Page 1


RISING TO THE CHALLENGE Each year for the past 10 years, KIPP has published an annual Report Card to share how our schools are doing—individually, at a regional level, and across the KIPP network as a whole. The Report Card reflects our collective commitment to transparency and accountability. In addition to reporting our progress, the Report Card also provides a unique space to reflect on where we have been, where we are today, and the work ahead. In 2012, we continued to experience the impact of globalization as young Americans struggled to gain employment in an economy undergoing dramatic shifts. In the midst of these shifts, the gap in the employment rate between college graduates and non-college graduates continued to widen. What is more clear than ever is that the future of our country—and all of us who enjoy the incredible freedoms that come with it—depends upon our collective commitment to providing all children with access to a great education. And, while we need this to happen for every child, there is a level of urgency when we consider the challenges faced by the one in five children living in poverty in America. In the greatest country on earth, we live with the reality that a child in a more affluent community is seven times more likely to graduate from college than a child growing up in poverty. While recognizing the challenges we face, we remain optimistic. When Mike Feinberg and Dave Levin founded KIPP, there were few examples of schools serving lowincome students with success. That picture has changed. Today, there are hundreds of transformational schools operating in underserved communities across the country. This growth has, in large part, been achieved by building the talent pipeline

necessary to fuel these efforts. In more than a few cities, the odds are increasing that a child will wake up in the morning and head off to a school that will prepare him or her for this incredibly competitive world. In a number of communities, from Houston to Newark, and from New Orleans to Washington, D.C., the results of nearly two decades of hard work are evident. In this year’s Report Card, we step back to ask: What will it take to build systems of highperforming schools that prepare all students for success in college and in life? In doing so, we hope to move the conversation beyond what it takes to create one great school to how to tackle the challenge of building entire systems of great schools. We share our thoughts on this with great humility, as our beliefs on what it takes to build a great system of schools will continue to evolve, informed by the experience of our KIPPsters and by the shifts in the world taking place all around us today. This year, the KIPP network grew to include 125 schools in 20 states and the District of Columbia that collectively serve more than 41,000 students. As we open each new school and are joined by others who are innovating and continuously learning, we are optimistic that together we can rise to the challenge of overcoming educational inequity and create a better tomorrow for all children.

John Fisher

Richard Barth

Chairman of the Board KIPP Foundation

Chief Executive Officer KIPP Foundation


The people I love the best jump into work head first without dallying in the shallows and swim off with sure strokes almost out of sight. . . . who strain in the mud and the muck to move things forward, who do what has to be done, again and again.

— borrowed with gratitude from “to be of use,� a poem by marge piercy


table of contents

our approach 6 a belief in all students 7 college graduation as the goal 9 academics and character 13 visionary leaders 17 excellent teachers 21 striking the balance 25 a culture of continuous learning 27 on the horizon

31

national results local results

35 40

cities with multiple kipp schools atlanta, ga 41 austin, tx 43 baltimore, md 45 chicago, il 47 denver, co 49 gaston, nc 51 helena and blytheville, ar 53 houston, tx 55 jacksonville, fl 59 los angeles, ca 61 lynn and boston, ma 63 memphis, tn 65 new orleans, la 67 new york city, ny 69 newark, nj 71 philadelphia, pa 73 san antonio, tx 75 san francisco bay area, ca 77 washington, dc 79

cities with one kipp school

albany, ny 81 charlotte, nc 82 columbus, oh 83 dallas, tx 84 indianapolis, in 85 kansas city, mo 86 minneapolis, mn 87 nashville, tn 88 oklahoma city, ok 89 san diego, ca 90 st. louis, mo 91 tulsa, ok 92

appendix

93

detailed school results available at www.kipp.org/reportcard


what does it take to build a system of high-performing schools ? When Mike Feinberg and Dave Levin set out to start KIPP, they wrestled with the question, “What will it take to build a highperforming school that serves all students with excellence?” Their answers—empowered leaders, a culture of high expectations and a focus on results, choice and commitment, and more time in school to offer rich academics, character development, as well as extracurricular opportunities— became known as the Five Pillars. These operating principles guide

all KIPP schools, and increasingly have been adopted by others seeking to build schools where all students achieve. Nearly two decades later, KIPP has grown to include 125 schools, and in the next four years that number will increase to nearly 200 schools. As we have grown, we have continued to grapple with tough questions. Today, our questions have moved beyond what it takes to build just one or two great schools. Instead, we are asking:

What will it take to build a system of high-performing schools that prepare all students for success in college and in life? While we are still learning and do not have all of the answers, we have come to believe that, just like individual schools, systems of high-performing schools share a set of common elements that, when implemented together, create an environment where all students can succeed.


our approach a belief in all students Our work at KIPP is built on the most basic of beliefs: that all students will learn and achieve.

college graduation as the goal Grounded in this belief, teachers, leaders, and staff at KIPP are united around a shared end goal: to prepare KIPP students to succeed in college and lead choice-filled lives.

academics and character In order to truly prepare students for college, we must create classrooms and schools that not only deliver rigorous academics but also help students develop their character.

visionary leaders Outstanding schools—those that offer rigorous academics and character development—are built, led, and sustained by empowered leaders.

excellent teachers Supported by a great leader, it is the teacher in the classroom who helps students develop the character, knowledge, habits of mind, and skills needed to be successful in college and the competitive world.

striking the balance The path to success starts with a fundamental conviction that empowered leaders and teachers are best positioned to make the decisions that impact students. This belief is balanced with the idea that leveraging the knowledge and resources of a broader system also helps everyone succeed.

a culture of continuous learning In an environment where leaders and teachers are empowered to make decisions, a culture of innovation is fostered. By measuring what matters and having a mind-set of continuous learning, those innovations having the greatest impact on students can be surfaced and widely disseminated for the benefit of all.

rising to the challenge

6


a belief in all students

family affair

Galessa, valedictorian of KIPP Delta Collegiate’s class of 2012, is a freshman at Vanderbilt. Back in Helena, a small rural town in the Arkansas Delta, she left big shoes for her brothers to fill. All of her brothers are enrolled in the KIPP elementary, middle, and high schools in the Delta. And they are all climbing the mountain to and through college.

kipp works because we all have the same belief: that all students can and will learn. — mitch brenner, kipp teacher


what does it take for all children to learn and achieve ? Since our founding, it has been our core belief that all students, regardless of their zip code or demographics, will learn and achieve. We are committed to serving the students who need us most and refuse to accept anything less than an excellent collegepreparatory education for students from low-income communities. This year, KIPP grew to serve more than 41,000 students in grades PreK–12. Nationally, 86 percent of KIPP students qualify for free or reduced price meals and 95 percent are African American or Latino. At our current rate of growth, we expect to serve more than 60,000 children by the fall of 2015. Beyond growing the number of students we serve, we are committed to making sure that students who join KIPP stay with us year after year. Just as we track and analyze our student achievement outcomes, we also closely study our student attrition rates. We consider student

attrition to be a key factor in understanding a school’s overall health. Put simply, a school with excellent test scores but high student attrition is not realizing our mission. In 2011–12, 88 percent of KIPP students returned to their KIPP school or completed the highest grade offered at their school. While many aspects of KIPP have remained constant, we have evolved and changed as well. Originally, KIPP only served students in middle school. In 2004, we opened our first KIPP elementary school and our first KIPP high school in Houston, TX. The decision to expand to a PreK–12 model grew out of a desire to keep students with us longer. We began asking, “What if students came to us when they were 3, 4, or 5 instead of 10 or 11? Maybe we could start them out on an entirely different academic trajectory?” By enrolling students as young as 3, 4, and 5, we could provide them with the foundation needed

to successfully launch into middle school. By staying with students through their high school years, we could better ensure that students sustained results and continued on a trajectory to, and eventually through, college. Today, our network includes 37 elementary schools, 70 middle schools, and 18 high schools. As we grow these schools and open additional schools, we build on our foundational belief that all students will learn.

41,000+ kipp students nationwide

95%

are african american or latino

86%

are eligible for free or reduced price meals

96%

of kipp classes outperformed their local districts on state tests in reading. 92% did so in math.

rising to the challenge

8


college graduation as the goal

living proof

Lorenzo Castillo is a teacher at KIPP New Orleans, but before that, he was a KIPP student himself in Houston. In fact, he’s one of more than 100 KIPP alumni who now work for KIPP, helping the next generation of students climb the mountain all the way to graduation day.

what does it take to ensure more students from low-income communities graduate from college ? Essential to creating a great system of schools is having our eyes on the same goal: college graduation. At KIPP, teachers, leaders, students, and parents are all united around this goal. While we know that not every student will choose to attend a four-year college, the skills necessary to get into and succeed in college

are essential to creating greater opportunity and self-sufficiency. Far too many smart, hard-working students from low-income backgrounds are not being prepared for college, and those who are attending are not graduating at the rates of higher-income peers. While making it to college is an important step, our goal is to

equip our students with the skills needed to graduate from college. To meet this goal, our schools are focused on ensuring that all students are taking rigorous, college-preparatory courses. As a complement to the education students undertake in the classroom, in 1998 we created a program


called KIPP To College (KTC) in order to stay connected to students once they leave KIPP. In recent years, we changed the name to KIPP Through College to reflect our increased emphasis on college completion. Through KTC, our schools and regions deliver day-to-day, on-theground advising and support to KIPP students and their families, from middle school all the way through college graduation. A local KTC program may include: high school and college placement guidance, academic support (connecting students with tutoring, summer enrichment, and test preparation), individualized financial aid counseling, student and family counseling to address social and emotional needs, and career services. KTC counselors support students

as they navigate high school and prepare for college entry. They help students identify a college that is the best match for them, and they stay connected as students work hard on their journey through college. Two years ago, in an effort to demonstrate how our KIPP alumni were faring after they left our schools, we published The Promise of College Completion: KIPP’s Early Successes and Challenges. This report detailed the college completion rates from the first two KIPP middle schools (which have been open long enough for their early classes of students to have graduated from college) and offered a clearer picture of the challenges students from low-income communities face on the

path to a degree, as well as the factors that help them succeed. Beyond rigorous academic preparation and character education, students need help finding a college that best matches their needs, formal and informal supports to integrate socially and academically once on campus, and financial resources. Our latest results show that 83 percent of students who completed eighth grade at KIPP go on to college. KIPP alumni are graduating college at rates that exceed national averages and are approximately four times the rates of their lowincome peers. This year we can report that 40 percent of KIPP alumni (from the original two KIPP schools) who completed the 8th grade at a KIPP middle school 10 or

more years ago have earned a bachelor’s degree, and nearly an additional five percent have earned an associate’s degree. In the coming years, as the number of KIPP alumni in college increases, we anticipate that these numbers could fluctuate. We see this as a tremendous opportunity to learn and to move closer to our goal of closing the college completion gap between our students and their highestincome peers. As we continue to refine our strategies, we humbly seek the partnership of others who share our belief that all students, regardless of circumstance, deserve the opportunity to make it to and through college.

striving toward completion 100 93 72

90

83 45

63 40

33 10

% of students who graduate from high school kipp average

% of students who start college

low-income average

% of students who complete four-year college u.s. average

rising to the challenge

10


— jennefer, kipp alumna


collaborating with higher education i was nervous about being so far away from family, but i have had an amazing support network through my fellow kippsters and the franklin & marshall community. — brianna, kipp alumna

In the past two years we have created unique partnerships with more than 25 colleges and universities nationwide. Our College Partnerships Initiative aims to identify higher education institutions committed to serving KIPP alumni and students from similar backgrounds, and to strengthen the supports these campuses offer to ensure that first-generation students are persisting and earning degrees at the highest rates possible. In the years ahead, along with our college partners, we look forward to learning together more about what it takes for underserved students to persist through college and earn a college degree. One of our earliest college partners, Franklin & Marshall (F&M), is developing innovative strategies to support prospective applicants as well as to help new students acclimate and thrive once on campus. During the summer of 2012, thirty rising KIPP seniors from across the country attended the F&M College Prep program. For three weeks, KIPP students lived on campus in residence halls, took classes with F&M professors, and immersed themselves in college life. In the fall, eight KIPP alumni enrolled at F&M.

college preparation at every stage Building college awareness through class lessons, school culture, and vocabulary.

elementary

High school transition support and assistance applying to summer programs.

middle Awareness of SAT/ACTs, financial aid, majors, and the application process. College campus visits and guest speaker events.

College-prep education with AP and advanced curriculum.

high Financial literacy, SAT/ACT support, and support with college applications.

One-on-one support once in college: mentorship, academic supports, financial aid advising, and counseling.

college Thoughtful counseling to ensure the right college match for each student. Celebration of college acceptances as community milestones. Continued support of those who pursue other post-high school options.

Career awareness, internship application support, and resume building. Ensuring high expectations and college success through graduation day.

rising to the challenge

12


academics and character

beyond expectations

For first and second grade science teacher Ashley Soellner, developing curiosity is just as important as teaching the basics of life science. And as the after-school ballet club coordinator, she is critical to a well-rounded educational experience for the students of KIPP Baltimore.

i love when the light comes on and a child thinks, “i can do this.” — jennifer, kipp parent and staff member


what does it take to create classrooms and schools that offer rigorous academic preparation and character development ? Since KIPP’s beginning, the development of character has been as important as the teaching of rigorous academics. We believe both are critical to the success of our students. A rigorous education is one that prepares students for the demands of college. Quite simply, rigor means teaching with the end in mind. With a clear understanding of what our students must know and be able to do in college, we must plan backwards from high school all the way down to kindergarten in order to ensure that students are acquiring the knowledge and skills they will need at every grade level. To support students in acquiring the academic knowledge and skills to be college-ready, our teachers set ambitious, measurable, yearlong goals for student growth and achievement. They plan how they will achieve these goals by segmenting work into manageable and measurable units. Throughout the year, teachers regularly track and communicate student progress and use data to drive shortand long-term planning and to determine when re-teaching is necessary.

KIPP New Orleans teacher Jamie Irish sets a high bar for his eighth-grade math students. At the start of the year, Irish issues a call to action challenging his students to establish high goals for themselves individually and as a class. To track progress, Irish provides students with consistent, actionable feedback and remediation daily. With a clear goal from day one, Irish says, “Students start believing that they can change the trajectory of their lives in my class.” Just like Irish, KIPP Academy Lynn Collegiate teacher Shauna Mulligan is working to ensure rigorous instruction in her high school English classes. Mulligan believes that students studying the humanities should be able to use evidence to arrive at correct interpretations. According to Mulligan, “Really hard thinking and figuring things out is fun, and asking students to be exact makes them think really hard.” To drive rigor in English, Mulligan plans in advance how she expects students to answer questions and listens with an evaluative ear to confirm that students are reading and thinking carefully, accurately, and at a high level.

In 2011–12, 96 percent of KIPP classes outperformed their local districts on state tests in reading and 92 percent did so in math. In addition, on a nationally norm-referenced test, KIPP students, on average, are outperforming their peers on achieving one or more years of growth. Ultimately, academic rigor is rooted in the belief that all students will learn and achieve. We believe that when a student is struggling academically, it is our responsibility to reteach in order to give that student another opportunity at mastery. We work to understand the learning styles and academic strengths and areas of growth of individual students. We vary our teaching strategies to ensure that all students can access content. And we consistently communicate that through hard work, students can accomplish their goals.

In its longitudinal study of KIPP middle schools, Mathematica found that KIPP’s impact is “positive, statistically significant, and educationally substantial.” Further, KIPP’s impact is consistently positive across the four academic subjects examined—in each of the first four years after enrollment in a KIPP school and for all measurable student subgroups—including Special Education students and English Language Learners.

rising to the challenge

14


here at kipp, i am challenged. but i like it. — rosemary, kipp student


character and academic preparation are critical for success in college and in life. In addition to the teaching of rigorous academic skills, we are intentional about explicitly creating opportunities for students to develop their character. As our earliest classes of KIPP students graduated high school, we began to see that academic success alone did not always predict success in college. Strength of character also plays an important role. While the idea of fostering a student’s character development has been core to KIPP from the beginning, KIPP schools around the country are now focused on how to integrate a more structured and measurable approach to character development.

when i grow up, i want to be the kind of person who doesn’t back down. a person with integrity. a person who has a lot of hope. — atolani, kipp student describing her character goals

Rooted in the research of Dr. Martin Seligman (University of Pennsylvania) and Dr. Chris Peterson (University of Michigan), and building off the pioneering work of Dr. Angela Duckworth (University of Pennsylvania) and our schools in New York, KIPP is now especially focused on helping students cultivate seven strengths predictive of life success: zest, grit, selfcontrol, optimism, gratitude, social intelligence, and curiosity. We share more about our character work on our website and offer suggestions about how schools, classrooms, and lessons can be infused with opportunities to develop these character strengths. Writer and journalist Paul Tough describes KIPP’s approach to character in his book How Children Succeed and argues that character may have more to do with student success than simply IQ. Moreover, Tough writes that character can be developed and describes how this knowledge can help all students overcome obstacles and succeed in life. At KIPP, we are committed to helping our students incorporate the seven character strengths into their daily thoughts and actions both inside and outside the classroom.

rising to the challenge

16


visionary leaders

community roots

Crystal grew up in South Memphis. She is one of the first college graduates in her extended family of over 50. When she studied the civil rights movement in-depth in college, she was inspired to open a school for the children of her hometown. That dream school of hers will finally come true next summer—the first KIPP school on the south side of Memphis.


what does it take to empower leaders to have a lasting impact ? KIPP was built on the idea that great leaders create great schools, and that a great school can change the trajectory of a child’s life. We believe that schools are the units of change and principals are the leaders of that change. It is the empowered and wellprepared school leader who attracts talented teachers, fosters their growth and development, and creates a culture of excellence for all. In 2000, when Doris and Donald Fisher partnered with Mike and Dave to create the KIPP Foundation, they established the Fisher Fellowship to begin to train leaders to replicate the success of the original KIPP middle schools. Today, the Fisher Fellowship continues to prepare individuals for the school leader role with intensive training, coaching, and mentoring. In addition, Fisher Fellows participate in

residencies at KIPP schools and Our national leadership development programs other high-performing schools complement the formal during their fellowship year. coaching, mentoring, 360-degree feedback, and Beyond the Fisher Fellowship, we offer nationally coordinated ongoing guidance offered by our local schools and regions. leadership development KIPP regions regularly bring opportunities to emerging together individuals who share leaders in our schools. We know that to open new schools similar roles for skill-building workshops. In addition, our and sustain quality in our school leaders look to develop existing schools, we will need the emerging leaders in their a deep pipeline of leaders including new school founders, own schools by creating learning opportunities and successor school leaders, professional development assistant principals, deans, and grade level chairs. Through experiences for rising leaders who have an interest in school the KIPP School Leadership leadership. For example, a Programs (KSLP), we have teacher aspiring to school trained over 1,000 educators, many of whom will assume the leadership might be asked reins of an existing KIPP school to run Saturday school, coordinate parent group or found a new one in the years ahead. Further, each year meetings, or represent the school at a city function. In other high-performing charter doing so, rising leaders gain schools and school districts valuable exposure to the role from across the country send of a school leader. participants to KIPP to be trained by KSLP.

sharing our practices In 2012, we launched the KIPP Leadership Design Fellowship (KLDF) to introduce public school administrators from districts and charter schools to KIPP’s leadership development practices. With support from our Investing in Innovation (i3) grant from the U.S. Department of Education and matching grant partners, this eight-month cohort-based program has allowed KIPP to open its doors to leaders from 55 public school districts and charter school systems, as well as leadership training organizations, and offer them an in-depth look at KIPP’s principal recruitment, training, and development practices. Across multiple summits and in-school residencies, this program has fostered a collaborative learning experience for all participants.

rising to the challenge

18


building capacity

For Amber Young Medina, being a great mom and wife is as important as leading a great school. That means setting clear boundaries in her life so that she can be present with her students and staff, as well as with her own family. Building a strong leadership team is essential to the success of the school. She coaches her staff to be effective leaders themselves, keeping in mind their individual goals and skill sets. Empowering her staff is critical to KIPP Raíces Academy’s success as an enduring institution for generations of students to come.


increasing school leader success and sustainability Our data shows us that school leader longevity is correlated with several positive outcomes, including lower student attrition and greater student achievement gains. Since the job of leading a school is not easy, we have grappled with the question: “Is there a set of behaviors that characterize great school leaders and make the job of leading a transformative school sustainable over the long-haul?” In partnership with David Maxfield from Vital Smarts, a team of remarkable leaders from across KIPP conducted an extensive research project to identify four behaviors that are vital to increasing school leader success and sustainability. Known as the “KIPP Vital Behaviors for Success and Sustainability,” these four behaviors are:

1) teach and insist. Teach more people to do the work that needs to be done . . . and insist that they do it. Great school leaders build and empower a leadership team to make decisions and implement them, give real responsibilities to emerging leaders, hold people accountable for agreed-upon outcomes, and embrace mistakes as an opportunity to teach and build capacity.

2) prioritize and execute. Plan and execute (like a lesson). Effective school leaders clearly identify short- and long-term goals for all team members and the school as a whole. They clearly identify the most important priorities to realize long-term goals, and prioritize both strategic and tactical tasks.

3) engage your lifelines. Use a lifeline. Be a lifeline. Great school leaders reach out to peers that can honor, encourage, and push them, and in turn, do the same for others.

4) renew to get stronger. Build in time for physical recovery and mental and emotional renewal. The job of a school leader is hard and demanding. It is vital to create a school culture that integrates and celebrates deliberate and ongoing recovery and renewal for the entire school community.

rising to the challenge

20


excellent teachers

real learning

In Lakeda Ward’s third grade science and math class, students eagerly gather to perform an experiment. “I don’t want them just to work the problem,” she says. “I want them to understand how and why a problem is solved.”


what does it take to attract and retain great teachers in every classroom ? Recruiting and retaining highquality teachers is critical to the long-term success and sustainability of our schools. When we ask our alumni to reflect on their time at KIPP and share one thing that made the difference in their success, their response is overwhelmingly “my KIPP teachers.” We know, and have experienced what research confirms, that teachers are the single most important inschool factor contributing to student achievement. While teaching is extremely rewarding, it is also extremely challenging. Teachers working in underserved communities often face additional challenges. Catching up students who are one and sometimes two grade levels behind academically takes remarkable commitment and focus. Working longer days, being available to students after hours, and creating classrooms filled with the joy of learning requires dedication and persistence. We aim to recruit skilled teachers from diverse personal and professional backgrounds who have a passion and commitment to our mission. Whether they want to grow into a leadership

role within their school or master their profession as a teacher, we find a place for great talent at KIPP and strive to keep people with us year after year. In the 2011–12 school year, 74 percent of our teachers from the previous year stayed with KIPP, and we are committed to seeing that number increase. To keep teachers with us, we invest in their growth, recognizing that teaching is a craft and that teachers deserve regular opportunities to hone and refine their skills. We strive to foster an environment that encourages collaboration among colleagues and regularly celebrates success. In addition, teachers at KIPP have the freedom and autonomy to innovate creatively in the classroom and make decisions about what is best for their students. Within their school building, teachers at KIPP have the opportunity to participate in regular, on-site professional development that enables them to connect with colleagues, share resources, deepen their knowledge, and solve for shared problems. Beyond coordinated professional development,

one of the most powerful supports teachers at KIPP receive is ongoing instructional coaching and mentoring. In Austin, TX, for example, instructional coach Melissa Scheinfeld works side by side with her school leader to help guide each teacher in designing and delivering highquality curricula that will help prepare students for success in college. In cities where KIPP has multiple schools, teachers often have opportunities to collaborate with and learn from other local KIPP teachers who teach the same grade level or subject. Many teachers form cross-school working groups and develop processes to share resources and practices that maximize learning. In addition, many KIPP teachers collaborate across cities. Steve Frederick, a teacher in Denver, CO, is partnering with Susan Oba in San Jose, CA. Together, the two are redesigning Steve’s sixth-grade math curriculum and plan to share all that they develop so that other KIPP teachers may build on their lessons and strategies.

2,800+ kipp teachers nationwide

74%

of teachers returned last year

68%

returned to their position

6%

moved into a non-teaching position at kipp or now teach at another kipp school

rising to the challenge

22


professional development and online tools fuel sharing and innovation We believe that great instruction results from innovation and collaboration. When something works, we celebrate it and share it broadly. To enable our teachers and leaders to benefit from the collective knowledge and learning occurring across KIPP, the KIPP Foundation invests in creating frameworks and tools that provide a common language and facilitate the exchange of effective practice. Two years ago, we saw a need to create a network-wide, shared language for describing what great teaching looks like at KIPP. We created the KIPP Framework for Excellent Teaching (KFET), and today leaders are beginning to use this framework to develop tools to coach and support teachers as they grow in their practice. KIPP teachers also have access to KIPP Share, a national online platform that enables teachers—some of whom are separated by thousands of miles—to connect with each other and share ideas, curriculum, and resources. To date, nearly half a million resources and tools have been shared on KIPP Share. Teachers have the opportunity to attend nationally coordinated, subject-specific retreats and professional development gatherings throughout the year, the largest of which is the annual KIPP School Summit (KSS). In 2012, more than 3,000 KIPP teachers, leaders, and support staff participated in KSS. During this week of professional development, our Team and Family have the opportunity to learn, share, connect, and renew in preparation for the coming academic year. At KSS, our focus is on one thing: getting even better at delivering on the promises we make to our students so that each and every KIPP student is prepared to climb the mountain to and through college.  

kss is a once-in-alifetime, amazing, energizing experience. — kipp school summit attendee survey response


sharing best practices

Brett Noble teaches 11th grade English in Gaston, NC, and he has uploaded his entire curriculum to KIPP Share. With all of his resources at their disposal, his colleagues across the country don’t have to start from scratch.

rising to the challenge

24


striking the balance striking the balance

focus

Sha Reagans co-leads the KIPP high school in Newark. As the principal, no one knows the needs of his students better than he does. But real estate and technology contracts? Those things he leaves up to his regional office. That way, he has the time to focus on what matters most, and what he knows best: the students in his school.

what does it take to empower leaders and leverage scale ? As our network has grown, we have continued to confront and revisit the question of which decisions are best made closest to students and whether there are cases in which our students are best served by centralizing or standardizing certain practices. As we think about empowering leaders and leveraging scale, we do not view this as an either-or choice between two alternatives. Rather, we believe that a large degree of school leader autonomy can be preserved

in a system of schools that makes selective investments in standardization, which enables the system to operate effectively and efficiently. In KIPP’s earliest years, we focused on recruiting and training outstanding educators who could replicate the success of the original two KIPP middle schools. After several years of supporting the creation of stand-alone schools in community after community, we came to believe that, although the school is the critical unit of


change, schools could derive many benefits from operating in geographic clusters: KIPP regions. Schools clustered in KIPP regions can share instructional practices and materials, thereby accelerating innovation in the classroom. In a KIPP region, the KIPP school leader can focus on students, teachers, and families while a central office provides services across multiple schools, such as human resources, recruiting, facilities management, technology, food service, procurement, and transportation, as well as alumni services. Since 2006, we have approached growth into new communities with an eye toward building not just one transformational school but an entire KIPP region—a local system of schools—and we are supporting the founding teams of our flagship school in each community to expand and become a KIPP region. Today, 95 percent of KIPP schools are part of a KIPP region. They are supported by a central office, governed by a common local board, and led by a local executive director.

our ability to leverage our national scale and accelerate innovation. For example, we have established networkwide shared understandings and definitions for describing the characteristics of great leadership (KIPP Leadership Competency Model), a framework outlining what great teachers do (KIPP Framework for Excellent Teaching), and a framework defining what makes a healthy KIPP school (Healthy Schools & Regions). These frameworks provide the foundation on which our leaders create tools and practices that they then share in order to learn from one another and drive results in their schools.

At KIPP, we believe decisions are most effectively made closest to the student. Yet, with schools in 20 states and the District of Columbia, we believe that national investments in common languages and common frameworks are central to

rising to the challenge

26


continuous learning

what does it take to build a data-driven culture and an organization committed to continuous learning ? transparency about attendance, behavior, and academic progress with our students and families ensures that we’re all on the same page. — joanna belcher, kipp school leader

We believe that data helps us understand our true impact, what is working, and what needs to be improved. We know that when our school and regional leaders and teachers are empowered to make decisions and have access to quality data, innovation can flourish. Further, they are better able to refine instruction and drive strategic planning, identify opportunities for learning, and share effective practices. And we believe that school health is measured by a much broader range of indicators than standardized test scores alone.

To bring to life our belief—that as educators we must all move beyond the singular focus on test scores and provide our schools and regions with a holistic view of their performance—we created the Healthy Schools & Regions (HSR) framework. Through HSR, we look at a set of academic and nonacademic indicators of school success including college attainment, student achievement, student attrition, teacher retention, and the number of teachers and other staff preparing to assume school leadership roles. We also survey students, parents, school leaders, teachers and staff to understand how a school’s culture, leadership, and instructional strategies are impacting results. We are committed to examining school health and the health of our network by exploring Six Essential Questions. Please see page 35 for an overview of our health in 2011–12.


healthy schools & regions

six essential questions question 1

are we serving the children who need us ? question 2

are our students staying with us ? question 3

are our students progressing and achieving academically ? question 4

are our alumni climbing the mountain to and through college ?

question 5

are we building a sustainable people model ?

question 6

are we building a sustainable financial model ?

rising to the challenge

28


empowered by data

Teachers at KIPP Empower Academy utilize innovative instructional technology in the classroom to enhance and personalize student learning. Throughout the day, teachers are able to work with small groups of students to offer differentiated, individualized instruction while other students engage in self-paced, online learning on classroom laptops. Moreover, teachers have access to richer, more real-time data allowing them to monitor student progress, target interventions, and plan more effectively.


constantly improving Our Healthy Schools & Regions work informs our decision-making and prioritization, helps us improve our understanding of promising practices throughout the KIPP network, and helps our teachers and leaders drive student outcomes. Through our HSR assessment data, teachers have access to high-quality data on student achievement and growth, and can differentiate instruction. School leaders can use data to prioritize emerging school needs and improve their own instructional leadership. KIPP regional leaders can gain a more holistic view of the health of their region and put in place strategies to address areas of growth. Nationally, HSR enables us to identify top performers so that we may learn from and disseminate effective practices.

Equally as important as measuring what matters is having a mind-set of continuous learning, an unrelenting drive to constantly improve, and mechanisms in place to share what is working. At KIPP, we aim to foster an organizational culture that believes: “When there are problems, we find solutions. When there is a better way, we find it. When a teammate needs help, we give. When we need help, we ask.” Common frameworks play a critical role in allowing us to leverage our scale in support of continuous learning, enabling KIPP teachers and leaders across the country to compare results and share effective practices. When great practitioners start with something that is already working and make it even better, innovation is accelerated. To that end, we are working toward providing

greater access to startingpoint resources for our teachers and leaders. Beyond creating tools for teachers to share curricula and resources online, we also launched a similar online collaboration tool for our noninstructional staff. And we have created national “communities of practice” for staff members who teach the same subject or share the same job functions. Guided by a master teacher or leader, members of communities of practice gain new insights into common challenges and share knowledge and materials through professional development retreats and school visits. Through measuring what matters and having a mind-set of continuous learning, we are committed to getting better, each year and each decade, so that we can best support our students in developing the character and academic skills for success in college, career, and life.

i would never tell my students that they’re perfect, and i feel the same way about me. we all have room for growth. i talk about that constantly in my classroom. — adrianne capaldi, kipp teacher

rising to the challenge

30


on the horizon striking the balance

what will it take to improve public education for all students ?


Over the past two decades, we have had the great honor of watching thousands of KIPP students grow and achieve at the highest levels, challenging beliefs about what is possible in public education. Along the way, so many others who share our commitment and work tirelessly on behalf of underserved students have joined this movement. Together, we are all rising to the challenge of eliminating educational inequity. Twenty years ago, there were few visible examples of classrooms in low-income communities that were changing the life trajectories of children. Today, there are entire schools that are putting students on track for success in college and the competitive world. And there is growing acknowledgement that it is possible to build and replicate schools that attain transformational results. The challenge now is to scale this success—to create dozens of systems of schools that are providing life-changing educational opportunities for America’s underserved students. At KIPP, we are committed to broadening our impact and sharing all that we have learned about designing and operating a network of high-performing schools. We aim to more intentionally disseminate our KIPP-developed frameworks and tools,

strive to create a dialogue around key issues like college completion and student mobility, and join with others to collectively advocate for the needs of underserved students. Even as we are optimistic today about progress made, much work remains. Our journey is far from complete and as we look to the future, many challenges loom large, and opportunities await. As a nation, we must continue to figure out how to close achievement gaps and prepare all students for success in college and the increasingly competitive world. And we must all collectively address emerging challenges and opportunities on the horizon.

For example, how will we, as a greater education community, leverage the higher learning standards of the Common Core to push all students toward college readiness? How will we continue to build the talent pool that the education sector needs? How will we ensure that talented and hard-working students who are undocumented have access to postsecondary opportunities? And how will we create pathways to success and self-sufficiency for students who are not college-bound?

As a network, these are just a few of the questions we are considering as we envision the work that lies ahead. We share these challenges and opportunities, humbly acknowledging that we do not have all of the answers. We invite students, parents, teachers, principals, higher education leaders, policymakers, philanthropists, and others to join with us as we collectively figure out how to rise to these challenges and improve education for all.

rising to the challenge

32


about the report card The annual KIPP Report Card is a direct reflection of our commitment to performance transparency and accountability for student results and achievement in our schools. We are determined to find out what’s working and not working for our students and families. The numbers tell a rich story. By analyzing our data, we can help sustain practices that make our schools thrive, while also understanding our challenges so that we can meet them head-on. The 2012 KIPP Report Card provides data that tracks the growth and performance of the KIPP network; this data was collected from each locally-run KIPP site open during the 2011–12 school year.

city profiles and aggregate results The printed version of the Report Card features the aggregated achievement and demographic data for each of our KIPP geographic sites. These profiles are ordered alphabetically by city within two sections: sites with multiple schools and sites with one school (some are considered KIPP regions and others are stand-alone schools). The information displayed in each profile includes the number of students served, grades served, student attrition, teacher retention, and achievement data. Profiles of KIPP sites with multiple schools also include a listing of all schools in that city. We collect achievement data from two sets of student tests: state criterion-referenced exams required of all public schools and nationally norm-referenced achievement exams administered to all KIPP students in grades two through eight (and in some cases, kindergarten and grade one). For state criterion-referenced exams, we hold ourselves accountable for raising student achievement beyond the proficient level; as such, we report the percentage of students who are not just proficient, but advanced. KIPP schools administer norm-referenced exams in order to have a common measurement of student achievement and growth across all states and to identify strengths and areas for improvement across KIPP schools.

school profiles and results Achievement and demographic results from all 109 KIPP schools open in the 2011–12 school year can be found at www.kipp.org /reportcard. The information on each of these profile pages includes student enrollment and demographics, student attrition data, number of teachers, per-pupil revenues, and achievement data. Note: Demographic data is accurate as of November 2012 (2012–13 school year) while achievement data, student attrition, and teacher retention reflect the 2011–12 school year. Values on all graphs are rounded to the nearest whole number. Percentages for student demographics and norm-referenced tests may not add up to 100 due to rounding. Values less than 11% may not be labeled due to space constraints.


helena & blytheville, ar kipp delta public schools ¡ est. 2002

78 number of

1,169

students enrolled

PreK-12 70% grades

teachers (fte)

teachers retained within kipp

served

41 5 oh io st re et, he le na , ar 72 34 2 • 87 0.75 3. 90

scott shirey

(57% retained in their position)

k ip p h ig h sc h o o l a p and act r es u lt s

executive director

21

av er ag e

86%

6%

16%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

94%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

1% Latino 0% Other 4% Caucasian 1% Asian

African American

sc ho ol 92% grhi gh ad ua ti on

literacy

% of Students

% proficient + Advanced

75%

82

75

mathematics

85

66

85 69

66

81

80

78

75

67

90

80 68

64

90

87 67

65

47

50%

76 44

34

77

75

66

60 62

61

44

40

ki pp de lt a li te ra cy ac

25% 0%

3rd

5th

6th

7th

8th

kipp advanced kipp proficient

3rd

11th

5th

district advanced district proficient

6th

7th

8th

End-of-Course E OC

ad em y

amanda joh nson grades: pr ek-4 est. 2009

state advanced state proficient

2011-12 measures of academic progress (map)

% of Students by Quartile

reading

39

33

32 17

32

fall k

spring k

41%

to ok at le as t on e ap

(those wh

o have comp

co ll eg e m at ri cu la

leted 8th

sc or ed 3 or ab ov e on at le as t on e ap

grade at kip

p 5+ years

ago)

ti on

ki pp bl he vi ll e co ll eg eytpr ep ar at or y maisie wrigh t grades: 47 est. 2010

ki pp de lt a co ll pr ep ar at or y eg e marcus ne lson grades: 5-8 est. 2002

ki pp de a co hi gh sclt ho ol ll eg ia te todd dixon grades: 912 est. 2006

mathematics 35

23

18

23

80%

s)

68%

79

68 51

t r a te s

ta .o rg

(for gradua ting senior

sc h o o ls

2012 AR Mathematics E xam

93

100%

to ok th e ac t

a lu m n i a tt a in m en

arkansas benchmark exam 100%

ac t

35 • w w w .k ip pd el

19

19

39

32

14

14

14

32

31

27

29

26

30

32

28

29

29

29

28

35

34

28

32

24 21

41

38

27

27

44

spring k

30

15 38

39

15

25

16

spring 3rd

12 39 38 spring spring spring 3rd 2nd 1st

top quartile

fall 5th

14 spring spring spring 6th spring 8th 5th 7th

third quartile

fall k

spring 1st

second quartile

spring 2nd

25

20

28

27

43

fall 5th

27

spring 5th

23

25

26

31

29

36

25

18

25

19

27

16

26 35

21

spring spring spring 8th 6th 7th

bottom quartile

54

We report demographic information about our students (race/ ethnicity, eligibility for free/reduced price meals, and those defined as having special needs) for each city. We report annual student attrition data for each city. At the city level, we aggregate the state and district comparison data for criterion-referenced tests. We also show results for normreferenced tests for grades two through eight. For high school seniors, we report both SAT/ACT and AP exam participation rates and scores as a measure of college readiness. At the city level, we report high school graduation and college matriculation rates for those sites that have college-age alumni. We report teacher retention data at the city level when there are two or more schools reporting. At the individual school level, we report per-pupil funding and facilities information, providing context for assessing financial health and sustainability. Please find this information online at www.kipp.org /reportcard.

rising to the challenge

34


national results question 1

are we serving the children who need us ?

41,000+ kipp students across the country race & ethnicity

86%

9%

are eligible for free or reduced price meals

receive special education services

15%

are designated as english language learners

Note: Some schools serve a much higher proportion of ELL students than others given the communities they serve.

question 2

are our students staying with us ?

88% of kipp students returned in 2012

(or completed the highest grade at their school)


question

3

are our students progressing and achieving academically ? Every state administers criterion-referenced tests in the spring in order to assess student academic achievement. Each state has a unique test. The results of these exams allow us to compare the performance of KIPP classes to that of their local districts and states, but do not allow us to compare to classes in different states.

by the end of 8th grade, 96% of kipp classes outperform their local districts in reading; 92% do so in math. reading 78

96

91

80

78

73

60

56

52 43

38 16

3rd grade

4th grade

5th grade

6th grade

mathematics 60

56

96

88

80 67

62

7th grade

8th grade

92 77

69

58 33

3rd grade

4th grade

5th grade

% of classes outperforming their:

6th grade

7th grade

local districts

8th grade

states

high school results advanced placement (ap) tests for graduating seniors from kipp high schools

100 100

100 79 72

68

ce

s

sc

ien

at ic em ma th

en

gl

ish

66

% of classes outperforming their:

71%

local districts

took one or more ap tests.

a score of 48% received 3 or higher on at

s st o c i a ud l i es

71

least one ap test.

states

36


question

3, CONTINUED

are our students progressing and achieving academically ? by the end of 8th grade, 55% of kipp students outperform their national peers in reading; 60% do so in math.

reading performance by quartile on norm-referenced tests 55%

fall/spring fall/spring kindergarten 1st grade

top quartile

fall/spring fall/spring 2nd grade 3rd grade

fall/spring 4th grade

3rd quartile

fall/spring fall/spring 5th grade 6th grade

2nd quartile

fall/spring fall/spring 7th grade 8th grade

bottom quartile

math performance by quartile on norm-referenced tests 60%

fall/spring fall/spring kindergarten 1st grade

top quartile

fall/spring fall/spring 2nd grade 3rd grade

fall/spring 4th grade

3rd quartile

fall/spring fall/spring 5th grade 6th grade

2nd quartile

fall/spring fall/spring 7th grade 8th grade

bottom quartile

In order to see movement from fall to spring, only students that tested in fall and spring are included. Not all KIPP schools test in grades K and 1. The number of schools represented for each grade are as follows: K (16); 1 (13); 2 (12); 3 (7); 4 (4); 5 (55); 6 (51); 7 (45); 8 (41). Please note that while 4th grade represents the final grade of elementary school in most KIPP schools, in 1 of the 4 schools reporting 4th grade data, 4th grade is the cohort of new-to-KIPP students at a middle school that serves grades 4-8. KIPP elementary results are separated from middle school results because the majority of KIPP middle school students did not attend a KIPP elementary school.


on average, kipp students are outperforming the national average of students achieving 1+ years of growth. percent of students meeting growth targets on norm-referenced tests

reading

mathematics

K

61

K

67

1

58

1

66

2

48

2

53

3

57

3

72

4

56

4

68

5

64

5

70

62

6

72

61

7

70

56

8

68

6 7 8

meeting or exceeding growth targets

not meeting growth targets

In order to ensure that our students are on track to being college- and career-ready, we look closely at achievement results beginning in kindergarten. KIPP schools use a variety of data sources and tools to understand student achievement and track student growth. These include classroom observations and tests, evaluations of students’ skills against state standards, and a nationally norm-referenced test called Measures of Academic Progress (MAP).

national average

in 2008, the majority of 5th graders entered kipp below grade level. as 8th graders in 2012, the majority of them exited above grade level. mathematics

top quartile 3rd quartile 2nd quartile bottom quartile

fall 5th grade

spring 8th grade

Norm-referenced tests (NRTs) compare a student’s score against the scores of a national group of students. We require all KIPP schools serving grades 2–8 to administer an NRT; most also administer the test in grades K and 1. Unlike state tests, these exams allow us to compare the performance of KIPPsters to their grade-level peers across state lines. We can also track student performance across time. At KIPP, students test on MAP in the fall and the spring. Each year after fall testing, MAP assigns all students a target growth goal that they are to meet or exceed by the spring.

percent of students on or above grade level

reading

note: nationally normreferenced tests and measures of academic progress (map)

About norms for MAP: The 2011 Report Card reflected NWEA’s 2008 norms, while this year’s Report Card reflects 2011 norms. Changes between the 2011 Report Card and the 2012 Report Card may be due to changes in norms rather than to changes in performance.

spring 8th grade fall 5th grade

2011–12 marks the 4th consecutive year that KIPP has administered MAP, allowing us to look at a cohort progression from 5th to 8th grade. The results above represent the same cohort of students from 16 pilot schools that tested in fall 5th grade in 2008 and spring 8th grade in 2012.

38


question

4

are our alumni climbing the mountain to and through college? kipp students graduate from college at four times the rate of the average student from a low-income community. 100

kipp average 93 72

90

low-income average

83 45

u.s. average

63 40

33

10

% of students who graduate from high school

% of students who start college

% of students who complete four-year college

KIPP tracks its rates of high school graduation, college matriculation, and college completion based on those students (alumni) who complete eighth grade at a KIPP middle school.

question 5

are we building a sustainable people model? 74% of kipp teachers returned last year.

68% returned to their position 6% moved into a non-teaching

position at kipp or now teach at another kipp school

question 6

are we building a sustainable financial model? We believe it is important that KIPP schools and regions monitor their financial health and assess their financial sustainability and we are currently revisiting the measures and approaches to do so.


local results

40


atlanta, ga

kipp metro atlanta · est. 2003

110

1,609 students

number of teachers (fte)

enrolled

77%

K, 5–10 grades served

david jernigan

(78% retained in their position)

executive director

5%

17%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

82% teachers retained within kipp

97%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

2% Latino 1% Other 0% Caucasian 0% Asian

African American

2012 criterion referenced competency test english language arts

% of Students

% of Students

100% 75%

mathematics

2012 G A R eading/E nglis h Language Arts E xam 99 98 94 96 98 95 96 92 94 91 90 86 88 84 70

78 75

84

2012 G A Mathematics E xam 99 91 90 88 85 80 77 70 68

74

65 46

50% 25% 0%

5th

6th

7th

8th

kipp exceeds standard kipp meets standard

End–of–Course E OC

district exceeds standard district meets standard

map was not administered in the 2011–12 academic year by kipp metro atlanta.

5th

6th

7th

state exceeds standard state meets standard

8th

End–of–Course E OC


98 anderson avenue, nw, atlanta, ga 30314 • 404.924.6310 • www.kippmetroatlanta.org

kipp high school ap and act results

N/A

average act

N/A

N/A

took the act

alumni attainment rates high school 96% graduation

(for graduating seniors)

took at least one ap

N/A

scored 3 or above on at least one ap

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

86% college matriculation

schools kipp strive primary mini’imah shaheed grades: k est. 2012

kipp ways academy dwight ho–sang grades: 5–8 est. 2003

kipp south fulton academy jondré pryor grades: 5–8 est. 2003

kipp atlanta collegiate dave howland grades: 9–10 est. 2011

kipp strive academy ed chang grades: 5–8 est. 2009

kipp vision academy steven jones grades: 5–7 est. 2010


austin, tx

kipp austin public schools · est. 2002

K–2, 5–12 65% grades teachers retained within kipp

124 2,080 number of students

teachers (fte)

enrolled

served

86%

executive director

7%

9%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

steven epstein

(60% retained in their position)

91%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

7% African American 0% Other 1% Caucasian 0% Asian

Latino

2012 state of texas assessments of academic readiness reading

% of Students

% of Students

100% 75%

mathematics

2012 T X R eading/E nglish Language Arts E xam 95 84 78 77 77 76 80 73 70 74 72 76 69 68 67

2012 T X Mathematics E xam 97 93 93 79 81 78

77 77

69 71

69

7th

8th

88 87

50% 25% 0%

5th

6th

7th

8th

kipp level iii: advanced kipp level ii: satisfactory

End–of–Course E OC

5th

district level iii: advanced district level ii: satisfactory

6th

state level iii: advanced state level ii: satisfactory

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map) reading % of Students by Quartile

76

95

mathematics 11 17

17 19

25

31

30

31

34

34

36

25

fall 5th

41

29

33

27

30

34

40

30

27

24

26

22

18

29

spring spring 7th spring 6th 5th

top quartile

28

third quartile

fall 5th

second quartile

kipp austin administered map to students in grades 5-7, and administered sat-10 to students in grade 8.

spring 18 spring 7th spring 6th 5th

bottom quartile

End–of–Course E OC


8509 fm 969, austin, tx 78724 • 512.501.3643 • www.kippaustin.org

kipp high school ap and sat results

1373

average sat

98%

high school 95% graduation

44%

took the sat

alumni attainment rates

(for graduating seniors)

took at least one ap

35%

scored 3 or above on at least one ap

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

85% college matriculation

schools kipp austin comunidad kipp austin connections elementary justin scott grades: k–2 est. 2010

kipp austin college prep freddy gonzalez grades: 5–8 est. 2002

bethany blevins grades: k–1 est. 2011

kipp austin vista middle school laura farber grades: 5 est. 2012

kipp austin academy of arts & letters kevin newman grades: 5–8 est. 2009

kipp austin beacon prep katie hayes grades: 5 est. 2012

kipp austin collegiate carrie donovan grades: 9–12 est. 2008

44


baltimore, md

kipp baltimore · est. 2002

74 1,025 number of students

K–3, 5–8 86% grades teachers retained within kipp

teachers (fte)

enrolled

served

80%

executive director

11%

5%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

jason botel

(73% retained in their position)

100%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

0% 0% 0% 0%

African American

2012 maryland school assessment mathematics

reading 2012 MD R eading/E nglish Language Arts E xam 93 90 85 81 81 81 80 76 78 65 62 59

%% of Students of Students

100% 75%

77

71

2012 MD Mathematics E xam 94 90 86 83 80 76

69

65

49

50%

40

25% 0%

5th

6th

7th

8th

kipp advanced kipp proficient

5th

district advanced district proficient

6th

7th

8th

state advanced state proficient

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map)

% of Students by Quartile

reading 33

34

32

28

26

31

20

18

mathematics 38 17

29

20

30

20

18 26

19

fall k spring spring 1st k

23

25

25

28

40

32

35

42

36 31

spring 2nd

fall 5th

top quartile

33

31

20

31

30

33

29

26

30

24

26

spring 8th

spring spring spring 7th 5th 6th

third quartile

15

25

13 21 spring k spring fall k 1st

14 15 35

16 24

36

18

17

34

36

34

42

41

spring 7th

22

15 36

56

spring 2nd spring fall spring 5th 6th 5th

second quartile

bottom quartile

63

19 15

spring 8th

Latino Other Caucasian Asian


4701 greenspring avenue, baltimore, md 21209 • 410.367.0807 • www.kippbaltimore.org

kipp high school ap and act results

N/A

average act

N/A

high school 90% graduation

N/A

took the act

alumni attainment rates

took at least one ap

natalia walter grades: k–3 est. 2009

N/A

scored 3 or above on at least one ap

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

college 74% matriculation

schools kipp harmony academy

(for graduating seniors)

kipp ujima village academy mike lucas grades: 5–8 est. 2002


chicago, il

kipp chicago · est. 2003

K–2, 5–8 75% grades teachers retained within kipp

45 number of

745 students

teachers (fte)

enrolled

95%

served

executive director

10%

11%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

april goble

(67% retained in their position)

97%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

3% Latino 0% Other 0% Caucasian 0% Asian

African American

2012 illinois standards achievement test reading

2012 IL Mathematics E xam

2012 IL R eading/E nglish Language Arts E xam 97 84 86 82 78 78 78 73 68 71 65 60

100% % Met/Exceeded Standard % ofofStudents % Students

mathematics

75%

84

77 76

78

85

78 79

85

65

50% 25% 0%

5th

6th

7th

5th

8th

kipp exceeds standard kipp meets standard

district exceeds standard district meets standard

6th

7th

state exceeds standard state meets standard

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map) reading

mathematics 25

% of Students by Quartile

83 81 85

27 27 21

16 27

40

26

fall k

14

22 25

13 19

24

30

44

41

34

23 29

18

spring k

spring 1st

31

fall 5th

23

27

spring spring 6th 5th

top quartile

34

21

14

31

32

33

28

26

11 45

24

16

28

14 spring 8th

spring 7th

third quartile

27

21 25 spring k spring fall k 1st

19

12

20

21

20

28

24

32

28

28

23

59

43

51

50

29

29

second quartile

fall 5th

spring 8th

spring 5th spring spring 6th 7th

bottom quartile

8th


1945 south halsted street, chicago, il 60608 • 312.733.8108 • www.kippchicago.org

kipp high school ap and act results

N/A

average act

N/A

school 96% high graduation

N/A

took the act

alumni attainment rates

(for graduating seniors)

took at least one ap

N/A

scored 3 or above on at least one ap

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

92% college matriculation

schools kipp ascend primary school ellen bhattacharyya grades: k–2 est. 2010

kipp ascend middle school lauren henley grades: 5–8 est. 2003

kipp create middle school kate mazurek grades: 5 est. 2012


denver, co

kipp colorado schools ¡ est. 2002

67 number of

895 students

5–12 52% grades teachers retained within kipp

teachers (fte)

enrolled

served

95%

executive director

9%

17%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

rebecca holmes

(43% retained in their position)

86%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

7% African American 2% Other 3% Caucasian 1% Asian

Latino

2012 colorado student assessment program reading

mathematics 2012 C O Mathematics E xam

2012 C O R eading/E nglish Language Arts E xam

% Proficient + Advanced % of Students % of Students

100%

50%

74

70

75%

52 35

44

59

55

69

67

50

49 48

57

68 51

62

70 54

64 50 50

54 51

63

62

57

53 40

51 38

38 21 25

25% 0%

5th

6th

7th

8th

kipp advanced kipp proficient

9th

10th

5th

district advanced district proficient

6th

7th

8th

9th

state advanced state proficient

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map) reading

mathematics

% of Students by Quartile

32

15

20

28

25

33

35

38

28

59

fall 5th

spring spring 6th 5th

top quartile

16

23

37

31

33

36

21 21

32

14

spring spring 8th 7th

third quartile

38

16

67

second quartile

fall 5th

38

spring 5th

30

42

27

20

27

spring 7th

spring 6th

bottom quartile

23 26 14

spring 8th

21 22

33

10th


375 south tejon street, denver, co 80223 • 303.934.3245 • www.kippcolorado.org

kipp high school ap and act results

N/A

average act

N/A

high school 75% graduation

N/A

took the act

alumni attainment rates

(for graduating seniors)

took at least one ap

N/A

scored 3 or above on at least one ap

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

61% college matriculation

schools kipp montbello college prep nick bucy grades: 5–6 est. 2011

kipp sunshine peak academy emily yates grades: 5–8 est. 2002

kipp denver collegiate high school kurt pusch grades: 9–12 est. 2009


gaston, nc

kipp gaston college prep public schools · est. 2001

K, 5–12 grades

53 number of

806 students

teachers (fte)

enrolled

70% teachers retained within kipp

served

73%

executive director

6%

15%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

tammi sutton

(61% retained in their position)

75%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

2% Latino 3% Other 19% Caucasian 1% Asian

African American

2012 north carolina end–of–grade test reading

Students % %ofofStudents

100% 75% 50%

mathematics

2012 NC R eading/E nglis h Language Arts E xam 96 91 89 87 83 75 74 72 71 71 68 66 53 45 45

83

82 64

2012 NC Mathematics E xam 96 95 95 85 81 80 79 70 67

86

81 79

25% 0%

5th

6th

7th

8th

End–of–Course E OC

kipp level iii & iv

5th

district level iii & iv

6th

7th

8th

End–of–Course E OC

state level iii & iv

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map)

% of Students by Quartile

reading

mathematics 25

25

27 28

34

31

34

26

26

28

15

fall 5th

32

18 27

26

11 27 spring spring 7th 6th spring 8th 18

top quartile

20

22

41

38

25

17

17

third quartile

26

fall 5th

second quartile

22 14 spring spring 8th 6th

bottom quartile

map results were not available for spring 2012 5th grade in reading and mathematics, and spring 2012 7th grade in mathematics. due to north carolina department of education suppression laws, we were unable to collect disaggregated proficiency band data for end of course/end of grade scores for 2011-12.


320 pleasant hill road, gaston, nc • 252.308.6932 • www.kippgaston.org

kipp high school ap and sat results

1401

average sat

100%

high school 91% graduation

65%

took the sat

alumni attainment rates

(for graduating seniors)

took at least one ap

27%

scored 3 or above on at least one ap

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

86% college matriculation

schools kipp gaston college preparatory primary emily cook dwight grades: k est. 2012

kipp gaston college preparatory michele stallings grades: 5–8 est. 2001

kipp pride high school kevika amar grades: 9–12 est. 2005


helena & blytheville, ar kipp delta public schools · est. 2002

78 number of

1,169

students enrolled

PreK–12 70% grades teachers retained within kipp

teachers (fte)

served

86%

executive director

6%

16%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

scott shirey

(57% retained in their position)

94%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

1% Latino 0% Other 4% Caucasian 1% Asian

African American

2012 arkansas benchmark exam literacy

mathematics 2012 AR R eading/E nglis h Language Arts E xam

% of % ofStudents Students

100% 75%

82

75

85

66

2012 AR Mathematics E xam

93

85 66

81

80

78

75

69

67

90

80 68

64

90

87 67

65

47

50%

76

34

77

75

66

60 62

44

44

5th 5th

6th 6th

61

79

68 51

40

25% 0%

3rd

5th

6th

7th

8th

kipp advanced kipp proficient

3rd 3rd

11th

7th 7th

8th

state advanced state proficient

district advanced district proficient

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map)

% of Students by Quartile

reading

mathematics

23

39

33

32

19

19

39

32

fall k

spring k

14

14

14 30

32

31

27

29

26

32

28

29

29

29

28

35

34

28

32

spring 3rd

fall 5th

41

24 21

38

27

27

44

spring k

30

21

38

39

spring spring 2nd 1st

top quartile

14 spring spring spring 6th spring 8th 5th 7th

third quartile

fall k

35 15

39

15

25

16

spring 3rd

spring 1st

second quartile

spring 2nd

25

20

28

27

43

fall 5th

27

spring 5th

23

25

26

31

29

36

25

18

25

19

27

16

26

38

12

17 32

35

23

18

spring spring spring 8th 6th 7th

bottom quartile

End–of–Course E OC


415 ohio street, helena, ar 72342 • 870.753.9035 • www.kippdelta.org

kipp high school ap and act results

21

average act

100%

68%

took the act

took at least one ap

alumni attainment rates high school 92% graduation

(for graduating seniors)

41%

scored 3 or above on at least one ap

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

80% college matriculation

schools kipp delta elementary literacy academy amanda johnson grades: prek–4 est. 2009

kipp blytheville college preparatory maisie wright grades: 4–7 est. 2010

kipp delta college preparatory marcus nelson grades: 5–8 est. 2002

kipp delta collegiate high school todd dixon grades: 9–12 est. 2006


houston, tx

kipp houston public schools · est. 1995

PreK3–12 70% grades teachers retained within kipp

507 9,583 number of students

teachers (fte)

enrolled

served

86%

executive director

4%

12%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

sehba ali

(65% retained in their position)

60%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

35% African American 1% Other 3% Caucasian 1% Asian

Latino

2012 state of texas assessments of academic readiness reading/english language arts

mathematics 2012 T X Mathematics E xam

2012 T X R eading/E nglish Language Arts E xam 100%

% of% Students of Students

78 75%

71

87

77

71

78 65

70

77

76 63

89

82

74

67

76

75

80

82

78

67 63 68

68

66 68

65

71

78

76

67

77

75

69

76

74

82

25% 0%

3rd

4th

5th

6th

8th End–of–Course E OC

7th

kipp level iii: advanced kipp level ii: satisfactory

3rd

4th

district level iii: advanced district level ii: satisfactory

5th

6th

7th

8th

state level iii: advanced state level ii: satisfactory

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map) reading % of Students by Quartile

90

82

53

51

50%

71

40

mathematics 27

25

25

32

27

28

33

18

23

25

26

spring 1st

25

22

14

spring spring spring 4th 2nd 3rd

top quartile

16

16

25

11

33

25

31

38

34

35

24

28

33

30

28

26

28

fall 5th

32

24

29

25

15

35

16

14

spring spring 8th 7th spring spring 6th 5th

third quartile

14

spring 1st

37

23

16

25

22

29

30

24

31

25

29

28

24

18

28

spring 2nd

11 spring spring 3rd 4th

second quartile

22

12

23

29

fall 5th

22

30

40

36

24

22

12 spring spring 8th spring 7th spring 6th 5th 27

22

14

bottom quartile

End–of–Course E OC


10711 kipp way, houston, tx 77099 • 823.328.1051 • www.kipphouston.org

kipp high school ap and act results

19

average act

94%

82%

took the act

alumni attainment rates high school 94% graduation

(for graduating seniors)

took at least one ap

58%

scored 3 or above on at least one ap

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

88% college matriculation

schools: primary kipp coastal village primary school lynn barnes* grades: prek–4 est. 2009

kipp peace elementary school aundrea johnson grades: k–1 est. 2011

kipp dream prep olive hayden–moore grades: prek3–4 est. 2006

kipp sharp college prep lower school alma salman grades: prek3–4 est. 2008

kipp explore academy frank cush grades: prek3–3 est. 2009

kipp shine prep deb shifrine grades: prek3–4 est. 2004

kipp legacy preparatory school tresha francis grades: prek–2 est. 2010

kipp zenith academy tiffany george prados grades: prek3–3 est. 2009


schools: middle kipp 3d academy alison cumbley grades: 5–8 est. 2001

kipp intrepid preparatory school steve khadam–hir grades: 5–8 est. 2008

kipp academy middle school andrew rubin grades: 5–8 est. 1995

kipp coastal village middle school lynn barnes* grades: 5–7 est. 2010

kipp liberation college kipp polaris academy prep for boys tai ingram grades: 5–8 est. 2006

simone senior grades: 5–8 est. 2007

kipp spirit college prep kipp voyage academy for girls charles king grades: 5–8 est. 2006

tasha ginn grades: 5–8 est. 2009

schools: high kipp generations collegiate denise rodríguez grades: 9–10 est. 2011

kipp houston high school lara wheatley grades: 9–12 est. 2004

currently, these two schools are both being led by lynn barnes.*

kipp sunnyside high school john allen grades: 9–11 est. 2010

kipp courage college prep eric schmidt grades: 5 est. 2012

kipp sharpstown college prep karima wilson grades: 5–8 est. 2007


jacksonville, fl

kipp jacksonville schools ¡ est. 2010

K, 5–7 grades

29

367 students

number of teachers (fte)

enrolled

89%

tom majdanics

served

executive director

12%

22%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

96%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

African American

2012 florida comprehensive assessment test

% of Students % of Students

100%

reading 2012 FL R eading/E nglish Language Arts E xam

75%

56

41

30

25%

69

61

50%

0%

5th

mathematics 2012 FL Mathematics E xam

51

57

55 56

47

53

31

5th

6th

kipp level 4/level 5 kipp level 3

district level 4/level 5 district level 3

6th

state level 4/level 5 state level 3

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map)

% of Students by Quartile

reading

mathematics 21

12 21

13

13

11

30

27

30

27

34

30 65

27

17 17

29

26 63

spring spring 5th 6th fall 5th

top quartile

30

44

spring 6th

spring 5th

fall 5th

third quartile

second quartile

bottom quartile

1% Latino 2% Other 2% Caucasian 0% Asian


1440 mcduff avenue north, jacksonville, fl 32254 • 904.683.6643 • www.kippjax.org

kipp high school ap and act results

N/A

average act

N/A

N/A

took the act

alumni attainment rates school N/A high graduation

took at least one ap

ashley ferguson* grades: k est. 2012

N/A

scored 3 or above on at least one ap

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

N/A college matriculation

schools kipp voice elementary school

(for graduating seniors)

kipp impact middle school ashley ferguson* grades: 5–7 est. 2010

currently, these two schools are both being led by ashley ferguson.*


los angeles, ca

kipp la schools ¡ est. 2003 served

teachers (fte)

enrolled

85% teachers retained within kipp

K–8 grades

129 number of

2,194 students

89%

executive director

9%

9%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

marcia aaron

(85% retained in their position)

65%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

33% African American 1% Other 0% Caucasian 0% Asian

Latino

2012 california standards test english language arts

%% ofofStudents Students

100%

mathematics

2012 C A R eading/E nglish Language Arts E xam 91

87 55 58

50%

43

48

57 54

63

70

59 47

2012 C A Mathematics E xam 86

85

82

75%

100

98

62 49

48

59

57

74

69 69

64

61 65

63 45

55

54 41

49 35

25% 0%

2nd

3rd

5th

6th

kipp advanced kipp proficient

7th

2nd

8th

3rd

district advanced district proficient

5th

6th

state advanced state proficient

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map) reading 37 % of Students by Quartile

81

29

32

37

43

15

19

12

mathematics

13

spring spring 3rd 2nd

25

23

25

29

30

35 fall 5th

19

16 34

35

28

16

33

20 26

36

39

31

23

21

29

11 spring spring 8th 7th 17

spring spring 5th 6th

top quartile

24

spring 2nd

49 19 19

31

spring 3rd

44

19

37

31

20

27

30

30

16

24

spring 5th

20

56

19 18 spring 8th

spring 6th spring 7th

fall 5th

third quartile

second quartile

bottom quartile

kipp la administered sat-10 to students in kindergarten and first grade, and administered map to students in grades 2-8.

7th

8th


4545 dozier avenue, los angeles, ca 90022 • 213.489.4461 • www.kippla.org

kipp high school ap and act results

N/A

average act

N/A

N/A

took the act

alumni attainment rates school 96% high graduation

(for graduating seniors)

took at least one ap

N/A

scored 3 or above on at least one ap

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

college 91% matriculation

schools kipp comienza community prep margarita florez grades: k–2 est. 2010

kipp la college preparatory school carlos lanuza grades: 5–8 est. 2003

kipp empower academy mike kerr grades: k–2 est. 2010

kipp philosophers academy reginald greene grades: 5 est. 2012

kipp raíces academy amber young medina grades: k–4 est. 2008

kipp scholar academy tiffany moore grades: 5 est. 2012

kipp academy of opportunity archana patel grades: 5–8 est. 2003


lynn and boston, ma kipp massachusetts ¡ est. 2004

89% 5–10 teachers retained within kipp grades

61

657 students

number of teachers (fte)

enrolled

served

84%

executive director

15%

7%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

caleb dolan

(80% retained in their position)

54%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

32% African American 1% Other 10% Caucasian 3% Asian

Latino

2012 massachusetts comprehensive assessment system mathematics

english language arts 100%

%%of of Students Students

84 75% 50%

2012 MA Mathematics E xam

2012 MA R eading/E nglis h Language Arts E xam

61

52 48

66

59

64

59

50

39

81

71

60

57 31

41

5th

6th

7th

5th

8th

kipp advanced kipp proficient

dsitrict advanced district proficient

37 21

25% 0%

52

51

48

38 39

6th

7th

28

8th

state advanced state proficient

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map)

% of Students by Quartile

reading 31

mathematics 36

34

24

30

33

22

22

24

26

33

28

25

22

11

15

17

fall 5th

spring spring spring spring 8th 5th 6th 7th

top quartile

22

36

23

13

39

third quartile

22

45

28

31

15

19

22 24

39

24 14 fall 5th spring 5th

second quartile

50

41

23 13

spring 6th

spring spring 7th 8th

bottom quartile


90 high rock street, lynn, ma 01902 • 781.598.1609 • www.kippma.org

kipp high school ap and act results

N/A

average act

N/A

N/A

took the act

alumni attainment rates school N/A high graduation

(for graduating seniors)

N/A

took at least one ap

scored 3 or above on at least one ap

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

college N/A matriculation

schools kipp academy boston christine barford grades: 5 est. 2012

kipp academy lynn anna breen grades: 5–8 est. 2004

kipp academy lynn collegiate drea deangelo grades: 9–10 est. 2011


memphis, tn

kipp memphis collegiate schools · est. 2002

K, 5–10 61% teachers retained within kipp grades

49

771 students

number of teachers (fte)

enrolled

served

89%

executive director

12%

13%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

jamal mccall

(39% retained in their position)

98%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

2% 0% 0% 0%

African American

Latino Other Caucasian Asian

2012 tennessee comprehensive assessment program reading/language arts

%% ofofStudents Students

100%

2012 T N R eading/E nglis h Language Arts E xam

75% 50%

60 44 40

38 34

5th

47 33

6th

2012 T N Mathematics E xam

66

57

51

48

42

25

26

7th

8th

25% 0%

mathematics

44

kipp advanced kipp proficient

26

5th

district advanced district proficient

45

43

34

End–of–Course E OC

60

56

53

28

26

21 6th

7th

state advanced state proficient

% of Students by Quartile

25 29

mathematics 11

17

37

27

18

17

31

26

23

27

34

32

25 23 28 spring spring spring 6th 5th 7th spring 8th fall 5th 40

13 23

26

29

28

34

28

24

54

35

14

26

top quartile

third quartile

fall 5th

second quartile

38

spring spring 5th 6th

37

18 8th

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map) reading

38

18 27

41

spring 7th spring 8th

bottom quartile

46

40 25

End–of–Course E OC


2670 union avenue extended, memphis, tn 38112 • 901.452.2682 • www.kippmemphis.org

kipp high school ap and act results

N/A

average act

N/A

high school 95% graduation

N/A

took the act

alumni attainment rates

(for graduating seniors)

took at least one ap

N/A

scored 3 or above on at least one ap

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

college 72% matriculation

schools kipp memphis collegiate elementary school grace williams grades: k est. 2012

kipp memphis academy middle andy bobowski grades: 5 est. 2012

kipp memphis collegiate middle school andrea criollo grades: 5–8 est. 2002

kipp memphis collegiate high school richard bailey & jerry sanders grades: 9–10 est. 2011


new orleans, la

kipp new orleans schools · est. 2006 teachers (fte)

enrolled

96%

72% teachers retained within kipp

K–11 grades

245 3,214 number of students

served

11%

14%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

rhonda kalifey–aluise executive director

(66% retained in their position)

97%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

1% Latino 0% Other 2% Caucasian 0% Asian

African American

2012 integrated louisiana educational assessment program english language arts 2012 LA R eading/E nglish Language Arts E xam

% of % ofStudents Students

100% 75% 50%

mathematics

66

75

69 55

53 57

3rd

4th

64

70

81

71

2012 LA Mathematics E xam 90

69

69

55

54

55

5th

6th

7th

73

78

67

68

71

62

55

50

65

73

70

66

54

77 59

49

78

70

70

81

55

63

50

25% 0%

8th End–of–Course E OC

kipp mastery/advanced kipp basic

3rd

4th

5th

district mastery/advanced district basic

6th

7th

8th

End–of–Course E OC

state mastery/advanced state basic

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map) reading % of Students by Quartile

79

76 64

mathematics 12

12 16

23

18

20

25

33

26

32

33

25

40 46

40

41

43

13

24

17

20

27

27

32

31

24

30

32

28

28

29

27

33

spring spring 4th spring spring spring k 3rd 1st fall k 2nd

top quartile

17

55

41

33

spring spring 8th spring 7th spring 6th 5th fall 5th

third quartile

16

11 17 25

27

23

23

31

39 56

13 12 27

28

29

31

39

26

29

22

34

33

30

21

19

42 24

39

47

31

16

spring spring spring 4th k spring spring 3rd 1st fall k 2nd

second quartile

21

22

41

60

fall 5th

27

spring spring 6th 5th

bottom quartile

17

spring spring 8th 7th


3820 st. claude avenue, new orleans, la 70117 • 504.373.6269 • www.kippneworleans.org

kipp high school ap and act results

N/A

average act

N/A

high school N/A graduation

N/A

took the act

alumni attainment rates

(for graduating seniors)

N/A

took at least one ap

scored 3 or above on at least one ap

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

college N/A matriculation

schools kipp believe primary sarah greenberg grades: k–1 est. 2011

kipp believe college prep adam meinig grades: 5–8 est. 2006

kipp renaissance high school jon robertson grades: 9–11 est. 2010

kipp central city primary korbin johnson grades: k–4 est. 2008

kipp central city academy alex jarrell grades: 5–8 est. 2007

kipp mcdonogh 15 primary mark burton grades: k–4 est. 2006

kipp mcdonogh 15 middle luke naegele & deanna reddick grades: 5–8 est. 2006

kipp new orleans leadership primary colin smith grades: k–1 est. 2011

kipp new orleans leadership academy jared lamb grades: 5–7 est. 2010


new york city, ny kipp nyc · est. 1995

K–3, 5–12 83% grades teachers retained within kipp

243

2,916 students

number of teachers (fte)

enrolled

served

88%

executive director

15%

7%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

josh zoia

(81% retained in their position)

49%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

48% African American 3% Other 0% Caucasian 0% Asian

Latino

2012 new york state assessment english language arts

2012 NY Mathematics E xam

2012 NY R eading/E nglis h Language Arts E xam 96

100%

Students %% ofofStudents

mathematics

76

75%

58 50%

42

53

47

52

70

51

34

30

28

25

5th

6th

7th

8th

25% 0%

56

46

84

End–of–Course E OC

kipp level 4 kipp level 3

85

76

66

85

65

83

65

46

42

40

40

5th

6th

7th

8th

district level 4 district level 3

62

62

End–of–Course E OC

state level 4 state level 3

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map)

% of Students by Quartile

reading 18 30

37

37

24

fall k

22

27

30

35

29

27

21

25

25

26

30

15 15

mathematics 26

spring k

22

spring 1st

14

spring 2nd

top quartile

35

fall 5th

20

13

20

36

40

32

28

19

spring spring 5th 6th

25 27 43

19 13

12 spring spring 8th 7th

third quartile

31

34

19

17

28

24

27

22

29

23 27

fall k

spring k

28

42

15 spring spring 2nd 1st

second quartile

22

18

23

28

23

25

32

38

31

29

27

23

28

30

41

fall 5th

11 11 27 26 spring spring 7th 8th spring spring 6th 5th

bottom quartile

high school district/state comparisons are from 2011 because 2012 results were not available at the time of publication.

73


470 7th avenue, new york, ny 10018 • 212.991.2610 • www.kippnyc.org

kipp high school ap and act results

N/A

average act

N/A

school 95% high graduation

N/A

took the act

alumni attainment rates

(for graduating seniors)

took at least one ap

N/A

scored 3 or above on at least one ap

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

89% college matriculation

schools kipp academy elementary carolyn petruzziello grades: k–3 est. 2009

kipp amp academy debon lewis grades: 5–8 est. 2005

kipp nyc college prep high school natalie webb grades: 9–12 est. 2009

kipp infinity elementary school stephanie adams & lindsay fry grades: k–2 est. 2010

kipp infinity charter school allison holley grades: 5–8 est. 2005

kipp star elementary school anokhi saraiya grades: k–1 est. 2011

kipp star college prep charter school stacy johnson grades: 5–8 est. 2003

kipp academy new york frank corcoran grades: 5–8 est. 1995

kipp washington heights danny swersky grades: 5 est. 2012


newark, nj

team schools, a kipp region · est. 2002

K–3, 5–12 81% teachers retained within kipp grades

168

1,801 students

number of teachers (fte)

enrolled

served

87%

executive director

13%

8%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

ryan hill

(81% retained in their position)

94%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

5% Latino 1% Other 0% Caucasian 0% Asian

African American

2012 new jersey assessment of knowledge and skills mathematics

language art literacy

%% ofofStudents Students

64

63 35

30

25% 0%

5th

61

51

48

47

92

91

82

77

75% 50%

2012 NJ Mathematics E xam

2012 NJ R eading/E nglish Language Arts E xam

100%

83

80

77

83

58

57

79 60

7th

8th

5th

11th

kipp advanced kipp proficient

district advanced district proficient

6th

80 67

7th

8th

11th

state advanced state proficient

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map)

% of Students by Quartile

reading 24 33

29 14

fall k

43

mathematics 34

38

24

25

19

18

15

18

16 37 22

spring spring spring 2nd k 1st

top quartile

19

21

13

28

34

28

32

32

24

29

30

33

34

21

24

14 21 spring spring 7th spring 5th spring 6th 8th fall 5th 39

third quartile

16

13 27

28

25

23

35

spring k

29

22

36

12 11 spring 2nd

17

fall k

15

54

31

19

spring 1st

18 30

31

31

24

22

19

43

28

21

19

fall 5th

second quartile

28 28 26

21 18 spring spring 7th spring 5th spring 8th 6th 26

44

59

45

34

29

6th

63

57

54

71

bottom quartile


60 park place, newark, nj, 07102 • 973.622.0905 • www.teamschools.org

kipp high school ap and sat results

1250

average sat

98%

31%

took the sat

alumni attainment rates school 94% high graduation

(for graduating seniors)

2%

took at least one ap

scored 3 or above on at least one ap

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

88% college matriculation

schools spark academy, a kipp school

thrive academy, a kipp school

joanna belcher grades: k–3 est. 2009

newark collegiate academy, a kipp school shawadeim reagans & bridgett hitchings grades: 9–12 est. 2007

lindsay schambach grades: k est. 2012

rise academy, a kipp school drew martin grades: 5–8 est. 2006

team academy, a kipp school marc tan grades: 5–8 est. 2002


philadelphia, pa

kipp philadelphia schools · est. 2003

K–2, 5–11 71% grades teachers retained within kipp

83 1,256 number of students

teachers (fte)

enrolled

served

86%

executive director

19%

10%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

marc mannella

(59% retained in their position)

92%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

4% Latino 3% Other 0% Caucasian 0% Asian

African American

2012 pennsylvania system of school assessment reading

2012 P A Mathematics E xam

2012 P A R eading/E nglis h Language Arts E xam

100%

%% ofofStudents Students

mathematics

75%

65

50%

27

25% 0%

76

68

60

39 43

34

5th

6th

80

76

78

74 60

58

52

44 45

7th

5th

8th

kipp advanced kipp proficient

district advanced district proficient

83

80 56

53

6th

7th

8th

state advanced state proficient

mathematics

% of Students by Quartile

45

49

22

23

16 30

34 14

fall k

34

33

15 35

spring k spring 1st

26

23

24

28

33

42

fall 5th

22 27

40

12

11

29

28

31 28

31

31

spring spring spring 7th spring 5th 6th 8th

34

31 26

fall k

18 34

28 15

29

spring k

14

18

22

29

26

25

31

35

29

57

51

40

31

45

fall 5th

top quartile

third quartile

20

19

spring 1st

second quartile

77

53

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map) reading

79

spring spring 7th spring spring 6th 8th 5th

bottom quartile


5900 baltimore avenue, philadelphia, pa 19143 • 215.294.8596 • www.kippphiladelphia.org

kipp high school ap and act results

N/A

average act

N/A

school 94% high graduation

N/A

took the act

alumni attainment rates

(for graduating seniors)

took at least one ap

N/A

scored 3 or above on at least one ap

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

74% college matriculation

schools kipp philadelphia elementary school ben speicher grades: k–2 est. 2010

kipp philadelphia charter school meredith mehra grades: 5–8 est. 2003

kipp west philadelphia kipp dubois collegiate preparatory academy shawna wells grades: 5–8 est. 2009

aaron bass grades: 9–11 est. 2010


san antonio, tx

kipp san antonio · est. 2003

K, 5–12 79% grades teachers retained within kipp

82 number of

1,201 students

teachers (fte)

enrolled

served

84%

executive director

9%

15%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

mark larson

(76% retained in their position)

93%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

4% African American 1% Other 2% Caucasian 0% Asian

Latino

2012 state of texas assessments of academic readiness reading

mathematics

2012 T X R eading/E nglish Language Arts E xam 100%

% of Students % of Students

77 75%

53

64

63 60

74

76

84

64 62

69

80

74

2012 T X Mathematics E xam

68

78 66 66

77

75

84

86 74

57

48

50% 25% 0%

5th

6th

7th

8th

End–of–Course E OC

kipp level iii: advanced kipp level ii: satisfactory

5th

6th

district level iii: advanced district level ii: satisfactory

7th

8th

state level iii: advanced state level ii: satisfactory

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map) reading % of Students by Quartile

76

71

59

53

92

84

mathematics 23

14

14

14

21

27

31

30

27

29

32

35

38

fall 5th

30

27

21

18 42

19

spring spring spring 7th 6th 5th

top quartile

28

32

39

41

31

29

26

23

22

33

fall 5th

third quartile

24

27

16

spring 8th

32 21

second quartile

24

21

spring spring 6th 5th

14 spring 7th spring 8th

bottom quartile

End–of–Course E OC


731 fredericksburg road, san antonio, tx 78201 • 210.787.3197 • www.kippsa.org

kipp high school ap and act results

N/A

average act

N/A

high school 96% graduation

N/A

took the act

alumni attainment rates

(for graduating seniors)

took at least one ap

N/A

scored 3 or above on at least one ap

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

86% college matriculation

schools kipp un mundo dual language academy luzdivina lozano grades: k est. 2012

kipp aspire academy roy feliciano grades: 5–8 est. 2003

kipp camino academy brennecke hinojoa grades: 5–7 est. 2010

kipp university prep high school jennifer zinn grades: 9–12 est. 2009


san francisco bay area, ca kipp bay area schools · est. 2002

133 number of

2,600

students enrolled

5–12 grades

teachers (fte)

76%

79% teachers retained within kipp

served

executive director

7%

8%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

beth sutkus thompson

(71% retained in their position)

53%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

24% African American 2% Other 3% Caucasian 17% Asian

Latino

2012 california standards test english language arts

mathematics 2012 C A Mathematics E xam

2012 C A R eading/E nglish Language Arts E xam

% of% of Students Students

100% 75%

76 64

58

63 50

50%

59

81

79

76 55

62

59

54

86

78 65

53 57

48 50

39

48

59

65

87

76

73 47

55

44

56

55

48

32

40

45

48

42 44

38

25% 0%

5th

6th

7th

8th

9th

10th

kipp advanced kipp proficient

11th

5th

district advanced district proficient

6th

7th

8th

9th

10th

state advanced state proficient

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map) reading % of Students by Quartile

33 36

mathematics 14

21

17

18

25

30

28

35

31

34

24

26

31

28

24

32

25

17

24

fall 5th

spring spring spring 5th 6th 7th

top quartile

15

38

30

26

23

26

21

27

24

22

32

20

21

17

40

second quartile

30

23

fall 5th

third quartile

23

19

16

spring 8th

25

spring spring spring 8th 7th spring 6th 5th

bottom quartile

free/reduced lunch data represents 2011-12 for all schools, except kipp heartwood. heartwood is a nslp provision 2 school and was not required to collect meal applications. for reporting purposes, the school carries forward its most current fr/l data from 2011–12.

11th


1404 franklin street, suite 500 oakland, ca 94612 • 510.465.5477 • www.kippbayarea.org

kipp high school ap and sat results

1524

average sat

97%

school 96% high graduation

93%

took the sat

alumni attainment rates

(for graduating seniors)

77%

took at least one ap

scored 3 or above on at least one ap

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

85% college matriculation

schools kipp bayview academy kerianne ryan grades: 5–8 est. 2003

kipp summit academy ric zappa grades: 5–8 est. 2003

kipp bridge charter school lolita jackson grades: 5–8 est. 2002

kipp king collegiate high school kate belden grades: 9–12 est. 2007

kipp heartwood academy judy tang grades: 5–8 est. 2004

kipp san jose collegiate tom ryan grades: 9–12 est. 2008

kipp san francisco bay academy kyle shaffer grades: 5–8 est. 2003


washington, dc kipp dc · est. 2001

PreK3–12 75% grades teachers retained within kipp

253 number of

3,040 students

teachers (fte)

enrolled

81%

served

executive director

12%

12%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

susan schaeffler

67% retained in their position)

97%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

1% Latino 2% Other 0% Caucasian 0% Asian

African American

2012 dc comprehensive assessment system reading

2012 DC Mathematics E xam

2012 DC R eading/E nglis h Language Arts E xam

100%

% of Students % of Students

mathematics

89 76

74

75%

52

50%

41 41

45 49 49

49 46 48

54 39 41

44

6th

7th

50

44

51

49

60 44 44 28

25% 0%

3rd

4th

5th

8th

3rd

10th

kipp advanced kipp proficient

40 38

76

69

65 51 52

47 50

45 49

51

4th

5th

6th

7th

district advanced district proficient

95

59

51

58 42 44

8th

10th

state advanced state proficient

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map)

% of Students by Quartile

reading 36

28

27

28

23

26

14

fall k

18

spring k

mathematics

15

17

27

23

35

22

39

17

11

12

11

15

25

29

24

25

29

29

36

31

30

29

33

35

30

23

24 35 40 spring spring spring 3rd spring 1st fall 2nd 4th 5th

top quartile

15

23

13

35

33

31

32

25

28

25

30

14 spring 24 spring 8th spring spring 7th 5th 6th 26

19

third quartile

kipp dc’s 4th grade was composed entirely of students new to kipp in 2011-12.

23

fall k

20

21

43

30

31

15 24

40

16 27

28

spring 2nd

spring 3rd

31

spring 4th

55

27

40

46

28

27

28

29

25

21

22

18

32

23

25

spring k spring 1st

second quartile

16

spring 5th

fall 5th

bottom quartile

24

spring 6th

11 spring spring 8th 7th


1003 k street nw, washington, d.c. 20001 • 202.223.4505 • www.kippdc.org

kipp high school ap and act results

N/A

average act

N/A

N/A

took the act

alumni attainment rates high school 95% graduation

(for graduating seniors)

N/A

took at least one ap

scored 3 or above on at least one ap

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

75% college matriculation

schools kipp dc: discover academy philonda johnson grades: pre3–k est. 2009

kipp dc: leap academy abraham clayman grades: prek3–k est. 2007

kipp dc: will academy kate finley grades: 4–8 est. 2006

kipp dc: grow academy stacie kossoy grades: prek3–k est. 2010

kipp dc: promise academy casey fullerton grades: 1–4 est. 2009

kipp dc: college preparatory jessica cunningham grades: 9–12 est. 2009

kipp dc: heights academy cherese brauer grades: 1–2 est. 2011

kipp dc: aim academy kristy ochs grades: 5–8 est. 2005

kipp dc: lead academy mekia love grades: 1 est. 2012

kipp dc: key academy david ayala grades: 5–8 est. 2001


albany, ny kipp tech valley | grades: 5–8 | est. 2005

24 number of

304 students

1school

teachers (fte)

enrolled

81%

1 dudley heights, albany, ny 12210 518.694.9494 www.kipptechvalley.org

school leader

6%

23%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

don applyrs

88%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

6% Latino 2% Other 4% Caucasian 1% Asian

African American

2012 new york state assessment 100%

english arts Arts E xam 2012 NY language R eading/E nglis h Language

mathematics 2012 NY Mathematics E xam

% of Students % of Students

75%

58 50%

32

39

51

67

56 40

52 36 32

25% 0%

5th

6th

7th

53

50

41

65

65 37

23

8th

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

61

51

24

kipp level 4 kipp level 3

alumni attainment rates

48

90

87

82

5th

district level 4 district level 3

6th

7th

8th

state level 4 state level 3

high school N/A graduation

N/A college matriculation

kiipp tech valley transitioned from terranova to map in 2012-13; thus map data is not available for the 2011-12 academic year.


charlotte, nc kipp charlotte | grades: 5–8 | est. 2007

25 number of

343 students

1school

teachers (fte)

enrolled

77%

931 wilann drive, charlotte, nc 28215 704.537.2044 www.kippcharlotte.org

school leader

19%

10%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

tiffany flowers

93%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

4% Latino 2% Other 1% Caucasian 0% Asian

African American

2012 north carolina end–of–grade test

%% ofofStudents Students

100% 75%

english arts Arts E xam 2012 NC language R eading/E nglis h Language 64

73 74 75

74 72

59

68 68

71 71 71

mathematics 2012 NC Mathematics E xam 74

90

84 82

87

79 80

80 81

83 86 85

74 75 79

50% 25% 0%

5th

6th

7th

5th

8th

kipp level iii & iv

district level iii & iv

6th

7th

8th

End–of–Course E OC

state level iii & iv

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map)

% of Students by Quartile

reading

mathematics 26

12

19

19 33

40

30

31

29

fall 5th

36

42

17

spring 5th

26

39

30

27

23

26

25

27

32

spring 8th

37

29

15

third quartile

alumni attainment rates

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

15

38

33

39

28

22

23

15

30

23

spring spring 6th spring 8th spring 7th fall 5th 5th

spring spring 7th 6th

top quartile

15

17

second quartile

school N/A high graduation

bottom quartile

N/A college matriculation

due to north carolina department of education suppression laws, we were unable to collect disaggregated proficiency band data for end of course/end of grade scores for 2011–12.


columbus, oh

kipp central ohio ¡ est. 2008 kipp journey academy | grades: 5–8

20 number of

332 students

1school

teachers (fte)

enrolled

93%

1406 myrtle avenue, columbus, oh 43211 614.263.6137 www.kippcentralohio.org

86%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

school leader

executive director

17%

20%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

hannah powell dustin wood

2% Latino 5% Other 7% Caucasian 0% Asian

African American

2012 ohio achievement test

%% ofofStudents Students

100%

english arts Arts E xam 2012 OH language R eading/E nglish Language

50%

87

77

75%

49

80

67

66

55

55

56

mathematics 2012 OH Mathematics E xam

84

82

81 68

62

65

73

63

56

48

42 39

82

79 53

25% 0%

5th

6th

7th

kipp accelerated/advanced kipp proficient

8th

5th

6th

7th

8th

state accelerated/advanced state proficient

district accelerated/advanced district proficient

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map)

% of Students by Quartile

reading

mathematics 18

21 38

24

19

29

23

34

40

39

27

16

22

29

34

21

28

22

20

16 36 38

fall 5th

16

11

12

49

spring 5th spring 6th

17

spring 7th

top quartile

alumni attainment rates

spring 8th

60

fall 5th

third quartile

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

second quartile

school N/A high graduation

24 23 35

30

37

18 spring spring spring 7th 8th spring 6th 5th 40

bottom quartile

N/A college matriculation


dallas, tx

kipp dallas–fort worth · est. 2003 kipp truth academy | grades 5–8

22 number of

353 students

1school

teachers (fte)

enrolled

93%

3200 south lancaster road, dallas, tx 75216 214.375.8326 www.kippdfw.org

7%

9%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

executive director

school leader

60%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

quinton vance michael horne

39% African American 1% Other 0% Caucasian 0% Asian

Latino

2012 state of texas assessments of academic readiness

%% ofofStudents Students

100% 75%

english language arts Arts E xam 2012 T X R eading/E nglish Language 62

68

77

78 63

78

74

67

76

85 71

mathematics 2012 T X Mathematics E xam

80

81

78 59

67

64

83

77

60

94 76

71

50%

52

25% 0%

5th

6th

7th

8th

kipp advanced kipp satisfactory

5th

district advanced district satisfactory

6th

7th

8th

state advanced state satisfactory

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map)

% of Students by Quartile

reading

mathematics

12 38

24 29

fall 5th

14

28

34

29

34

12

13

44

41

22

18

32

14 spring spring spring 7th 8th spring 6th 5th 19

top quartile

alumni attainment rates

third quartile

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

41

33

32

38

30

32

28

23

20

19

spring 7th

22

30

20

27

22

spring spring 6th 5th fall 5th

second quartile

school 93% high graduation

58

28

spring 8th

bottom quartile

77% college matriculation


indianapolis, in kipp indianapolis college preparatory | grades: 5–8 | est. 2004

19 number of

289 students

1school

teachers (fte)

enrolled

3202 e 42nd sreet, indianapolis, in 46205 317.547.5477 www.kippindy.org

school leader

executive director

91%

17%

39%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

aleesia johnson

emily pelino

95%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

0% 2% 2% 0%

African American

Latino Other Caucasian Asian

2012 indiana statewide testing for educational progress

%% ofofStudents Students

100% 75% 50%

2012 IN R eading/E nglish Language english language artsArts E xam

62

54

85

77

76

73

73 53

53

2012 IN Mathematics E xam mathematics

72

65

45

41

7th

8th

84 67

81

75

66

77

73

81

78

52

51

7th

8th

25% 0%

5th

6th

kipp passing+ kipp passing

5th

district passing+ district passing

6th

state passing+ state passing

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map)

% of Students by Quartile

reading

mathematics 17

15 41

39

14

14

29

25

40

36

14

16

15

25

spring 5th spring 6th

42

39

15 18

18

28

24

spring 7th

spring 8th

fall 5th

top quartile

alumni attainment rates

31

51

19

19

24

33

25

24

22

30

27

27

29

23

29

29

24

spring 5th

spring 6th

spring 7th

spring 8th

fall 5th

third quartile

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

second quartile

school N/A high graduation

bottom quartile

N/A college matriculation


kansas city, mo kipp endeavor academy | grades: 5–8 | est. 2007

22 239 number of students enrolled

1school

teachers (fte)

2700 e 18th street, suite 155b, kansas city, mo 64127 816.241.3994 www.kippendeavor.org

jacob schmitz school leader

95%

9%

11%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

77%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

21% Latino 0% Other 2% Caucasian 0% Asian

African American

2012 missouri assessment program

%% ofofStudents Students

100%

communication 2012 MO R eading/E nglisarts h Language Arts E xam

mathematics 2012 MO Mathematics E xam

75%

53

50% 25% 0%

19

25

56

51 20

5th

26

28 28

29 28

6th

7th

8th

kipp advanced kipp proficient

60

56

55

54 32

31 32

5th

6th

41

31

27

7th

8th

19

district advanced district proficient

53

43

state advanced state proficient

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map)

% of Students by Quartile

reading

mathematics 21

26

29

34

21

29

32

39

28

44 fall 5th

spring 5th

spring 6th

top quartile

alumni attainment rates

11

24

18

32

42

15

20

27

20

24 31

55

spring 8th

spring 7th

third quartile

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

fall 5th

21

44

24 29

36

60 33 spring 5th

second quartile

school N/A high graduation

spring 6th

spring 7th

39

33 18 spring 8th

bottom quartile

N/A college matriculation


minneapolis, mn kipp stand academy | grades: 5–8 | est. 2008

17 number of

160 students

1school

teachers (fte)

enrolled

97%

1601 laurel avenue, minneapolis, mn 55403 612.287.9700 www.kippminnesota.org

24%

32%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

school leader

91%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

alvin abraham

1% Latino 4% Other 4% Caucasian 1% Asian

African American

2012 minnesota comprehensive assessment

% of Students % of Students

100%

reading 2012 MN R eading/E nglish Language Arts E xam 79

75%

76

60

53

50% 25% 0%

62

56 56

60

17 5th

6th

7th

kipp exceeds standard kipp meets standard

42

62

59

35

39

7th

8th

15 5th

8th

59

38

36

36

31

21

72

71

57

mathematics 2012 MN Mathematics E xam

district exceeds standard district meets standard

6th

state exceeds standard state meets standard

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map)

% of Students by Quartile

reading

13 34

mathematics

42

11

19

36

38

24 24

47

fall 5th

46

41

spring 7th

spring spring 6th 5th

top quartile

alumni attainment rates

25

21

18

28

36

19 19

21

14

24

24

18

21

36

50 63

spring 8th

39

54

spring spring 6th 5th

41

spring 7th spring 8th

fall 5th

third quartile

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

second quartile

school N/A high graduation

bottom quartile

N/A college matriculation


nashville, tn kipp academy nashville | grades: 5–8 | est. 2005

1school

21 number of

332 students

teachers (fte)

enrolled

89%

3410 knight drive, nashville, tn 37207 615.226.4484 www.kippacademynashville.org

executive director

15%

14%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

randy dowell laura howarth

87%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

school leader

9% Latino 0% Other 3% Caucasian 1% Asian

African American

2012 tennessee comprehensive assessment program

%% ofofStudents Students

100%

reading 2012 T N R eading/E nglis h Language Arts E xam

85

75% 50%

2012 T N Mathematics E xam mathematics

49 49

68

60 45 47

57 44

37

47

45

40

48

39

45

56

52 36

43

39

45

55

60

25% 0%

5th

6th

7th

5th

8th

kipp advanced kipp proficient

district advanced district proficient

6th

7th

End–of–Course E OC

state advanced state proficient

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map)

% of Students by Quartile

reading

12

mathematics

23

28

31

34

34

25

fall 5th

19

13

13

18

25

24

33

30

35

27 43

spring 5th spring 6th

41

31

alumni attainment rates

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

19

25

22

53

42

45

25

48

fall 5th

third quartile

22

16

51

spring 7th spring 8th

top quartile

25

16

second quartile

high school N/A graduation

spring spring 6th 5th

spring spring 7th 8th

bottom quartile

N/A college matriculation


oklahoma city, ok kipp reach college preparatory | grades: 5–8 | est. 2002

13 number of

269 students

1school

teachers (fte)

enrolled

75%

1901 ne 13th street, oklahoma city, ok 73117 405.425.4622 www.kippreach.org

11%

26%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

school leader

79%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

tracy mcdaniel

10% Latino 3% Other 7% Caucasian 1% Asian

African American

2012 oklahoma core curriculum tests reading %% ofofStudents Students

100% 75% 50%

2012 OK R eading/E nglis h Language Arts E xam 100 100 99 77

2012 OK Mathematics E xam 98 97 96

79

75

69

68

mathematics

52

55

56

61

5th

6th

7th

8th

63

71

70

70

68

57

54

52

53

5th

6th

7th

8th

25% 0%

kipp advanced kipp satisfactory

state advanced state satisfactory

district advanced district satisfactory

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map)

% of Students by Quartile

reading

mathematics 60

27

26

40

51

11

11 26

31

32

26 17

31

69

24

spring 5th

40 20 14

33

40

28

27

33

29

27

28

36

35

fall 5th

spring 5th

spring spring 7th 8th

spring 6th

fall 5th

top quartile

alumni attainment rates

third quartile

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

second quartile

school 96% high graduation

48 17 spring spring 7th 8th

15 spring 6th

bottom quartile

college 80% matriculation


san diego, ca kipp adelante preparatory academy | grades 5–8 | est. 2003

17 number of

359 students

1school

teachers (fte)

enrolled

99%

1475 sxth avenue, san diego, ca 92101 619.233.3242 www.kippadelante.org

school leader

12%

12%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

christa coleman

85%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

8% African American 1% Other 6% Caucasian 1% Asian

Latino

2012 california standards test english arts Arts E xam 2012 C A language R eading/E nglish Language

mathematics 2012 C A Mathematics E xam

% %ofof Students Students

100%

69

75% 50%

67

63

69

59

54

43

42

62

68 66

60

59

68 65 51

61

66

55

58

52

43

53 49

25% 0%

5th

6th

7th

5th

8th

kipp advanced kipp proficient

district advanced district proficient

6th

7th

8th

state advanced state proficient

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map)

% of Students by Quartile

reading

mathematics 18 11

14

20

13

28

36

11 23

27

29

31

37

32

19 12

38 19

22

15

27

27

42

46

25 41

fall 5th

37

alumni attainment rates

fall 5th

third quartile

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

second quartile

school 88% high graduation

21

29

23

26

18

26

18

33

spring 8th

spring spring 7th spring 6th 5th

top quartile

12

39

spring 6th

spring 5th

spring 7th

36

spring 8th

bottom quartile

college 72% matriculation


st. louis, mo

kipp inspire academy | grades: 5–8 | est. 2009

23 number of

331 students

1school

teachers (fte)

enrolled

89%

2647 ohio avenue, st. louis, mo 63118 314.865.0855 www.kippstl.org

executive director

13%

17%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

kelly garrett

98%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

jeremy esposito school leader

0% Latino 0% Other 1% Caucasian 0% Asian

African American

2012 missouri assessment program communication 2012 MO R eading/E nglisarts h Language Arts E xam

mathematics 2012 MO Mathematics E xam

% of Students % of Students

100% 75%

52

50%

30

28 29

25% 0%

51

5th

44 27

29 25

6th

7th

5th

district advanced district proficient

67

39

24

kipp advanced kipp proficient

57

55

55

60

27

29

6th

7th

state advanced state proficient

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map)

% of Students by Quartile

reading

mathematics 12 29

37

21

25

48

fall 5th

19

20

25

33

38

35

16

11 35

25

top quartile

alumni attainment rates

30

25

24

27

51

22 18 17

30

12 18 spring spring 5th spring 7th 6th

43 15

32

spring 7th

spring 5th spring 6th

fall 5th

third quartile

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

second quartile

school N/A high graduation

bottom quartile

N/A college matriculation


tulsa, ok

kipp tulsa college preparatory | grades: 5–8 | est. 2005

25 number of

324 students

1school

teachers (fte)

enrolled

85%

1661 east virgin street, tulsa, ok 74106 918.925.1580 www.kipptulsa.org

14%

9%

eligible for free/reduced price meals

school leader

95%

receiving special education services

annual student attrition rate

andrew mcrae

1% Latino 4% Other 0% Caucasian 0% Asian

African American

2012 oklahoma core curriculum tests

%% ofofStudents Students

100% 75% 50%

reading 2012 OK R eading/E nglis h Language Arts E xam 60

69

68 49

75

72

55 54

58

6th

7th

mathematics 2012 OK Mathematics E xam

79 64 62

59

80

71

70

70

52

59 55

52

5th

6th

7th

77

68 47

25% 0%

5th

8th

kipp advanced kipp satisfactory

district advanced district satisfactory

8th

state advanced state satisfactory

2011–12 measures of academic progress (map)

% of Students by Quartile

reading 14

mathematics 16

31

39

19

21

36

24

fall 5th

22 16 29 29

15 36

22

19

21

38

30

24

17

25 34

25 26

spring spring 5th spring 7th 6th

top quartile

alumni attainment rates

31

spring 8th

third quartile

(those who have completed 8th grade at kipp 5+ years ago)

47

fall 5th

40

37

17

16

40

41

23

25

20

18

spring spring 7th 8th

spring 5th spring 6th

second quartile

school N/A high graduation

bottom quartile

N/A college matriculation


appendix data definitions and methodology

In order to provide a full picture of the achievements of the KIPP network, the KIPP Foundation collects a wide range of information from each locally-run KIPP school. The Report Card features data for our schools that were open in 2011-12 aggregated by each of our KIPP geographic sites. The following categories explain the data presented in the preceding pages. Demographic data is accurate as of November 2012 (2012–13 school year) while achievement data, student attrition, and teacher retention reflect the 2011–12 school year.

enrollment

The Report Card provides enrollment figures for each school. In November 2012, there were more than 41,000 students in 125 KIPP schools.

student demographics

The Report Card displays graphically the percentage of students who qualify for the federal free and reduced price meals program (a proxy for family income), the race/ethnicity percentages by city, and the percentage of students defined as having special needs, as of November 2012. In the Report Card, we define special needs students as those who have Individualized Education Plans (IEPs) or are otherwise defined by the school as having special needs. In consultation with parents and other school staff, a special needs teacher prepares an IEP document that outlines the learning goals for the students and the ways in which the school will accommodate and support the student’s special needs. Percentages for student demographics may not add up to 100 due to rounding.

student attrition

The Report Card features student attrition data from the 2011–12 school year. KIPP defines attrition as the percentage of students who leave a school (for reasons other than completing the highest grade) in one annual cycle between October 1 of one year and October 1 of the following year, which is the date that most states close their enrollment. The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) also uses this date when referencing enrollment for a given year. Network-wide statistics are based on all 109 schools open in 2011–12.

student achievement— state exams

Like all other public schools, students enrolled at KIPP schools are required under state and federal law to take exams, the results of which are used for state accountability purposes. The state tests profiled in this Report Card are criterion-referenced exams, which means that the content reflects the academic standards set by each state. The Report Card provides school-level achievement data for each subject matter test required by the state to fulfill the reporting requirements of the No Child Left Behind (NCLB) Act, and compares the percent of students within a class that pass the test with state and district passing rates for each subject test. We also report 2012 state ratings or designations when these results are available and applicable. Some states, but not all, use such a system for rating schools. These tests do

not measure growth over time. Note: End-of-Course tests are subject tests taken by students in multiple grades.

student achievement— nationally normreferenced exams

All KIPP students take norm-referenced achievement exams in reading and mathematics from second grade through eighth grade. Normreferenced tests allow us to track the performance of students while enrolled in KIPP as compared to their grade-level peers nationally. They also provide a way to monitor student achievement longitudinally and to see the progress our students are making on the road to college. The average American student who takes a nationally norm-referenced exam will score at the 50th percentile. This student is outperforming five out of ten students nationally. From one year to the next, the average student will make one year of growth and not gain any percentile ranks, meaning that he or she will stay at the 50th percentile from year to year. If a student’s percentile increases on a nationally norm-referenced exam from year to year, it means that the student has made more than one year of growth relative to his or her peers. Across the network, almost all our schools use of the Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) test, while in the past the Stanford Achievement Test (SAT-10) has been the primary norm-referenced test. Due to this transition, we provide a snapshot of growth rather than a representation of long-term growth. The norm-referenced tests graphs on each school’s page depict the percentage of students in each percentile range (1–24, 25–49, 50–74, 75–99) on the norm-referenced test that were administered during the 2011–12 school year. In order to provide a growth measurement as well, we also report the percentage of students who made one year or more of academic progress between fall and spring of the 2011–12 school year. Percentages for normreferenced tests may not add up to 100 due to rounding. The 2011 Report Card reflected NWEA’s 2008 norms, while this year’s Report Card reflects 2011 norms. Changes between the 2011 Report Card and the 2012 Report Card may be due to changes in norms rather than to changes in performance.

attainment data— high school graduation and college matriculation

The Report Card features high school graduation and college matriculation data at the regional and school level.

college matriculation among high school graduates. For KIPP high schools with senior classes, the Report Card also includes Advanced Placement and college entrance exam (ACT and SAT) participation and performance data for graduating seniors, as well as district and state benchmarks where available. All graduation, matriculation, and exam data was tracked and verified by the region or school in the fall of 2012 and maintained within KIPP’s alumni database. Accompanying state and district data is collected through official state, district, and test company sources as noted.

teacher retention

The education community lacks a common standard for defining and reporting teacher retention. The National Center for Education Statistics defines all cases in which a teacher stops teaching at a particular school as turnover, regardless of whether a teacher switches schools, moves into a non-teaching position within his or her current school, or leaves the field of education altogether. KIPP adopts this framework, defining “retained within position” as cases where a teacher who is teaching at a school in one school year continues teaching at the same school as of the fall (September 1) of the following year. Any teacher who begins teaching at a school during the academic year (September 1 to April 30), regardless of whether he or she joined at the beginning, middle, or end of the year, is considered part of the denominator that is utilized in calculating “retained within position” rates. At the same time, because KIPP is a rapidly growing network of schools, many KIPP teachers leave to teach at another KIPP school or transition to a nonteaching capacity within the KIPP network. Current KIPP teachers are an important source for future KIPP leaders, which is why we also report “retained within KIPP,” a metric that counts these teachers as staying within the KIPP Team and Family. We only calculate retention metrics when we have at least two schools per city reporting. Note that teacher counts reflect the 2012-13 school year, and that they represent full-time equivalency (FTE) as the sum of full-time and parttime teachers.

sources “Family Income and Unequal Educational Opportunity 1970 to 2011,” Postsecondary Education OPPORTUNITY no. 245 (November 2012) Richard Fry and Kim Parker, Record Shares of Young Adults Have Finished Both High School and College (Washington, D.C.: Pew Research Center, 2012). Christina Clark Tuttle, Brian Gill, Philip Gleason, Virginia Knechtel, Ira Nichols-Barrer, and Alexandra Resch, KIPP Middle Schools: Impacts on Achievement and Other Outcomes (Washington, D.C.: Mathematica Policy Research, Inc., 2013).

We are thankful for the support of the individuals and organizations that have partnered with the KIPP Foundation to make a difference in the lives of more than 41,000

At a regional level, we report graduation and college matriculation data for eighth-grade completers (of KIPP Middle Schools) five years after completing the eighth grade.

children across the country, proving what is possible in public education. For a list of supporters of the KIPP Foundation, please see www.kipp.org/honor-roll. For the KIPP Foundation’s 2011–12 audited financials, visit

At the school level, we report four-year high school graduation among 9th grade starters and

www.kipp.org/support.


John Fisher, Chairman President, Pisces, Inc.

Richard Barth, President CEO, KIPP Foundation

Katherine Bradley President, CityBridge Foundation

Philippe Dauman President and CEO, Viacom, Inc.

Mike Feinberg KIPP Co-Founder

Doris Fisher Founder, Gap Inc. and Co-Founder, KIPP Foundation

Reed Hastings Founder and CEO, Netflix, Inc.

Rhonda Kalifey-Aluise Executive Director, KIPP New Orleans

Martha Karsh Founder, Karsh Family Foundation

David W. Leebron President, Rice University

Dave Levin KIPP Co-Founder

Michael L. Lomax President and CEO, UNCF

Mark Nunnelly Managing Director, Bain Capital

Carrie Walton Penner Trustee, Walton Family Foundation

José H. Villarreal Senior Advisor, Akin Gump

---------------

Shawn Hurwitz, Founding Board Member, Emeritus President and CEO, MAXXAM Property Company

Don Fisher, Founding Board Chair, Emeritus September 3, 1928–September 27, 2009 Founder, Gap Inc. and Co-Founder, KIPP Foundation


ARKANSAS

KIPP STRIVE Academy

NEW YORK

KIPP Austin Vista Middle School

KIPP Blytheville College Preparatory School

KIPP STRIVE Primary

KIPP Academy Elementary

KIPP TRUTH Academy

KIPP Delta College Preparatory School

KIPP Vision Academy

KIPP Academy New York

KIPP 3D Academy

KIPP Delta Collegiate High School

KIPP WAYS Academy

KIPP AMP Academy

KIPP Academy Middle School

KIPP Infinity Charter School

KIPP Coastal Village Middle School

ILLINOIS

KIPP Infinity Elementary School

KIPP Coastal Village Primary School

CALIFORNIA

KIPP Ascend Middle School

KIPP NYC College Prep High School

KIPP Courage College Prep

KIPP Adelante Preparatory Academy

KIPP Ascend Primary School

KIPP STAR College Prep Charter School

KIPP DREAM Prep

KIPP Bayview Academy

KIPP Create Middle School

KIPP STAR Elementary School

KIPP Explore Academy

KIPP Washington Heights

KIPP Generations Collegiate

KIPP TECH Valley

KIPP Houston High School

KIPP Delta Elementary Literacy Academy

KIPP Bridge Charter School KIPP Heartwood Academy

INDIANA

KIPP King Collegiate High School

KIPP Indianapolis College Preparatory

KIPP San Francisco Bay Academy

KIPP Intrepid Preparatory School KIPP Legacy Preparatory School

NORTH CAROLINA LOUISIANA

KIPP Charlotte

KIPP Summit Academy

KIPP Believe College Prep

KIPP Gaston College Preparatory

KIPP PEACE Elementary School

KIPP Academy of Opportunity

KIPP Believe Primary

KIPP Gaston College Preparatory Primary

KIPP Polaris Academy for Boys

KIPP Comienza Community Prep

KIPP Central City Academy

KIPP Pride High School

KIPP SHARP College Prep Lower School

KIPP Empower Academy

KIPP Central City Primary

KIPP LA College Preparatory School

KIPP McDonogh 15 Middle

KIPP SHINE Prep OHIO

KIPP Philosophers Academy

KIPP McDonogh 15 Primary

KIPP Journey Academy

KIPP RaĂ­ces Academy

KIPP New Orleans Leadership Academy

KIPP Scholar Academy

KIPP New Orleans Leadership Primary

OKLAHOMA

KIPP Renaissance High School

KIPP Reach College Preparatory

COLORADO

KIPP Liberation College Prep

KIPP San Jose Collegiate

KIPP Sharpstown College Prep KIPP Spirit College Prep KIPP Sunnyside High School KIPP Voyage Academy for Girls

KIPP Tulsa College Preparatory

KIPP ZENITH Academy KIPP Aspire Academy

KIPP Denver Collegiate High School

MARYLAND

KIPP Camino Academy

KIPP Montbello College Prep

KIPP Harmony Academy

PENNSYLVANIA

KIPP Un Mundo Dual Language Academy

KIPP Sunshine Peak Academy

KIPP Ujima Village Academy

KIPP DuBois Collegiate Academy

KIPP University Prep

KIPP Philadelphia Charter School DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA

MASSACHUSETTS

KIPP Philadelphia Elementary Academy

KIPP DC: AIM Academy

KIPP Academy Boston

KIPP West Philadelphia Preparatory

KIPP DC: College Preparatory

KIPP Academy Lynn

KIPP DC: Discover Academy

KIPP Academy Lynn Collegiate

KIPP DC: Grow Academy

TENNESSEE KIPP Academy Nashville

KIPP DC: Heights Academy

MINNESOTA

KIPP Memphis Academy Middle

KIPP DC: KEY Academy

KIPP Stand Academy

KIPP Memphis Collegiate Elementary School

KIPP DC: Lead Academy

KIPP Memphis Collegiate High School

KIPP DC: LEAP Academy

MISSOURI

KIPP DC: Promise Academy

KIPP Endeavor Academy

KIPP Memphis Collegiate Middle School

KIPP DC: WILL Academy

KIPP Inspire Academy

FLORIDA

NEW JERSEY

KIPP Austin Beacon Prep

KIPP Impact Middle School

Newark Collegiate Academy

KIPP Austin College Prep

KIPP VOICE Elementary School

Rise Academy

KIPP Austin Collegiate

SPARK Academy

KIPP Austin Comunidad

GEORGIA

TEAM Academy

KIPP Austin Connections Elementary

KIPP Atlanta Collegiate

THRIVE Academy

TEXAS KIPP Austin Academy of Arts & Letters

KIPP South Fulton Academy

KIPP Report Card 2012  

The Report Card is a direct reflection of KIPP's focus on results and long-standing commitment to performance transparency. It shares studen...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you