seen

as C. Floridona or

This species alive

a

until

specimen was kindly

nificent

am

belongs to the genus Chry-

is

the Florida terrapin.

never

I

had mag-

I

sent

me

by Mr. R. H. Young, -of Haines City, Shortly after

Florida.

cellent condition, at

ington,

some

I

its

arrival in ex-

my home

had the opportunity

in

to

Wash-

examine

eight or ten other living specimens

United States National Museum, which had been forwarded by a collector

at the

from Adel, Georgia. None of these lathowever, was as large as the young

ter,

specimen, this having a length of cara-

pace of over fourteen inches. That individual is now in the National Zoologi-

Washington, as is also the Adel specimens, the former having been presented by me after I had secured a number of photographs of One of these is here reproduced in it. cal

Park

at

largest of the

Figure

I,

taken on ventral view.

part of the shell

is

pale yellow,

All this

and the


ftquatic JLitt

170

markings there seen are abrasions from

up

the plastron having rubbed against the

to say the least of

box in which it traveled from its Florida Several of the Adel specimens home. had the plastron beautifully blotched with intense black, the ground color being a It will be rememvery pale yellow.

in a dome-like fashion that

shell is not fully

mal

developed until the ani-

younger individuals having

adult,

is

much

the carapace

we

as

species of the genus.

and in the adult rarely has any markings upon it. (Fig.

bars of a lighter shade.

also yellow,

in other

it

as a rule, have the carapace of a blackish

brown

is

see

Florida terrapins,

bered that the plastron in our Painted

Terrapin

unique,

is

This form of the

it.

marked

sometimes

color,

with

Centrally, the

marginal scutes present a yellowish bar, but this character, too,

may

be quite dim.

black head has fine linear mark-

Its jet

ings of pale yellow, with a strong stripe

of

same

the

from

running posteriorly

color

either eye to the neck.

The

stripes

on the chin are much lighter or even whitish.

As

to

its

habits, they probably

much from

very

differ

species of the genus

;

do not

those of other

still,

we

stand in

need of some good account of these nature, as there does not

seem

to be

in

any

such extant at the present time.

Daphne

during the winter

scarce

is

months, and not

of us

all

find

it

con-

venient to collect the larvae of Corethra,

but every aquarist can provide enchy-

worms. box of any convenient

traeid

A filled

Chrysemys 2.)

Sometimes

the plastron

is

picta

in this species,

encountered

ing the Florida terrapin

specimens of

head for

its

however,

of a rich deep buff color,

difficulty is

it,

for

size of

it

markings

*The Painted Terrapin.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;that

is,

adult

has the smallest carapace

in

mounds

Ventral view of a

Presented by Mr. Edward S. Schmid, of Washington, D. C. Both specimens photographed from life by the author.

male, reduced.

size,

partly

kept constantly moistened

eventually be supply.

mashed

made

to yield a gratifying

small

Occasional potatoes,

oatmeal,

portions

corn

of

starch

pudding, unflavored, or bread and milk, in identify-

any other species

this country, while its

soil,

with milk and water, and properly started with a "nest" of the white worms can

*

and may have some central upon it of a deeper shade.

No

with

will

be

the

needed

worm-food.

This

should be buried just below the surface. A little observation will determine the

proper quantity and frequency of feedTo gather worms, lay a slice of ing. bread well moistened with milk on the soil, and a few hours later they will be

found beneath it in removed with small

little

clumps, readily

forceps..


;

Notes on the

I

Life - History of Planorbis

corneus and Other Freshwater Mollusks

WILLIAM

T.

WEBSTER,

F.

R.

M.

5.

i

â&#x20AC;˘Hi At the previous meeting of

this society

had the pleasure of bringing

I

notice the occurrence of a red

to your form of

Planorbis corneus, and in stating the fact

many

that

freshwater snails cannot live

with the Cypridae. At the made this communication, I did quite know the extent and scope of

in association

time not

I

and my remarks were confew bare facts. I hope, to-

this society,

fined to a night, to

but

go into the matter more fully

there

definite

are

which

still

several

hope

I

to clear

matters

up

in-

some

at

future date. I

do not make any pretensions to being

considered an authority on the subject of freshwater snails

;

tirely centred in their

my

is

is

form has a

value than any other, that

is,

one

and

importance,

very considerable

possibly this red

en-

food for

In this respect the subject

fishes.

of

interest

utility as

being taken respecting this

snail.

have distributed quantities over a wide area, and there is probably little danger now of its becoming extinct. I

summer

I

had the pleasure

of conducting one of your fellows to the

pond where

it

be interested to to find

was found, and you

know

that

we were

the centre. In many cases the hole is quite small, whilst in others the perfora tion is large, and only the outer,

or body, In the early summer these perforations were neatly sealed

whorl remained. all

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;quite

for study,

as

perfectly as if done in a turning lathe, and there was nothing to indicate that they had ever possessed

an Later in the season, the sealing becam.- ragged as further erosion took apex.

place.

It is interesting to record that nearly every specimen with a large hole, if lifted carefully by hand, had a young

Sphaermm corneum

On many

attached

to

the

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;the bivalve dropped away when was used for

collecting.

carefully examining the tentacles peculiarities are observed.

Some

have both extremely long, slender and well matched. Some have one long and one short the shorter is left or right in;

discriminately.

Some have two very

short

stunted and conical.

few

tentacles,

A

were

found doing well, entirely without, and the places where they should have been were indicated by the merest suggestion. Some specimens have

and these

will

the left tentacles

having been isolated and mated, all the young proved normal. None has been

abundant evidence that the red

With further material

and some have been discov-

able

colony was an old established one, and the snail had even acquired a local name. interesting

shells,

a scoop

left

in other directions, considerable in-

In the early

mal

ered with red bodies and white or nearly white shells. Most specimens over one year old are completely perforated in

be

if it

pleased to say that in fish culture circles,

is

Several specimens have been found with nearly white bodies and nor-

ce ntre

judgment of fishes, and if after a trial, it may be found to improve the I am flavor of fishes as food for man.

terest

light.

far greater

to the

and

to

many

features have been brought

bifurcated,

found with a single tentacle. The mating of the red form with the normal always produces dark offspring, and if two of these dark ones are mated.


â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Aquatic

172 red progeny results

but

;

am

I

not able

JLitt

taught to acquire knowledge apart from

what extent this agrees with the Mendelian theory. Continual mating

instinctive habits.

of the red considerably improves the bril-

snails in general are quite

to say to

of

liance

this red

As

color.

form

is

before remarked,

a sort of albino.

have

I

been unable to find any satisfactory

lit-

erature dealing with albinism in the lower animals

even the best authorities on

;

dismiss

fishes

the

few

with

subject

words, and no attempt at explanation. Certainly, departure

from the normal

much change

productive of

is

tem-

in the

is

domestication.

to

they differ in habits entirely. character

of

difference

Also the by a

exhibited

golden and a white orfe will be instrucas

further

;

albinism a

carries

this

stage

nothing need be said of goldfish.

In this way, the red Planorbis shows evi-

dences of capabilities of

unknown

in the

domestication

normal.

grave

sires,

effort its

is

made

to

instinctive de-

difficulties arise.

For the study of the freshwater snails small aquariums are not to be recommended. I find, I get the best results in a bell glass nearly 30 inches in diameter,

the bottom

and

filled

with a mixture of sand

have been struck with the

difficulties

he encountered when trying to induce a lowly creature to vary opposition to

its

its

procedure

instinctive habits.

in

Other

observers have claimed successes in overcoming the persistent efforts of these animals to retain their instinctive habits, and you will agree with me that it is highly desirable

such

should

observations

be

carefully confirmed in every detail, be-

fore being brought forward as facts.

It

obvious there must be some limit to

animal resources, and that the creature only succumbs to interference secretions

the animal struggle. telligence,

is

when

cer-

become exhausted, and compelled to give up the

Freshwater

and

are

shell grit

spected

all

Jeffreys

round. says,

"Land and freshwater most

snails, as well as slugs, are for the

part herbivorous," also,

(freshwater snails) yield,

of Planorbis

on being

"Several kinds

irritated, a quantity of their

purple blood

;

own

these are vegetable eaters."

In the face of these definite declarations

Those of you who have read Fabre's monumental observations on insect life,

tain

when an

should be capable of being rotated or in-

a golden tench

is

but

quite an object lesson,

and lend themselves

will

;

observation of a normal green and

perament of albinos and transitory alThey become more easily tamed,

tive,

creatures

turn a snail aside from

as

good tempered

up to where the sides become vertical, and having a depth of about 20-in. of water. Such an aquarium should contain well established and growing plants Vallisneria for choice, and

binos.

The

The acquired can be

interfered with without resentment,

snails

capable

have an of

in-

being

I feel

some

to the

diffidence in raising objection

accuracy of the statements

;

but

I

must, in the interests of truth, say that

Planorbis corncus, others, are

vorous.

and probably some

more carnivorous than

In fact,

I

cornens being a vegetarian,

food

is

obtainable.

herbi-

can scarcely imagine if

animal

In a pond there must

be constant deaths of minute animals,

and unimaginable numbers of tragedies from which the mollusc may obtain some share, and never be at a loss for animal During the warm weather matter. Planorbis c omens will devour incredible quantities of animal food, and it will grow faster and do better on a flesh diet than on vegetation. I have fed it upon animal food exclusively, tough muscular table scraps, and I have made every effort humanly possible to deprive it of


aquatic plant food, and in such circumstances

thrived

exceedingly

it

and attained

well,

a large size.

Turning

and

and studied

there are places

a large aquarium,

traveling surface,

if

used.

A

self-

essential,

as

the

as previously described, vessel

is

is

water must not be disturbed, and the growing plants must be in sufficient profusion to keep the water from becoming foul with a small population of a hundred or more adults. When the snails have settled down, put in one large piece of meat, more than is likely to be consumed under two or three days, or renew in exactly the same place without disturbing the plants. Soon a vertical thread will be seen reaching from bottom to top and probably more or less attached at intervals, to some upright leaf of ValThis thread will be observed to

gradually thicken as each snail in passing

along

it

adds

its

contribution of slimy

matter, and in quite a short time a rope

of

proportions

respectable

is

formed,

leading from the

unconsumed meat to the surface of the water, where many ramifications will be found.

This rope

becomes thicker than the thumb of a man. There will be a constant procession of snails up and down the rope, and it is interesting to watch a sometimes

on the surface come into contact with one of the surface ramification lines. In an instant, the sluggish creature becomes alert and snail leisurely travelling

quickens

its

tenaciously to the guiding line, and the repleted snail must give way. As the rope is usually somewhat irregular,

one side more or

ning, this can be observed

lisneria.

173

to the subject of thread spin-

with certain success

supporting

JLitt

As

pace.

able to judge there to the direction,

is

and

far as I have been never a mistake as in a little

time the

less

attached to plants,

which offer a limited and only one snail can

be in possession. When the conditions are ideal for observation, and the travellers

many, much amusement

reward

will

the observer.

Anyone who has read Fabre on the processionary caterpillar will remember he describes how these creatures live in

large

numbers in a common dwellinghouse, and on leaving which, for feeding

purposes, spin a thin line of caterpillar in the procession to the existing one until it

on

its

silk.

adds

Each its line

branches off

own

account, and these lines are used for the purpose of finding the

way

back home, just as a cord or rope would be used in the exploration of an intricate cave. There seems to be a curious resemblance of methods of snail and cater-

pillar,

and

this

the most remarkable seeing that a snail after a good meal, puts up with all sorts of annoyances is

from

descending snails rather than leave the guiding line, although it has the power to float to the surface. Planorbis Coras is well known, can rise to the surface from the bottom like a cork, or nells,

sink like a stone, and it apparently has considerable control over the rate of fall and rise. In a deep aquarium a falling snail will frequently retard its progress very perceptibly as it nears the bottom,

and a

rising

piece of meat

snail

often

will

more than

its

own

carry

a

weight,

interest centred here, as in a dense colony

any visible difference to the normal rate of ascension, which shows there must be a considerable latitude of power. I have never been able to wit-

many

ness,

snail reaches the thick vertical rope

commences

its

descent.

There

is

and

much

snails may be on the rope, and a descending snail will not give way to an ascending one. The hungry snail clings

without

when there has been no suspicion of interference, a snail voluntarily fall to the bottom,

and ascend

to the surface


Aquatic

174 either by

again,

The

observation, as

it

instinctive habit

touched

and interference

will discharge

it

charge,

will at

it

an

is

re-

I

came

to a

was fortunately

momentary

halt,

and

In this

was no interference in any way, and the snail had no assistance from a spun thread. This is the only there

have seen, although I have for years carefully watched the progress of every falling animal presenting the opThis is an portunity for observation. case

I

important fact to record, as I have long thought corneus possessed some such

power, as a fallen snail on reaching the bottom, often has some trouble to attach

and

itself,

this act of

corneus

interesting to witness.

larly

many

confused further count.

The statement

freshwater snails

that

water and on doing so die, is frequently met with in books dealing with the univalves, and observers are warned to pro-

then floated back to the surface. instance,

twenty-two

when hatching began

complete dis-

drop about nine or ten inches below the water surface or half the depth of the It

this year, laid

batches of eggs, but it

is

particu-

This, and

other observations, are better seen

with snails that have been

in

confine-

ment a long time and have overcome

Many

their natural nervousness.

snails

caution is

is

unnecessary

reasonable care

if

taken to keep the captives under prop-

A

er conditions.

somewhat

freshwater snail

fortune to find a newly-introduced fish

dead or dying, having leapt from

The common minnow

home.

good

the

to

surface,

rise

but this experiment

is

new

its

affords a

If this fish is put into

illustration.

new home it is quite common for jump out, especially during the a

night, evidently seeking

it

to

first

old quarters.

its

most cases for one night only, all danger is past and Fish do not like the fish settles down. If the tank is covered, in

changes snail

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;nor

is

do

If

snails.

put back into

its

been kept for

When

snails,

some

time, are

the water line, suspicion

an escaped

new home

impossible.

gently detach-

a

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

tom

if

is

and is capable of acquiring knowledge apart from mere instinct, and erratic movements on the part of the creature can only be interpreted in one way ignorance is no excuse for cruelty. Aquarium keepers, no doubt, have had the misintelligent creature,

usually accepts the situation

ed when well on the journey, at once

This pre-

vide covers for their tanks.

observed .whilst creeping from the botto the surface will,

under

the twenty-

are in the habit of creeping out of the

able, a few days ago, to observe a specimen of corneus in its second year, gently

tank.

second of July

old,

first to

and,

air,

once creep to the sur-

face for a renewal.

mens of corneus, two years observation from the

lightly

is

some

irritated to the extent of

is

this

the fallen snail

If

sented.

remains feeding a con-

Apparently

time.

siderable

if

creeping or otherwise.

return to the surface requires a long

liitt

is

if this is

it

not

which have found above at

once

di-

the most successful with those which are

rected to the presence of enemies or foul

educated to being frequently handled.

water.

I

regret

I

have never been able to

isfactorily ascertain the age a snail

most of

more

less upset

Cypris, nor have the

number

may

my

reach, as 01

sat-

I

a

One species, Limnaea pereger, has had name imposed upon it describing it as

attempts have been by the attentions of

a restless creature,

been able to observe

pereger exhibits characteristics peculiar

of eggs a snail

produce for the same reason.

may

actually

Two

speci-

see,

to itself. I

and as far as

without just cause.

know

It is

I

Certainly,

can L.

the only freshwater snail

of which can,

and does, catch


Aquatic and tadpoles, and devours them.

little fish

It

much sought

is

which take

fishes,

mon

to

water

see

line

;

vestigated,

this

after by

the larger

greedily.

it

just

snail

It is

but in every case

in-

has been there to escape

it

ever this snail

if

the

have

I

is

found out of

its

When-

enemies, and not from choice.

it

com-

above

its

element

almost a certainty that the water,

is

good, contains predatory fishes.

I

have

TLitt

175

have had has been given a chance and has been observed closely. P. corneus is seldom able to repair a sersnail I to

live,

ious fracture. Recently I have observed one replace quite a large piece of the

outer

lip,

and

small, behind

utterly

When

nessed

many

escaped over the

always

dies.

edge

and one individual down. behaves in much the same

in the night once,

and then

twice,

L. pal list ris

way

all

settled

in shallow water.

which

spots,

in

in some instances mere pinholes. The death of the snail always occurs when the perforation becomes complete,

dence,

L. pereger in a small vessel with

two dozen P. corneus, about two months Within twelve hours all the latter old. were dead, and I have not repeated the experiment.

will

in

"Freshwater

book,

his

that

Neritina

fluviatilis

not live in confinement, and men-

tions

the

many

great

and

no matter where

says

corneus is have wit-

in numerous small time become perforations,

customed to changes, and make no attempt to escape. The various species of freshwater snails seem able to live together, in harmony, perhaps with one exception. Some time ago I placed a half-

Bateman

I

and the animal of the pond

attempts,

A

ence from one vessel to another, get ac-

Aquaria,"

orifice,

repair.

eroded

are

snails

an intact

unable to

'

Snails subjected to constant transfer-

grown

is

dies.

fracture of the outer whorl, large or

inches in diameter, containing under one

introduced, they

In most

given up in despair, and the animal

A

first

to replace nearly

cases a tiny fracture of the outer lip

mens

inch of water, for some months.

made

the whole of the large whorl.

experimentally kept a number of speciof L. pereger in a tiny dish, 2V2

another case a brave but

in

vain attempt was

matter in order to save this

it is

From

situated.

this evi-

very strange to find the eroded

apex of the red form

so well

mended

as

previously described.

As is

to the

enmity of the Cypridae;

this

a carefully ascertained fact, confirmed

by very many experiments, and is quite beyond doubt. The matter can be easily put to test by taking some snail spawn

and the weed to which it is attached, and placing this in a bowl together with Cypris, collected from a ditch. A control experiment should be made, carefully Cypris

eliminating the crustacean.

most ubiquitous

;

makes

it

its

is al-

appearance

It is

even when the utmost care is taken to guard against it. There are numerous species of theCypridae, and I am not prepared to admit that all are sinners. I

highly important that causes of failure

prefer to suspect the smaller kinds, but

snail

unnecessary suffering.

had a

cently

ent of repute,

who

I

have

tells

me

sought

for

has

this snail

thrived for years in an aquarium.

should be

re-

from a correspond-

letter

before

definite

statements are recorded.

As

have a good many Planorbes collected for me, I receive quite a number with

I

injured

shells,

and

subjects for observation.

consequently

Every injured

in

any

is

nearly always

case, the

enemy

is

present.

the one that

The

larger

kinds seem to be ignored by the snails. It

is

still

a matter of doubt as to

takes place.

From

repeatedly made,

observations

I find

I

what have

the snails usuallv


aquatic %itt

176 imprison a foreign body

in their

Naples Aquarium

shells

and perish whilst waiting for the discorn Possibly something

fort to pass away. like this

happens

of Cypris

in the case

finding an entrance, and the crustacean

by no means, a desirable prisoner.

is,

The

larger kinds of snails are the chief

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;P.

Vortex,

victims of Cypris

and the smaller

extent,

some

to

are able

snails

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;pos-

to escape the attentions of Cypris sibly being so small there

When

for an entrance.

is

little

room

breeding

snail

through a summer has been a failure, any snails hatching out at the advent of

Whoever take

live

It is quite dis-

through the winter.

made by

tressing to witness the efforts

snails to escape the tiny persecutor, little snails

water-line place reach,

may in

and

often be seen above the

great numbers, trying to

beyond

themselves

Our Smithsonian

port.

to

themselves to a

larger

enemy's

the

flat

snails

surface,

and do not

tive limits of the orifice of the shell,

and

can be observed in this uncomfortable position for long periods.

To

establish

new

Mediterranean,

The

snail

fry

services

far

of

tions.

A

to

fishes

some

of

fresh-

may

extent,

take

toll

but their

outweigh other considerahandful of duckweed should

be sown to carpet the surface of the water, and hide the snails from the ravages of water birds and other visitants. pond such as described has been found extremely successful in several instances. Real at a meeting of the Malacological Society of London. (Courtesy of the Fishing Gazette.)

A

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

alive

and content.

swimming and creeping

In

many

great glass compartments are the

things that live

beneath the surface of that semi-tropic

Separated are they from each other,

sea.

because most of them agree about as do the lion

tank

in

and the lamb. Here we see a which we behold a number of

somewhat resemble a great brown shoe, with two glaring eyes in the heel. From beneath come eight arms that everlastingly stretch out and again contract, like India rubber. They project creatures that

now

here,

now

there

;

they

grasp Avhatever they touch, they seize a

and then the arm

bit of food,

contracts.

Into the stomach beneath the eye of the

creature

irresistibly

is

it

while this

But

drawn.

occurring the other arms are

is

up and down, are searching near and far for

stretching in and out, are slipping

colonies

water snails, quite a small pond will produce immense numbers. A broadleaved water-plant is usually chosen on which to affix eggs, and Potamogeton A natans is probably one of the best. few sticklebacks (no other fish) should be introduced for the purpose of getting rid of Cypris.

makes

are to be seen the sea creatures of the

attach

protrude their bodies beyond the protec-

Institution

annually a donation of money. Here

it

themselves,

the

whilst

Naples makes a mis-

most complete in the world. Indeed, the world of science contributes to its sup-

all

cold weather, when Cypris has disappeared until the spring, almost invariably

visits

he misses the great aquarium, the

if

The

anything possible. as though

creature

moves

too were a prey of these rub-

it

ber arms which stick by rows of suckers to

the

whatever they touch, and which have power of grasping a man and draw-

him down

ing

This

is

to the ocean's depths, as

they do an

as

easily

the

ranean Sea

is filled

Next we turn first

glance

unfortunate

octopus, and the

we

therewith.

to a

see only

tank in which at

rough stones and

sand, but on closer examination

some They are

ceive that alive.

of

imitating

they

one

lie,

is

both

fish

Mediter-

we

per-

of the rough stones are fish that

the

objects

in color

reddish, that one

have the power among which

and form. is

This

brown or black


Aquatic or yellow, in accordance with the objects

Hideous creatures are

near at hand.

(jo

they, lying there silently, awaiting a fish

tures of

Now

a darting creature rises

slowly

settles

again.

It

we have

down

located

find

tbe

as

food.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;sold

the

octopus,

that basket a

a very large

seen to

lie

so close

to so nearly resemble

it,

Here are baskets same rubber-like

the

arms, tbe same glaring eyes.

may

now

that,

fish

market place in Naples. same hideous crea-

to tbe

from it, and then to become sand

flat

is

it,

and

to the sand,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

a great

is

the sand moves,

now

There we

that fails to perceive that stones such as

they have mouths.

111

fiitt

contain

This basket

number of small ones, few arms chopped off from Here are the repulone. a

sive fish that resemble stones, there the

transparent squids, next the cuttle

fish,

Aquaria in the Conservatory of the Missouri Botanical Garden as to

make

impossible to

it

sand ends and others about

;

fish

we

begins.

see their

where There are

tell

still

eye look-

sea breeds, seems to be a food for man,

take

bodies.

times the

two

contains crabs, with legs

There are tanks of

feet in length.

coral,

of sharks, of transparent squids,

the cuttle fish,

tures habits.

of

all

and hosts of colors,

The water

is

fish

shapes,

and creaand

sizes

as clear as air, the

creatures live before our eyes, the most instructive

object

concerning aquatic esting- sea.

lesson life

of

the

world

of this most inter-

upon man. It is a question, I which is the stronger. Some-

or to feed

ing upward, but no one can trace their

The next tank

In fact, whatever the

not less unsightly.

the

it,

as to

man

octopus

travels as

I

eats

the

am now

octopus, again

man.

the

eats

Whoever

traveling, needs leave

squeamish stomach at home. Ask no Eat whatever others eat. questions.

his

That

is

good philosophy, and

breeding, too.

Withal,

it

is

it

is

good

but a differ-

The man who

ence in education.

eats

the slimy oyster or the slippery clam

needs not octopus

a

criticize

him who considers

delicacy,

the

nor yet should the


— Aquatic

178

man who

eats lobster be sensitive or im-

patient

his host serves

if

appeal

these

of

him

a not less

All

horned creature instead.

ungainly

palates

divers

to

in

sundry degrees, so why quibble? John W. Lloyd in "The American Angler."

JLite

through the generosity of Mrs. William M. Sloan and Messrs. Westlake, Nugent, Fox and Blair. Rearing and breeding

Unks have been

installed in another hot-

house, which, with occasional presentations of fishes

and

plants, will serve to

maintain the exhibition tanks at

Xiphophorus montezumae The Montezuma illustrated

ing

and

recently

Swordtail,

described as

,

by Jordan and Snyder in the Bulletin of the United

States Fish

The body

of

Commission

in

this

species

a trifle

is

Xiphophorus with the dorsal region somewhat familiar

deeper than the helleri,

elevated, suggesting Platypoecilus.

general color indistinct

The

yellowish-olive, with an

is

lateral

band.-

A his

high school professor, cleaning out

desk

preparation

in

some old ex-

much

amination papers and, after

The

scales

of

ll

propounded by his exam-

e startling theories

A

inations.

review of the papers reveal-

ed the following original facts discoveries

— or rather

"The swimmerets

:

crayfish are used for walking

;

of

of crayfish are modified to smile

eyes are not visible

bordered above and below with black, and approximately as long as the body.

with air

Length

three-fourths

;

;

fishes'

fresh water fish will

;

the parts that

make up

the blood are the stomach and heart

mammals' bodies are is

partially

;

all

covered

the nervous system of the frog

;

a sympathetic one

of speech

;

;

the frog has a sense

the frog takes in water which

flows out just behind or near the ear;

inches.

^

St.

The

and

not live in water

the

the chelae

edges forming stripes. Occasional individuals have a dark blotch at the base of the caudal fin or a few such marks on the side. Caudal appendage, or "sword,"

two

per-

biology students in their entrance

the upper part of the body have dark

about

new

the

for

scholastic year, discovered

suasion, agreed to make public some of

11).

fig.

1900 (p. 131,

times

Hohen-

stein

in a

originally described

was

foreign journal,

all

— Paul

new (mean-

to aquarists, not to science)

new

condition.

attractive

in

mimicry

Louis Society

Saint Louis

Aquarium

is

the kind of animal that shoots

out poison so as to escape without being

Society re-

hurt, as the skunk."

cently held a reorganization meeting at which all offices were declared vacant,

new

officers

being elected as

Chairman, Paul Hohenstein man, James T. Westlake

follows:

;

vice-chair-

;

treasurer,

Frank Moran secretary, John Wetzel. Enthusiasm for a local public aquarium, quiescent for some time past, has

The freshwater shrimp creature

;

it

is

cmirements of

is

a

cunning-

quickly adaptive to the reits

environment.

I

once

placed a single shrimp in a small bell

;

been revived. to

the

To

direct public attention

movement,

twenty-eight

large

glass

aquarium with a small perch, and, fish hunted the shrimp for

although the

many months, it never succeeded in capThe crustacean became very turing it. and eluded capture by its extraormovements, which must have been to a large extent acquired under IV. T. Webster. the novel conditions.

aquaria, stocked with a wide variety of

wily,

have been installed in the alcoves of a conservatory in the Missouri Botan-

dinary

fishes,

ical

gardens.

This was made possible


;

!

aquatic Life

(Shnfeldt) I Became a Fancier (Proctor) Peculiar Planorbis (Breder) Association and Color Discrimination in Mudminnows and Sticklebacks (White) The Hay Infusion Microcosm (Woodruff) The Bladderworts, notes and news. ;

;

A

1918—1919

;

;

September, 1918. The Blood-fin (Heede) Breeding Haplochilus cameronensis (Nelles) Japanese The Spotted Gourami (Reams) ;

;

;

;

(Boyd)

Snail

Aquarium

;

Water

and

Its

Restoration Aquarium Heater {Dormeier) (Hale) Fish Foods (Heede) Happy Families, Breeding Habits of Mud-minnow, notes and news. ;

;

;

Aquarium

October.

Heating

(Breder)

June.

Observations on the Chelonians of North America, Part HI (Shufeldt) ; Gambusia episcopi (Brind) The Wheel Animalcules (Bade); Sonnet to a Goldfish (Burditt) ;

A

Study of the Diamond Bass (Trell) ; The Stickleback (Barker); Goldfish in China, Red-colored Water, Crappie Spawn in Washington Aquarium, and Society News.

Brook

;

Hemiramphus fluviatilis (Brind) Mollienisia latipinna (Heede) Blue-tailed Skink (Deckert) Factors Controlling the Development of Snails Tropical Aquarium Fishes (Webber) in Aquaria (Gale) Habits of Black Bass, The Pipe-fish, notes, etc. ;

;

;

;

;

July. A Big-headed Gurnard (Fowler) The Nesting Habits of Certain Sunfishes as Observed in a Park Lagoon in Chicago (Hubbs) Badis badis (Brind) The Paradise Fish (Bal;

;

;

November. American Live-bearing Tooth(Bade) Aquarium Notes (Leitholf) The Notes on Krefftius adspersus (Freund) Anatomy of the Fish (Clark) Breeding Habits carps

;

;

;

;

A

Bloated Axolotl of Burmese Eel (Finckh) The Name "Water Flea," notes and (IVaite) news. ;

;

leisen)

The Garden

;

Philadelphia

a Terrarium

A

Aquarium,

Cynolebias recurva and Other

Tillaea

Another Tank Heater (Mellen) Aquarian

bellottii

;

;

;

Emotions of Fishes A Cigar Box Aquarium (Modesto) (Gale) Photosynthesis, MisFlorida Notes (Carlton) cellaneous notes, news, etc.

Elevator,

August. Observations on the Chelonians of North America, Part IV (Shufeldt) The Stemhart Aquarium, with portrait of Ignatz ;

Steinhart Lebias sophise (Brind) The Senses of Fishes (Herrick) Marine Aquaria, An Epidemic Among Fishes, Manufacture of Pearl Buttons, etc. ;

(Brind) Notes (Finckh) (Kuhn) Aquarist vs.

December.

(Breder);

Fish

Akiyama Goldfish Farm, notes and news.

;

;

;

;

;

1919. Limia caudofasciata Classification of Fishes (Stead)

January, holf)

;

;

Second Fish

— "You

;

Changes of the Chub-sucker (Hubbs) (Brind) A Simple Heated plus carpintis Aquarium (Finckh) Notes on the Breeding GoldHabits of the Pigmy Sunfish (Poyser) fish Farm of Kichigoro Akiyama, notes and news.

likes

him,

he

he's

the

puts a damper on everything."

(Leit-

Color Neetro-

Fish— "Nobody

First

;

original 'blue fish.'

said

it,

"

;

;

Who

;

February. Polycentropsis abbreviata(5nnd) Cho'ogaster cornutus, the Fish of the Dismal ;

Swamp (Welsh)

;

A Wood

Aquarium

(Pil-

Danio

malabaricus (Leitholf) Managing Notes on Native Fishes (Pray) Reactions of Fishes to the Aquarium (Innes) Habit-forming Drugs, The Boston Show, A True Fish Story, notes and news. kington)

;

;

remembers the barber shops with of teeth in the windows to let

strings

you know that tooth-yanking could be obtained inside? Likewise the aquarium of

leeches

restore

to

to "black eyes."

The

the

proper tink

characteristic pole

;

;

March. Breeding the Goldfish (Hanna) Observations on the Chelonians of North Lucania ommata America, Part I (Shnfeldt)

is

still

ting,

striped red, to indicate blood-let-

but he has a razor for the purpose

;

FRANCIS

K.

CHRISTINE

;

Apistogramma agassizi (Heede); Viviparous Water-fleas (Tompkins)

(Welsh);

The

;

Fishes-in-general (Stead) Striped Gourami (Simpson)

Breeding the Notes and news.

;

;

The Surinam Toad (Deckert) April. Keeping Cichlasoma nigrofasciatum (Brind) Beware the (Innes) Living Food Alive Dragonfly (Gordon) An Electrolytic Aerator (Putnam) Water Lilies, Some Cultural and Historical Notes (Pring) Beef vs. Liver, notes and news.

Manufacturer of "Shield of quality" fishfood, For Tropicals, 15 cents and 20 cents a box. 25 cents.

Creation,

the

new

Infusoria

without

(use

;

;

;

sheep manure), 50 cents box. Broadtail Telescopes and 25 varieties of Trop-

;

;

;

icals.

All

requisites. aquarium Mail orders and

Dwarf Gouramies.

Special inquiries

'

Nanostomus eques (Brind) The May. Water Horse-tail (Woblcr) Observations on ;

;

the

Chelonians

of

North

America,

Part

II.

promptly attended

to.

518 BELGRADE STREET

PHILADELPHIA


;

•f

TROPICAL FISHES PLANTS

Fred. G. Schaefer Breeder of Fancy Goldfish Show

stock

Veiltail

of

scopes always on hand.

Calico All

!

i

Sagittaria

and Black Tele-

Cabomba

tropical

species of

!

Myriophyllum,

and subulata,

sinensis

rosaefolia, Ludwigia, Eriocaulon septan-

i

gulare and Isoetes (quillwort). I

fishes

and plants.

Wholesale and

retail.

Fundulus

holbrooki,

soma

evergladei.

I

I

Eight Pairs of Fine, Large Pterophyllum Sealare

Snakes, lizards, newts, turtles and other reptiles for terraria. Who'esale to dealers.

Cheap.

1610 North Second

Mesogonisteus chaetodon, GamHeterandria formosa and Elas-

nottii,

busia

Street

LOVERING

T. P.

Philadelphia

Wilmington

I

i

North Carolina

I }

AQUARIUMS We able

make durable, artistic aquariums suitfor home or conservatory; beautiful

Fishes, plants, foods and Cabomba, large, all supplies for the aquarist. strong and healthy, $5.00 per hundred bunches

wherever placed.

none better. Pioneer Aquarium Works.

HUGO I

Dealer and Breeder of Tropical Fish

10440 115th

Street,

L.

Wisconsin

Racine,

NELLES

C.

i

Two

reasonable.

Prices

Richmond

lata,

silver

cups,

awarded at the last exhibition Ridgewood Aquarium Society.

Heros facetus, Barbus semifasciolatus, DaD. albolineatus and hybrids of Xipll. X. Platypoecilus rubra and Xiph. helPlatypoecilus pulehra;

many

23 of

first

the

DIRECTIONS— Take

nio rerio, lielleri, leri, X.

} i

prizes

Fine, healthy stock of Osphromenus trichopteris, Polvacanthus dayi, Betta rubra, Aeara bimacu-

Hill

N. Y.

MY MODERN CONSERVATORY.

SEE

lettfcolf TBrotbets

I.,

}

R.

other spe-

T.,

exit.

Fulton Street Elevator, B. avenue; use Walnut street back one block.

Lefferts

to

Walk

cies.

281 Southern abenue, ©ittsburflb.

Fine

©a

Telescopes CALICO

Broad-tail

BLACK

and

SCRIMSHAW'S

GEORGE WILT,

62d

15 19 N.

Street,

1431 N. Clark

PHILADELPHIA

Street, Chicago,

Telephone,

Auto

Please

j

FISH HATCHERY

Correspondence Solicited

Superior

111.

i

441."

Delivery.

I

Mention I

"AQUATIC WKen

Importer and

LIFE"

Writing Advertisers

of a Large

i

Variety of Gold and Tropical Fishes

!

Breeder

I

Non-hardening

aquarium

cement

that

contains

Complete line of aquariums or glycerine. kept in stock; special sizes made to order. no

i

!

0!

D

Large stock of tropical fishes always on hand (36 Shipments made to all parts of the species). Plants, snails and United States and Canada.

or Excellent Conformation

n Color Cannot Be Beat

general I

how Their

m

Quality in Finnage

>e

Them

at C. C.

5109 Catherine Street

supplies

wiH pay cash

class

ave Blues, Blacks and Calicos very Fancier Should Look

3

oil

for for

the

aquarist.

your surplus

fishes,

if

first-

stock.

Dogs Kennels. cages and bird-houses. bought and sold on commission. Ta'king' parrots. warbling canaries, etc. Can furnish any sort of What do you want'.' live stock.

Rirds,

Them Over

VOWINKEL Out of -Town Customers name :

Philadelphia,

Pa

Ordering.

County

When


AQUATIC MICROSCOPY BY DR. ALFRED SPLENDID, not

C.

U

too technical hand. J

book of the lower organisms for the inquiring

who

aquarist

dislikes

nonplused by scientific verbiage. pages, with 198 illustrations.

n U

f

be

o

324

S

to

8

%

J

Address Aquatic Life

n £><

Hbt Qtoarf Uouramt FRAMCIS

K.

518 Belgrade Street

at

I U

Barbus, Mouth-breeders and

many

f fi

other

U 8

beautiful fishes.

August Obermuller J

]

Fine Pairs

!

a fine, large stock of Danio malabaricus and other species of Danio. (The most sprightly aquarium fishes) Haplochilus,

U

$2.25 Plus Postage on 2 Pounds

New

Something

STOKES

$6.00

Breeder and Fancier of Telescopes and Tropicals

96 Columbia Avenue,

welcome

<

>

»

»

»

»

f

-,

r

\

Sale or Exchange Surplus stock of rare fancy

G.

Philadelphia, Pa

x-mcu

it

[

any

at

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[

City Heights, N. J.

conservatory Saturday afternoon and on Sunday.

visitors

plants of

CHRISTINE

Jersey

all

fishes

and

kinds.

Germann, 0. D. 3823 N. Richmond Phone: Monticello 6864.

St.

Chicago

Ampullaria gigas The four-horned

snail deposits coral red

masses of eggs out of water.

A

big, in-

teresting species.

Large

size,

Medium

25 cents each.

20 cents each.

size,

Small fellows, 15 cents each.

The Canadian Bird Store AQUATIC SUPPLIES

2139 Van Buren

Street,

Chicago

Illinois

Mollienisia latipinna (or Velifera) Some ship.

scientists assert that Velifera is but a perfectly developed latipinna Per dozen, $4.00.

—the

only sort

we

Cyprinodon variegatus (Sheepshead Minnow), $3.00 per dozen. Notropis metallicus, Fundulns heteroclitus, Gainbusia holbrooki, Goldfish all varieties. Shnbunkins (Spotted Goldfish), $4 00 per dozen. Japanese Snails, $2.00 and $2.50 per dozen. Plants. Vallisneria (narrow leaf), 30 cents per dozen; Vallisneria (wide leaf), 60 cents per dozen; Sagittaria (broad leaf), 75 cents per dozen; Water Poppy, $1.00 per dozen; Cabomba, Giant Anacharis, Potomogeton and Myriophyllum spicatum (milfoil), 75 cents per dozen Red, bunches. Egyptian Lotus (dormant tubers best time to plant), 50 cents each. White and Yellow Water Lilies (dormant tubers), 50 cents each; (seeds, 15 cents per pack-

All plants postpaid. Freshwater Shrimp, sun dried, shelled and shredded. The best fish food. Contains no White Worms (BnCoarse, medium or. fine, $1.10 per pound, postpaid. other substances. The chytraeus), per portion, 50 cents, with instructions how to breed a continuous supply. A collection of twelve varieties of aquarium plants, $1.00, postpaid. When best live food. remitting for fishes please include 50 cents for shipping can. age).

CRESCENT FISH FARM, 1624

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Mandeville Street,

New

Orleans, La, n

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Patented

Aquarium

Peerless

November

10

For Sale

Different

AH Thru

Stock Sizes

U. S. A.

Larger Sizes

and

Order

Canada

to

HALTERBECK

Manufactured by J. J. 170 172 TWELFTH AVENUE, -

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8cx

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ASTORIA, >oon vmn i

PIETZSCH

etc.,

at

If

FISH R0BI

-

"The Was

Brind's

benefit.

-

—has

paid for

itself,

Gold and Doand 40 Insects, Parasites,

Order Direct TO-DAY as only a limited number of copies

L.

BRIND, 449 W. 206th NEW YORK

J.

Schaeffer Phila..

Pa

THE BEST

left

Street

3424 Hurley Street

PHILADELPHIA CXXXXXXXX>OCX)CXXDCXXDCXOCOOCXXX)CX)OCX30CX3i

GOLDFISH 1,500,000 PLAIN &

§ 8 Q

8 o

FANCY

Ready for market at rock-bottom prices. ped anywhere in United States or Canada. for

our illustrated

X Ship-

Write

catalogue.

Oriental Goldfisk and Supply

O

w.

IS

W. BURGESS,

Q

Fish — Tropical,

138 21 Plants Infusoria, etc.

Robert

mail 17c

Postage 50c Postpaid

thrive

jj

mestic;

By

Add

1818 Frankford Avenue

in

natural colors and half-tone. Illustrates

for a daily ration.

them.

S.

$1.50

etc.,

give your fish live food sprinkle a pinch of

just

Magic 'Infusoria)

SCHAEFFER

so you get the

This work shows Fish, Plants,

to

winter,

K-lS

II

and grow on Enchytraeids, the Generous box by mail. 50 little white worms. Full directions given for propagating cents. Fishes

Practical Fish Fancier"

$3.00

J.

FOOD

Teutonia Avenue, Milwaukee, Wis

New Book

you wish

LIVE FOOD

The natural and best food

for goldfishes, barring Package, 50c. (cash or check), with innone. for raising a constant supply. structions

-II

Yogi 15c box. Yogi 75c Pound

PUCE. 10c

ENCHYTRAEIDS -White Worms

$1.50

OOOC

"Yogi"

YOGI

reasonable prices.

Your Fish Are Not Doing Well— Try

Inc.

Magic in your aquarium 2 or 3 times a week. Also a little of the breeders' choice

67 MAHAR AVENUE, CLIFTON NEW JERSEY

PAUL MARQUARDT, 829

>

CO.,

N. Y.

I.,

during

fishes, including Haplochilus camerH. rubrostigma, H. Chaperi, Danio,

Polyacanthus,

L.

i

Tropical onensis,

If

1915

9,

L

3757

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Co

3761 Cottage Grcn>e Avenue Chicago,

8

8 o

5

Illinois

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EVERYTHING IS FISH THAT COMES TO THE NET OF A NATURALIST

Thousands

Our

$2.50 per Dozen $ 15.00 per Hundred

EDWARD

edited by F. BIGELOW, who in the heavens and earth, as well as the waters under the earth. Four months' trial, 25c. One year, $1.00. is

Veiltail

Magazine

(BtuOe to jRature Will Help You

It

Young

of

Telescopes from the Finest Stock in America

Don't paddle in the water with one hand and In other words, be blind with both eyes. "keep your eyes open" for all nature.

Wbt

—>oooc

fishes

Mixed

Colors, Blues, Blacks

THE AGASSIZ ASSOCIATION

Calicos, Etc.

ArcAdiA Sound Beach

Connecticut

Franklin Barrett S.

SILVER

Wyoming Avenue

&

C. Street, Phila.,

Pa

Fancier and Breeder of Tropical Fishes Splendid healthy stock at reasonable Haplochilus cameronensis, Betta rubra, etc. All kinds of live-bearing

35c Extra for Shipping

prices.

Cash With Order

fishes.

NEW

Street YORK (Between 2d and 3d avenues)

235 East 11th

HENRY

CITY

Snails.

Telephone 461

Fishes, Plants, etc., Sold at Conservatory

241 Walker Street, Cliff side, N. t?oooc

?OOQ<

Cliff side

J.

)OOOCZ3O0O«jt

Goldfishes Blacks

::

Blues

::

-tmru

3QOOC

)OOOC

A AQUARIUM &&S is

"Goldfish Varieties

& Tropical

Aquarium Fishes", byWm.T.Innes, former President of the Aquarium Society of Phila.; 250 pages, 195 illustrations. Tells all about the fancy varieties of the Goldfish and nearly 300 tropicals ; how to breed them, etc., etc. For the beginner or the advanced expert. -

A

and Vari-hues

complete, practical, handsome book, sent postpaid anywhere for Enlarged edition now ready. $4.00

INNES

None

«im-»-

THE BEST BOOK

KISSEL, JR.

Breeder & Fancier of Broadtail Telescopes Tropical Fishes, Plants and

Can

& SONS

-

133 N. 12th

St.

-

Phila., Pa.

for sale at present!

Diatoms

GEORGE

A.

Strewn slides of diatoms offered in exchange for similar slides, diatomaceous material, or slides of any character.

SCHENK

Mount Vernon, M. Y.

Editor, Aquatic Life

j>0GOC=3O0OC DCXXDCXX5CXX)OrX)CZDC=DOOOOCOOOOOCX3C

Lincoln Park Pet Shop MADAM

TUZEE, Manager.

CHICAGO >

practical

the aquarium,

work on care and breeding

of

fish

greenhouse and outdoor ponds.

Tappan's Natural Fish Food.

Dogs

Street

—xz^ooooooooooooc

oooooooooooo<

A in

Everyone interested in keeping fish should send for a copy of this hook. Price $1.00.

BIRDS & SMALL PETS OF ALL KINDS

1509 North Clark

1

"AQUARIA FISH"

Finely illustrated.

TROPICAL FISHES OUR SPECIALTY Aquaria, Bird Cages and all Supplies. Displayed and Sold on Commission.

r

paid,

Three boxes, post-

25c.

Guinea Pigs and Thoroughbred Collie Pups, beautifully marked. Write for prices.

F. L. Route

2,

TAPPAN Hopkins, Minn.


XX3QOOO

OOOOOOOOOOOOOOO*

Aquatic

JLift Vol. Ill

Vol. II

$2.25 each, postage paid

P.

1210 N. Warnock

Street, Philadelphia,

|

cloth

Q

binding, with title page and complete index. (Stock of Volume II is small.) One hundred copies of Volume I, loose or bound. Can use single issues. Address publisher.

8

Plants

8

Aquarium Supplies

many

Substantial

illustrations.

WANTED:

PETERS Pa

BREEDER AND IMPORTER Rare and Fancy Fish

8

Volumes average 165 pages and as

2

HARRY

every variety,

of

of

Snails

and

kinds at

all

all

times.

§ g 8

MANUFACTURER OF Green River Fish Food

OOC=)OOOOOOOOOCXXXXX3C=>OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC=»8

15c Box

3C=30OOO0O00OO0OC

Green River Baby Fish Food

JAPANESE GOLDFISH By DR. HUGH M. SMITH

20c Box

A

A

guide to the methods of breeding fancy goldfish practiced in Japan. The result of the personal investigations Ten breeds are illusof the author. trated in color, with numerous text cuts; 112 pages. $2.00, plus

postage on 2 pounds.

Address Aquatic Life

GOOD FISH FOOD

one of the

is

necessary to keep fish in good health. After the test of years Green River stands out It as the best food on the market. keeps the fish in good color by promoting a healthy, robust growth. It Ask will not sour ot cloud the water. vonr dealer or send for it today.

most

things

essential

3CTDOOOCZZ3000

»=»

HERMAN RABENAU, Aquatic Life must be seen

Large assortment of Splendid Telescopes and Jap Goldfish at Reasonable Prices

& Terraria

Fine Assortment of Lionheads

to be appreciated

Visitors

Shipping Cans 50c

Welcome

Plants and Tropical Fish a Specialty

New

Importations of

Breeders

Aquarist

PERMANENT DISPLAY OF

3000000000

rioooooooooc

Young Blues, Blacks and Young

Varieties received

HARRY

regularly

1210

1163 Myrtle Avenue. Brooklyn, N. Y.

$1.50 Dozen

Calicos

5.00 Dozen

Veiltails or Broadtails

P.

PETERS

NORTH WARNOCK STREET PHILADELPHIA

Near Broadway.

3000000000C

50CDOOOOOOOOOC

OOOCX30<X>CX==>000000<XX)OOOC=)OOOOOOi

GOLDFISH, FOODS, PLANTS, DIP NETS Combination Natural Fish Food

Sample Box 10c

Japanese Shrimp Fish Food

-

Sample Can 15c

-

Sample Box 15c

Baby Fish Food

Nippon Goldfish Co T.

Proprietor.

Importers and Dealers

15c, 25c 35c Each

Glass Feeding Rings

MXTRATA,

1919-21 Bush Street, San Francisco, Cal

PLANTS

SNAILS

Mail Orders Promptly Attended to

GOLDFISH

Special Prices on Quantity Lots. Cash With Order.

Dried Shrimp, Birds, Cages and All

Catalogue

Sent

Upon

Supplies

Request.

AQUARIUM STOCK CO 273 Greenwich Street

::

New York

City

r

STOCKS ARE COMI1 Price List Sent on Request 3000000000C


Aquatic life 9 1919