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A MAGAZINE BY AND FOR THE KIPP NEW JERSEY COMMUNITY

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welcome TO T H E FA L L E D I T I O N O F

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FAMILY

LETTER FROM OUR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 02 SCHOOL UPDATES 04 KIPP LANNING SQUARE’S HEALTH CENTER 06 MY CHILD HAS AN IEP. WHAT’S NEXT? 07 OUR 2019-2020 ACADEMIC PRIORITY 08 SAFE ON SOCIAL 11

Dear Families, This time of year is a season for new beginnings. Our students are forming new friendships, getting to know their teachers, and discovering their passion for learning. This fall is no exception­—as our founding students at KIPP Lanning Square Primary move on to a fresh start in middle school! As we begin our sixth year in Camden, we are reminded of our deeply held belief that promises to children are sacred—and that all kids deserve a world-class education that prepares them for college and choice-filled lives. TEAM & Family is published with families in mind. This edition—featuring tips on everything from handling your child’s transition to middle school to supporting a child with an IEP—is no different. Here’s what’s inside:

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OUR TEACHERS WERE STUDENTS ONCE, TOO. So they know why this year’s academic priority of student engagement matters. Hear their stories on page 8.

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BE SAFE ON SOCIAL. Whether your student is an aspiring Instagram influencer or new to social media, here’s what you need to know to help keep your child safe on social media this school year.

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OUR AWARD-WINNING STUDENT AUTHORS. Out of over 60 entries, the work of these student writers took home the top spots of our 2019 student writing contest. Check out their work on page 13.

As always, thank you for partnering with us on your child’s educational journey. We can’t wait to see what our students accomplish this school year! Best, Drew Martin Executive Director, KIPP Cooper Norcross Academy

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in this issue

TRANSITIONING TO MIDDLE SCHOOL 12 THE POWER OF THE PEN 13 THE ROAD TO COLLEGE SCHOLARSHIPS 14 ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT 16 SCHOOL CALENDAR 19

TEAM & FAMILY CONTRIBUTORS A special thank you to the KIPP parents, families, teachers, and staff for partnering with us and contributing to this issue. RESOURCES Visit kippnj.org/school-resources for student handbooks and more information about your child’s school. COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS? marketing@kippnj.org KIPP NJ MISSION The mission of KIPP New Jersey is to create a network of schools in Camden and Newark, New Jersey, that instill in their students the desire and ability to succeed in college, in order to change the world.

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KIPP UPPER ROSEVILLE ACADEMY

KIPP NEWARK LAB HIGH SCHOOL

KIPP Upper Roseville Academy is excited to help students embrace curiosity and challenge through hands-on academic centers and a Responsive Classroom approach. Each classroom will care for a class pet and plant, and we are incorporating social-emotional blocks and mindfulness after recess.

As we introduce our founding ninth graders to the excitement and rigor of high school, we’re particularly excited for both our “STEM” corner, where students take Algebra or Geometry, Algebra-based Physics, Intro to Design and Engineering, and Computer Science and our “groups,” where students meet daily to support each other as people, set and achieve personal goals, and create school-wide policies and procedures.

KIPP NEWARK COLLEGIATE ACADEMY Thanks to a generous grant from the KIPP Foundation and Amazon, KIPP NCA will be launching its first robotics team with our in-house built robots—as well as incorporating robotics into the new computer science curriculum.

KIPP NEWARK COMMUNITY PREP KIPP Newark Community Prep is thrilled to be opening our doors to our first class of 5th graders. We’re eager for students and families to help build our community—our namesake —into a place that feels like a home away from home and that nurtures kindness, learning, positive peer relations, and celebration.

KIPP RISE ACADEMY KIPP Rise Academy is excited to enhance its enrichment programs through hands-on learning opportunities. We will be offering daily enrichment courses in Technology, Performing Arts, Physical Fitness, and Innovation and Design.

KIPP SPARK ACADEMY

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KIPP TEAM Academy is excited to expand its extracurricular offerings by adding robotics and coding and offering character education as a new co-curricular class.

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KIPP BOLD ACADEMY KIPP BOLD Academy is continuing its rich tradition of electives this year, adding robotics, coding, and media courses.

KIPP THRIVE ACADEMY KIPP THRIVE Academy is launching with a focus on creating a safe, joyful, and challenging school year through social-emotional learning structures such as morning meeting with our KIPPsters, an open line of communication with our families, and teachers being laser-focused on intellectual preparation for their lessons to maximize kids’ learning!

KIPP Lanning Square Middle is excited to be able to offer 5th-8th grade students the opportunity to participate in a wide variety of co-curricular activities, including dance, art, gym, music, band, cooking, STEM, and spoken word.

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KIPP Seek Academy is excited to start a school news channel that broadcasts live every morning. This program, Seek Speaks TV, is hosted by our fourth grade scholars, the Class of 2028! We are looking forward to a great school year.

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KIPP Lanning Square Primary is introducing social and emotional learning into the curriculum. Once per week, students will receive lessons on topics such as self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making.

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KIPP Life Academy will be working tirelessly to incorporate the use of effective data in the day-to-day teaching of each individual scholar in order to ensure strong academic results and a life-long love of learning.

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KIPP SPARK Academy teachers are working on creating even more engaging and unique lessons across all content areas to get our scholars super excited about learning. The SPARK team will also be creating more leadership opportunities for students to help them to build character and responsibility.

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KIPP WHITTIER MIDDLE KIPP Whittier Middle is excited to be fully ‘founded’ this year, educating fourth through eighth grade students. Whittier is focusing on the importance of attendance through parent engagement and student incentives throughout the year—and we will offer students more than a dozen options for extracurricular programs!

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“Our work at the Health Center allows parents access to convenient, quality health care. We work proactively and reactively. At our well visits with parents, we take a thorough history of each child and answer any questions the parent or student might have. We go over medical conditions and come up with a plan to respond to any problems. If a child has asthma, we can treat with a nebulizer and monitor them. We can run strep tests and provide vaccines. It’s truly comprehensive healthcare that allows us to keep parents informed and oftentimes stay at work, comfortable their child is receiving high-quality care.” E L A I N E PAY N T ER, M SN , A P N .C Pediatric Nurse Practitioner

KIPP Lanning Square’s Health Center E LE VAT IN G ST U DE NT H EALTH —AND EXPA N D IN G L E A RN IN G — O N E VI SI T AT A TI M E

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ike many parents, KIPP Lanning Square mom Anna Martinez is pretty busy. With three children—a kindergartner and first grader at KIPP Lanning Square Primary and a sixth grader at KIPP Lanning Square Middle—any given school year throws her a handful of bumps, bruises and ear infections that might require time off of work for her— and time out of the classroom for her children. Recognizing the need of parents like Ms. Martinez, KIPP NJ and Cooper University Health Care joined forces to launch the Cooper Health Center at KIPP Lanning Square. Open year round and available to all KIPP families in Camden, the Center fielded more than 600 visits from KIPP students, including over 100 well visit appointments, last year. One of those visits was from Ms. Martinez’s son Antonio during an asthma attack. “Normally that would have required me to take him to the ER immediately,” said Martinez. “But this time, they were able to tell me what was happening and keep me informed throughout the day. He even went back to class that same day,” she said. “They’re nice, they’re respectful and they listen to your concerns. And they’re fast—it doesn’t matter how big or small the issues are,” she added. According to Elaine Paynter, a pediatric nurse practitioner at the Center, their work allows children to spend more time doing what matters: learning. “Sometimes they’re surprised, but children who respond to treatment can go right back to class! We also run strep tests and provide vaccines, which is peace of mind for our parents,” said Paynter.

Here’s how the Cooper Health Center at KIPP Lanning Square can support your family—and allow your children to spend more time in the classroom: • The Health Center is open every day school is open—and throughout the summer months. • The Center treats all KIPP + Head Start students (including KIPP Whittier Middle students), regardless of primary care provider. • It provides walk-in sick visits: a sick child will be seen on the spot (and can stay at school if he or she is ok). •  No more long waits at the doctor’s office! The Center offers convenient well visits and vaccinations, including school physicals and sports physicals. • The Center’s nurses can write prescriptions on the spot to your local pharmacy. •  Your daughter/son won’t have to miss school for an appointment—and oftentimes our Center gets a sick child back to school sooner through quicker treatment and diagnosis. • We help parents avoid missing days of work. You can give permission for your sick child to be seen without you. • Does your child have asthma? Keep your child’s condition under control—you can refill medication, and we can provide oxygen on site to prevent missed school and ER visits.

K I PP CO O PER N O RC ROSS FA MI LI ES ! Be sure to set your child up for a healthy school year by making an appointment for a well visit today! You can call at 856-536-1511 to schedule an appointment. Parents can fill out an enrollment packet for the Health Center anytime at KIPP Lanning Square’s front office. 6

My Child Has an IEP. What’s Next?

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avigating services for a child with an Individualized Education Plan (IEP) can be tricky. Often, complicated acronyms and a slew of unfamiliar language can make it hard to know how to best support your child. But having an IEP also means you have a team of teachers and administrators that are ready to support your child’s success inside and outside the classroom. What’s an IEP, anyway? An IEP is a document that supports the success of students who are eligible for special education services. From setting measurable academic goals to providing appropriate accommodations and modifications, having an IEP in place allows your child to receive services that address their unique needs. At least once a year, your child will have an IEP meeting where teachers, parents or family members, staff (and sometimes the student) gather to discuss your child’s social, behavioral, and academic progress. Below we’ve outlined some tips to help you help your child excel with an IEP year-round—and help you prepare for that meeting. And as a bonus, we’ve even defined some of those confusing terms! CO MMU N ICAT IO N IS K E Y. The first time you speak with your child’s teachers shouldn’t be at their IEP meeting. Our staff is always eager to update you about your child’s development—and that’s a two-way street. We encourage you to keep teachers posted about areas where you notice them struggling or excelling. E MP OW E R YO U R CH IL D TO SE L F -A DVO CAT E . This is especially important for older children and high schoolers who may be heading to college. Make sure your student understands what services are provided by their IEP and why—and that they can articulate their IEP to their teachers. Students who learn to self-advocate can recognize when a topic or class might pose a challenge and work with their teachers to develop a plan or accommodation that supports their needs. F RA ME YO U R CH IL D ’S O U T LO O K . Your child will look to you as a model for how to think about their IEP. As a parent, you can help equip your child with the social and emotional tools they need to

work through learning challenges. Tell them about a time you’ve persisted through difficulties, and speak to them candidly about your own strengths and weaknesses as a learner. A good attitude can go a long way towards helping your child feel empowered academically. D O YO U R H O ME WO R K . Before an IEP meeting, make sure to write down anything you want to address about your child’s academic progress or behavior at home. In the middle of a meeting, it can be hard to remember what you intended to say. A SK Q U E ST IO N S. If you don’t understand the terms being used, or a course of action or goal doesn’t make sense to you, don’t be afraid to ask more questions. Also—you can always arrange to meet with staff after the meeting to go over any reports or request clarification. It is always our goal for you to leave with a clear understanding of everything that has been discussed at the meeting.

COMMON IEP TERMS Review these definitions from U N D E R S T O O D . O R G (a great resource for families of children with IEPs!) before your next IEP meeting! Annual goals: The IEP document lists the academic and functional (everyday) skills the IEP team thinks your child can achieve by the end of the year. These goals are geared toward helping your child take part in the general education classroom. IEP goals need to be realistic and measurable. Behavior intervention plan (BIP): A plan designed to teach and reward positive behavior. Typically, the plan uses strategies to prevent and stop problem behaviors. It may also have supports and aids for the child. A BIP is often included as part of an IEP. To get a BIP, a child must have a functional behavioral assessment. Present level of performance (PLOP, PLP, PLAFF, PLAAFP): This is a snapshot of how your child is doing right now. PLOP describes your child’s academic skills (such as reading level) and functional skills (such as making conversation or writing with a pencil). The school prepares this report for the IEP meeting. This is the starting point for setting annual IEP goals. Related services: Any support services your child needs to benefit from special education. One possible example is transportation. Another is occupational therapy. Transition plan: This part of the IEP lays out what your teen must learn and do in high school in order to succeed as a young adult. The transition plan includes goals and activities that are academic and functional. But they extend beyond school to practical life skills and job training. 7


OU R 2 01 9 -2 02 0 ACADE MI C PRI O R I TY Each year, KIPP New Jersey chooses one unifying academic goal to implement across the schools in our network. Often these goals reflect what we want to see taking place in our classrooms every year—but highlighting a priority helps us all rally towards a common goal and energize our kids and communities. You might remember last year’s initiative, Our Kids Love to Read and We Do Too. Our kids read millions of words collectively, thanks in part to that focus! This year’s

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academic priority is Our Kids Love to Learn, and We Do Too. This priority is all about curiosity and connection. We want to deepen the level of cognitive engagement our kids experience during lessons, inspire their curiosity about content, and connect with them both academically and emotionally. Our hypothesis? If we encourage authentic engagement in our classrooms, this will be another important step forward towards helping our kids change the world!

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At a region-wide professional development session last spring, a few of our Camden educators—all on the frontlines of this year’s engagement priority—shared how their own experiences as children informed their approach to student engagement in the classroom. Hear their stories below.

Linden Reed

B EH AV I OR SPECI ALIST KIPP Lanning Square Primary Growing up, I was a pretty decent student, and I didn’t usually get into any real trouble. I had a great relationship with my math teacher, Mr. Landis, whom I just loved. One day there was a pause in the class—and it was a point where students who had struggled on a quiz could seek extra help. I raised my hand and said something obnoxious like, “Well, what do you do if you got 110%?” I remember his reaction so clearly. He didn’t get mad at me. He just looked at me surprised and said simply, “That’s not very kind.” I remember thinking, ‘Wow...I can’t believe I was so mean!” As a behavior specialist today who works with some of our hardest to reach scholars, I like to think that I help kids succeed because of the relationships I build with them. I want to create an atmosphere where kids follow the rules because they respect me, one another, and themselves. In my morning check-ins, I do a lot of play-acting where I’ll play both teacher and student. I had a little girl who would get frustrated if she couldn’t get her teacher’s attention immediately—she hated being ignored. We would rehearse situations with her as a teacher, and I would do something ridiculous—like stomp my foot for attention. It worked, because it was easy to see why a teacher couldn’t call on her when she acted this way and also gave her a chance to practice it correctly. The key message wasn’t naming the consequence for misbehavior. It was that “being respectful is the best way to get my teacher’s attention.”

Nairobi Colon H I STORY TEACH ER KIPP Whittier Middle

When I think of engaging teachers, I think of my second grade teacher, Ms. Macconette. As a child, I had the bad habit of sucking my thumb. My parents had tried everything, from taping it to putting hot sauce on it. Nothing worked. Ms. Macconette worked with my parents to come up with an idea: Every time I sucked my thumb, she would stop her lesson and put a mark on top of the board. No one else knew what it meant, but I did. I stopped doing it, because I realized I cared about how she viewed me and wanted to stop to make her happy. It was a little thing, but her approach showed she cared about me and that helped to set me up for success. 10

Ms. Macconette showed she cared about me in so many different ways. She always made sure my work was done—and done well. I would check in with her a lot, and if I wasn’t understanding a concept, I would go back and do it again. Sometimes she’d give me extra work or encourage me to tutor other students.

When I think of student engagement and the kind of teacher I want to be, I think of Ms. Macconette and her ability to make me feel cared for—while holding me to high standards. That’s the kind of teacher I want to be for my students.

Heather Baker

MATH TEAC HER KIPP Lanning Square Middle When I was in third grade, I thought I was a fantastic student—especially in math. When we did competitions reciting our multiplication tables, I would always win. But I had a weakness—which was word problems. I wasn’t a strong reader. My teacher caught on and tried to help me. He saw my anxiety about word problems and told me I knew how to solve the math in a word problem, but I didn’t know what the problem was asking. So he made me act it out. At lunch and recess, we would go through word problems together and take on the roles of the people in the problem. This helped me visualize what I needed to solve. Today, I try to model that same approach with my fifth grade mathematicians at KIPP Lanning Square Middle. At the launch of every unit, we start by acting out a problem, and I have different members of the class play different roles for each problem. I encourage them to turn and talk to a partner to share their approaches to a given problem. I look forward to seeing how we can take engagement in math to a new level with next year’s priority of academic engagement!

Safe on Social: Help Your Child Stay Safe Online Heading into the School Year

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t’s a new school year, and for many parents, this means it’s time to take a closer look at how often—and how safely —their children are using social media. Platforms like Facebook, Instagram, or Snapchat offer a powerful outlet for children to stay in touch with friends and family, create social action around issues they care about, and meet or interact with people who share similar interests. Having a positive social media presence can be a good thing when it comes time for them to apply to colleges or a job. But unrestricted access to social media can have unintended consequences. In fact, many teens report having interactions on social media that make them scared or uncomfortable. Oftentimes social media is the perfect place for teenagers to amplify middle or high school social drama, which can have consequences for your child’s mental health. Here are some tips that can help you jumpstart a conversation with your child to help them stay safe online this school year. •  Keep an open line of communication. Ask your child what social media platforms they enjoy. Children should know they can come to you with any problems­—but make sure they know that this includes social media usage. Tell kids they can count on you for support or advice if they receive an inappropriate message or notice classmates bullying each other on social media. •  Be nice (work hard!). Be nice is half of KIPP New Jersey’s motto for a reason. Make sure you explain to children to always treat people with respect and the benefit of the doubt, even online. Kids should remember (before they hit ‘enter!’) that their posts can be seen by anyone, anytime in the future, including a college admissions representative, a relative, future bosses, etc. If you wouldn’t show it to a grandmother or respected adult—don’t post it! •  Don’t ‘friend’ strangers. Tell kids to decline friend or follow requests from people they don’t know or trust. It’s a simple rule of thumb that teenagers can often forget as they grow their social media followers. •  Privacy settings matter. Take the time to go over the privacy settings on your child’s social media accounts so they truly understand how to use them. Explain that passwords exist to prevent identity theft and should never be shared with anyone—even trusted friends, boyfriends or girlfriends. •  Encourage unplugged time. Smartphones and social media are designed to be addictive—and sometimes inhibit real-life social relationships. Help kids cultivate authentic relationships by enforcing unplugged time with your kids over family dinners or when they’re with friends. Make sure that when your kids go low-tech, you do, too! R E ME MBE R ... If you have any questions or concerns about your child’s social media usage, feel free to reach out to school staff members for support. We hope that these tips help your family navigate the rough waters of social media this school year!

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did,” she added. “When it comes to academics, communicate with your teachers! My seventh grader was struggling with her vocabulary words, so everyday her advisory teacher Mark Joseph and I would text about how many pages she’d read to make sure she was keeping up with her reading,” said Scott. Start preparing early. Tameeka Walden is the parent of a fourth grader at KIPP Life Academy in Newark and also leads the school’s Parent Teacher Association. She plans to bring her daughter to visit her future middle school well in advance of her first day, so she can become familiar with the school and learn the lay of the land. “The first thing that families should do is visit the middle school with your kids, go meet your school leader and see it firsthand—you can also ask to learn more about the curriculum,” said Walden. She adds that families can go the extra mile to start preparing their children academically too. “I’ve been working with my daughter on her writing, a skill I know she’ll need going into middle school,” she said.

Transitioning to Middle School is Tough. Here’s How You Can Help Make it Easier for Your Child. “Who do I sit with at lunch? How can I juggle several classes with different teachers? How much homework will I have?” These are just a fraction of the questions students transitioning from elementary school are likely to have as they navigate middle school—and chances are high that families share these same questions about new academic and social expectations. Here is advice on how to help your child transition to middle school—from families and staff who have been there! Encourage exploration. According to Taylor Wegmann, a social worker at KIPP Whittier Middle, allowing your child to explore new opportunities as they enter middle school is vital. “Families can foster emotional growth by providing kids with opportunities to make choices in a safe and supportive way. Allowing kids to choose what club or sport they’d like to join after school, what color 12

book bag they’d like to use, or which friends to play with helps kids begin to navigate their worlds independently,” said Wegmann. Mistakes are OK. Middle schoolers don’t always get it right—socially or academically. But making mistakes “helps make kids more resilient as they go through life,” said Wegmann. Jen Scott is the parent of three children, two of whom attend middle school at KIPP Rise Academy in Newark. Her oldest is college-bound after graduating from KIPP Newark Collegiate Academy. Scott believes failure is vital to academic success

in middle school. “I let them go through the struggle. I didn’t make excuses for them. If they didn’t have their homework, they didn’t have their homework. Letting them face some consequences helped them become more responsible going into higher grades,” she said. Communicate with staff. Our team is here to support your child academically and socially. “I reached out to the school social worker when I knew my youngest was struggling,” said Scott. “I asked her to keep an eye out for her and check in, and she

Moving up to middle school is a big change for kids and may leave them feeling anxious—but know that together we can help your child develop their confidence, both socially and academically. As the year moves along, don’t forget to check in with your child on how s/he is handling the transition to provide support as s/he conquers new challenges.

TH E P OWER OF TH E P EN Last school year, we held the second annual KIPP NJ Writing Contest to celebrate the academic work our kids do. We had over sixty entries and were blown away by their brilliance. Their work covered a range of topics from technology to environmentalism to mental health and more. Check out some of the award winning work below and keep an eye out for the announcement about this year’s writing contest!

“Memes” BY J I MMY ME N D OZA KIPP Lanning Square student Memes. One of the beautiful things about the internet. They come in and by all through the years and then forgotten. Memes go all around You try posting the most ridiculous things And soon it’s a Meme.

Excerpt from “The Unbreakable Vow” BY MA K AY LA J E F F RI E S KIPP Newark Collegiate Academy alumnae As a black woman living in the hood, I am expected to always be strong and that started to weigh on me. Sometimes I didn’t want to be strong; I just wanted allowance to be human. I could not imagine living this way for more than forty years. Only then did my mother become a person and not a one dimensional character in my story.

Families can foster emotional growth by providing kids with opportunities to make choices in a safe and supportive way. TAY LO R WEGM A N N Social worker at KIPP Whittier Middle

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Setting the Stage

The Road to College Scholarships Starts Here

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f you’re the parent of a high school junior or senior, you may notice your student dragging their feet when it comes time to apply for scholarships. From gathering letters of recommendation to writing essays, acquiring a scholarship takes work. But you may want to tell them this: If you spend 20 hours in one week on an application and earn a $1,000 scholarship, you’re still earning $50 an hour—not a bad rate—and far better than most campus jobs! Whether your child is a freshman or a senior in high school, it’s never too early to start thinking about scholarships that can support their journey to and through college. Here you can learn more about available scholarships, what it takes to land them, and resources to fuel your search.

F U T U R E FO CU S Knowing a potential college major —or what you want to study— can really pay off. Many scholarships target specific career goals.

REM EM B ER Scholarships typically go to students with at least a 2.5 GPA. Boosting your GPA will increase your likelihood of securing college scholarships!

Opportunities for Your Scholar K IP P FO U N DAT IO N SCH O L A R SH IP S Amplify Scholars: kipp.org/amplifyscholars/ These scholarships from the KIPP Foundation provide stipends for tuition and college expenses, mentoring support, and access to a 3-day retreat hosted in New York City to build skills and connections. David Goldberg Scholars: kipp.org/goldbergscholars/ Goldberg Scholars receive stipends for expenses outside of tuition and room and board, a Goldberg Mentor for ongoing support, and access to professional networking events that help students secure career opportunities. RO N A L D MCD O N A L D H ACE R SCH O L A R SH IP mcdonalds.com/us/en-us/community.html This scholarship provides up to $100,000 in education funding for Hispanic students on the basis of academic achievement, community involvement, and financial need.

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CO N N ECT Has your student been involved in the community lately? Many scholarships award students for service, character, and leadership.

U N CF uncf.org/Scholarships UNCF is the nation’s largest private scholarship provider to minority group members. They award more than $100 million in scholarships to more than 10,000 students across the country each year. H U MA N IT Y R ISIN G humanityrising.org/Scholarship This organization dedicated to youth service awards thousands of dollars in cash college scholarships and tuition discounts to students who are making a difference in the world through volunteerism. Q U E ST BR ID GE SCH O L A R SH IP S questbridge.org This competitive scholarship offers full college funding to low-income students that demonstrate exceptional academic ability. T H E GAT E S SCH O L A R SH IP thegatescholarship.org This is a highly selective, last-dollar scholarship for exceptional, Pell-eligible, minority, high school seniors.

WOM EN OF T H E D REAM SC H OL ARS H I P womenofthedream.org/ College-bound graduating senior girls in Camden are eligible for this scholarship, which seeks to support students demonstrating service to their community and academic achievement.

Don’t Forget to Think Local Many scholarships are right around the corner. Alumni Associations Parent Employers Local Businesses Local Foundation Public Libraries Newspapers Bulletin Boards Book Covers

Head to www.collegegreenlight.org to explore thousands of scholarship opportunities for your student! Another great resource (and Newark-based business!) is Pedul. You can visit www.PeduL.com to access to hundreds of scholarships with the option to apply to several at once. They’ll also confirm for you whether any scholarship you’re applying for is legitimate. 15


JASON ODOOM KIPP School Attended: KIPP Newark Collegiate Academy

College: New Jersey Institute of Technology, Class of 2018*

Major/Area of Study: Information Technology

Employer: Booz Allen Hamilton

What advice would you give to younger KIPPsters?

MAE-EMMA JONES

“To work not only for a good future but for a better world and the greater good. You should try to be a positive influence in the lives of others and believe that you can make a difference. If you are determined, you can do anything you want to—really.”

JOSEILY M. WILLIAMS

*Jason also received training in web design, JavaScript, and Ruby at Flatiron School.

KIPP Newark Collegiate Academy

KIPP School Attended: College:

KIPP School Attended: KIPP Newark Collegiate Academy

JOSELIN MARROQUIN

College:

KIPP Schools Attended:

Montclair State University, Class of 2021

KIPP Rise Academy KIPP Newark Collegiate Academy

Major/Area of Study:

College:

Jurisprudence Law and Society

Mount Holyoke College, Class of 2022

What advice would you give to younger KIPPsters?

Major/Area of Study: Public Health

“One piece of advice I will give is once you find yourself, stay true to yourself. Focus on you and stay in your own lane. You are running your own race, how you get there is up to you. Network with others, no matter if you have different end goals. College is a fun roller coaster that will surprise you.”

What did you learn at KIPP that you still use today? “I learned the power of communication— communication between teachers, staff, the network, friends, associates, and more. The first impression is really the key to opening many doors in life. I am thankful to grow as a young adult with good and improving communication skills.”

ZAHIR MILLER KIPP Schools Attended: KIPP Rise Academy KIPP Newark Collegiate Academy

College: Essex County College, Class of 2020

Major/Area of Study: Liberal Arts

Bloomfield College, Class of 2020

Major/Area of Study: Interactive Multimedia and World Wide Web

What did you learn at KIPP that you still use today?

“I’ve learned to always keep perfecting my drafts. Whether in scripts for films or for my media essays, a second opinion always is better than your own.”

CIANNA M. CASTRO KIPP School Attended: KIPP Newark Collegiate Academy

College: Temple University, Class of 2022

Major/Area of Study: Theater

What did you learn at KIPP that you still use today?

“I learned to fight for the things that you want in life. Your college career won’t be easy, and there will be times you’ll fail, times when your credits will be messed up or your financial aid package won’t come in on time. Just remember to keep going and to be persistent.”

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What advice would you give to younger KIPPsters? “I would tell younger students to feel free to live your life. Don’t become stagnant and only caught up in school, homework, home, and sleep. Take time to follow your passions, no matter how big or small. Take time to build healthy relationships with your peers and teachers (I promise it will come in handy), and to figure yourself out.”

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Camden 2019-20 Calendar July 2019 SU

August 2019

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November 2019

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January 2020 SU

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April 2020 SU

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No School for Students 1:00pm Dismissal Saturday School: 9:00am-1:00pm Summer Hours: 9am-2pm First/Last Day of School Report Card Conferences

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October 2019

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MA KE-UP DAYS : The calendar allows for four school days to be missed due to emergency or winter inclement weather. Any school cancellations in excess of four days will be made up according by adding Saturday School day(s) and/or adding school days to the end of the school year.

D ELAYED OPENING S AND EARLY DISM ISSALS: KIPP Cooper Norcross Academy may call a delayed opening or an early dismissal because of an emergency or winter inclement weather. For winter inclement weather, KIPP Cooper Norcross Academy will follow the decision made by the Camden City School District. In most cases, a delayed opening will mean each school starts two hours later than its regular start time and early dismissal will mean each school ends two hours earlier than its regular dismissal time.

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Know someone interested in enrolling their child in a KIPP school in Camden? Tell them to call 856.295.2988 or visit KIPPNJ.org today!

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Profile for KIPP New Jersey

Team & Family Magazine - Camden Fall 2019  

Welcome to Team and Family, a magazine for and by members of the KIPP NJ community!

Team & Family Magazine - Camden Fall 2019  

Welcome to Team and Family, a magazine for and by members of the KIPP NJ community!

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