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Jacob C. Cassel 915 Arch Street, Philadelphia, Pa Manufacturer

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AQUARIUMS Aquarium Ornaments Floral Terra Cotta, Etc.

and

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;aquat(c Jttfe

8

February, 1920

Vol. V.

|

I

T. p.

International monthly magazine devoted to tlie study, care and breeding of fishes and other animals and plants in the home aquarium and

g 8

terrarium.

542 East Girard Avenue

Philadelphia

Entered as second-class matter, September 2d, 1915, at the Post Office, Philadelphia, Pa., under Act of March 3d, 1879. Popular and scientific articles and notes on subjects pertaining to the aquarium and terrarium. and to the habits of fishes in general, are always wanted for "Aquatic I/ife." Readers are invited to join in making it a medium of mutual help by contributing to it the results of their studies. The pages are always open to anyone having information of interest to the aquarist and student of Manuscripts, books for review aquatic biology.

and general correspondence should be addressed to

the editor.

LOVERING

WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA

New

Varieties Aquatic Plants Choice and Rare Specimens Snakes and Reptiles Tropical Fishes

[J

Q g Q o Q g n

Fundulus nottii, $1.50 per pair. Elassoma evergladei, $1.75 per pair. Heterandria formosa, $1.00 per

q p p 1] U [l

YEARLY SUBSCRIPTION

U

$1.00 SPECIAL

[)

Attractive assortment

FOREIGN SUBSCRIPTIONS SINGLE COPY

1.50

15

Payments should be made by money

order, draft If local checks are sent, ten or registered letter. cents should be added for collection charges. Foreign remittances should be by international money order. CopyriKlit, 1920, by .Joseph E. Bausman.

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M. chaetodon, 50c each Small turtles, $1.25 per dozen. Newts, $1.00 per dozen. Wholesale to dealers.

"Aquatic Life" has the largest circulation of any magazine in the world devoted to aquatic nature-study. It offers to advertisers a market that can be reached through no otlier medium. Rates made known on application. $1.25

of Plants stock for private aquarium.

Sufficient

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Water Gardening Your water garden winter

cold

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Than

better

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time

whether your pond measured

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acres.

Feed

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book contains 140 illustrations, more than pnough to give you a comprehensive idea of the decorative possibilities of water plants. The Is

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is fish-

The only of aquatic,

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.SL'.Tr..

THE BOOK DEPARTMENT

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Philadelphia

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An

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No. 2

W. A. POYSER JOSEPH E. BAtrSMAN

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Pa

I R


•b"

GoldfisK Foods and Feeding as Practiced in

Japan

EIICHIRO NaKASHIMA The purpose of this paper is to present an otitHne of the substances used as foods for goldfish by the breeders of Japan. Foods naturally

into

fall

two

Though

animal and vegetable. fish is often classed as

classes,

the gold-

omnivorous

it

is

evenly over the

soil;

feces,

from domestic animals,

rice bran, etc.

or several sorts

composition water

specimens

eral days to

necessary that animal sub-

stances dominate in the

food supplied.

First in importance are the entomostra-

cans

— Daphnia, forms.

allied

Cyclops,

Cypris

Following close

and

in point

come larval mosquitoes, tubifex worms, the dried and ground chrysalis of the silkwork, ground shrimp, dried of value

bonito,

boiled

eggs

of

domestic

artificial

or

Any may be used alone mixed. To promote de-

a fact that to produce the most vigorous it is

about a medium-

sized bucketful to each five square feet of surface. The manure may be human

is withheld for sevexpose the bed to the sun's Then it is permitted to fill to a

rays.

depth of six inches and a quantity of adult Daphnia introduced.

more water to three feet

added

is

reached.

is

At

intervals

depth of two After a lapse of

until a

ten to fifteen days plenty of Daphnia will

be found.

The

fowl,

quantity produced by such a pond depend upon the climate, nature of

dregs of meat and similar substances.

will

The foods

of vegetable origin are usually

the water, soil temperature, initial treat-

used as ingredients in prepared mixtures,

ment of the pond, etc. Water plants should have been removed in preparing

worm-eaten wheat flour, wheat bran, buckwheat flour, worm-eaten rice flour, viz.,

rice brain, corn meal, etc.

The advance

of the science of sanita-

the bottom, as

it is considered that they absorb certain materials needed by the Dahpnia, their presence, therefore, being

When

Japan as elsewhere, has made for the stamping out of the stagnant and often filthy ponds in which the muchto-be-desired entomostracans Daphnia,

persist.

Cyclops,

of vegetable origin, they seem to develop

tion,

in

opment

— reach

their greatest devel-

numbers.

The Japanese were

etc.

in

detrimental.

and

in great

On

abundance, but do not long the other hand, with

more slowly but

thus early led to put aside ponds and

duration.

study conditions favoring their develop-

use a

ment under control. A small, muddy pond about fifty feet square is now much favored. The pond may have a bottom of sand or mud, but a mixture of the two is preferable. The water should first be drawn ofif, and the bottom then thoroughly worked with a large wooden rake, after which manure should be spread

animal manures are

used the Daphnia appear most quickly

It is

the supply

is

manure

of longer

better in consequence to

mixture of the two classes of manure. Larval mosquitoes are found in almost all

bodies

may

of

freshwater and at times

be collected in quantity. afl:"ording

valuable food for adult fishes.

number

In a past

of Aquatic Life, H. E. Finckh,

Esq., of Australia, describes an admir-

able

scheme for maintaining a supply

at


â&#x20AC;˘aquatic JLitt

14

home, whereby the eggs are collected and hatched in jars, being thus small enough for very young fishes. This plan, while

would

small,

where the output

suitable

entirely

is

not be practicable for an

many thousands

establishment rearing

of

transported great distances.

"Yolk water"

made by

is

filtering,

through cheese-cloth, the yolks of hardThis

boiled chicken's eggs.

not

fish

may

Daphnia, and

for larval

is

enough

large

yet

take

to

be used as a substi-

Some-

goldfish.

tute in the absence of the latter.

Tubifex worms, which will be found described in most zoological textbooks, occur in sand and mud, especially in

times the yolk, broken in small pieces,

dirty drains

When

heads.

mud in

and

will

They

ditches.

indispensable

sidered

are con-

rearing

in

much

they are collected,

may

This

be taken.

lion-

be placed

a pan of water and stirred several

when they

times,

will

assemble in masses

and may be removed.

rather than

mashed and

fed to

filtered, is

adult fish in advance of the spawning season.

Dregs of meat or lean meat scraps are used as an ingredient

mixtures.

in

Worm-eaten wheat

flour

flour,

has been infested with weevils,

that

consid-

is

ered valuable, and has the added advan-

Otherwise, put

tage of being cheap, an important fea-

the catch into a sieve with a wire-cloth

ture considering the quantities used by

bamboo

bottom, or in a

basket,

finely

woven, through the meshes of which they will

necessary

to

At other times

pieces.

into the

For young fishes it may cut them into small

water below. be

way

eventfully find their

care should be

may

taken not to use too many, as they

the large fish farms. the

other vegetable

the basis of

An

In connection with materials

many food

artificial

food for young

be composed of "just a

it

forms

mixtures. fish

may

of ground shrimp or chrysalis, lo parts corn meal, 25 parts rice bran and 65 parts wheat trifle"

be injured in handling and quickly die

dust.

and pollute the water.

while dry and then stirred into a pot of

The silkworm is very abundant in Japan and the chrysalids are very cheap. These are dried and ground and mixed with vegetable ingredients, such as wheat

boiling water, blending well and

flour,

bran and

com

Japanese breeders. to kill the fish, as

is

is

is

usually added

The

bonito

world. it

is

is

is

a

rich in fats

apt

and

mixtures of the vege-

fisli

of the mackerel

widely distributed over the

In method of using and

does not at times

dififer

may

be a

of

trifle

ities there is need for a more non-nitrogenous food, so the mixture should be changed to 20 parts shrimp and 80 parts

it is

table substances.

family and

the ingredients

shrimp, 20 parts corn meal and 80 parts

wheat. Before and during breeding activ-

decomposes readily. Dried, ground shrimp is a very nourishing food and may be used alone, but it is rather expensive and for that reason to

fish

making For older

consid-

It is

If fed alone, it

a mixture harder than mash.

used by most

meal.

ered very nourishing, and

These should be thoroughly mixed

much from

in effect

shrimp, but

used for fishes while

l)cing

corn meal.

Due foods,

the

to

securing

increasing

sufiicient

of

live

of

Association

Breeders'

the

difficulties of

quantities

Tokyo has been experimenting with

a

view of making prepared food simulate more closely in calories and bulk the live foods.

The

grains and

materials

flesh.

powdered and

the

The flcsli

available

are

grains should be boiled, all l)ones

(Concluded on page 20.)


on tne Chelonians

Obser\)ations

of DR.

Common

R.

NortK America. VII. W. SHUFELDT,

C. M. Z.

S.

Chelydra serpentina

Snapping Turtle

}

In Part

VI

of the present series there

was presented three the young-

of

our

different views of

common Snapping

Turtle (Chelvdra serpentina)

my

,

and

in the

yellowish

of

ings

making a very especially

when

the animal

lifted out of the water.

contrast

the

white,

attractive

combination,

was

just being

This specimen

some notes on the adult of this interesting and widely known species. One of the handsomest examples of this

had a length of some thirty centimeters, and was taken in a little stream that passed through a marshy place where cattails and other aquatic plants flour-

species of the family Chclydridac

ished.

present contribution

it is

intention to

offer

I

cap-

tured near Edgemoor, in Maryland, early in the it

to

summer the

of 1919, later presenting

made but one photograph ;

this

is

of this

here reproduced, and

it

National Zoological Park, at

gives a very excellent idea of the appear-

was duly

ance of one of this species. In American Forest rv and elsewhere I have published

Washington, D. C, where

it

placed in the alligator tank, and where it

I

capture

was devoured next day by one of those It was an unusually

voracious reptiles.

fine individual, its

deep, leaden black,

dark parts being of

a

and the usual mark-

some

of

my

photographs of other snap-

and they show direct views of upper and lower parts of the shell as presented by examples of this species. ping

turtles,


<aquattc JLite

16

There

is

snapping

of

another species

which is confined to Mexico and Guatemala, while our United States species is found as far south as Ecuador

turtle

in

These, however, are

South America.

when we come

the merest pygmies

to

compare them with our giant, the AlliSnapping Turtle {Macrochelys lacertina), which may come to weigh as much as i6o pounds, and which inhabits the main rivers that empty into the Gulf

gator

of

Mexico from western Texas

to sim-

ilar streams emptying into the Gulf of is It Mexico in western Florida. I do and abundant, nowhere especially not recall having seen a single specimen

of

it

during the year and a half

in the city of

New

I

spent

other species that chance to

within

it

striking

it

with great

many

a young duck has been dragged

beneath that element, to be devoured by one of these voracious reptiles. As a

matter of

it. This may be easily demonstrated through experiment, but it

water be denied is

in the

specimens of our snapping turtle have harmless

muddy

to giving

them food beneath the

surface of the water in the tank where

Years ago

I

pers in one of

of

may come

to 33 pounds,

A

to

and have bite from

a length of nearly 30 inches. a big one is no trifling matter, for cases are on record where a finger or a toe has been bitten oft' by a large specimen,

often kept tiny

my

the

turtle.

from behind

little

snap-

aquaria, and well do

I

ion, as

This moss streamed out in a

it

swam

it

rium, wherein

it

lived at peace with other

young turtles of various species. Eggs of this turtle are spherical form, with tough, roughish, white

when irritated, of striking at its enemy much as an angry snake does. They capture the fish they feed upon in

her

;

habit,

same manner, and

a snapjjing turtle

in

shells,

some dozen of them to She often lays these at some distance from the pond or stream in which she li\cs, and she will plod over the ground until she comes to a place of

the female laying

Alligator

very attractive fash-

the length of the aqua-

Snapper has been known to bite off a hand or a foot. Marvelous, indeed, is the power of the sharp, cutting jaws of either of these species and one in good health has the

the

will

gant, green moss, fully twice the length

Specimens of this reptile

the

and

tracts of the southern

in their

States.

while

pets,

Connecticut,

slow-running,

southwestern

weigh from 31

to be very

feed out of the hand of the one accus-

remember a specimen I had that was not more than an inch in length, from the back of which grew a long tassel of ele-

come across them

marshy

gentle-

can add noth-

they are kept.

and

Through

a cruel thing to do.

ping turtle during the past fifty-five years or more, and kept them in captivity for These I have usually captured study. the

snapper will starve to

fact, a

death should opportunity to feed under

tomed

of

Snap-

difficulty.

feed under water, and

pers invariably

have, however, from time to time, owned specimens of our common snap-

in

swim over As given,

ness and kindness, some good-tempered

I

streams

distance.

so like a flash indeed that the eye

ity,

appreciates

come

haunts

at the

this chelonian stroke is of lightning rapid-

ing to the history of this great reptile beyond what has already been published.

myself, having

mud

bottom of the pond or stream where it lives, thus taking hapless minnows and

per-

Orieans.

sonal observation, then,

I

From

will conceal itself in the soft

the clutch.

liking,

worry she t^<^

a

settles

until

when

sizal)le

she

will

proceed

to

excavation, into which

down, depositing

the clutch

is

o.^^

complete.

after

Then


Eitf

)eiquattc

out she crawls again and begins to push

17

the earth over her treasures through any

secure dai)hne, or have propagating boxes of enchytraeids and angle worms,

movement

they

of which she

times crowding

it

is

capable, some-

her until

in front of

tumbles into the cavity, or working

through a sidelong motion. eggs are

it

it

in

After the

safely covered, she will pass

all

again and again over the place until she

appears to feel quite satisfied that she

made it appear as natural as posBeyond this fact, however, we stand much in need of a whole lot more

has

sible.

on

information as

to

the time

young

tiny

many

subject,

this

especially

how

the

to water,

and

of incubation,

way

find their

other points.

may

released by the plants

almost

is

It is

nil.

add

beneficial, therefore, to occasionally

fresh water to the self-sustaining aqua-

rium.

In thus proceeding, syphon the

water from the bottom, taking with

it

the

accumulation of sediment, and replace with

drawn

water of

same temperature

the

several hours before.

advantage.

Specimens brought from outdoors must be gradually acclimated to the

warmth of the house and quarAt no other time of the year are parasites introduced on the new arrivals so apt to make their presence known. The greatest danger of the winter greater

antined.

more

is

in the often rapid

affecting

is

changes of

small

disease

parasites.

may

thyopthirius multifilius,

any time, we know

at

vitality

comparatively low, mak-

them very susceptible to While the "white

ing

aquaria

The

so than larger ones.

of the fishes

it

schemes

to

combat

and

pest," Ichinfest fishes

best

from

this pest

its

Many

ravages during the cold months.

have been

devised, but the best general plan

is

to

gradually raise the temperature of the

aquarium and feed as

If fishes incline to mate, either sepa-

great

to

do not readily overcome lost energy incidental to bruised roots and leaves which will speedily decay.

temperature,

Nature knows no fiscal year, but the aquarist must know the "fishal year." During this month of short and dull days we are aware that the oxygen

fed

plants

months

February Pointers

be

Scraped raw beef is a good substitute. Roots of plants should nf;t be disturbed this month. (Growth is slow and the

possible.

If

may

aeration

live

food as much

convenient, mechanical

be used.

Two

or three

water from

rate the sexes or lower the temperature.

times daily syphon a

Mtality to produce strong, healthy off-

the bottom of the tank, replacing with

spring

is

lacking

at

season

this

breeding should ordinarily be

aged until later when

it is

and

discour-

possible to pro-

Food-rings eliminate guess work and

The

rings

warm

water.

a

little

Make a solution of warm water and add

twice daily to the aquarium, con-

tinuing until the water in the aquarium

vide abundant live foods.

over-feeding.

fresh,

sheep manure and

little

may

be of glass,

takes on a darker color.

Chicago Aqua-

rium Society.

One of the latter mamade by pouring it while

cork or paraffin. terial

may

be

hot into a tin-box cover.

remove the centre of the pointed knife.

Surplus

When disc

cool

Guard against

it.

If

lot

of problems solve themselves

if

alone.

with a

food produces

noxious gases and otherwise fouls the water.

A let

you can

A man until

never finds the ideal

he locates one

thing he

tells her.

who

woman

believes every-


}

I

MOSQUITO

OKe

i

I

HERBERT M. HALE,

I

Museum

South Australian

} )

number of Aquatic Life the and pupa of the mosquito were

In the larva

last

organs that the emerging mosquito

The body

male.

now

is

described; the present article deals with

and

the adult insect.

skin; the legs are held

The

active

pupa contains the de-

little

imago or perfect

veloping

the

insect,

head and thorax being enclosed in the larger part, whilst the curved tail is the abdomen. In a short time the mosquito is ready to leave the chrysalis case, and

commence

period of

the final

his-

its life

and are

along the

stiffly

to career over the surface as

iature

and

boat,

mosquito

drawal

in a

min-

gust

may

the with-

frequently completed, but the

is

insect

if

sudden

a

Even when capsized

it.

The

partially enclosed.

still

slightest breeze will cause the

upset

a

supported by the floating pupal

is

sides

is

almost upright

entangled in the surface film

is

tory; the photographs

show the manner change is effected. The

from which

which this mosquito illustrated

Individuals which have thus perished will

Culex fatigans, a

often be seen on the surface of a pond.

in

is

cannot extricate

it

or predaceous aquatic insects

widely distributed species, pictures of the

If

immature stages of which appeared

are present there

in

of

the previous paper.

When dark

fully developed the

in color;

disturbed

if

By now

to dive.

placing

pupa

it

is

it

in a

small

aquarium the completion of the metamorphosis may be admirably observed. Just prior to emergence the pupa unbends

its

floats at the sur-

abdomen and

The

face in a horizontal position.

en-

upwards against

closed mosquito pushes

the skin, which slowly bulges until the portion between the breathing-tubes pro-

trudes above the surface.

This

is

then

burst open and the thorax immediately

appears through the

because the head neath

it

is

slit

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; emerging

bent

in the chrysalis.

first

downwards beThe insect rises

up out of the case with a very steady and regular motion, and excepting for an occasional wriggle of the abdomen, without visible

effort.

In the third picture the

antennae are released,

from the feathery

anrl

it

is

a])ijcarance

apparent f)f

these

is

the additional danger

an attack from below.

The wings

very

is

reluctant

fishes

itself.

The

sheaths.

extracted before the

are

legs are entirely

withdrawn from

front pair

their

freed

is

first

and greater stability is attained by resting them on the surface film, the latter being indented but not pierced by the infinitesimal

pressure

of

these

delicate

members. The middle pair soon follows and finally the ends of the long hind

drawn

legs are

out.

Our mosquito

is

now

free

and after

resting until the wings are dry, in

the

away

usual in

course

cell,

on the side of

examine

events,

search of a mate.

]>risoned in a glass tles

of

it

at leisure.

would flutter

Being im-

however,

it

set-

and we may The head is much

this

smaller proportionately than in the larva,

which the eyes were represented by mere Ijlotches of pigment, whereas each in

now

consists

lenses.

Tinv,

of

a

great

variously

number

CDlored

of

scales


jSlquattc

mu

19

^>5?

The Birth Photographs by the author

clothe

the

giving

insect,

iridescent appearance.

has smaller and

less

turing the skin.

equipped,

is

of a

a beautiful

ornate antennae than

and

is

provided

set of lancets for

The

punc-

male, not being so

comparatively

inoffensive,

feeding on plant and other juices as does the

common house

fly; in a

both sexes are said to the

female only

is

the

bite,

few

species

but usually

offender.

Mosquito

Enlarged three and one- half diameters

The female which

the male, sucks blood,

with a sheathed

it

:

The

peculiar Ijuzzing note of the female at-

tracts the male, he being enal^led to rec-

ognize her tions

call

by means of the vibra-

the hairs on his plumose an-

of

recorders

of

tennae,

these

sound.

After impregnation the eggs are

acting

as

deposited on the water, often in several

To

batches.

accomplish this the female steadying

stands

on the

herself

by grasping with the fore legs

some

floating

weed. fastened

As

the

surface

particle

film,

such

as

duck-

eggs are laid they are

together

with

a

waterproof


â&#x20AC;˘aqufttic

20

mu Luciocephalus pulcher

and arranged in a boat-shaped mass with the aid of the hind legs her secretion

C. J.

;

now

duty being

she soon dies.

fulfilled

Each egg has a trap-door arrangement at the bottom, through which the wriggler drops out into the water

little

thus again commences the

cycle of

life

ditches,

found that peculiar laby-

is

rinth fish, Luciocephalus pulcher.

translated

ally

Goldfish Foods

compounded but

color

is

pretty

does re-

it

fish.

attractive reddish-

band bordered

lateral

should contain

it

sort of a binder, chicken

agar agar, to prevent

The general

brown, with a dark

Liter-

name means

the

semble that voracious game

(Concluded from page 14.) and fats being carefully removed. The resultant food should not only be prop-

some

and

Sumatra,

of

swamp waters

six to ten miles inland, in

pike-head, and in appearance

the insect.

erly

HEEDE

Along the eastern coast

egg or

dissolving or

it

breaking up and polluting the water.

To

secure a food as a substitute for

larv'al

mosquitoes, this insect was ana-

lysed by a chemist. tion

it

was

With this informamake a mixture

possible to

the elements of which approximate those of the mosquito,

viz.,

two

wheat

pints of

flour boiled like mash, one chicken egg,

one and one-half scruples of sugar and

Luciocephalus pulcher

one-fifth of a pint of lean, boiled pork.

long time.

Food mixtures, ])ared,

will

if

regardless of

labyrinth fishes the coloration

vary considerably.

how

pre-

used without discrimina-

For

this

reason

may

dishes, very shallow,

and about eighteen

The

inches in diameter.

Into

dippers.

the

For

foods larval

are fish

with

placed the ])ans

are

suspended about two inches below the surface of

the

water,

grown young and

while

for

adults the depth

which

individ-

to

is

its

breeding

be lacking, though an

unlikely.

it

It

is

is

live-bear-

known

to

from a number of specitaken to Europe in 1905, whic*

business succeeds only as

it

::iens

did not lono- survive.

About are

may

serves.

si.x

found

in

hundred species of the

ri\'ers

fishes

of the United

States.

well-

be five inches. .\

seems

opinion has been held that ing,

dishes are sus-

by three strong strings

these

grown

aquarists only

from poles thrust into the banks of the pond, and extend about two feet from the shore. pended

Full

apt to

is

reach a length of four inches.

Authentic information on habits

Japanese breeders invariably use feeding pans. These are unglazed porcelain

abdomen light As with other

;

gray, with a tint of rose.

uals

tion, pollute the water.

and white

black

Avith

These ingredients are thoroughly mixed and then dried, keeping perfectly for a

'I'hc

C/reeks played an in.strument called

instrument

a lyre.

'I'hc

now

a nioutli-organ.

it's

poon.

still

is /

used.

lan'ard

l)Ut

Lam-


Maintaining an Aquarium MAX TRELL

Too many people rium

a divine gift bestowed upon a

is

much

lucky minority as

the

in the

give

easy,

so

is

required

am

httle

in fact, so nearly take care of

;

themselves, as the aquarium.

ticeship

the

Fortunately they are wrong.

things are so

trouble

same fashion

poetry and

music,

of

gift

other arts.

Few

are inclined to be-

maintenance of an aqua-

lieve that the

is

All that

ready to

guarantee

interest.

given

that,

I -

a

person with a willingness to learn and (provided he

in the subject

neither immature in intellect or years), will put

many

him

in a position to

finny pets as he has

in a shorter

supply oxygen to the air-breathing ani-

mals

is I

keep alive as

room

for,

and

time than he perhaps thinks

possible.

aquarium would be devoid of

how many

matter

my

Aquarium, from

pen, immediately

dishes, jars,

flat

army

contrivances and a vast receptacles

that

are

hanging of glass torture

veritable

chambers for the inhabitants. The normal is a rectangular box from a foot to

affair

fishes

interest

no

contained.

it

Fishes at the surface sign.

is

It signifies that either

an ominous the water

is

dank and foul or that the amount of oxygen in the water is insufficient to support the animal

life

contained therein.

The fishes may do one of two things. They may remain at the bottom and drown or swim at the top and live a few days longer. factors

excludes bowls,

and the second is to Without plants the

in the water,

beautify the tank.

a short, enjoyable appren-

and a great deal of

an interest

The quantity of plants needed will depend both on the size of the aquarium and the species of the plants. The plants have a two-fold use. The first is to

Unless other conditions are found at the top

they will be

taking advantage of the oxygen absorbed

by the water from the in

the case of

air.

The remedv

foul water

is a speedv change, and in the second, the installa-

more oxygen-giving plants or the removal of some of the fishes to another

tion of

sixty inches long, with a depth of not

tank.

more than twenty inches

tracted period of dull days, reduces the

bottom

the

in the largest

preferably

of

Excessively hot weather, or a pro-

is

and brings the But even this is an indication of too many fishes, and refutes that ill-chosen term "balanced aquarium." No aquarium is balanced.

walking into unnecessary danger to buy

Either the plants are giving off more

size,

slate,

though glass may be used in small sizes. Aquaria are occasionally manufactured with metal bottoms.

been so treated as

Unless these have

to be rust-proof,

it

them.

A bles

of

or

sand

should,

thorough

after

quantity of water-plants

dealer can

supply)

placed

(

which any

in

position.

the

plants

fishes to the surface.

oxygen than

two-inch layer of small, white peb-

washing, be spread over the bottom and a

activity

is

actually being

the excess being given

phere, or there

and the agonv.

fishes

is

oft'

consumed,

into the atmos-

an insufficient supply

are

at

surface

the

The proper term

is

in

"self-sus-

taining aquarium," the plants being suf-


jaquatlc JLitt

22 ficient in

number

and under than

is

all

to liberate at all times

conditions

more oxygen

at

odd

effects

place

and tunnels in the tank. fairy ridiculous, save perhaps more Nothing is celluloid ducks, geese and alligators castles

Space, even in the largest of tanks,

is

never excessive and should not be delibTo do so merely for erately wasted. the transient pleasure of

squeeze through a is

seeing a fish

window and emerge

as lamentable as

it

is

laughable.

An

important consideration

is

the loca-

No one would think tion of the tank. of keeping a rubber-plant or a geranium in a is

A

dark corner.

place in the sunlight

do not confuse sunhght

necessary;

with sunshine.

nothing short of idiocy to place

is

many

Water

plants will inva-

stocked tank. indefinitely in

they are fed once a day and kept

size if

out

an aquarium. A single work havoc in an overThree or four fish will live an aquarium of adequate

fishes in

hot day will

needed.

Novices aiming

from the roof

It

too

reach

of

of

who

like to see the fish eat.

Many

kinds of fish-foods are on the

Dried shrimp, ground to the

market.

is a good winter food. In and summer small earthworms, white worms, mosquito larvae and daphne are not to be excelled. The

proper

size,

the

spring

fish

should be fed sparingly, especially

when using bit

lodges on the bottom unnoticed

More

to stop.

if

oxygen is liberated for the But while it is absolutely necessary that they have light, on the other hand too much light will have another

The

fishes.

consequence.

everyone

Doubtless

has

seen the green slime peculiar to swamps and pools, commonly mis-termed malaria water.

A

similar condition will soon pre-

vail in the

aquarium

if

it

is

allowed to

stand in the direct rays of the sun. This algae, is caused by an excessive growth of

So well do they thrive with warmth and sunshine that in a few weeks they may dominate the tank, covering and choking the higher l>lants. in some instances even rendering

is

ficult.

])lied

the

the ]jart of the fishes dif-

A

large sheet of tissue paper apto the side of the aquarium nearest

window

serves to prevent such an

excessive growth. l)oth of

Snails

and tadpoles,

which feed on algae, may well be

introduced.

it is

time

least

the white rice- wafer so

desirable food

commonly

sold.

fishes should preferably be fed in the

morning. tank

the

If

holds

more

than

ten

gallons the water need never be changed.

The water

will

evaporate, however,

so

same temperature should be added from time to time to With small keep the level constant. tanks half the water should be removed by syphoning at intervals of two months and refilled with fresh water. water of the

fresh

The

a group of one-celled plants.

movement on

as a

added will only remain decompose. It may be

on the bottom to mentioned that the

the needed

As soon

dried foods.

of food travels through the water and

and decay unless they are given sufficient light to perform the process of photosynthesis, in which riably cease to function

boys with

inquisitive

long fingers and kind-hearted neighbors

selection of fishes rests with the

owner.

My

advice

is

to start with hardy,

inexpensive fishes, such as those brought

from our southern in

States,

or captured

Later, with increased

nearby ponds.

knowledge, the more expensive exotics

may

be

acquired.

]jerish at the

reason, and

it

Fishes

are

apt

to

beginning for no apparent is

less

discouraging to lose

a native fish easily replaced than costly tro])ical one.

it

is

a

liut in a short while,


aquatic if

23

JLitt

budding aquarist does not become

the

discouraged, dead fishes will be the excepInterest

tion.

eclectic

and

then become more

will

tropical as well as cold-water

and enjoyed. No and how let the motto be

species will be studied

how burning

matter

the

catholic

taste,

the desire

"Quality always before quantity."

An Easily

Constructed

Heated Aquarium H. E. FINCKH was mid-winter and my ten

It

perma-

nent heated tanks were fully populated.

The unexpected exotic

fine

arrival

of

some

forty

made necessary

fishes

the

immediate construction of some sort of heated accommodations.

My

eye rested

on an empty, rectangular kerosense can,

and within two hours the problem was solved.

The kerosene can

I

thus making

flange on

all

sides

an inch wide.

From

one-inch lumber a frame was constructed of such length and width that the flange it was tacked Through one side of frame an opening was cut to permit

rested on the top, to which to prevent slipping.

the

the placing of a

On

cut in two, length-

two deep trays of equal size. The edges of the trays were bent outward at right angles, forming a wise,

being provided by several holes

drilled

through the opposite

at

.

morning following the making

my

den stood

50 degrees, whereas the water in the

aquarium was just 70. This box, and another constructed since, have now been in operation for more than two

all-glass

months, giving such satisfaction that venture the description to aid others

may sometime

be landed

I

who

in a similar pre-

dicament.

Roosevelt Wild Life Forest Experiment Station

The

side.

the

TAyNK

/4EATI/tG

of the heater the glass in

lamp below the pan, ven-

tilation

EMER GE /JCY

A /<

lamp opening was closed by a piece of glass held in place by two studs in such a way that it may be pushed aside when

The known

necessary.

Experiment Station was announced by

The bottom

of the tin tray

ered with a thick piece of lished all-glass

felt,

at Syracuse,

.

The

lamp below placed the

The apparatus

will

be understood by reference to the ap-

pended sketches.

New York

the

an estab-

the tin tray then filled with water insertion of the

authorities on fish life as Ichthy-

ologist at the Roosevelt

was cov-

tank placed thereon, and

heater in operation.

selection of one of America's best

Wild Life Forest

State College of Forestry

when

it

became known that

Prof. T. L. Hankinson had accepted the position.

made

This

is

the

to the technical

since Dr.

Charles C.

first stafil:

appointment of the station

Adams was made

director.

The

selection

is

of particular import-


j^quattc

24 ance, because

marks the continuation

it

by the Roosevelt

work

years

of

station

of

in progress under the supervision

of the college. Professor Hankinson has for five summers been engaged in the study of the fish of Oneida Lake and in the Palisades Interstate Park region, in co-operation with Dr. Adams. The selection of Professor Hankinson for the Roosevelt Wild Life Forest Ex-

periment Station

the beginning of a

is

program of important work. So far the work has been devoted to fish, owing to limited funds, but now will be extended to big game, game birds, furbearing animals, game vermin and simdefinite

ilar forest

"It

is

significant to

tion at the

in the fish

survey for the College of For-

now comes as the member of the technical estry,

Roosevelt Station.

It

is

know

that the Roose-

New York

Forestry at Syracuse

Sta-

State College of is

the direct out-

full-time

first

of

stafif

now

the

actually

under way. ''Such a station

is

unique, as no other

similar station or institution exist.

opens up a vast

It

known

is

to

for the

field

As a memorial to Theodore Roosevelt the plan has already received hearty support from many leading naturalists and sportsmen. naturalist."

'field

"The

There

out.

can only

field is so large that I

work

give typical phases of the

made an exhaustive hoped, be

made one

This

will,

it is

of the specialties of

fur-bearing animals to subject

study of a

scientific

the Roosevelt Station.

another

as laid

has, for instance, never been

trout stream in America.

problems.

Wild Life Forest Experiment

velt

%iU

The relation game vermin

demanding

of is

detailed

growth of plans, presented to Mr. Roosevelt in December, 1916, for the study of

study.

the natural history of forest wild

ence such as can only be built up by

He

life.

greeted the suggestions with instant

enthusiastic

approval,

and

urged

that "

"Upon

a foundation of fact

of wild life

made by Dr. Charles C. Adams. Director of the Station, when before the New York Fish, Game and Forest League

wild

for the

first

time the

life

modern social when this manner that forest wild

station said,

is

"but

well under way.

the

New York

new in name," its work is already

For

the last five years

State College of Forestry

has been making a study of the fish life of the State, giving special attention to the Oneida

Lake and

to

the

Palisades

This survey work is in the main to be continued by the Roosevelt Station and Professor T. L. HankInterstate Park.

inson, wlif) lias l)cen associated with nie

policies for

the texture

be intel-

life will

and sympathetically appreciated and can be used by man to the best advantage.

"The

as

only

way.

Adams

his-

up such

to build

management or will fit them into

of

ligently

Dr.

life

and economic life. It is done in a scientific

development of the staalready well under work of the and tion

latest plans for

we may hope

principles of

is

infer-

physiology, disease and heredity

they should be taken up 'in a big way.' This was the preliminary explanation

convention he told

on the ecology,

investigations tories,

and

life

This

is

in fact the largest

wild

problem."

The man

in jail doesn't

have

to

dodge

automobiles.

"Oh, Oswald is my darling boy," sang the maiden before the row then she saw him with another and she isn't singing now. Which reminds us that we have ;

never

you

?

seen

a

jealous

goldfish.

Have


OOOCXX3Cr300OCr300O(

JOOOC

)000(

3000(

KXXy

1000<

»000<=3CXXXXX?[

Des Plaines Fish Farm 867

N. Dearborn Street

(Hatchery

Chicago, Illinois

Des

at

Plaines,

111.)

Importers and Breeders of Gold and Tropical Fishes. Orders should be placed for the following fishes to be shipped after May 15th, when weather conditions will permit safe transportation:

now

Fundulus chrysotus "

(mottled

"

per pair, $2.00

— very

rare)

" " "

" " " " "

Fundulus goodei Cyprinodon variegatus Orysias latipes (Medaka) Heterandria formosa Xiphophorus helleri (young) Macropodus viridi-auratus (young)

" " " " " "

" " " "

Gambusia holbrooki Jordanella floridae Platyposcilus pulchra

4.00 2.00 2.00 .50 .50

i.oo 1.00 .75

2 00 per pair, $1.00 to 2.00

NATURE'S FISHFOOD For Tropical Fishes

For Goldfish

A

good food

For Native Fish

absolutely necessary if one would keep his fishes in good conNature's Fish Food is the result of years of study and experiment. If dition. your dealer does not have it we will gladly send you a sample package for 20 is

cents.

Orders for

amounting

fishes

to less than $5.00

cannot be

filled,

Shipping

cans cost 35 to 50 cents extra. 000000 C=3000C

30ooczr)OOCcrDoocc

looccrzjoooc

February. Polycentropsis

aquatic Life

abbreviata(5;-i";;d)

;

Chologaster cornutus, the Fish of the Dismal

Swamp (Welsh);

1918—1919-1920

kington)

October.

Aquarium

Hemiramphus

Heating

(Breder)

;

(Brind) Mollienisia Blue-tailed Skink (Deck-

fluviatilis

;

latipinna (Heede) er t) Factors Controlling the ;

Development of (Webber) Snails

;

Aquarium Fishes

Tropical in

Aquaria (Gale)

Pipe-fish, notes,

;

Aquarium

(Pil-

malabaricus (Leitholf) Notes on Native Fishes (Pray) Managing the Aquarium (Innes) Reactions of Fishes to Habit-forming Drugs, The Boston Show, A True Fish Story, notes and news. ;

;

;

;

Habits of Black Bass,

The

March. Breeding the Goldfish (Hanna) Observations on the Chelonians of North America, Part I (Shufeldt) Lucania ommata ;

etc.

November. American Live-bearing Tooth(Bade) Aquarium Notes (Leitholf) Notes on Krefiftius adspersus (Freund) The Anatomy of the Fish (Clark) Breeding Habits

carps

A Wood

Danio

;

;

;

;

(Welsh)

The

Apistogramma agassizi (Heede) Water-fleas (Tompkins) Viviparous ;

;

;

;

;

A

of Burmese Eel (Finckli) Bloated Axolotl (PVaite) The Name "Water Flea," notes and ;

Fishes-in-general (Stead) Striped Gourami (Simpson)

Breeding the Notes and news.

;

;

;

news.

April,. The Surinam Toad (Deckert) Cichlasoma nigrofasciatum (Brind) Keeping (Innes) Beware the Living Food Alive Dragonfly (Gordon) An Electrohi:ic Aerator (Putnam) Water Lilies, Some Cultural and Historical Notes (Pring) Beef vs. Liver, notes and news. ;

December.

Cynolebias bellottii (Brind) Tillaea recurva and Other Notes (Finckh) Another Tank Heater (Kiihn) Aquarist vs. Aquarian (Mellen) Emotions of Fishes (Gale); A Cigar Box Aquarium (Modesto) Florida Notes (Carlton) Photosynthesis, Miscellaneous notes, news, etc. ;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

;

Nanostomus eques (Brind) The May. Water Horse-tail (Wobler) Observations on ;

January, holf)

;

1919. Limia caudofasciata Classification of Fishes (Stead)

Changes of the Chub-sucker (Hiibbs)

;

(Leit-

Color Neetro;

(Brind) A Simple Heated i^quarium (Finckh) Notes on the Breeding Habits of the Pigmy Sunfish (Poyser) Goldfish Farm of Kichigoro Akiyama, notes and news.

pliis

carpintis

;

;

;

;

Clielnnians of North .\merica. Part IT. 1 Became a Fancier (Proctor) (Shufeldt) A Peculiar Planorbis (Breder) Association and Color Discrimination in Mudminnows and (JVhite) The Hay Infusion Sticklebacks The Bladderworts. Microcosm (Woodruff) notes and news.

the

;

;

;

;

;


on

Observations

June.

North America, Part

Chelonians of {Shufeldt); Gam-

the

III

The Wheel Animal-

Wear a Handsome Solid Gold

cules {Bade); Sonnet to a Goldfish (Biirditt) ; Stud}^ of the Diamond Bass (Trell) ; The

Pin of Your Favorite Fish

{Brind)

busia episcopi

;

A

{Barker); Goldfish in China, Red-colored Water, Crappie Spawn in Washington Aquarium, and Society News.

Brook 'Stickleback

A

Big-headed Gurnard {Fowler) The July. Nesting Habits of Certain Sunfishes as Observed in a Park Lagoon in Chicago {Hubbs) Badis badis {Brind) The Paradise Fish {BalThe Garden a Terrarium {Brcder) Icisen) Elevator, Fish Aquarium, Philadelphia Akiyama Goldfish Farm, notes and news. ;

;

Copyright.

1919,

Supply

Stil-B-Nu

Co.

I

;

;

;

A

August. Observations on the Chelonians of The North America, Part IV {Shufeldt) Steinhart Aquarium, with portrait of Ignatz Steinhart; Lebias sophise {Brind) The Senses Marine Aquaria, An of Fishes {Hcrrick) Epidemic Among Fishes, Manufacture of ;

;

;

Pearl Buttons,

We

have produced a beautiful scarfpin and watch-fob for the gentlemen, and a brooch for ladies. These fishes are made of solid gold, An odd and are of excellent workmanship. and attractive piece of jewelry now being worn by many aquarists. Your choice of Telescope, Same size as illustrations. Lionhead or Sealare. Prices, Including' War Tax: Sealare,

Telescope, with

We

are in favorite pet.

maculatus Platypoecilus September. Observations on the Chelonians of {Brind) North America, Part V (Shufeldt) Notes on the Life-history of Planorbis corneus and Other Freshwater Mollusks {Webster) PhilAquarium, Naples Exhibition, adelphia Aquaria in the Conservatory of the Missouri Botanical Garden, Xiphophorus montezumae, Freshwater Shrimp, notes and news. ;

;

;

January, 1920. Betta rubra {Hccde) Observations on the Chelonians of North Amer;

Beef Heart and Part VI {Shufeldt) Beef Liver for Young Fishes; Notes on MosLucania ommata (exquito Larvae (Hale) Habits of Fundulus nottii tension of range) and Heterandria f ormosa Linseed meal cause of disease among trout; South Australian Aquarium Society, Passaic Aquarium Society, the Redfield Theory, etc. ica,

;

;

;

a

diamond

$7.75, postpaid. eye, $9.25, postpaid.

position to supply pins of your Price quoted on application.

Choice Diet for Your Fish

Stil-B-Nu Fishfood is a scientifically prepared food, containing the most nutritious ingredients; a proved and tested food for all aquarium fishes, A trial, and your food problem is solved. Coarse

and

We

fine.

!

I t J

\ 1 i

I

Lionhead, $7.25, postpaid, Telescope, with ruby eye,

A

etc.

postpaid.

$7.25,

I

recommend

Tropicals.

for

fine

\ i l

I i

( »

J i

j [

Price 20c. hex; 3 boxes 50c., postpaid.

1

This food contains Stil-B-Nu Dried Shrimp. nothing but shrimp, which is dried and properly prepai-ed to make a choice morsel for all kinds Coarse or fine. of fishes. We recommend fine for Tropicals. Price 20c, box; 3 boxes 50c.,

\ I

postpaid.

; i I i

Stil-B-Nu Infusoria Culture is essential to the aquarists who desire to raise Gold and Tropical fishes. This culture is a result-iiroducer. Full directions with each box. Price 50c., postpaid.

—a treatment

Remedy

Stil-B-Nu Fish bination for tlie

non-poisonous comof fungus, tail-rot, etc., of tropical and fancy goldfishes. Don't fail to have a box or two on hand for the first sign of trouble. Full directions in each box. Price: 6 tablets in a box, 25c., postpaid,

j

f j

^

I

' j { j

f

;

Aquarium

Specialty

Co

Stil-B-Nu Aguarium Salts will toward keeping your fishes in replacing the lime and salts sorlied by the fishes and snails, in a box, 2£c., postpaid.

Dpar Mr. Taubles: P.ecause we were unavoidably swallow all kinds of substitute

Made

3%

City.

compelled fishfoods

to

for

the past three years, our health and happiness were sore!y impaired. We owe you our undying gratitude for feeding us again on our old favorite:

Dried

Flies

and

Insects

whcrcliy we firel assured of fully recuperating. Our flabby skins are already starting to round out, and our apiietites are really wonderful.

Your

TOOK Wliy not earn

own

a

B'ISII

similar testimonial

W. M. from your

lisliesV

ll>i-.

iji-r

ounce.

.S].2.">

Aquarium 411

per

poiirjd,

Specialty

iJostpaid.

Co

a

:

Stil-B-Nu Square Nets, 55c., postpaid. \

414 East Tremont ave..

New York

long way good health b.v * they are abPrice 6 tablets

go

IS

sizes,

inches.

made

exce'-

1

[

miteiial

bi.iss to tin

two 5

ferule tip are mule Miu.ire slmpe, allowing easy access loineis A real net.

mauul.K luK d by

lent

in

and

us,

and

is

of

The frame and

Stil-B-Nu Aquarium Scrapers something entirely Hetter order one today and avoid placing new. the hand In the aquarium when you clean it. Price 35c., postpaid.

Easy-Reading'

made

cially

accuralc

and

Thermometers,

Aquarium for tell

us. at a

Tliese

g'ance

espeinsti'nmcnts iirc the tcniiicratiu'c

No a<niariuni is <-onip'cte witliy(]nr water. Price $1.00, postpaid. out a therninnicter. of

good magiiifyiMg .\ ofien needed by the a(|uarist. especially collecting insects and raising iufuscjri.'i. A\'e have an excellent glass, priced very reasonably at $1.75, postpaid.

Pocket glass wlien

Magnifying Glass.

is

Get our prices on Go'd and Tropical Fishes. Plants, Aquariums, Anuarium Stands, Snai's, Castles, Bcoks and Japanese Art Novelties.

1

1

t I i

i j f j ( j I

J I

j f

I s

I

Kast Trcnjont ave.,

STIL-B-NU SUPPLY CO

\

-New York (Mty.

427 East Girard Avenue

]

Philadelphia


Fred. G. Schaefer Breeder of Fancy Goldfish Show

stock

of

scopes always on hand. fishes

f

All species of tropical

]

Wholesale and

and plants.

retail.

Several thousand Young Broadtail Telescopes

and Black Tele-

Calico

Veiltail

1

]

Eight Pairs of Fine, Large Pterophyllum Scalare Cheap.

and Japs in all the desirable colors, with deep bodies and from two to four inches long. Per dozen, $10 and up.

Gneiding's Goldfish Hatchery

1610 North Sec6nd

Street

Ridgefield Park

Philadelphia

:

:

New

Jersey

Phone, Hackensack 2.599W

AQUARIUMS We able

make durable, artistic aquariums suitfor home or conservatory; beautiful

Fishes, plants, foods and Cabomba, large, supplies for the aquarist. strong and healthy, $5.00 per hundred bunches

wherever placed.

Please

all

none better. Pioneer Aquarium Works.

HENRY

Mention

Wisconsin

Racine.

i^quattc JLife When

KISSEL, JR.

Breeder & Fancier of Broadtail Telescopes Tropical Fishes,

Plants and

Snails.

Ad"v)ertisers

Telephone 461 Cliffside

Fishes, Plants, etc.. Sold at Conservatory

241 Walker Street, Cliffside, N.

Fine

Writing

J.

Telescopes CALICO

Broad-tail

BLACK

and

SCRIMSHAW'S FISH HATCHERY

Correspondence Solicited

GEORGE WILT,

62d

15 19 N.

Street,

PHILADELPHIA

1431 N. Clark

Street, Chicago,

Telephone,

The Original Enchytraeid Breeder Feed your fishes white worms, which can be raised indoOrs throughout the year. Generous portion, 60 cents, raising them.

with

CHARLES 230 5th

full

E.

Street

instructions

Hill,

Importer and

111.

4415.

Delivery.

Breeder

of a Large

Variety of Gold and Tropical Fishes

JENNE

Union

for

Auto

Superior

N.

J. Non-liardening aquarium cement that contains Complete line of aquariums no oil or glycerine. liept in stocli;

D

n Color Cannot Be Beat

how Their

i i

m

general I

Quality in Finnage

ee

Them

at C. C.

5109 Catherine Street

will

class

ave Blues, Blacks and Calicos very Fancier Should Look

special sizes

made

to order.

Large stock of tropical fishes always on hand (.36 Shipments made to all parts of the species). Plants, snails and United States and Canada.

or Excellent Conformation

supplies

for

the

aquarist.

pay cash for your surplus

fishes,

if

first-

stock.

Kennels. Bogs cages and bird-houses. bought and sold on commission. Talking parrots, warbling canaries, etc. Can furnish any sort of What do you want? live stock. Rirds,

Them Over

VOWINKEL Out-of-Town Customers name :

Philadelphia,

Pa

Ordering.

County

When


0(=i^

3CXXDC

OOOOOOOOOCXX3CX>OOOOOOOOOOCXX3000<

GOLDFISH

AQUATIC MICROSCOPY BY DR. ALFRED SPLENDID, not

[|f«|

C.

STOKES

too technical

hand

1,500,000

§

organisms for the who dislikes to be

FANCY

PLAIN &

all book

of the lower

fi

inquiring

aquarist

8 9 Q

Ready for market at rock-bottom prices. pad anywhere in United States or Canada.

o

Oriental GoldfisK and Supplj)

I

324

nonplused by scientific verbiage. pages, with 198 illustrations. $2.50 Plus Postage on 2 Pounds

for our

3757

Q

Address Aquatic Life

-

ShipAVrite

catalogue.

illustrated

Co

3761 Cottage GroOe Avenue

n

Chicago,

Illinois

80C=30OOOOOOOO0CX>O(3OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOC)O e

If

TROPICALS

Your Fish Are Not Doing Well— Try

ENCHYTRAEIDS -White Worms

or send for it by mail. Yogi 15c box. Yogi 75c Pound

goldfishes, barring Package, oOc. (cash or check), with innone. structions for raising a constant supply.

The natural and best food for

-

Brind's

New Book

-

Robert Sticansta

$1.50

At

$3.00— has paid for itself, so you get the This work shows Fish, Plants, etc., in natural colors and half-tone.

benefit.

Phila. .

Pa

Aquarium Cement

name implies, it sticks and put. Has the adhesiveness

its is

stays

where

SCRIMSHAW

13S Fish Tropical, Gold and Domestic; 21 Plants and 40 Insects, Parasites, Infusoria, etc.

Illustrates

Order Direct TO-DAY as only a limited number of copies

BRIND, 449 W. 206th NEW YORK

rm

Sctaaeffer

of glue and Contains no oil, lead the pliancy of rubber. or glycerine, and does not harden or corrade S. A. with age. 1431 N. Clark Street, Chicago, Illinois. it

Was

L.

J.

1818 Frankford Avenue

**The Practical Fish Fancier"

W.

By mail 17c Postage 50c Postpaid

Add

Magic (Infusoria)

PAUL MARQUARDT, 829 Teutonia Avenue, Milwaukee, Wis

$1.50

GOLDFISH

vs.

quality of a fishfood is proven when the majority of leading breeders use it: thats YOGI. Ask your dealer or druggist

The

Sale or Exchange Surplus Stock of Rare and Fancy Fish

left

Plants of All Kinds

Street

G.

Germann, 0. D. 3823 N. Richmond

Phone: Monticello

St.

Chicago

6864.

lOfW-

1 MoUienisia latipinna (or velifera) Some

scientists assert that Velifera is but a perfectly developed latipinna

Per dozen, .?4.()0. Cyprinodon variegatus (Sheepshead Minnow), $.3.00 per dozen. Xotropis inetallicus, Fundnlus heteroclitus, Gambusia holbrooki, Goldfish

— the

only sort

we

ship.

all

varieties.

(Spotted Goldfish), $4.<»0 per dozen. .ruiiinips.^ Snails, .$2.00 and .$2..50 per dozen. I'lants. Vallisneria (narrow leaf), 30 cents per dozen; Vallisneria (wide leaf), fiO cents per dozen; Sagittaria (broad leaf), 75 cents per dozen; Water Poppy, .$1.00 per dozen; Cabomba. Giant Anacharis, Potomogeton and Myriophyllum spicatum (milfoil), 73 cents per dozen Red, bunches. best time to plant), .^O cents each. Egyiitian liOtus (dormant tubers White and V.-Uow Water Lilies (dormant tubers), 50 cents each; (seeds, 15 cents per package;. -All plants postpaid. Freshwater Shrimp, sun dried, shelled and shredded. The best fish food. Gontains no White Worms (Enother substances. Coarse, medium or line, $1.10 per pound, postiiaid. The chytraeus), j>er portion, 50 cents, with instructions how to breed a continuous supply. best live food. A collection of twelve varieties of aquarium plants, $1.00, postpaid. When remitting for fishes i)lease inclutle 50 cents for s)iipi>lng can. Shiil)niikiiis

CRESCENT FISH FARM, 1624 XH- OC

Mandeville Street,

New

Orleans, La,

—mo

jt


3000C=>OOOC

EVERYTHING IS FISH THAT COMES TO THE NET OF A NATURALIST

Veiltail

Don't paddle in the water with one hand and In other words, be blind with both eyes. "keep your eyes open" for all nature.

U^c

TELESCOPES

Magazine

Our

(15uilie to

Beautiful Breeders

ilJature

Will Help You

Prize

EDWARD

F. BIGELOW, who edited by in the heavens and earth, as well as the waters under the earth. One year, $1.00. Four months' trial, 25c. It

Is

3000C=>300C

Winning Stock

fishes

$12.00 Per Pair

THE AGASSIZ ASSOCIATION 1

Vn

Franklin Barrett

ArcAdiA

]

Sound Beach

Connecticut

—xxoc

J

401

to

417

UU(__>C

Red

Helleri

FISH,

— silver cup

and gold medal. A new fish for aqnarists. The most attractive live-bearing fish. We now have them for sale. first prizes

PLANTS, SNAILS, ETC Wholesale and Retail •uinru

A

stock of Haplochilus

fine

and

Hybrids ^iiulchras rubrastigma. .3.5 other species of fishes.

THE

SILVER

AQUARIUM

New York

N. Y,

city,

(Between 2d and 3d avenues.)

—Minoi—

"

i-

innm

>f

>i

yjs

fo^lJ^?

&

"Goldfish Varieties Tropical Aquarium Fishes", byWm.T.Innes, former President of the Aquarium Society of Phila.; 250 pages, 195

is

235 East llth street,

3000C=>000C

THE BEST BOOK

rubl-as

ON

S.

innr\r-

cameronensis, H.

and

Wyoming Avenue

Philadelphia

Winner' of

:

East

Tells all about the fancy varieties of the Goldfish and nearly 300 tropicals ; how to breed them, etc., etc. For the beginner illustrations.

3000

•boooc

KlOOcf

or the advanced expert.

Goldfishes

A

complete, practical, handsome sent postpaid anywhere for Enlarged edition now ready. $4.00 hoot,

Blacks

Blues

::

and Vari-hues

::

INNES

NIone

& SONS

-

133 N. 12th

St.

-

Phila.,

Pa

for sale at present!

Diatoms

GEORGE

A.

SCHENK

Mount Vernon, M. T.

Strewn slides of diatoms offered in exchange for similar slides, diatonraceous material, or slides of any character.

Editor, Aquatic Life

^oooc ?OOOCXX3CXX?CXX3C:~)<

JOOOOOOOOOCICXJC

FRANCIS K.CHRISTINE JIannfiKturer of "Shield 1.5c. and 20e. a box.

6

Creation

(tlie

Use

9

New

of

Quality" Pishfood, For Tropicals, 25e.

Infusoria), 50c. Box,

Without Sheep Manure.

"AQUARIA FISH" A

practical work on care and breeding of fish the aquarium, greenhouse and outdoor ponds. Finely illustrated. Everyone interested in keeping fish should send Price $1.00. for a copy of this book. in

Tappan's Natural Fish Food. Telescopes

Broadtail

R

icals.

g Q

(idunimies.

All

iittonrted

aquarinm

and 25 varieties of Troprequisites.

Mail orders and

Special

inquil-ies

Dwarf

promptly

paid,

PHILADELPHIA 30CXX300OO0CXD0C

3000QOOCXXDOOOC

Three boxes, post-

25c.

Guinea Pies and Thoroiightired Collie Pups, beautifully marked. Write for prices.

to.

518 BELGRADE STREET

n

F. L. Route

2,

TAPPAN Hopkins, Minn.


HARRY

aquatic ^itt Vol. Ill

::

$2.25 each, postage paid

-Volumes average 165 pages and

as cloth

many

illustrations. Substantial binding, with title page and complete index. (Stock of Volume II is small.) One hundred copies of Volume I, loose or bound. Can use single issues. Address publisher

WANTED:

»

M

>onrvTrii-»rv-ifvS<-ir«

w

«

m

Street, Philadelphia,

Pa

BREEDER AND IMPORTER Rare and Fancy Fish Plants

every variety,

of

Aquarium Supplies

of

all

and

Snails

kinds at

all

times.

MANUFACTURER OF 15c Box

><

Green River Baby Fish Food

JAPANESE GOLDFISH By DR. HUGH M. SMITH

20c Box

A GOOD FISH FOOD

A

guide to the methods of breeding fancy goldfish practiced in Japan. The result of the personal investigations of the author. Ten breeds are illustrated in color, with numerous text cuts; 112 pages. $2.00, plus

Wamock

PETERS

Green River Fish Food

OOOCXXXXX>^=:^^OOOOOOOOOQOOOOO< M

1210 N.

P.

postage on 2 pounds.

Address Aquatic Life

most

one of the

is

necessary to keep fish in good health. After the test of years Green River stands out as the best food on the market. It keeps the fish in good color by promoting a healthy, robust growth. It will not sour ot cloud the water. Ask your dealer or send for it today. things

essential

3<

>000<

)OCOC

^ HERMAN RABENAU,

PERMANENT DISPLAY OF Aquatic Life must be seen

Breeders

Aquarist

Large assortment of Splendid Telescopes and Jap Goldfish at Reasonable Prices

& Terraria

Large Assortment of fine

to be appreciated

LIONHEADS

Welcome

Visitors

Plants and Tropical Fish a Specialty Importations of

New

Shipping Cans 50 cents

Varieties received

HARRY

regularly

1210

lies Myrtle Avenue. Brooklyn, N. Y. Nettr

r=

>ooo<

>oooc

3000C

3CI30I

OCX3CXXX)OOCZ3COO

:30oo<

GOLDRSH, FOODS, PUNTS, DIP NETS Combination Natural Fish Food

-

Sample Box 10c

Japanese Shrimp Fish Food

-

Sample Can 15c

Nippon Goldfish Go T.

-

Baby Fish Food

Sample Box 15c

Glass Feeding Rings

15c, 25c 35c Each

Mai/ Ordtrs Promptly Attended Special Prlceg on Quantity Ca«h With Ordar.

Catalogue

Sent

L'pon

::

IjOt«.

Proprietor.

Importers and Dealers

PLANTS

SNAILS

Dried Shrimp, Birds, Cages and All Supplies

Request.

New York

MURATA,

1919-21 Bush Street, San Francisco, Cal

GOLDFISH

to

AQUARIUM STOCK CO 273 Greenwich Street

PETERS

PHILADELPHIA

BroRdway. z>ocx>c

uuo<

P.

NORTH WARNOCK STREET

City

NEW STOCKS ARE COMING! Price List Sent on Request


Aquatic life 2 1920