Page 1

                                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

                                                                                                                                       KNUT  SKJÆRVEN    

ON THE  GO    

WORKBOOK FOR  NEW  STREET  AGENDA.  


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

         

 

                                                      A  DEDICATION       THIS  BOOK  IS  FOR  MY  PARENTS  AND  THEIR  PARENTS  AND  THEIR  SONS  AND  DAUGTHERS.     SOME  WERE  THERE  FOR  THE  PAST,  SOME  ARE  HERE  FOR  THE  PRESENT,  AND  SOME  WILL  BE  THERE  FOR  THE   FUTURE.     PHOTOGRAPHS  LOOK  AT  EVERYTHING  FROM  EVERYWHERE.    ALL  IS  VISIBLE  IN  ALL  ELSE.     ALL  IS  STILL  THERE.     COPENHAGEN   APRIL  3,  2014.    

 

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

2


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

  RAIN  DANCE  #1     LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin,  June  2012  

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

3


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

              INTRODUCTION     This  is  a  workbook  on  the  go.     Not  only  can  you  bring  it  with  you.    It  will  also  be  under  constant  development.  It  is  ready  as   you  find  it  now.  The  next  time  you  visit  it  may  be  even  more  ready.       Photographs  might  change  place  or  be  substituted  and  texts  may  be  added.       The  workbook  will  eventually  hold  129  photographs.  Not  that  many  texts.  After  all,  we  are   here  for  the  visuals  and  not  for  the  words.       The  workbook  it  is  also  a  personal  statement  on  street  photography.  It  goes  beyond  the   narrow  definition  of  the  term.       It  has  no  beginning,  no  middle  and  no  end.  It  does  not  matter  where  you  start  and  stop.  Every   photograph  reflects  all  others.  So  does  every  piece  of  text.       At  present  it  functions  mostly  as  a  picture  book.  Increasingly  it  will  also  become  a  textbook.       The  workbook  is  intended  as  a  tool  for  NEW  STREET  AGENDA:  The  Workshop.  You  will  find   information  on  NEW  STREET  AGENDA  in  the  back  of  the  book.     Good  luck  studying  the  workbook.  Don’t  forget  that  the  photographs  need  to  be  read  as  well.     Knut  Skjærven     Copenhagen,  March  24,  2014.     If  you  want  to  support  the  project  New  Street  Agenda,  it  is  possible  to  make  a  donation  or  buy  one  of  the   framed  photographs.  For  more  information  please  see  page  165.  

Front  Page  Photo:  The  Greeting  #00,  Berlin,  2011        

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

4


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

THE  WEDDING    #2   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Copenhagen,  June  2011    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

5


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

TEXT  CONTENT:       INTRODUCTION  (3);  TEXT  CONTENT,  PHOTO  CONTENT;  COUNCIL  OF  EUROPE  (7);   GESTALT  FACTORS;  DIFFERENCE  IS  EVERYTHING;  MAP  THE  GAP;  HONOURING  HENRI;   YOU  NEED  A  PROJECT;  TAPPING  INTO  THE  STREAM  OF  LIFE;  IN  CONCERT;  PICKING  YOUR   SECOND  BRAIN;  INTRODUCING  THE  LIKERT  SCALE;  WHY  CONTENT  ANALYSIS;  TWO   ROADS  TO  BERLIN;  FIGURE/GROUND;  KILL  YOUR  DARLINGS;  OCCAM’S  RAZOR;  THE   DEFINITION;  HIGH  AND  LOW;  TWIN  SISTER;  THE  LADDER;  WHAT  COMES  FIRST?;   CONNOTATION  PROCEDURES;  ITCHING  PHOTOGRAPHY;  WALLS  OF  VISION;  IS  STREET   PHOTOGRAPHY  ART?;  MEN  ACT,  WOMEN  APPEAR;  WHAT  IS  BAREBONES   COMMUNICATION?;  HAVE  YOU  EVER  BEEN  ARRESTED?;  REFERENTIAL  STREET   PHOTOGRAPHY;  VISUAL  STORYTELLING;  CREATICS;  FROM  CITY  PLAN  TO  CITY  STREET;     TWO  SPATIAL  SYSTEMS;  WHOLES  AND  PARTS;  THE  TWO  HERMENEUTICS;  BAREBONES´   BLOGS;  SELECTED  LITERATURE  AND  LINKS;  WORKSHOP  AND  E-­‐LEANING  PROGRAMS;   ABOUT  THE  AUTHOR;  LIMITED  EDITIONS;    THREE  WAYS  OF  SUPPORT;  NOW  TAKE  THE   SAME  WAY  BACK.     TO  BE  CONTINUED  …                

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

6


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

            PHOTO  CONTENT:     THE  GREETING  (FRONTPAGE  00);       RAIN  DANCE;  THE  WEDDING;  GIRL  WITH  BIKE;  DIRTY  DANCING;  BIKE  MENDER;  FIVE  IN  A   ROW;  BRASS  BAND;  DOCKSIDE;  THE  SHADOW;  DOCKLANDS  (10);  THE  MUSICIANS;  DAY   DREAMERS;  HOT  SPOT;  IN  CONCERT;  THE  FLYING  DUTCHMAN;  HONOURING  HENRI;   BRIEF  ENCOUNTER;  LADY  IN  BLUE;    AT  THE  GALLERY;  IN  MID  AIR  (20);  LONG  TALL   SALLY;  LAST  CHANCE;  THE  READER;  JUST  PASSING;  LOUVRE;  POTSDAMER  LOW;   RINGSIDE;  LOOKING  BACK;  GONE  FISHING;  POSITIONS  (30);  PIANO  MAN;  MARATHON   MAN;  VINTAGES;  DISTRACTION;  THE  SPREAD;  RAINY  DAY;  LEAVING  HOME;  THE   STRANGER;  THE  INTERVIEW;  THE  GHOST  (40);  FRIENDS;  THE  CROSSING;  THE  BRIDE;   ROCK  MUSIC;  SKIN  TONES;  THE  LOBBY;    PLAYGROUND;  UNDER  THE  BRIDGE;  SELF   PORTRAIT;  SPREE  VIEW  (50);  PARISERPLATZ;  MONUMENT  MEN;  TWIN  SISTERS;  PARTY   TIME;  SHOOTING  SHADOW;  IN  A  ROW;  CAMERA  WORK;  SOFT  SOLUTION;  K-­‐DAMM   COUPLE;  BLUE  NOTE  (60);  MONBIJO  PARK;  THE  KISSING  LINK;  BLUE  LADY;  MOVABLE   FEAST;  THE  SMILE;  THE  DANCERS;  ART  LOVERS;  CHECKPOINT  CHARLIE  ;  SMOKING;  THE   PHOTOGRAPHER  (70);  WAYS  OF  SEEING;  KEEPING  LOW;  WINSTON’S  VOCATION;   THOUGHTFUL;  MYSTERY  MAN;  FAMILY  LIFE;  DANCE  LESSON;    BOOKSHOP;  BIKE  BENEFIT;   THE  RECEPTION  (80);  POTSDAMER  PLATZ;  SURVEILLANCE;  BUS  DRIVER;  SEX  IN  THE   CITY;  DOWN  STAIRS;  BLUE  VELVET;  COUPLES;  DANISH  DESIGN;  LUNCH  TIME;  MONKEY   BUSINESS  (90);  THE  LETTER;  PRESS  CONFERENCE;  LEGS;  BLENDING;  LUSTGARTEN;   PICTURING  PEOPLE;  IN  THE  MOOD;  THE  KISS;  MODERN  TIMES;  WINDOW  VIEW  (100);   THE  CONFERENCE;  GONE  SHOPPING;  CLOSER  LOOK;  FRAMEWORK;  IN  COLOUR;  BITS  AND   PIECES;  THE  BOW;  LOOKING  AT  YOU;    THIRST;  MEN  IN  BLACK  (110);  BERLIN  FASHION;   SORROWS;  REFLECTIONS;  STREET  ART;  NIGHTLIFE;  RED  DRESS;  CAPTAIN’S  CORNER;   WINNER  TAKES  ALL;  MIRROR,  MIRROR;  NOT  AFRAID  (120);  RESTING  ARTIST;  GENUINE   SISOL;  THE  PHOTOGRAPHER;  SOLID  STATEMENT;  HANDS  ON;  THE  CROWD;    WALL   PAPER;     DANCING  FEET  (128)       TO  BE  CONTINUED  …          

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

7


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

GIRL  WITH  BIKE    #3  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin,  June  2011        

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

8


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

COUNCIL OF  EUROPE         In  September  2012  I  was  approached  by  the  Council  of  Europe.      They  said  that  they  had  seen  my   photographs  on  the  internet,  and  kindly  asked  if  they  could  use  some  of  them  for  a  larger  project  they   were  running.         This  project  was  the  elaboration  of  an  online  self-­‐study  course  for  the  Autobiography  of   Intercultural  Encounters.         The  photographs  were  to  be  used  as  illustrations  for  this  self-­‐study  course.    I  had  no  objections  and   when  the  course  opened  in  December  2013,  it  contained  47  of  my  photographs.  All  recently  shot  in   Europe.           Most  of  the  photos  you  will  find  in  this  book.  When  you  find  “COE”  written  behind  the  number  of  the   photograph,  it  means  that  the  picture  is  included  in  the  online  course  for  the  Autobiography  of   Intercultural  Encounters.         Council  of  Europe  is  a  huge  organization  that  was  established  shortly  after  the  Second  World  War  to   advocate  democracy,  human  rights  and  peace.  Today,  it  consists  of  47  Europeans  states  covering  some   820  million  people.  Yes,  that  is  the  population  of  larger  Europe.       There  will  be  a  virtual  exhibition  of  the  photos  in  Strasbourg  in  the  end  of  April  2014,  and  I  will  try  to   hold  exhibitions  in  other  Europeans  cities  as  well.         I  am  grateful  and  honoured  to  be  a  part  of  the  Autobiography  of  Intercultural  Encounters.  It  is  a   long-­‐term  project  which  the  Council  of  Europe  will  continue  to  develop.           For  more  information  about  the  Council  of  Europe  and  the  Autobiography  of  Intercultural   Encounters,  please  follow  the  links  below.     COUNCIL  OF  EUROPE:   http://hub.coe.int     AUTOBIOGRAPHY  OF  INTERCULTURAL  ENCOUNTERS:  THE  PROJECT:   http://www.coe.int/t/dg4/autobiography/default_en.asp     AUTOBIOGRAPHY  OF  INTERCULTURAL  ENCOUNTERS.    THE  APPLICATION:   http://coe.dokeos.com/main/newscorm/lp_controller.php?cidReq=AUTOBIOGRAPHYOFINTER&actio n=view&lp_id=1        

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

9


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

DIRTY  DANCING    #4  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin,  June  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

10


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

BIKE  MENDER    #5   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Paris  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

11


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

GESTALT FACTORS     One  of  the  major  set  of  tools  for  doing  itching  images  are  gestalt  factors.  They  derive  from   gestalt  psychology,  which  roughly  speaking  was  a  discipline  developed  at  Humboldt   University  of  Berlin  in  the  beginning  of  the  nineteenth  century.     Major  figures  are  Max  Wertheimer  (1880-­‐1943),  Wolfgang  Köhler  (1887-­‐1967),  and  Kurt   Koffka  (1886-­‐1941).  The  two  last  were  students  of  the  first.     The  original  gestalt  factors  are  these:  1)  the  factor  of  proximity;  2)  the  factor  of  similarity;  3)   the  factor  of  common  fate  or  destiny;  4)  the  factor  of  objective  set;  5)  the  factor  of  direction;  6)   the  factor  of  closure;  7)  the  factor  of  good  curve;  and  8)  the  factor  of  past  experience  or  habit.     These  are  the  factors  mentioned  in  a  ground  breaking  article  by  Max  Wertheimer  from  1923.     Gestalt  means  distinctive  form.       Gestalt  factors  are  factors  that  are  at  work  dealing  with  the  low  road  of  perception.       The  exception  to  that  is  the  factor  of  past  experience  or  habit.       Through  past  experience  or  habit  you  will  be  able  to  modify  the  impact  of  the  other  factors.   This  factor  links  the  high  road  and  the  low  road  of  perception.     It  is  interesting  to  see  how  many  of  the  famous  street  photographers,  who,  by  pure  instinct,   use  gestalt  factors  in  their  photography.  It  is  not  likely  that  they  new  much  about  gestalt   factors.       Yet,  they  practiced  it.        

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

12


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

FIVE  IN  A  ROW    #6   LIMITED  EDITION  7   BERLIN  2010  

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

13


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

BRASS  BAND    #7  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2011  

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

14


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

DOCKSIDE    #8  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Hamburg  2011      

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

15


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

THE  SHADOW    #9  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013      

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

16


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

DOCKLANDS    #10  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Copenhagen  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

17


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                  DIFFERENCE  IS  EVERYTHING     Difference  is  everything.       Difference  is  a  fundamental  condition  for  perception.  Remember  what  happened  to  the  white  pearl  on  the  white   forehead?  It  turned  invisible  as  it  did  not  stand  out  to  be  perceived.  You  cannot  see  something  that  is  visually  not   there.  Even  if  it  is  actually  there.     From  micro  worlds  to  larger  cultural  movements.       If  there  is  no  difference,  there  is  nothing.       Two  black  pixels  side  by  side  cannot  be  seen,  as  there  is  nothing  to  set  them  apart.    Fill  a  frame  with  pixels  the   same  colour  and  you  have  nothing  but  colour.     Difference  works  well  in  street  photography  too.  Surprise,  surprise.  If  you  know  how  to  work  differences  you  can   make  your  photographs  stronger.       Take  the  next  photograph:  THE  MUSICIANS.     THE  MUSICIANS  holds  two  sets  of  distinctive  figures:  Three  guys  sitting  on  a  bench.  They  are  obviously  the   musicians.  One  contrabass  laying  in  the  grass  behind  them.  The  two  sets  are  different  and  the  photo  would  not  be   the  same  without  them.         Yes,  you  could  remove  the  contrabass  and  have  the  three  sitting  there  on  their  own.  Yes,  you  could  remove  the   three  people  and  have  the  contrabass  on  its  own.  That  would  be  two  very  different  pictures.  Now  they  are  there   in  the  shot  and  they  are  there  together.     That  means  two  things  for  this  photo.  First  it  becomes  a  referential  shot.  The  two  figures,  three  people  and  the   contrabass,  reflect  on  each  other.    Secondly,  and  even  more  curious:  the  two  do  not  wear  each  other  out.  Quite   the  opposite:  they  give  each  other  strength.    Being  different  they  push  each  other  to  stand  out.     It  is  a  case  of  visual  sharpening.       Want  to  make  a  visual  point  of  something,  then  make  sure  that  you  include  an  element  that  is  different  from  the   others.  That  is  what  difference  is  about  in  street  photography.    From  the  tiny  pixels  to  the  larger  relations.     You  can  take  any  photograph  in  the  workbook  as  an  example.    The  reason  why  you  can  see  something  at  all,  is   that  elements  are  different.  That  goes  for  the  whole  pictures  as  they  stand  out  from  the  background,  to  even  the   tiniest  elements,  called  pixels.          

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

18


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

THE  MUSICIANS    #11  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Paris  2013      

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

19


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                  MAP  THE  GAP     One  of  the  main  instruments  for  New  Street  Agenda  will  be  what  we  call  a  gap  analysis.  It  is  based  on  content   analysis,  but  takes  you  a  bit  further.   Gap  analysis  functions  as  the  first  practical  step  in    The  Workshop  and  the  courses  for  self-­‐study.  They  all  start   with  a  gap  analysis.   The  idea  is  very  simple.  According  to  Wikipedia  a  gap  analysis  “is  the  comparison  of  the  actual  performance  with   potential  performance”.   Applied  to  New  Street  Agenda  is  comes  down  to  this:  If  you  know  where  you  want  to  go  with  your  street  art,  you   need  to  map  where  you  are  at  present  and  make  a  plan  of  how  to  get  to  that  other  point.   You  have  to  map  the  gap  and  fill  it.      That  done  and  you  are  there.  With  a  little  bit  of  luck,  as  the  song  goes.   If  you  have  an  idea  of  where  you  want  to  be  in  the  future,  and  you  know  your  point  of  departure,  it  is  pretty  easy   to  mark  the  way  for  your  potential  progress.      Yes,  I  say  potential  progress  because  there  is  always  the  risk  that   you  never  make  it  to  that  other  point.  But  that  is  risk  you  carry  in  all  you  life  so  why  worry  about  it  here.   Knowledge  and  stamina  will  most  likely  do  it  for  you.  The  thing  you  know  for  sure  is  that  if  you  don’t  even  try,   you  will  never  reach  that  other  point.      That  other  point  is  your  benchmark.  A  benchmark  is  an  ideal  and  what   you  strive  for.   In  New  Street  Agenda  the  benchmark  is  how  the  classical  street  photographers  did  their  work.  There  are  many  to   name  but  indeed  Henri  Cartier-­‐Bresson  is  one  of  the  masters.  Others  are  Robert  Frank,  Elliot  Erwitt,  Bill  Brand,   Tony  Ray-­‐Jones  and  more.   If  you  see  what  these  folks  did  and  the  way  they  did  it,  you  have  your  benchmark.  Much  as  it  is  formulated  in  the   definition  we  have  of  street  photography  on  New  Street  Agenda.   In  New  Street  Agenda,  having  a  benchmark  and  mapping  the  gap,  are  integrated  tools  in  the  larger  process  of  you   individual  progress  as  street  photographers.   You  may  ask:  Is  the  idea  then  to  make  all  of  us  classical  street  photographer?  Definitely  not.  But  it  is  good  place   to  start  so  you  can  grow  out  of  there.   Remember  that  Picasso  was  an  excellent  natural  painter  before  he  started  to  change  the  way  we  see  things.  He  is   known  for  breaking  the  rules.  Not  for  following  them.   And  a  good  benchmark  too.  You  map  the  gap.        

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

20


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

DAY  DREAMERS    #12  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Paris  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

21


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

HOT  SPOT    #13  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Paris  2011    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

22


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

IN  CONCERT    #14     LIMITED  EDITION  7   Paris  2012  

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

23


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

THE  FLYING  DUTCHMAN    #15  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Paris  2012      

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

24


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

  HONOURING  HENRI     Honouring  Henri  (next  page)  is  an  inspirational.     Being  an  inspirational  means  that  it  takes  inspiration  from  something  else.  Could  be  a   photographic  style,  could  be  a  single  shot  that  you  admire.     When  I  took  an  interest  in  street  photography  a  few  years  back,  I  knew  that  one  of  the  ways  to   learn  was  to  study  the  work  of  the  famous.  I  started  reading  books  about  Henri  Cartier-­‐ Bresson  and  to  look  at  his  photographs.     I  liked  many  and  I  decided  to  copy  some  of  his  concepts  for  practice.  Not  the  actual  photos  but   their  concepts.  I  memorized  a  few  and  said  to  myself  that  I  needed  to  be  on  the  outlook  for   situations  that  were  similar.     One  of  the  photos  I  memorized  was  taken  in  Belgium  with  the  two  guys  looking  through  the   fence  at  a  football  match.    One  of  them  looking  away  from  the  fence.     Honouring  Henri  is  an  inspirational  based  on  that  famous  photograph  by  Henri  Cartier-­‐ Bresson.            

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

25


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

HONOURING  HENRI    #16  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Paris  2012          

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

26


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

              YOU  NEED  A  PROJECT     You  are  not  going  to  make  it  without  a  project.  That  is  the  very  simple  truth.     Wanting  to  do  street  photography,  make  up  your  mind  about  it.  Wanting  to  do  street  photography,  you  already   have  a  project.       But  you  might  want  to  be  a  bit  more  specific  about  it.     Why  do  you  need  to  have  a  project?  Simply  because  it  helps  you  focus  and  do  the  job  you  want  to  do.  If  you  don’t   like  your  project  after  a  while,  don’t  stay  on  it.  Make  yourself  another  project.     A  project  may  be  wide  or  it  maybe  deep.       The  collective  project  we  have  set  up  for  the  workshop  in  Berlin  in  2014,  is  Berlin  Vibrant  City.       By  using  the  word  vibrant  you  are  already  half  way  there.       Vibrant  is  defined  as  positive,  lively,  exiting,  itching  and  respectful.    You  have  set  aside  the  part  of  the  world  that  is   negative,  not  lively,  not  exiting,  not  itching  and  disrespectful.     Humour  is  in  there  too.     I  made  a  project  some  years  back.  It  was,  roughly,  to  shoot  street  scenes.  I  am  still  on  that  project  but  have   broken  it  down  in  smaller  projects.       Street  scenes  was  defined  as;  a)  having  people  as  the  bearing  element;  b)  being  contextual  and  shoot  for  scenes   with  people  interacting;  c)  taken  in  public  areas;  d)  being  respectful  concerning  the  people  in  the  photographs.     Going  for  straight  photography  with  minimal  post-­‐production.     Street  photography  was  and  is  (to  me)  more  of  an  attitude  than  a  locality.  That  gives  me  room  to  shoot  anything  I   like  but  still  with  an  eye  on  the  project.     Good  luck  with  you  own  project.  You  need  to  have  one.          

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

27


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

BRIEF  ENCOUNTER    #17  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Paris  2012          

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

28


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

LADY  IN  BLUE    #18  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Paris  2013          

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

29


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

AT  THE  GALLERY    #19   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Paris  2012          

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

30


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

IN  MID  AIR    #20  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Copenhagen  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

31


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

  TAPPING  ON  TO  THE  STREAM  OF  LIFE     Think  of  it  this  way:  Street  photography,  when  it  is  best,  taps  in  to  the  stream  of  life.  You  don’t   only  see  it.  You  feel  it.     The  difference  between  photography  and  mere  mechanical  picturetaking,  is  seeing  the   difference  and  reacting  on  it.       Street  photography  does  this  in  a  way  that  is  unique  compared  to  any  other  type  of   photography.    It  is  closer  to  life  than  any  other.       That  is  where  the  fascination  comes  from.         Tapping  into  the  stream  of  life  depends  on  four  things:  that  there  is  life;  a  way  of  seeing  it;  that   there  is  someone  to  record  it;  and  finally  that  there  are  instruments  to  record  it  with.     So  what  is  necessary,  then,  are  these  four  things:  the  photographed;  and  a  way  of  seeing;  the   photographer;  and  a  photographing  device.       In  no  way  is  this  an  easy  task.  Of  the  four,  a  way  of  seeing  is  the  most  important.     Street  photography,  when  at  its  best,  is  just  this.      

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

32


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

LONG  TALL  SALLY    #21   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012  

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

33


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

LAST  CHANCE    #22  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

34


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                    IN  CONCERT     Have  you  ever  been  to  course  in  creativity,  where  the  instructor  has  asked  you  to  characterize  yourself  as  an   animal?  I  have.       Maybe  you  see  yourself  as  a  lion?  Maybe  you  are  a  mouse?  Maybe  something  in  between?  Or  something  very   different.     The  idea  is  that  the  answers  tell  about  your  personality  and  even  suggest  which  type  of  positions  in  a  company   you  might  be  good  at  handling.       There  are  much  more  to  it  than  this,  but  I  am  sure  you  get  the  idea.     Let’s  try  this  in  a  slightly  different  way.       I  often  compare  a  street  photograph  to  a  piece  of  music  and  ask  a  few  questions:  One,  what  type  of  music  is  this   photograph?  Second,  are  there  false  tones  played.       I  might  say;  oh  this  is  a  typical  bob  dylan,  a  grieg,  a  mozart  or  even  a  wagner.  Maybe  a  gun’s  and  roses  or  a  typical   pavarotti.     The  overall  question  is  always  this;  do  these  guys  play  in  concert?  Do  they  fit?  Are  the  signals  clear  and  are  the   noises  kept  in  proportion?       I  particularly  hunt  for  visual  noises.  Visual  noises  are  those  visual  elements  that  compete  with  or  even  disturb  the   main  message  of  a  photograph.     You  could  use  this  technique  already  when  shooting.  Go  for  a  clear  rhythm  where  elements  are  in  concert.  Or  you   could  apply  it  later.     I  find  such  a  change  of  perspective  to  work  really  well.  It  lets  me  see  things,  that  by  giving  them  other  names,   becomes  visible  in  new  ways.     If  you  are  a  lion  you  may  want  to  try  this.  If  you  are  a  mouse,  you’d  better  not.              

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

35


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

THE  READER    #23  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2011    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

36


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

JUST  PASSING    #24  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

37


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                    PICKING  YOUR  SECOND  BRAIN    

I am  sure  you  have  heard  the  expression  picking  someone's  brain.  It  is  a  fast  and  clever  way  to   get  new  knowledge  sitting  on  the  shoulders  of  others.  And  perfectly  legitime,  by  the  way.  It   simply  means  that  you  share  someone  else’s  good  knowledge.   Without  picking  other  people’s  brain  the  human  race  would  not  go  far.  Think  of  the  first   hunters,  who  learned  to  kill  from  their  forefathers  in  order  to  get  food  on  the  table.   What  about  starting  by  picking  your  own  brain?  Most  of  us  have  a  second  brain  and  even   more  brains  to  chose  from.  I  try  to  use  mine  as  best  I  can.  Sometimes  it  works.   Picking  your  second  brain  means  that  you  deliberately  use  information  from  one  area,  in   another  area.  You  take  tips  and  tricks  and  solid  knowledge,  that  you  have  from  one  area  and   apply  them  to  street  photography.   One  such  piece  of  information  I  have  from  phenomenology.  In  phenomenology  they  use  an   expression,  epoché,  that  originally  comes  from  Greek.  It  means  suspension.   When  suspending  you  try  to  set  aside  all  your  practical  knowledge  of  the  world  and  dive  into   the  phenomenon  in  question.     Another  word  for  it  is  brackets.  When  you  bracket  you  freeze  a  moment  to  investigate  it.   To  me  there  are  many  similarities  between  bracketing  and  photography.  Freezing  a  moment   is  one.  Having  taken  a  photo  you  have  all  the  chance  in  the  world  to  investigate  it.  It  does  not   run  away  like  the  rest  of  the  living  world  around  you.     In  photography  you  suspend  the  world  to  hold  on  to  particular  moments.  When  you  do  black   and  white  photography,  as  opposed  to  colour  photography,  you  already  start  suspending.  You   suspend  colour  information  to  better  concentrate  on  aesthetic  aspects  of  your  visual.  It  is   easier  to  see  form,  when  you  discard  colour.  Just  as  an  example.   For  me  this  technique  works  well.  I  am  in  no  doubt  that  it  will  for  you  too.  But  you  have  to  find   it  first.  Your  second  brain.    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

38


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

LOUVRE    #25   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Paris  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

39


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

POTSDAMER  LOW    #26  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin    2011    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

40


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

RINGSIDE    #27   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Copenhagen  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

41


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

LOOKING  BACK    #28  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2011    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

42


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                  INTRODUCING  THE  LIKERT  SCALE     When  you  look  at  a  photograph,  you  execute  a  tacit  content  analysis.    When  you  regard  a  real  life  scene,  you   perform  a  content  analysis,  as  well.     In  ordinary  looking  and  seeing,  be  it  a  real  life  situation  or  a  photograph,  content  analysis  is  already  at  play.  How   else  would  you  know  and  appreciate  what  you  are  looking  at?     Science  is  more  specific.  There  is  a  distinction  between  a  quantitative  and  a  qualitative  method.     If  you  have  a  series  of  photographs  in  front  of  you  can  count  the  number  or  people  in  each  and  come  up  with  an   average  of  people  per  photograph.  That  would  be  a  quantitative  analysis.       If  you  look  for  attitudes  of  the  people  involved,  as  an  example,  that  would  be  part  of  a  qualitative  analysis.     In  describing  photographs  in  New  Street  Agenda  we  will  go  a  step  further:  we  will  introduce  a  Likert  Scale.       A  Likert  scale  is  a  simple  way  of  detecting  attitudes  or  opinions.  You  simply  mark  a  scale  when  you  answer.     The  opinion  you  want  to  investigate  could  be  this:  Do  you  think  that  street  photographs  should  have  people  as  the   bearing  element?     The  scale  you  are  asked  to  mark,  could  be  like  the  one  below:            High  agreement                                            Average  Agreement                                                                                    Low  Agreement                          *  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  *    -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  *  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  *  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐  -­‐*     Mark  the  scale  and  you  have  your  answer.     There  are  at  least  three  critical  areas  using  such  a  scale.  You  need  to  know  them  all:       The  first  is  formulating  the  case  you  want  to  investigate.  The  second  is  your  ability  to  read  images.  The  third  is  the   truthfulness  in  giving  the  answer.     A  Likert  Scale  can  be  used  to  detect  your  strength  and  weaknesses  as  a  (street)  photographer.  It  is  possible  to   suggest  a  road  ahead  and  set  up  a  customised  training  program.  As  you  like  it.     Obviously,  this  will  not  only  improve  your  street  photography  but  you  visual  instinct  as  a  whole.     The  Likert  Scale,  by  the  way,  is  called  so  because  if  was  first  put  to  use  by  an  American  psychologist  named   Rensis  Likert  (1903  –  1981).      

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

43


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

GONE  FISHING    #29   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

44


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

POSITIONS    #30  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

45


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

MARATHON  MAN    #31  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Copenhagen  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

46


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                  WHY  CONTENT  ANALYSIS?     Why  content  analysis  in  street  photography?  Why  not  let  photographs  be  as  they  are  without  making  too  much   theoretical  fuzz  about  them?     Both  can  be  honoured.       Content  analysis  has  a  special  place  in  New  Street  Agenda.  In  a  learning  situation,  it  can  help  bring  you  from  one   phase  to  another.  It  may  show  you  were  you  are  at  the  moment  in  your  photography,  and  suggest  a  road  for   further  development.     Content  analysis  is  a  tool  for  progress.     There  are,  basically,  two  types  of  content  analysis.  They  serve  different  purposes.       The  two  types  are  quantitative  content  analysis  and  qualitative  content  analysis.  The  first  goes  wide  and  might   end  up  in  statistical  overview  of  a  series  of  photographs.    The  second  goes  deep  and  may  expose  things  like   attitudes  or  judgements  in  the  same  photographs.     You  may  want  to  know  the  percentages  of  men  and  woman  used  in  a  specific  newspaper  over  a  period.  You   simple  count  them  and  give  the  result  as  numbers.  That  would  be  an  example  of  quantitative  content  analysis.       If  you  in  addition  would  want  to  know  how  men  and  women  are  used  (positive,  negative,  neutral),  you  would   have  to  look  closer  at  each  image  to  see  how  people  are  placed  in  relation  to  each  other,  what  kind  of  lenses  used,   how  colours  are  used,  are  people  smiling,  etcetera.  That  would  be  example  of  a  qualitative  content  analysis.     The  two  differ  in  another  aspect  as  well.         It  is  relatively  straightforward  to  make  a  quantitative  analysis  of  the  type  mentioned.    You  need  to  be  able  to   recognize  men  from  women  and  to  count  them.  It  can  be  relatively  complicated  to  do  a  qualitative  analysis  of  the   same  photos.  You  need  know  what  it  is  in  a  photograph  that  constitutes  the  qualitative  aspects  of  it.       You  are  much  more  reliant  on  the  person,  who  does  the  analysis  for  you,  when  you  ask  for  a  qualitative  analysis   as  compared  to  a  quantitative  analysis.     You  could  say  that  that  quantitative  versus  qualitative  contents  aims  at  describing  the  hard  and  the  soft  contents   of  a  photograph.  In  New  Street  Agenda  we  will  use  these  terms.    

       

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

47


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

PIANO  MAN    #32  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Copenhagen  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

48


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

VINTAGES    #33  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Hamburg  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

49


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                ALL  YOU  HAVE  GOT     If  street  photography  sometimes  can  turn  out  artworks,  what  is  it  that  characterise  such  works  and  set  them   apart  from  both  classical  disciplines  as  painting  and  sculpture,  and  from  the  stream  of  average  street   photography?     Let  us  look  at  some  basics  before  I  answer  questions  related  to  this.       The  first  point  to  be  made  is  this:  Street  photography  is  made  with  a  technical  device  called  a  camera.       This  technical  device,  whatever  form  it  may  take,  have  the  capacity  of  fixing  visual  expressions.    Such  fixations   have  to  be  made  in  split  seconds  at  the  right  time  at  the  right  place.     For  street  photographers  such  expressions  are  gathered  from  public  life.     It  is  the  overall  characteristic  that  public  life  very  seldom  stands  still.  You  have  to  take  every  single  photo  in  a   narrow  window  of  two  simultaneous  movements:  your  own  movement  and  the  movement  of  that  or  those  you   are  picturing.       On  top  of  that  you  need  to  free  your  subjects  from  contexts  that  will  destroy  your  photograph  if  you  don’t  keep   them  at  low  noise.  You  even  have  to  compose  your  shot  in  way  that  the  composition  supports  the  overall   expression.     That  is  really,  really  a  tall  order.    Indeed  a  challenging  task.     You  do  not  have  the  chance  of  the  painter  or  the  sculpturer  to  come  back  after  a  break  to  erase  some  and  add   some.    You  do  not  have  the  benefit  of  the  street  documenter  to  come  back  the  next  day  to  do  it  all  over.  You  do   not  have  the  opportunity  of  the  landscape  photographer  to  wait  till  the  sun  shines  once  more.     Street  photography  is  a  very  different  ballgame.  It  solely  relies  on  your  ability  to  see  and  to  capture  those  rare   moments  that  are  there  for  an  instance  and  will  vanish  forever  thereafter.     You  only  have  that  split  second  window  that  either  makes  or  breaks  your  photograph.       That  is  all  you  have  got.            

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

50


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

DISTRACTION    #34  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2010    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

51


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

THE  SPREAD    #35  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

52


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                TWO  ROADS  TO  BERLIN     If  you  read  the  text  beneath  the  photographs  in  the  workbook,  you  will  find  that  many  have  been  taken  in  Berlin.   Why  is  that?     I  am  sure  that  we  all  have  our  favourite  spots  for  photography  and  mine  have,  for  some  years  now,  been  Berlin.   Even  if  I  live  in  Copenhagen  and  spend  most  of  my  time  there,  it  is  very  seldom  that  I  bring  a  camera  with  me.       When  I  visited  Berlin  for  the  first  time  in  2007  I  had  the  feeling  that  the  city  was  good  for  photography.  And  I  was   right.  Berlin  has  an  appreciation  for  photography  that  I  have  found  nowhere  else.    People  seem  to  love  it.     When  I  go  there,  I  always  bring  a  camera.     But  there  is  another  catch  to  it.       New  Street  Agenda  is  practically  born  out  of  Berlin.  In  a  most  curious  way.  I  can  even  be  more  precise:  It  is  born   out  of  Humboldt  University  of  Berlin.  That  you  did  not  know.     Let  me  explain.    Carl  Stumpf  (1848  –  1936)  founded  Berlin  School  of  Experimental  Psychology  in  1893.  There   arrives  Max  Wertheimer  (1880  –  1943)  to  study.  Later  came  Kurt  Koffka  (1886  –  1941)  and  Wolfgang  Köhler   (1887  –  1967).    Wertheimer,  Koffka  and  Köhler  are  said  to  be  the  founders  of  gestalt  psychology.       Gestalt  psychology  roams  in  the  background  of  New  Street  Agenda.       Also:  Rudolf  Arnheim  (1904  –  2007)  was  a  student  of  Max  Wertheimer.  He  got  his  doctorate  there  in  1928  on  a   thesis  on  facial  expressions  and  handwriting.  That  later  took  him  into  the  study  of  the  visual  arts.  Including  film   and  photography.     Want  more?       The  psychological  department  was  located  at  two  floors  of  the  The  Imperial  Palace,  Berlin  Schloss,  that  today  is   being  rebuild  as  a  house  of  art  and  culture,  Humboldt  Forum.         The  Imperial  Palace,  was  mentioned  by  Edmund  Husserl  (1859  –  1938)  when  he  for  the  very  first  time  addressed   photography  in  his  work  that  later  was  known  as  phenomenology.  That  was  in  1904.     You  could  say  that  New  Street  Agenda  goes  way  back.                

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

53


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

RAINY  DAY    #36  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2011    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

54


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

LEAVING  HOME    #37  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

55


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                FIGURE/GROUND     One  the  most  important  distinctions  you  will  ever  hear  about  in  visual  communication,  is  the  distinction   figure/ground.  Another  name  for  it,  that  may  be  even  more  illuminating,  is  the  distinction  signal/noise.     As  street  photography  is  a  discipline  within  visual  communication,  both  distinctions  are  of  paramount   importance  there  too.     If  you  don’t  know  or  experience  the  difference  of  how  figure/ground  or  signal/noise  stick  together,  it  is  not  likely   that  you  will  ever  take  a  good  shot.     The  figure  is  the  single  most  distinctive  element  in  a  photograph.  The  ground  is  everything  else.  The  signal  is  the   single  most  distinctive  element  in  a  photograph.  The  noise  is  everything  else.     The  basic  idea  is  to  have  the  figure  as  you  main  element  and  have  the  ground  support  it.  Too  much  visual  noise   and  you  will  not  hear  the  visual  signal.     In  The  Stranger  (next  page)  the  young  lady  sitting  is  the  figure  and  everything  else  is  the  supportive  ground.  She   is  the  signal  and  the  noise  orchestrate  nicely  around  her.     That  said,  you  can  change  the  figure  in  a  photograph  but  that  is  more  of  a  clinical  exercise  than  anything  else.         You  can  have  the  man  in  the  background  as  your  figure/signal  by  directing  your  attention  to  him,  but  he  will   never  be  in  natural  charge  of  the  photograph  in  the  same  way  as  the  young  woman.     The  woman  is  the  natural  figure/signal  in  this  photograph.  No  doubt  about  it.          

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

56


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

THE  STRANGER  #38  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

57


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

THE  INTERVIEW    #39  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Copenhagen  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

58


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

THE  GHOST  #40  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

59


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                KILL  YOUR  DARLINGS     I  did  not  invent  these  words.  Somebody  else  did.       That  somebody  else  was  William  Faulkner.  He  said,  that  in  writing  you  must  kill  your  darlings.    Our  task  is  to   adapt  this  to  street  photography,  and  say  that  even  in  photography  you  must  murder  your  darlings.     In  street  photography  your  darling  are  those  concepts,  those  ways  of  seeing,  those  clichés  that  you  use  under  the   illusions  that  others  may  perceive  them  in  the  same  way  that  you  do.         Because  they  are  your  darlings.     Are  your  handling  of  your  favourite  themes  just  as  eminent  as  you  find  them  to  be?  Looking  at  street   photography  in  general,  themes  are  repeated  over  and  over.  So  maybe  not.     It  is  not  a  bad  idea  to  let  a  photograph  simmer  over  the  night.    Let  is  be  for  a  while  and  come  back  after  some  time   to  review  it.       If  you  have  a  text,  read  it  out  loud  for  yourself  and  listen  to  what  you  say.    Come  back  the  next  day  if  it  is  a  text  or   a  picture  that  you  enjoy.  See  if  you  enjoy  it  as  much  the  day  after.       It  is  a  hard  task,  this.  You  need  to  be  your  own  critic.  In  an  age  of  egocentricity  this  takes  training.  And  guts.     I  am  not  saying  how  it  could  be  done.  I  am  only  suggesting  that  is  should  be  done.     Can  New  Street  Agenda  help  you  in  this?  I  think  it  can  because  New  Street  Agenda  might  teach  you  how  to  take   things  apart  to  put  them  back  together  again.       You  may  want  to  let  that  idea  simmer  too.       Always  a  good  idea  to  know,  who  your  enemies  are  before  you  start  killing  them  off.            

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

60


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

FRIENDS  #41  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Copenhagen  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

61


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

THE  CROSSING  #42  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2011    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

62


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

KILL YOUR  DARLING                      

THE  BRIDE  #43  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Copenhagen  2010    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

63


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                    OCCAM’S  RAZOR     Occam’s  Razor  is  borrowed  from  philosophy.     It  states,  that  if  there  are  two  or  more  hypothesis’  available  for  interpretation  of  a  phenomenon,  the  more  simple   is  will  be  chosen.     In  street  photography,  as  in  other  forms  of  visual  communication,  Occam’s  Razor  states,  that  if  there  are  two  or   more  possible  interpretations  available,  the  simpler  will  win.     If  you  want  to  structure  your  street  photographs,  and  help  the  viewers  get  your  visual  story,  a  little  help  from   Occam  and  his  razor  might  work  well.     It  is  a  question  of  simplicity  and  the  way  you  order  things.    Rudolf  Arnheim  calls  the  latter  for  orderliness.       Working  with  Occam’s  Razor  is  training  the  ability  see  what  perceptually  comes  first  and  how  the  first  links  to   what  comes  after.     In  The  Bride  (last  picture)  the  bride  is  suggested  to  be  the  dominant  figure  and  the  couple  leaving  a  somewhat   less  dominant  figure.  The  whole  seen  is  very  simple.  The  shot  is  suggested  to  be  in  accordance  with  Occam.     In  Rock  Singer  (next  picture)  the  female  singer  is  suggested  to  be  the  main  figure  and  the  band  her  ground.  Yes,   like  in  figure/ground.    That  shot  is  also  suggested  to  be  in  accordance  with  Occam.     I  use  the  work  suggested  for  the  simple  reason  that  in  street  photography,  things  are  nor  written  in  stone.                  

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

64


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

ROCK  MUSIC  #44  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

   

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

65


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

SKIN  TONES  #45   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2011    

   

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

66


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

THE  LOBBY  #46   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

67


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                    THE  DEFINITION     Street  photography  can  be  different  things.       The  understanding  of  what  street  photography  is  depends  on  how  you  define  it.       You  can  go  for  a  descriptive  definition,  a  normative  definition  and  even  no  definition  at  all  by  simply  pointing  to   the  photographs  or  the  photographers  you  mean  to  include.     In  New  Street  Agenda  we  have  chosen  to  work  with  a  normative  definition.     A  normative  definition  is  not  right  or  wrong.    It  is  practical.  It  lets  you  know  how  to  understand  what  we  mean   with  street  photography  in  this  particular  context.     Street  photography  is  first  and  foremost  an  attitude  to  photography.    It  is  not  a  piece  of  geography.       As  long  as  pictures  are  taken  in  a  public  area,  that  will  do.  Indoor  public  spaces  works  as  well.  Like  museums,   galleries,  train  stations,  shopping  malls,  cafés  and  even  restaurants.  And  the  like.     Pictures  must  not  be  staged  or  posed.     Street  photography  is  storytelling  photography.  It  is  contextual  and  depicts  people  in  their  social  settings.    The   bearing  element  is  human  beings.     No  sole  dogs  or  cows  or  parrots  or  pigeons.  No  architecture  or  portraits.       The  definition  is  consistent  in  what  you  find  in  classical  street  photography.     Not  to  forget  that  street  photography  is  straight  photography.    Post-­‐editing  should  be  held  at  a  minimum  and   have  no  other  purpose  than  to  naturally  enhance  what  is  already  there.     On  top  of  that,  our  understanding  of  street  photography  is  that  is  it  a  discipline  that  gives  back  more  than  it  takes   away.       Street  photography  the  new  agenda  way,  is  affirmative  photography.     Some  times  even  with  a  sense  of  humour.  In  the  best  of  cases,  it  is  itching  photography.  

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

68


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

PLAYGROUND    #47   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Paris  2013    

   

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

69


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

UNDER  THE  BRIDGE  #48  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Copenhagen  2012      

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

70


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

SELF  PORTRAIT  #49  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

 

 

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

71


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

   

         

HIGH  AND  LOW     In  street  photography  there  is  a  high  road  and  a  low  road.  You  need  to  walk  them  both.     The  high  road  are  those  perceptions  that  reside  in  your  knowledge  and  experience.    The  low   road  are  those  perceptions  that  you  bring  with  you  as  a  species.  As  a  human  being.       High  road  perceptions  differ  with  the  individual.  Low  road  perceptions  do  not.     In  psychology,  you  talk  about  perceptions  from  above  and  perceptions  from  below.       You  can  code  your  photographs  if  you  know  about  the  high  road  and  the  low  road.  You  can   decode  them  too.    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

72


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

SPREE  VIEW  #50  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2011    

   

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

73


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

PARISERPLATZ  #51  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

   

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

74


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

MONUMENT  MEN  #52  COE     LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

   

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

75


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

TWIN SISTERS     One  of  the  most  important  gestalt  factors  in  street  photography  is  the  factor  of  similarity.       The  factor  of  similarity  tells  you  that  if  two  or  more  things  are  alike,  you  will  perceptually  tend   to  group  them.       So  it  is  with  the  two  musicians  in  Twin  Sisters  (next  page).They  belong,  and  are  perceived     as  one  group.  Not  only  do  they  look  alike,  they  also  act  alike.       This  likeness  it  the  itching  element  in  this  shot.       Mind  you,  similarity  comes  in  different  forms  and  with  different  content.  It  does  not  have  to   be  physical,  human  similarity  like  in  Twin  Sisters.  It  can  as  well  be  colour,  distance,  tonality,   form,  size,  expression  or  other.  You  name  it.     If  you  handle  the  gestalt  factors  well,  it  is  easy  for  all  to  see  what  is  the  driving  factor  in  a   specific  photograph.  Then  the  factor  takes  charge  of  the  image.     If  you  need  to  argue  about  it  or  to  write  a  Russian  novel  to  convince  others,  you  have  already   lost.  There  is  probably  nothing  in  charge  in  your  photograph.     Don’t  tell,  show  in  stead.          

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

76


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

TWIN  SISTERS  #53  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

 

 

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

77


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

THE LADDER     Nobody  in  their  right  mind  should  spent  the  amount  of  time  on  street  photography,  that  I   seemingly  do.     The  good  thing  is  that  I  don’t.     Yes,  I  enjoy  taking  photographs  of  this  type.  I  freely  admit  that.  It  takes  me  to  strange  places   and  people  that  I  never  have  seen  or  met  before.         In  many  senses  of  the  word,  I  get  around.  I  don’t  even  have  to  travel  much.  Not  that  I  mind.     That  said,  enjoying  and  writing  about  street  photography  is  only  the  lowest  step  on  the  ladder   of  knowledge.  Higher  up  there  are  photographs  and  pictures  as  such,  and  visual   communication.  Science  and  art  and  philosophy  follows  too.     Even  higher,  you  will  find  the  rest  of  the  world.  Including  yourself,  which  can  come  as  a  bit  of   a  surprise.     Talking  about  gestalt  factors  or  Occam’s  Razor  or  whatever  little  theme  touched  upon  in  this   workbook  is  indeed  relevant  for  street  photography.  But  it  is  also  relevant  for  the  area  of   everything  else.     If  you  learn  to  understand  the  codes  and  decodes  of  a  single  photograph,  that  is  a  step  on  the   way  to  handle  everything  else.       You  may  not  succeed  in  all  of  this  because  the  task  is  tall.  But  you  are  allowed  to  say  that  you   have  tried.  Or  are  working  on  it.     That  is  the  beauty  of  it.    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

78


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

PARTY  TIME  #54  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2011    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

79


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

SHOOTING  SHADOW  #55   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012  

 

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

80


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

IN  A  ROW  #56     LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

81


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                    WHAT  COMES  FIRST     Yes,  the  question  is  relevant.       What  comes  first?    Theory  of  street  photography  or  street  photography?     It  is  so  that  the  photographs  you  see  on  these  pages  are  shot  with  a  camera  in  one  hand  and  an  instruction  book   in  the  other?    Are  pictures  taken  to  illustrate  Occam’s  Razor,  the  factor  of  similarity,  the  factor  of  whatever,  to  fit,     if  not  a  written  workbook  then  maybe  a  conceptualized  workbook?     If  there  is  a  positive  relationship  between  texts  and  picture  at  all?  Because  I  am  not  sure  that  there  is,  even  if  I  in   some  cases  suggest  so.     The  answer  is  straightforward.     Even  if  there  may  have  been  some  unconscious  ideas  about  ways  of  photography,  these  ideas  were  never   realized  till  after.  It  started  few  years  back  when  I  was  asked  to  provide  16  photographs  to  illustrate  an   interview.       Incidentally,  I  had  ordered  prints  and  had  the  chance  to  place  them  side  by  side  on  a  dining  table.  I  discover  that   all  photographs  were  pieces  of  the  same  larger  picture.  Call  it  a  concept.    Many  were  built  the  same  way  and   many  even  looked  the  same.     I  am  not  trying  to  say  something  about  quality.  Only  to  say  something  about  a  certain  approach.  And  approaches,   as  such,  carries  no  quality.     Specific  curiosity  into  street  photography  started  there.    Texts  on  street  photography  came  after  actual  street   photography.  But  if  definitely  helps  what  to  look  for  when  you  have  a  name  on  what  to  look  for.         That  said,  there  is  always  a  pre-­‐understanding  that  might  lead  to  a  progress  of  that  understanding.    Such  a   movement  is  not  only  a  circular  movement,  but  formed  as  a  spiral.  It  always  adds  to,  and  takes  away  from  itself.   Always  on  the  go.     It  is  a  continuous  movement  implicating  that  every  time  you  decide  to  start  on  something,  start  has  already   begun.     How  else  would  you  know  what  and  where  to  start?        

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

82


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

CAMERA  WORK  #57   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012  

 

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

 

83


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

SOFT  SOLUTION  #58   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

 

 

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

84


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

CONNOTATION PROCEDURES     Let’s  not  forget  Roland  Barthes  and  his  connotation  procedures  from  1961.       No,  things  don’t  fade  with  age.  They  mature.  Particularly  in  this  business  where  so  many  have   so  little  to  say  about  so  much.     We  will  listen  to  Barthes  once  more.  Here  are  his  connotation  procedures  from  the  article  The   Photographic  Message,  that  he  published  in  1961.     Numbered  nicely  as  Barthes  did  it.  There  are  6  connotation  procedures:    1)  Trick  Effects;  2)   Pose;  3)  Objects;  4)  Photogenia;  5)  Aestheticism;  and    6)  Syntax.     Connotations  are  normally  set  apart  from  denotations.  Denotations  are  what  is  shown  in  a   photograph.  Connotations  are  the  way  it  is  shown.     Look  at  K-­‐DAMM  COUPLE  at  the  next  page.  I  would  say  that  the  picture  shows  a  young  man   and  a  young  woman.  That  would  be  what  is  denoted.    Pretty  straightforward.     They  are  pretty  relaxed,  aren’t  they?  That  would  be  what  this  photograph  is  connoting:   Relaxation.  Among  other  things.     Denotations  would  normally  be  fairly  objective.  Connotations  would  be  said  to  be  more   subjective.     Barthes  connotation  procedures  are  tools  that  can  be  used  to  understand  connotations.  And   use  them  in  your  street  photography.       Some  procedures  are  more  elegant  than  others.       Maybe  a  few  have  timed  out  after  all.        

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

85


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

K-­‐DAMM  COUPLE  #59   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2011      

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

86


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

BLUE  NOTE  #60  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2011    

   

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

87


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

ITCHING PHOTOGRAPHY     Street  photography,  the  new  agenda  way,  is  itching  photography.     What  does  it  mean  to  be  itching  photography?  Itching  photography  means  that  pictures  tries   to  get  under  your  skin  and  that  each  photograph  has  a  level  of  attraction  and  attention  that  is   higher  than  normal.     In  a  positive  way,  and  in  the  best  of  cases,  they  take  you  away  from  the  routines  of  just  getting   along.  They  should  be  an  aesthetical  challenge  from  the  norm  of  normality.     Itching  photography,  is  not  satisfied  by  being  documentation.  It  is  also  documentation,  but  not   first  and  foremost.     In  itching  photography  you  add  a  little.  You  structure  the  whole,  the  details  and  the   combination  of  these  in  a  way  that  the  photographs  stand  out  from  the  madding  crowd  of   street  photography.     And  you  do  this  visually  for  all  to  see.       How  you  do  this  is  up  to  you.  There  are,  however,  certain  basic  models  that  you  will  get  to   know  in  this  workbook.       As  a  starter.              

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

88


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

MONBIJO  PARK  #61  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013  

 

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

89


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

THE  KISSING  LINK  #62   LIMITED  EDITION  7   BERLIN  2010  

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

90


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                WALL  OF  VISIONS     There  is  a  wall  in  Europe.  It  is  not  an  iron  curtain  or  the  wall  in  Berlin.  It  is  not  a  solid  wall  at  all.   You  are  free  to  visit  both  sides  of  the  wall.  There  is  no  one  there  to  stop  you.   But  somehow  someone  seldom  do.   You  may  have  heard  of  this  separation.  It  is  wall  of  science.  Two  different  ways  of  seeing.  Often  symbolized  by   The  English  Channel.  Dividing  the  world  in  an  Anglo-­‐Saxon  way  of  seeing,  and  a  Continental  way  of  seeing.   On  the  one  side  UK,  US  with  Scandinavia  in  a  sidecar.  On  the  other  side  Germany,  France,  Italy  and  maybe  Spain.   Let’s  remember  them  at  the  Continental  Way  and  the  Anglo-­‐Saxon  Way.   They  have  other  names  as  well.  The  Anglo-­‐Saxon  Way  is  sometimes  called  as  a  way  of  explanation.  The   Continental  Way  is  sometimes  named  a  way  of  understanding.  The  first  deals  with  bit  and  pieces,  the  second  with   larger  structures.   How  do  this  reflect  on  New  Street  Agenda?  It  is  a  nice  to  know  or  a  need  to  know  or,  maybe,  a  not  to  know?   Look  at  is  this  way:  Are  images,  pictures,  photographs,  street  photographs  objects  in  an  external  world  that  the   human  brain  visually  captures  and  thereafter  possible  explains?  After  having  thought  about  them  for  a  while?  Or   are  these  objects  already  understood,  or  partly  understood,  the  spit  second  you  approach  them  or  they  approach   you?   Ways  if  seeing.  You  may  certainly  call  it  that.   Difficult  questions.  Those  who  specialises  do  not  always  agree.    That  is  why  they  are  called  specialists.   As  for  the  mediating  approach  of  New  Street  Agenda  the  two  ways  come  together.  What  is  sound  and  practical   should  be  reconed.      Complementarity  is  a  word  you  could  use.  Phenomenology  is  continental  but  making  it   operational  might  be  Anglo-­‐Saxon.    Gestalt  psychology  might  be  berlinish  but  some  of  its  prime  advocates  turned   Americans.   Think  about  it.   Norway  is  on  top  of  The  English  Channel.  Not  on  either  side.  Not  part  of  the  continent  and  closer  to  the  sea.   Maybe  that  is  a  reason  why?   Think  about  that  too.  

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

91


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

BLUE  LADY  #63   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Paris  2013      

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

92


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

MOVABLE  FEAST  #64   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013      

 

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

93


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

THE  SMILE  #65  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

94


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                  IS  STREET  PHOTOGRAPHY  ART?     Is  street  photography  Art?   You  hear  the  question  now  and  again.  Discussions  often  follow.    The  answer  is  clear:  no.  Street  photography  is   not  Art.  Nor  is  oil  painting,  sculpture,  body  paint,  or  jazz  music.   Even  urinals  are  not  Art.   The  question  is  wrongly  posed.  Art  does  not  refer  to  any  specific  objects  of  the  world  like  those  produced  within   photography,  painting,  sculpture,  writing,  singing,  or  what  you  can  think  or.  There  are,  however,  certainly  people   within  all  these  areas  that  are  capable  of  producing  Art.   E.H.  Gombrich  says  it  in  the  first  sentences  of  his  big  book  The  Story  of  Art:  There  are  no  such  thing  as  Art.  There   are  only  artists.   That  seems  to  be  it  in  so  far  as  we  speak  about  a  type  of  activity.  Art  emerges  thought  the  making  of  it.  It  does  not   belong  to  a  type  of  objects,  but  to  a  special  kind  of  successful  activity  that  in  some  lucky  instances  produce  what   we  call  objects  of  Art.         What  is  special  for  this  kind  of  activity?  Here  are  some  answers  that  do  not  characterize  the  making  of  Art:   Art  is  not  lazy,  it  is  not  unengaged,  it  is  not  casual,  it  is  not  easy  to  do,  it  is  not  stupid,  it  is  not  without  training   and  knowledge.  It  is  not  without  experience.  Art  is  not  without  talent.  It  does  not  have  to  be  rational.  It  is  not   without  curiosity.  Art  is  not  average.  It  is  not  painless.  It  does  not  even  have  to  be  irrational.   Within  street  photography,  or  within  photography  as  such,  it  leaves  you  with  a  very  small  group  of  people   capable  of  doing  it.  Much  smaller  than  I  could  ever  have  imagined.  You  see  it  when  people  do  it  right.   That  is,  if  you  have  the  special  capacity  of  seeing  and  know  what  to  look  for.  Not  unlike  the  situation  you  are  in  as   a  street  photographer.   Back  to  the  question:  Is  street  photography  art?  No,  it  is  not.    But  certain  street  photographs  made  by  luck  or  by   un-­‐luck,  or  by  other  means,  from  a  small  group  of  people,  certainly  can  be.   E.H.  Combrich  has  no  problem  with  it  either.  On  page  624  in  my  version  of  his  big  book  he  shows  Henri  Cartier-­‐ Bresson’s  Aquila  degli  Abruzzi.  Taken  in  Italy  in  1952.   Beneath  the  short  text  accompanying  the  image,  is  written  one  word:  Photograph.  It  is  no  possible  to  state  it   clearer  than  that.    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

95


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

CHECKPOINT  CHARLIE    #66     LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2008    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

96


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

  ART  LOVERS   #67   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

97


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

CHECKPOINT  CHARLIE  #68   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2010    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

98


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

SMOKING  #69   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

99


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

THE  PHOTOGRAPHER  #70   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Copenhagen  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

100


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                    MEN  ACT,  WOMEN  APPEAR     One  of  the  most  inspiring  thinkers  you  can  meet  in  this  industry  is  John  Berger.       One  of  the  most  inspiring  books  you  can  read  is  his  Ways  Of  Seeing  first  published  by  BBC  in  1972.    I  have  a   Penguin  version  of  the  book  from  2008.     For  those  street  photographers,  who  still  master  the  art  of  reading,  it  is  definitely  worth  picking  up  a  copy  of   Berger’s  small  book.       For  those  street  photographers,  who  enjoy  images  more  than  texts  about  images,  the  good  news  is  that  Ways  Of   Seeing  contains  chapters  where  not  a  single  word  is  written.  They  are  strictly  made  up  of  pictures.     There  are  different  ways,  Berger  suggests,  in  the  modes  men  and  women  have  been  and  still  are  portrayed.  In   paintings  and  in  photographs.     With  men  it  is  about  the  power.  A  man’s  presence  is  dependent  upon  the  promise  of  power  which  be  embodies,   Berger  states.  It  has  to  do  with  what  he  can  do  to  you  or  for  you.     Women,  on  the  contrary,  constantly  have  to  include  a  reflection  of  themselves.  How  does  she  look  to  others?    Her   appearance  it  is  not  a  question  of  what  she  can  do  to  and  for  you.    It  is  a  question  of  what  can  be  done  to  her  by   others.    This  is  expressed  in  gestures,  clothes,  taste,  surrounding,  expressions  and  more.     By  this  mode  of  reflection  she  has  turned  herself  into  an  object.  First  and  foremost  a  visual  object  –  something  to   be  seen.  A  sight.     Men  act,  women  appear.       These  are  some  of  the  words  spoken  by  John  Berger.            

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

101


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

WAYS  OF  SEEING  #71   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

102


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                    WHAT  IS  BAREBONES  COMMUNICATION?     What  is  barebones  communication?       You  see  use  of  this  expression  from  time  to  time.  Not  so  much  in  this  workbook,  but  in  many  of  the  related   activities.       Even  so,  this  workbook  is  a  barebones  communication  effort.  It  is  in  short  a  barebones  activity.     The  term  has  been  in  use  since  November  2007,  when  the  first  post  on  the  first  site  that  targeted  visual   communication,  was  posted.  The  blog  soon  became  an  activity  for  photography.  It  is  still  very  much  alive.     The  name  of  the  blog  was  originally  barebones  communication.  And  it  still  is  when  you  look  at  the  URL.  Only   recently,  in  March  2014,  did  I  change  its  name  to  On  Street  Photography  &  Visual  Communication,  to  reflect  what   might  be  targeted  in  the  future.     I  left  it  more  or  less  untouched  from  the  middle  of  2010,  as  a  wanted  to  concentrate  on  street  photography.   Barebones  communication  was  originally  not  intended  for  that.       Back  to  the  meaning  of  the  term.  As  one  the  pillars  of  New  Street  Agenda  is  phenomenology  the  reason  why  goes   like  this.     Edmund  Husserl  (1859-­‐1938),  often  spoken  of  as  the  father  of  phenomenology,  used  a  phrase:  Zu  den  Sachen   selbst.  Translated  that  would  be  To  The  Things  Themselves.     The  term  barebones  communication  is  from  that  pool  of  inspiration.  Applied  to  visual  communication.  Later  to   street  photography.     Phenomenology  is  an  approach  and  a  method.  It  deals  with  the  description  of  things  as  they  revealed  themselves   as  phenomena.  Applied  to  street  photography,  it  might  reveal  what  street  photography  is  all  about.     Much  more  can  be  said  about  this.    That  must  be  another  time     Here  is  what  barebones  communication  looks  like  today:   http://www.barebonescommunication.wordpress.com.  As  I  said,  the  site  is  still  very  much  alive.       You  should  go  there.  Now  you  have  a  clue  as  to  the  meaning  of  the  word.      

     

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

103


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

KEEPING  LOW  #72   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

104


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                   

WINSTON’S  VOCATION  #73   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

105


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

THOUGHTFUL  #74   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

106


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                    HAVE  YOU  EVER  BEEN  ARRESTED?     Have  you  ever  been  arrested  when  you  are  our  walking  the  streets  for  a  good  street  setting?  I  have.  It  happens  to   me  all  the  time.   Have  you  ever  been  arrested  by  Marilyn  Monroe?  When  out  having  nothing  else  to  do?   No,  Monsieur  Cartier-­‐Bresson,  street  photography,  has  very  little  do  with  hunting.  I  think  that  you  got  that   wrong.   Nor  has  the  art  of  archery  much  to  do  with  hunting.  You  got  that  wrong,  too.   Street  photography  has  more  to  do  with  being  arrested  when  out  having  nothing  else  to  do.  Like  being  surprised   when  you  least  of  all  expect  it.   It  happened  to  me  in  2009,  when  as  was  walking  the  narrow  streets  of  Potsdam.  I  was  arrested  by  Marilyn   Monroe  in  the  window.  All  dressed  in  pink.   Not  only  did  Marilyn  arrest  me.  The  whole  setting  did.  Look  how  nicely  she  is  framed  behind  glass.  Neatly   balances  by  the  door  as  if  she  still  was  reachable  if  you  went  inside.   Come  on  in,  she  seemed  to  said.   The  whole  scene  was  right.   It  is  a  good  thing  to  be  arrested  like  that.  It  happens  when  all  that  you  have  learned  comes  together  in   recognizable  moments,  and  they  touch  you  instead  of  you  hunting  for  them.   It  is  true  then,  that  moments  come  to  you  instead  of  the  other  way  around?  Yes,  it  is  true.  If  you  don’t  believe  it,   just  ask  Marilyn.    She  might  still  be  there  in  the  same  window.  With  her  friends.   If  not  there,  she  will  be  elsewhere.  Arrests  happen  all  the  time.                            

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

107


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

MARILYN  IN  THE  WINDOW  #74A   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Potsdam  2009      

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

 

108


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

MYSTERY  MAN  #75  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012      

 

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

109


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

FAMILY  LIFE  #76   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2011  

 

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

 

110


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

DANCE  LESSON  #77  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013  

 

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

 

111


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

BOOKSHOP  #78   LIMITED  EDITION  7   HAMBURG  2012    

 

 

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

112


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

              REFERENTIAL  STREET  PHOTOGRAPHY     What  is  referential  street  photography?  What  does  a  referential  photograph  look  like?     In  New  Street  Agenda  we  speak  of  contextual  photography.  From  contextual  street  photography  to  referential   street  photography,  the  jump  is  not  long.  There  are  differences,  though.  Let’s  look  at  it.     In  contextual  street  photography  you  treat  subjects  in  a  context.  Meaning  they  are  distinctly  among  other  things   or  other  people.  That  spurs  the  element  of  storytelling.     Referential  street  photography  builds  on  top  of  that.  It  points  to  a  distinct  reference,  or  connection,  made  in  your   photograph.  Could  be  a  reference  between  people.    Could  be  a  reference  between  people  and  objects.     Referential  photography  is  always  contextual,  but  contextual  photography  does  not  have  to  be  referential.     The  reference  needs  to  be  there  for  all  to  see.  Not  a  little  and  implied  reference  that  is  only  seen  by  the   photographer.     A  reference  does  not  have  tell  a  story  actually  taking  place  in  front  of  you  when  shooting.  It  can  as  well  be  a  story   told  by  you  by  selecting  the  scene  and  framing  your  image.         There  are  plenty  of  examples  of  referential  street  photography  in  the  workbook.  Let  me  point  to  a  few:       In  BIKE  BENEFIT  (next  picture)  you  see  two  persons.  They  are  in  reference  to  each  other.  The  main  reference  is   the  biker  looking  at  the  passing  woman,  who  in  return  projects  her  sexuality  back  upon  him.  In  BOOKSHOP  (past   picture)  the  two  women  are  in  reference  because  of  their  closeness  and  similarity..  But  also  because  of  their   differences.    They  are  of  the  same  gender,  but  of  different  age,  style  and  culture.     To  be  in  reference  means  to  establish  a  virtual  connection  between  two  or  a  few  significant  parts  in  a  photograph.   You  make  this  reference  so  strong  that  Occam  would  be  in  no  doubt  about  it.        

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

113


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

BIKE  BENEFIT  #79   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013          

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

114


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

              VISUAL  STORYTELLING     I  am  sure  that  we  all  have  our  favourites  photographs.       I  have  many.      THE  RECEPTION  (next)  is  one  of  them.  It  is  a  low-­‐key,  low  noise  picture  that  I  took  in  the  gallery   area  of  Berlin  a  couple  of  years  ago.  At  first  I  did  not  think  much  of  it  since  it  is  shot  around  midnight  and  it  was   almost  too  dark  to  shoot  anything.     I  lifted  the  dark  areas  and  lowered  the  bright  areas  in  LR  and  started  looking  at  I  properly.  It  seemed  to  work   after  all.  Today  I  enjoy  it.  Not  because  of  it  technical  qualities,  but  because  it  is  a  good  example  of  what  I  call  a   storytelling  photograph.       Let  me  mentioned  that  visual  storytelling  in  New  Street  Agenda  fall  in  one  of  two  categories.  You  have  pictures   where  the  story  largely  is  told  within  the  photograph.      And  you  have  pictures  where  the  story  is  told,  if  not   mainly,  but  to  a  large  extent  outside  the  photograph.       Elsewhere  we  call  this  for  closed  and  open  images.  Closed  or  open  stories.     Photographs  will  often  be  a  combination  the  two.       THE  RECEPTION  is  an  example  of  a  closed  image.  The  story  is  told  within  the  image.  You  don’t  need  much  extra     information  to  see  what  it  is  all  about.    It  is  all  there.     The  story  is  that  you  have  a  guy  literally  telling  a  story.  Sitting  with  glass  in  hand.  The  two  people  surrounding   him  are  obviously  enjoying  his  story  since  they  pay  full  and  smiling  attention.  You  can  follow  their  eye  directions   and  find  that  they  cross  in  front  of  his  face.     There  are  two  minor  and  supporting  stories.  One  story  is  going  on  in  the  group  of  people  at  the  back  of  the  room.   Another  is  the  relation  that  has  been  established  by  the  two  dogs  and  the  photographer.  Here  the  story  is   opening  up  towards  something  that  partly  going  on  outside  the  frame:  the  photographer  taking  the  picture.     You  have  a  single  picture.  Stories  are  three  in  one.  Supporting  and  complementing  each  other.     Question:  Are  all  street  photographs  storytelling  pictures?  Either  open  or  closed  or  combined?       I  think  not.  In  this  workbook  most  of  them  are.  For  the  simple  reason  is  that  storytelling  belongs  to  the  very  idea   of  street  photography.     You  may  want  to  take  a  look  at  JUST  PASSING  (last).  Be  welcome  to  tell  the  story.  Don’t  take  my  word  for  it.                      

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

115


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

THE  RECEPTION  #80   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012  

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

116


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

POSTDAMER  PLATZ  #81  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2010      

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

117


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

SURVEILLANCE  #82  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

     

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

118


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

BUS  DRIVER  #83   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

   

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

119


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

SEX  IN  THE  CITY  #84   LIMITED  EDITION  7   HAMBURG  2012    

 

 

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

120


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

DOWN  STAIRS  #85  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

 

 

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

121


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

BLUE  VELVET  #86   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

   

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

122


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

COUPLES    #87   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

123


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

DANISH  DESIGN  #88   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Paris  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

124


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

LUNCH  TIME   #89   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

125


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                CREATICS:  A  TACTIC  FOR  CREATIVITY     Many  years  ago  I  thought  up  a  new  word.  The  word  was  Creatics.     There  is  a  road  that  connects  creativity  and  tactics,  I  thought.  The  word  Creatics  is  a  good  term  for  it.  So  I  took  it.   I  even  wrote  a  series  of  articles  about  it.  Click  here  and  you  will  see.  Unfortunately  it  is  in  Danish.   The  idea  is  that  if  you  set  you  mind  to  it,  learn  a  little  bit  of  technique,  you  ideas  can  come  to  you  in  stead  you   going  looking  for  them.  Or  have  them  served  by  others.   Seems  that  people,  in  all  wakes  of  life,  follow  a  common  pattern  in  the  way  they  deal  with  challenges  that   involves  innovation  and  idea  generation.  Be  it  in  the  business  world,  be  it  in  science,  be  it  in  innovative  contexts,   be  it  within  the  confinements  of  arts.  Maybe  even  in  photography.   I  must  learn  that,  I  thought.   I  am  not  implying  that  luck  shines  on  this  method  all  the  time.  But  once  in  a  while  results  come  out  right.   Here  is  the  core  of  it  all:  The  process  for  creativity,  is  a  road  with  4  steps:   The  first  step  is  preparation.  You  need  to  know  the  area  you  deal  with  and  give  yourself  specific  tasks  within  that   area;  the  second  step  is  forgetting  all  about  your  task;  the  third  step  is  by  George  I  think  I’ve  go  it;  the  fourth  step   is  the  evaluation  of  the  creative  idea.   Two  of  these  steps  are  conscious  steps:  the  first  and  the  fourth.  Two  of  these  steps  are  unconscious  steps:  the   second  and  the  third.   There  are  fancy  names  for  the  four  steps.  Wikipedia  uses  the  terms  preparation,  incubation,  illumination  and   verification.  Use  those  names  if  you  want  to.   I  added  a  tactical  aspect  to  it.    Set  you  mind  to  it  and  gather  the  necessary  information  first.  Give  yourself  a  task   to  solve.  The  weight  lies  in  preparation,  if  you  ask  me.   In  street  photography,  you  gather  information  by  looking  on  and  reading  about  what  others  have  managed.   Photographers,  and  other  visual  artists.   Don’t  try  to  do  advances  in  astrophysics  if  you  have  not  trained  for  it.  Don’t  try  to  win  the  Darby  if  you  can’t  ride   a  horse.  Don’t  think  that  you  can  do  street  photography  without  knowing  anything  about  its  peers.  Stick  to  your   own  path.  Then  Creatics  will  work.   Having  done  your  homework,  the  rest  of  the  creative  process  may  come  pretty  easy.  You  might  even  end  up  with   something  that  is  really  good.  Like  an  eminent  street  photograph.  Or  two.       If  you  are  lucky.    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

126


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

MONKEY  BUSINESS  #90   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

   

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

127


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

THE  LETTER  #91   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

128


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

PRESS  CONFERENCE  #92   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

129


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

LEGS  #93   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

130


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

BLENDING  #94   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

131


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                  FROM  CITY  PLAN  TO  CITY  STREET   Not  that  big  a  jump  in  terms  of  associations,  is  it?  From  city  plan  to  city  street.  Roads  on  the  same  map.   In  the  lay  out  of  a  city  the  American  architect,  Kevin  Lynch,  says:  “Nodes  are  the  strategic  foci  into  which  the   observer  can  enter,  typically  either  junctions  of  paths,  or  concentrations  of  some  characteristic”.   In  street  photography  it  is  just  the  same:  A  strategic  loci  into  which  an  observer  can  enter.  Any  visual  point   where  vectors  meet  or  cross.   A  note  is  not  a  static  thing  like  a  volume  just  sitting  there.  Nodes  are  meeting  point  of  energy.  Like  in  a  city   junction.  A  crossing.   Since  street  photography,  in  our  definition  of  it,  definitely  has  to  do  with  human  beings,  particular  attention   should  be  paid  to  the  human  body  and  its  nodes.  If  the  human  body,  the  torso,  is  the  volume  them  the  limbs  are   its  vectors.  Like  arrows  pointing.  Arms,  feet,  head,  fingers.     In  stead  of  city  junctions,  you  have  body  joints  or  the  joining  of  bodies.   Arms  crossing,  legs  crossing,  grasping,  fingers  pointing.  Not  only  in  a  single  individual  but  in  encounters  with   others.  A  couple  dancing,  holding  hands,  crossing  feet,  making  street  love.   Rudolf  Arnheim  stresses  bodily  contractive  and  expansive  movements  as  important  nodes:  outgoing  breast  and   arms  confining  the  head,  are  the  words  he  used  in  a  description  of  a  Gustave  Courbet  nude:  Woman  In  The   Waves.   There  is  no  reason  to  define  nodes  in  street  photography  more  strict  than  this.  It  is  no  hard  science  anyway.   Go  figure  it  out  on  your  own.    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

132


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

LUSTGARTEN  #95   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

133


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

PICTURING  PEOPLE  #96   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

134


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

IN  THE  MOOD  #97   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

135


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

TWO SPATIAL  SYSTEMS     It  is  such  an  amazing  feeling  you  get  when  an  obscure,  little  idea  gets  an  unexpected  backing  from  a   reliable  source.  It  makes  the  work  worth  while.     Not  long  ago  some  of  us  participated  in  what  was  called  The  Academy.  The  Academy  was,  and  still  is,  a   closed  Facebook  group  for  focusing  on,  and  training  basic  visual  principles  that  are  relevant  to  street   photography.     I  say,  still  is,  since  the  group  has  only  taken  a  break  over  summer  to  let  all  gather  new  energy.       The  Academy  held  monthly  challenges  that  all  could  participate  in.       One  of  these  challenges  focused  on  finding  a  main  visual  figure  and  structure  a  supportive  ground   around  it.  Even  if  the  wording  was  a  little  different,  the  idea  was  to  establish  a  visual  center.       A  month  or  two  after  the  challenge  was  very  different.  The  idea  was  to  shoot  for  what  I  called  a  spread.   You  make  a  spread  when  you  place  people  of  the  same  size  and  shape,  well  separated,  over  the  total   frame.  Top  to  bottom.    Left  to  right.       None  of  these  concepts  are  difficult  to  grasp  as  ideas.    From  idea  to  execution  there  can  sometimes  be  a   long  road.  And  in  the  challenges  there  were.     Why  should  this  be  particularly  exiting,  you  may  ask?     It  turns  out  that  figure  and  spread  fits  well  as  photographical  executions  of  what  Rudolf  Arnheim  calls   the  centric  and  the  eccentric  spatial  systems.  The  first  arrange  things  around  a  common  center  (figure).   The  second  arrange  things  so  that  no  place  is  distinguished  (spread).     This  gives  us  two  new  terms  for  the  wordbook  that  accompanies  New  Street  Agenda:  the  centric  and   the  eccentric  spatial  system.       There  is  much  more  to  it  than  this.  What  opens  up  is  a  road  to  visual  composition  that  is  quite  new  and   highly  potent  and  will  do  well  for  street  photography.     That  is  what  the  amazement  is  all  about.     More  will  come.              

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

136


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

THE  KISS  #98   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

137


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

MODERN  TIMES  #99   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

138


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

WINDOW  VIEW  #100   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

139


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

THE  CONFERENCE  #101   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

140


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

GONE  SHOPPING  #102   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

141


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

WHOLES AND PARTS Street scenes are always grasped as wholes. Without such wholes there would be no context that parts could be part of. All would loose their meaning. After all, parts are parts because there are wholes to be part of. Parts are of two types. There are parts that are pieces and there parts that are moments. This wisdom comes from phenomenology. The difference is that parts as pieces you can, literally speaking, take apart. Parts as moments you cannot take apart. If you confuse the two, you miss serious points. Imagine that you are holding a print of a fine photograph. You tear a corner from it. Then have two parts. Those parts are pieces and the two have now a life of their own. You can frame them both and hang them on the wall. Take the colour of the same photo. You cannot tear the colour out of it even if that too is a part of the picture. The colour is a moment. Other words for this phenomenon: Pieces are independent parts. Moments are nonindependent parts. The first are abstractions, the second are concretes. Here is one important consequence of this: The perception of a photograph is a nonindependent part. It is a moment. Meaning: there is a bond between the photograph and the viewer of it. That bond you cannot get away from. Seen from the other side, there is never a photograph unless there is a viewer of it. Think about it.

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

142


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

CLOSER  LOOK  #103   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

143


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

FRAMEWORK  #104   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

144


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

In  Colour  #105   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013        

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

145


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

BITS  AND  PIECES  #106   LIMITED  EDITION  7   PARIS    2013      

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

146


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

THE  BOW  #107  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2011    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

147


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

LOOKING  AT  YOU  #108   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

   

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

148


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

THIRST  #109     LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2011  

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

149


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

MEN  IN  BLACK  #110   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

   

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

150


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

BERLIN  FASHION  #111   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

151


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

SORROWS  #112   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

152


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

REFLECTION  #113  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

153


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                  THE  TWO  HERMENEUTICS     The  two  hermeneutics.  What  are  they?       Let’s  look  at  the  term  hermeneutics  first.  It  refers  to  the  interpretation  of  texts.  Traditionally,  biblical  texts,   literature  and  philosophy.  It  is  a  technical  discipline  that  instructs  you  how  to  interpret  older  texts.  This  is  what   we  call  hermeneutics  as  methodology.     But  there  is  also  hermeneutics  in  a  more  fundamental  way.  It  suggests  that  hermeneutics  is  a  not  only  a  method   for  the  scholarly  interpretation  of  texts.  It  is  also,  and  even  more  important,  the  way  human  beings  approach   their  world  quite  generally.  Every  meeting  with  the  world  is  a  hermeneutical  meeting.  That  is  what  we  call   hermeneutics  as  ontology.     Does  hermeneutics  only  work  with  texts  or  does  it  also  cover  visual  messages?       Indeed  it  works  with  visual  messages.  How  else  would  you  understand  Leonardo  da  Vinci’s  Last  Supper  (1495-­‐ 1498);  Sandro  Botticelli’s  The  Birth  of  Venus  (1485);  Jackson  Pollock’s  One  (1950);  Henri  Cartier-­‐Bresson’s   Aguila  degli  Abruzzi  (1952).    Or  all  the  other  visuals  that  meets  you  on  a  daily  or  a  non-­‐daily  basis.       For  that  matter  the  two  photographs  flanking  this  text:  Reflections  and  Street  Art.    Hermeneutics  are  at  work   every  time  you  open  your  eyes  to  the  world.  That  includes  looking  at  photographs  of  it.       Visual  objects  have  not  flown  in  from  afar,  nor  are  they  god  given.  You,  as  the  spectator,  are  always  there  to  give   the  artist  a  helping  hand  in  unfolding  his  message.  Interpretation  is  always  the  first  phase  of  such  a  meeting.    The   first  phase  of  any  meeting.     The  two  hermeneutics  don’t  exclude  each  other.  They  work  in  complement.       The  ontological  approach  is  there  since  it  belongs  to  the  basics  of  being.  On  top  of  that  you  have  the   methodological  approach,  which  brings  with  it  technical  ways  of  understanding:  Looking  for  how  gestalt  factors   operate,  how  connotations  are  established  and  unfold,  what  impressions  are  embedded  in  each  different  colour.       Und  so  weiter.        

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

154


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

STREET  ART  #114  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

155


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

NIGHTLIFE  #115   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Hamburg  2012        

 

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

156


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

RED  DRESS  #116   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

   

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

157


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

CAPTAIN’S  CORNER  #117   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Copenhagen  2012    

   

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

158


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

WINNER  TAKES  ALL  #118   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Hamburg  2012    

   

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

159


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

MIRROR,  MIRROR  #119  COE   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2011        

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

160


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

           

  BAREBONES´  BLOGS     Berlin  Black  and  White   http://www.berlinblackandwhite.wordpress.com     Knut  Skjærven  Street  (Slideshow)   http://knutskjaervenstreet.wordpress.com     On  Street  photography  and  other  life  changing  events   http://www.knutskjaerven.wordpress.com     On  Street  Photography  &  Visual  Communication,  used  to  be  barebones  communication   http://www.barebonescommunication.wordpress.com     Phenomenology  and  Photography   http://www.phenomenologyandphotography.wordpress.com     Street  Photographer’s  Toolbox   http://www.streetphotographerstoolbox.wordpress.com     The  Europeans   http://www.theuropeanseu.wordpress.com       OTHERS:     Creatic(s)  /  Danish     http://creatics.blogspot.dk  

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

161


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

NOT  AFRAID  #120   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

162


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                 

SELECTED LITERATURE  AND  LINKS:     LINKS     Wikipedia  on  Gestalt  Psychology   http://www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gestalt_psychology     Wikipedia  on  Hermeneutics   http://www.phenomenen.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermeneutics     Wikipedia  on  Phenomenology   http://www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phenomenology_(philosophy)     Wikipedia  on  Street  Photography   http://www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Street_photography     LITERATURE       Arnheim,  Rudolf:  Art  and  Visual  Perception,  University  of  California  Press,  Berkeley  and  Los   Angeles  1974     Ellis,  Willis  D  (ed):  A  Source  Book  of  Gestalt  Psychology,  Routledge  and  Kegan  Paul,  London   1974.     Gombrich,  E.H.:  The  Story  of  Art,  Phaidon,  London  1996.     Gadamer,  Hans-­‐George:  Truth  and  Method,  Continuum,  London  &  New  York  2006.     Kandel,  Eric  R:  The  Age  of  Insight,  Random  House,  New  York  2012.     Sokolowski,  Robert:    Introduction  to  Phenomenology,    Cambridge  University  Press,  New  York   2006.    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

163


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

   

RESTING  ARTIST  #121   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

 

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

164


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

GENUINE  SISOL  #  122   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

165


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

THE    VISITOR  #123   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2013      

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

166


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

SOLID  STATEMENT  #124   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

 

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

167


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

               

HANDS  ON    #125   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

168


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                WORKSHOP  AND  E-­‐LEARNING  PROGRAM     For  those  who  want  to  train  some  of  the  principles  for  street  photography  that  are  suggested  in  this  workbook,   there  are  several  options.     First  of  all  there  is  the  upcoming  3  days  workshop  that  will  be  held  in  Berlin  June  12-­‐15,  2014.  There  are  few   places  left.  The  workshop  will  be  repeated  in  September  and  possibly  in  October/November  2014.       For  more  information  on  the  workshop,  please  follow  the  link  below.     For  those  who  don’t  want  to  travel,  there  is  a  newly  developed  e-­‐learning  program  that  runs  over  6  months.  It     includes  an  analysis  of  your  present  work  and  suggests  a  road  ahead.  You  are  coached  along  the  way  though  a   series  of  8  shooting  sessions.     Please  be  aware  that  both  in  the  workshop  and  the  e-­‐learning  program  there  is  work  to  do.    You  should  not  take   it  too  easy.  It  is  not  complicated,  though.     For  more  information  on  any  of  these,  please  send  an  email  at  knut@skjaærven.com.  And  you  will  get  an  answer.     LINK  TO  MORE  ON  THE  WORKSHOP:   http://newstreetagenda.wordpress.com/berlin-­‐june-­‐12-­‐15-­‐2014/                  

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

169


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

THE  CROWD  #126   (From  The  Summit  in  Berlin  2012)   PRIVATE  PRINT     Berlin  2012      

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

170


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

             

    ABOUT  THE  AUTHOR:     Knut  Skjærven,  is  a  Norwegian  born  photographer,  writer  and  researcher  living  in  Copenhagen,  Denmark.     For  many  years  he  was  a  communication  consultant  for  one  of  the  largest  Danish  companies,  TDC.    That  took  him   to  positions  as  a  manager,  business  developer,  project  management  and  key  account  sales.       TDC  is  the  incumbent  telecommunication  operated  and  as  the  company  sold  off  to  hedgefunds  and  started   dismantling  the  company,  he  opted  out.  He  is  now  full  time  on  different  aspects  of  communication,  photography,   research  and  writing.       Knut  Skjærven,  was  educated  from  University  of  Bergen,  Norway,  and  University  of  Copenhagen,  Denmark.  He   holds  a  B.A.  in  philosophy  and  M.A.  in  film  science.  He  has  completed  one  of  the  most  esteemed  Danish  courses  in   advanced  business  development  (PIL  –  Perspective  in  Leadership).     He  has  written  numerous  articles  on  communication  and  held  a  column  on  communication  for  the  Danish   Newspaper,  Børsen.    In  2013  he  was  selected  as  the  sole  contributor  of  photographs  to  Autobiography  of   Intercultural  Encounters  under  Council  of  Europe.     Since  2010  he  has  initiated  a  number  of  sites  and  social  groups  on  street  photography:     BLOGS:   Berlin  Black  &  White  (2010);  Phenomenology  &  Photography  (2010);  The  Europeans  (2012);  The  EDGE  (2013);       On  Street  Photography  and  other  life  changing  events  (2013);  Street  Photographer’s  Toolbox  (2013);  New  Street   Agenda  (2013).     SOCIAL  SITES:   On  Every  Street  (Facebook  Group);  The  Europeans  (Facebook  Group);  The  Edge  (Facebook  Page);  Street   Photographer’s  Toolbox  (Facebook  Group);  On  Every  Street;  The  Academy  (Facebook  Group);  On  Every  2ND   Street  (Facebook  Group).    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

171


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

       

WALL  PAPER  #127   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

172


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

                                                                     Series  One:  American  Nutwood.                                                                            Series  Two:  Black  Stain  Maple      

LIMITED EDITIONS     You  have  a  chance  to  buy  limited  editions  of  a  selected  group  of  photographs.    It  is  a  high  quality   series.  We  call  it  The  FRAME.   There  two  series  are:  American  Nutwood  and  Black  Stained  Maple.   The  prints  are  digital  silver  prints.  Frames  are  all  hand  made  and  are  only  made  to  order.    Limited   Editions  are  7  per  series.   The  frames  are  produced  by  Bilderrahmen  Landwehr  in  Berlin.  This  is  the  very  best  frame  maker  I   could  find.  Yes,  the  quality  is  grand.   The  outer  measurements  are  roughly  29  cm  x  29  cm.   The  price  is  Euro  600.00  per  picture.   Each  frame  is  checked  by  the  author  before  shipment.  Free  shipment  in  Europe.   All  photographs  come  signed,  numbered  with  a  Certificate  of  Authenticity.     For  further  information  or  order  of  photographs,  please  write  directly  to  knut@skjaerven.com.   Read  more  about  The  FRAME:   http://frameselection.wordpress.com                

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

173


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

       

WALL  PAPER  #128   LIMITED  EDITION  7   Berlin  2012        

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

174


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

    THREE  WAYS  OF  SUPPURT     New  Street  Agenda  is  a  new  and  alternative  way  of  looking  at  street  photography.       It  moves  street  photography  into  the  area  of  art  and  science  and  draws  on  disciplines  like   philosophy,  psychology  and  art  history.  Not  limited  to  those.     The  workbook  is  in  the  making  and  will  continue  to  unfold.    It  is  called  a  workbook  because   you  have  to  work  with  it.  Is  has  no  beginning,  no  middle  and  no  end.  Just  dive  into  it  anywhere   you  like.       Look  at  the  photographs,  read  the  texts  and  make  up  the  larger  perspective  yourself.     A  project  like  this  is  never  finished,  but  it  will  come  to  a  practical  end  when  it  contains  129   photographs.  Not  that  many  texts.  We  are  here  for  the  pictures  and  not  for  the  words.     If  you  would  like  to  support  New  Street  Agenda  there  are  three  ways  to  do  it.  You  can  a)  make   a  straight  donation;  b)  participate  in  one  of  the  workshop  or  educational  programs;  or  c)  buy   a  framed  photograph  from  the  limited  editions.       If  you  are  keen  on  any  of  these,  please  send  a  word  to  this  mail  address:  mailto:   knut@skjaerven.com     A  lot  of  effort  is  going  into  this  project.  It  is  privately  run  and  developed.       Have  a  good  day.     Best  regards   Knut  Skjærven   Copenhagen,  Denmark   April  2014.     Last  page:  MARILYN  IN  THE  WINDOW  ©(#129),  Potsdam  2011              

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

175


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

           

  THANKS.  YOU  HAVE  ARRIVED  AT  YOUR  DESTINATION.    

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

176


ON THE  GO  2014   NEW  STREET  AGENDA      

           

  NOW,  TAKE  THE  SAME  WAY  BACK.  

© KNUT  SKJÆRVEN.  ALL  RIGHTS  RESERVED  

177

NEW STREET AGENDA  

FOLLOW IT. THIS IS THE EMERGING WORKBOOK FOR NEW STREET AGENDA.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you