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TRIAD EDITION 2015 - 2016

www.mccantscom.com www.blackpagesusa.com

Celebrating

19 years

1996 -2015


CALLING ALL BISON

IN THE GREENSBORO, HIGH POINT, WINSTON-SALEM & SURROUNDING AREAS!

You are cordially invited to become a member of the newly chartered Howard University Alumni Club of Winston Salem and the Triad (HUAC – WST). While membership provides essential support (student recruitment and financial contributions) for Howard University, it also gives alumni in the area a way to stay connected. For more information regarding events and how to connect with Bison love in the Triad, please like us on Facebook or call Donna M. Jones at 336-817-8199. Together, we can have fun while fulfilling the mission of Howard University.

A Legacy Renewed.


“Giving You The Prettiest Smile� Family Dentistry, With a Smile

Dr. Sharon Long-Stokes Family Dentistry, located in Greensboro, North Carolina, provides a full range of dental services, from the latest cosmetic techniques to the most advanced methods in tooth restoration and tooth replacement. We utilize the latest technologies and the highest quality materials, ensuring exceptional results and a beautiful smile. Services We Provide

Clear Correct Aligners Crowns and Bridges Dental Cleaning Dental Filling Dentures Emergency Visits Oral Surgery Root Canal Therapy Tooth Extractions Tooth Whitening Veneers

prettiestsmiles.com

SHARON LONG-STOKES DDS, PA.

(336) 275-9922 (877) WEFLOSS

106 S. Murrow Blvd Greensboro, NC 27401


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Williams, Tonya 14 Williams, Elijah 15 Onsei-Bonsu, George 16, Chisholm, Elmer L. 17, Long-Stokes, Sharon DDS, PA 3, Edwards, Monte 5, Brown, Danny 20, Blackmon, Charles 21, Lide, Richard 7, Holloway, Tamara 5, Sweatt, James 24, Scott, Matthew 25, McCray, Nasha 26 Jones, Donna M. 27,

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CHURCHES 84

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PROFILE OF ACHIEVEMENT 44

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30 35 18 19 Back Cover 69 22 23 68 92

Coleman, Carolyn Quilloin 44 Alexander, Dr. Sandra Carlton 45 Boyce, Brenton PA 46

SORORITIES AND FRATERNITIES 48 - 57 Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Kappa Lambda Chapter 48 Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Beta Iota Omega Chapter 49 Sigma Kappa Omega Chapter 50 Delta Sigma Theta Greensboro Alumnae Chapter 51 Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. Delta Kap pa Zeta Chapter 52 Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc Greensboro NC Alumni Chapter 53 Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. Beta Kappa Kappa Chapter 54 Tau Omega Chapter 55 Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. Delta Sigma Chapter 56 - 57 FOR YOUR INFORMATION 58 - 66 Investing in Ghana 58 Marketing Murder 59 - 61 Estate Planning 62 - 63 Leadership 64 Health Insurance 65 INDEX OF ADVERTISERS 82



The Triad’s Trusted Source for Signature Projects! “Samet/SRS welcomes Guilford County School’s newest school – George C. Simkins Jr. Elementary. We welcome our students to this new facility and wish them continued success.” Samet and SRS have been a joint venture partner since 2006 on projects throughout the Triad. For more information, please contact our corporate office at 336.544.2600.

Service

Quality

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www.mccantscom.com www.blackpagesusa.com 301 N. Elm Street, Suite 268 Greensboro, NC 27401 Call: 336-274-1709 Email: gerry@blackpagesusa.com

Gerry McCants President McCants Communications Group, Inc. Our Distribution

Distribution of the Black Pages is primarily conducted via the major churches in the area and by a number of established distribution points that have been set up in your area. Our staff will also provide copies of the Black Pages to all of our advertisers, corporate and government procurement officials, local groups and organizations, as well as at conventions, trade shows, festivals, and other community events.

Obtain Copies of the Black Pages:

A copy of the Black Pages can be obtained by contacting our office at (877) 273-1709, or mailing $5.00 for postage and handling for each copy to 301 N Elm St, Ste 268, Greensboro, NC 27401.

Disclaimer

The specific purpose of the Black Pages is to feature and highlight minority-owned businesses. The Black Pages seeks to provide exposure to individuals and businesses at the forefront of the entrepreneurial effort. The objective of the Black Pages is to help these individuals and businesses provide positive leadership for today’s youth, as well as a realistic alternative to the traditional career/ employment opportunities of the past. The Black Pages USA accepts no liability for errors, ommissions or contents of information provided to the magazine, or for the consequences of any actions taken on the basis of the information provided, unless that information is subsequently confirmed in writing. Any views or opinions presented in this publication are solely those of the individual author(s) and do not necessarily represent the views of the company.

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PROUD SUPPORTER OF THE INTERNATIONAL CIVIL RIGHTS CENTER & MUSEUM. WINNER OF MULTIPLE NATIONAL AWARDS FOR GRAND OPENING ACTIVITIES, INCLUDING

PRW EEK ’ S PROMOTIONAL EVENT OF THE YEAR.

Advertising

Marketing

Public Relations

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www.rlfcommunications.com

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336.553.1801

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RUDOLPH H. CLARK, JR. CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT “Committed to becoming your partner in helping you or your business reach your financial goals.” 130 E. Fisher Ave. Greensboro, NC 27401 (336)-691-8970 Fax: (336)-691-8972 E-Mail: rudyclark@rudolphclarkjrcpa.com

Offering You the Following Services: ACCOUNTING SERVICES

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General Accounting Bookkeeping Payroll Services Development of Budgets, Forecasts, Projections Compiled and Reviewed Financial Statements

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The Moses H. Cone Memorial Hospital

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Delivering

exceptional care close to home.

Cone Health is more than one hospital. No matter where you live or work, Cone Health provides convenient access to world-class hospitals close to home. Our latest addition, Alamance Regional Medical Center, joins Moses Cone, Wesley Long, Annie Penn, Behavioral Health and Women’s Hospital as one network dedicated to one promise — to provide exceptional care to our patients, their families and our community. Collaborative and compassionate partnerships like these bring additional resources to each community and strengthen access to advanced healthcare options. BARIATRICS | CANCER CARE | EMERGENCY CARE | HEART & VASCULAR | NEUROSCIENCES | ORTHOPEDICS | WOMEN’S SERVICES | CONEHEALTH.COM


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COVER Here they are! Entrepreneurs, business owners, corporate and community leaders throughout the Triad area as featured on the front cover. These individuals serve as role models and examples of success and leadership in our community. They are leaders who have shown what can be accomplished through hard work, dedication, determination and perseverance. Because of the foundation they have laid, we all can now traverse those mazes a little easier.

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Tonya Williams By all accounts, NC A&T State University alum Tonya Williams, ’98, is a successful professional. As one of the top managers of the City of Greensboro’s Field Operations Department, she is approachable, organized and flexible, and very good at her job. And even though she doesn’t see herself as a well-known role model for young women just beginning their careers, that’s how others see her. “The impact Tonya has had in our department and with our employees in the past 15 years is unbelievable,” says Dale Wyrick, director field operations. “Many people have commented to me about her drive, skill set, and way with all people.” Williams summarizes her personality this way: “I’m motivated by challenges though I’ve always been seen as the one who has everything planned out. I identify goals – short-term and long-term – and figure out what I need to accomplish them. Once I have, I move on to the next goal or come up with new goals.” After graduating college with a degree in political science, Williams put her drive to good use in December 2000 when she accepted a job as an administrative assistant with the City of Greensboro’s Transportation Department. “Yes, I had a degree, but I’m a humble person, and my goal was to get into the door of the local government. And I did,” she says. “I figured the rest would fall into place through hard work, confidence, and dedication.” And it did. Her A&T education on governmental structure, political analysis, public policy, and how it all works has paid off. The City position was a shared one between three departments at a facility away from downtown. Hers was the first face visitors to the building saw. “I was the receptionist, customer service representative, had fiscal responsibilities, answered phones, entered work orders, worked on the departmental website and newsletter, and took minutes at meetings where I was the only female. I gladly did it all, and I loved the variety and learning opportunities,” Williams says. “I learned a lot about the City and various departments, and got to know and meet many people throughout the organization.” During the next several years, Williams’ job duties progressively grew in complexity and quantity, especially when two departments moved to other facilities and other departments were merged with field operations. It was during this timeframe that Wyrick had her join his leadership team to help centralize the fiscal operations of the department. “I’m detail-orientated and well organized,” she says. “I understand obstacles exist, but I identify them and then stay flexible enough to resolve the issues that come up.” Now as budget and operations division manager for field operations, Williams oversees all financial and budgetary functions. She also oversees the Work Management section, which maintains the work order database system, technology components and billing, and the Warehouse section, which ensures proper controls of purchasing and storing inventory and non-inventory items. “There’s an array of tasks to handle every day with my job. I enjoy the variety of responsibilities within the department and knowing I’ve made a difference and accomplished something at the end of the day,” she adds. She’s also active in professional organizations such as the American Society of Public Administrators, NC Local Government Budget Association and National Forum for Black Public Administrators (NC Triad Chapter) for networking and training opportunities. 14

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Elijah Williams NC A&T State University alum Elijah L. Williams, ‘96, is passionate about being responsible for the daily operations of the TZ Osborne and North Buffalo Water Reclamation facilities, which serve 277,000 Greensboro water customers. And his goal is to spread the word about his industry to others, especially minorities and women, to help increase its professional diversity. “I have a lot of respect for the people in my department and the work they do. Ours is not a glamorous job or one that’s visible to the average person,” says Williams, water reclamation* division manager for the City of Greensboro’s Water Resources Department. “You see cars, roads, video games and you know an engineer worked on them. But, you don’t see miles of underground water and sewer lines, pumping stations, laboratories, reclamation plants. They’re there and they’re part of our everyday use, giving us dependable drinking water and proper sewer systems. That’s a great responsibility we all take seriously.” To circulate information about the water industry, this certified professional engineer is active with the City’s Minority and Women’s Business Enterprise (M/WBE) program. He recently led a professional services on-call request for qualifications process that helped create more opportunities for the participation of minorities and women in Water Resources Department projects. Williams refers to this as ‘capacity building,’ developing more opportunities for M/WBE businesses to learn about other avenues or trades and services available to them. He uses as an example plumbers who work on residential homes. If they knew about additional contracts they could bid on that involved working with chemical piping systems, they could gain that skill and then expand their businesses. The issue of capacity building is nationwide. Even though the utility industry is rapidly changing and growing, it’s typically overlooked by minority and women students and professionals. “There are critical jobs available everywhere in the water resources industry, but people have to know about those options,” he adds. One way to help accomplish this is lending his time and nearly 20 years experience to the NC American Water Works Association/Water Environment Association (NCAWWA/WEA) as a member of its endowment committee and vice chair of the risk management committee. “I do it to give back to the community, to keep abreast of current industry trends and to network with professional peers from other municipalities,” Williams says. And another way he’s trying to spread the word about what the water industry has to offer is by returning to the A&T campus to create a student chapter of NCAWWA/WEA. The chapter, which kicks off this fall, is set to be officially chartered by the professional organization during its annual conference in November. “Being an alum of A&T, I feel the need and desire to promote the water resources industry to students interested in engineering, chemistry, biology, any science, and show them examples of what they can aspire to become, anything from a water main repair crew member to a facility supervisor,” Williams says. “Students need to know about all aspects of engineering, not just design, but also construction, operations, utility. The water resources industry has job opportunities in those areas and more.” Williams adds he’s proud the industry led him to the City of Greensboro, in 2005 as a utility operations engineer. Since then, he has assisted in recruiting for job openings in his department and worked with City staff and administrators who were supportive and encouraging professionally. Personal support comes from his wife Sophia and sons Joshua, 11, and Caleb, 7. One professional supporter, he says, is Steve Drew, the Water Resources Department director. Creating the A&T student chapter of NCAWWA/WEA was Drew’s idea and he asked Williams to work on the project with him. It’s that type of support Williams says he wants to continue. “I challenge young people today to open their minds up to more than what they think they can and will do,” Williams says. “And then the sky’s the limit, for them and our industry.”

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Dr. George Osei-Bonsu Dr. George Osei-Bonsu is a graduate of the University Of Science And Tech, School Of Medicine, Kumasi, Ghana. He completed his residency training in internal medicine at Harlem Hospital Center and the prestigious Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York. In addition to serving as the medical director at Palladium Primary Care in High Point, Dr. Osei-Bonsu is medical director at Wesley Long Hospital in Greensboro. He also practices for Eagle Physicians & Associates at Moses Cone Health System. As a primary care physician, he is dedicated to diagnosing and treating illnesses that disparately affect the African-American community, including diabetes, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol. Dr. Osei-Bonsu is also trained to provide wellness and urgent care.

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Elmer L. Chisholm Elmer L. Chisholm is an experienced manager in several industry sectors. Upon graduating from Duke University, Durham, North Carolina in 1998 receiving a Bachelor of Arts degree in Sociology and Economics, he was selected by Sears, Roebuck and Company to enter its National Management Training Program. Here, the training included inventory management, financial operations, marketing, and management strategies. He excelled and was selected to make presentations and train other trainees. After a brief period (from April 2000 – March 2001) as an apartment-leasing consultant, he continued his management development as an assistant manager and store manager respectfully with Rent-A-Center Company. As an account manager, he managed accounts receivables, counseled customers with challenging payment histories, and coordinated the delivery and service schedules to coincide with daily goals. He consistently ranked in the top 5% of account managers in his region. As Store Manager, he was responsible for the daily store operations, supervising account managers, reviewing and approving all new customer files, updating current customer files. On multiple occasions, his store received “store of the month” accolades. Returning to academia, Mr. Chisholm attended N.Y.I.T. – Ellis College where he received a MBA in November 2007. From June 2007 to fall 2012, combining his managerial talents and education, he was a dedicated employee with Bank of America, where he served as Assistant Vice President and Banking Center Manager II, responsible in part for introducing new executives to the banking environment while managing daily banking center operations. In fall 2012 Mr. Chisholm became a partner in Building Wealth and Communities (BWC), a limited liability corporation, doing business in North Carolina and other states throughout the Southeast Region. BWC provides services in economic development via real estate analysis, research; and strategic analysis via financial layering, structuring/forecasting and development project management.

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Dr. Sharon Long-Stokes Dr. Sharon Long-Stokes has been practicing dentistry for 19 years. She has had a passion for the dental profession since the age of five. Her legacy began with her father, Dr. Durel Gray Long. She worked with him every summer for six years while she attended middle and high school and knew this was her destiny. She graduated from Howard University with a B.S. in microbiology and a minor in chemistry and obtained her Doctor of Dental Surgery from Howard University College of Dentistry in 1993. Dr. Long-Stokes continues her education in dentistry through numerous institutes for advanced study. The office of Dr. Long-Stokes is located at 106 South Murrow Boulevard, Suite 100, Greensboro, NC 27401 and is open Monday through Friday. Call 336-275-9922 or toll-free 1-877-WeFloss, e-mail KeepSmiling@PrettiestSmiles.com, or visit www.PrettiestSmiles. com for more information. At Dr. Long-Stokes’ office, patients are treated like family and provided gentle dental care in a relaxed atmosphere. The professional teamwork of her staff creates a friendly, caring environment. Dr. Long-Stokes utilizes state-of-the-art technology, including digital x-rays, intraoral cameras, Cerec crowns in an hour, Clear Correct invisible aligners, LumiSmile digital makeover images and laser surgery. She also offers state-of-the-art services, such as in-office and take-home teeth whitening, gum treatment, including Perio Protect, routine and periodontal cleanings, veneers, Lumineers, Snap-On-Smiles, implant restorations, root canal therapy, partial and complete dentures, and extractions.

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Monte Edwards Monte A. Edwards is Executive Vice President of Marketing and Business Development and Partner for SRS, Inc., which provides professional facility support and construction management services. Monte brings Fortune 250 executive level experience to the SRS leadership team. He spent 15 years in the wireless telecommunications industry, most recently in Vice President & General Manager positions for Alltel Corp. and GTE Wireless Corp. Monte holds a Bachelor of Science degree in Management from Cornell University in Ithaca, NY and enjoys serving the community through present/past local Board of Directorships with the United Way, Salvation Army, Chamber of Commerce, YMCA, Junior Achievement and Cornell Alumni Association. Monte is a member of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Cornell Admissions Ambassadors Network and The 100. SRS, Inc. takes pride in building high quality projects in the NC Triad area, including: »» »» »» »» »» »» »» »»

Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering Union Hill Elementary School Summerfield Elementary School GTCC Parking Deck GTCC Donald W. Cameron Campus UNCG Jefferson Suites UNCG Spartan Village WSSU Donald Reaves Student Activity Center

»»

Center for Design and Innovation (WSSU/UNC School of the Arts/Forsyth Tech CC)

SRS, Inc. has garnered industry recognition from the Small Business Administration, Department of Homeland Security, DiversityBusiness.com, the National Association of Minority Contractors, and was listed on Inc. 500’s list of the 250 Fastest Growing Private Companies in America. SRS, Inc. employs 160 people in North Carolina, Tennessee, Kentucky, Louisiana, and Georgia.

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Danny Brown Danny Brown has been the owner and president of United Maintenance Group since 1990. His experience as a project manager and small business owner in the construction and engineering sector has given him much fulfillment over the years. Brown received his Bachelor’s degree from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and holds multiple certifications. The culmination of his expertise is landscaping architecture, landscaping contractor, demolition, and lot clearing in preparation to build a house, building, or parking lot. Brown has completed projects all over the southeastern United States. His most fulfilling experience was cleanup post Hurricane Katrina. He states, “That was a real experience.” He continues to remain extremely instrumental in the clean-up of the after math of storms during hurricane season. His largest contract was the Hampton Homes Capital Improvement renovation project. Other clients include Guilford County, Winston Salem, and City of Greensboro. Perhaps one of the most recognizable projects that he has completed was the landscaping irrigation and concrete project for Bennett College Capital Improvement. He also finalized the installation of a sports field in conjunction with landscaping and irrigation projects for Northern Elementary, Ragsdale High, and Alamance Elementary schools in Guilford County. Outside of managing a highly successful company, he volunteers with Guilford County Schools by mentoring and sharing his life experiences with young men, test proctoring, and preparing meals for Greensboro Urban Ministries. Brown’s favorite pastimes are traveling and riding Motorcycles and ATVs. His favorite destination is Orlando Florida. Dbrown7031@triad.rr.com

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Charles K. Blackmon Charles focuses his legal practice primarily on business, entertainment, and nonprofit organization matters. Prior to joining Tuggle Duggins, PA, Mr. Blackmon was a member of Gray Newell Johnson & Blackmon, LLP and founding partner with the law offices of Whitfield & Blackmon, LLP in Greensboro. He was an associate attorney with the firm of Dessen Moses & Sheinoff in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania before that concentrating in the areas of labor and employment law.

Mr. Blackmon is a member of the North Carolina and Pennsylvania State Bars, the American Bar and North Carolina Bar Associations, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro Board of Trustees, the M&F Bank Piedmont Triad Advisory Board, Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc., the Greensboro Men’s Club, and Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity (the Boulé). Additionally, he lectures regularly on business and entertainment topics.

His clients include: North Carolina A&T University Foundation, Inc., Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference (MEAC), Café Pasta, and R&R Productions. A Durham native, Mr. Blackmon obtained his B.S. in Industrial Relations from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and his law degree from the North Carolina Central University School of Law. He resides in Greensboro, North Carolina with his wife, Mable Hubbard Blackmon. They have a daughter, Chloe, in college.

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Richard Lide Richard Lide is the president, CEO and founder of the highly successful Patriot Staffing Employment Agency. Patriot Staffing is a full-service staffing agency providing qualified employment solutions for any size organization. The company acts as an extension of human resource departments and specializes in a broad range of temporary assignments and temp-to-hire positions, as well as direct hire services for professional, light & heavy industrial, manufacturing and administrative positions. The company is strategically and technologically situated to respond to the needs of clients across the country. Additionally, Patriot Staffing is equipped to handle background and drug testing. Born and raised in Raeford, North Carolina, Lide had dreams of becoming a professional football player, but when the career he anticipated didn’t materialize he found himself working at a local staffing agency. Within only a few short years Lide discovered his passion for helping individuals find solid employment. Armed with a degree from North Carolina A&T State University, he decided to launch the flagship agency in 2006 in Greensboro, North Carolina. Within the first year of business the new company made over $1.2 Million dollars and was recognized as the sixth largest minority-owned business in the Triad. Patriot Staffing has since grown and expanded, with North Carolina branches in Asheboro, Charlotte, Raleigh, Hickory, Rocky Mount and Research Triangle Park as well as Roanoke and Norfolk, Virginia. Patriot Staffing is currently among the top grossing of all triad companies and is certified by the American Staffing Association (ASA). Lide is also a participating member of various professional business organizations such as the Greensboro Chamber of Commerce, Greensboro Merchants Association, National Minority Supplier Development Council, Winston Salem Chamber of Commerce, Guilford Technical Community College Career Advisory Board and CAI. In addition to running Patriot Staffing, Lide is also the Chairman of Community Helps Network. Since 2007, the privately owned agency initiates, provides and promotes services for people with mental illness, substance abuse, financial and social issues and developmental disabilities. Through the network, clients gain greater independence and develop the ability to succeed and contribute to community life. With a great deal on his plate, Lide’s wheels are always turning, but he always makes time to give back and maintains a presence in the community. He desires to work with youth and instill in them a greater work ethic and professionalism.

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Tamara Holloway I am a Protector from Mayhem, Mayhem is when something chaotic happens in someone’s life. Tamara Holloway, an Allstate Agent residing in Greensboro, is making great strides in the North Carolina community to offer quality insurance, and protect you from Mayhem. Insurance essentially means you are insuring the risk and possibility that something could happen. To eliminate that moment of panic, when something does happen... is to have insurance. “One thing you shouldn’t have to ask yourself is, ‘Am I covered for that?” Not only is it important to be insured but to have the proper amount of insurance,” says Holloway. There are many factors that may determine the proper amount of insurance that one may need, the state minimum may not always be enough. That’s why Holloway is here to assist. Mrs. Holloway, a wife and mother, has worked in the insurance industry for four years. She encourages the African American community to make insurance a top priority. “We have left it in the hands of our loved ones to take on that burden when we have passed away. But if we as a people, could make this a priority, to have and keep in place as others communities do, it would be beneficial.” Not only will you be protected from Mayhem and insured but you will also be receiving the best customer service agents are able to offer. “It is easy to sell a policy but harder to maintain it. Because of the day and age we live in, we can shop online and get a quote from almost anywhere. I like to keep a close rapport with my clients, and I like to set myself apart by having close relationships with my clients,” says Holloway. Throughout the years we’ve all heard actor Dennis Haysbert, say his famous line on several Allstate commercials, “It’s Allstate’s stand, are you in good hands?” With excellent customer service, mayhem protection and vital life insurance, from Tamara Holloway, you are guaranteed to be in good hands. Contact Tamara Holloway of Allstate Insurance at 336-346-2740 and taholloway@allstate.com for more information.

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James Sweatt Everyday life presents risks and challenges. James Sweatt has the knowledge and enjoys helping clients navigate and minimize risks and thereby realize their dreams. Sweatt is a State Farm Insurance Agent Owner. As a trusted risk and list manager, with a stellar track record, Sweatt and his staff of three expertly makes sound financial and coverage recommendations to clients and prospective clients to grow and protect their assets as well as manage losses and potential losses. The Sweatt office is committed to operating through transparency, recommending fair and appropriate coverage policies and staying abreast of the latest changes within the industry. From simple car, home and life insurance to complex financial services, the Sweatt team is fully qualified, competent and passionate. The office seeks to “wow� clients through exceptional customer service and offering significant cost savings. James Sweatt has the corporate background and pedigree necessary to successfully lead and operate his agency and work on the behalf of clients. He has worked extensively within the financial and customer service field for over 20 years. Sweatt is a registered financial representative as well as a Six Sigma Certified Master Black Belt which is a widely recognized certification within the business sector that signifies expertise in the complex methods used to proactively identify and remove the causes of game changing errors and minimize their effects. His personal resume includes highlevel positions held for Fortune 500 companies such as JP Morgan Chase New York, General Electric, Bank of America and The McGraw Hill Companies. In addition to all the hard work and time Sweatt puts into the exceptional work he does for his clients, he remains committed to his family and community. When he is not spending quality time with his lovely wife and four children, Sweatt is involved with his local church and consistently participates in other community organizations including the United Way, the YMCA and the American Heart Association. Even still Sweatt knows the importance of leisure and physical activity and finds the time to enjoy his love of traveling, history, football and golf.

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Matthew Scott Matthew Scott, serves as the Interim Executive Director for the Greensboro Community Development Fund. What is the Greensboro Community Development Fund? It was once the Greensboro Venture Capital Fund, which was created to stimulate the development of jobs and economic activities in the Greensboro area. It has worked to provide debt financing to minorities and female owned businesses and motivates and assists those same businesses to receive conventional commercial loans; thus allowing new and expanding businesses to grow and prosper. Mr. Scott has served in the capacity as Interim Executive Director since March 2015 where he plans to “continue the momentum that began with my predecessor, Jerome Gray.” With his education in Economics, Mr. Scott went to Davidson College and soon headed to the work force after his beautiful daughter was born. Previously Mr. Scott has worked in the capacity of Pricing and Rent Statistician for R.E. Carroll Management in Greensboro, and several apartment complexes, Pricing Analyist, and a Manufacturer for Gilbarco Veeder- Root; which serves as the largest manufacturer of gas station pumps in the world. Within the past few years recruiting new partners in Greensboro has been a huge success for GCDF. “We have had our certification with the City of Greensboro for 3 years.” They have partnered with Wells Fargo, Bank of America, Guilford County, Z. Smith Reynold Foundation, the Winston, and Guildford County Government, Community Foundation of Greater Greensboro, and Greensboro Partnership just to name a few. It is with no surprise that Scott and his board of trustees would go on to be of help to so many in their community. Since 2011 the GCDF has been able to assist with an estimated $185, 300 in lending, 14 total loans for start-ups & existing businesses, and 45 jobs have been created or maintained since their launching. “In the past year, combing our programs we have been able to help around an estimated 140 people over our short existence with direct loan and services.” With a desire to continue to help the Greensboro community he would like to encourage business owners in the area who have been reaching for their dreams to know that if they have ever had challenges when getting a project off the ground to be encouraged as he sends encouragement their way. Also he is eager to see Greensboro citizens and communities grow and prosper. For more information on how you can see your business flourish head over to

GCDFonline.org.

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Nasha McCray At an early age growing up in South Florida, Nasha McCray knew a career in helping people was in her blood. Nasha’s father proudly served the community as a police officer for the Sunrise Police Department for more than 20 years, while her mother developed and trained directory operators for AT&T. With public service values instilled in her at an early age, Nasha was driven to pursue a Bachelors degree in liberal studies and earned a Masters degree in public administration at the University of Central Florida. The relationships she built there and through her involvement with Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority Inc. and National Pan-Hellenic Council, along with her volunteerism efforts with other service organizations, began shaping her vision and passion to make meaningful impacts in society. After graduation, Nasha worked her way up the ranks at the City of West Palm Beach, Florida first as an intern, Planner, and ultimately, becoming a Project Manager for the City’s Community Redevelopment Agency. Nasha was recognized by her peers, colleagues, and citizens as a quick learner and an asset to the team. After four years of successfully completing projects, Nasha took advantage of a promotional opportunity as the Senior Planner with the City of Jacksonville in North Carolina. While in Jacksonville, Nasha was credited for developing the City’s first Neighborhood Planning Program, spearheaded the adoption and implementation of downtown master plan and design guidelines, and managed the City’s long range Growth Management Plan. When asked what she loved most about these accomplishments, Nasha responded: “It was a great opportunity and honor to work with the residents to help shape the future of Jacksonville and to serve its diverse population, including the military at Camp Lejeune.” These accomplishments did not go unnoticed, as the City of Greensboro recruited and selected her as the Planning and Project Development Division Manager for its Parks and Recreation Department. This leadership position has allowed her to add her skills in strategic and city planning and establishing community relationships with parks and recreation, thus furthering the City’s efforts to improve quality recreational opportunities for its citizens. “When I arrived in Greensboro and became part of the Parks and Recreation Department, the first thing that struck me was the genuine sense of family,” says McCray. “The common thread that is woven throughout the fabric of parks and recreation is simple. We’re here for a shared purpose, which is to build better lives and a better community.” The benefits and opportunities offered by the Parks and Recreation Department are endless. “While we provide the functions most people associate with us, such as recreation centers, athletics, and parks, parks and recreation is so much more now,” adds McCray. “We truly offer something for everyone from cemeteries, youth development, and environmental education to trails and gardens. This allows us to touch on different aspects of people’s lives throughout our community.” McCray takes her leadership position seriously and uses it to make meaningful and impactful changes throughout Greensboro. She has worked closely on a variety of projects with residents and community groups alike, even with NC A&T State University. Some examples include completing a historic structure rehabilitation plan for World War Memorial Stadium, relocation of the Hayes Taylor YMCA to Barber Park, development of Gateway Gardens, and a host of others. “The most rewarding part of my job is helping people work through real issues in their neighborhood, while getting to know the people that live there,” adds McCray. “Helping our community turn their dreams into reality makes me feel like more of a part of this community every day.” When it comes to advice for college students trying to choose a career path, especially those interested in parks and recreation, city/urban planning, or public administration, McCray encourages students to become active and involved early. Parks and Recreation offers a vast array of volunteer and internship opportunities and even has a volunteer coordinator who can match students with different divisions and sections that mirror their interests. “There are a number of leadership opportunities for college students through boards and commissions and even community meetings,” adds McCray. “In fact, our department started the country’s first College Commission. Aside from that, I want our student community to know they should never feel that just because you’re a student your voice doesn’t matter. Reach out and talk to people, get involved, and find a mentor who can help you figure out opportunities that may be available to you.” McCray loves what she does; however, she’s always looking for ways she can further develop and help more people. Those who know Nasha expects to see her to continue to shine and we wouldn’t be surprised to one day see her title change to: Nasha McCray, City Manager.

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Donna M. Jones Donna Jones is the owner of Donna M. Jones State Farm Insurance Agency in WinstonSalem, NC, an insurance and financial services business providing life, health, auto, fire, and business insurance; banking products and services; and retirement and education planning. The Agency is committed to understanding the needs of their customers in order to provide the information and inspiration to help them plan for the unexpected and give life to their dreams.

Donna is passionate about helping individuals, families and particularly small business owners understand their risks and the options available to insure their future. In addition to being a licensed insurance professional with over 15 years of experience, she is a Professional Project Manager, Registered Corporate Coach, and Certified Six Sigma Green Belt. Donna’s insurance and professional experience positions her to be a valuable business partner for small business owners. She is a skilled facilitator and is available to conduct seminars on the following topics that will inform and inspire participants to get to a better state: • Insurance

Long-Term Care

Financial Planning

Retirement Planning

Education Planning

Business Owner Solutions

Donna is a graduate of Howard University with a Bachelors of Business Administration in Insurance and is also the President of the newly chartered Howard University Alumni Club of Winston Salem and the Triad. Her desire to be an integral part of the community is one of the reasons she decided to open her agency. She is an active part of the community serving on the Board of Family Services, Inc., the Advisory Committee of the Small Business Center at Forsyth Tech, the Faculty of Business Advisory Board at Winston Salem State University, The Women’s Fund of Winston Salem, United Metropolitan Missionary Baptist Church and various business and community organizations in Winston Salem. Donna was recently accepted into the 2016 class of Leadership Winston-Salem. Donna loves to sing. She achieved her “bucket list” goal of singing the National Anthem at a sporting event when selected to do so for the Winston Salem Dash. She enjoys being outdoors running with her Black Girls Run sisters, biking, hitting golf balls and spending time with family and friends. For more information about ways to help you or your organization get to a better state, please contact: Donna M. Jones, Agent 682 Saint George Square Ct. Winston Salem, NC 27103 Bus (336) 602-2980 Cell (336) 817-8199 www.dmjinsurance.com

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Jakayla Lide


Jakayla Emani Lide Student/Leader

J

akayla Emani Lide is headed to greatness. The Northern Gilford High School Junior is working hard to make her dreams come true. Jakayla is not only active in her extra curricular activities but shining in the classroom. She is a 16-year old honor student taking advanced courses in Chemistry, Spanish and English. She has actively taken part in a Jump Rope Team, Step Team, and has begun taking Dance and Theater Classes in Downtown Greensboro. With hopes of following the path her father, Richard Lide has set before her, she plans to attend North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University. Jakayla plans to make history as an Aggie just as her dad, who is a North Carolina A&T Hall of Famer. She plans to study Mass Communications and minor in Theatre. With her strong love for production and performance she plans to audition for school plays. Her passion for Journalism will surely blossom as she embarks on her journey as a journalist. Jakayla desires to be a member of the National Association of Black Journalist with hopes of landing an internship with a local radio broadcasting company. She understands the importance of being a student of service. Jakayla is working to help with community service projects in the area. She would like to focus primarily on the living situation for those who are homeless in the Guilford County area, as a resident she hurts for those who go to bed cold and hungry. Jakayla has two siblings, Whitney Robinson, 26 and Jayden Lide, 10 months. She is the lovely daughter of Kimberly Lide and Richard Lide, President and CEO of Patriot Staffing Employment Agency.



Neighborhood Development wants you to join our team!

Community Planner Code Compliance Manager Grant Compliance Administrator Housing Program Coordinator Housing Rehabilitation Project Coordinator Code Enforcement Officer

City of Greensboro NEIGHBORHOOD DE VELOPMENT An integral part of the City’s diversity and inclusion policy is to provide qualified individuals with equal employment opportunity in all employment practices (i.e. hiring, promotion, recruitment rates of pay, and other forms of compensation). The Neighborhood Development Department is committed to maintaining a diverse workforce and environment. Neighborhood Development offers single and multi-family housing development opportunities for building contractors and developers. The department also offers Code Enforcement positions where workers can use a diverse knowledge of safety codes, best practices, and violations to help keep Greensboro safe and healthy. The City also uses certified contractors to work on its behalf for nuisance abatement – clearing brush, cutting grass, removing junk. There are no shortages of opportunities within Neighborhood Development. WWW.GREENSBORO-NC.GOV/NEIGHBORHOODDEVELOPMENT


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Elected Officials

Yvonne Johnson

Sharon Hightower

Jamal T. Fox

Greensboro City Council

Greensboro City Council

Greensboro City Council

Rep. Alma Adams

Senator Gladys Robison

Ralph Johnson

Amos L. Quick III

J. Carlvena Foster

US House Of Representatives NC 12 Congressional District

Cecil Brockman

NC Senate 28

NC House District 58

NC House District 60

Guilford County School Board Guilford County Board Of Commissioner

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Dr. Sandra Alexander

Guilford County School Board

Justin Outling

Greensboro City Council

Derwin L. Montgomery

Winston-Salem City Council

Deena A. Hayes

Guilford County School Board

Ray Trapp

Guilford County Board of Commissioners

Denise Adams

Winston-Salem City Council

Vivian H. Burke

Winston-Salem City Council

James Taylor

Winston-Salem City Council

Deanna taylor

Winston-Salem/Forsyth County School Board

Everette Witherspoon Walter Marshall Victor Johnson Jr. Lisa Johnson-Tonkins Winston-Salem/Forsyth Forsyth County/County Forsyth County/ Clerk Of Superior Court County School Board Commissioner County Commissioner 2 0 1 5

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Congresswoman Alma Adams, Ph.D. 12th Congressional District of North Carolina

Dr. Alma S. Adams

was elected to her first term representing the 12th Congressional District of North Carolina on November 12, 2014. After winning a special election, Congresswoman Adams was sworn in immediately as the 100th woman elected to Congress, the most in U.S. history. Representative Adams sits on the Committee on Education and the Workforce, the Agriculture Committee, the Small Business Committee, and the Joint Economic Committee. She is the Ranking member of the Small Business Subcommittee on Oversight. The Congresswoman is the founder of the first ever Congressional Bipartisan HBCU Caucus and she is part of the Women’s Caucus, Congressional Progressive Caucus, Diabetes Caucus, Congressional Black Caucus, Historic Preservation Caucus, AIDS/HIV Caucus, Hunger Caucus, Medicaid Expansion Caucus, and the Art Caucus. Congresswoman Adams also holds a leadership role in the Democratic Caucus as Vice President for the 114th Congress’ freshmen class and she serves as a Regional Whip for the Democratic Caucus.

Congresswoman Alma Adams, Ph.D. 12th Congressional District of North Carolina

Throughout her career, Representative Adams has promoted quality education for all students, spearheading legislation to boost funds for Historically Black Colleges and Universities, providing nutritious breakfasts in schools and while supporting increased pay for teachers. For 40 years, Dr. Adams taught Art History at Bennett College.

While at Bennett, she led the effort to increase student civic participation coining the phrase “Bennett Belles are Voting Belles” and organizing annual marches to the polls. As a former educator, Rep. Adams has dedicated her career to improving the lives of young people and her community. In 1994, Dr. Adams was appointed by her peers to serve in the North Carolina House District 26 seat. She went on to serve ten terms in the state House. During her tenure, she rose to become the chair of the North Carolina Legislative Black Caucus and was instrumental in passing legislation that improved the climate for quality affordable health care in the state. A working mother of two, Representative Adams pioneered the Displaced Homemakers Bill and successfully spearheaded the state’s first minimum wage increase in nine years. Before serving as a member of the North Carolina General Assembly, Congresswoman Adams served nine years on the Greensboro City Council. Throughout her service to the second district in Greensboro, Dr. Adams worked to create safe and affordable housing and the revitalization of neighbors. Later, Dr. Adams became the first African American woman ever elected to the Greensboro City School Board. It was then that she made a lifetime commitment to effecting social change in her community and beyond. Congresswoman Adams has one daughter, Linda Jeanelle Lindsay, one son Billy E. Adams II, and four grandchildren, Joslyn Lindsay; Aaron Lindsay, Billy E. Adams III, and Miracle Sumner. Adams graduated from North Carolina A&T State University in 1968 and received her master’s degree in Art Education in 1972. She earned her Ph.D. in Art Education and Multicultural Education from The Ohio State University in Columbus, Ohio in 1981.


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U N I V E R S I T I E S

PO BOX 3619, DURHAM, NC 27702 PHONE: 919-956-4423 EMAIL: TAMARA.BYNUM@SELF-HELP.ORG

OUR MISSION:

TO CREATE OWNERSHIP AND ECONOMIC OPPORTUNITIES FOR ALL, ESPECIALLY PEOPLE OF COLOR, WOMEN, RURAL RESIDENTS, AND LOW WEALTH FAMILIES AND COMMUNITIES.

OUR PROMISE: TO PROVIDE FINANCING, TECHNICAL SUPPORT, CONSUMER FINANCIAL SERVICES, AND ADVOCACY FOR THOSE LEFT OUT OF THE ECONOMIC MAINSTREAM.

WE CURRENTLY LEASE MORE THAN 300,000 SF OF COMMERCIAL SPACE IN GREENSBORO, WITH A FOCUS ON LEASING TO NONPROFITS AND LOCAL BUSINESSES. NOW LEASING, RENAISSANCE SHOPS AT PHILLIPS AVENUE WILL SERVE ITS SURROUNDING COMMUNITY WITH FRESH GROCERIES AND CONVENIENT SHOPPING OPTIONS. COMING SOON, A REVITALIZED COMMUNITY OF RESIDENCES, BUSINESSES, RESTAURANTS, AND ARTS AT REVOLUTION MILL. 38

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graphic design

web design

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City of Greensboro MINORITY & WOMEN BUSINESS ENTERPRISE OFFICE The new M/WBE Office is open and ready for business. It is located in Room 149 of the Melvin Municipal Office Building at 300 W. Washington Street. The M/WBE Office has primary responsibility for administration of the City’s M/WBE Program Plan. The goal of the program is to promote the economic inclusion and full equitable utilization and development of firms that engage in business with the City. Learn more about the City’s commitment to diversity and inclusion at www. greensboro-nc.gov/diversity. An integral part of the City’s diversity and inclusion policy is to provide qualified individuals with equal employment opportunity in all employment practices (i.e. hiring, promotion, recruitment rates of pay, other forms of compensation). W W W. G R E E N S B O R O - N C . G O V / M W B E



www.blackpagesusa.com


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Carolyn Quilloin Coleman

Guilford County Board of Commissioners Guilford County Schools

Carolyn Quilloin Coleman, a Democrat, is serving her fourth term on the Guilford County Board of Commissioners. She was elected to serve District 9 in 2002, 2006 and again in 2010. Due to redistricting, she currently serves District 7. She served as the Board’s Vice Chairwoman in 2004 and served as Chairwoman of the in Board 2006. Commissioner Coleman is a native of Savannah, Georgia, where she graduated from Savannah State College. She holds a Bachelor of Science degree with a major in history and a minor in economics and socioloigy. She has done further study at Memphis Theological Seminary and holds the Masters of Science degree in adult education from North Carolina A&T State University. Previous to her work as a Commissioner, she served as the Special Assistant to Governor James B. Hunt for eight years. In this position, she advised the Governor on policy, personnel, legislation and concerns pertinent to the minority community. Commissioner Coleman currently serves as a liaison on several Boards, including the Greensboro Convention and Visitors Bureau, Piedmont Authority for Regional Transportation (PART) and Work First Planning Board. She is active in the NAACP, serving as the Secretary to the NAACP National Board of Directors and the Vice President of the North Carolina State NAACP, as well as activities with the local Greensboro Branch of the NAACP. She is involved in numerous civic and volunteer organizations including Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, North Carolina Agricultural & Technical State University Board of Visitors and is a communicant of the New Zion Baptist Church in Greensboro. Commissioner Coleman currently resides in Pleasant Garden and is the mother of one son, Carlton.

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Dr. Sandra Carlton Alexander Board of Education At Large Guilford County Schools

Dr. Sandra Alexander is a retired university professor and administrator, a business owner, a community activist, an elected official, a published author, a wife, a mother and a grandmother. For over thirty years, she served as an English professor and an administrator at North Carolina A & T State University before retiring from that position.. Soon thereafter, she realized her dream of opening her own business. For 12 years she has operated Greensboro Scenic Tours, the only locally owned sightseeing tour business in the Piedmont Triad. Dr. Alexander sits on many non-profit boards. A long time supporter of the arts, she has served on the Board of Directors of Triad Stage, the United Arts Council and the North Carolina Writers Network. Some of her leadership positions include being President of the Greensboro YWCA and founding President of the local Negro Business and Professional Women’s Club, Inc. Dr. Alexander has always regarded education as a priority of the highest order. In 2003, she received the Board of Governor’s Outstanding Teacher of the Year Award, and in 2008, she was elected to the Guilford County Board of Education where she serves in an At large position representing parents and students from throughout the county. She is a fiction writer. In 1992, her volume of short stories, Black Butterflies: Stories of the South in Transition, won her the North Carolina Arts Council Writers’ Fellowship. A graduate of North Carolina A & T, Dr. Alexander a masters degree from Harvard University and a Ph. d. from the Univ. of Pittsburgh. She is married to Rondal Alexander. They have two adult children, Tonya and Derrick, and she is the proud grandmother of a four month old grandson, Dylan, who is the joy of her life.

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Brenton J. Boyce Public Attorney

Law Offices of Brenton J. Boyce, PA

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Lake Activity Specialist Environmental Education Supervisor Regional Park Supervisor Assistant Regional Park Supervisor Crew Member (Specialized Maintenance & Botanical Gardens) Sportsplex Manager Community Recreation Centers Coordinator

Parks & Recreation wants you to join our team!

City of Greensboro PA R K S & R E C R E A T I O N The Greensboro Parks and Recreation Department is a dynamic team transforming the way your needs are met and services are provided. We’re leaders locally and nationally in creating benefits for people through equitable practice and innovative strategies. Through enhancing quality of life, improving health and wellness, providing environmental education and delivering real economic impacts, we are committed to building better lives and a better community. Come join us! W W W. G S O PA R K S A N D R E C . C O M gsoparksandrec

@gsoparksandrec

@gsoparksandrec


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ALPHA PHI ALPHA Kappa Lamda Chapter

The Kappa Lambda Chapter of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Incorporated became the 10th Alumni Chapter on June 9, 1923.

Brothers in Kappa Lambda serve in various capacities in this professional and fraternal lives. This can be best revealed by the election of Bro.

Founded in Greensboro, North Carolina, the Kappa Lambda Chapter became the 110th Satellite Chapter of Alpha Phi Alpha. The Chapter was established by Brother Stansback of Wilson, North Carolina. The charter members were Brothers F.L. Merry, President; F.D. Bluford, Vice President; J.B. Matthews, Secretary; D.K. Cherry, Chaplain, and Brothers Davis, Lanier and Giles.

Laurence Aikens in 2007 as District Director for the Association of North Carolina Alphamen. Bro. Aikens represents the District and Kappa Lambda well at the District and Regional levels. Other brothers in the chapter have severed on the District and Regional levels of the fraternity as well by working with the Southern Region and holding various positions on the district level.

Over the years the Brothers of Kappa Lambda have earned several awards and recognitions as a chapter and as individuals. In 2005, Kappa Lambda was named the Outstanding Alumni Chapter of the Year for the entire fraternity. Winning this recognition came on the heels of winning Chapter of the Year for the Association of North Carolina Alphamen and claiming the title as well at the Regional Convention in 2005. At the same time, Bro. Jarvis T. Harris was name the 2005 Outstanding Alumni Brother of the Year.

The Brothers of today’s Kappa Lambda Chapter continue to serve and lead the Greensboro community faithfully. Led by Brother Orlanda Carter, the Brothers of Kappa Lambda continue to uphold the principles of manly deeds, scholarship and love for all mankind.

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Please visit www.KL1923.org.org for more information.

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ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA Beta Iota Omega Chapter

Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Incorporated is the first Greek-letter organization established by black college women. Founded on the campus of Howard University in Washington, D.C., in January 1908, the sorority has provided service to all mankind through a nucleus of over 170,000 members throughout the world. Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority members contribute to the community by means of volunteer service while cultivating high scholastic and ethical standards. The Beta Iota Omega Chapter, was founded February 12, 1934 in Greensboro, North Carolina. The Beta Iota Omega Chapter is currently the largest graduate chapter in the Triad area, with membership of over 200 women. The chapter provides “Global Leadership Through Timeless Service� via national program initiatives such as Emerging Young Leaders (EYL). This signature program provides leadership skills, character building and civic engagement to girls in grades six through eight. Other programs include the Health Initiative, Economic Security, Social Justice, Global Poverty and Internal Leadership for External Service. The Beta Iota Omega Chapter is the supervising chapter of Zeta Xi Chapter at Bennett College for Women; Alpha Phi Chapter at North Carolina A&T State University; and Nu Rho Chapter at The University of North Carolina- Greensboro.

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ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA SORORITY, INCORPORATED SIGMA KAPPA OMEGA CHAPTER GREENSBORO, NC Serving the Greensboro Community Since 1990

Karla Lewis, Chapter President

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Marvette Artis*^

Tonya Currie

Ashley Jones

Audrey Ray

Shelly Barnes

Pamela Daye^

Doris Jones^

Kimberly Robertson

Latricia Barrett-Crawford

Lavaura DuBose

Pamela Jones

Tanya Robinson-Caldwell^

Fannie Bratcher^

Karen Dyer

Laquanda Leaven

Deborah Scales*^

Regina Breeze

Tikela Evans

Deidre Lewis

Candace Scott

Linda Brown*^

Tiffany Faison

Marilyn Lewis

Marilyn Gerry Shoffner^

Willie Jean Brown*

Allison Ford

Deborah Love

Roslyn Smith

Shea Burns

Audrey Franklin^

Keisha Martin

Dawn Tafari

Virginia Bynum

Shenise Goldsby

Brenda McEachern

Juliaette Thomas*

Kimberly Cheek

Sheila Gothard

Jessica McLean

Adrienne Turner

Carolyn Clarke

Yvonne Hankins

Leslie McLean

Sandra Wallington

Tonisha Coburn

Sabrenna Hayes

Norma Noble

Mozell Weston*^

Deena Currie

Kinshasa Hill

Becky Jo Peterson-Buie Sondra Wright

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DELTA SIGMA THETA Greensboro Alumnae Chapter

The GREENSBORO ALUMNAE CHAPTER of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc. was chartered as BETA MU SIGMA on May 24, 1942. In 1963, Grand Chapter renamed BETA MU SIGMA to GREENSBORO ALUMNAE CHAPTER. The chapter will celebrates its 70th Anniversary later in 2012. The members of Greensboro Alumnae have continued to involve themselves in projects reflecting our national programmatic thrusts through local service projects that have been extremely meaningful to the Greater Greensboro area. The GREENSBORO ALUMNAE CHAPTER’s public service initiatives are; Social Action’s “Get Out the Vote”, The

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Jabberwock Scholarship Pageant and The Arts & Letters’ “Visual and Performing Arts Program” which showcases our high school students’ artistic talent. The chapter also hosts, in conjunction with the Alpha Mu, Omicron Delta and Omicron Eta collegiate chapters, the National Programs: Delta Academy (6th-8th grade females), Delta G.E.M.S. (9th-12th grade females), Project S.E.E.(5th grade) and most recently, EMBODI (8th-11th grade males) and Domestic Violence Awareness. Please visit www.dstgreensboroalumnae.org for more information.

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KAPPA ALPHA PSI

Greensboro NC Alumni Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc

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OMEGA PSI PHI Beta Kappa Kappa Chapter

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TAU OMEGA OMEGA PSI PHI

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A CHAPTER OF I FRATERNITY, INC

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Dr. Deborah H. Barnes

Marketing Murder

The Commerce of Lynching

In 1893, the stalwart citizens of Paris, Texas tortured Henry Smith, “a negro fiend incarnate” and burned him at the stake for allegedly “ravishing” and murdering three-year old, Myrtle Vance, the youngest child of a local policeman. After the fact, a chronicle of the crime, its lethal retribution, and the nation’s response to the grisly affair was commercially published as The Facts in the Case of the Horrible Murder of Little Myrtle Vance and Its Fearful Expiation at Paris, Texas, February 1, 1893. The 200 page, illustrated, eyewitness account (written from the lynchers’ point of view) not only was designed to defend the politics of vigilantism but also to generate income for the grieving family. The sheer pageantry of the public murder the narrative describes must have required financial backing, since the intricate coordination of a large cast of characters, the preparation of various “staging areas,” and the use of numerous technological resources and special effects would ordinarily come at a price. That is, it seems unlikely that so sophisticated a plan could have been so spontaneously orchestrated without the administration of a “lynching impresario”—someone who would plan and expedite a “lynching extravaganza” for a fee (though one is not identified.) Hence, this lynching narrative1 not only preserves the important details involved in hosting America’s first “spectacle lynching,”2 it also lays bare a virtually unexplored aspect of racism’s summary justice: the commerce of lynching. The Facts in the Case alludes to the financial profits that Smith’s capture and murder could generate for corporate, commercial, and entrepreneurial concerns. The narrative notes, for example, that the Texas and Pacific Railroad delivered spectators to Paris by specially chartered excursion trains, after local and regional newspapers and national wire services announced the town’s intention to punish Smith for his crime.3 Accordingly, posses were deputized to apprehend the “criminal” with many of its

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less affluent members being “armed and mounted” via municipal funds. Dog-handlers and their blood-hounds were similarly retained for the search. The promise of instant celebrity and a (privately-raised) $500 reward further incentivized trackers to apprehend the fugitive.4 Following his capture near Hope, Arkansas and his return to Paris –also by special train—Smith was chained atop a custom-made “float” and paraded around the town square where he was mocked and condemned by the angry mob. Afterwards he was delivered to a ten foot high wooden scaffold, emblazoned with the word “Justice,” where his torture was to be staged. Erected specifically to make his execution visible to the mob, the platform was conveniently located on the prairie near the railroad tracks. Before Smith’s almost hour-long excruciation began, his coat and shirt were stripped away, torn into pieces, and distributed for souvenirs among the 15,000 spectators who had come to witness his retribution. Beginning with the soles of his feet, the toddler’s father, her fifteen year-old brother, and two uncles alternated their efforts to sear every inch of Smith’s body with burning brands, before they burned out his eyes and forced the blazing iron down his throat, burning away his tongue. After their vengeance was fully sated, his persecutors “converted his body to ashes” by saturating Smith in fuel oil and setting aflame “combustibles,” which had been placed below the scaffold, rendering it a pyre. Smith’s immolation was no less spectacular than his punishment: after burning for more than ten minutes, he leaped, ablaze, from the burning scaffold, rolling out of the fire three times before his tormentors found a way to fasten him securely in the inferno. When Smith’s cremation was completed, the mob scoured the site for mementos (e.g. bits of bone, splinters from the scaffold, pieces of charred rope. etc.)5 Professional photographers,

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lynching spectacle as a market niche compelled promoters to innovate and enhance Lynch Law’s deadly choreography in order to draw and maintain the interests of increasingly large crowds of spectators.

who had arrived early to secure unobstructed views of the event, documented the atrocious affair for posterity and for profit by quickly producing souvenir postcards for lynching enthusiasts and prints for newspapers. Though the spectacle of Smith’s lynching was unprecedented, his murder by mob was all too common. Leon F. Litwack has noted that between 1890 and 1917, two to three Black southerners were hanged, shot, burned at the stake, or quietly murdered every week to enforce the submission to whites that Jim Crow racism demanded. Just as many if not more Blacks became the victims of “legal lynchings”—that is, quick trials and summary executions—“nigger hunts,” and private violence at the hands of whites. 6 For many decades, lynching had served as a means of extralegal justice in the West and most of the victims had been white. But in the 1890s, the apex of the lynching era, lynching and sadistic torture rapidly became predominantly a southern phenomenon, with black men, women, and children as its principal victims. Vicious white mobs became dissatisfied with simply killing their victims; they executed Blacks by means of extraordinary torture and barbaric mutilation, often destroying what remained of their lifeless bodies in a mania of overkill. By the end of the nineteenth century, the mob murder of a black man, woman, or family had evolved into a popular form of public amusement that spectators were willing to travel great distances to witness. Emergence of the

Once it’s economic and entertainment value had been fully realized and exploited, lynching as commerce help to shape lynching culture. Tens of thousands of white southerners witnessed and participated in “lynching bees,” “lynching carnivals,” “nigger barbecues,” or “picnics” as they were commonly known. Most Americans—white and black, north and south—learned about these ghastly matters through various forms of media: widely circulated news coverage, pamphlets, radio announcements, and to a lesser degree, books. Souvenir photographs of smiling and preening mobs of white men, women, and children coupled with grisly mementos from the event—such as amputated and preserved body parts, artifacts made from “tanned” human skin, scrota, bone fragments, pyre ashes, splinters from the nullifying tree or scaffold, and segments of chain or bits of rope—opened another, macabre, yet lucrative, market. By the mid-1890s, wire services, telephone companies, car and truck dealers, newspaper publishers, restaurants, hardware stores, reporters, and photographers had already claimed a stake in lynching commerce. After all, mobbists drove cars, spectators used cameras, lynchers needed guns, rope, fuel oil, and lumber; out-of-town spectators arrived on specially chartered trains and bought food and liquor at their destinations; newspapers and wire services reported the horrifying events locally and nationally, while telegraph offices and radio stations announced times and locations of the upcoming carnage. Those who could not (or would not) attend the lynching itself could purchase lynching narratives, like The Facts in the Case, which provided sensational,


voyeuristic accounts of the ritualized mob torture and murder of a “notorious fiend.” After a fifty year lull, the end of the 20th Century witnessed a revival of “lynching commerce”—this time, in the form of academic and popular publications.7 The emergence of new scholarship on lynching culture bracketed the unveiling, in 2000, of Without Sanctuary,8 James Allen’s controversial traveling exhibit of lynching memorabilia. Though many exhibit-goers balked at

the timeworn images of predatory mobs humiliating, torturing, and creatively murdering their human prey, the exhibit drew vast crowds of spectators as had the spectacle lynchings captured in many of the photographs. Hence, notwithstanding the subject’s gruesomeness, contemporary interests in lynching photographs, postcards, letters, pamphlets, books, and ephemera underscore the endurance of lynching commerce today.

I coined this term to identify published accounts of lynching that are written by a participant, spectator, sympathizer, apologist or victim.

1

This term is coined by Grace Elizabeth Hale. She describes spectacle lynching as a blatantly public, actively promoted lynching of a southern black by a large crowd of southern whites. For a full discussion of this phenomenon see: “Deadly Amusements: Spectacle Lynchings and the Contradictions of Segregation as Culture.” Making Whiteness: The Culture of Segregation in the South, 1890 – 1940. (NY: Pantheon, 1998) 199 – 240.

2

After the Smith lynching, railroad companies could be depended upon to transport lynchers and spectators to previously arranged sites, according to Hale. Some of these trains were even advertised in local papers.

3

Governor J. S. Hogg posted a $250 reward for the felon’s capture, which many Parisians considered insultingly paltry. 5 These kinds of relics would be sold rather than given away after subsequent lynchings.

4

For an excellent analysis of lynching within the context of southern culture, see: Trouble in Mind: Southerners in the Age of Jim Crow. Leon F. Litwack. (NY: Knopf, 1998).

6

For further reading on spectacle lynchings (in addition to Litwack and Hale) see also: At the Hands of Persons Unknown: the Lynching of Black America, Phillip Dray, (NY: Random House, 2002); Lynching and Spectacle: Witnessing Racial Violence in America, 1890-1940. Amy Louise Wood. (Chapel Hill: University of NC Press, 2009)

7

Selected photographs from Allen’s collection are available online at http://withoutsanctuary.org/; Collected photographs are also available in book form: Without Sanctuary: Lynching Photography in American. James Allen. (Santa Fe, NM: Twin Palms, 2000).

8

Deborah H. Barnes, Ph.D. Interim Dean, College of Liberal Arts Jackson State University Deborah H. Barnes, Ph.D., is the Interim Dean of the College of Liberal Arts at Jackson State University. She has published and lectured widely on authors Toni Morrison, Richard Wright, Langston Hughes, and Arthur P. Davis and on topics of lynching and Indian boarding schools. She edited a two-volume textbook--I’m Buildin’ Me a Home: An Interdisciplinary Reader and Workbook for African American Experience, (Littleton, MA: Tapestry, 2009) She is currently editing an anthology of lynching narratives: Written in Blood: Lynching Narratives 1850 - 1900.

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ESTATE PLANNING

WHAT IS IT? WHY IS IT IMPORTANT?

You

may not know what Estate Planning involves, but you have an estate and you have an estate plan. As a matter of fact, almost everyone has an estate and a plan. Your estate is made up of everything you own, your car, your house, your checking account, savings account, investments, life insurance, furniture and all of your other personal possessions. No matter how large or small, everyone has an estate and something in common, you can’t take it with you when you die. An estate plan determines what happens to your property when you die. If you don’t create your own estate plan, guess what, the state of North Carolina has created one for you. However, you probably won’t like because it may not distribute your property the way you would do it. To make sure that your wishes are carried out, you need to provide instructions stating whom you want to receive something of yours what you want them to receive and when they are to receive it. Of course, you want all of this to happen with the least amount paid in legal fees and court costs. That is estate planning….creating a plan in advance and listing whom you want to receive the things you own after you die. However, a good estate plan will manage so many other issues that are important to your family’s wellbeing. For example, a good estate plan will name a guardian for your minor child and someone to manage their inheritance. A good estate plan will include instructions for your own care if you become incapacitated before you die. A good estate plan will include insurance to provide for your family by replacing your income. 62

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And finally, but perhaps most importantly, a good estate plan will include instructions for passing your values, (r eligion, education and hard work) along with your valuables. An estate plan starts with a will or living trust. A will provides instructions that distribute your assets when you die. Your will must go through a court process called “probate.” The probate process ensures that all of your creditors are paid. At the end of the process, your assets will be distributed as you instructed in your will. A revocable living trust essentially accomplishes the same thing as a will, but it avoids the probate process and has the added bonus of allowing you to select someone to manage your affairs while you are alive but unable to do so yourself. Additionally, a trust doesn’t have to die with you, it can also manage your assets until your children are old enough and mature enough to handle it themselves.

WHEN SHOULD YOU CREATE AN ESTATE PLAN?

The best time to plan is right now. No one likes to think about dying and leaving the ones we love. Taking care of our loved ones is a responsibility too important to leave to the state of North Carolina. Make your own choices. Knowing that you have a properly prepared plan in place will give you peace of mind that your family will be taken care of when you die ……what could be better than that? Estate Planning is one of the most thoughtful and considerate things you can do for yourself and for the ones you love.

Debra Ragin Jessup

Jessup & Probst 301 North Main Street, Suite 2222, Winston-Salem, NC 27101 Telephone: 336-721-9090 • Facsimile: 336-721-9095 Email: debra@jessupprobstlaw.com

www.jessupprobstlaw.com

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Do You Really Understand

Health Insurance And How It Works? Let me share a story with you that I heard at a presentation to the employees of this large production company. The insurance representative asked the employees, “Do any of you know how your insurance works?” Some said, yes they understood. But do you want to know what was amazing? It was how many people said no they didn’t understand. Over half the room didn’t understand

either how their insurance worked or what benefits they were paying for. So when the

insurance representative sat down with this one employee, this young man, whom had been complaining to his boss about a pain in his side for 2 years, said he couldn’t afford to go to the doctor. The boss told the young man, “You have insurance. Use it!” Well the young man told the insurance representative about his situation where he has to pay this $5000 deductible before his insurance can kick in with his 80/20 co-pay. When the representative looked at his policy, he told the young man that all he had to pay was $20 as a co-pay and he could go to his doctor. How many of you

out there are just like this young man? Paying a monthly, quarterly, semi-annual or annual premium and don’t know what you are paying for.

NABAJ Insurance Group specializes in educating our clients on what their policy does and how they need to utilize their benefits. We work with multiple carriers so that we may find the best bang for our clients’ buck. There are many ways to review and learn more about insurance plans today. Some information is available over the internet and some comes through the mail. Not everything you read is what you need Insurance is not a “One Size Fits All”. But there is still no better way to understand your insurance policy than to sit down with an experienced, certified agent that has your best interest at heart. A good insurance agent should ask you, their client, that age old question. “What would you like for your

insurance policy to do for you?” Stay tuned for the next article: “Is it LIFE Insurance or DEATH Insurance?” (Do you really know how life insurance works?)

A. Rene’e Lewis, CEO

1500 Pinecroft Rd., Suite 123, Greensboro, NC 27407 Cell: 336.709.3063 Fax: 336.265.8460 nabaj@nabajinsurancegroup.com

www.nabajinsurancegroup.org


Field Operations wants you to join our team!

Environmental Compliance Specialist Stormwater Crew Member Waste Reduction Supervisor Safety Manager Pavement Maintenance Crew Member GIS Analyst

City of Greensboro F I E L D O P E R AT I O N S An integral part of the City’s diversity and inclusion policy is to provide qualified individuals with equal employment opportunity in all employment practices (i.e. hiring, promotion, recruitment, rates of pay, other forms of compensation). The Field Operations Department is committed to developing a diverse and inclusive environment to improve individual and organizational performance resulting in a better value for all our customers. Learn more about the City’s commitment to diversity and inclusion at www. greensboro-nc.gov/diversity. Also, visit www.greensboro-nc.gov/MWBE to learn how the City’s Minority and Women’s Business Enterprise program provides minorities and women equal opportunity to participate in all aspects of City contracting and purchasing. W W W. G R E E N S B O R O - N C . G O V / F I E L D O P E R AT I O N S



Juan Langford Coming from a family of business owners, Juan Langford knows firsthand the safeguards necessary to protect your business. As a Small Business/ Group Benefit Specialist with LegalShield, Juan and his partner, Alan Leak, offer small business owners access to a team of attorneys and a plethora of consultants throughout the nation. The Greensboro-based partners have a combined 17-year history with LegalShield. Juan, who holds a B.S. degree in technology education from Elizabeth City State University and a master’s in Adult Training from Old Dominion, joined LegalShield 10 years ago, after a decade on the collegiate football coaching staffs of several institutions, including North Carolina A & T State University. Alan, who earned a B.S. in psychology from North Carolina A & T State University, was a former NFL player with the Indianapolis Colts and Carolina Panthers. He also worked in the telecommunications industry before joining LegalShield more than seven years ago.


We Work as hard for your business as you do. charles Blackmon focuses his practice primarily on corporate business, sports and entertainment matters. He has full range of experience in representing closely held businesses and nonprofits, including employment, compliance, and dissolution issues. in addition to his business practice, Blackmon represents clients in the entertainment industry and sports related fields. He is well versed in contract drafting and negotiation. He has also tried cases in the state and federal courts of North carolina and Pennsylvania as well as handled client administrative matters before various governmental agencies in both jurisdictions. Blackmon is actively involved in numerous professional and civic organizations and holds leadership positions with several. He maintains business and professional relationships in the Northeast having practiced in Philadelphia for a number of years. a Durham native, Blackmon obtained his B.s. in industrial Relations from the University of North carolina at chapel Hill in 1983 and his law degree from the North carolina central University school of Law in 1988. He is admitted to practice in North carolina and Pennsylvania.

tuggle Duggins is a multi-specialty, multi-disciplinary law firm focused on the needs of closely held businesses and business owners. We provide representation in legal matters ranging from conventional personal and business issues to complex legal matters. Offices: 100 N. Greene street, suite 600 Greensboro, Nc 27401 (Lincoln financial Building) 2 0 1 5

cONtact Us: (336) 378-1431 (telephone) (336) 274-6590 (facsimile) www.tuggleduggins.com T R I A D

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Connection

Your to the African-American Business Community. The Black Pages is a minority busines and professional advertising, information, resource and marketing guide. It is an annual publication that benefits minority businesses and major companies whose target or goal is increased exposure in the African-American community. Shouldn’t your business, product or service be included in the most effective marketing tool reaching the African-American community today?

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Our school district is diverse.

Our business partnerships should be too. Guilford County Schools is deeply committed to involving minority and women-owned businesses in school construction and renovation. Since 2008, more than $83 million has been awarded to MWBE participants in construction and design. Find out how you can get involved at www.gcsnc.com/pages/gcsnc/departments/mwbe.


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INSURANCE GROUP, LLC

Rene’e Lewis, CEO

1500 Pinecroft Rd., Suite 123 Greensboro, NC 27407 Cell: 336.709.3063 Fax: 336.265.8460

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Providing:

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MEDICARE

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Connection

Your to the African-American Business Community. The Black Pages is a minority busines and professional advertising, information, resource and marketing guide. It is an annual publication that benefits minority businesses and major companies whose target or goal is increased exposure in the African-American community. Shouldn’t your business, product or service be included in the most effective marketing tool reaching the African-American community today?

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I N D E X

O F

A D V E R T I S E R S

INSURANCE

ACCOUNTANT Clark, Rudolph CPA

25

ARCHITECT Gravely, C linto n A I A A rc h i te c t & As s o c i ate s

74

State Farm- James Sweatt 68 State Farm - Donna Jones 76 Allstate - Tamara Holloway 5 NABA J Insurance Group 79 Leslie Garner 70

ATTORNEY

LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT

Blackmon, Charles 69 Jesseup, Debra 62

The McEachern Group 64 BWC 35 Self Help 38

BANK Wells Fargo 74

BEAUTY & HAIR Dudley Beauty Corp, LLC

76

CHILD CARE YMCA 70 Tyson Place 71

Neighborhood Development 31 Minority & Women Business Enterprise 42 Greensboro Aquatic Center 43 Parks & Recreation 48 F ield Operations 68 Water Resources 92

CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT S RS, Inc. 6 XPress Restoration 6 United Maintenance Group, LLP Back Cover GE Construction 80 Weaver Cooke 81 C T Wilson Construction 81 Long-Stokes, Sharon DDS, PA Drewr y, Vincent DDS, PA Greene, Stacey DDS, PA

3 76 72

ELECTED OFFICIALS

32 - 34

ELECTRICIAN

E lectric One 72

FIRE PROTECTION

Goode Fire Protection Ser vices

GRAPHIC DESIGN

DBK Marketing Solutions

GUILFORD COUNTY

Guilford County Schools

82

B L A C K

Alpha Medical 78 Moses Cone Health 11 Shipman Home Care 40

PHYSICIAN Onsei-Bonsu, George 30

REAL ESTATE Keller Wil liams 36

CITY OF GREENSBORO

DENTISTS

MEDICAL

83 39 73

P A G E S

RESTAURANT Smitty ’s McDonalds 37 Biscuitville 81

SECURITY Double D Security 74

SMALL BUSINESS BENEFITS Legal Shield 76

SORORITIES AND FRATERNITIES

Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc. Kappa Lambda Chapter 48 Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc. Beta Iota Omega Chapter 49 Sigma Kappa Omega Chapter 50 Delta Sigma Theta Greensboro Alumnae Chapter 51 Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. Delta Kappa Zeta Chapter 52 Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc Greensboro NC Alumni Chapter 53 Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. Beta Kappa Kappa Chapter 54 Tau Omega Chapter 55 Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. Delta Sigma Chapter 56 - 57

TAX PREPARATION Jackson Hewitt – Lacy & Glenda Tinnen

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C H U R C H E S

THE PIEDMONT TRIAD

CHURCH

LISTINGS

CLEMMONS

St Phillip AME Zion Church

Hickory Grove AME Zion Church

Swift Street AME Zion Church

1330 Ashe Street • 272-1301

3791 Harper Road • 766-5142

4408 Swift Street • 299-5017

GREENSBORO/HIGH POINT

Trinity AME Zion Church

African Methodist Episcopal

Apostolic

Bethel AME

Friendship Temple Apostolic Church

Bethel AME

Tabernacle of Praise Deliverance

Mt. Zion AME

Baptist

Persimmon Grove AME

Anderson Grove Baptist Church

631 East Florida Street • 274-4670

2306 Floyd Street • 379-1488

200 Regan Street • 273-5268

2401 E. Bessemer Avenue 370-0208

518 Spur Road • 674-8431 1422 Huffine Road • 375-3729

200 Florence Street • 574-0202

5504 Summit Avenue • 621-0848

African Methodist Episcopal Zion

Cedar Grove Baptist Church 702 Norwalk Street • 294-2628

Mt Olive AME Zion Church

Cornerstone Baptist Church

Oak Grove AME Zion Church

East White Oak Baptist Church

5736 Inman Road • 665-1944

2123 McConnell Road • 274-0843

1809 Water Street • 275-6892

300 Lawrence Street • 274-3166 84

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Pentecostal

Laughlin Memorial United Methodist Church 1417 Huffine Mill Road • 375-3267

Freewill Penecostal Church

1606 Martin Luther King Jr. Drive • 273-2159

Pentecostal Church of Christ

Methopolitan United Methodist Church 1701 East Market Street 275-4658

St. Matthew United Methodist Church

4004 Perth Place • 697-9652

600 East Florida Street • 272-4505

Greensboro Deliverance Center

St. Paul United Methodist Church

820 Granite Street • 275-9905

2900 North O’Henry Boulevard • 621-5257

Power House of Deliverance Church

Union Memorial United Methodist Church

1800 Willow Road • 274-9924

1012 East Lee Street • 273-4006

Rescue Temple Church of God in Christ • 3008 E. Bessemer Avenue 334-0123

Word of Faith

Presbyterian

719 Dallard Street • 378-6008

Word of Faith Christian Center

Presbyterian Church of the Cross

African Methodist Episcopal

1810 Phillips avenue • 274-5467

St. Stephens AME Zion Church

St. James Presbyterian Church

1012 Leonard Avenue • 883-0414

820 Ross Avenue • 273-6658

Turners Chapel AME

Seventh Day Adventist

7615 Florence School Drive • 454-3215

Seventh Day Adventist Church of

Baptist

East Market Street 1804 E. Market Street • 272-2997

Bethlehem Baptist

801 S. Centinial Street • 882-8543

Unitarian

Calvary Baptist Church

808 Hilltop Street • 882-8543

Unitarian Church of Greensboro 5603 Hilltop Street • 856-0330

First Baptist Church

701 East Washington Drive • 882-9229

United Church of Christ

First Emmanuel Baptist Church

St. Stephen United Church of Christ

831 Leonard Avenue • 882-8221

1000 Gorrell Street • 273-4536

First United Baptist Church

1409 Deer River Road • 882-6211

United Methodist

Friendship Baptist Church

Bass Chapel United Methodist

715 W. Willis Avenue • 882-9429

Church • 5074 Bass Chapel Road • 617-6869

Foster Grove Baptist Church

Carroway United Methodist Church

831 Skeet Club Road • 869-2004

1301 16th Street • 621-6906

Holmes Grove United Methodist Church 1100 Alamance Church Road • 272-6302

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Friendship Missionary Baptist Church 715 West Willis Avenue • 882-9429 T R I A D

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C H U R C H E S

Ebenezer Baptist Church

Rising Ebenezer Baptist Church

Garden of Prayer Sovereign Grace

Reynolds Chapel Baptist Church

3730 Wiley Davis Road • 292-8449

455 Gorrell Street • 273-6550 327 Hibleer Road • 855-8928

Baptist Church

Shiloh Baptist Church

1006 N. English Street • 292-8672

1210 Eugene Street • 272-1166

Gethsemane Baptist Church

Solid Rock Baptist Church

3701 Heath Street • 273-5940

2910 McConnell Road • 273-9940

Godly Love Baptist Cathedral

St. James Baptist Church

2735 Freeman Mill Road • 273-4732

536 W. Florida Street • 273-0822

Good News Baptist Church

St. Paul Baptist Church

2400 McConnell Road • 272-4009

1309 Larkin Street • 275-4680

Gospel Light Baptist church

United Institutional Baptist Church

1412 Woodmae Drive • 272-8262

802 East Market Street • 272-0822

McConnell Road Baptist Church

Unity Baptist Church

3911 McConnell Road • 697-8506

1205 North English Street • 274-8677

Manasseh Baptist Church

804 Franklin Boulevard • 235-0859

White Oak Grove Baptist Church

Martin Avenue Baptist Church 3711 Martin Avenue • 621-9542

Catholic

Mt Zion Baptist Church

Mt. Pleasant Christian Disciples of Christ

1301 Alamance Church Road • 273-7930

1515 Britton Street • 275-7988

New Calvary Baptist Church

St. Mary’s Catholic Church

1901 Spencer Street • 274-5500

812 Duke Street • 272-8650

New Cedar Grove Baptist Church

St. Pius Tenth Catholic Church

1108 Morris Street • 275-6945

2210 N. Elm Street • 272-4681

New Hope Baptist Church

Christian Methodist Episcopal

306 S. English Street • 274-1022

Reid Memorial CME Church

New Light Baptist Church

1010 Bennett Street • 273-2606

1105 Willow Road • 273-5579

New Zion Missionary Baptist Church 1310 Martin Luther King Drive • 272-8441

Pilgrim Baptist Church

Church of God In Christ Evangel Fellowship Church

of God in Christ • 2207 East Cone Boulevard • 375-3900

711 Oxford Street • 272-7301

Evangel Fellowship Outreach Ministry House

Pleasant Grove Baptist Church

2114 McConnell Road • 691-1545

3812 Groomtown Road • 299-2622

Nu-Life Church of God in Christ

Providence Baptist Church

209-W. Florida Street • 275-3243

1106 Tuscaloosa Street • 273-7552 86

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P A G E S

U S A


Wells Memorial Church of God in Christ 1001 W. Washington Street • 272-6564

Inter-Denominational Greater Christian Fellowship

Church of God of Prophecy

118 W. Vandalia Road • 273-2597

Jehovah's Witnesses

Church of God of Prophecy 1935 Opal Drive • 275-9130

Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses

Episcopal

2615 Liberty Road • 691-1827

Jewish

Church of the Redeemer

901 E. Friendly Avenue • 275-0033

Beth David Synagogue

Episcopal Church of the Holy Spirit

804 Winview Drive • 294-0007

3910 Yanceyville Street • 621-7321

Temple Emanuel

Holiness

713 N. Green Street • 275-6316

Faith, Hope and Charity Holines Church 2116 Pear Street • 275-7145

Lutheran Grace Lutheran Church

God’s House of Deliverance

1315 W. Washington Street • 272-1174

800 Silver Avenue • 373-3997

Muslim

Hayes Memorial United Holy Church 1515 Willow Road • 275-8356

Al-Ummil Ummat

Holy Temple United Holy Church

2109 Martin Luther King, Jr., Drive • 574-3689

1907 Huffine Mill Road • 375-5089

University Mosque

Mt. Calvary Church

NC A & T State University Harrison Auditorium

3819 West Avenue • 299-2357

Non-Denominational

Mt. Zion United Church of God 705 Banner Avenue • 274-6284

Cornerstone Tabernacle

1709 E. Wendover Avenue • 273-2688

Powerhouse of Deliverance Church 1800 Willow Road • 274-9924

Inner Growth Ministry Outreach 643 W. Lee Street • 273-8035

St. Mark United Holy Church 225 Gillespie Street • 274-0915

Love and Faith Christine Center Fellowship Church

Shiloh Holiness Church of God in Christ 210 Lawrence Street • 273-0797

4344 Blackberry Road • 632-0205

New Jerusalem Cathedral

1606 Phillips Avenue • 272-1105

Skeens Chapel Holiness Church

350 Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive • 275-2177

New Mellennium Christian Center 424 Fisher Park Circle • 510-0440

United House of Prayer for All People 101 S. Dudley Street • 574-1016

Sanctuary Deliverance Church

Wells Memorial Church of God in Christ

3631 Summit Avenue • 375-1711

1001 E. Washington Street • 272-6564

2 0 1 5

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E D I T I O N

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C H U R C H E S

Christian

Gethsemane Baptist church 401 Wise Street • 883-2137

High Point Christian Center

Greater New Hope Baptist Church

515 Cross Street • 882-8738

906 Meredith Street • 887-6877

Holiness

Living Waters Baptist Church 1300 Brentwood • 885-0915

Friendship Holiness Church

Mt. Olive Baptist

1714 Brooks Avenue • 884-1189

105 N. Hoskins • 882-3836

Kings Chapel Holiness Church

Mt. Carmel Baptist Church

500 Saunders Place • 885-0631

915 Old Mill Road • 869-3437

Inter-Denominational

Mt. Vernon Baptist Church

716 Leonard Avenue • 882-9216

Word of Reconciliation Ministries 400 Brentwood Street • 887-7314

Mount Zion Baptist Church

51 E. Washington Drive • 887-3610

Word Fellowship Ministries 601 E. Washington Drive

New Bethel Baptist Church

1116 Montlieu Avenue • 887-1061

Word of Life Tabernacle

1217 East Green Drive • 885-9318

Oak Grove Baptist Church

1710 East Green Street • 883-2678

Presbyterian

Solid Rock Baptist Church

St. Paul Presbyterian

903 Kearns Avenue • 889-2486

309 Summit Road • 882-4310

Temple Memorial Baptist Church 1458 Cedrow Drive • 883-7023/7339

Seventh Day Adventist

Church of Christ

Baldwin Chapel SDA Church

1200 Leonard Avenue • 889-7930

Olga Avenue Church of Christ 1316 Olga Street • 887-2017

United Methodist

Revealed Faith Baptist Church

Memorial United Methodist

1233 Montlieu • 887-5276

1327 Cedrow Avenue • 889-4501

Church of God St. Paul United Church of God

KERNERSVILLE

Cedar Street Church of God

Baptist

1212 Pearson Place • 889-9430 402 Cedar Street • 887-5141

Pentecostal Light House Baptist 317 Jefferson Street • 692-3964

Miracle Temple Cogic

805 Fairview Street • 883-8268

Providence Baptist Church 319 Nelson Street • 996-6284

88

B L A C K

P A G E S

U S A


LEWISVILLE

Freewill Union Methodist 110 Carr Street • 475-2921

African Methodist Episcopal New Hope AME Zion 7000 Shallowford Road

WINSTON-SALEM African Methodist Episcopal

THOMASVILLE

Bethania AME Zion Church

Baptist

Goler Metropolitan AME Zion Church

1705 Bethania-Rural Hall Road • 924-1706 1435 E. 4th Street • 723-2325

Brown New Calvary Baptist Church

John Wesley AME Zion Church

200 Doak Street • 476-6514

1800 25th Street NE • 723-5453

Emmanuel Baptist Church

St. James AME Church

204 Turner Street • 475-1018

1501 Patterson Avenue • 724-3865

First Baptist Church

Union Bethel AME Church

103 Church Street • 475-9632

1617 N. Trade Street • 722-0010

Friendship Baptist Church 106 Smith Street • 472-9361

Apostolic

Union Baptist Church

Apostolic Church of Christ

828 Mary James Avenue • 476-4948

2044 Martin Luther King • 788-2539

Church of Christ

Christ Rescue Temple Apostolic

Cornerstone Church of Christ 1102 Short Street • 472-5175

Church • 1500 N. Dunleith Avenue • 722-9841

Holiness

146 S. Graham Avenue • 725-9011

Bethel Tabernacle Holiness Church

4529 N. Cherry Street • 744-9741

Church of the Lord Jesus of Apostolic Church Heavenly Host Apostolic Church

105 Forsyth Street • 475-1027

Ministries of Truth of the Apostolic Faith

Zion Tabernacle FBH

145 Alice Street • 748-1239

710 Douglas Drive • 476-6175

St. John Apostolic Church 1131 21st NE • 722-3464

Inter-Denominational Voice of the Word Outreach Center

St Matthew Apostolic Church

United Methodist

Baptist

3640 New Walkertown Road • 724-1780

713A Lexington Avenue • 475-9643

Antioch Baptish Church

Central United Methodist

5061 Lansing Drive • 744-1213

115 James Avenue 475-9658 • 472-8659

College Park Baptist Church 2 0 1 5

T R I A D

E D I T I O N

89


C H U R C H E S

New Hope Baptist Church

1710 Polo Road NW • 768-5870

4911 Old Rural Hall Road 767-1911

Emmanuel Baptist Church

1075 Shalimar Drive • 788-7023

New Jerusalem Baptist Church

First Baptist Church East Winston

1212 Dunleith Avenue • 723-9743

700 Highland Avenue • 722-5605

New Trinity Baptist Church

First Calvary Baptist Church

1240 East 22nd Street • 723-1532

401 North Woodland Avenue 724-2611

New Unity Baptist Church 2946 Ivy Avenue • 721-1199

First Thessalonia Baptist Church

North Winston Baptist

100 East 30th Street • 661-0638

4023 Tise Avenue • 767-8446

First Waughtown Baptist Church

Phillips Chapel Baptist

838 Moravia Street • 784-7386

1312 N. Glenn Avenue • 723-9451

Freedom Baptist Church

Pilgrim Rest Baptist Church

1222 East 14th Street • 722-9270

1905 N. Jackson Avenue 761-1351

Friendship Baptist Church

1317 N. Cherry Street • 723-6105

Piney Grove Baptist

Galilee Missionary Baptist Church

4715 Indiana Avenue • 767-4044

575 N. Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive 724-3857

Pitts Memorial Baptist Church 812 Aureole Street • 748-9056

Gethsemane Baptist Church

Prince of Peace Baptist Church

4363 Carrier Avenue • 767-6806

1909 East 25th Street • 722-7504

Mars Hill Baptist Church

Providence Baptist Church

1331 East 4th Street • 722-0675

319 Nelson Street • 996-6284

Morning Star Baptist Church

Second Calvary Baptist Church

1400 Fitch Street • 748-0216

1751 East 7th Street • 723-8429

Morning Star Missionary Baptist

Second New Bethel Baptist

1400 Fitch Street • 748-0216

Church • 1900 New Walkertown Road • 722-0128

Mt. Carmel Baptist Church

3230 Geutnab Drive • 784-7802

Shiloh Baptist Church

Mt. Glory Baptist Church

916 East 12th Street • 724-9263

214 N. Dunleith Avenue • 722-1507

Solid Rock Baptist Church

Mt. Pleasant Baptist Church

3010 Carver School Road 723-2910

795 NW Crawford Place 725-9623

St. Mark Baptist Church

Mt. Zion Baptist Church

1100 Manly Street • 723-6396

950 File Street • 722-2325

St. Stephen Baptist Church

New Bethel Baptist Church

5000 Noble Street • 744-7279

1016 North Trade Street • 724-1824 90

B L A C K

P A G E S

U S A


Holiness

Union Baptist Church

1200 North Trade Street • 724-9305

Kimberly-Park Holiness Church

Union Chapel Baptist Church

417 Burton & Lime Avenue • 723-8001

300 West 25th Street • 748-8644

Mercy Seat Holy Church

United Cornerstone Batist Church

145 Pine Tree Road • 661-1034

2745 Patria Street • 785-1268

Mt. Calvary Holy Church

United Metropolitan Baptist Church

1615 W. 22nd Street • 748-0043

450 Metroploitan Drive • 761-1358

Mt. Nebo Holiness Church

White Rock Baptist Church

205 N. 25th Street • 924-2790

1233 14th Street • 723-6494

New Faith Chapel Holiness Church

Zion Memorial Baptist Church

101 North Dunleith Avenue • 725-7390

1419 Waughtown Street 784-7699

North Winston Baptist Church

True Temple Holiness

Church of Christ

Zion Tabernacle FBH Church

4023 Tise Avenue • 767-7949

Church of God 1232 Mint Street • 761-1436

Church of Christ 4399 Carver School Road • 767-7949

444 Dean Street • 724-3274 INTER-DENOMINATIONAL

Church of God

Living Word Fellowship, Inc.

2060 Bethabara Road • 924-9658 United House of Prayer 2501 Ivy Avenue • 723-3900

Church of God in Christ

1217 E. 15th Street • 722-6715

Church of God Apostolic

3652 Old Lexington Road • 650-1904

Pentecostal

First Church of God in Christ

Ishi Pentecostal Temple

1319 Excelsior Street • 722-1715 Presbyterian

635 Ontario Street • 767-8950

Mount Sinai Full Gospel

Grace Presbyterian Church

Deliverance Center 2717 Manchester Street • 722-2624

3901 Carver School Road 767-7530

Christian

St. James Presbyterian Church 820 Ross Avenue • 723-6658 Progressive baptist

Cleveland Avenue Christian Church 945 Cleveland Avenue • 722-8866

Christian Methodist Episcopal Hanes Memorial CME Church

United Progressive Baptist Church 1122-N. Jackson Avenue 725-5609

819 Highland Avenue • 723-7861

Shouse Temple CME Church 4250 Carver Road • 744-0943

2 0 1 5

T R I A D

E D I T I O N

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G 342 N. ELM STREET GREENSBORO, NC 27401 (336) 387-8328 WWW.GCDFONLINE.ORG

MISSION:

The Greensboro Community Development Fund (GCDF) provides business loans to develop and sustain small businesses and enable them to become part of the mainstream economic revival.

EXPERTISE:

Our primary function is to generate economic growth, create jobs, and revitalize neighborhoods by providing affordable financial services to under-served businesses.

WWW.GCDFONLINE.ORG



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