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knack magazine / issue nine

KNACK is dedicated to showcasing the work of new artists of all mediums and to discussing trends and ideas within art communities. KNACK’s ultimate aim is to connect and inspire emerging artists. We strive to create a place for artists, writers, designers, thinkers, and innovators to collaborate and produce a unique, informative, and unprecedented web-based magazine each month.

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WILL SMITH Co-Founder, Photo Editor ANDREA VACA Co-Founder, Art Director, Production Manager ARIANA LOMBARDI Executive Editor ARIANNA SULLIVAN Editor JONATHON DUARTE Creative Director, Design

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KNACK ARTMAGA ZINE.COM K N ACK M AGA ZINE1@ GM A IL .C OM


knack magazine / issue nine

IS SU E N I N E

Artist Biographies . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-6 Cliff Shapiro. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Marco Lukini Perez. . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 Ian Mason. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Hannah Underwood . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Elisabeth Prigent-Karoubi. . . . . . . . . 46 Submission Guidelines . . . . . . . . . . . 50

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cliff shapiro

marco lukini perez

Cliff Shapiro received his BFA in photography from the College of Santa Fe in 2010 and has been a Santa Fe based photographer since. Cliff’s works range from the experimental to commercial. Cliff looks forward to one day looking back on it all through a shoebox of Polaroids. His most recent body of work, landscapes of Ireland, can be found at his website www.cliffshapiro.com

Marco Lukini is a photographer and graphic designer. He studied photography in Mexico, then learned about typography. He believes photography is a more balanced perception.


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ian mason

hannah underwood

Ian Mason grew up in Chicago and is a student at the Georgetown University Law Center. He currently works as a researcher for the Annual Review of Criminal Procedure, a reference work for the criminal justice system, and aspires to be a criminal practitioner.

Hannah Underwood was born and raised in Houston, Texas. She attended College of Santa Fe and University of New Mexico. She loves feet and hands and ear massages.

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CLIFF SHAPIRO P H OT O G R A P H Y

I have often wondered whether the ideals we hold a photograph to be in fact an illusion. At first we think of the photograph as a way of preserving the moment, a truth. But doesn’t our subconscious and the passage of time distort that truth as it becomes memory? Isn’t memory just a lie? The photograph is an evolution. Doesn’t our memory change over the course of time? The idea for this project was to take the photograph along for the ride, to allow the photograph to morph from its original Polaroid form into something else, something new. Something that reflected the way I remember ghosts from my past. The result is “polaroids” that are in fact third generation color calotypes created using the original polaroid separation as the “negative.” ...

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Across the Street, 2007


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Laundry Day, 2007

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Self Portrait No. 1, 2007


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Dave, 2007

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Self Portrait No. 2, 2007


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Viola’s, 2007

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MARCO LUKINI PEREZ GRAPHIC DESIGN

It is better to be the turtle than the rabbit, not because the turtle will win, but because the point of this life is take all of the time that we can get. ...

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IAN MASON C R E AT I V E W R I T I N G

I write both as a creative outlet and as a vehicle for illustrating the issues of our day. So much of what I read and write these days is legal, memos, judicial decisions, and the like. Taking the time to branch out into the journalistic and narrative writing I cut my teeth on is always satisfying. Our beliefs and understanding of the world is shaped by experiences and how we react to them. I think creative writing is most powerful medium we have for transmitting how we experience things as opposed to merely what is was we experienced. When an experience shapes my understanding of an issue, writing about it provides the best opportunity for me to impart that understanding. The piece here started as a on a jail visit I went on with my criminal justice class in Montgomery County, Maryland. It wound up not working very well as a legal critique. It fit much better as an impression of the experience of mass incarceration in this country. ...

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jail visit op-ed


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I'll confess to a guilty pleasure: I cannot get enough of prison documentaries. These programs vary widely in quality and always reek with sensationalism. But behind the movie trailer announcer voiceovers and the desperate-to-be-on-television interviewees' stories lies the terrible subject of my macabre fascination. More serious inquiry into the deepest and, despite the ceaseless glow of florescent lighting, darkest holes in our republic does little to dispel the sensationalism. I have poured over the sobering figures that reveal a shadow-America with a population larger than New Mexico's that consumes more than that state's total gross domestic product, and Hawaii's, and Delaware's combined. This world for the worst sees constant violence and hosts systematic rapes estimated in the hundreds of thousands per year. When I arrived to tour a Maryland jail, then, my conscience was steeled for the horrors and harsh realities of concentrated criminality and absolute dominating authority. Nothing in the correctional system could shock me, except for what I encountered: the world’s worst waiting room. There was no violence on display, not even any raised voices. The constant screaming and cat-calling of the television clips was absent, replaced by the institutional humming of florescent bulbs and jocular staff banter. In place of the unbearable tension of the prison yard, with its congregations of gang members and the ever-present threat of brawls or worse, was a high school-esque half-court with one contently jogging inmate.

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To be sure, this was a fully-modern jail not some turn of the last century prison. Even the oft-mentioned stomach-turning prison smell had been excised; our correctional officer guide insisted on account of the smoking ban. Styrofoam was banned for its propensity to be melted down into shanks. Every block was self-contained to avoid any need to move the prisoners. As our CO boasted, there had never been a serious escape attempt and the jail was practically free of the drugs that drive the television prisons’ economy. He equivocated on whether this was attributable more to the strict visitation policy or the jail’s crown jewel: its state-of-the-art body cavity scanner machine. Looking back, none of this should have been surprising. Surely, I hadn’t expected the bloody violence and psychological drama of the small screen to unfold before my eyes at 10am on a Thursday, had I? No, certainly not. But neither was I expecting to be struck by the place’s sheer normality. It was not some surreal sight possible only in the netherworld behind bars, but by something just the opposite that has stayed with me.

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We walked by her as we entered one of the cell blocks. She was younger than I, late teens perhaps, white, pretty, tattooless, decidedly suburban looking, penal jumpsuit and lack of makeup notwithstanding. I don’t mean to imply any reason she shouldn’t be in jail, for all I know she is a serial killer, though I suspect not. She was fretting as a correctional officer directed her on what to do with some triplicate carbon-copy form she grasped into a crumpled roll in her right hand. She stepped one


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She was younger than I, late teens perhaps, white, pretty, tattooless, decidedly suburban looking, penal jumpsuit and lack of makeup notwithstanding. way and then, corrected, the other. In the momentary pause between, she threw her hands up above her shoulders and gave a sharp frustrated half-sigh. It was as if she were with her friends affecting that familiar teenage disinterest while a teacher instructed her on where to stand for a school photograph. What was really missing, compared to my television prisons, was not, as Robert Cover put it, “the experience of being violently dominated,� but the exceptionality of that experience. When our wayward Marylandian anti-heroine was ever so slightly pissy with that CO, he reacted as though she were just one more customer at any other paperwork-laden government facility. He acted just as if she were some teenager asking where she should take her test-receipt at the DMV to have her license printed. Fair enough, one more day at the office. But so did she.

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Given the general facts of our system of incarceration, what I’ve just related was more unsettling than the sordid tales of the jailhouse documentary. My macabre fascination was rooted in the same perception of exceptionality that informs the basic punitive logic of incarceration. When it was ultraviolent cons committing and being made victim of unspeakable acts of depravity in far away dungeons, I could accept it. Or be “outraged” at the “inhumanity” of it all, depending on how compassionate I felt. But her little gesture completely untethered our system of mass incarceration from any such notion. The system is not the drastic action of society’s righteous wrath. It is a matter of routine, the world’s worst waiting room replicated onto a demographic scale. And it isn’t fooling anyone, not even a teenage girl from Montgomory County.


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The system is not the drastic action of society’s righteous wrath. It is a matter of routine...

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HANNAH UNDERWOOD C R E AT I V E W R I T I N G / S U D I O A R T

I strive to stretch joy into the far corners of the room. I create morale boosting accessories to remind me to sink into character. It is most important for me to create an environment where I can truly feel like myself, thereby helping others to do the same. ...

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Weeks weaken when dragged into days and days are decimated into hours and hours are hastened through by minutes and minutes only manage to squeak by. A moment is not a mountain. Nor an ant hill. We persist on something smaller. A carrier. A marriage. And a mirage.

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But who cares. I tarry along.


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headdresses bewitched to boost morale


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PHOTOGR A PHS by E L I S A B E T H P R I G E N T- K A R OU B I

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Ile Sainte Marguerite , about half a mile off from the city of Cannes, France May 2013


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Cannes, France, view from the port May 2013

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Cannes, street view, poster for the Festival de Cannes, presenting Mélanie Laurent et Quentin Tarantino, 2009. “Cannes fait le mur “ May 2013

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opposite page: Typical parisian builduing / rainbow, (view from my window), march 2013, Paris


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PHOTOGRAPHERS, GRAPHIC DESIGNERS & STUDIO ARTISTS Up to 10 high resolution images of your work. All must include pertinent caption information (name, date, medium, year). If there are specifications or preferences concerning the way in which an image is displayed please include them.

WRITERS K NAC K se e ks writing of all kinds . We will eve n conside r re cipes , reviews , and essays (although we do not prefe r any thing that is ac ade mic). We se e k write rs whose work has a distinc t voice , is charac te r drive n , and is subve rsive b ut tastef ul . We are not inte reste d in fantasy or ge nre f ic tion . Yo u may submit up to 2 5 ,0 0 0 words and as lit tle as on e . We acce pt simultan e ous submissions . N o cove r let te r n e cessar y. All submissions must be 12pt, Tim es N ew Roman , do uble -space d with page numbe rs and include your nam e , e - mail , phon e numbe r, and ge nre .

ALL SUBMISSIONS: KNACK encourages all submitters to include an artist statement with their submission. We believe that your perspective of your work and process is as lucrative as the work itself. This may range from your upbringing and/or education as an artist, what type of work you produce, inspirations, etc. If there are specifications or preferences concerning the way in which an image is displayed please include them. A brief biography including your name, age, current location, and portrait of the artist is also encouraged (no more than 700 words).

*Please title f iles for submission with the name of the piece. This applies for both writing and visual submissions.

ACCEPTABLE FORMATS IMAGES: PDF or JPEG WRITTEN WORKS: .doc, .docx, and RTF

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EMAIL: knackmagazine1@gmail.com SUBJECT: SUBMISSION (PHOTOGRAPHY, STUDIO ART, CREATIVE WRITING, GRAPHIC DESIGN)


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Missed a submission deadline? Do not fear! K N ACK oper ates on a rolling submission s ystem. This means that we w ill consider wor k from any ar tist at any time. Our “ deadlines� merely ser ve as a cutof f for each issue of the magazine. A ny and all wor k sent to knackmagazine1@ gmail.com w ill be considered for submission as long as it follow s submission guidelines. The day wor k is sent merely reflec t s the issue it w ill be considered for. Have questions or suggestions? E-mail us. We w ant to hear your thought s, comment s, and concer ns. Sincerely, A r iana Lombardi, Editor

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ISSUE 12 SUNDAY, AUGUST 11th


knack magazine / issue nine

KNACK is requesting material to be reviewed. Reviews extend to any culture-related event that may be happening in the community in which you live. Do you know of an exciting show or exhibition opening? Is there an art collective in your city that deserves some press? Are you a musician, have a band, or are a filmmaker? Send us your CD, movie, or titles of upcoming releases which you’d like to see reviewed in KNACK. We believe that reviews are essential to creating a dialogue about the arts. If something thrills you, we want to know about it and share it with the KNACK community—no matter if you live in the New York or Los Angeles, Montreal or Mexico. All review material can be sent to knackmagazine1@gmail. com. Please send a copy of CDs and films to 1720 West Alameda Street Santa Fe, NM 87501. If you would like review material returned to you include return postage and packaging. Entries should contain pertinent details such as name, year, release date, websites and links (if applicable). For community events we ask that information be sent up to two months in advance to allow proper time for assignment and review. We look forward to seeing and hearing your work.

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KNACK Issue #9