Page 1

patterns • decorating tips • fiber art • culture

Issue No. 26


Asian Fabric

contents

Vol 7 Issue 2

quilts 23 Furo-ra Otaki

31 Dragon’s Cabin

Special thanks to:

Featuring Geisha Dynasty

Lovely sashiko elements

51 Coral Tree

Used exclusively and recommended by Asian Fabric™

New from Kona Bay

features 6 Shadowland Collection

New collaboration with Jason Yenter from In The Beginning Fabrics

10 Quilt Market Wrap-up

Take a peek at our trip to Kansas City, MO for the big industry show

50 Coral Tree Story

Kona Bay finds love in South Africa with DaGama Textiles Coral Tree quilting fabrics

departments 4 Publisher’s Note 8 Shop Directory

Where to shop for Kona Bay

12 News From Friends of Kona Bay

15 What I Did With My Kona Bay

Great projects from our readers

30 Designer Directory

Patterns to inspire

37 Contributor Bios 38 Travel

Kanazawa, Japan

46 Food

Kanazawa, Japan • pg 38

Kogai Namasu, Tori no Kara-age & Cucumber Buckets for the table

2012 Asian Fabric 3


publisher’s note

Asian Fabric™ Quilting and design ideas for inspired minds

Aloha from Da Textile Samurai! Issue #26 2012 • VOL 7 ISSUE 2

Usually, one is blessed with a significant event or great news at least once a year. Of course, we don’t count birthdays, anniversaries, babies being born or a new kitten from the rescue center. I am fortunate to share not one but TWO exciting and wonderful blessings with you today! First—Asian Fabric magazine has moved from a paid printed publication to a free, easily accessible, online magazine. Everyone can now enjoy the wonder and beauty of Asian fabrics, culture, and travel. Not only do you get free patterns and the great stories all have come to expect, Asian Fabric will now come out every two months instead of quarterly! Secondly—Kona Bay Fabrics is celebrating a first in the quilting industry by combining forces with Jason Yenter, of In The Beginning Fabrics fame, to produce what easily will be the runaway fabric collection of the year!! The upcoming SHADOWLAND COLLECTION melds Kona Bay’s fabric printing technique with Jason’s coloring and styling. The group will be available September/ October at your local quilt shop. The Shadowland Collection consists of thirty- three wonderful fabrics that are so unique and gorgeous that Kona Bay will also be publishing it’s first pattern book with six beautiful quilting projects that will showcase the fabric release this Fall. You may view the Shadowland Collection and book projects at www.konabay. com to start thinking about all the possibilities. Make sure to encourage your local quilt shop to get their orders in! Plus, our Coral Tree Quilt project on page 51 uses a new South African line of cotton Kona Bay is proud to now distribute in the US. The Furo-ra Otaki Quilts starting on page 23 feature Kona Bay’s Geisha Dynasty fabric available in your local quilt shop now. Having Asian Fabric magazine free online is so exciting! Please let your friends know they can also be enjoying Asian Fabric magazine by simply signing up on the Kona Bay Fabrics website at www.konabay.com. We hope you enjoy our new magazine format. Join me on Facebook and let me know what you think. I’d love to meet you!

Publisher douglas Eagleson Quilt designer & EDITOR Georgie Gerl ggerl@comcast.net SPECIAL CONTRIBUTORs Patricia Brown Pepper Cory ASSISTANTS TO PUBLISHER Doris Eagleson 1923–2010 Cheryl Hamai Brittany Eagleson

Subscriptions Kona Bay Fabrics www.konabay.com 15812 NE 83rd St Redmond, WA 98052 800-531-7913

advertising and editorial inquiries Eagle Publishing www.PublishingPeople.com 328 E. Indiana Ave Spokane, WA 99207 866-638-1115 Editor and associate publisher Vicki Dar nwwoman@mac.com ART DIRECTOR Tyann Prentice tyannprentice@mac.com

Advertising Representative Renee Peterson

neepeterson@gmail.com

INTERN Emily Hotchkiss

Kona Bay Fabrics © 2012 Mahalo and Aloha!!

Douglas (Textile Samurai) Eagleson Publisher • douglas@konabay.com

4 Asian Fabric 2012

Asian Fabric™ is produced six times a year by Eagle Publishing for Kona Bay Fabrics. The magazine accepts no responsibility for unsolicited manuscripts or artwork; they will not be returned unless accompanied by a stamped, self-addressed envelope. © Kona Bay Fabrics. All rights reserved. No piece, in part or full, may be reproduced without permission.


Neko This collection of playful Asian kitties and paw print accent designs combine effortlessly to start you out on your next feline-themed quilt.

Koi Garden

IN STORES NOW

Kona Bay’s newest collection featuring Japanese Koi in serene pools of water accompanied by a delightful variety of complementary floral designs.


Shadowland Collection

a nd Shadowl on Col lect i Q u i lt s

Yent d by Jason e n ig s e d Fabric orgie Ge ired by Ge Quilt insp

6 Asian Fabric 2012


K

ona Bay Fabrics, once again, is leading the way into unexplored territory with the release of their exciting new collection named Shadowland. This striking tonal collection was inspired by vintage Kona Bay fabric and designed by Jason Yenter, the celebrated President of In The Beginning Fabrics. “We love the captivating collection Jason has created for us,” President of Kona Bay Fabrics, Douglas Eagleson, said excitedly, “It is sure to be the runaway hit of the year!” Over lunch one day, Eagleson shared a favorite piece of early, immensely popular, Kona Bay fabric with Yenter. He mentioned he was hoping to bring it back for Kona Bay’s twentieth anniversary this year. Yenter, who’s family owns In The Beginning Fabrics, is the designer of many successful fabric collections himself. He was fascinated by the subtle elements and printing technique used. He commented that he’d love to be involved in creating a new series of designs bringing into play these unique Kona Bay techniques. With that, the Shadowland Collection was born. “Kona Bay Fabrics is both blessed and honored in having Jason Yenter—one of the fabric industry’s premier fabric and quilt designers—involved in this dynamic project with Kona Bay,” Eagleson commented, “No one knows fabric design and coloring like Jason and the Shadowland Collection proves this point once again!” In celebration of this very special industry first, Kona Bay will be releasing their first pattern book at the same time. Shadowland Collection Quilts will feature six gorgeous quilt projects created using the Shadowland Collection. Award winning Quilt Designer, Georgie Gerl, will provide thoughtfully written instructions. The Shadowland Collection and book will both be available at local quilt shops this September. The Seattle region is home to three of the fabric industry’s preeminent companies. “We feel fortunate to be good friends with other area fabric makers,” says Eagleson, “It’s a unique dynamic but our common goal is success for us all.” Last fall at the annual Quilt Market, the big daddy trade show for the quilting industry, the group even did a joint promotion referring to themselves in fun as “The Seattle Cotton Cartel.” Kona Bay Fabrics, who sells solely wholesale, is taking orders now for the Shadowland Collection and the accompanying book due out September. The entire Shadowland Collection may be viewed on the Kona Bay Fabrics website at www.konabay.com and orders can be placed by calling Kona Bay Fabrics at 1-800-531-7913.

ter erl

2012 Asian Fabric 7


shop directory: where to find kona bay The premiere shops across the country for exceptional service and a superb selection of Kona Bay Fabrics.

Seminole Sampler 71 Mellor Ave Catonsville, MD 21228 866.407.2363 Dedicated quilt shop specializing in Asian, Batik and contemporary fabrics. Excellent service to meet all your quilting needs. Classes for all levels. Extensive selection of books, patterns and notions.  www.seminolesampler.com

arizona 35th Ave Sew & Vac Fabric World 3500 W. Northern Ave Phoenix, AZ 85051 602.841.5427 4939 W. Ray Road, STE 27 Chandler, AZ 85225 480.961.7363 Two convenient locations with 25,000 bolts combined, including a large selection of Asian fabrics. Notions, books, threads and all quilting supplies. Kits available from this issue. Hours: M-F 9-6; Sat 9-5; Sun 10-4.  www.35thavesewandvac.com

michigan

florida

minnesota

Boutique 4 Quilters, Inc. 2945 W New Haven Ave West Melbourne, FL 32904 321.768.2060 A shop with a Scandinavian ambiance. Large selection of Asian, Kaffe Fasset, Batiks and Silk fabrics. Hand dyed fabrics and Fiber Art by local artists. A place where Fiber Artists and Traditional Quilters gather. Come visit Florida’s most creative quilt shop! Hours: Mon & Tue 9:30am-5pm; Wed 9:30am-7pm; Thur & Fri 9:30am5pm; Sat 9:30am-4pm.  www.boutique4quilters.com

Blue Bamboo 12865 Industrial Park Blvd Plymouth, MN 55441 800.323.1105 Gorgeous array of Asian fabrics which feature the best of Kona Bay in both fabric and kits. Choose from wall hangings, quilt and runner kits. Check our website for current fabrics and sign up for our newsletter. See over 5000 bolts of fabric which include Asian, flannels, brights, holiday and batiks.  www.mybluebamboo.com

The Stitchery 1129 E Grand River Ave Howell, MI 48843 517.548.1731 The Stitchery carries many Kona Bay Fabrics. Full service quilt shop with over 5,000 bolts of fabric and supplies. Authorized Janome dealer, featuring the Memory Craft 11,000 Embroidery Machine. Conveniently located between Detroit and Lansing. Open Mon-Fri 9-6, Sat. 9-4.  www.thestitcheryonline.com

missouri maryland Patches Quilting & Sewing 308 S Main St Mount Airy, MD 21771 301.831.0366 A delight for your eyes with over 4,000 bolts of fabric. Our large selection of Asian prints, Batiks, and Black and Whites will aid you in any project. Don’t forget to check out our books, notions and classes.  www.patchesquilting.com

8 Asian Fabric 2012

The Quilted Fox 10403 Clayton Road St. Louis, M0 63131 314-993-1181 toll free 877.993.1181 Huge selection of Asian fabrics both in-store and online. We also carry internationally oriented fabrics. Many kits available. Open Mon and Wed 10 am–5 pm; Tues and Thurs 10 am–6:30 pm; Fri and Sat 10 am–4:30 pm, and Sun Noon–4:00 pm.  www.quiltedfox.com


washington

nevada The Quilted Dragon 2890 Yucca Terrace Ave Pahrump, NV 89048 775.751.9033 Just one hour NW of Las Vegas, we specialize in Oriental, Batik, and Wide Backing fabrics, Sashiko supplies and notions all at discount prices everyday. We stock over 1,700 book titles and 600 patterns at all times. Open MTW 9–3 and second Sat 9–3.  www.quilteddragon.com

new york Discount Sewing & Jackie Lynn’s Fabric Center 475 E. Ridge Rd Rochester, NY 14621 585.544.4110 Exquisite selection of Asian quilting fabrics. Sales and Service Center for Brother, Janome, HandiQuilter, Elna and Tin Lizzie machines. Open Mon-Sat 10-5, Tues & Thurs 10-8.  www.discountsewingcenter.com

ohio Gramma Fannies Quilt Barn P. O. Box 270 Berlin, OH 44610 330.893.3243 Largest selection of Asian fabrics in Ohio’s Amish Country. You’ll enjoy our unique quilt shop located in an old barn as a part of Schrocks Amish farm. Locally made quilts plus 2500 bolts of beautiful fabrics specially designed for quilt shops. Just 1 mile east of Berlin, the heart of Amish Country, on State Route 39. Mon-Sat 10-5.  www.grammafanniesquilts.com

pennsylvania Sew Smart Fabrics 30 W Oakland Ave. Doylestown, PA 18901 215.345.7990 The best selection of Asian prints in Eastern Pennsylvania. We also carry silks, wools and other fabrics. Books, patterns, trends. Open everyday.  www.sewsmartfab.com

The Shibori Dragon 11124 Gravelly Lake Dr SW Lakewood, WA 98499 253.582.7455 Specializing in Asian and Batik fabrics, Sashiko supplies, vintage silk kimonos– largest selection in the Pacific NW. Unique beads, buttons, needleart threads and embellishments. Open Mon-Fri 10-6; Sat 10-5; Sun noon-4. See our ad on page 60.  www.shiboridragon.com

wyoming E.T. Quilts 80 S. Main Buffalo, WY 82834 307.684.9006 877.ETQUILTS (877.387.8458) Quality fabrics, including Wyoming’s largest collection of Asian prints, notions, kits, patterns, books and quilts. Salt City Candles, needlecraft supplies, and Boyd’s Bears also available. Check out our website and receive a free gift with your first on-line order. Open Mon–Sat 10–5.  www.etquilts.com

online shops eQuilter eQuilter.com is your online fabric store for quilting, sewing and fashion, with OVER 20,000 Fabrics IN STOCK! We specialize in Asian-Pacific and contemporary quilt fabrics. See our ad on page 2.  www.equilter.com SeaWatch Fabrics Mukilteo, WA 866.407.2363 Extensive selection of Asian fabrics, Batiks and light Batiks. Unique patterns, “Wall Hanging of the Month” club, fat quarter bundles and Superior Threads. Free shipping on all orders over $25. Most orders shipped the same day.  www.seawatchfabrics.com Debsews Fabrics Wide selection of Asian fabrics • Tone-OnTone fabrics • Fat quarter selections • Patterns & magazines • Special sale items. Debsews as been selling fabric to thousands of satisfied customers online since 1999 and we are very proud of our customer service. See our ad on page 60.  www.debsews2.com

2012 Asian Fabric 9


Doug with Alex Veronelli of Aurifil Threads based in Italy

T

he Kona Bay Fabrics crew was in Kansas City, Missouri mid-May for the semi-annual International Quilt Market. The original wholesale tradeshow for the worldwide quilting and soft crafts industry has been the place to be every spring and fall since 1979. The quilting industry has grown to gross annual sales exceeding $3.6 billion. Quilt Market showcases anything and everything related to the industry including fabrics, supplies, computer software, books and equipment and more.

Don and Diane McGregor of Castilleja Cotton in Canada

Kona Bay always enjoys the opportunity to visit with friends and customers. Our customers—quilt shop owners and fabric distributors from around the globe attend. We wanted to share just a few photos showcasing our booth and some friends of Kona Bay. The Fall show takes us back to Houston, Texas the end of October.

Doug with Jason Yenter of In the Beginning Fabrics


The Kona Bay booth

Elisa Parker of Elisa’s Backporch Designs

A beautiful geisha bag project from Issue 25

A Kona Bay booth from years gone by

Kona Bay VP, Kristina Nakashima, visiting with Meryl Ann Butler

Prototype bags from a Kona Bay customer

Beautiful prototype bags out of Asia


NEWS from Friends of Kona Bay La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum Exhibits and Events June 27 - October 7, 2012 At Play - Asobi: Quilts from Japan Miwako Kimura, Guest Curator. This is the museum’s 8th biennial exhibit of quilts using vintage kimono materials. When the word “play” is mentioned, we think of children playing hide and seek, totally absorbed, lost in time. When quilters become involved in making quilts, the element of play is fully incorporated. Quilt making is the ultimate “play.”

Ainu Embroidery: Work of Yoshimi Kato Miwako Kimura, Guest Curator. For 4,000 years, the Ainu people lived in Japan. The Ainu have assimilated into Japanese culture but they pride themselves in preserving their language and their rich culture and lifestyle. This exhibit focuses on their textiles, garments and stituchery. Kato learned this embroidery from an Ainu lady who taught her the traditional stitching techniques and it’s historical background.

12 Asian Fabric 2012


Special Event Artist Reception June 27 • 10am–noon Meet Guest Curator, Miwako as well as instructors Noriko Koyama, Sachiko Yoshida and Yoshimi Kato along with many other Japanese artists. At left, Miwako Kimura; at right Kazuko Yoshiura

June 27 & 28

Japanese Textile Workshops Workshops taught by instructors from Japan, instruction in English. Each workshop is three hours long. Call museum to schedule. June 27 1pm–4pm “Japanese Style Tote Bag” by Noriko Koyama Cost: $45 + $15 material fee

June 28 9am “Floral Quilt” by Sachiko Yoshida Cost: $55 + $30 material fee

Museum Hours Wed–Sun: 11am–5pm Mon & Tues: By appoint only Closed major holidays

June 28 1pm “Ainu Embroidery” by Yoshimi Kato Cost: $45 + $12 material fee

Admission $7.00 Non–Members $5.00 Students & Military w/ID Free for Members & Children under 12 Museum Location 703 Second Street La Conner, Washington 360-466-4288


NEWS from Friends of Kona Bay From Pacific Rim Quilt Company— Introducing a NEW Book & DVD set

By Janice Lee Baehr and Nancy Lee Chong For nearly 200 years people have loved the beauty of Hawaiian quilts. Never before has the design process been revealed in such a vivid detail. The book and DVD guides you, step-by-step, through the thrilling process of designing your own personal and unique Hawaiian quilt. Sisters Nancy and Janice, well-known for their Hawaiian Quilt and 2 Fabric Applique Quilts pattern lines, have been designing and making Hawaiian quilts for over 30 years.

Visit their site at www.prqc.com or call 360-568-7778 66-page book, full of photos, illustrations and instruction PLUS, 2 hours of instruction and inspiration on the DVD

14 Asian Fabric 2012


Woul d you l i ke t o be f eatur ed i n Asian Fabric Magazine’s What I did with my Kona Bay fabric section? Find out how...

o see t g n i d r e wa r r y r e v ys ou a w It is e v creati e h t ns are r l l e a t t a p s and c i r b a f you! y b d e t e xe c u ho one w y r e v r s to e of you o t o Thank h p rk red a a h ur wo s o s Y . ha s with u s n g i s de s all! u s e r inspi

There are 2 ways to submit— 1. Email: publishingpeople@mac.com 2. Mail: Eagle Publishing KB Project 328 E. Indiana Ave Spokane, WA 99207

www.konabayfabrics.com


What I did with my featuring Suzanne Cosmo

H

Kona Bay fabric

ere is my finished hand quilted, My Day at Kona Bay and Kona Gardens. For Kona Gardens, I used Kona Bay farbrics for the dragonflies and the flowers in the center the edges are others fabrics I found. I wish I could have found more Kona Bay fabrics on the day I went shopping; I had an idea in my burning in my head and wanted to sew it that weekend. Thanks, Suzanne Cosmo Washington

16 Asian Fabric 2012


My Day at Kona Bay

Kona Gardens

I just finished this one. I do like it! 50% of it is Kona Bay. It is lots of fun for me to mix my fabrics, especially the bonded gold fabric. 2012 Asian Fabric 17


Kathleen Brown

O

f c ou r s e yo u r m a t e r ia l is “ s p ec ia l�. I ma d e the s e throws for my f a m ily. T h e y a r e a l l d iffe rent s ize s . I had the m machin e quilte d , b u t did cu t t h e bind ing a nd finis he d them.

Kathleen Brown, Haysvlle, KS 18 Asian Fabric 2012


2012 Asian Fabric 19


Sharon Carson

T

h is is a jacket I made using the Mt. Fuji pattern and Asian panels a friend gave me.

Sharon Carson Elk Grove, CA 20 Asian Fabric 2012


Birds of Heaven

Dianne WinnenOldenburg

H

ere are 3 views of a duster I made using Kona Bay fabric. The back of my Birds of Heaven features a Kona Bay fabric panel of cranes, which was the inspiration of the garment. Underneath is an abstract representation of Mt. Fuji and the birds in flight. Prairie points represent the birds. The front features segments of the same fabric, red piping and sashiko quilting. Birds of Heaven has been in juried art and quilt shows...and won awards! Thanks Kona Bay! Dianne Winnen-Oldenburg Akron, OH 2012 Asian Fabric 21


The Cranes at Play

Joan Brown

st purchased these panels from J uDewSews in Hawaii and could hardly wait

to design with them.

They are the perfect size for throw pillows. The next challenge was finding companion pieces for the finished pillows. My stash never lets me down! I love the colors and look forward to another project design. Thanks so much for the great designs! Joan Brown Dana Point, CA

22 Asian Fabric 2012


Furo-ra Otaki Quilt A cascade of flowers open to regale our Geisha in this tranquil garden scene.

Let’s Begin

3. Sew one unit from step 2 between one 2” x %”

Before you begin read all instructions. Referring to project Cutting Chart, cut First Cuts strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed under Next Cuts from these strips. Refer to General Instructions (pages 58-59) for detail technique instructions. Use an Accurate Seam Allowance and Assembly Line methods and a 4”wide seam allowance to sew this project. Press seams in direction of arrows as indicated in each diagram.

Fabric D piece and one %” x @” Fabric B piece as shown. Diagram 3 Press. Make eight, four of each variation.

Making the Blocks

4. Sew one unit from step 3 between one ^2” x

%”

%” @”

@”

@”

@” Make $

Make $

@” Fabric B piece and one 2” x ^2” Fabric D piece as

1. Sew one 8” Fabric C square between two 2” x 8” shown. Press. Make eight, Diagram four4of each variation. Fabric D pieces. Press seam toward Fabric D. Sew this unit between two 2” x 11” Fabric D pieces as shown. Press. Make four and label Block 1. Block measures 11” square. Diagram 1 Block 1

@”

@”

@”

@”

@”

^2”

^2”

@” Make $

Make $

5. Sew one unit from step 4 between one *” x @”

!1!”

Fabric B piece and oneDiagram 2” x *” Fabric D piece as shown. 5 Press. Make eight, four of each variation. *”

Make 4 Block meausres 11” square

*” @”

@”

@”

@”

2. Sew one 2” Fabric B square to one 2” Fabric D square. Press seams toward Fabric B. Sew this unit between one @” x #2” D piece and one #2” x @” Fabric B piece as shown. Press. Make eight, four of each Diagram 2 variation. @”

@”

@”

#2”

#2” Make $

24 Asian Fabric 2012

@”

Make $

Make $

Make $


Diagram 6

6. Sew one unit from step 5 between one @” x (2”

@”

@”

@”

@”

Fabric D piece and one (2” x @” Fabric B piece as shown. Press. Make eight, four of each variation. (2”

Make $

(2”

Make $

Furo-ra Otaki Quilt Cutting Chart & Material List Furo-ra Otaki Quilt (Floral Cascade) 59” square Featuring fabrics from the Geisha Dynasty & Ginkgo Tonal Collections designer: Georgie Gerl

material list Backing #w yards Batting ^^” square Cut strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed from these strips. *Yardages listed for Fabric D and E are for regular cuts. If “Fussy Cutting” these fabrics extra yardage will be needed. Amounts will vary depending on motif selection and fabric repeats.

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

First Cuts

Next Cuts

Fabric A-GEIS-16 Black ! @!” square “Fussy Cut” q-!3 yards Quilt Center Yardage needed will vary depending on fabric repeat. Fabric B-GEIS-22 Red !q yards Border

!

%(” x $@”

$ $ @ @ * * !^ * !^ * !@

%(” x @” #@” x @” @$” x @” @!” x @” !!” x @” (2” x @” *” x @” ^2” x @” %” x @” #2” x @” @” squares

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

First Cuts

Fabric C-GEIS-18 Black ! !a-!w yards Background & Corners @

#@” x $@”

Fabric D-GEIS-23 Cream ^ !( !w yards Binding & Border Background

@w” x $@” @” x $@”

Fabric E-GEIS-21 Red 4 yard Accent Square

$2” x $@”

Next Cuts @ $ @

#@” x $2” *” squares $2” x @$”

@” x !!” @” x (2” @” x *” @” x ^2” @” x %” @” x #2” @” squares 1!” x %” %” squares

@

!” x $@”

@$ * @) * * !^ * !^

!

%” x $@”

$

2012 Asian Fabric 25


Diagram 10

7. Sew one 2” x 1!!” Fabric D piece to one unit from step 10. Sew one 2” Fabric B square 6 as shown. Press. Make eight, four of each variation. Label these Block 2 and Block 3. Blocks Diagram 7 measures 11” square. Block 2

Block 3

!1!”

!1!”

between two 2” x #2” Fabric D pieces as shown. Press. Make four.

#2”

@”

#2” @”

Make $

11. Sew one unit from step 9 between one 2” x *” Fabric

@”

@”

D piece and one unit from step 10 as shown. Press. Sew this unit between two 2” x 11” Fabric D pieces. Press. Make four Diagram 11 and label Block 4. Block measure 11” square. *”

@”

Block 4

@”

@” Make $ Block meausres 11” square

Make $ Block meausres 11” square Diagram 8

!1!”

8. Fold four 1” x 5” Fabric D pieces lengthwise wrong sides together to make 2” x 5” folded piece. Place folded pieces on one 5” Fabric E square matching raw edges and folded edges in toward center. Stay-stitch in place. Make four.

Fold

B pieces as shown. Press. Sew this unit between two *” x @” Fabric B pieces. Press.Diagram Make four. 9 @”

@”

@” *”

@” Make $

26 Asian Fabric 2012

Make $

Make $ Block meausres 11” square

Make $

9. Sew one unit from step 8 between two %” x @” Fabric

%”

Make $

Furo-ra Otaki Quilt • %(” square Quilt Layout Layout


Assembling the Quilt 1. Referring to step 2 diagram’s center section, sew one Block 4 between one Block 2 and one Block 3. Press seams toward Block 4. Make four.

2. Arrange and sew four !!” x @” Fabric B pieces, two of Block 1, and one unit from step 1 as shown. Press. Make two. Note: One row will be rotated for bottom row, refer to photo on page 25 to check orientation of Block 1 prior to sewing. Diagram 12 @”

@”

@”

@”

!1!”

Make @

3. Referring to step 5 diagram’s center section, sew one 21” Fabric A square between two @!” x @” Fabric B strips. Press seams toward Fabric B. Sew this unit between two @$” x @” Fabric B strips. Press.

4. Sew unit from step 3 between two $2” x 24” Fabric C strips (top and bottom of panel). Press seams toward Fabric C. Sew this unit between two #@” x $2” Fabric C strips (sides of panel). Press.

5. Arrange and sew together four #@” x @” Fabric B strips, two units from step 1 and one unit from step 4 as shown. Press. @”

Diagram 13 @”

@”

@”

#@”

6. Refer to layout for step 6. Measure row from step 5 from side to side. Cut four @”-wide strips to this measurement. Sew four strips from this step to rows from step 2 and 5. Press seams toward border. Note: Fabric B strips were cut parallel to the selvage. If cutting strips in opposite direction sew @” x $@” Fabric B strips endto-end to make one continuous @”-wide Fabric B strip then cut pieces.

Finishing the Quilt 1. Cut backing fabric piece into two equal pieces. Sew pieces together to make one ^&” x *)” approximate backing piece. Press and trim to backing to measure ^&” x ^&”.

2. Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Bind quilt as desired.

2012 Asian Fabric 27


Furo-ra Otaki Bed Quilt

Bed Quilt Cutting Chart & Material List

By simply making additional Furo-ra Otaki Quilt blocks and using a different layout you create a King-size quilt in no time.

Making the Bed Quilt 1. Re f e r t o F u r o - r a O t a k i Q u i l t instructions to make twelve of Block 1, four of Block 2, four of Block 3, and sixteen of Block 4.

2. Referring to layout, arrange all blocks, eight 11” Fabric D squares, and thirty 2” x 11” Fabric B pieces into six rows. Sew strips and blocks into rows. Press seams toward Fabric B. Note: Rows 1, 3, 4, and 6 uses two 11” Fabric D squares, two of Block 1 and two of Block 4. Rows 2 and 5 uses two of Block 1 and four of Block 4. Check orientation of all blocks prior to sewing rows together.

3. Measure row from side to side and cut seven @”-wide Fabric B strips to this measurement. Referring to layout, sew strips from this step and rows together. Press seams toward border.

Furo-ra Otaki Bed Quilt Backing *q yards

95½” square

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

Fabric B-GEIS-22 Red @3 yards Border

Batting !)#” square

First Cuts !

*!” x $@”

@* &* #) * $) * $) * @$

&$” x @” &!” x @” !!” x @” (2” x @” *” x @” ^2” x @” %” x @” #2” x @” @” squares

#

*” x $@”

!@

*” squares

!@

!!” squares @” x !!” @” x (2” @” x *” @” x ^2” @” x %” @” x #2” @” squares 1!” x %” %” squares

For Fabric B the cuts listed first runs parallel to the selvage.

*Wait to cut these strips till steps 3 & 4 quilt assembly in case your quilt measures differently. Fabric C-GEIS-18 Black d yard Block 1 Center

Fabric D-GEIS-23 Cream !) !!” x $@” !) @w” x $@” ^2 yards $! @” x $@” Binding & Background

*

!” x $@”

^$ * $* * * $) * ^$

@

%” x $@”

!^

4. Note: Fabric B strips were cut parallel to the selvage. If cutting strips in opposite direction follow step 4 instructions. Measure quilt top through center from top to bottom, including borders just added. Cut two @”wide Fabric B strips to that measurement. Sew to sides of quilt and press.

28 Asian Fabric 2012

Fabric E-GEIS-21 Red 2 yard Block 4 Center

Next Cuts


5. Sew !!” x $@” Fabric D strips end-to-end to make one continuous !!”-wide strip. Cut four !!” x %#” strips. Note: Our quilt measures 74” square and we cut four 11” x 53” Fabric D pieces for outside border units. If your quilt measures differently adjust Fabric D length.

6. Referring to layout, arrange and sew together one Block 2, 11”-wide Fabric D cut strip, and one Block 3. Press. Make four. Sew two of these strips to the top and bottom of quilt. Press.

7. Sew one remaining border unit from step 5 between two 11” Fabric D squares. Press. Make two and sew to sides of quilt. Press.

Finishing the Quilt 1. Cut backing fabric piece into three equal pieces. Sew pieces together to make one 1!)#” x 1!@)” approximate backing piece. Press and trim to backing to measure !)#” x !)#”.

2. Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Bind quilt as desired.

Furo-ra Otaki Bed Quilt Layout • (%2” square

2012 Asian Fabric 29


patterns to inspire: a directory of designers

• Fast • Fun • Easy • Bold Machine or hand appliqué

Kimono • 24” x 36”

Tea Ceremony • 24” x 36”

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30 Asian Fabric 2012

$19.99/ set + Shipping & Tax

Call for wholesale info.

1-866-638-1115 xt 2 or neepeterson@gmail.com


Dragon’s Cabin Quilt Have fun using some of your favorite Asian prints in assorted light and dark fat quarters.

Let’s Begin Before you begin read all instructions and Pattie’s tips for choosing and cutting fabrics. Refer to General Instructions (pages 58-59). Use Accurate Seam Allowances and Assembly Line Method to construct this quilt and a 4”-wide seam allowance throughout this project. Press seams in direction of arrows as indicated in each diagram.

Pattie’s Tips Choosing Fabrics For two-color log cabins, batiks and busy prints are excellent choices for creating visual interest, giving the impression of more fabric being used then actually were used in quilt. For scrappy log cabin blocks focus on the value light versus dark. If using directional fabric pay careful attention when cutting strips.

Cutting Tips Cut the longest log length across width of fabric for this quilt it’s !@2”, cut piece would measure !@2” x $@” for two-color quilt or !@2” x !*” for scrappy quilt using fat quarters. Cut smaller pieces from this strip. There is an exception when using directional fabrics. Check placement of log in quilt some pieces will need to be cut lengthwise parallel to the selvage and others will need to be perpendicular to the selvage.

Embellishing Center Section If sewing a Sashiko needlework or an appliqué piece on center section then cut Fabric E square larger than listed in chart, complete work, press, and trim unit to measure !&2” square. For this quilt Pattie used Pepper Cory’s Dragon Stencil which works well straight or block on point.

Outside Border Do not cut fabric until quilt top is completed. Measure quilt width and length. There should be enough fabric to cut along the lengthwise grain of fabric.

Making the Dragon Cabin Blocks These blocks uses assorted Fabric A light fabrics and assorted Fabric D dark fabrics. Pattie recommends to square up block after each complete rounds of logs are added.

Resizing a Block

1. Refer to General Instructions for Half-Square

To turn quilt into a miniature wall hanging reduce log cabin block to half its original size. Reduce both the finished length and width for each log by half then add back the seam allowances. For example, in a 7” finished log cabin block the longest size measures 1” x 7”, add seam allowance, and cut !2” x &2” piece. To make quilt twice as large then double the finished measurements and add seam allowance to that measurement.

Triangles. Draw a diagonal line on one #” Fabric A square. Place marked square and one #” Fabric B square right sides together. Sew a scant 4” away from drawn line on both sides, cut on drawn line, and press. Make six. Trim squares to @2” to make twelve half-square Diagram 1 triangle units.

Fabric A = #” x #” Fabric B = #” x #” Make 6

32 Asian Fabric 2012

Square to @2” Make 12 Half-square Triangles Units


Dragon’s Cabin Quilt Cutting Chart & Material List Dragon’s Cabin Quilt 62” square Featuring assorted fabrics from different Kona Bay Fabric Collections. designer: Patricia Brown

material list Backing $ yards Batting ^*” x ^*” Read Patti’s Tips prior to purchasing and cutting fabric pieces for this quilt. Fabric A and Fabric B list total cuts needed for quilt these are cut from ten assorted light Asian fabrics (Fabric A) and ten assorted dark Asian fabrics (Fabric B). Use 4"-wide seam allowance and press seams in direction of arrows.

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage Fabric A Ten assorted light Asian fabrics Fat Quarter of each Log Cabin Logs

Fabric B Ten assorted dark Asian fabrics Fat Quarter of each Log Cabin Logs

Total Cuts needed for Quilt cut from assorted fabrics ^ !@ !@ !@ !@ !@ !@ !@ !@

#” squares !2” x !@2” !2” x !!2” !2” x !)” !2” x (” !2” x &2” !2” x ^2” !2” x %” !2” x $”

$ *

^2” squares #d” squares* *cut once diagonally #2” squares #” squares @” x !!2” @” x !)” @” x (” @” x &2” @” x ^2” @” x %” @” x $” @” x @2”

* ^ !@ !@ !@ !@ !@ !@ !@ !@

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage Fabric C ! yard Inside Border & Binding

Cuts & %

Fabric D @ yards Outside Border

Fabric D Fat Quarter Center

@w” or @2” x $@” (Binding) !2” x $@”

Read Patti’s Tip to determine 6”-wide cuts from fabric piece.

!

!*” !&2” square seeor below

Use 18” square for Sashiko stitching or appliqué center. (See Patti’s Tips) Use !&2” square for “Fussy Cut” motif fabric piece.

Dragon stencil #PCW1921 is available at your local quilt shop. If unable to locate, contact Patti: contact@albfabrics.com or (Tues – Saturday) 252-222-0787.

2012 Asian Fabric 33


2. Sew one unit from step 1 to one @” x @2” Fabric B piece 6. Sew one unit from step 5 to one @” x &2” Fabric B piece as shown. Press. Sew one @” x $” Fabric B piece to unit. Press. Make twelve assorted units. Note: Use different fabrics for Diagram 2 each log. @”

as shown. Press. Sew one @” x (” Fabric B piece to unit. Press. Make twelve assorted units. Diagram 6 @”

(”

$” @2”

&2” @” Make 12

@”

3. Sew one !2” x $” Fabric A piece to one unit from step 2 as shown. Press. Sew one !2” x %” Fabric A piece to unit. Diagram 3 Make twelve assorted units.

7. Sew one !2” x (” Fabric A piece to one unit from step 6 as shown. Press. Sew one !2” x !)” Fabric A piece to unit. Press. Make twelve assorted units. Diagram 7

%” !2”

!2”

Make !@

!)”

!2” $”

!2” Make 12

(”

4. Sew one unit from step 3 to one @” x %” Fabric B piece as shown. Press. Sew one Diagram @” x ^2” Fabric B piece to unit. 4 Press. Make twelve assorted units. @”

^2” Make !@

8. Sew one unit from step 7 to one @” x !)” Fabric B piece

%”

as shown. Press. Sew one @” x !!2” Fabric B piece to unit. Press. Make twelve assorted units. Diagram 8

@”

!!2” @”

Make 12

5. Sew one !2” x ^2” Fabric A piece to one unit from step 4 as shown. Press. Sew one !2” x &2” Fabric A piece to unit. Make twelve assorted units. Diagram 5

!)”

&2” !2”

!2”

@” ^2”

Make !@

Make 12

34 Asian Fabric 2012


Diagram 9

9. Sew one !2” x !!2” Fabric A piece

!@2”

to one unit from step 8 as shown. Press. Sew one !2” x !@2” Fabric A piece to unit. Press. Make twelve assorted blocks. Block measures !@2” square.

!2”

!2”

!!2”

Make !@

Making the Center Block

3. Sew four units from step 2 to !&2” Fabric E square.

If embellishing center section with Sashiko work or an appliqué piece cut Fabric E center square larger than listed in chart, compete work, press, and trim unit to measure !&2” square.

Press.

Diagram 12

1. Sew one Fabric B triangle to one #2” Fabric B square. Diagram 10 Press. Sew another Fabric B triangle to side. Press. Make eight. #2” #2”

Make *

2. Sew one unit from step 1 to one ^2” Fabric B square as shown. Press. Sew another unit from step 1 as shown. Press. Diagram 11 Make four. ^2”

^2”

Assembling the Quilt Referring to quilt layout arrange all blocks into rows checking orientation of blocks and fabrics placement prior to sewing blocks together.

1. Sew two Dragon Cabin blocks together as shown. Press. Make four. Referring to photo, sew Center Block between Diagram 13 two units from this step. Press.

Make $

Make $ 2012 Asian Fabric 35


2. Sew one unit from step 1 between two Dragon Cabin Blocks as shown. Press. Make two. Sew these units Diagram 14

to sides of unit from step 1. Press seams toward center.

Make @

Adding the Borders 1. Sew !2” x $@” Fabric C strips end-to-end to make one continuous !2”-wide Fabric C strip. Press. Measure quilt from side to side. Cut two 1!2”-wide strips to this measurement. Sew to top, and bottom of quilt. Press seams toward border.

2. Measure quilt through center from top to bottom, including borders just added. Cut two !2”-wide Fabric C strips to that measurement. Sew to sides of quilt and press.

3. Refer to Outside Border tip to cut borders or refer to steps ! and @ to join, measure, trim, and sew ^”-wide Fabric D, strips to top, bottom, and sides of quilt. Press. OR Sew ^%2” x ^” Fabric D strips to top and bottom and sides of quilt, mitering corners. Press seams toward border just sewn.

Finishing the Quilt 1. Cut backing fabric piece into two equal pieces. Sew pieces together to make one &@” x *)” approximate backing piece. Press and trim to backing to measure ^*” x ^*”.

2. Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Refer to Finishing the Quilt in General Instructions to layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Refer to Binding the Quilt and bind as desired.

Ask at your local quilt shop for Pepper’s Dragon stencil

manufactured by Quilting Creations. The stock number is PCW1921. If your local shop doesn’t have it, email Patti Brown

at ALB Fabrics. You may also purchase the kit for the quiltcomplete with stencil-or the stencil separately at ALB Fabrics.

Contact Patti via email: contact@albfabrics.com or phone her at 252-222-0787 (open Tue-Sat).

36 Asian Fabric 2012


contributors Patricia Brown

Pepper Cory Patti credits her late mother for instilling a love of sewing. At the early age of four, Patti made her first project, a doll pillowcase, which she made on her mother’s portable GE sewing machine.

Quilting came later but fit well with Patti’s passion for design. Even in grade school, she was always drafting and designing something. Her dolls sported original Patti designer wear and she even designed doll furniture. As an adult, Patti enjoyed designing house plans for the sheer artistic fun of it. Designing quilt patterns was a natural result of learning to quilt.

After a career exploring the right side of her brain in the nuclear industry, Patti opened ALB Decorator Fabrics in Morehead City, North Carolina thirteen years ago. The name honors her late mother, Alice LouEmma Brameyer. ALB carries the largest in-stock selection of first-quality decorator fabrics in the county. The store not only sells fabric and offers classes to help customers tap into their own creativity—they offer custom fabrication as well. The Quilted Butterfly, a subsidiary of ALB, is located at the same site. Not to be out done by the decorator side—the extensive selection of high-quality cotton has created a loyal following. The store has an excellent selection of Asian fabrics and hand-dyed batiks. A visit to Patti’s store qualifies as an adventure in creativity. Patti plays an active role in the success of the business, applying her creative wonder at every turn. Designing patterns like Dragon’s Cabin to showcase the Asian fabrics she sells and loves is second nature.

Patti takes pride in her business and her designs. She and her team make every effort to help you find and work with just the fabric you need. In 2005, ALB Decorator Fabrics was awarded the “Amazing Customer Service Award” by the local Chamber of Commerce. The next time you’re in Carteret County, make sure to visit Patti at ALB. You can also find out more online at www.albfabrics. com.

Pepper’s love affair with quilts began in 1972 when she purchased an antique quilt for $1.00. She is a quilt collector in addition to a celebrated quilter.

When talking about Pepper’s quilt career accomplishments, it’s difficult to know where to begin. Since her start down the path to becoming the well-known and admired quilting master she has become today, Pepper has touched the lives of so many with her enthusiastic and easy going manner.

Teaching has taken Pepper around the globe and to nearly every state in US.

The author of seven quilt instruction books, Pepper also writes for quilting magazines, blogs on the web, and still manages to travel and teach around the world. Her latest book is The Pepper Cory Quilt Pattern Collection (AQS, 2007). Pepper is the recipient of the Jewel Pierce Patterson Teacher’s Award and past-president of the International Quilters Association. One of her more recent endeavors includes designing stencils for home decorating and quilt marking through Quilting Creations International and The Electric Quilt Company. Her sashiko dragon stencil can be seen in Patricia Brown’s Dragon’s Cabin quilt on page 00.

Since 2000, Pepper expanded even more and added designing fabrics to her repertoire. Known for her sense of humor, individualistic teaching approach, and love of strange fabrics, she confesses to a lifelong passion for handwork and her current flame is Sashiko. Sashiko is a unique style of decorative stitching that was originally used in Japan to reinforce clothing. Not surprisingly, Pepper is on board the handcrafts technology train. Her downloadable video class Waste Not, Want Not –Scrap Quilting and a workshop called The Sashiko Zen Pillow appear on the indy site cratsy.com. She also appears on thequiltshow. com. Her program, #1007, is titled Simple Stitches, Super Quilts. Always the prolific writer, Pepper authors several blogs— Pepper at the Quilt Studio (about quilting and her daily life) – peppercory.blogspot.com, Quilt Flap (about antique quilts) – quiltflapper.blogspot.com and Needle Me Now (on behalf of the Colonial Needle Company) – needlemenow.blogspot.com. For a closer look at Pepper’s career and multiple pages of quilting inspiration, be sure to visit her website at www. peppercory.com.

2012 Asian Fabric 37


Kanazawa

The City of Gold

K

anazawa is a storybook village,

unusual to spot

come to life. Its long existence

both natives and

means that it is singularly touched by

foreigners in this

history, yet remarkably untouched as

traditional garb

well. The buildings here received no

around the city.

damage during the bombings of World

The

War II. Accordingly, visiting Kanazawa

are exq ui si t el y

i s a n e xc e l l e n t wa y t o e x p e r i e n c e

b e a u t i f u l :

t h e J a p a n o f m a ny c e n t u r i e s a g o.

d ec o rat ed w i t h

In fact, many female tourists get

painstaking hand

into the spirit of Kanazawa by renting a

embroidery and

kimono for a few hours and walking the

alive with vivid

streets as a long ago geisha might have

color and detail. The workers at kimono

done. This is an enormously popular

rental galleries dress their clientele

facet of visiting Kanazawa and it’s not

completely in traditional clothing, from

38 Asian Fabric 2012

kimonos


their headdress to their footwear. The wearing of the kimono provides visitors with an insider’s look at what life was like for the women in Japan of many centuries ago. It’s a memorable experience, one that few who have the opportunity are willing to pass up.

befuddle visitors with their profusion

A city, with a history as long as

and lack of evident city planning.

Kanazawa, is bound to have some

Taken altogether, this is a singularly

colorful attractions. Visitors take the

charming destination, one where

opportunity to explore quarters that

getting lost for a few hours is a pleasant

once housed geishas and mansions

distraction rather than a cause for

that samurai called home. Narrow,

consternation. It is while wandering

crooked streets and ancient canals

off the beaten path in Kanazawa that

m a ke b e a u t i f u l p h o t o g ra p h s a n d

people make the best discoveries. 2012 Asian Fabric 39


Kenrokuen Garden Kanazawa

cities, Kanazawa’s main attraction

is located along

is the Kenrokuen Garden, which

the Sea of Japan

is located on what used to be the

on

coast

castle’s grounds.

island

The castle endured

the

of

the

of

Honshu.

It

several fires during

is a part of the wealthy Ishikawa

its long existence,

Prefecture. While much of Japan

but the last fire in

was

many

1881 put an end

centuries, the citizens of Kanazawa

to the structure

were single-mindedly developing

for

their handicrafts, something at which

then, Kanazawa’s

they still excel today. Through their

citizenry

peaceful pursuit of pottery, painting

c o n c e n t ra t e d

and weaving, the people of Kanazawa

maintaining these

built a thriving culture that has been

gorgeous formal gardens as a center

sustainable

centuries.

of tranquility and tourism. Many

As one of Japan’s famous castle

experts on Japanese gardens consider

focusing

40 Asian Fabric 2012

on

for

war

many

for

good.

Since has on


this to be the finest example in the nation. Approximately 150 years were required to create the garden initially. The time and care that have been lavished on the garden since shows in the many hushed pathways, tranquil ponds and graceful trees

found

around

every

turn.

Kerokuen translates to “a refined garden� that incorporates no fewer than

six

a n t i q u i t y,

attributes.

Seclusion,

spaciousness,

scenic

charm, use of water and careful arrangement are all in evidence in Kerokuen. Visitors wind their way through exquisite trails and also spend some time taking in historic structures. One of the most popular of these is the Shigure-tei Tea House where visitors can enjoy a refreshing cup of green leaf tea. They are also free to tour the house, which was reconstructed in 2000 and based upon the design of a much older tea house that once stood upon the spot.


Kimono Artist

If Kerokuen is one of the most

lovely collection of Kaga Yuzen, a

renowned gardens in Japan, then

process for hand painting and dyeing

the Ishikawa Prefectural Museum

pieces of silk. Since the Edo period,

for

and

beginning around 1600, local artisans

Crafts is certainly one of its most

have practiced this painstaking craft.

outstanding

Anyone

Traditionally, craftspeople begin the

who loves art and textiles will be

dyeing process with unpatterned

beguiled by the astonishing history

cloth.

of creativity stored at this institution.

persimmons were used to dye the

The region is famed for its Kutani

fabric in the 17th century. As time

pottery that was first produced during

progressed, techniques became more

the 1600s. The Kutani technique is

sophisticated. Today, Kaga Yuzen has

identifiable though its use of multi-

several signature colors including

layered pictures in vivid colors. The

purple, dark red, deep indigo blue,

distinctive, traditional patterns depict

ochre, yellow and a vibrant grass

people and other motifs using 5

green. Many examples of Kaga Yuzen

colors. Each pottery piece is highly

feature themes of birds, flowers and

detailed and utilizes an unusual shade

other natural motifs. Landscapes

of red peculiar to this technique.

showing mountains and streams are

also prominent. Approximately two to

Tr a d i t i o n a l

The

museums.

museum

42 Asian Fabric 2012

Products

also

boasts

a

Extracts

from

plums

and


three months of careful work is required

beautiful and durable material that

for an artisan to produce a single Kaga

is suitable for an endless variety of

Yuzen piece. Each item is a labor of

uses. It is no surprise that Kanazawa

love and a true work of art.

is often referred to as the city of gold. At the Museum for Traditional Products and Crafts, visitors explore all of these art mediums and many others. There are displays showing Kaga

embroidery

with

its

three

dimensional design using delicate threads to decorate kimonos, obis and other garments. Visitors are also treated to displays of Kaga fly fishing lures, tea kettles, umbrellas and

tradi ti onal

Japanese

paper.

Though Kanazawa is renowned for

The museum is an excellent place

many different types of handicrafts,

to spend several hours browsing

the city is perhaps best known for its

and

production of gold foil. Artisans have

and diversity of the handicrafts

been perfecting their techniques for

created in and around Kanazawa.

producing gold foil here for many

The museum whets the appetite

marveling

at

the

artistry

centuries. In fact, today Kanazawa produces some 99% of all the gold leaf manufactured in Japan. The gold leaf is used to decorate altars in private homes and is indispensable in many works of art. Some gold leaf is used for dyeing garments or used to adorn folding screens. The Kanagawa gold leaf is considered particularly special because of three properties. The gold leaf produced here does not rot, never changes color and is not oxidized. These properties make it a 2012 Asian Fabric 43


of most visitors, but none of the

Of particular note are their fish and

items

sale.

shellfish delicacies. Buri daikon, a

Fortunately, a nearby market known

local specialty using yellowtail that

as the Ishikawa Prefectural Products

is boiled with a radish is considered

Center sells many textiles and works or

a particular delight. Diners in the

art that are still being produced in the

region also enjoy Jibuni, a Kaga

on

d i s p l ay

are

for

cuisine classic consisting of duck that is boiled and seasoned and mixed with vegetables in a hearty soup. The region also boasts 15 unique vegetables

such

as

a

Japanese

pumpkin and the leafy kinjiso that add flavor and style to many dishes. Kanazawa is a center of history and culture where the past lives on in the region’s sophisticated handicrafts. Artisans utilize time tested techniques to produce some of the most spectacular textiles being made in Japan today. With a gorgeous public garden and an abundance city today. This market is a browser’s

of old world charm, Kanazawa is

dream, with emphasis on the many

destined to be a city that lives forever

handicrafts for which the area has

in the hearts of all who visit it.

long been recognized. On the second floor, shoppers can indulge in a traditional sushi meal in order to keep them ready

energized to

and

explore.

In fact, Kanazawa is also known as a city of culinary excellence.

44 Asian Fabric 2012


Kaisen-Don

seafood rice bowl

2012 Asian Fabric 45


Kogai Namasu

discover JAPANESE CUISINE Kogai Namasu Ingredients: • 3 cucumbers, sliced and lightly salted • 1 carrot, cut into thin very thin strips • 1 bundle long rice

46 Asian Fabric 2012

Sauce: • 1/2 inch piece finely cut ginger • 1 cup sugar (start off with half cup and add to taste) • 1/2 cup vinegar • 1 Tbsp salt • 1 can kogai (baby clams) ajitsuke (sauce and all)


Doug’s Favorite Cucumber Salad Let’s start with a couple notes. First of all, the long rice, which looks more like a noodle, is optional. You won’t see it in all recipes. English or Japanese cucumbers have a thinner skin and finer seeds than regular cucumbers. Any will work though. You can always remove the seeds if they are too large or plentiful. The recipe calls for ajitsuke clams which are seasoned with soy sauce and sugar. If you don’t have access to these, just make sure they’re baby clams.

1. Start by pouring boiling water over the long rice. Let it sit for a while to soften. Drain and cut into shorter lengths.

2. Squeeze any excess moisture from the cucumbers. Combine all ingredients and refrigerate. I like to use jars with lids. Marinate it several hours before serving.

A favorite option of mine is to add kamaboko (pink and white fish cake). Julienne as you did the carrots.

Sunomono in Japanese refers to a variety of pickled vegetables. Su means vinegar in Japanese. By eliminating the clams and long rice in the Namasu recipe, you have the makings of Sunomono.

2012 Asian Fabric 47


Japanese Picnic Food Kara-age is a type of food that is marinated, dredged and deep fried. Perhaps the most popular and the perfect accompaniment to Namasu is Tori no Kara-age —Japanese-style fried chicken nuggets. Chunks of dark meat chicken are marinated in a homemade teriyaki sauce then coated with cornstarch and fried. These are easy to make and pack well for a picnic or an on-the-go snack.

Tori no Kara-age • 1 lb. chicken thigh meat, • 1/4 inch slice of fresh ginger cut into small chunks • 1 cup cornstarch • 3/4 cup soy sauce • vegetable oil for deep frying • 1/2 cup sugar • Nori sheets (optional) • 2 tsp mirin or sake Cut chicken thighs into one-inch chunks. In a small pot, blend together soy sauce, sugar, mirin or sake and fresh ginger; bring to a simmer, stirring to dissolve sugar. Cool to room temperature. Marinate chicken meat in this mixture for several hours. Drain chicken meat and dredge each piece in cornstarch. In Japan they often rap each piece in a ½" x 2" strip of nori, dabbing a bit of water on the end to seal the nori together. It adds a little interest and a touch of flavor. In a deep skillet or pot, heat vegetable oil to about 375°. Deep fry chicken pieces until golden brown, turning as necessary. Drain on paper towels. Serve warm or at room temperature. 48 Asian Fabric 2012


GET CREATIVE! cucumber fun STEP 1

Cucumber Bucket This delightful place setting Japanese bucket is very easy to prepare. You can use it to hold flowers, candies or a special appetizer. Add a name card and you’ll have a lovely place marker. You’ll need:

STEP 2

• a firm, fresh English cucumber (regular works as well) • an exacto knife or sharp, small knife • a melon baller • a twig, sturdy stem or decorative grass

1. Cut a piece of cucumber 3-4” in length. STEP 3

Trim as needed so it stands up straight.

2. Cut down either side to form handles. Be careful not to make cuts too deep.

3. Carefully cut out the area between the handles and use a melon baler to scoop out the inside of the bucket. Leave enough on the sides to support the handles and whatever you put inside. STEP 4

4. You may wish to make decorative cuts on the side to further embellish or simply leave the texture of the cucumber. If you make cuts on the side. Remember they must be very shallow. Fill with items of your choice. 2012 Asian Fabric 49


Coral Tree Fabrics

Kona Bay Fabrics Finds Love In South Africa

Just when you think you know everything about fabric, something new and interesting comes along. Neither Kona Bay Fabrics nor African textiles are new, but the two together are bringing an exciting new story to the United States. DaGama Textiles is one of South Africa’s oldest and leading textile producers. Their brands are household names and can be seen in use among diverse cultural groups throughout South Africa. Kona Bay Fabrics has been providing quilting and sewing enthusiasts with high quality, exquisitely designed 100% cotton fabric since 1991. Kona Bay lead the way, being the first to introduce Asian designs to the quilting industry. When two culture conscious leaders meet, the results can be creatively dynamic. Kona Bay Fabrics is proud to announce that they are now US Distributors of the unique DaGama Textiles Coral Tree Fabrics Shweshwe Collection. “Our customers will love working with the DaGama designs,” remarked Douglas Eagleson, President of Kona Bay Fabrics, “Plus, the fabric has the same combed cotton soft finish Kona Bay Fabrics is known for.” Shweshwe, pronounced shway-shway, finds its African roots in the 1600’s. Traditional shweshwe, a heavily starched indigo fabric was printed in red, brown and indigo. The rich, layered designs are accented by sharp detailing that comes from the dye discharge printing technique used. DaGama is using the same designs that have proven timeless as the basis for their new, 100% cotton fabric for quilting, home sewing and wearables. The innovative, modern interpretations of Shweshwe feature brilliant, contemporary colors suitable for a range of projects. Kona Bay Fabrics, who sells solely wholesale, is taking orders for the first shipment due in June. Visit the Kona Bay Fabrics website at konabay.com to view the entire line.


Coral Tree Quilt

This geometric design lap quilt features the newest DaGama Coral Tree fabric line from Kona Bay Fabrics. Important information please read prior to cutting fabrics. We recommend washing and pressing all fabrics prior to cutting it into strips and pieces, for best results wash each color separately. Triangles can be cut using one of two methods. 1. “Fussy Cutting” pieces from a directional fabric design. Draw large, medium and small triangles on pattern paper or template plastic. Refer to information on template page (page 57) and cut triangles from fabric strips as shown in the illustrations or select design elements in fabric and use triangle template to randomly cut triangle pieces. Extra fabric will be needed for “Fussing Cutting” fabric, adjust yardage as needed. 2. For non-directional fabric use this method. Refer to project Cutting Chart to cut First Cuts strips as indicated in chart then squares from these strips as listed under

52 Asian Fabric 2012

Next Cuts. Fabric squares listed in chart are cut once or twice diagonally to make triangles pieces.

Making the Quilt Refer to General Instructions (pages 58-59) for technique information. Use an Accurate Seam Allowances and Assembly Line Method to construct this quilt. Use a 4” -wide seam allowance throughout this project. Press seams in direction of arrows as indicated in each diagram.

1. Sew one small Fabric G triangle to one small Fabric D triangle as shown. Press. Sew one medium Fabric B triangle Diagram 1 to unit. Press. Make sixteen.

Make !^


Coral Tree Quilt Cutting Chart & Material List Coral Tree Lap Quilt 64” square Featuring fabrics from the Da Gama Coral Tree & Kona Bay Fleur Tonal Collections designer: Georgie Gerl

material list Backing $ yards Batting &)” x &)” Cut strips as indicated in chart then cut smaller pieces listed from these strips. Yardages listed are for regular cuts. If “Fussy Cutting” extra yardage will be needed. Amounts will vary depending on motif selection and fabric repeats.

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

First Cuts

Fabric A GS0013-07 d yard Featured Squares

! #

Fabric B FLEUR-01 Cream/White @a yards Background

@ @ # % !)

Next Cuts

*2” x $@” $ *2” squares %2” x $@” !^ %2” squares

^4” x $@” %d” x $@” %2” x $@” #” x $@” @” x $@”

* * !^ #@

^4” sqs* %d” sqs** %2” squares #” x %2”

*^4” squares cut twice diagonally (small triangles) **%d” squares cut once diagonally (medium triangles) Fabric C FLEU-01 Black • @4 yards Dark Squares & Binding

@ !) &

!!a” x $@” $ !!a” sqs* #” x $@” !@* #” squares @w” x $@”

*!!a” squares cut twice diagonally (large triangles) Fabric D GS0007-01 s yard Accent Squares

! #

^4” x $@” $ ^4” sqs* 2012 Asian 00 #@ #” Fabric #” x $@” squares

*^4” squares cut twice diagonally (small triangles)

Fabric Name, Placement & Yardage

First Cuts

Next Cuts

Fabric E GS0024-02 s yard Accent Squares

! #

^4” x $@” $ ^4” sqs* #@ #” squares #” x $@”

Fabric F GS0025-02 s yard Accent Squares

! #

Fabric G GS0001-01 s yard Accent Squares

! #

Fabric H GS0002-01 w yard Accent Border

!%

!2” x $@”

Fabric I GS0027-07 w yard Border

@ !)

!^ #” squares #” x $@” !2” x $@” @ !2” x #)2”

*^4” squares cut twice diagonally (small triangles) ^4” x $@” $ ^4” sqs* #@ #” squares #” x $@”

*^4” squares cut twice diagonally (small triangles) ^4” x $@” $ ^4” sqs* #@ #” squares #” x $@”

*^4” squares cut twice diagonally (small triangles) * !2” x !)2” * !2” x *2”

2012 Asian Fabric 53


2. The Simple Triangles technique 5. Making Simple Triangle units,

8. Making Simple Triangle units,

sew one #” Fabric D square to one #” x %2” Fabric B piece as shown. Press. Sew one 3” Fabric E square to unit from this step as shown. Press. Make sixteen. Sew one unit from this step to one unit from step 4 as Diagram 5 shown. Press. Make sixteen.

sew one #” Fabric F square to one #” x %2” Fabric B piece as shown. Press. Sew one 3” Fabric G square to unit from this step. Press. Make sixteen. Sew one unit from this step to one unit from step 7 as shown. Diagram 7 Press. Make sixteen.

Fabric D-#” square Fabric E-#” square Fabric B-#” x %2” Make !^

Fabric F-#” square Fabric G-#” square Fabric B-#” x %2” Make !^

is used throughout this quilt refer to General Instructions or back to this step for detail instructions. Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of one #” Fabric I square. This will be your sewing line. Place one marked square on one pieced unit from step 1 as shown. Stitch on drawn line, trim 4” away from stitch lines and press. Make sixteen. Diagram 2

Fabric I-#” square Pieced Unit from step 1 Make !^

3. Sew one @” x $@” Fabric B strip to one !2” x $@” Fabric H strip lengthwise to make a strip set as shown. Press. Make ten. Cut strip set into sixty-four %2” -wide Diagram 3 segments.

Make !^

Make !^

6. Sew one unit from step 2 to

9. Sew one unit from step 8 to

one unit from step 5 as shown. Diagram 5-B Press. Make sixteen.

one %2” Fabric A square as shown. Diagram 8 Press. Make sixteen. %2”

$@”

%2” @” !2”

Make 10 %2”

Cut ^$ segments

Make !^

7. Making Simple Triangle units, sew one #” Fabric F square to one pieced unit from step 3 as shown. Press. Sew one 3” Fabric G square to unit from this step. Press. Make Diagram 6 sixteen.

Make !^

10. Sew one unit from step 6 to one unit from step 9 as shown. Press. 9 Unit 1. Make sixteenDiagram and label Unit 1

4. Referring to Simple Triangle technique in step 2, sew one #” Fabric D square to one pieced unit from step 3 as shown. Press. Sew one #” Fabric E square to unit from Diagram 4 this step. Press. Make sixteen.

Fabric F-#” square Fabric G-#” square Pieced Unit from step 3 Make !^

Make !^

11. Sew one small Fabric E triangle Fabric D-#” square Fabric E-#” square Pieced Unit from step 3 Make !^

to one small Fabric B triangle as shown. Press. Make sixteen. Sew this unit to one Fabric C large triangleDiagram piece as 10 shown. Press Make sixteen.

Make !^

54 Asian Fabric 2012

Make !^


Diagram 16

12. Sew one small Fabric B triangle

17. Sew one 82” Fabric A square between

to one small Fabric F triangle as shown. Press. Make sixteen. Sew this unit to one pieced unit from step 11 11 sixteen. as shown.Diagram Press Make

two !2” x *2” Fabric H strips. Press seams toward Fabric H. Sew this unit between two !2” x 1!)2” Fabric H strips as shown. Press and label Unit 3. Make four.

!2”

Unit 3

!2”

!)2”

Make $ Make !^

Make !^

13. Making Simple Triangle units,

18. Sew one Unit 2 between two of Unit 1 as shown. Press. Make eight for block top and bottom rows.

Diagram 17

sew four 3” Fabric C squares to one %2” Fabric B square as shown. Press. Make Diagram sixteen. 12

Make 8 Fabric C-#” squares Fabric B-%2” square Make !^

19. Sew one Unit 3 between two of Unit Diagram 18 2 as shown. Press. Make four for block middle rows.

14. Making Simple Triangle units, sew two 3” Fabric C squares to one unit from step 3 as shown. Press. Diagram 13 Make thirty-two. Make 4 Fabric C-#” squares Pieced Unit from step 3 Make #@

15. Sew one unit from step 13 between two units from step 14 as Diagram 14 shown. Press. Make sixteen.

20. Sew one row from step 19 between two rows from step 18. Press. Make four. Blocks measure #)2” square. Diagram 19 two blocks as shown. 21. Sew one !2” x #)2” Fabric I strip between

Press. Make two. !2”

Make !^

#)2”

16. Sew one unit from step 12 to one unit from step 15 15 as shown. Diagram Press and label Unit 2. Make sixteen. Unit 2

Make 2

22. Sew !2” x $@” Fabric I strips end-to-end to make one continuous Make !^

1!2”-wide Fabric I strip. Press. Measure quilt row from side to side. Cut three !2”-wide strips to this measurement.

2012 Asian Fabric 55


23. Referring to layout, arrange and sew together three strips from step 22 and rows from step 21. Press seams toward border.

24. Measure quilt through center from top to bottom, including borders just added. Cut two !2”-wide Fabric I strips to that measurement. Sew to sides of quilt and press.

Finishing the Quilt 1. Cut backing fabric piece into two equal pieces. Sew pieces together to make one &@” x *)” approximate backing piece. Press.

2. Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads. Layer and baste backing, batting, and quilt top together. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Bind quilt as desired.

Coral Tree Quilt

64” Coral Tree Quilt64”x Layout • ^$” square

56 Asian Fabric 2012


Alternative Method for Cutting Triangle Pieces Draw pattern on template plastic or pattern paper and cut on drawn lines. Triangles can be cut randomly from fabric or cut strips of fabric wider than triangle pieces aligning fabric straight of grain with pattern straight of grain markings.

Coral Tree Small Triangle Pattern

G of ht ig ra St in ra

to igh

a Str

Small & Large Triangle Cutting Layout

fG

Coral Tree Medium Triangle Pattern

rain

Straight of Grain

Medium Triangle Cutting Layout

Straight of Grain

Strai g

ht of G

rain

Larg Coral Tre e Tria e ngle Patte

rn

Important Information: Straight of Grain markings is noted on each pattern piece. Small and Large Triangle straight of grain is placed along triangle long side while the Medium Triangle is placed on each short side. This is important in order to eliminate bias edges along blocks outside edges. 2012 Asian Fabric 57


general instructions

How-to Help You! Before You Begin We recommend washing and pressing your fabric prior to cutting it into strips and pieces. To help prevent fabric from fraying in the washer, clip corners at a 45 degree angle removing a small triangle piece.

Achieving a Perfect Block Accurate Seam Allowance Use 4”-wide seam allowance for all projects in this magazine unless otherwise stated. If seam allowances differ as little as z” assembling blocks will be difficult, especially when incorporating several block designs in a quilt. To check your seam allowances follow these steps.

Half Square Triangles

without breaking threads, continue this process to stitch additional units. Cut sections apart, press and continue with next step.

Fussy Cut This process is the selection and cutting of a particular motif pattern which is featured in a cut piece. Remember to center design and always allow for seam allowance.

Simple Triangles This is an easy way to make triangles from squares.

Step 1 Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of fabric square that will become the triangle. This will be your stitch line.

Step 1 Cut three 12” x 6” pieces of fabric from assorted scraps. Sew pieces together to make one 32” x 6” piece. Press.

Step 2 Center strip should measure 1” x 6”. If piece measures differently check to see if seams have been pressed flat. If the piece still differs cut new strips and adjust seam allowance until you achieve the perfect stitch.

Pressing Press using steam or dry heat setting. Always use an “up and down” motion since a side-to-side motion can distort the block or unit.

Assembly Line Method Use this method when making multiple pieces or blocks.

Step 2 Place marked square on fabric piece shown in construction step matching raw edges. Sew on drawn line and trim 4” away from stitching.

Fabric A- 2 2" x 2 2" Fabric B- 2 2" x 6 2"

Step 3 Press seams as indicated in construction diagram. Measure sewn piece to check accuracy.

Tip: There is a waste factor with this technique but you can stitch an additional 2” away from stitch line. Cut piece between stitching saving the smaller version for some future project. Diagram 3

Step 1

Position pieces right sides together, stitch unit.

Step 2 Align and sew the next unit

58

ASIAN FABRIC 2012

This technique differs from the Simple Triangle method; you will be making two triangles at one time.

Step 1 Draw a diagonal line on the wrong side of one fabric square. Place marked square and one corresponding square right sides together. Sew a scant 4” away from drawn line on both sides, cut on drawn line, and press.

Fabric F- 2 2" x 2 2" Fabric D- 2 2" x 2 2"

Square to 2” Make 2

Step 2 Measure unit and trim as indicated in construction diagram.

Applique Technique Quick Fused Method This method joins fabric to each other with the use of fusible web. There are many types on the market and you will need to refer to manufacturer’s instruction for specific requirements. If quilt does not require laundering you can use heavy-weight fusible web and follow steps 1-4. If your quilt will require laundering use lightweight fusible web and follow all steps. Remember that appliqués when pressed to background fabric will be a reverse image from patterns provided.

Step 1 Trace all appliqué pieces on the paper side of lightweight fusible web leaving 2” space between pieces. Cut approximately 4” away from traced line.

Step 2 With fusible web paper side up, fuse to the wrong side of fabric scraps following manufacturer’s instructions.

Step 3 Cut on draw line. Remove future project

paper backing, a thin film of adhesive will remain on fabric.


General Instructions

Step 4 Referring to project photo, position and fuse all pieces of one appliqué design at a time onto background.

Tip: An Appliqué Pressing Sheet is very helpful when there are many elements to a design. Place your pattern (reverse image from pattern provided) under the pressing sheet as a guide. Arrange pieces on sheet and press following manufacturer’s instructions. Allow piece to cool, remove appliqué unit and arrange on background to fuse unit in place. If the piece is not cooled, the fusible web could remain on the sheet instead of the fabric.

Step 5 If using a machine, cut a piece of stabilizer larger than appliqué area and pin to wrong side of fabric. Stabilizer is used to achieve an even stitch. Using a satin stitch, blanket stitch or other decorative stitching to secure appliqué in place. Start stitching from the background to the foreground. Option: use a hand embroidery stitch instead.

Hand Appliqué If project specifies quick-fuse you will need to reverse all patterns and add 4”- wide seam allowance. The steps that follow will add the seam allowance after pattern is traced onto fabric.

Step 1 Make a template of all pattern pieces and indicate where pieces overlap. Place template on right side of selected fabric.

Step 2 Trace around template using a removable fabric marker. This will be your turn under guide. Cut out shapes approximately 4” beyond traced line. Step 3 When layering and positioning pieces always work from the background to the foreground.

Step 4 Enter from the wrong side of applique shape bringing the needle up on the traced line. Using the tip of the

needle turn under a small portion of the fabric along trace line and secure with thumb. Using a blind stitch, stitch along folded edge to join piece to background. Stitch is hidden under fabric.

Option 1 Step 1 Position binding away from corner leaving 8” free of stitches and aligning raw edges with the edge of the quilt. Sew using a 4”-wide seam.

Step 2 Stop sewing 4” from quilt top

Blind Stitch

Finishing the Quilt

edge and backstitch. Clip threads and turn quilt. Fold binding up at a 45 degree angle to create the mitered corner as shown.

Diagram 1

Backing fabric and batting should be 4”-8” larger than the quilt top. Press backing and quilt top trimming all excess threads from quilt prior to basting.

Step 1 Lay backing right side down, batting and quilt top (right side up) on top.

Step 2 Backing and batting need to

Step 3 Fold the binding back down aligning top fold with edge of quilt and matching raw edges. Start stitching 4” Diagram 2 for all corners. from quilt edge. Repeat

be taut prior to basting quilt. Start in the center and work out toward edges. You can hand stitch, pin or use a specialty tool to baste quilt together.

Step 3 Check batting instruction for quilting requirements. Hand or machine quilt as desired. Remove basting.

Binding the Quilt Two options are given for binding the quilt. For both options trim batting and backing 4” beyond raw edge of quilt, this will give fullness to the binding. Sew binding stripes end-to-end to make one continuous strip. Fold and press binding strips in half lengthwise with wrong sides together. To reduce bulk when joining strips, cut ends at 450 angle and sew together as shown.

Step 4 Determine length needed for binding strip ends, trim and sew ends together. Stitch binding to quilt. Fold binding to back of quilt, a diagonal fold will form at the corners. Hand-stitch binding to back of quilt.

Option 2 Step 1 Measure quilt through center from side to side. Cut two binding strips to this measurement. Sew to top and bottom of quilt matching raw edges with edge of quilt. Press binding away from quilt top.

Step 2 Measure quilt through center from top to bottom including the binding just added. Cut two strips to this measurement and sew to sides of quilt. Press.

Step 3 Fold top and bottom strips to the back and pin in place. Repeat for sides. Hand-stitch binding to quilt. 2012 ASIAN FABRIC 59


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