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A MAGAZINE BY AND FOR THE KIPP NEW JERSEY COMMUNITY


Welcome back! The beginning of the school year is always marked with excitement for the year ahead as we welcome back our returning families and open our doors to new families for the first time. Thank you for choosing KIPP New Jersey and entrusting us with your child’s education. Together, you are part of a strong community of more than 5,900 students and more than 1,300 alumni across the state of New Jersey. This year marks our seventeenth school year in Newark. And every day since our opening, we continue to work towards our vision of ensuring that Newark is known as a city of world-class education. We believe that through building strong relationships amongst staff, families, and students, setting a rigorous college preparatory bar, and creating learning environments where students can have fun learning, our kids will be prepared for college and a choice-filled life beyond our doors. We hope you enjoy the fall issue of TEAM & Family Magazine—a collaborative initiative between students, family and staff to provide you with resources that will help you navigate the school year ahead for your children as well as think ahead to their future education within KIPP. In this issue, you will find:

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CIVICS ENGAGEMENT IN AND OUT OF THE CLASSROOM

FAMILY RESOURCES

SPOTLIGHTING WRITING AND READING

At KIPP we have always believed in educating the whole child, and lessons on community engagement help students understand the world around them and be an active citizen. Check out what this looks like on page 9.

We are proud to partner with a variety of local community organizations to ensure the best care and resources for our families. You can find some of these and more in a local resource guide on page 18.

Our kids love to read and we do too! On page 10, take a look at our reading tips and favorite book recommendations.

Thank you again for believing in our schools and working alongside of us to help unlock the potential of every child in our classrooms. Please do not hesitate to reach out to me with any thoughts or questions you may have on how we can best serve your child or children. And if you would like to be a part of our next issue, please email marketing@kippnj.org. Our entire KIPP team and family is looking forward to another successful and exciting school year. Thank you for your continued support. Best, Joanna Belcher Executive Director, Newark


in this issue LETTER FROM OUR EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 02 SCHOOL UPDATES 04 A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A KIPP STUDENT 06 TEACHING FOR CIVIC ENGAGEMENT 09 STRONG READERS, STRONG LEADERS 10 HEAD OF THE CLASS: KIPP ALUMNI IN THE CLASSROOM 13 TOP TIPS FOR HIGH SCHOOL SUCCESS 14 KIPP NJ ALUMNI IN THE SPOTLIGHT 16 NEWARK COMMUNITY RESOURCES 18 SCHOOL CALENDAR 19

TEAM & FAMILY CONTRIBUTORS A special thank you to the KIPP parents, families, teachers, and staff for partnering with us and contributing to this issue. RESOURCES Visit kippnj.org/school-resources for student handbooks and more information about your child’s school. COMMENTS OR QUESTIONS? marketing@kippnj.org KIPP NJ MISSION The mission of KIPP New Jersey schools is to create a network of schools in Camden and Newark, New Jersey, that instill in their students the desire and ability to succeed in college, in order to change the world.


KIPP NEWARK COLLEGIATE ACADEMY

KIPP BOLD ACADEMY

This school year, we’re excited to launch a community service initiative and graduation requirement. Students will have opportunities to be active members in their community and have a lasting impact on Newark through service.

Last year our performing arts programming continued to grow at KIPP BOLD Academy. Our 7th graders performed song selections by Lin-Manuel Miranda including In The Heights Broadway, Moana, and, of course, Hamilton: An American Musical.

KIPP RISE ACADEMY

KIPP THRIVE ACADEMY

This past spring we hosted our first ever Global Solutions competition, where over 30 students from grades 5-8 presented on topics ranging from cleaning up Newark’s storm drains, to saving the rhino population with an ivory alternative, and to solutions to other challenges across the globe.

KIPP THRIVE Academy continued to develop relationships with community partners. Vision to Learn provided free vision screenings to our students, and many students received a pair of free eyeglasses!

KIPP SPARK ACADEMY

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KIPP LIFE ACADEMY

In June, KIPP Life Academy hosted its first End of Year Community Block Party, inviting local community members to celebrate a successful year with food, rides and lots of fun!

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At KIPP SPARK Academy last year, every grade had a recital, performing music and dance routines they learned during the school year.

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KIPP SEEK ACADEMY

Last year our school added fourth grade and TWO new after-school clubs, Seek Youth Dance Company and Seek Voices. Seek Voices performed at our annual Be the Change event in March 2018 and Seek Youth Dance Company got to see The Lion King on Broadway!

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KIPP TEAM ACADEMY

This past year, students got to chose a preference for their co-curricular courses, from offerings such as African Dance, Music Production, Culinary Arts, Drama, African Drumming, and more!


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KLSM students have the opportunity to participate in over 20 after-school programs per quarter including KUMDO, an elite Korean martial art program!

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Through a partnership with Campbell’s Healthy Communities, KLSP students learned about nutrition, how to cook, and what plants need in order to grow by planting their own seeds in KLSP’s school garden!

KIPP WHITTIER MIDDLE

KIPP Whittier family members and guardians got involved in our school community through our Kick-Off BBQ, Back-to-School Night, and two Family Fun nights throughout the school year.

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8:54 AM High school students head to homerooms for a quick 10-minute catch up with their advisors. Then it’s on to second period.

8:10 AM Our kids love to read! Students in elementary grades engage in read alouds, shared reading, and/or close reading.

7:15-7:45 AM* Doors open at KIPP schools across Newark and Camden. KIPPsters might arrive in homerooms or the school cafeteria for a “brain” breakfast— which consists of healthy options to get them ready for the day ahead.

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF A KIPP STUDENT *PLEASE NOTE, YOU CAN CHECK WITH YOUR CHILD’S SCHOOL FOR EXACT SCHEDULES.

OUR STUDENTS ARE IN SCHOOL EARLY AND STAY LATE TO MAXIMIZE THEIR LEARNING TIME. HERE IS A GLIMPSE OF WHAT A SAMPLE DAY CAN LOOK LIKE ACROSS ELEMENTARY, MIDDLE, AND HIGH SCHOOL.


9:00 AM

Elementary students transition from text study to writing where they work on a short story they’ve been drafting. 10:35 AM Middle school students transition from text study to math where they tackle challenging problems by deconstructing them. Meanwhile, 11th graders are in AP History with Mr. Fleming, preparing to master the AP exam’s challenging document-based questions.

11:25 AM Middle school students sit in small groups with a teacher for guided reading. Guided reading gives students a chance to wrestle with a text just above their independent level with a teacher there to give them strategies to help build their comprehension.

11:35 AM Elementary students enjoy lunch as one big group with time for fun and socializing. Later in the afternoon classes will also enjoy some time outside during recess.

11:50 AM High schoolers work on a block schedule, so while some are at lunch, these students are learning chemistry.


12:35 PM Did you say Recess?? These middle schoolers head for the gymnasium to let loose after lunch.

1:18 PM Parlez-vous français? Students in 11th grade French 3 do.

1:55 PM Middle school students enter their strategic reteach block, where teachers meet with students for small group instruction. This allows students to stay on track, even when they hit a bump in their academic journey.

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Fourth graders head to specials classes, either art or movement, depending on the day. In different grades, students receive different extracurricular classes. 3:40 PM Free Choice Centers – After working hard all day, students in 3rd grade get some time to choose something to focus on during free choice. Before dismissal, middle school students have community time either as a grade level or in small groups to celebrate achievements, learn a character lesson, or just have fun.

4:00-4:10 PM KIPP schools dismiss. Some students head home, some stay at school for extended care, and others participate in afterschool clubs like these students who participate in the KIPP Rise Academy Girls Running Club.


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s Martin Luther King, Jr. once said, “Everybody can be great...because anybody can serve.” His statement raised awareness about the importance of service, and KIPP classrooms throughout New Jersey are helping students envision and create the world they want to live in by building civic engagement into the curriculum. This foundation starts as early as kindergarten where teachers in some KIPP New Jersey elementary schools have developed a social justice curriculum that lays the foundation to develop critical thinkers and civically engaged students. Victoria Clinton, a teacher at KIPP Seek Academy, says she started the program at her school to build a model for students that reflected their own experiences, role models, and interests. According to Ms. Clinton, students in the social justice class have conversations about current events and controversial topics taking place in their communities and around the world.

TEACHING FOR

CIVIC ENGAGEMENT Building Civic Engagement Early Helps Students Understand The World Around Them

She notes that students in her class pick up on the fact that other countries don’t have the same resources as the U.S. and why this matters to everyone. They talk about basic human rights and the importance of electing representatives who can speak to their needs and interests. “It helps students understand the rights we have as Americans: what it means to feel included and what it means to feel excluded because of your religious beliefs, where you come from, or some other reason,” says Clinton. Corey Harris, who teaches the curriculum at KIPP Life Academy, says it’s never too early to get kids started talking about more global issues. “This program is trailblazing because I don’t think people think our kids can handle this level of information. To me, it’s about always telling the truth within a narrative that is age-appropriate and kids can understand. Our narrative starts with our kids: who they are, where they come from, and the issues that affect them.” KIPP Life Academy parent Tameeka Walden agrees. “My scholar has been given a platform to use her voice, but also to gain the most valuable tool: knowledge. As Dr. King said ‘Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about the things that matter.’” While not every KIPP school has a dedicated social justice curriculum, discussions to help build student engagement and build critical thinking about world issues are built into other lessons. There are many ways in which a school or classroom can build a more civically engaged student body. At KIPP Newark Collegiate Academy, students take part in an annual day of fasting to raise awareness about hunger issues, complete service projects, and raise money for local charities. The Student Government Association organizes and executes the event and often has over 150 students participate. At KIPP Lanning Square Middle in Camden, the student service club participates in multiple service projects in the community throughout the year. Recently they made and delivered lunches to a local homeless shelter. These experiences allow students to see the impact they can have first-hand and encourages them to be change agents within the community. Academically, a civic engagement curriculum helps students build written and verbal communication, critical thinking, and leadership skills. But it’s more than coursework; it’s about creating well-informed students who can lead real world conversations. “For the kids, having them walk away with practical ways they can build resiliency and contribute to their communities, Newark, and the world...that’s what we’re here for,” says teacher Corey Harris. “I want them to be woke, well-informed, and highly opinionated.”


Strong Readers, 7 WAYS TO HELP YOUR CHI LD BUI LD A LOVE OF R E ADING

Strong Leaders BUILDING A LIFELONG LOVE OF READING among students can seem like no easy task for both parents and educators who must compete with smartphones, social media, and extracurricular activities. Yet reading for pleasure has been reported as critically important for children’s educational success with evidence suggesting that reading for pleasure is an activity that has emotional and social benefits. There are many things you can do to ensure your child builds strong reading skills early in their development, which are key to their happiness, confidence, and success in school and life. These approaches can bring lasting benefits to your child and your family. Here are some ideas on how to encourage a love of reading:

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CHOOSE BOOKS THEY LOVE Children read what they are interested in, and they are more likely to read if they enjoy the topic. So it is important to identify book series that will keep children engaged. Don’t discourage your child from reading books with pictures no matter their age—graphic novels still allow you child to practice key reading skills. Additionally audiobooks also count and can be a great way to expose your child to books they aren’t ready to navigate independently. Feel free to listen together!

BRINGING BOOKS TO LIFE Bringing books to life, for young children especially, is one of the most important building blocks to developing lifelong readers. It creates a setting for discovery and elevates reading, allowing your child to experience the world around them and grow their imagination through books. For your daughter or son, this could mean creating an art project that’s based on a scene in the book, asking your child to give a speech as though they’re a character in the book, or setting up an informal book club discussion with friends.

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WHEN CHILDREN LEARN, THEY LEAD When children read, they learn about the world they live in. Children can be encouraged to read different genres of books, and this allows them to imagine themselves as the main character or take on the perspective of the author.

“Kids who read more have more empathy,” Kristen Jones, a teacher at KIPP Rise Academy, maintains. “They are constantly building the skill of putting themselves in the shoes of another, which allows them to be more effective at taking on leadership roles when the opportunities arise. The kids who read the most in my middle school classroom are those now yielding the greatest impact at universities nationwide”

THE FAMILY THAT READS TOGETHER IS HEALTHIER A report by the American Association of Pediatrics published in March 2018 found that although parent-child reading experiences are helpful to a child’s language and literacy development, parents also benefit from these interactions, as they improve parenting confidence and self-esteem and reduce parent stress levels and depression. Parents can try to find time to read with their child before bed each night, or, if the child is old enough, can take turns reading pages. This creates a special bonding time routine for you and your child. For high school students, this experience may require a shared book club. Additionally high school students may find books that are made into feature films more appealing, which creates opportunity for further discussion.

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K-1ST G RA D ES B ISC UIT Alyssa Satin Capucilli G OOD N IG HT MO ON Margaret Wise Brown IF YOU G IVE A M OUSE A COOKIE Laura Joffe Numeroff 2ND- 4TH G RA DE S D OG MA N Dav Pilkey

USING THE LIBRARY AS A RESOURCE A trip to the library can serve as a great bonding opportunity for children and parents. Most libraries have reading programs and other special events for children of all ages, and library cards are free. Plan a monthly visit to the local library, and enjoy its free programming. Libraries have gone increasingly digital and your child may be able to download e-books and audiobooks from the comfort of home.

ENCOURAGE WRITING In our schools we encourage children to create their own stories. This is something that can be done at home as well. The more students can see themselves as authors, the more they’ll learn to understand and appreciate books told from different perspectives. While traveling home, you could have your child tell you a story about their day at school or one from their imagination as a way to build these skills.

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Book Recommendations for Every Grade

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READING STRUGGLES Sometimes children may struggle with reading for reasons beyond their control. The earlier a reading problem is identified and addressed, the easier it will be to help a child become a successful reader. All reading difficulties can be surmounted with the proper interventions. Let your child’s teacher know if you suspect your child might be struggling with reading. We want to see all of our students succeed and will work with you to assess the situation and find the best possible solution and/or support.

RA D WOMEN WORLDWIDE Kate Schatz THE VILLAG E OF ROUND AND SQUA R E HOUS ES Ann Grifalconi 5TH- 8 TH G RA DE S THE HA R RY P OTTE R SE RIE S J.K. Rowling G H OSTS Raina Telgemeier WON D ER R.J. Palacio 9 TH-12TH G RA D ES THE B OOK THIEF Markus Zusak THE B LUEST EY E Toni Morrison MA RC H John Lewis


Head of the Class F

or years we’ve focused on hiring the best teachers to support our students and help them achieve their dreams. And over the past few years that has meant hiring some of our founding students who are now college graduates and want to make an impact in their community.

and-downs, but I never regret my choice to be an educator, especially for KIPP. My teachers nourished, loved, and challenged me so it’s easy to return and give that same love to my students.”

KIPP Seek Academy student with Kamilah Bolden, KIPP alum and Teacher Fellow

For Bilal Walker, a KIPP alumnus and teacher, his decision to return to KIPP TEAM Academy to become a teacher was partially based on the importance of having teachers who identify with the student experience, and how these teachers can empower students in ways that transcend gender and race. “The truth is, as a young black male, I wish that I’d had more teachers who looked like me. As I have developed as a teacher, I’ve learned firsthand how valuable that can be. Having teachers who look like you is powerful. Teachers need to understand their kids, and if they don’t come from the same communities as their students, they need to make it their business to explore the city, research its roots and immerse themselves in the cultures in which their students live, eat and breathe.” Like Mr. Walker, many KIPP alumni see value in creating an environment where students can see success modeled by the teachers and mentors around them. This is where KIPP alumni make the biggest impact and support a culture of giving and service in their communities. Alumni, like Mr. Walker, are highly and uniquely qualified individuals who want to be the change in their community.

KIPP SPARK Academy fourth grader, Ayokunmi Lapite, couldn’t agree more. Her teacher, Tiandra Kimbrough, is a KIPP NJ alum and having her in the classroom has been inspirational.

She inspires me because she achieved her goals to come back and teach. If she can achieve her goals, I can achieve my goals, too. AYO KUN MI L A P I T E KIPP SPARK Academy student

At our schools, more than twenty local alumni, as well as several hailing from other regions, have returned to work in some capacity including teaching and co-teaching roles, as well as student support roles. Kalimah Bolden, a 2010 KIPP TEAM Academy graduate who describes her time there as life changing, says that being an alumnus makes it easier to identify the needs of students on a daily basis and that the experience guides her work. “Being a former student makes it easy for me to talk to my team about what our scholars need on a daily basis. I’m able to teach and grow the minds of our kids in Newark. Every day has its ups-

“I think it is amazing that she came back to work in the community she grew up in. Seeing her makes me think I want to give back to the community that will get me to where I will be in the future,” says Ayokunmi. “She inspires me because she achieved her goals to come back and teach. If she can achieve her goals, I can achieve my goals, too.” Having alumni teach and lead in our schools offers the opportunity for our schools to improve even more. Having had the experience of being students in our classrooms, our alumni offer feedback to question and improve systems, revisit policies, innovate curriculum and impact culture. “I love knowing my students have the same access to loving teachers, quality education, and ways to express themselves that I did,” says Bolden. “I don’t think I would appreciate KIPP as an educator if I wasn’t a student first. I believe in the systems that were created to give the children of Newark a loving environment to grow and learn. There’s a reason why so many former students come back to work for KIPP New Jersey— we believe in the work that we do here.”


TOP TIPS

S S E C C U S L O O H C FOR HIGH S

Whether your child is entering freshman or senior year, these tips will help them stay on track with a plan and goals in mind. Navigating the college testing and admissions process can seem like a challenging process, but thanks to the KIPP Through College (KTC) placement team, our families can rest assured that they will receive support every step of the way. From preparing for standardized tests, to completing financial aid packages, to finally making the best college decision, KIPP New Jersey is there to and through college. As your high school child begins the journey to college, here is a quick year-by-year checklist of key milestones that they will conquer—with your help—in partnership with the KTC team. FRESHMAN YEAR

SOPHOMORE YEAR

Explore opportunities! Students should become involved in extracurricular activities to see what sparks their interest.

Students will register for and take the PSAT for practice (if appropriate by math placement) and/or the PLAN test.

This is a great time for your child to start building a resume/ activities list in preparation for college applications.

Students should continue to build their resume, keeping track of hours of involvement and memorable experiences in activities.

Students should get to know their counselor. He/she will be an important part of their high school career, particularly in helping make plans for the next four years and beyond. Calling all athletes! Become familiar with NCAA requirements if your child may want to play sports in college. GPAs are made early. Students should hard and work to get the best grades they can to build a strong transcript.

Start visiting more colleges with your child to get a sense of “turn-ons” and “turn-offs.” The right college match is important!  Help your child think through career options and the necessary education for these goals. They can also consider taking a summer course or participating in a summer program in an area of interest or enrichment.


JUNIOR YEAR

This is a big year!

September: Register for and take the PSAT. In the fall, students will begin thinking more formally about post-secondary plans, continue college visits and make a list of their top choices! Also in the fall, students should complete extra studying and test prep in advance of your SAT/ACT tests.  DEADLINES AHEAD: In the late fall, students should become aware of registration deadlines for SAT I, SAT II, ACT, TOEFL. (LD/504 Students make special arrangements for alternate testing situation.)  Think ahead: In Spring, help your child select a challenging course load for next year and request recommendation letters. Spring is a good time to attend college fairs with your child to talk to college representatives and gather information about potential schools. Students should meet with their KTC counselor over the course of the spring to discuss post-secondary plans and create their college wish list. May: AP exams for junior AP courses Summer: Application time! Students will start applications and write practice college essays. SENIOR YEAR  September: Seniors will finalize school selections, meet with their KTC counselor to discuss, and request recommendation letters from teachers, coaches, and finalize their resume! They will also begin to submit applications for schools with rolling admissions. LAST CALL: Last chance to register for SAT I, SAT II, ACT, TOEFL (if desired). Students must have all scores sent directly to colleges to which they are applying! (November is the latest recommended testing date for Early Decision/ Early Action applicants.) November: Student should file CSS Financial Aid Profile if required. December: Students should be aware of Early Decision/ Acceptance deadlines and submit remaining applications! January: Submit FAFSA for eligibility for federal financial aid and submit mid-year grades to colleges. Talk to your child’s KTC counselor to get more information on submitting FAFSA including deadlines.  WARNING: Senioritis ahead! Help your child avoid it! Colleges have been known to revoke acceptances if there is a major downturn in grades in the second half of the school year. May: AP exams for senior AP courses.  Keep copies of everything! Occasionally things do get lost. Keep copies of college applications, financial aid applications, essays…everything! And remember, reach out to the KTC team for help or guidance along the way. We’re here to help!

When I had to apply for college, I wouldn’t have been able to do it without my counselor Ms. Nunez. With her help, I was accepted into 14 of my 15 schools. Q UI N CY JO N ES JR. , KIPP NJ Alumni, Rutgers University, Class of 2021

Ms. Nunez celebrated EVERY single admission—with a text or phone call. It was so obvious that she was proud of Quincy and wanted Quincy to be proud of himself. C E L ESTE WI L L I A M S KIPP NJ parent


SPOTLIGHT ASIA BOSTIC KNJ School:

KIPP Newark Collegiate Academy, Class of 2014

College:

Howard University, Class of 2018

Employer:

Amazon Fulfillment Manager

What advice would you give to younger KIPPsters?

My biggest piece of advice would be to take advantage of any opportunities that you come across. No one is going to chase you down to apply for things, but if you see that there is something you can use to grow, take advantage. Otherwise, they will fly right past you. Also, never let anything shake the faith that you have in yourself. People will tell you no, but that just means you’re talking to the wrong person! Keep going! Lastly, INTERNSHIPS!!!

TALIB THOMAS KNJ Schools:

KIPP Rise Academy KIPP Newark Collegiate Academy, Class of 2017

College:

William Paterson University, Class of 2021

Major:

Theatre and Comedy & Media Production

Employment:

NAHEEM HEIGHT KNJ Schools:

KIPP Rise Academy KIPP Newark Collegiate Academy, Class of 2015

College:

Lycoming College, Class of 2019

Photography studio Intern Editor in Chief, NEWARK TIMES

Major:

What did you learn at KIPP that you still use today?

What did you learn at KIPP that you still use today?

KIPP schools have taught me to be accountable for my own actions. In college your mom and dad aren’t there to wake you up for class. Nor are they there to make sure you do your homework. The choice is yours. This mindset and set of skills were sharpened at KIPP and I still use them today. You are the future and now is your time to shine.

English Literature

I use the “agenda concept,” where we were given agendas in middle and high school. Whenever I have major assignments coming up, I plot them in my phone’s calendar and often set reminders for when assignments are due and when I should set aside time to complete those assignments ahead of time. Even if you do not utilize the agendas passed out every year, find some alternative to writing down your assignments to keep yourself accountable and on track with the speed of the class.


ON KIPP NJ ALUMNI BRIONA HAWKINS KNJ Schools:

KIPP TEAM Academy KIPP Newark Collegiate Academy, Class of 2015

College:

Dickinson College, Class of 2019

JANIYA WADE

Major:

KNJ Schools:

Educational Studies and minor in Political Science

KIPP Rise Academy KIPP Newark Collegiate Academy, Class of 2016

What advice would you give to younger KIPPsters?

College:

My advice for younger KIPPsters is to believe in themselves and their dreams for how they can positively impact the world. I know that sounds cliche, but we often can forget how much power there is in one. I would also encourage them to work hard enough to create options for themselves in the future. Lastly, I would say to remember the duty you owe to those before you and to those after you.

Ramapo College, Class of 2020

Major:

Business Management Major

Employment:

Intern at Newark Regional Business Partnership

What advice would you give to younger KIPPsters?

You’re capable of accomplishing so many things, so you shouldn’t limit yourself to what makes you comfortable. Learn to challenge yourself and get out of your comfort zone because you’ll be amazed at what you can do. KHALIL IDRIS KNJ School:

KIPP TEAM Academy KIPP Newark Collegiate Academy, Class 2011

College:

New Jersey Institute of Technology, Class of 2019

What did you learn at KIPP that you still use today?

I learned how to build an organization from the ground up. Seeing someone like Mr. Hill (KIPP NJ Founder) sleep at TEAM to ensure that the school would be running the next day taught me about leadership and tenacity. He wanted it bad for the students which later grew into KIPP NJ. I got a lot of my drive from seeing the start of KIPP NJ firsthand, from its inception until now. In essence, I saw what persistence and the right people alongside you can do for an organization.


Newark Family Resources For more information, please contact your school social worker to determine what service or services you qualify for. Your school’s social worker may have additional resources not listed here. E MP LOYME N T

MEN TA L HEA LTH S ERVIC ES

North Ward Family Success Center 286 Mt. Prospect Avenue, Newark 973-481-0415 Resources Available: Family success plans, employment related, life skills, housing assistance, advocacy and related supports

Mt. Carmel Guild Behavioral Health 58 Freeman Street, Newark Screener: 973-596-3980 Resources Available: Individual and family therapy; psychiatric evaluations; medication management; child, adolescent and adult services

FOOD PA N T R IE S

Cooperative Counseling Services 407 Chestnut Street, Union 908-731-5719 intakecoordinator@cooperativecs.com Resources Available: Individual, family, and group therapy; psychiatric evaluations; medication management; trauma focused services; services for ages 3-21

Community Food Bank www.cfbnj.org/food/find-food/ 908-355-3663 Hunger Relief Network Several locations in Newark www.mendnj.org HOU SIN G

PA R EN TIN G

South Ward Children’s Alliance Brick Avon Academy: 219 Avon Avenue, Newark 862-236-1333 Resources Available: Family case management, tax prep classes, tax prep services

Family Service Bureau of Newark 274 South Orange Avenue 973-412-2056 Resources Available: parenting groups, anger management classes, substance abuse education and counseling, therapeutic youth groups, psychiatric services and medication monitoring

LGBT H OT L IN E

S UB STA N C E US E

LGBT National Youth Talkline 800-246-7743

Bethel Family & Youth Resource Center 63-65 Pierce Street, Newark 973-643-6565 Resources Available: Outpatient, IOP and partial care programs from substance use; marijuana recovery prevention; biopsychosocial assessments; drug education and prevention; positive youth development; relapse prevention; parenting skills; self-esteem building workshops

MAT E R N IT Y SE RVI C ES

Family Service Bureau’s New Start Program 247 South Orange Avenue, Newark 973-412-2056 Resources Available: Assistance with securing infant supplies; parenting classes; access to mental health and addiction services; life skills training; assistance with pediatric care; assistance in applying for Assistance to Needy Families, WIC, and other social services

UTILITY A SS ISTA N C E

Utility Rights www.njcommunityresources.info/utility_shutoff.html


Newark 2018-19 Calendar July 2018

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1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

4

5

6

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

11

12

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

18

28

29

30

31

25

SU

MO

WE

December 2018

TH

FR

SA

1

2

3

7

8

9

10

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

13

14

15

16

17

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

19

20

21

22

23

24

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

26

27

28

29

30

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

FR

SA

1

2

January 2019

TU

SU

MO

WE

TH

FR

SA

1

2

3

4

5

SU

MO

TU

WE

TH

WE

TH

1

February 2019

TU

TU

March 2019 FR

SA

1

2

SU

MO

TU

WE

TH

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

17

18

19

20

21

22

23

27

28

29

30

31

24

25

26

27

28

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

MO

TU

FR

SA

31

April 2019 SU

May 2019

MO

TU

WE

TH

FR

SA

SU

MO

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

5

6

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

12

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

TU

June 2019

WE

TH

FR

SA

SU

WE

TH

1

2

3

4

7

8

9

10

11

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

13

14

15

16

17

18

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

19

20

21

22

23

24

25

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

26

27

28

29

30

31

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

1

30

KNJ PD - No School Holiday/Break School PD - No School RC Confs (Half Days) Beginning/End of Quarter Half Day

MAK E- U P DAYS : KIPP New Jersey’s schedule allows for four school days to be missed due to emergency or inclement weather. Any school cancellations in excess of four days will be made up by adding up to two Saturday schools, removing PD days and/or removing days from spring break.

D E L AY E D O P E N I N G S A N D E A R LY D I S M I SSA L S : KIPP New Jersey may call a delayed opening or an early dismissal because of an emergency or inclement weather. In most cases, a delayed opening will mean each school starts two hours later than its regular start time and early dismissal will mean each school ends two hours earlier than its regular dismissal time.


JOIN THE KIPP NEW JERSEY BOOK CLUB! This year, our academic priority is to engage our scholars and families in our reading initiative, entitled Our Kids Love to Read, and We Do, Too. As part of this initiative, we will be facilitating a book club for staff and families. We will cover four books over the course of the year and KIPP New Jersey families who sign up for the book club will be provided copies of each book at no cost. Contact the main office at your child’s school to learn more!

Profile for KIPP New Jersey

TEAM & Family Magazine - Newark Fall 2018  

A magazine for and by the KIPP NJ community.

TEAM & Family Magazine - Newark Fall 2018  

A magazine for and by the KIPP NJ community.

Profile for kippnj
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