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DIVISION OF FISHES F. NATinNAT, MUSEUM

".

XX

'^d.^

PRICE

10

CENTS

^ THE

AQUARIUM


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FRANKLIN BARRETT 4815

D

Street. Olney, Philadelphia, Pa.

Largest GrcenPiouses in the World Devoted to le Breeding of Fancy, Chinese and Japanese Goldfish and Propagation of Aquarium Plants I

WHOLESALE AND RETAIL

FISHES

PLANTS

COMMON

CABOMBA MYRIOPHYLLUM

SCALED

ANACHARIS

SCALELESS

SAGI'ITARIA

COMET

LUDWIGIA

FANTAIL FRINGETAIL TELESCOPES

VALLISNERIA

HORN WORT POTAMOGETON SNOW FLAKE WATER POPPY WATER HYACINTH

CELESTIALS LION'S HEARS SHUBUNKINS

SALVINIA

PARADISE GOLDEN-ORFES GOLDEN'-TENCH G ^MBUSIA-AFFINIS STICKLE-BACKS

WATER FERN LACE LEAF

WATER LETTUCE UMBRELLA PALMS CYPERUS PAPYRUS CYPERUS ALTERNIFOLIUS

SNAILS

GRACILIS

COMMON RAM S HORN

LAXUS FOLVA VARIEGATED POSION FERNS

POTOMAC AFRICAN JAPANESE

PTERIS FERNS

WOI.F

WAIER Submerged and Semi-Submerged Plants

LILIES

FOR rONDS ON ESTATES

Manufacturer of the Celebrated Rustless corner pieces.

Marbleized

slate

"SUPERIOR" AQUARIUMS Made

bottoms.

in

galv..nizeci

sheet iron, wrc^ufiht iron

and brass nickel plated.

Manufacturer of the Male

aquariurri pure

Once

tried,

We

"AMERJAP" FISH FOOD

Celebrated

fro n the purest of materials.

For

fish only.

and sweet and does not injure the plants

in

Kcrps your the aquarium

good conoition, keeps your Eaten by the fiih with avidity.

fish in

always used.

carry the finest line of aquarium

ornaments in the country. No rough, sharp idges to injure and every orn.iment glazed with a smooth and beautiful finish, and in harm, nious colorr, creating an artistic effect in the aquarium. mairn the

fish, b'jt

Globes, Nets, Pebbles, Sand, Foods, Etc. Everything Pertaining to the Aquarium and Pond Send

for Price Lists


1.

Newly exuded

egg, not fecundated, wrinkled and unexpanded surface covered with vesicles. Full and

lateral views.

Egg. four and ten hours after fecundation, showing germination and formation of membrane.

H.

Development of embryo and plasmic processes 24

edge

at

of

membrane

and 34 hours after spawning.

Development of alevin and yolk-sac, 50 and 58 hours after spawning

5.

Free-swimming alevin attached to the yolk sac, showing skeleton, partly developed digestive organs

and surface

).

7

Alevin caudal

days old; dorsal partly developed.

The

tins

and

fully

developed.

developed Telescope

ten days old.

PLATE

old.

Alevin seven days old; pectoral and anal

8,

live lins

Four days

colors.

II

EMBRYOLOGY OF THE GOLDFISH

FROM GOLDFISH BREEDS AND OTHER AQUARIUM FISHES BY COURTESY OF INNES AND SONS

H

T

WOLF

fry,


(T

^

The Aquarium Volume

MARCH,

I

Number

1913

10

J

^= stripes cross the

MoUienisia latipinna. ('

WHILE

.7.

The

IIKEDE, BrooMyii.

many

of the inhabitants of

our aquaria have been given more appropriate vernacular names,

or less

MoUienisia latipinna, a live-bearing species of the family Cyprinodontidae, has apparently escaped the attention of the manufacturer of

common

na

me

s.

caudal-fin

lower part of the body. round with a short

is

When

peduncle.

breeding, the colors

are most intense, at other times, and in

young

fish, it is less distinct,

may be

readily bred in the temperature of 75 to 80 degrees, Fahrenheit, is maintained. At

MoUienisia

aquarium

if a

to 75 degrees

native

a

70

other times,

This MoUienisia is

thovigh the

stripes are always present.

is

This

of southern

sufficient.

North America, and is said to occur abundantly in its chosen

species will bear

haunts.

(luring the

len

a

While

is

more

The

are

are

in

male

beauti-

with

each successive brood.

and heavier

color, the

more matnumber

increasing

larger

attractive

num-

ure, the

Xip lioph orus

sexes

VI

of fry than

those

bles the female

both

smaller

i>er

latipinna resem-

built.

sum-

ng females produce

though

is

Yo

in e r.

not in color, M.

but

fifty

four times

In habits and actions,

to

\oung, three or

MOLLIENISIA LATIPINNA Lesueur. Pmwiiig by E. S Young.

ful, larger, and has an unusually developIn length, the males ed dorsal-fin. to three inches. one-half two and average running stripes as appearing spots Red from head. to tail, cover the whole body. The gill covers have blue markings

which are also present on the dorsal-fin and tail of the male. The tail of the Vertical male is marked with red. Copyright. 1913. by

clams,

etc.,

best foods

Daphnia,

Cyclops,

raw

scraped

beef,

but they do fairly well on

artificial foods.

They

are largely vege-

however, and do not need so much live food as some other species, such as Gambusia Holbrooki or G. bimaculata. That they are plant-eating must not be construed to mean that they destroy the plants of the aquarium,

tarian,

except Alga and similar fine vegetation. W.

A.

I'oy


The

fishes

when

first

imported from

the south are very sensitive to changes

shipment,

of temperature,

ference from tank to tank.

or

It is

trans-

advisable

to disturb as little as possible until they

have been thoroughly acclimated. Another Mollienisia. M. formosa, from Mexico, is a nice aquarium fish, but inferior in color to M. latipinna. The body is greenish gray with greenishyellow cross-stripes; abdominal region, metallic blue; dorsal and caudal fins, In dull yellow with dark markings. contrast to M. latipinna, the males are Breeding smaller than the females. habits, food and temperature requirements, the same as M. latipinna.

Embryology of the Plate

W. A

l*()V8f:K,

or as

is

cells.

essentially the

unexpanded

(Fig.

1

now

)

becomes

Unfertilized eggs are opaque

globular.

and whitish

in color, soon becoming covered with a fungus, and should be removed. The impregnated eggs are

becoming darker with the subsequent development of the embryo

yellowish,

(Fig. 2).

With the entry of the sperma-

tazoon, changes take place in the contents of the egg, completing the process

same

may be

in all

necessary to reach the egg.

The usual type of spermatozoon of head,

is accomplished by the entry of a single spermatozoon into an egg. The egg which, before fecundation, was slightly flattened and

In animals

classes

sists

spermatozoa. Fertilization

differentiation and development embryo proceeds rapidly, depending, of course, upon the temperature of the water (Fig. 3). The various stages

some-

it is

above the Protozoa. The male and female secrete, one the egg, the other the spermatozoa, the union of which results in the formation of a new individual. In the lower torms of life, the cells may be alike, but in the more developed forms there is considerable difference. The female cell or "egg", is largest and passive, containing nutrient matter for the development of the embryo. The male element, or spermatozoon has the power of locomotion the

the eggs, simultaneously discharging the

The

Indiiiiia.

times called, fecundation, consists the process

male

the

goldfish,

development.

ll;inii)i()?i(i.

of the fusion of two

With

cell.

the female in the protrusion of

assists

of fertilization and initiating embryonic

Goldfish.

II.

FERTILIZATION,

female

middle piece and

contail.

it resembles a tadpole with an extremely long tail in proportion to

of the

readily

under

observed

the

being made frequently. The stage shown by Figure 4 usually proves most interesting to the lay-observer. At this time the alevin is microscope,

observations

most active within the ready to come forth.

egg,

and

It is

is

about

possible to

see the circulation of the blood; to follow

the blood corpuscles through the entire

body of the

alevin, and their return through the gills. When this stage has been reached, the activity of the alevin soon ruptures the egg-walls, thus beginning an independent existence (Fig. 5).

After still

leaving the egg,

attached

to

the

the fry,

yolk-sac,

furnishes

during

Superficially,

svistenance

the head.

which the fins are developed as shown by Figures 5, 6, and 7. The complete

It is,

of course, microscopic.

The spermatozoa

are formed in a gland of the male called the testis (vernacularly,

in fishes, the milt, as

opposed

to the

roe of the female).

The

essential

duction

is

phenomenon

for

about a week,

absorption of the contents of the sac in ten days to two weeks, finds the fully

developed young fish (Fig. 8) foraging and beginning the battle

for Infusoria, in repro-

the act of impregnation of the

that

results

fittest".

in

"the

survival

of the


February number we took up

By the time you buy the angle and figure the trouble, not to mention a possible outlay for tools, you wont save very much by constructing it yourself. However, for those who prefer to make their own, the proposition is simple. A frame of this size requires no rivets, only soldering of the joints

advantages and

being necessary.

The Aquarium. A

each.

Series of Artk-les on the Constiuetion, Equipment and Maintenance of Aquaria, and the Breeding of Goldfish. C. G. B.

IMilwauliee.

Metal-frame Aquaria.

//.

the IN the

SCHENK,

disadvantages

aquarium. In this article of the we will take up the metal-frame tank with glass sides and ends. In determining the material we are going to use, we can consider iron, which should be smooth so it can be neatly painted or nickel-plated, brass, polished

brass,

all-glass

or nickel-plated, and aluminum. nickel-plated frame is

is

the best, as plating

may

which would make

off,

If a

wanted, aluminum

wear

in time

a very unsightly

tank.

Supposing you have decided on the material, the next thing to consider

the as

size.

My

advice

is

to

large as your purse,

where the aquarium will

allow.

In

make

is

the tank

and the space

to be placed, determining the prois

have the length the largest measurement: the heighth, two inches greater than the width. I say two inches greater than the width, because, when you have put two or three inches of sand on the bottom, the water depth This will not be more than the width. is as it should be, for while we can make the tank as long and as wide as we wish, the depth must under no circumstance be greater than the width. But we want as much depth as possible I will give one set of for the plants. measurements for a very desirable size aquarium: 24 inches long x 14 inches portions,

Have the bottom of your tank made wider

of

number

have

and mechanics.

I

of brass frames

of the

had

a

size

mentioned made

for three

dollars

material

than

the

For a frame as mentioned, have the bottom of 1:^ inch surface, corners and top of one inch. The purpose of this is to take care of the bottom strain which is much greater than the top and sides. Material onesixteenth of an inch thick is heavy enough for the size tank above mentioned. Use one-quarter inch plate glass In for the sides, ends and bottom. having the glass cut, the best way is to take the frame to the glazier so he can get all measurements accurate. Be careful against scratches on the glass. When ordering the glass fitted, have the sides go first, the ends next, and the bottom Allow one-eighth inch for cement last. around all measurements. There are a number of good formulas for

cement.

I

will

which have stood the

give three,

all

of

test.

1.

1 1

part white lead (ground in oil) part litharge (dry)

Mix together

to

make

a

good working

putty. 2.

part zinc white (dry) 1 part spar varnish Mix into good working putty.

1

3.

part litharge (dry) 1 part white lead (dry) 1 part fine sand ir part powdered resin with boiled oil into putty with a 1

high X 12 inches wide. My advice is to have the frame made by some one who has the necessary materials, tools

surface

corner uprights and top.

Mix

Now

little patent dryer. with our frame, glass and cement


all

ready,

we

will

proceed to

set

the

combined,

would be

it

tremendous

a

glass.

saving to breeders to be able to hold

Put plenty of cement all around the frame of one side, after which set a side glass, pressing firmly, but very gently After trimming against the cement. away the cement which you have squeezed out, proceed to put the cement on the second side, then the one end, after which the other end, and finally the bottom. Now put a corner of cement all around the inside. Brace the sides and ends with sticks of wood and allow Next, turn to set for two or three days. the aquarium bottom side up and fill the space between the glass and upper frame with cement. If your work has been well done, your aquarium will be water-tight and should remain so for many years. A good plan is to give the

in check.

corners on the inside a coat of spar

varnish before applying the cement as it

Copper and

is

it

dangerous to the life of hence care should be

plants,

fishes

make

exercised not to

the solution too

strong, nor to allow the fish to

remain probably be necessary to kill a few fish with an overdose in order to arrive at the proper strength, but as the fish are sure to die if not treated, there is everything to gain and nothing to lose by experimentin

too

it

long.

Make

ation.

will

It

a stock

solution

by

dis-

solving 120 grains of sulphate of copper in

For use, take a

of water.

pint

a

tablespoonful of the stock

solution

a quart

of water.

Put the

diluted

solution,

allowing

to

fry in the

them

to

remain fifteen minutes to several hours. Return the fish to clean, fresh water and note results.

helps to stick the cement better to the

In

glass.

procedure, leave

this

the

about twelve hours before putting on the cement, so that the varnish will be sticky. varnish

dry

(To

Cure

HAKRY

'T^WO -lost

P.

years

had

I

gill

trouble

end of the season, advised

me

a

scientific

friend

copper solution and with pronounced success. I wanted to try it out more thoroughly last year, but did not have a single case. I submit the formula, hoping that it may be further proved efficient, and the results of the experiments published in The Aquarium. Before this time, no cure for the disease has been known, and as gill for

a

to try the

remedy.

trouble kills

young

I

a

did,

hundred

times

more

goldfish than all other ailments

as

man

"Some of

droop,

stand

down of

others

— ?"

to us.

the

those

stalks

Yes,

upright."

"Well, those that droop have

The

in them!"

grain

among my goldfish, and as a result, thousands of young. Toward the

Socrates for looking he walked. For answer pointed to a field of grain

ground

and observed, but

for Gill Trouble. PETERS, Philadelphia.

ago

Someone chided at the

the great

continued.)

1)6

Tlie third iirticle will be on the equipment of the iKiujirium with sand, plants, etc.

A

Observe!

for

has come The name rebuked him is story

Socrates lives.

man who

forgotten.

The man who walks with head

in the

does not see the useful things lying about his feet. And it is these

clouds

close-to-hand things that he must weave

warp and woof of his fabric he would make the mantle of success. Exchange. into the

A

laboratory

of natural history

is

if

a

sanctuary where nothing profane should

be

feel less agony churches than in laboratory. — Lowis Agassiz.

tolerated.

improprieties scientific

I

in

at

a


The Hydra. W. A

TN -*-

the tentacles into the body cavity. On the inside are simple ciliated amoeboid

I'OYSER, Hammond, Indiana.

his aquaria breeder may

tanks

or

the

find, attached

fish

by

its

base to the stems of aquatic plants, a very small animal, just large enough to

be seen without the aid of a glass, of a pale green or brown color. This is the

common

hydra, technically

Hydra

(green hydra) or hydra).

It

Hydra

fiisca

viridis

(brown

possesses a gelatinous, sub-

which may undergo form. One end expands into a foot or disk by which the creature attaches itself, or moves cylindrical

various

body

changes

slowly along as

of

its

own

volition dictates:

while a mouth surrounded with

more

tentacles

five or

the opposite end.

is at

These tentacles or feelers are exceedingly contractile: one moment they may be long,

slender threads, at the next,

or

after a meal, blunt knobs.

The most remarkable, as well as the most interesting characteristic of the hydra is its power to overcome animals more active and muscularly stronger than

itself.

The

body

and

feelers

layer of the

surface

numerous

contain

termed lassocells or nettling organs, about one twohundredth of an inch in diameter. Each nematocysts,

popularly

is filled with a poisonous fluid, and coiled vip in the fluid is a long thin filament in a state of tension. Groping about with its flexible arms, the hydra touches an animal swimming near it, the contact rupturing

sac-like or bag-like cell

the

cell,

when both

fluid

and filament

are forcibly ejected, the end of the

ment entering the

fila-

and piercing poison. While the it ready for the hydras are not powerful enough to incommode the larger animals, Daphnia, Cyclops and newly hatched fish are This is well known readily overcome. to fish

culturists

cells

into

which

particles of the food

The animal

pass to be digested.

no

real

stomach or

posseses

intestine, the inside

of the body-sack

being practically a colony of amoebae which serve the same purposes.

The hydra propagate mostly by gemmation or budding. Throughout the summer, buds are produced trom the side of the animal, which increase in size, become open at the free end and The

gradually acquire feelers.

pedicel

becomes thinner by degrees, and finally the young polp frees itself from the parent and begins an independent existence. As in other animals, the hydra also reproduces sexually from an but the sexes are not separate. Budding, which is but a process of natural self-division, is carried on to a large extent, more individuals being produced in this way than from eggs. In autumn an egg is produced at the base of the body-sack, and these probably egg,

sexual eggs or resting bodies until the

next spring,

hatched, and a

new

lie

dormant

when they

are

generation produced.

Like some other lower animals, the hydra may be multiplied by mechanical division. Cut an animal in two, or, slice into a number of rings, and each

grow a crown of tentacles and become a perfect specimen. It was once claimed one could be turned inside out, and the former outside cells would perform the digestive functions^ but this is now believed to be in error. will eventually

victim,

who

use every means

to rid the tank of the pests.

The prey when mastered,

is

thrust by

"Every good

man

every haid- working

has his Hobby, and

man

one." In the woods, a

man

should have Athenaeum.

casts

off"

his years,

as the snake his slough, and at what period soever of life is always a child. Emerson.


THE AQUARIUM Issued in the Interests of the Study,

Care and Breeding of Aquatic Life Published monthly except July and August Hammond, Ind., hy t lit* A(iuiirium 8i)cieties of Brooklyn, Chicajio, New York, PhihiMinneapolis delpliia, Boston, Milwaukee, at

manuscripts, exclianses, books for dii'ect to the Editor-in-Chief; remittances to the Treasurer: all other matter to the Business Mana'^ier

Send

all

review,

etc.,

F,i)iTOB-iN Chief,

Hammond


:fX=z

fT

=^

C O ]M ]VI E N T S

Q XT E R I E S American

have been success-

catfish

introduced into the

fully

streams

We

are

glad

prosperous

campaign

for

At

started.

election of the Brooklyn

to subscribe for

New

York!

We

congratulate Dr. Schneider and his

associates.

who

looking for

is

means and

leisure

be afforded splendid facilities for original work. Dr. Bigelow will be

Hope was fancy

fish

reach of

in

the originator of the gold-

Philadelphia.

He

first

The editor purchased his from Mr. Hope about that

all.

goldfish

time.

A

that

condition.

The is

in

A

recent meeting a reso-

members The Aquarium. Good This is a move in the

and should be followed by the other clubs. Interesting programs have been arranged for future meetings which will be announced from month to

month

in the magazine.

curious

result

workers' strike in

of

London

the last

transport

year was

a scarcity of goldfish. These fish are brought to London by boat from Italy. Messrs. Cura & Sons were the only London dealers to supply their customers, having received approximately 41,000

eoldfish durino; the

month of June.

The New York Medical all pets

Many

goldfish keepers use a feeding

ring cut from sheet cork.

introduced Japanese fish into that city, some twenty years ago, at a price within first

learn

will

glad to furnish particulars. J.

to

new members has been

a

for

Agassiz Association

number

lution was passed urging all

right direction,

The

the

of

a

financial

Society resulted in a change of officers.

a retired aquarist of

meeting

Society

Aquarium Society of New York

of

Euroj^e and the Hawaiian Islands.

The annual

February

the

of splendid specimens of Celestial Telescopes and Lion-heads were exhibited.

J

%.-.

At

Philadelphia

Society says

except goldfish carry danger from

microbes.

"Can" the poor canary. Disinfect the cat.

Put carbolic on the dog. Fumigate the mat; Quarantine the parrot. Sterilize the mouse. Gold-fish are the only pets To keep around the house!

Chicago Evening American.

This can be

made very attractive by sowing timothy seed upon it, much as it is sown upon grotesque

red Chinese pottery, used to simulate hair upon the head. The grass grows rapidly, and when it is about an inch high, the ring may be turned upside down. The grass makes a delicious and wholesome morsel for the fish. The other side may now be planted and a new crop grown. Chas. Paxson, Philadelphia. (Thus another item, hay, is added to the

where

it

is

the goldfish bill-of-fare.

Ed.)

Minneapolis has adopted the coagu-

method

of purifying the city process the organic matter is destroyed by the use of sulphate of alvimina and lime. The lime is necessary to the method to render the water alkaline, breaking the sulphate into alumina and sulphuric The last step in the process is acid. impurities and the removal of the chemical agents by sand filtration. Of course, it is impossible to remove all the chemicals by this method. The use of this water has resulted in severe lation water.

In

this

losses to fish fanciers in that city. Mr. Tappan reports that he alone has lost several hundred valuable fish.


Comments and

(Ci)iif iiiuoil.i

In conjunction with the Spring Flower

Show

The

of

Society of

Horticultural

Chicago, the Chicajjo Fish Fanciers Club will exhibit

The show

goldfish will

be

and tropical held

of the Institute and

the

at

The

Institute. April 1st to 5th.

The

fish.

Art

officers

Horticultural

Society have cooperated with the club

way, and have assigned pro-

in every

minent and ample space for the exhibit. This will be the first noteworthy exhibition of fishes in Chicago since the World's Fair in 1892. Plant

newspaper

is

the

article

The

Bache.

get

to

fishes

mosquitoes

title

usual

oil

of your

of an excellent

conchonius are

occasionally

by

growth

introduction

more

method.

of a

pond

is

few con-

efficient than the Breezes blow the

a bright red

the pectoral or dorsal

attacked

at

the base of

fin,

usually the

former. In one case the growth extended

from the pectoral

up

fin

to the gills

and

caused the intervening scales to stand

These attacks yield to saltwater in about four days. I use sea salt which is no doubt better than out.

treatment

table salt for the treatment of all fish.

change it daily and make it strong enough so that the salty taste is just easily discernable. These are the only fish on which I ever saw this affection, and as they are in with a number of other kinds, it would seem possible that the malady is peculiar to the Barhus I

family.

from the pen of Rene

shiners and sunfish into a

sidered to be

rid

The Aquarium: My Barhus

Editor,

Queries.

If

me

any of our

scientific friends

can

tell

the cause of this trouble and what

is, I

would be greatly obliged. that the affected fish

fact is

other signs of

ill

it

A peculiar show no

health,

film of oil off the greater part of the

Wm.

T. Innes. Jr.

water surface, and the "skeets" go on breeding as before. To the fish, the

mosquito larva or "wriggler" is a dainty titbit to be devoured at every opportunity.

Boat-flies,

Water

skaters,

the

larvae of certain beetles and the dragon-

deadly enemies of the wrigglers of Anopheles, the malariacarrying mosquito. are

fly

A Deformed

also

raised

Guppyi.

Guppyi, a

injury or other cause

Do

not feed your goldfish this month the title of an absurd article that appeared a couple of months ago in the newspapers of several cities. It tells that during fovir months of the year, is

November to March, no food should be given! One fish to a quart of water is given as the proper proportion. The are to be kept, according to the author, in deep, not shallow, bowls, and the water should be changed weekly in winter. He adds that goldfish given this care have been known to live eight to ten years. Poor fish! It is to be greatly regretted that such misleading information should be given the layman. fish

Last

summer

I

hundred of Girardinus native of Venezuela. Through

several

one of the

fry,

a

unknown

to

me,

female, developed a

The

singular deformity.

fish is slightly

humpbacked, and being transparent, the backbone is plainly discernable in the form of the letter S as shown by my sketch.

The

fish

seems to be

in the

best of health and has given birth to

normal little ones as a well regulated Frank L. Tappan. Guppyi should. This malformation has been noted in a

number

of other species.

"The beautiful useful."

is

as

Ed.

useful

as

the

Victor Hugo.


SOCIETY BULLETINS Brook lyn

/\.quarium »

Society

^ ^

J^

Regular meeting

4tli

Tues.

in every month except.Tune. •July &Aug.atFaircliildBldg 702 Fulton St., at 8 P.M.

rnitiation Fee,

*1.00

Annual Dues,

$2.00

Chicago Fish ^ PancierS Club ^===^=^^^=^^=z. Regular meetings

on

the

C^fyHa^tuarlVuSg' North Clark St.. at M. on Fourth Wednesday where announced.

137-1.39 8.30 P.

Initiation Fee,

$1.00

Annual Dues

$U)0

1

he

An

«^

U n a f r C:„«:„«-,, «t oOCieiy ^ \\

II

i?:^Trrr...

eixy,.ri

«^ 1

m

II

t-n

«t

«t

U

i

<^ 7^

»^

:„7.„n,io->i ,.<fi.7^

Mt

\\^l

'

1.,

—th^

German-Anu4i('an

School,

President, Dr. Frederick Schnbider, 64 Grove Street. Vice President, Geo. W. Post, 52 Herkemer Street. Finan<MaI secretary, Theodore P. Fritz, 805 Halsey St. corresponding and Recording Sec'y, ...harry Roess^e, no Harman street. Treasurer, Theodore P. Fritz, 805 Halsey St. Local Editor, Dr. Frederick Schneider, 64 Grove Street. Local Business Manager, Owen H. Smith, 702 Fulton Street

^ »* tj k/i u ill d Tuesday, March llth:-Business Meeting. Tuesday, March 25th: Exhibition of Tropical Fishes. •

P''e«ident

F. S.

Vice President secretary Treasurer Librarian ^ocal Editor Local Business Manager

^ndTvntniuSwelt.Ne^^ York, cMcii month except July :uKl Auuust. .Corre-

A-mualiy."''"

Dues

Initi ation Fee, $1

$2

Philadelphia U

m

.^

.^

A

q U a r Society tS' /V

1

^_

Regular meeting on the Fourth Wednesday, at 1414 Arch Street

IVT iYX

i

1

1

1

W vv

AAiq U 11

*1. 00

e e V. fv w a II u W

OCiety S. ,

U ^ ^ II

i

1

^^

W. B. Hoffman, Hammond, Ind. Carl Fossetta, IMl George Street. W, A. Poyser, Hammond, Ind. P.

G. Orsinger. 123 J.

W. Gage,

Oakley Blvd. Glenlake Ave.

S.

1225

22 NassMu Pl;icc, East Ora7ige, N. .T. O. H. SMITH, 2:{ .liicol) St rcct New York City Ivccording secretary Arthur Osborne, 42 South St., .Icrscv City, N. .1 Corresponding Secretary Herman Osmer, West New Brighton, Y. Y. Treasurer H. A. Richtbekg, 85 South 16th St., East Orange, K. .T. I-lbrarian Herman Hofkmeisteb. 165 Webster Av., .Jersey ('ity, N. J. Local Editor John Treadwei.i. Nichols, Am. Museum of Nat History ^"'''^'

.

Business Manager

Carl P Ording,

1931

Broadway, New York

Review of "The Blatter" by H. A. RichtExhibition of new fishes by J. A. Osborn. Exhibition of fishes of British Guiana by Richard Dorn. Address "Aquarium Management" by W. L. Brind. Friday, March 28th:-Review of " Wochenschrift" by Richard Dorn.

Thursday, March 13th: ^^^i-

Address "The Names

of

Wednesday,

March

Vear.

Fishes" by Rev. H.

26th:

— Competition

Charles Paxson on

SeiTciaiy

^

T,il)niriaii

for

Telescopes under ore

"The Schlammbeisser:

A New Aquarium

J-cavenger.

C G. B Schenk, 105 Grand A venue August Grau, 3110 Grand A vejiut>

President vi,.p President Tic.'isnrer

S. Coffin.

H. R. LiPPiNCOTT, CoUlngswood, N. J Charles Paxson, 2.534 N. 11th Street" Hiram Parker, 234 N. Wilton Street L. M Dorsey, Jr 2219 N. 19th Street Wm. T. Innes, Jr., 1834 N. Park Ave. L. M. Horsey, Jr., 2219 N. 19th Street

president Vice President Treasurer secretary Local Editor Local Business Manager

111

Regular meeting on First Monday at 105 Grand Ave.

66th Street

North Avenue

1225 Glenlake Ave., Chicago.

m

Jf-

457

Edw. W. Kikbnan.

PrcsichMit ^'ii'<' ''ifsident

Annually

fl

o f <1 1

West

428

Wednesday, March 12th:— Business Meeting. Wednesday, March 26th: — Meeting at residence of J. W. Gage,

mJes"*K'"6.tn.esp^o;Kllng

Membership

Young,

Dr. G, A. Pkeusker,

Shei'man Ave., .Jersey City, and on the Fourth Friday at the American MTis(.um of

Geo J. C. Steffen. 950 First Street Rev. Paul Both. 2liO'? Prairie A venue August W. Pollworth. 1816 Wright Street W. A. Brye,

Local Business Manager

Monday, March

3rd:

— Regular

Meeting

304 Fifteenth Street

Grand Ave.

at 105

Initiation Fee,$l. Dues, $1.20

Minneapolis

Aquarium ^nfiffv

^ ^ ^

p,.g^jjjp„t

Treasurer

J.

Secretary

F. L. Tappan, 92South7th street W. Franzen, Curator Museum Pub. Library Robert Rasmussen, .504 Loan & Trust Bldg

Boston

Aquarium .

Society

.

J^

^

-^

Initiatiot.Fee.ll An'lDues.il

Tennant

President gg^retary

Treasurer

I.ee, 18

Ohas. W. Alden,

Franklin ^

A.

15

Packard,

School

Perry St

5

.^

Dedhani, Mass.

St.,

HroomHeld

St ,

,

Boston. Mass.

Cambridge, Mass.


AN ENTOMOLOGIST WANTED FOR ARCADIA. Aofassiz Association's Arc Adi A is for study and research, and for giving information upon any phase of nature to any person who desires

"The

to

know."

ArcAdiA

is

well equipped with every facihty for studying nature and

Within the adjacent territory, especially in ArcAdiA, there are facilities for studying various kinds of aquatic and marsh insects. The laboratory is well equipped with ai^paratus for classifying, examining, photographing, etc. There are breeding cages for studying the insects in their transfoi-mations, and whatever further equipment may be necessary will be made to suit the needs of a student. We want an adult entomologist, preferably a married man, to come to ArcAdiA, lease a building site, erect a small cottage and live near to nature in the spirit of the Institution. He shall have the freedom of the Institution without expense, but for his services no salary will be paid. We are looking for some one who has retired from the active duties oflife, and expects to spend the rest of his days in close proximity to the entomological especially so in entomology.

Nymphalia which

is

a part

of

world.

The experiment has been successfully made in the Department of Botany. Some three years ago a lady in Wisconsin desiring to devote the rest of her life to the study of plants, became a member of The Agassiz Association, at the cost of only three dollars for the first year and only a dollar and a half each year thereafter She leased a building site and erected at her own expense a portable cottage in which and in the surroundings she leads the ideal ArcAdiAn life in nearness to nature She devotes all her spare time to the Botanical Department, collecting plants, studying them in their habitat, planting them in her little yard, and studying them under the microscope. A pleasurable part of her occupation is to show the results to the admiring visitors at ArcAdiA. The Agassiz Association remunerates her for her services in giving her all the facihties of the equipment, such as may be needed in her botanical pursuits. In return for her services she receives the best pay in the world the joy of doing and the joy of helping. Her attractive little cottage is known as Botany Bungalow. We want some entomologist to make his home in the "Entomologist's Eyrie" or "The

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

Ant-Hill" or some similarly named cottage in ArcAdiA. Pull particulars as what the A A is and what is its ArcAdiA, what it has done and what it is trying to do, and including a copy of "The Guide to Nature", will be sent to

upon application.

On

the other hand, full particulars will be required of the personahty, experience, plans, etc., of the applicant who would couie here and take charge of our Entomological Department. We would prefer some one who has retired from active business hfe and has means to devote the rest of his days to his favorite pursuits, but such entire devotion of time is not necessary. Arrangements could be made for some income for services, if desired Emi:)l()yment of various kinds can be obtained in the vicinity, but, as previouly stated, the ideal would be one who has retired and intends to devote all the rest of his time to the interests and beauties of entomological skill,

nature For further particulars ap[)ly to The Agassiz Association, Edward F. Bigelow, President, ArcAdiA: South Beach, Connecticut.


The American Botanist is

the largest and best illustrated

Herman T. Wolf's work

magazine of popular botany in existence It is designed for all who are interested in the study and cultivation of wildflowers and garden plants. Send for sample copy. Quarterly, $1 0*^ a yeai-. With The Aquarium $1.50.

WiLLARD

N.

ClUTE

&

Aquarium Book "Goldfish Breeds and Other

Aquarium Fishes" is

the standard authority.

Tells all about

breeding fancy goldfish and treats in a practical

CO., Joliet, III

way on

jects.

240

all

aquarium and terrarium sub-

beautiful

illustrations.

Price,

postage prepaid by us, $3.00

MILWAUKEE TRYPOD

CO.,

'^^^

^Tlw'JJu'^ee. wis.

^v. t'. ^;^'A.^fS. manaoer M;iiuif;ictnrer and i-epairer of aquariums Dealer in all Ninfls of afiuarium fisliesaud plants. Imported Japatit'sc and Chinese siold fishes.

European Fish!

INNES

Amphibians!

Reptiles!

& SONS

Twelfth Street Corner Cherry,Philadelphia,ra

Aquatic Plants !

Prequent consignments received from Australia, India, Ceylon, North and South Africa, K;ist Indies, etc. We ship only the Fanciers supplied with small mixed collections strongest specimens, so safe arriv^al is ensured. State your wants. Prices and all information by return mail Wanted: 200 adult American Xewts {Spelerpes ruber), 24 large Bull Frogs, 100 small mixed Terrapins Cash or exchange

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

L. 1

cxjRA &

so:ns, London, E. C.

and 6 Vine Street, England.

]y[OR AL When waddles

When

duck lays an egg she

a off

a

whale of a

as

nothing had happened.

if

hen lays an egg there's a noise.

The hen advertises

mand

just

for hens'

Hence the

de-

eggs instead of ducks'

eggs â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Exchange. .

ADVERTISE IN

...The

Aquarium...


liOFE,

.T.

Herpetologist, Importer of rare Reptiles and Batrachians, Natural History Objects, etc. Also all varieties of curio fish on hand and supplied. — Dciiler illBirds, curious animals, dogs. Angora Cats, and kittens — Pets of every kind. CATALor.IJE FOR

The Leading 35 N. Ninth

THE ASKING. Pe,t

Shop, Philadelphia, Pa.

St.

WILLI A:\r JNIACK

EVERYBODY LOOK! me a silver dime for the first and ciassiiled list of Tropical Aquarium Fishes in the English language, giving Seud

on/y

POPULAR NAME and SCIENTIFIC NAME of each species, grouped according to with standard American market value per adult pair of each and an illustration and desi-ription of the families,

RAREST TROPICAL

FISH.

(!i?2U0UUpair.)

2193 Broadway,

F. L.

and

Long-eared

Goldfish

W. LBRiNO, P Z oOO [sham Street,

City.

TAPPAN

Dealer and Breeder of Rare

New York

Importers, Breeders and Dealers in

Gir-rdinus reticulatus

Mtxiran Swordtail Girardinus guppyi Chanchitos Geophagus Platvpoecilia niaculata And many others Gambus:a ho brooki

Japanese Goldfish and Tropical Fish Fish foods, plants and aquaria Pets of every description

SINGAPORE SNAILS deposit a mass of large coral-red egg=i out of Ihe watet; the snails drop into the water as they hatch.

A

Booth No.

my

the aquarium.

in

Birds, seeds and cages

Burnett's Japanese Fish

little

for new book, ''AC^UARIA FISH". practica. wors- on care and breeding of lisli

York.

Terminal Pet Shop

Paradise Fish

Send #1.00

New

-

THE

Fancy Fish Sutifish

S.; Aquari.st, -

18

Food

Concourse

HUDSON TERMINAL BUILDING NEW YORK

lUustraled

Prices cheerfully furnished for special size-1 aquariums

92 Seventh

Sireet, South, Minneapolis,

Minn.

EACH MONTH

BEST COLLECTION OK

FANCY FISH

AQUATIC PLANTS

My make

e.xperience lias

(if

eiiiiblecl

me

to

make

aquatic life. aim is to assist the student of Nature and it possible for him to obtain tiie specimens in'

a specialty of

all

desii'es in a liealthv

and

first

class condition.

Brooklyn, N.

Y

Near Broadway Jobber and Importer

m

Vallisneria spiralis

W.

&

".Mention

Sagittaria natans

All Accessories

(Water Fern)

at ten cents per i)lant, one dollar per dozen. Not more than two dozen plants of one species will be sold to one person.

-

Aquariums

iitiliz(»

Ceratopteris thalictroides

HERMAN RABENAU 1163 Myrtle Ave.

Fish Fanciers Club

this space to ofier for sale ore.xchans'e fish, plants, foods, atiuariuni implements etc., reared or nnfactured by its niembei's. Tlie weatheimakinu it ditTicnlt to ship fisli with safetj' we utfer this nionl h will

Always on Exhibition Mjiny yeiirs

The Chicago

;M.T

Address; S East 34tb Street. Watcli for our offeriim'

THE AQUARIUM when

wiitlns adverlisers.

HIJ^PERT CHICAGO, in tlie

next issue.

ILL.


WM.

PAULLIN

L.

Goldfish Hatchery

Water Gardener GROWER OF THE

Finest Water Plants BREEDER OF

Fancy Goldfish and

Jacob G. Gassel 915

Arch

Tropical

Street, Philadelphia, Pa.

LmsIi

Maiiiif ictiiriT of

Large Aquariums^ Ponds and Small Lakes Stocked and Planted

Aquariums Aquarium Ornaments Floral Terra

(

'otta,

etc.

and

Send

all

Try PauUin's Hatchery

Fibh Food

Fish (Jlobes

(Ji)ldtish

for Catalog

and Trade

Prices

425

tried

NoXal Fish Food? whv

not?

fins fish

act

Manufactured hy

THE NATURE SHOP, Importers, Breeders. Dealers of

Animals, Birds, ttc.

579

all

W.

varieties of Fancy N. Y. dry

healthy and robust; as

fine

makes your will

and is the for Daphnia.

a laxative

It will not sour or Daphnia. cloud the water. This food is used by the New York and Philadelphia Aquaria; also by many breeders in Philadelphia and other large cities

lai St.,

IN

and Plants, Hirds and .Mocking- Bird Food, Etc.

Ask your dealer

I'oods

Cages, Bird Seed,

HARRY

THIELER'S SONG RESTORER Very 33 Flvtijusii

color; also

riold and Silver Fish Aquaria,

Fancy Japanese Fish Globes,

develop

Will

and

best substitute It contains 17 ingredients, also

Inc.

THIELER DEVLER

best winter food on the

market.

TRY

WOLF STREET, PHILADELPHIA

The

food you have

the

It's

;

G.

Food

Greenriver Fish and Baby Fish Food

been looking for; it floats; the fish like it and it it has produced wonderful is good for them 1 I". results and will do the same tor you; Four sizes 15 cents per bottle.

1-ish,

Fish

cents a box, postpaid

5

aquarium lequisites

Have you

If not,

I

Ite.st

in tlie

Avknue,

or send to

PETERS

Warnock Street PHILADELPHIA, PA.

IMPORTER AND BREEDER N. Y.

'rolci)h'ine Coiiiiection

Me:Uion

P.

it

1210 North

Market

BROOKLYN,

for

THE AQUARH'M

«

Largest selection of Breeders In Philadelphia.

ulien wrilins advertiser

*


The

President

The SxANDAiin Paint Co, UX) William St., New york

August

Aquarium Society

of the writes

29, l!M2

City

Gentlemen:— ()l)tiiiuinK unsatisfactory results from a number at preparations for vvaterproofln<i; cement, an architect inciuced me to try IMPERVl'I'E. The results liiive been all that could be desired and liave successfully witlistood the test of time, in concrete aquarium and pool construction I recommend your product on all occasions. The addition of IMI'ERVITE to the cement at tlie time it is mixed not only renders the pool watertight but also eliminates the danger of having chemicals from the fresh cement wash into the water and kill the fish. Yours very truly (Signed) Wm. T. Innes. .Tr. President of Aquarium Society of Philadelpliia

used for leaky Cellars, walls. Cisterns, Sewers,

Swimming--pool8,

lleservoirs,

walls. Pits,

ways.

Underground

Pits

:

for Scales,

Elevators,

also Waterproof Flywheels, etc Coal and Grain Pockets, any depth below water-line ---Waterproof, non-cracking stucco. GUARANTEE that Impervite contains no soap: and that when used according to our directions will make cement mortar absolutely and permanently waterproof.

Boilers,

;

WE

St.,

^

Aquarium Specialty Co. WASHINGTON NEW YORK CITY

RetaiDiTitr-

Dams, Tunnels, Tanks, Sub-

The Standard Paint Company, 100 William

1827-31

(P^

about

follows

as

IMPEIIVITE is Ba.semeiits. Damp

New York

City

J!/A./^l €tyn

AVE.

MAKER3 OF THE

Rogers

Crystal

Aerator and Filter "friioa - -•'-

-rtpinw

fOBM

iDon

Wis BBBK

LARGEST MANUFACTURERS OF Aquaria,Terraria,Vivaria and Aquatic Cages, Mouse and Frog Houses

;OVGISU\DWl{DSTORi;^

BREEDERS OF Fringetail and Chinese Telescopes and of Red, African and Japanese Snails

Japanese

CULTIVATORS OF

Natans and Gigantica and of Single-rooted Ludwigia MuUertti Sagittariii

107 Flatbush Ave., Brooklyn, Telephone 3746- R Prospect "KNUh' (SAID" E. C.

Correspondence

solicited

AQUARIA

VAHLE,

BIKDS

Write

for Price List

Dealef in

ANI

]VI

A I^ S

Aquarium Plants of all kinds

Goldfish

Aquaria Tanks Fish Globes Ornaments, Etc.

Auburndale Goldfish Co. (Not Incorporated)

N. State Street

CHICAGO, ILL.

ANi.

Imported

Birds, Cages, Seeds, Etc.

114

315 N. Madison St., Chicago

Whole.Siilti iuid Ri'tiiil

a SUPPLIES KAEMPFER'S BIRD STORE

N. Y.

920

West Randolph Send

for

St.,

Chicago,

Catalig and Trade Prices

111.


The Aquarium 1/10 1913