Page 1

U.

S.

NATIONAL MUSEUW

7 ^' /

PRICE

10

CENTS

THE

^

AQUARIUM

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FRANKLIN BARRETT 4815

D

Street. Olney, Philadelphia, Pa.

Largest Greenhouses in the World Devoted to the Breeding of Fancy, Chinese and Japanese Goldhsh and Propagation of Aquarium Plants WHOLESALE AND RETAIL

PLANTS

FISHES

CABOMBA MYRIOPHYLLUM

COMMON SCALED

ANACHARIS SAGITTARIA LUDWIGIA VALLISNERIA

SCALELESS

COMET FANTAIL FRINGETAIL TELESCOPES

HORNWORT POTAMOGETON SNOW FLAKE WATER POPPY WATER HYACINTH

CELESTIALS LION'S HEADS SHUBUNKINS

SALVINIA

PARADISE GOLDEN-ORFES GOLDEN-TENCH GAMCUSIA-AFFINIS STICKLE-BACKS

WATER FERN LACE LEAF

WATER LETTUCE UMBRELLA PALMS CYPERUS PAPYRI'S CYPERUS

SNAILS

ALTERNIFOLIUS GRACILIS

COMMON RAMS HORN

LAXUS FOLVA VARIEGATED

POTOMAC

BOS ON KERNS PTERIS FERNS WA lER LILIES I

AFRICAN JAPANESE

Drawing by

H

.

T.

WOLF

Submerged and Semi-Submerged Plants FOR PONDS ON ESTATES

Manufacturer of the Celebrated Rustless corner pieces.

Marbleized

slate

"SUPERIOR" AQUARIUMS

bottoms.

Made

in

galvanized sheet iron, wrought iron

and brass nickel plated.

Manufacturer of the

Celebrated

"AMERJAP" FISH FOOD

Keeps your fish in good condition, keeps your n the purest of materials. For fish only. Eaten by tiie fish with avidity. aquarium pure and sweet and does not injure the plants in the aquarium. Once triel, always used.

Male

We maim

the

fro

ornaments in the country. No rough, sharp edges to injure and every orniment glazed with a smooth and beautiful finish, and in harmonious colorr,

carry the finest line of aquarium fish, b-it

creating an artistic effect in the aquarium.

Globes, Nets, Pebbles, Sand, Foods, Etc. Everything Pertaining to the Aquarium and Pond Send

for Price Lists

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Vam K3) <^KK3> K3


.\


/f=

The Aquarium Volume

FEBRUARY,

I

Number

1913

9

JJ

^= The

The pumps

New York Aquarium.

JOHN TREADWELL NICHOLS, New

York.

the New York Aquarium, THEsouthern extremity of Manhattan at

Island, looking out across the harbor,

was originally built as a fort with walls eight feet thick, and within the narrow compass of these walls it has been to

difficult

piping,

etc.,

arrange the for a big

proper tanks,

pubHc aquarium.

The building has been open

as a

public

aquarium since 1896, and in 1902 came under the management of the New York Zoological

Society.

Since

1902,

Dr.

Charles H. Townsend has been director, and there have been many changes

made, notable improvements in lighting and ventilation, and the introduction of a large storage tank for pure sea water, as the impure, somewhat brackish harbor water, pvimped through a well, was unfit for many of the fishes.

The aquatic animals in the Aquarium shown to the public in several large

a well under the building. run day and night, and there is an emergency pump to connect with either harbor or storage system when one of the regular ones is out of order. Flowing fresh water is from the city's water system, and an air compressor furnishes wherever necessary. aeration extra Supply pipes to the tanks are of vulcanized rubber, and drainage pipes to

the

salt

The tanks

the Aquarium is able to methods of hatchcommercial the show ing certain fishes, as well as the growth

hatcheries,

of their young.

and

planted in various waters. Parsuccess has been obtained in

later

and

Eggs are obtained free, from them

in return the fish raised

ticular

glass-fronted wall tanks, the largest

are about equally divided

between fresh and salt water. The fresh water food and game fish — trout, whitefish, bass, pickerel, m u s k a 1 1 u n g e are Through coalways on exhibition. national fish and state operation with

pools in the floor of the building, the largest thirty-eight feet in diameter,

water reservoir of iron, lead

lined.

are

in

^

hatching whitefish eggs in automatic glass hatching jars and rearing the fry

also a gallery where smaller wall tanks are

them mosquito larvae. feeding Through the top of such a hatching jar,

shown. By means of a steam plant, the water is warmed to satisfy the tropical fishes in winter, or cooled to be right

one, for the two elass tubes enter supply of running water, extends almost to the bottom of the jar, the other, for

the northern species in summer. Under the building is a reservoir for pure sea water which has been brought

outlet,

reaches

below

its

seven and one half feet across. There

is

for

from outside the harbor. This is pumped to the exhibition tanks and thence falls through sand filters back to the reserBrackish water for the large floor pools is pumped from the bay through voir.

by

only

mouth.

a

short

distance

The semi-bouyant

are continually rolled over each other by the current of water, and a circulation in the egg mass is set up, up

eggs

along the outside of the jar and down in Thus each egg comes in center. turn to the top. Any dead eggs, because

the


of their different specific gravity, accumulate above tbe mass and may be taken

with paddles instead

turtles,

which are flapped

of"

feet,

like the wings of a

out in the esÂŤaj)in<i current by pushing As the the oiith't tube down to them.

bird.

fry hatch, they automatically leave the

other creatures large and small are on

jar in the outflow.

show

Of

water

salt

fishes,

more

the

inter-

found near New York have most of them been shown at the Aquarium. The little sea horse, clad in an embossed coat of mail, looking like esting

species

a knight of the chess board, itself

propelling

slowly forward in an erect position

by means of its back fin, and hanging on with a prehensile tail, is commonly found there; also skates and flounders, the former flattened from above downward, the latter from side to side, and both matching the bottom on which they

Large

lie.

which

a

is

sportsmen

in

caught

bass

gigantic

and

south,

the

jewfish

the

sharks,

by

other

species, are kept in the large floor pool.

But of

all

the marine fishes, the most

interesting and beautiful are the bright

colored tropical species brought the coral reefs of Bermuda,

gaudy wrasses and parrot red squirrel

fish,

angel fish with

The

its

bright colors

from

among them

fish,

source of joy to visitors.

such forms as mosquito larvae, as little as though they inhabited the

known

antipodes.

For variety and extensiveness of its the New York Aqviarium

collections,

stands foremost in the world.

hope that quarters,

Let us

expand into larger present cramped ones

will

as its

big-eyed

long streamers,

a veritable

it

do not leave adequate space available for laboratories etc., and thus shut it off from certain fields of usefulness.

The

etc.

reef fishes

Rev. C.

ONE

many-hued flower

not satisfactory, for in fact the

more often monotonous than bright. But the reef supplies them with infinite corners and crannies to dodge around and into, if pursued by larger fishes, and they can therefore flaunt with impunity bright colors which would be suicidal if carried over open stretches of sand.

tones of the coral are

The Aquarium contains many

aquatic

animals which are not fishes. There are always a goodly company of salamanders, turtles, etc., up to the giant sea

Violet in Aquaria. KELLER RUBRECHT, Milwaukee.

does not expect violets to be

classified

the color of the reef, and that the reef is

these the

place within sight of the general public

little

is

Of

most notable which have been shown successfully are young specimens of the valuable Alaskan fur seal and the remarkable sea elephant from Lower California. By contrast, tanks of minute animals, attractively arranged behind large magnifying lenses set in board,

there

garden,

active seals are a constant

big,

the blue and yellow of coral

many

the right seasons.

at

The

have long been the wonder of naturalists. The theory that they harmonize with in itself

Starfishes, variovis species of crabs,

the flower-like sea anemone, and

is

no

with aquatic plants, yet

prettier

and more interesting

plant for the aquarium than

Viola

blanda (possibly Var. pahistriformis), the little Sweet White Violet, found almost every where in damp places in our woods. Last summer we found them growing abundantly under water in a swamp. We took a number of specimens home and planted them in our aquaria where they still thrive. They seem to enjoy their gravel bed under water and form neat little colonies which give the tank an unusually attractive appearance. The plants retain a dark green color rivaling that of the giant Sagittaria. Its identity in the aqviarium will deceive many an expert botanist.


The Mouthbreeders C. J.

HEEDE,

After the female has laid her eggs, the

male

Hidoklyii.

THE

mouthbreeders, Paratilapia multicolor, belong to the fish family called Cichlids. They are found wild in ponds near Alexandria, Egypt, and were first introduced into Europe as an aquarium fish at the beginning of this century. Their size is about two to two and a half inches long. The female is more heavily built than the male in the fore part of the body, especially back of the head, where the breeding bag is located. In this bag first the eggs,

and later, when hatched, the young mouthbreeders are kept. The color of the male of this species is very beautiful, especially at the breeding time. The body,

them, and then the female into her mouth and by moving her jaw as if she were chewing something, constantly keeps fresh water fertilizes

gathers

them

around and between them This takes from fifteen to twenty days, during which period the mother fish will not take any food.

circulating

until they are hatched.

The number of young

varies from ten even more. Like the young of other spawning fishes, their first food The young fish go out to is infusoria. to fifty, or

hunt

this

food,

particularly

at

night-

when frightened, swim back mouth of the parent fish. In a

time, and into the

few days they will be able to care for themselves, and

fins are

the mother fish

marked with yel-

must then be taken out of the

and

tail

low, violet, red,

blue and green,

aquarium,

and the fish

otherwise

looks as though

might attempt to eat her young. time the At when the moth-

adorned

with

precious stones,

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; indeed

it

is

a

living gem. The male

er fish takes the

regular

has

a

red spot

on the anal

the

eggs PARATILAPIA MULTICOLOR Di-awiiii' t'riiiii life liy E- ^- VonNG.

fin;

without this red marking, and otherwise not so well colored. The temperature of the water in the aquarium where mouthbreeders are kept must not be under 65 degrees Fahrenheit, in breeding time 75 degrees. When the female is about to produce her eggs, female

is

as can easily be seen by her enlarged

body and head, the pair build

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

a

their nest

shallow hollow in the sand

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

between the plants at the bottom of the aquarium. The bottom of the aquarium must be covered by about two inches of sand, and no clay or soil should be used, as

otherwise the fishes will

water

muddy

as

she

make

in arranging their

in

mouth,

her the

male must be removed from the aquarium where his mate is confined, otherwise he will disturb her in her work of caring for eggs and young. It is not advisable to let the fishes breed more than twice in a season or it will weaken them, especially the female, on account of the fasting while the eggs are in her mouth. These fishes are generally kept by fanciers, not alone for their beauty of color, but also for their highly interest-

ing breeding habits and their hardiness.

In the aquarium

they should be fed,

the

besides fine aquatics such as Riccia and

nest.

Salvinia, live food as Daphnia, Cyclops,


etc.,

raw, finely scraped meat, finely cut

up worms, or

rich artificial food.

Another mouthbreeder, called Tilapia natalensis, from South Africa, has lately made its appearance in our market, but is

not quite so beautiful

as

the

first

caudal ocellus (shown in cut) distinguishes the male, though it is present in the female, but very indistinct.

With the coming of

spring, the

making

a

bed of

soft

rootlets,

sand or This

mentioned kind, and breeds in exactly the same way. However, it does not need quite so high a water temperature, and can therefore be bred successfully

gravel for reception of the eggs.

without

nest about nine days,

artificial heat.

male

builds the nest, unassisted by the female,

operation, as well as spawning, to take place at night. in eight to

The

fry

is

said

emerge

ten days, remaining in the

attaching themby the adhesive organ on the snout, or lying in the bottom of the nest. The male guards the nest and remains with the young until they have attained a length of about four selves to rootlets

The

Dogfish.

w. A. POYSEH, Ilamnioiid

rambler THEswamp, be

may

Iiidhina,

by river, lake or he on fishing bent,

find the sole survivor of a primitive

family of fishes species of

much

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Aniia calva

interest.

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

inches.

The

a

Like others

DOGFISH, Amia

of frequent occurrence,

it

bears numer-

ous names in different parts of

Here we

find

it

as the bowfin,

its

range.

as the dogfish, elsewhere

grindle,

mudfish, mud-

jack, etc.

Amia

calva is one of the few lungfound in the United States. It comes to the surface to breathe, as can be noted, even when it is young. This species is remarkable for the presence of the cellular air-bladder and other

fishes

ancient characters.

It is

not particularly

dogfish

is

exceedingly voracious

and in the aquarium should be segregat-

calva L.

ed, or kept with fishes is

much

larger.

under any conditions. It two feet. Only very young specimens are desirable. The accompanying illustration is reproduced by permission from The Fishes of Illinois by Forbes and Richardson, to which the writer is indebted for the notes on the breeding habits.

will flourish

attains a length of

It is a

remarkable

fact that

no salmon

attractive either in shape or color, but

inhabit any of the rivers that

has other characteristics, good and bad,

the Indian Ocean.

make it of interest. In color, greenish-brown above, lighter on the

that

fall

into

This widely distributed order of fish is, however, found in all the rivers of Central Asia that flow

and west.

sides,

north

A

tropical

merging into cream on the belly. mingling of the colors gives the fish a mottled appearance. The dorsal fin is marked by two dark olive bands. A

It

not particular as to environment and

The nature

of the

ocean into which the rivers flow, is no doubt the proximate cause of the absence of Salmonidae in the south.


A

Simple Device for Heating the FREDERICK SCHNEIDER,

Dr.

been MUCH schemes evolved has

Brooklyn.

many

and

said to

heat

the

househokl aquarium. I have tried many methods, hut a most simple device planned by a friend in Germany has proven the most successful. Any aquarium may be made a "heated aquarium", provided it has a metal bottom, with but little outlay, and maintained with the

minimum

Cut from a piece of sheet metal,

suitable

a

of attention. zinc,

or any

funnel-shaped

cone

drawing), measuring six inches in

(see

diameter

at

the base, and three inches

The apex

high.

of the cone should be

cut off leaving an opening seven-eighths

of an inch in

diame-

ter.

On

under

As

it.

the small

Aquarium.

would suggest

a heater I

German Bunsen burner

with a blue flame will do. If gas is not convenient an alcohol lamp, or an oil

lamp may be used.

After filling the

tank with water, raise it to the proper height and place the burner under the

middle of the cone. After lighting the burner you will that the cold water enters the

notice

top or middle tube and comes out warm from the side openings. All the heat is

taken up by the water in the cone, and none escapes beyond the circumference, provided, the flame

is

centered under

the cone.

The plants and their roots are in no danser, as no heat will be transmited beyond the

edge of the cone

op-

e X c e

posite sides

and

w

p

t

i

d-

through

b

e-

the

m

a y

called

Bunsen burner

"Kolibri", but any small

water.

and bot-

have used this meth-

tom,

o d

tween

top

C

VI t

of

holes

I

about

same

th

and

diameter as the top as

shown

s a

Of make

in cut.

the same metal

fit

the

^ÂŤ1"hotvx

ter-

Solder the three tubes in the proper places, then put the finished cone in the middle of the aquarium and Cover the ends solder to the bottom.

burner.

tube.

tubes with fine wire gauze to prevent the entrance of fishes or particles of food and dirt. The tank should now be raised high

of the

<

place

the

source

of heat

is

in

required.

I

am

using. If gas

as the source of heat

to

very

than

better

which

Sketch ShowinB Circulation of Water.

minal aperture; and two pipes of the same diameter to fit the side holes, but sufficiently long to extend at least half an inch above the plane of the central

enough

it

is f acto r y, in

the other methods

pipe or tube one and one-quarter inch to

six

find

fact

a

long

t

for months

but

little

is

also

used

attention

The temperature of

aqviaria

one room may be varied by reducing

or increasing the supply of gas to the

"Even without going from our own neighborhood, or withdrawing from spots with which we have been long intimate, much may be learned in adIt is not dition to what we yet know. always the animals that we are most familiar with by name and frequency of occurrence whose history we understand Rev. L. Jenyns. the best".


;

THE AQUARIUM Issued in the Interests of the Study, Care and Breeding of Aquatic Life

pecuniary gain, but to be helpful. Its department, "The Camera," is conducted by enthusiastic camerists, each of whom, as in a camera society, desires to help

Fublislied montlily except July and August at Hammond, Ind., by tlie Aquai'ium Societies of Bi'ooklyn, Ohicaso, New York, Phila-

Boston,

deipliia,

Send

manuscripts, exchanges, books for

all

review,

Minneapolis

Milwaukee,

etc.,

associates

remittances matttr to the Business Manager

Grand

Indiana C. G. B.

SCHENK

You

Milwaukee, Wis.

Ave.,

FLOYD

Chicago,

III.

SCBSCKIPTIONS,

Single Copies,

10c

S.

How

FEBRUARY,

I

EDWARD

F.

No

1913

invited

to

Sub-

cooperate.

to

Construct a Breeding of

Advertising Rates upon Application

Vol.

are

scription; $1.00 a year. Single copy: 10c.

YOUNG

Tbeasurek, 428 W. 66th St.

others.

There is no better remuneration. All income is devoted directly to the interests and improvements of the magazine.

W. A. POYSER

Business Manager,

of benefitting

the satisfaction

llammoiul.

105

and colleagues. Editor, and contributors are paid by

all his associates

direct to tiie Kditor-in-Cliief to the Treasurer; all other

Editor- IN Chief,

"The Guide to Nature", Arcadia, Sound Beach, Connecticut, is a magazine for adults, and has a definite purpose. It is published by an association of students and lovers of nature not for

9

Bigelow, Arcadia,

Sound Beach, Connecticut, desires for the "Nature and Science" Department of the "St. Nicholas" Magazine (New York), photographs of interesting inventions, and of natural objects that

w

H. K.

ITH

Tank

Wood.

LIPPINCOTT, spring

Philadelphia.

approaching,

the

amateur fish breeder naturally turn to the spawning season. Few are fortunate enough to possess greenhouses with cement tanks where this operation may take place, hence it behooves the rest of us to look about for suitable receptacles for our purpose. This generally results in a thoughts

of the

miscellaneous collection of tubs, pots,

photographs of machines or mechanical

pans and jars that lend anything but an artistic touch to the garden and lawn. Too, this motley collection of non-

appliances of interest to the readers of

descript utencils usually excites strenu-

are

novel,

beautiful.

instructive

He

"St. Nicholas".

or

especially

particularly

desires

They may be mounted

or not, of any size and on any kind of

paper.

The only requirements

are that

ous objections from the feminine side of house. The aquarist has enough

the

trouble that cannot be avoided, so

it

is

they shall clearly show something worth

best to side-step this issue by adopting

showing, and be interesting or instructive.

neat and uniform tanks.

Do

not send "snap

shots" of scenery

Cypress lends

itself

admirably to our

that can be equalled for beauty and for

purpose, being a tree whose habitat

general interest in almost any part of

very wet places.

earth. Pay will be at the usual magazine rates, and will vary with the interest and the novelty. A small photograph may be more valuable than a big

the

one.

is

in

This wood resists the action of water far better than others, costing about six inexpensive is — and being a soft cents per board foot wood is easy to work. The construction is exceedingly simple as shown by the


and anyone who is even moderately familiar with tools can make as many tanks as are required. Any size tank may be made, but I find that the sizes considered are most satisfactory, and the lumber cuts to an advantage with but little waste. The large tank measures 30 inches wide, 16 inches high, and 48 inches long. The smaller one 24 inches wide, 9 inches illustration,

and 32 inches long. For the larger which, 1:^ inch lumber is used,

high,

tank

each end of the tank and secured with nuts. This completes the large tank. The smaller one is identical, except that the iron rods and the strip across the middle of the bottom are omitted. This method of construction gives a strong, neat and substantial tank that will last for years.

Painting improves the appearance, but the pores and prevents the neces-

fills

sary evaporation of the water absorbed

by the wood, thus causing decay much

when

dressed,

earlier

Here

I

weather,

is about 1^ inches thick. use a board 16 inches wide, thus

than

if

unless

the tanks

some

be

to

left

be

preventive

avoiding

used.

seams in the sides or ends and but one

chipped into the tank

Para-

fine,

and

t

h o

r-

bot-

oughly ironed

tom. The side

into the pores

in

the

bottom

and

wood

of the

boards,

with

a

hot

though

is

sad-iron

will

the

it

not shown in

prevent

the cut, have

absorption of

been

the water.

rabbet-

should be done once This

depth

ed to

a

of a

quarter

of an inch for

a year.

the reception

tanks

of the

The

structed

ends.

treated

bottom

boards

and

grooved.

All

joints

and as

described

are

tongued

Five c o n-

have been in by the use writer for four years and show no signs

A COMPLETE TANK Drawing by

L.

are painted with white lead just

M. Dorsey,

Jr.

The tank is clamped, and 1^ inch screws inserted through the sides and bottom into the ends. A strip 3 inches wide and as long as the width of the tank is screwed tightly to each end of the bottom, and a similar strip in the middle.

of decay.

Strips of this width are secured in like

Slovenly and careless habits of study will hinder progress exceedingly; and those who in the beginning skip difficulties, or are satisfied with guesses, will

before being put together.

then

set up,

manner

each of the end boards, thus An iron rod one quarter-inch thick, threaded at both ends, is now passed from side to side at to

insuring against warping.

is a great artist, when she is herself to suit her means to her

"Nature left to

Lamartine. It probable that goldfish end".

highly imbreeders will

is

concur.

always be impeded by doubts. Notcutt.


him which

The Aquarium. A

Sfrios of Articles on tlie Const ruction, F.ciuipnit'iit iuul Miiiiitoriance of Aiinaria, iuul llie Breeding of GoUltisli.

will

be

interesting

at least

and worth while.

The

first

important step to consider is we are going to keep

the vessel in which C. G. B.

The

/.

THE

title

SCHENK,

All-glass

Milwiiukee.

Aquarium.

selected for this series of

articles

many

has been used

times

seems to be the most appropriate, 1 have decided to use it again. In these articles my ambition is to help the novice who has never tried to keep fishes in an aquarium, but would like to do so, and the one whose attempts in this direction have not been

before, but as

it

very satistactory.

There are many books available

in

the public libraries on the subject of the

aquarium; and most of them are worthy of careful reading, but the majority of the authors have failed to consider sufficiently the little details which every amateur must learn before he or she will be successful in keeping aquatic pets alive

and in a healthy condition. In

these articles

I

will try to

make

thing as clear and simple as

I

every-

possibly

can, so the beginner can go ahead with

confidence in himself and success in his effijrts.

Before going further

let

me

assure

every reader that there are no secrets to

"hobby." Should you not fully understand what is set forth in these articles you are privileged to use the "Comments and Queries" department of the magazine to your heart's content. This section is for the purpose of answering questions, so don't be backward in sending in your questions on matters you are in doubt about. To those who have passed the infant class in the study of the aquarium, and have graduated with honors, these articles are not written. They are intended for the beginner. However, I hope even the expert may find something "new" to

this

our fishes. This is generally called the Anything that will hold aquarium. water will house live fishes, provided, it is chemically clean. By chemically clean, I mean a vessel that will not throw off poisonous

For

substances.

galvanized pails, pans,

instance,

are not suit-

etc.,

able on account of the galvanized iron

poison which would be Fibre tubs are to your fishes.

throwing fatal

off a

excellent.

The

oblong metal frame with glass sides and ends. The worst that I can at this moment think of is the round glass globe which we see so often in bird stores and every other place where fishes and aquarium best

aquarium

the

is

supplies are sold.

Three types of all-glass aquaria can readily be purchased in the open market. Of these three types, the round shape most commonly seen is the worst; the cylinder shape

shape best of

is

all.

next best; the oblong

Of

the last mentioned

from Germany seem to be the best made. They are usually marked "Made in Germany", blown into the side. If an all-glass aquarium is considered, let me caution you that they are liable to breakage Irom changes in temperaToo, the all-glass oblong tank is ture. kind,

those

imported

expensive in the larger sizes. If such an aquarium is decided upon, be sure to put a pad of one-half to one inch thickness of felt underneath to prevent breakage as much a possible. These pads can be purchased from any one selling the

There are several advertisers in magazine who sell the imported allglass aquaria in all sizes. Price lists can Please be had by writing for them. mention The Aquarium when requesttanks. this

(

ing catalogs or other information.) (I'o l)c continiicfl

)

Tlie next artit-le will consider the \aiinus styles of nietal-franieil acinaiia.


Feeding Goldfish. WM.

A

T.

INNES,

The pears and the

appear.

Philadelphia.

Jr.,

fall

insects

which

into the water are the only foods

of good and kind people are very much worried as to what they should feed goldfish. This

they get during the summer. When they are taken in in October they are in per-

some importance,

Oatmeal, Cream of Wheat, vermicelli, of boiled fish, or any other cereal composed of small grains are good foods exactly as taken from the table. They may also be used uncooked, taking care not to feed heavily. Some of these cereals swell to eight times their dry bulk. We would not want the

really

GREAT number

a subject of

is

but not as important as many imagine it to be. Considerations of how much to feed, and the conditions surrounding the goldfish

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; plants,

surface of water, ly

light, etc.,

more important

to the health of the

inhabitants of the a

rather

large

temperature, air

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; are tremendous-

aquarium.

aqua-terrarium

Having at

my

I naturally get on the aquarium subject with persons of all degrees of ignorance on fish-keeping lore. Scarcely a day passes that someone does not ask "What shall I feed my goldfish?" My stock answer is "Any-

place of business

thing they will eat."

Of

course,

this

answer requires an explanation, but in itself is intended to convey two facts; that the range of acceptable food tor goldfish is very large; that the subject is not of as much importance as supposed. A gentleman who has been a practical aquarist and a leading authority for a quarter of a century told me that he feeds his fish almost anything from the kitchen or table which is not too greasy, including cake! His fish are in large, shallow indoor tanks in which there is a profusion of healthy plant life, and an abundance of water. In a household aquarium of the ordinary type this haphazard method would not do, but nevertheless it is still true that if an aquarium is right, the fish may be fed on anyone or all of a score of foods, particularly

if they are not

Nobody would think

much.

on pears.

goldfish

my goldfish

In

the

when they nibble

at

fish to

dried

which would be acceptable on bill-of-fare.

I

the

fish

until they entirely dis-

white

a goldfish

wafer

Most pet a granular food composed of of ingredients which is better. only of

The

fair value.

food is

stores sell a

number

subject of fish food has been gone

into very carefully

by

a

Several

semi-amateurs.

number of our of them now

market prepared foods composed largely of the dried form of the insects which as living food

is

generally recognized as

the very best of

all

Dried

foods.

fish

ant shredded codfish, rice liver, chopped eggs, dog biscuit, flour, bran meal, and a small quantity

pulverized

roe,

of pulverized the

are some of mixed with the dried

cuttle-bone

ingredients

insects

and entomostraca.

has a certain amount of

of feeding

in

The

usually sold in pet and drug stores

is

summer,

meet the fate of the boy who ate apples and then drank water!

Scraped beef (once a week), bread thoroughly dried and crushed, earthworms, meal worms finely chopped, crushed dog biscuit and water crackers are a few of the easily obtained items

given too

soften sufficiently,

them

soft parts

in

an outdoor concrete pool which is partially shaded by a pear tree. Some of the pears drop in, and

place

fect health.

some

cases

Epsom

The mixture

salt

salts.

added, and

The whole

then cooked, dried and granulated Unless one intends into different sizes. using a large quantity, it pays much better to purchase this kind of food than to make it, and if the aquarium keeper wishes to adopt one kind of food, this is perhaps the best as it contains all the necessary elements.


my own

aquarium

for practically all

in a few minutes.

living Daphniit. a

the last particle of a feeding has dis-

crustacean about the size of a flea, which is found the world over, principally in

appeared within a minute. I will not attempt to give any rules on the frequency of feeding, but it will gauge by

The one best food aquarium fishes is the

still

Articles

ditches.

on

this

delicate

morsel have appeared in The Aquarium during the past year, so I shall not write further on that.

Another inhabitant of

water is the mosquito "wriggler." This is a wonderfully fine goldfish food. After they are large enough to swallow still

them, the young goldfish grow more An rapidly than on anything else. occasional meal is greatly appreciated by the large

fish,

and

to see

them

so rapidly

compensates for the bites one usually gets while collecting them. Among; living foods should be mentioned the freshwater shrimp. These occur in many brooks and springs. I partially

eaten

In

aquarium temperature, which is a more accurate method. When the temperature is between 40 and 50 degrees Fahrenheit, once a week; from 50 to 60, twice weekly; from 60 to 65, every other day; from 65 up, every day. In warm weather I

feed a very small quantity twice daily,

I hestitate to mention it for fear some kind-hearted sinner will overdo

but

the matter.

aquarium

Successful consists

in

management

reproducing as nearly

as

possible, natural conditions. Goldfish in

nature eat a variety of food. Remember, this is still true in the

The

aquarium.

Docile Goldfish.

have never seen them in large quantities, but they are desirable and should be taken whenever opportunity offers. The Germans dry sea-shrimp and use it as

H. G. Parsons, in the course of an able defense of the goldfish as a household pet, says: "The pet goldfish does

the principal part of their foods for

not

fish.

They export

all

large cjuantities of

it

America and other countries where it to smaller sizes and used is reduced It is to be largely as goldfish food.

to

recommended

highly

for this purpose,

and very likely, in a few years, it will be universally used as a part of American composite foods. In winter it is difficult to get suitable forms of living organic food. For several years I have satisfactorily met this

by feeding chopped

difficulty

using the soft parts only.

ping

it

is

slightly

to

milky.

A

oysters,

After chop-

wash the particles prevent making the water

well to

slight milkiness is not object-

soon disappears. Oysters may be fed about once a week, that is often enough. The principal point about feeding is not to feed too much. No more food should be given than will be consumed

ionable.

sit

on the front porch and howl

beat four-of-a-kind.

He

to

does not jvimp

on the kitchen table and cop out a pork chop. He does not pull down the lace curtains or sleep on your best hat. There are several other things wherein the

goldfish

could

The rearing of carp

an alibi." Kansas City Star.

prove

is

a very ancient

on the subject by a Chinese dating from the Third Century.

practice, a treatise

On February

26th, at the meeting of

Aquarium Society, Mr. W. T. Innes, Jr., will give a talk on "Some NewerDevelopments in Aquarium

the Philadelphia

Heating."

It

The widely

very large and numbering about

catfish family is

distributed,

seven hundred species, occuring in freshwater, in all parts of the world, but most abundant in warm climates.

is


.

SOCIETY BULLETINS

Brooklyn Aquarium ^ ^

Society

Tues.

Kt*j;ul;\i- iiict'tiiiu: 4tli ill

rvi'iv

July

tiioiitli

.^

cvcept.Juiie,

President, W. F DkVoe, Box 383, Baldwin, N. Y. Vice President, Du. Rudolph C. Ltenau, 1,S7 Bain bridge St. Local Editor Dr. Frederick Schneider, 64 Grove Street. Correspondins and Rei'ordins Sec'y, .Owen H. Smith, 52 Wall St., New York Treasurer, Harry Roessle, llii Harman St Financial Secretary Theodore P. Fritz, 805 Halsey St. Local Business Manager Owen H. Smith, 702 Fulton Street

\u!i-.;itF:iiicliildBlds 702'l''ult()ii St., ;it 8 P. M. <S;

Fee,

liiitiMtioii

*2.00

Chicago F sh Fanciers' Club i

meetings on

Rearular

Second Wednesday at

tlie

S09-12

<!ity Hall Sciuaie Building, 127-139 Xortli ('larl< St., at 8 30 1'. iM. (in Foui-rli Wed-

nesday where announced. Initiation Fee,

York

q u a Society

r

u

i

m

the the

German- American School, Sherman Ave., .Tersey City, and on the Fourth Friday at the American Museum of History,

77th

St..

and Central Park West.New eacli

month except

July and August.

Dues

Initiation Fee, II

$2

Philadelphia

Aquarium ^

Society

J-

^

ReTular meeiing on the Fourth Wednesday, at 1414 Arch Street Initiation

i

1

l<\^e.

w

$1 00

Annual

a u

k e e

Aquarium Society

^ ^ ^

Regular meetinif on

First

Monday at lO'i Grand Ave. Initiation Fee,$l. Dues, $1.20

Minneapolis

Aquarium Society

.^

J-

J-

Local Business Manager

66th Street

North Avenue

Fred

at residence of

S. Orsinger,

Oakley Blvd.

123 S.

Edw. W. Kfernan, 22 Nassau Place, East Orange, N. J. President Vice 'resident O H. Smith, 23 Jacob Street. New York City Recording Secretary Arthur Osborne. 42 South St.. .lersey City, N. Corresponding Secretary .. Herman Osmer, West New Brighton, Y. Y. TreMsnrcr H. A. Richtberg, 85 South 16th St., East Orange, N.J. Librarian Herma»i Hofhmeister, 165 Webster A v., Jersey City, N. J. Local EditoiJohn Treadwell Nichols. Am. Museum of Nat History Local Business Manager Carl P Ording, 1931 Broadway, New York I

.1

Review of -'The Blatter" by 11 A. RichtAuction of fishes, plants and devices donated by members. Friday, Feb. 28rh. — Review of the 'Wochenschrift" by Richard Dorn Address "How to Classify a Fish" John Treadwell Nichols

Thursday, Feb. 13th. berg.

President Vice President

H. R. Lippincott, Coll in gs wood, N. J. Charles Paxson, 2534 N. 11th Street .Hiram Parker. 224 N. Wilton Street L. M Dorset, Jr 2219 N 19th Street Wm. T. Innes, Jr., 1824 N. Park Ave. L. M. Dorsey, Jr., 2219 N. 19th Street

Treasurer Secretary Local Editor Local Business Manager

Wednesday,

Ftb.

.

26ih.

^

^

^

Initiatioi.Fee.$l An'lDues.iSl

Competition

Single-tail Telescopes

'.....'.

"

W. A. Brye,

3rd.

304

Fifteenth Street

Rev. G. Keller Rubrecht on "Aquarium " Plants

J

.

Secretary

F. L. Tappan, 92 South 7th Street W. Franzen, Curator Museum Pub. Library Robert Rasmussen, 504 Loan & Trust Bldg

Tennant

President

Treasurer

Nymphs,

ages.

"

.

'

Manager'.'.'.'.'..'.'.

Piesident

Secretary

Comets, all

.

Monday, Feb.

Treasurer

for

Fan-tails,

C. G.

Vice President TreasurerSecret :iiy Librarian Local Business

and

B Schenk, 105 Grand Avenue August Grait, 3110 Grand Avenue Geo J. C. Steffen, 9.50 First Street Rev. Paul Roth. 2602 Prairie AvenueAugust W. F'ollworth, 1816 Wright Street

Pi'esident

Boston

Aquarium Society

West

4.57

W. B. Hoffman, Hammond, hid. CARL, Fossetta, 1341 George Street. W. A. Poyser, Hammond, Ind. F. G. Orsinger, 123 S. Oakley Blvd. J.W.Gage, 1225 Glendale, Ave.

Treasurer Librarian Local Editor

Dues. *1.80. Corresponding Meml)ersliip fl.OO Annually

M

428

.

«^

Regular meetings on Second 'iliursday at

S'ork.

Young,

F. S.

Dr. G, A. Preusker,

Wednesday, Feb. 26th, "Auction"

New

A

President Vice President Secietaiy

$1.00 $1 on

Annual Dues

Natural

Tuesday, Feb. 25th:— Annual Election.

»1.tXt

Amiiiiil Dues,

Lee, 18 School

Chas. W. Alden,

Franklin

A.

15

Packard,

Broomfield 5

Perry

St.,

St.,

St.,

Dedham, Mass. Boston. Mass.

Cambridge, Mass.


Aquarium Book

MO

L

W.

Ishani

St.

and Shernian Avenue

C'OXih St.)

NEW VOKK.

Ai|uaii

Wolf's work

Herman T.

"Goldfish Breeds and Other Aquarium Fishes" is

Tells

the standard aiitliority.

all

about

and treats in a pracaquariiim and terrariuni sub-

breedinjr fancy goldfish

way on

tical

all

beautiful

2t0

jects.

$1 2

00

complete

postage prepaid by us, $3.00

The ''Ideal"

& SONS

INNES

only

Price,

illustrations.

Tweirtli Street Corner Cherry. I'liiladelphia.ra

I

A()uarium (Pat. applied for) EXTRA! "K. I). A." A(|uarium Pump, now only $9. (This is the price in Germany). Tliis is :yi\ introductory offer, only made for a siiort lime, after which price will return to S:,'o.oo. (The regular retail price) .irST AKKIVED: Welke'sFi.sh food and Willecke's Ti-opical

Fish food and Piscidin.

NEW

Each

PLANTS! Water Palm

WRITE

12c box, post paid. Trees, Sf.c each.

TODAY!

CATALOG

FitEE

FOIi

I3IATOMB Strewn and Selected Slides

W. A. POYSER,

Hammond. New York

2193 Rroadway,

F. L.

THE

Fancy Fish

of Rare and

Girrdinus

Long-eared Sunfish

Geophagus Gambusia holbrooki

And many

Fish foods, plants and aquaria

others

Pets ot every description

SINGAPORE SNAILS deposit a mass of large coral-red eggs out of the water; the snails drop into the water as they hatch.

A

my new

Importers, Breeders and Dealers in

Japanese Goldfish and Tropical Fish

Platypoecilia maculata

Chanchitos

Send $i.oofor

Terminal Pet Shop

reticulatus

Giiardinus guppyi

iVltxican Swordtail

Paradise Fish

City.

TAPPAN

Dealer and Breeder

Goldfish

little

book, "'AQ^U A Rl A FISH". and breeding of

92 Seventh

the aquarium,

Booth No.

AQUATIC PLANTS

of experience hu.s enaliled

My aim is to make It i)OssiI)le desires in

a

him and

iiic

to

make

life.

The weather or nrinufactured by its members. makins it difficult to ship fish with safety we otter this

Myrtle Ave.

Brooklyn, X. Y.

Near Broadway .\

Ceratopteris thalictroides

&

Menlion

(Water Fern)

one dolhir per dozei;. Not more than twodo/.en plants of one spe<'ies will be sold to one peison.

at ten cents

i)er

plant,

Address: AV.

q u a r i um s

Sagittaria nntans

VaUisneria spiralis

Jobber and Importer

==

month

iid

to obtain the specimctis he first class cdiidil ion.

HERMAN RABENAU \Uy.i

Fish Fanciers Club

utilize Ihis space to ofler for sale or e.xchanse fish, plants, foods, a(|Uarium implement.s etc., reared

assist the stutlent of Natii ic a

for health.v

The Chicago will

Always on Exibition a specialty of all aquatic

Concourse

EACH MONTH

OP

Many years

i8

Prices cheerfully furnished for special size.l aquariums

Minn.

BEST COLLECTION FANCY FISH

and cages

HUDSON TERMINAL BUILDING NEW YORK

lllustrau-d

Street, South, Minneapolis,

Birds, seeds

Burnett's Japanese Fish Food

practical work- on care (ish in

India

543

East

All Accessories

THE AQUARIUM when

H41-h

Watch

t?i.

Street. f; for our ott'erin

writing advertisers.

HII^FERT i

CHU'AGt). ILL n the ne.M issue.


WM.

PAULLIN

L.

Goldfish Hatchery

Water Gardener GROWER OF THE

Finest Water Plants BREEDER OF

Fancy Goldfish and

Jacob C. Cassel 915

Arch

Tropical Fish

Street, Philadelphia, Pa. IMlllluf.lCtUPtM'

(if

Large Aquariums^ Ponds and Small hakes Stocked and Planted

Aquariums Aquarium Ornaments Floral Terra ('otta, etc. Goldfish

and Send

all

Try

for Catalog

and Trade Prices

NoXal Fish Food? why

I

5

Hatchery Fish Food

cents a box, postpaid

aquarium requisites

Have* you tried

If not,

Paullin's

Fish Food

Fish (ilobes

not?

the

It's

food you have

been looi\ing for; it floats; the fish like it and it is good for them it has produced wonderful 11'. results and will do the same tor you; Four sizes 15 cents ptr bottle. ;

TRY

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Manufactured by

THE NATURE SHOP, Importers, Breeders. Dealers of bish, Animals, Birds, ttc.

579

all

W.

Inc.

varieties of Fancy idi St., N. Y. City

425

WOLF STREET, PHILADELPHIA

Greenriver Fish and Baby Fish Food The

best winter food on the

Will develop fine and color; also makes your fish healthy and robust; will act as a laxative and is the best substitute for Daphnia. market. fins

It

contains 17 ingredients, also It will not sour or

Daphnia.

This food is and \ised also by Aquaria; Philadelphia cloud the water.

G.

THIELER DEALER

IN

THIELER'S SONG RESTORER 33

Flatbi

sii

Ut'st in tlie

Avenue,

Market

BROOKLYN,

Tt'leplione Conneotioii

many

New York

breeders in Philadelphia

and other large

Fancy Japanese Gold and Silver Fish Aquaria, Fish Globes, Foods and Plants, Birds and Cages, Bird Seed, Mocking-Bird Food, Etc.

Very

by the

Ask your dealer

HARRY

for

P.

it

cities or send to

PETERS

Warnock Street PHILADELPHIA, PA.

1210 North

IMPORTER AND BREEDER N. Y\ High-grade Telescopes, Scaled or Scaleiess, 25c each up


3963 3 9088 01015

IMPEKVITE

WATERPROOF Cement Tanks with

Ordinary cement contiiins alkali which dissolves tlie water and will injure the fish. IMPEKVITE is an intejjral Waterproofinfr Compound of a bituminous nature, manufactured in Its action is to sea-jrreen, tile-red and other tints. seal up the alkalies of the i-emeiit and also to prev(Mit the water fiom penet ratin.s; it. The accoiTipanyin.iT letter hears testimony to this fact. August 29, 1912 The Stanuahi) F'aint Co, 1(X) William St., New York City Gentlemen:— Dhtainintf unsatisfactory results from Our booklet, "Iiitejiral Waterproofin ill

The Standard Paint Company,

number of preparations for waterproofing cementan architect induced me to try IMI'ERVITE. The results have been ail Ihati-ould be desired and have successfully withstood the test of time. In concrete aquarium and pool <'oiistruction I recommend your product on all occasions. The addition of IMI'ERVITE to the cement at the time it is mi.xed not only renders the pool watertight but also eliminates the dandier of liaviMg chemicals from the fresh cement wash into the watei' and kill the fish. Yours very truly (Signed) Wm. T a

for

100

rresideiitof Aquarium Society Cement Tanks" sent on request

William

Aquarium Specialty Co. 1827-31

WASHINGTON

NEW YORK

St.,

I'TiilatleTphia

<

New York

City

9". .j^//.mct^n^

AVE.

CITY

MAKERS OF THE Rogers

Crystal

Aerator and Filter

LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF Aquaria, Terraria, Vivaria and Aquatic Cages, Mouse and Frog Houses

BREEDERS OF Fringetail Japanese and Chinese Telescopes and of Red, African and Japanese Snails

CULTIVATORS OF

107 Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y.

Natans and Gigantica and of Single-rooted Ludwigia MuUertti

Telephnr'e 3746-R Prp«Pfcf

Sagittaria

•KNlTh'

E. C. Correspondence

solicited

AQUARIA

VAHLE,

A

« R

Write

for Price List

s

of all kinds

Goldfish

Aquaria Tanks Fish Globes Ornaments, Etc.

Auburndale Goldfish Co. (Not Incorpcratedi

N. State Street

CHICAGO, ILL.

^

Aquarium Plants

Imported

Birds, Cages, Seeds, Etc.

114

315 N. Madison St., Chicago

Wliolcsale iuici Retiill Deulor in I I) S A>.i. ]V I ]M r^

SUPPLIES

KAEMPFER'S BIRD STORE

SAID"

920

West Randolph Send

for

St.,

Chicago,

Catalog and Trade Prices

111.

1

The Aquarium 1/9 1913  

The Aquarium 1/9 1913

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