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Upper School Program Guide 2011-2012


Table of Contents i.

our mission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

ii.

general graduation

requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

iii.

program designations . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

iv.

global studies distinction . . . . . . . . 6

v.

english . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7

vi.

history . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11

vii.

mathematics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

viii.

science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

ix.

modern languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 21

x.

social sciences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26

xi.

strategy courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

xii.

visual art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30

xiii.

performing arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

xiv.

computer science . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36

xv.

the athletic program . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

xvi. theater arts program . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 xvii. activities . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 xviii. advisory . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

College Counseling. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

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i. our mission

Our Mission King Low Heywood Thomas is an independent, college preparatory school serving students from prekindergarten through twelfth grade.

Implementation of our Mission and Philosophy

King is a diverse, vibrant learning community dedicated to educational excellence and to the fullest academic and personal achievement of our students. We champion the development of each individual’s talents, character, and self-confidence by offering students challenging intellectual, creative, athletic, leadership, and service opportunities. Our culture of respect for one’s self and for others promotes independence and collaboration.

•• commits itself to educational excellence

Our graduates are well-prepared to pursue lives of learning and accomplishment, personal fulfillment, and social responsibility. Educational and Curricular Philosophy

At King, we believe that our students bring a unique blend of interests, talents, and needs to the educational experience. Faculty design a variety of programs that draw out individuality through the processes of intellectual, physical, creative, emotional, and social inquiry and expression. Our curriculum is comprised of all opportunities that run through our students’ daily experience with the School. All activities and interactions that define this curricular context promote the acquisition of communication skills, the cultivation of intellectual ability, the evolution of individual character, and the attainment of personal growth. The curricular goal of the School is to maximize each student’s development within these four domains.

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

To achieve the ideals of our Mission and realize the aspirations of our Philosophy, our community:

•• provides a student-centered environment

that encourages the exploration, discovery, and development of the uniqueness of each student •• designs a comprehensive program that offers

a wide range of academic, artistic, athletic, and other enrichment opportunities in order to provide appropriate challenge and support in meeting the needs of individual student profiles •• sustains a progressive educational community

rooted in an appreciation for and an active practice of the virtues of respect, civility, and compassion •• cultivates a faculty committed to ongoing

professional growth and renewal •• implements a variety of teaching methodologies

and creates meaningful and varied assessments in its quest to help students create meaning and derive understanding •• welcomes and values the wide range of perspectives

engendered by the diversity of our educational community and the world around us •• engages parents and collaborates with them in

support of their child’s educational process

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ii. general graduation requirements

General Graduation Requirements All students must complete Grades 9 -12 in order to qualify for a diploma. Students must earn 20 credits in order to graduate. Courses are assigned the following credit values: Full year course, meeting 8-10 times/rotation Full year course, meeting 4-5 times/rotation Semester course, meeting 8-10 times/rotation Semester course, meeting 4-5 times/rotation

1.0 credit .50 credit .50 credit .25 credit

While four years of study in Math, Language, and Science are encouraged, credits required in each academic department are as follows: English

4 credits

History

3 credits, including US History

Mathematics

3 credits, including Alg 1,

Alg 2/Trig, Geometry Science

3 credits, including Bio, Chem,

Physics Modern Languages Through Level 3 Visual Art

.50 credit, including Fundamentals

of Art for Beginners

Performing Arts

.50 credit

Life Skills

.25 credit in Grade 9 or 10

.25 credit in Grade 11 or 12

•• Students must take at least five credits of courses

each year with a minimum of 20 to graduate. Additional requirements include: The Athletic Program Participation in one athletic season or a minimum of 100 hours each year of an off-campus sport not offered by King The Theater Arts Program Involvement in at least one theater production over four years

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iii. program designations

Program Designations Movement between and among these programs is quite fluid and is dependent upon the relative areas of strength for each student. To assist in the identification of the program designation of a particular course throughout this Program Guide, course numbering information for each program is provided below. Course numbers also follow all course listings in each department in this guide. THE COLLEGE PREPARATORY PROGRAM

The College Preparatory Program is the fundamental program in every given discipline. THE HONORS PROGRAM

The Honors Program takes College Preparatory courses to a more sophisticated, advanced level, generally preparing students for Advanced Placement courses in their junior and senior years. Students may also choose to design an Independent Study which allows them to pursue advanced study in an area of interest at the Honors level. Course numbers in this program end in “0”. ADVANCED PLACEMENT COURSES

The Advanced Placement program prepares students for a College Board examination in their chosen courses in early May. Superior skills in the fundamentals of the various subject areas are generally a prerequisite for entering AP courses, along with a high level of intellectual curiosity and motivation, solid analytical and reasoning ability, and a strong independent work ethic. Course numbers in this program begin with “5” and end in “0”.

INDEPENDENT STUDY

Independent Study options are open to all students, either in addition to a full course load, or to round out a student’s academic program. Independent Studies are typically taken on a semester basis, and students may take them at the College Preparatory and Honors level. Students work on a topic of their own design and are responsible for mastering the work and research required under the direction of a mentor (mentors) from the appropriate academic department(s). Weekly meetings are required. Examples of past Independent Studies include the following: Advanced Clay Methods Aerospace Engineering Conducting Film Production Global Warming and Clean Energy German Laguage Graphics Programming Italian Language The Lincoln-Douglas Debates Music Theory and its Application Nietzsche Portrait Painting Portuguese Psychology: Healthy/Abusive Relationships Religion in Sparta and Athens: A Comparative Study Research in Biomass Energy Tracing the Denial of the Holocaust Writing and Illustrating a Children’s Book

King currently offers Advanced Placement courses in the following areas: Biology European History Macroeconomics Calculus – AB Microeconomics Calculus – BC Chemistry Physics – B English Language/Composition Spanish Literature English Literature Statistics U.S. History French Language

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iv. global studies distinction

Global Studies Distinction The Global Studies Program at King takes a multidisciplinary and multicultural approach to examining and understanding global issues. Interested students engage in intensive study of global problems and responses to them: environmental, socio-economic, diplomatic, and intellectual. Emphasis is placed on the study of the historical and anthropological origins and effects of global expansion; post-World War II and post-colonial world affairs; globalism and globalization; environmental changes and how they impact the globe; the growth of interdependent economies and their ramifications; global institutions such as the IMF and World Bank; global problems facing the United Nations; how new mentalities impact the globe and are impacted by it, as well as the global effects of mass media. Students examine those problems from diverse perspectives, in an effort to overcome ethnocentrism and foster multi-cultural understanding.

•• Four high school years of a language (Level 3 for

Chinese) •• Two Clubs from the following approved list:

* United Cultures Club * Model UN * Amnesty International * Build On * Environmental Club

Note: A two-year commitment to each club, including organization of one major event per club membership •• One Cultural/Language Immersion Trip during high school years •• Final Capstone Project: Independent Study on a

curriculum-committee approved topic during the Senior Year.

The Global Studies Distinction is an opportunity for a student to distinguish him/herself as one who is interested in and has seriously pursued a variety of topics and experiences related to global study. The Distinction appears on the student’s transcript. The requirements for earning this distinction are as follows: •• Challenge 20/20 •• Two of the following approved courses: Social Science Department Archaeology Cultural Anthropology Philosophy

Science Department Physical Anthropology History Department Genocides of the 20th Century Rwanda: A Case Study English Department Film Studies Department of Modern Languages Second Language Elective

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v. english

English The English Faculty encourages students to explore and understand how language is used to express the thoughts and feelings of English speakers interacting with their world and reflecting upon the challenges of being human. At each grade level students are empowered to develop and refine their skills of reading, writing, thinking, speaking, and listening, as they encounter increasingly challenging texts from a number of literary periods and genres. In particular, the English Faculty is committed to developing authenticity of personal voice in each student and to fostering a love of the written word and pleasure in the act of reading. Requirement: 4 credits, including American Literature

GRADE 10 WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE (ENG 201)

The primary goal of this course is to provide students with opportunities to further refine their skills in the study of literature and language. The course focuses on teaching the skills surrounding close textual inquiry, with attention to the terminology of literary analysis. Particular attention is paid to developing each student’s personal, analytical, and creative writing skills. The goals include clarity of thinking and fluent self-expression. Reading materials covered during the course are approached by genre, in order to highlight the specific characteristics of each type of literary expression: short stories, novels, poems, and plays. (Full year, 1 credit).

GRADE 9 FUNDAMENTALS OF COMPOSITION AND LITERARY STUDY (ENG 105)

The goal of English 105 is dedicated to the development of critical and creative skills that are essential to the writing process. Some of these skills include: reading critically, evaluating language, sharing thoughts and ideas through discussion, working collaboratively, and writing in response to literature. Over the course of the year students will write four analytic essays, one each quarter. Creative assignments that reflect the purpose of each text will also be given. A set of essential questions also guides this course. Some of them include: What defines a strong essay? What is revision? What is argument? What are character, theme, conflict, and language? How can stories, plays, and poems be interpreted, performed, and shaped? Furthermore, English 105 is designed around the theme of the quest. The course explores the meaning of the journey and traces the origin and development of identity through character and theme. (Full year, 1 credit). Texts: “Black Ice,” by Cary (summer reading); “Of Mice and Men,” by Steinbeck; “Things Fall Apart,” by Achebe; “The Odyssey,” by Homer; and “Romeo and Juliet,” by Shakespeare. Supportive material (poetry, short stories, articles, film) is provided as needed.

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

Texts: “Sound and Sense,” ed. by Arp and Johnson; “All Quiet on the Western Front,” by Remarque; “Brave New World,” by Huxley or “1984,” by Orwell; “MacBeth,” by Shakespeare; “The Bean Trees,” by Kingslover; “The Kite Runner,” by Hosseini; “The Glass Menagerie,” by Williams; “Trifles,” by Glaspell; and “The Elements of Style,” by Strunk and White. WRITING ABOUT LITERATURE – HONORS (ENG 200)

The materials and skills addressed in this course are similar to those in ENG 201. Students enrolled in this honors-level course are expected to demonstrate a high level of independence and initiative in their approach to their work. Reading assignments are longer; discussion is more detailed; and writing assignments are more sophisticated. Students may take this course with departmental approval; occasionally, students in Grade 9 with exeptional and skills in English may take this course. At the honors level, students are required to study topics in greater depth and demonstrate understanding of the material through different and appropriately challenging assignments. (Full year, 1 credit) Texts: “Writing About Literature,” ed. by Roberts; “Sound and Sense,” ed. by Arp and Johnson; “All Quiet on the Western Front,” by Remarque; “Brave New World,” by Huxley or “1984,” by Orwell; “Cry, the Beloved Country,” by Paton; “Macbeth” by Shakepeare; “The Importance of Being Earnest,“ by Wilde; “Trifles,” by Glaspell; “The Elements of Style,” by Strunk and White; “Hot Words” (vocabulary text)

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v. english

GRADE 11 AMERICAN LITERATURE (ENG 301)

American culture is marked by econimic, spcial, and political shift; American literature reflects this fluidity. Students begin their studies with selected colonial texts. They observe the Puritan preoccupation with religion as it gives way to transcendental thought and the rise of the individual. Following closely is the rise of the immigrant and the minority. Such diversity of thought and opportunity brings several essential questions to mind: What is an American? What is the “American Dream”? Who identifies with the dream and who does not? How can American literature help us to better understand ourselves today? Discussions encourage the sharing of ideas, as students engage with the materials and the texts. Students work to refine their critical and creative writing skills. (Full year, 1 credit) Texts: “Anthology of American Poetry,” “The Scarlet Letter,” by Hawthorne; “The Crucible,” by Miller; short stories by Poe; “Self-Reliance,” by Emerson; “Walden,” by Thoreau; “Ethan Frome,” by Wharton; short stories by Hemingway; “The Great Gatsby,” by Fitzgerald; “Their Eyes Were Watching God,” by Hurston; short stories by Hemingway; “Ragtime,” by Doctorow; “The Elements of Style” by Strunk and White AMERICAN LITERATURE – HONORS (ENG 300)

English 300 asks students to consider literature from multiple angles. In addition to assessing theme and character, students are asked to think about how a text is constructed, how a story is told, and how a writer uses language and literary devices to communicate a greater purpose. With these goals in mind, the course assumes that students are abstract thinkers who can read and write fluidly. In addition, discussion is central to the course; the exchange of ideas permits students to explore and discover a text together. As a result, a premium is placed upon the student’s initiative. Each individual must be willing to meaningfully engage with the materials, take responsibility for all written work, and respectfully consider the classroom as a balanced community of collaborative learners.

evolution of Native-American, European, and African voices, as the colonies shed their ties to the English crown, embrace nationhood, and move toward establishing a new American culture. Such a textured history begs several essential questions that we will visit throughout the year. What does the term “American” mean? What is the meaning of “individualism”? Who gets to be an individual? Who does not? What is the role of society? How does the individual interact with society and what is the result? Furthermore, the course introduces key literary periods including: Colonialism, Romanticism, Transcendentalism, Realism, Modernism, and Post-Modernism (Full year, 1 credit). Texts: A representation of Colonial Literature; “The Scarlet Letter,” by Hawthorne; “Self-Reliance,” by Emerson; “Walden,” by Thoreau; short stories by Melville and Poe; poetry by Whitman and Dickinson; “Huckleberry Finn,” by Twain; “The Awakening,” by Chopin; a selection of Hemingway’s short stories; “The Great Gatsby,” by Fitzgerald; a selected post-modern work. GRADE 12 LITERARY ANALYSIS (ENG 401)

This course focuses on selected major works in the British and European literary tradition. Students begin their studies with the epic story of “Sir Gawain and the Green Kinght,” followed by Chaucer’s “Canterbury Tales,” Shakespeare’s “Hamlet,” and end with twentieth century texts such as Conrad’s “Heart of Darkness.” This sampling of challenging classical works prepares students for further critical study at the college level. Through close, careful reading as well as oral and written response, students discover the singularity of each text as well as its place and purpose within the British literary tradition. (Full year, 1 credit) Texts: “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight,” trans. by Merwin; “Canterbury Tales,” by Chaucer; “Hamlet,” by Shakespeare; “1984,” by Orwell; “Equus,” by Shaffer; “Heart of Darkness,” by Conrad

In addition, English 300 is a survey course that is designed to expose students to a variety of voices that shape the American experience. We track the 2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

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v. english

LITERARY ANALYSIS – HONORS (ENG 400)

This course provides students with an opportunity for engaging in close critical analysis of sophisticated literary texts, both classical and contemporary. Beginning with Greek drama and the study of tragedy, students continue through Elizabethan drama with a Shakespeare play, highlights of British poetry (with particular focus on Romanticism and Coleridge’s “Rime of the Ancient Mariner”), and the 19th century novella during the first semester. The second half of the year is devoted to work on the Senior Thesis, as well as to the continued study of poetry and contemporary prose fiction. Assessments that challenge students’ understanding of these texts as both discrete entities and part of a literary tradition take the forms of expository and creative writing pieces. Students in this course are expected to be capable, close readers of texts who feel confident that they can manage the demands of an accelerated pace. (Full year, 1 credit). Texts: “Oedipus Rex,” by Sophocles; “Much Ado About Nothing,” by Shakespeare; “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” by Coleridge; “The Metamorphosis,” by Kafka; “The Yellow Wallpaper,” by Gilman; “Death of a Salesman,” by Miller; “Slaughterhouse Five,” by Vonnegut; “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society,” by Burrows and Shaffer; “What is the What,” by Eggers; contemporary poetry and short stories. LITERARY ANALYSIS – ADVANCED PLACEMENT (ENG 500)

The goal of this course is to provide students who are skillful in language and literature with the opportunity to study, in some depth, selected works in the British and European tradition. Each one of those selected works contains “the archetypes of betrayal and forgiveness and loving and loss that are the stuff of literature” (Parker Palmer). At the center of our inquiry resonates King Lear’s plea for greater selfknowledge and self-awareness: “Who is it that can tell me who I am?” Enrollment in AP English requires that students have demonstrated in earlier English courses the appropriate reading, writing, thinking, speaking, and listening skills necessary to keep up with a fast-paced

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

and demanding set of expectations. Emphasis is placed on thoughtful discussion of the materials, on writing of personal responses to the readings, and on expository essays and the application of supplementary materials to the literature being studied. The Senior Thesis is written during third quarter. Specific preparation for the AP examination in May includes multiple-choice packages on poetry and prose passages, in addition to writing focused-topic essays under time restrictions. (Full year, 1 credit) Texts: “Oedipus Rex,” and “Antigone,” by Sophocles; “Hamlet,” by Shakespeare; “Much Ado About Nothing,” by Shakespeare; “Dubliners,” by Joyce; “A Room of One’s Own” and “Mrs. Dalloway,” by Woolf; “The Remains of the Day,” by Ishiguro; selected poems, including excerpts from “Paradise Lost,” by Milton, “The Rime of the Ancient Mariner,” by Coleridge, and “The Waste Land,” by Eliot; “The Hours,” by Cunningham; “The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Society,” by Burrows and Shaffer english language and composition – advanced placement (ENg 520)

This course aims to strengthen students’ understanding of the varied rhetorical contexts in which prose can be written; the course also seeks to produce skilled writers who can themselves compose for a variety of purposes. In this course, then, students’ reading and writing focus on the interactions among a writer’s purposes, audience expectations, and subjects – as well as the way generic conventions of language contribute to effectiveness in writing. The reading materials in this course are drawn from a variety of “course readers” and include a text dedicated to the study of rhetoric. (Full year, 1 credit) Texts: “The Bedford Reader” (core text); “Everyday Use” (textbook for rhetorical analysis); Harper’s Magazine “Great Books for Dummies” (SOAPS and passage analysis); “I Know Why the Caged Bird Cannot Read – How American High School Students Learn to Loathe Literature,” by Francine Prose; “Speech to the Troops at Tilbury,” by Queen Elizabeth I; “Sonnet 16,” by Shakespeare; Neil Postman’s forward to “Amusing Ourselves to Death”; “Gettysburg Address,” by Abraham Lincoln

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v. english

FILM STUDIES (ENG 425)

This course takes a somewhat traditional approach, exploring the development of film chronologically, but within the overarching framework of how visual images combine with text and sound to create feeling and meaning. Students learn to watch films critically and to analyze them both for content (plot and character development, conflict, theme, etc.) and technique (mise en scene, lighting, camera angle, etc.). Simultaneously, students work collaboratively on a series of video projects. Students begin with the photographic basics of framing a shot, and culminate with their own 10-minute film, which they script, act, tape, and edit. The two focuses of the course complement each other, as students practice the techniques they view in the movies, and use their own experience in filming to inform their analysis of the movies. (Full Year, 1 credit) ADVANCED fILM STUDIES (ENG 426)

For students who have completed Film Studies and want to develop their camera and film editing skills. In this class, students advance from using iMovie to Final Cut Express, a professional-level film editing tool. In addition to shorter projects, students develop three separate 5-10 minute films from script to final cut, including a documentary, a literature-based project, and one of their own choosing. Students enroll in this course with teacher permission only. (Full Year, 1 credit) FICTION WRITING WORKSHOP (ENG 441)

This is a workshop course in which students concentrate on elements of fiction and use that knowledge in the composition and revision of their own original pieces. Plot, structure, character, setting, point of view, beginnings, and endings are all discussed along with considerations of tone, mood, voice, and audience. Inclass writing exercises prepare students to compose their own short fiction. At least three short stories are produced during the course of the semester, and these stories are critiqued by the writer’s peers in the workshop portion of the course. This criticism is used in necessary subsequent revisions. The revision process is one of the most important skills for young writers to learn and carry with them throughout their writing

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

careers. A packet of contemporary short fiction is read so that students can understand how writers craft their stories and to “see what’s out there.” (Semester 1, .50 credit) POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP (ENG 444)

This workshop course introduces student writers to the world of poetry. Students learn the elements of poetry including figurative language and imagery, as well as the elements of prosody such as rhyme and meter. Students begin the semester by writing in strict closed poetic forms including sonnets, villanelles, sestinas, ghazals, pantoums, and others. From working in form comes the respect for the craft of verse and the ability to work in open form, or “free verse.” As in the fiction writing course, original student work is critiqued by the writer’s classmates for use in the revision process. Selections of contemporary poetry are provided for students to deconstruct the craft of poetry as well as to see what is current in contemporary poetry. (Semester 2, .50 credit) possible ENGLISH COURSE SEQUENCING PATHS

Movement between and among the paths listed below is permitted, pending departmental approval. H = Honors course. Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

Fund of Comp and Lit

Writing abt Lit

Amer Lit

Literary Analysis

Fund of Comp and Lit

Writing abt Lit – H

Am Lit – H

Literary Analysis – H

Fund of Comp and Lit

Writing abt Lit – H

Am Lit – H

AP English Lit/AP English Lang/Comp

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vi. history

History The History Faculty guides students in the close examination of the written record of human civilization, human action, and interaction, via primary documents and secondary sources. Research and debate form an integral part of our studies, and special attention is placed on showing the controversy and complexity of historical study as students learn to synthesize and interpret opposing points of view while formulating their own theses. Requirement: 3 credits, including U.S. History GRADE 9 WORLD HISTORY 1 (HIS 101)

This course examines the political, social, and cultural history of the world, from the beginning of civilization in Egypt and Mesopotamia to the Middle Ages in Europe. Appropriate geographical study is also included. The history of ancient Egypt, the Middle East, Greece, Rome, and the shaping of Europe during the Middle Ages are closely examined through the construct of civilization. This course is centered on the historical events and forces that molded the Western world, but also carefully considers the study of Islam, India, China, and other Eastern cultures that have exerted considerable historical influences upon the global arena. A major research paper is required. Analytical writing and oral skills are fostered. (Full year, 1 credit) HUBRIS IN ANCIENT HISTORY (HIS 150)

This honors-level course examines topics in the ancient history of Egypt, the Near and Middle East, Greece, and Rome. Emphasis is placed on particular historical themes, or “problems,” which are examined through in-depth critical analysis, research, class discussion, event simulation, and debate. The course examines the issue of hubris as its overarching theme, in an attempt to demonstrate that hubris is not only a driving force in history, but also one of humanity’s gravest concerns. Students are expected to exercise critical writing and thinking, and develop their own perspectives by offering contrasting historical interpretations. Readings in the ancient classics and of primary and secondary sources are included in the course of study. A major research paper is required. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit)

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

GRADE 10 WORLD HISTORY 2 (HIS 201)

This course examines the cultural interactions between Europe and the world, and how those interactions created conflict and shaped the present global scene. While focusing on the growth of the Modern European nation-state, the course brings out how European interaction with the world helped to transform it and was transformed by it. Examples of this interaction are colonialism, world wars, and the spread of Western European political and economic systems. The course pays particular attention to the diverse cultures of China and Japan, Southeast Asia, India, the Middle East, Africa, and Latin America, and attempts to create the global synthesis of today’s socioeconomic and political arena. (Full year, 1 credit) WORLD HISTORY 2 – HONORS (HIS 200)

This course is a yearlong survey of world history from 1450 to World War I. Its focus is on the political, economic, social, religious, artistic, and intellectual affairs that influenced the development of diverse cultures in Europe, the Middle East, India, China, and Latin America. Emphasis is placed on historical themes, which among others include secularization, humanism, absolutism, mercantilism, socialism, and imperialism. The course requires student commitment to deal with a content-driven environment, where a higher level of proficiency in reading, writing, and critical analysis is necessary in order to succeed. Students must demonstrate independence and initiative as they work and study and be motivated to take what is taught in class to the next level of interpretation and analysis with limited assistance. There is extensive reading and analysis of primary sources, and student participation in class discussions and debates is essential. A major research paper is required. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit)

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vi. history

GRADE 11 UNITED STATES HISTORY – Honors (HIS 300)

This course is designed to provide students with the analytical skills and factual knowledge necessary to deal critically with America and its relationship to the world today. In surveying Amerian history from the Colonial era to the present, students focus on in-depth examinations of events and trends in the nation’s history that are core to the understanding of the development of the politics, economy, culture, and society of contemporary America. The course, which is discussion based, studies a range of materials, including primary documents, films and documentaries, music, photography, and historical monuments. Students enrolled in the course are expected to demonstrate a high level of independence and initiative in their approach to their work. A major research paper is required. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit) UNITED STATES HISTORY (HIS 301)

This course is a yearlong survey of American history from colonial times to the present. It reflects the assumption that we are the products of our history and that we need to understand the historical influences upon our current assumptions and behavior as citizens of our nation and the world. Special emphasis is placed on seeing the events of the past through the eyes of all the diverse labor, ethnic, and gender groups that comprise and have always comprised American society. Topics include the origins of the American Revolution, the Constitution, the Civil War and Reconstruction, reforms from Progressivism through the New Deal, the emergence of the U.S. as a world power, the Great Society era, and the Cold War. A major research paper is required. Analytical writing and oral debating skills are emphasized. (Full year, 1 credit) ADVANCED PLACEMENT UNITED STATES HISTORY (HIS 500)

This is a college level course that offers able students preparation for the AP examination. Topics stressed include in-depth critical analysis of political, socioeconomic, and cultural themes: domestic, foreign, and economic affairs, labor, ethnic, racial, and gender issues, and the growth of an American identity. Heavy emphasis is placed on the development of critical

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

writing: the critique, formulation, and defense of interpretive theses, the analysis and interpretation of primary source documents. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit) ELECTIVES AMERICA IN THE SIXTIES (HIS 460)

As the most controversial and divisive period to face America since the Civil War, the Sixties tore at the moral fiber of the United States and profoundly changed America. This honors-level course is an indepth examination of a variety of questions regarding that tumultuous decade. What was the Vietnam War about and how did the U.S. get involved? Why was the War so controversial? How did the civil rights movement and the students rights movement shape those years? What led to the development of a unique counterculture by the mid-Sixties? What were the experiences of those who fought in the War and those who participated in the various movements at home? How has the legacy of all these developments impacted the America we experience today? The course seeks to examine these issues through the eyes of those who lived during the Sixties, and thus makes use of “eyewitnesses” from the period, ranging from veterans to activists to government officials, who visit class or welcome off-campus visits. The course also accesses memoirs, short stories, film, and music from or about the era. HIS 300 or HIS 301 are prerequisites to this course. (Semester 1, .50 credit) GENOCIDES OF THE TWENTIETH CENTURY (HIS 465)

To understand the history of genocide in the 20th century, we examine the Armenian genocide of the Christians serving in the Ottoman army, the genocide of the Jews at the hands of the Germans in the Holocaust of World War II, and the genocide of the Tutsi at the hands of the Hutus in Rwanda. The German Nazis and European Jews serve as the central focus of this inquiry. From this focal point, the discussions branch out into related areas showing how prejudice can escalate into genocide. (Semester, .50 credit)

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vi. history

ADVANCED PLACEMENT EUROPEAN HISTORY (HIS 510)

This is a college-level course that offers able students preparation for the AP examination. The course involves students in an in-depth critical discussion of European political and socioeconomic institutions, while also examining the individual development of European nation-states and their national cultures, as well as European intellectual history and the history of art. Topics covered include the Renaissance, the Reformation, the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment, Royal Absolutism and Enlightened Despotism, the Era of Revolutions from the French to the Russian Revolution, 19th century ideologies, and the 20th century to the present. Students analyze and interpret primary and secondary sources and engage in intensive reading and writing. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit) possible HISTORY COURSE SEQUENCING PATHS

Movement between and among the paths listed below is permitted, pending departmental approval. H = Honors course. Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

World Hist 1

World Hist 2

U.S. Hist

Electives

World Hist 1

World Hist 2

Electives

U.S. Hist

Hubris in Anc Hist-H

World Hist 2–H

AP U.S. Hist

AP European Hist

Hubris in Anc Hist-H

World Hist 2 – H

AP European Hist

AP U.S. Hist

Hubris in Anc Hist-H

World Hist 2–H

AP Conflict/ Consensus; European Hist Amer as Global Pwr

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

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vii. mathematics

Mathematics The Mathematics Faculty works to enhance and expand student understanding of pattern, order, relation, and structure, and the development of abilities of logical analysis, deduction, conjecture and proof, and calculation within the context of these patterns and structures. Students learn that the process used in obtaining a solution is at least as important as a correct answer. The Faculty also works to ensure that each student is thoroughly familiar with analytical, computational, and problem-solving methods, as well as logical patterns of reasoning.

GEOMETRY – HONORS (MAT 200)

Requirement: 3 credits: Algebra 1, Algebra 2 and Trigonometry, and Geometry

ALGEBRA 2 AND TRIGONOMETRY (MAT 301)

ALGEBRA 1 (MAT 101)

This course develops facility in working with numbers, tables, graphs, equations, and inequalities. Students focus on solving word problems and reading carefully, doing hands-on labs that require them to collect and analyze data, make conjectures, and draw conclusions. Topics of study include: variables, expressions, equations, graphs that are linear and quadratic, linear vs. non-linear data, systems of equations, inequalities, laws of exponents, functions, and other traditional Algebra 1 topics. This course uses a spiraling approach, with topics revisited many times throughout the course. (Full year, 1 credit) GEOMETRY (MAT 201)

This course is tied to algebraic processes. By doing hands-on labs, students investigate symmetry and transformations, angles and lines, quadrilaterals and polygons, congruency and similarity, triangles and quadrilaterals, trigonometry including the laws of sine and cosine, proofs and constructions, and circles and conics. Coordinate geometry is woven throughout the entire course. Geometer’s Sketchpad software is used in many topics, and is an integral part of the course. The course uses a spiraling approach: ideas are revisited several times and connected to other topics. (Full year, 1 credit)

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

In addition to all topics covered in the non-honors Geometry course, students use Exeter materials – Math 2 – on a daily basis. Linear motion is explored, leading to the use of parametric equations and vectors in two and three dimensions. Optimization problems regarding paths of travel are continuously discussed throughout the course. Students in this course are exposed to more rigorous proofs and geometric constructions. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit)

This course is an in-depth continuation and extension of algebraic concepts studied in Algebra 1. Emphasis is on a functional approach directed towards applications. Topics covered include absolute value, functions, variation, systems of equations in two and three variables, sequences and series, exponential and logarithmic functions, rational exponents, radicals, complex numbers, quadratic equations, the coordinate plane, the distance formula, inequalities, and trigonometry. (Full year, 1 credit) ALGEBRA 2 AND TRIGONOMETRY – HONORS (MAT 300)

This course is a rigorous study of the real number system, linear equations and functions, polynomials, rational expressions, quadratic equations and functions, complex numbers, conic sections, systems of equations in three variables, logarithmic and exponential functions, sequences and series, and trigonometry. The emphasis is on a functional approach directed toward continuing work in mathematics. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit) Algebra 2 (MAT 303)

This course starts with the review of the major Algebra 1 topics and continues with an in-depth extension into Algebra 2 topics. A special emphasis is placed on the understanding of key functions such as linear, quadratic, polynomial, rational, exponential and logarithmic, as well as on equations related to these functions. (Full year, 1 credit)

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vii. mathematics

INTRO TO PRE-CALCULUS 1 (MAT 441) INTRO TO PRE-CALCULUS 2 (MAT 445)

These courses are for students who need to improve their algebra skills and work more with functions and trigonometry before taking Pre-Calculus. The courses involve an in-depth study of polynomial, rational, trigonometric, logarithmic, and exponential functions and equations, as well as an introduction to statistics. Prerequisite for the second semester is successful completion of the first semester course. Students may take the first semester course as a stand-alone course. (Semester, .50 credit; Full year, 1 credit) PRE-CALCULUS (MAT 401)

This course is designed to deepen understanding of functions in their various forms. Focal topics include linear and polynomial functions, rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and trigonometric functions. Particular emphasis is placed on application, and key concepts from upper-level mathematics are highlighted when possible. Additional topics include linear systems, matrices, sequences, series, and probability. (Full year, 1 credit) PRE-CALCULUS – HONORS (MAT 400)

This course is a rigorous study of elementary functions, theory of equations, limits of sequences and functions, vectors, trigonometry, matrices and transformations, analytic geometry with conic sections, and different coordinate systems. Emphasis is on the analysis of functions and graphic representations as preparation for the study of calculus. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit)

STATISTICS (MAT 431)

This course is designed to help students learn how to collect, organize, and interpret data, plan a study, identify relevant patterns using descriptive statistics, and test hypotheses using inferential statistics. Course content includes descriptive and inferential statistical methods. The TI-83 or TI-83 Plus is integrated into this course, as is the use of “Fathom” on the computer. (Semester 2, .50 credit) CALCULUS (MAT 414)

This course is designed for strong mathematics students who may not be planning a major in mathematics or directly related fields such as engineering. It serves students who desire a strong fourth-year, college-level mathematics course that prepares them for studies in such areas as economics, psychology, and health-related fields. The depth, breadth, pace, and rigor of the course will be somewhat below what students in AP Calculus experience. Topics include all or most of those traditionally found in the first two semesters of college calculus. A primary focus of the course is real-life applications. There are also opportunities to review concepts from Pre-Calculus. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit) ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS – AB (MAT 500)

This course is an in-depth study of basic differential and integral calculus. Topics include the derivative and its applications, maximum-minimum and related-rates problems, the definite integral and its applications to area and volume problems, and techniques of integration. Preparation for the AP examination is an implicit part of the course. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit)

DISCRETE MATHEMATICS (MAT 421)

This course is designed to provide students who are not planning to major in engineering or natural sciences in college with knowledge of basic topics in mathematics. These topics included management science, linear programming, coding and transmitting information, game theory, symmetry and pattern, and modeling in mathematics. The course includes many contemporary applications. Problem solving involves graphing calculators and other technology. Support materials such as videos, CDs, online applets and quizzes, and hands-on materials attract visual and kinesthetic learners. (Semester 1, .50 credit) 2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

ADVANCED PLACEMENT CALCULUS – BC (MAT 520)

This course is designed to represent college-level mathematics, and is considerably more extensive than AP Calculus – AB. The course covers the calculus of functions, including such topics as techniques of integration, infinite series, the calculus of polar coordinate functions, parametric equations, vector functions, improper integrals, and simple differential equations. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit)

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vii. mathematics

ADVANCED PLACEMENT STATISTICS (MAT 510)

This course introduces students to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Students are exposed to four broad conceptual themes: exploring data, planning a study, anticipating patterns, using probability and simulations, and statistical inferencing. Preparation for the AP exam is an implicit part of this course. PreCalculus (MAT 401 or MAT 400) is a prerequisite/corequisite for this course. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit)

possible MATHEMATICS COURSE SEQUENCING PATHS

Movement between and among the paths listed below is permitted, pending departmental approval. H = Honors course.

MULTIVARIABLE CALCULUS – HONORS (MAT 580)

This course builds on the foundation of the singlevariable course. Students study the calculus of vector functions, with emphasis on functions defining curves in the plane, as well as curves and surfaces in space. The course treats explicit, parametric, and implicit representations of curves and surfaces, along with their tangent lines and planes. The use of partial derivatives, directional derivatives, and gradients is explored. The study of integrals includes iterated integrals and multiple integrals. Applications include extrema problems (with Lagrange multipliers), volume and surface area, and physical interpretation of vector field theory. Advanced Placement Calculus – BC (MAT 520) is a prerequisite for this course. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit)

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

Algebra 1

Geometry

Algebra 2 and Trig

Pre-Calc or Discrete/ Statistics

Algebra 1

Geom – H

Alg 2 and Trig – H

Pre-Calc – H

Algebra 1

Geometry

Algebra 2

Trig offered

Geometry

Alg 2/Trig

PreCalculus

Calculus (only after Pre-Calc)

Geometry

Alg 2/Trig

Intro to PreCalc 1; Intro to Pre-Calc 2

Pre-Calculus

Geom – H

Alg 2 and Trig – H

Pre-Calc – H AP Calc AB or AP Calc BC

in 2010-2011

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

16


VIii. science

Science The Science Faculty provides a collaborative educational experience in which to study the physical world by reviewing current knowledge, manipulating variables or components, and interpreting phenomena. Students are challenged to expand their knowledge bases and develop the ability to use inquiry, problem recognition and resolution, critical thinking, and research while interacting with technical information. Students are exposed to all three basic sciences to enable them to perceive the world through multiple perspectives, make connections, and see patterns within and between disciplines. Requirement: 3 sciences courses, selected from among Introduction to Biology and Chemistry, Biology, Chemistry, and Physics. All Science courses include a comprehensive laboratory component that enhances class work, develops critical thinking, and builds strong lab skills. GRADE 9 introduction to biology and Chemistry (SCI 105)

This course recognizes that there is a natural overlap and integration between chemistry and biology, and introduces students to these fields in preparation for later science courses. Specifically, students are trained to use the Scientific Method as an advanced strategy for problem solving. They develop an appreciation for, and working knowledge of, skills such as critical thinking, data acquisition, and interpretation, as well as a respect for and use of laboratory apparatuses. Students are also taught a rigorous use of the mathematical methods employed in the sciences. During the first semester, topics include interactions of matter, measurement, atomic structure and the periodic table, chemical bonding, chemical formulas and equations, and basic stoichiometry. During the second semester, a biochemical approach to life is explored. This approach includes a biological review of levels of organization, characteristics of living systems, and the diversity of life. Other topics include molecular biology, cellular biology, ecology, and genetic evolution. This course prepares students for subsequent year-long courses in chemistry, physics, and biology. (Full year, 1 credit)

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

BIOLOGY 1 – HONORS (SCI 101)

This course is based on a biochemical approach to the study of life. It includes a review of levels of organization, characteristics of living systems, and the diversity of life. Other topics include molecular biology, cellular biology, ecology, genetics, evolution, and animal behavior. (Full year, 1 credit) BIOLOGY 1 – HONORS (SCI 100)

This course is designed for students with strong writing and verbal skills, as well as a keen interest in biology. Students explore thoroughly the fundamental principles underlying molecular biology and genetics and investigate the plant and animal kingdoms, with a particular emphasis on human biology. (Full year, 1 credit) GRADE 10 CHEMISTRY 1 (SCI 201)

This course introduces students to the fundamental laws governing interactions of matter. Students study theoretical, physical, and inorganic chemistry and analyze a variety of word problems. The course covers measurement, matter and energy, atomic structure and the periodic table, chemical bonding, chemical formulas and equations, and stoichiometry. The gas laws, kinetic molecular theory, reactions in aqueous solutions, and acids and bases are introduced. Development of mathematical skills and creative problem solving are important components of this course. (Full year, 1 credit) CHEMISTRY 1 – HONORS (SCI 200)

This course is designed for accelerated students who are particularly interested in the study of chemistry and have strong math skills. It is a survey course of basic topics in physical, theoretical, and inorganic chemistry. The following topics are covered: measurement, matter and energy, atomic structure, electron configuration and the periodic table, bonding, writing and interpreting chemical formulas and equations, stoichiometry, mole theory, gas laws, reactions in aqueous solutions, basic thermodynamics and equilibrium, and acids and bases. Class discussions include the impact of chemistry on society. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit)

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viii. science

GRADE 11 PHYSICS 1 (SCI 301)

This introductory course employs a mathematical, problem-solving approach. Students explore basic physical laws that govern everyday phenomena and use trigonometry, algebra, and graphical analysis to solve related problems. Topics include motion, forces, energy and heat, wave motion and sound, light and optics, electricity, magnetism, and nuclear physics. Laboratory work is based on the collection and analysis of real-time data using graphing calculators and various computer programs. (Full year, 1 credit) PHYSICS 1 – HONORS (SCI 300)

This survey course is designed for students with very strong mathematical skills. Students are required to solve challenging problems graphically as well as with trigonometry and advanced algebra. Topics covered in depth include Newtonian mechanics, thermal physics, electricity and magnetism, waves and sound, light and optics, and nuclear physics. Students use computer programs to collect and analyze data in the laboratory. Prerequisite is Algebra 2 & Tigonometry (MAT 301) or Algebra 2 & Trigonometry – Honors (MAT 300). The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit) CONCEPTUAL PHYSICS (SCI 305)

This course introduces students to fundamental concepts through an inquiry-based approach and thoughtprovoking demonstrations. The course includes many hands-on activities that relate physics to real-world experiences. The topics covered during the first semester include linear and circular motion, Newton’s Laws of Motion, projectile motion, momentum, planetary motion, and energy. The second semester follows with waves, sound, light, optics, simple electricity and magnetism, and concludes with nuclear physics. The course employs basic algebra and graphical analysis techniques to solve problems. (Full year, 1 credit) ELECTIVES

tics, and genetics. The college-level text and lab activities are supplemented by readings from journals, newspapers, and web sites. During the second semester, students help to decide the areas of biology that are studied. In the past these topics have included genetics, immunology, anatomy and physiology, and marine ecology. Laboratory work is an integral part of the entire course, and each student finishes the year designing and performing an independent lab project. Students may take this course at the honors level with departmental approval. At the honors level, students are required to study topics in greater depth and demonstrate greater understanding of the material through different and more challenging assignments. (Full year, 1 credit) PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY (SCI 423; Honors-SCI 440) ORGANIC CHEMISTRY (SCI 424; Honors-SCI 450)

This course sequence introduces students to advanced chemistry concepts in Semester 1. Physical Chemistry focuses on predicting reaction viability, equilibrium position, and rate. Topics include catalysis, solution chemistry, redox reactions, acid-base chemistry, and electrochemistry. Semester 2 students are introduced to organic chemistry and study hybridization and bonding, isomerism, and nomenclature of hydrocarbons, as well as a few basic functional groups. Polymerization and nucleophilic substitution and elimination reactions are introduced, as well as spectroscopy. Students master a wide variety of collegelevel lab skills. Students can elect to take the course in either semester as the topics are independent of each other, or in both semesters, resulting in a yearlong experience. Students have the option to take this course at the honors level with departmental approval. At the honors level, students are required to study topics in greater depth and demonstrate greater understanding of the material through different and more challenging assignments. (Semester, .50 credit; Full year, 1 credit)

BIOLOGY 2 (SCI 411) BIOLOGY 2 – HONORS (SCI 410)

This course begins with a review of topics basic to various branches of biology. These include basic inorganic and organic chemistry, cell biology, bioenerge-

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

18


viii. science

METEOROLOGY (SCI 421)

This is a descriptive course that uses basic algebra and trigonometry to support a qualitative approach to the subject. The course covers topics in the structure of the Earth’s atmosphere (gases, density, pressure, temperature), causes of local and global winds, cloud formation, storm formation and movement (hurricanes, tornadoes, thunderstorms), climate and climate change, and air pollution. Students use realtime data from the School’s weather station as well as data from the nationwide network. Physics 1 (SCI 301 or SCI 300) is a prerequisite. (Full year, 1 credit) FORENSICS (SCI 481)

This course is designed for seniors who have a basic knowledge of biology, chemistry, and physics, and who wish to learn about current technologies police rely on in order to apprehend criminal perpetrators and link them through trace evidence to crime scenes. There are a significant number of laboratory experiments in this course. Students learn about current scientific methods, including DNA analysis, forensic entomology, fingerprint collection, trace evidence from firearms and explosives, computer ballistic examination, drug and alcohol analyses, and arson and explosion detection technologies. Career paths in criminal science are also explored. (Semester 1 or Semester 2, .50 credit) PHYSICAL ANTHROPOLOGY – HUMAN EVOLUTION (SCI 430)

This honors-level course focuses on the evolution of Homo sapiens sapiens. After a brief review of genetics and anatomy, students begin a study of primatology. Primate anatomy and behavior are highlighted. Students then study each hominid that has been discovered, starting with Sahelanthropus tchadensis seven million years ago. The skeletal morphology, environment, and relation of each species to those earlier and later species are explored. Comparative osteology-anatomy and osteometry (measuring skeletal features) constitute lab topics. Casts of actual skulls are used extensively. Research questions revolve around the evolution of bipedal locomotion, the questions of whether earlier hominids were scavengers or hunters, when tools were first used, and the relationship of modern man to earlier species such as

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

Homo erectus and Homo neanderthalensis. The course ends with a discussion of the first evidence of culture in earlier man from the fabrication of Oldowan and later Acheulian tool assemblages to the birth of “cave art” at Lascaux. (First semester, .50 credit) Oceanography (SCI 427)

This lab-intensive course explores the oceans through the physics, chemistry, geology, and biology that interact to form the most abundant, complex, and dynamic environment on the planet. This course introduces students to the factors that contribute to ocean circulation, waves, and tides. Chemical properties and processes in the sea, such as dissolved oxygen, alkalinity, and nutrient cycles, and their effects on biology are covered. The local marine environment is also studied from a variety of perspectives, including the role of fisheries and human impact on Long Island Sound. (Semester .50 credit) ADVANCED PLACEMENT BIOLOGY (SCI 500)

This rigorous course uses college-level texts and laboratory materials, and is designed to be the equivalent of an introductory college Biology course usually taken by Biology majors during their first year. As such, the course examines in detail the biochemical and biophysical principles that underlie plant and animal morphology, physiology, and genetics. Students are asked to interpret complicated laboratory phenomena and to formulate their own conclusions from the data. Biology 1 (SCI 101 or SCI 100) and Chemistry 1 (SCI 201 or SCI 200) are prerequisites. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit) ADVANCED PLACEMENT CHEMISTRY (SCI 520)

This is a college-level general chemistry course covering the following topics: structure of matter, kinetic theory of gases, states of matter, chemical reactions and equilibria, chemical kinetics, and thermodynamics. Theoretical and physical chemistry are the foundations of this course, and an overview of inorganic and organic chemistry is included. The course incorporates a wide variety of labs that promote students’ ability to use basic and sophisticated undergraduate lab equipment, as well as to observe, record, analyze, and interpret data. Prerequisites are Chemistry 1 (SCI 201 or SCI 200) and Physics 1 (SCI 301 or

19


viii. science

SCI 300). Precalculus (MAT 401 or MAT 400) is also a pre- or corequisite course. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit) ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS – B (SCI 530)

This senior elective is offered as a second year of physics for students with a strong interest in science and/or engineering who have strong math skills. Calculus is seldom used, although some theoretical developments may use basic calculus concepts. The following topics are covered in great depth: Newtonian mechanics, waves, electromagnetic radiation and optics, nuclear physics, and electricity and magnetism. Also included in the course are fluid mechanics and thermal physics, along with temperature and heat as they relate to thermodynamics. Prerequisites are Physics 1 – Honors (SCI 300) and Pre-Calculus (SCI 401 or SCI 400). Students use computer programs to collect and analyze data for the required AP labs. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit) ADVANCED PLACEMENT PHYSICS – C (SCI 540)

This theoretical course is designed for the most advanced mathematics and science students and prepares them for the entire AP Physics – C examination. It covers the mechanics and electro-magnetism that comprise the entire syllabus of first-year collegelevel Physics courses. Physics 1 – Honors (SCI 300) and Calculus (MAT 410, MAT 500, or MAT 520) are prerequisites for the course. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit)

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

Intro to Biology and Chemistry

Biology or Chemistry or Physics

Biology or Chemistry or Physics

Electives

Biology 1

Chemistry 1

Physics

Electives

Biology 1

Chemistry 1

Electives

Physics

Biology 1–H

Chemistry 1 – H

AP Biology Physics –H

Biology 1–H

Chemistry 1–H

Physics –H

AP Biology or AP Chem or AP Physics –

B or Any two of the above

possible sCIENCE COURSE SEQUENCING PATHS

Movement between and among the paths listed below is permitted, pending departmental approval. H = Honors course.

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

20


ix. modern languages

Modern Languages The Modern Languages Faculty empowers students to understand and appreciate the diverse values, beliefs, biases, and worldviews of non-English speaking peoples. Students explore linguistic systems through a variety of culturally authentic materials. The Faculty employs multimedia resources to expand and refine exposure to the art, literature, and history of the Spanish- and French-speaking world. Through the acquisition of another language and a more intimate acquaintance with other cultures, students are better equipped to perceive and interpret the world and their place in it. Requirement: French, Spanish, or Chinese through Level 3. Chinese Chinese 1 (CHI 101)

This course serves as an introduction to the study of the Mandarin language. Instruction in spoken Chinese makes use of the Pinyin system of Roman letters, while written Chinese makes use of simplified characters that are used in Mainland China. Emphasis is placed on developing pronunciation and speaking skills with special focus on mastering the four tones used in Chinese. As students’ vocabulary and pronunciation skills increase, theyare given short reading and writing assignments. Chinese language instruction is embedded in the context of Chinese culture. Students should have mastered some 250 characters by the end of the course and should be able to read and write simple texts in Chinese. (Full year, 1 credit) Chinese 2 (CHI 201) Chinese 2 – HONORS (CHI 200)

Students continue to develop their writing, speaking, and listening skills in Chinese 2. Vocabulary and characters already introduced are reviewed and expanded. Grammatical lessons continue to be taught through the context of Chinese cultural units. Instruction makes use of all modes: speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Special emphasis is on mastering written characters introduced through the year. More advanced grammatical structures are introduced. Computer assisted language learning takes place through the use of programs using Chinese characters that rely on students’ ability to recognize character combinations and employ them in creating original texts.

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

Students may take this course at the honors level with departmental approval. At the honors level, students are required to study topics in greater depth and demonstrate greater understanding of the material through different and more challenging assignments. (Full year, 1 credit) Chinese 3 (CHI 301) Chinese 3 - HONORS (CHI 300)

This course continues to build on the material introduced and mastered in the first two levels of Chinese. Students will have mastered close to 750 characters by the end of Chinese 3. New material is introduced that expands on students’ ability to manipulate characters and vocabulary in novel situations. The four modes of speaking, listening, writing, and reading continue to be utilized so that students experience Chinese as they would any language used in daily life. An increased stress on creating original written pieces and oral presentations is made throughout the year. Computer assisted language learning programs continue to be employed that further develop students’ capacity to recognize an even larger number of characters and grammatical structures. Students may take this course at the honors level with departmental approval. At the honors level, students are required to study topics in greater depth and demonstrate greater understanding of the material through different and more challenging assignments. (Full year, 1 credit) possible Chinese COURSE SEQUENCING PATHS

Movement between and among the paths listed below is permitted, pending departmental approval. Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

Chinese 1

Chinese 2

Chinese 3

Chinese 4 (not yet offered)

Chinese 1

Chinese 2 – H Chinese 3 – H Chinese 4 (not yet offered)

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ix. modern languages

FRENCH FRENCH 1 (FRE 101)

This course is designed for students who have no previous knowledge of French or whose background in the language is found to be relatively weak. Content includes French grammar, verbs, vocabulary, and some idioms. There is an emphasis on speaking and understanding basic written and spoken French. Various aspects of French culture are discussed within the context of units on family life, friends, school, and food. (Full year, 1 credit) FRENCH 2 (FRE 201)

This course combines a review of previously learned structures and the development of language proficiency according to the needs and abilities of students. Oral work is encouraged through various class activities. Speaking, reading, and writing skills are improved with emphasis on increasing vocabulary. Cultural material is presented in greater detail at this level. (Full year, 1 credit) FRENCH 2 – HONORS (FRE 200)

This course is designed for students who have successfully completed one full year of French. This course continues the development of fundamental language skills and the study of new vocabulary and grammar. Balance is sought among the major areas of aural comprehension, speaking, reading, and writing, as well as awareness of French and Francophone civilization and culture. Students are encouraged to write on various vocabulary-related subjects. Finally, the comprehension of intermediate- level readings is also stressed during the second semester. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit) FRENCH 3 (FRE 301)

This course includes extensive review and a broadening of knowledge of grammar, verbs, vocabulary, and French and Francophone culture and civilization. There is an emphasis on practical applications of the language, including extensive oral work, as well as correct written expression of thoughts. This course completes the requirement, although students are encouraged to take language courses through their senior year. (Full year, 1 credit)

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

FRENCH 3 – HONORS (FRE 300)

During the first semester, this course includes the review and broadening of grammar, verbs, vocabulary, and idioms. During the the second semester students learn to read more complex, authentic texts and continue to develop their writing skills. French and Francophone culture and civilization are studied through selected readings. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit) FRENCH 4 (FRE 401) FRENCH 5 (FRE 501)

These courses are designed to refine and strengthen fundamental skills and develop a more sophisticated understanding and use of the language. Intermediate grammatical structures are thoroughly reviewed. Classes are conducted in French and a reasonable level of conversational ability is sought through frequent discussions and oral presentations. Reading and/or discussing diverse, authentic materials, as well as viewing films, stress the use of practical vocabulary and the study of Francophone cultures. (Full year, 1 credit) INTRODUCTION TO AP FRENCH LANGUAGE (FRE 420)

This course is intended for advanced French students who have successfully completed Level 3 and who are ready to move at a faster pace and to undertake more demanding language material. Although not exclusively, the course leads to the AP Language examination. While reading short stories, poetry, French magazines, and viewing films, students regularly practice sophisticated grammatical structures and systematically increase their vocabulary. They discuss the works, write compositions, and are assessed orally, which all enhance their ability to use the language. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit)

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ix. modern languages

ADVANCED PLACEMENT FRENCH language (FRE 500)

French 500 is designed to advance the proficiency of students and to prepare them for the AP French Language exam. Specifically, students develop their speaking, writing, and reading comprehension skills, as well as their knowledge of the Francophone world. Students’ proficiency is regularly assessed through oral participation, written work, grammar, and vocabulary tests, and through the reading of authentic materials. Practice AP exams are used throughout the year in preparation for the AP exam. (Full year, 1 credit)

possible FRENCH COURSE SEQUENCING PATHS

Movement between and among the paths listed below is permitted, pending departmental approval. H = Honors course. Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

French 1

French 2

French 3

French 4/5

French 2

French 3

French 4/5 French 4/5

French 2

French 3

French 4/5 Intro to AP French Language

French 2–H

French 3–H

Intro to AP French Language

AP French Language

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

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ix. modern languages

SPANISH SPANISH 1 (SPA 101)

In this course there is strong emphasis on basic structure, verb tense (past and present), idiom, and vocabulary building. Vocabulary is taught in context. Listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills are given equal importance, as is the development of awareness of the cultural diversity of Spanishspeaking countries. (Full year, 1 credit) SPANISH 2 (SPA 201)

This course expands students’ exposure to basic skills. Emphasis is given to the four basic skills: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. Continued study of structure, mood (both indicative and subjunctive), more sophisticated vocabulary, and idioms are the focus of this course. Oral proficiency is encouraged by the use of Spanish for communication in the classroom. Cultural material is presented in greater detail at this level. (Full year, 1 credit) SPANISH 2 – HONORS (SPA 200)

This course follows essentially the same format as the Spanish 2 course, but is more intensive and moves at a more rapid pace. Oral reports on cultural topics, creative and expository writing activities, and the reading of short literary selections are included in this course. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit) SPANISH 3 (SPA 301)

Structure and verb tenses are reviewed in this course. Vocabulary building, acquisition of idioms, and proficiency in speaking and writing form the basic foundations of this course. Short stories are read, discussed, and serve as references for written work. The study of Hispanic civilization and culture is continued. This course completes the requirement, although students are encouraged to take language courses through their senior year. (Full year, 1 credit)

styles, among other literary elements. Students write extensively in this course, constantly creating their own grammatical contexts, an activity that further bridges the gap between language and meaning, and allows them to accurately express their arguments regarding any given, open-ended topic. Significant attention is paid to the history of Spanish-speaking countries in order to give more contextual scope to the works that emerged from notable periods. Class participation is a fundamental part of fueling discussions and is expected consistently of every student. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit) SPANISH 4 (SPA 401) SPANISH 5 (SPA 501)

These courses focus on the language-culture areas, beginning with Spain and following the exploration and conquest of the New World to Latin America. Historical and contemporary events, geography, Indian cultures, art, and the relationship with the United States are some of the topics studied. Films, videocassettes, periodicals, the internet, and cultural artifacts are used, as is textual material. Satisfactory completion of Spanish 3 (SPA 301 or SPA 300) is a prerequisite for this course sequence. (Full year, 1 credit) INTRODUCTION TO AP SPANISH LITERATURE (SPA 410)

Reading and writing about short stories, novellas, plays, poetry and films, as well as developing practical conversational skills are of primary importance at this level. Because the course serves as preparation for the AP examination, particular attention is given to the development of the techniques of literary analysis. The continued study of Hispanic culture is achieved through historical studies, biographical works, and the literature of Spanishspeaking countries. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit)

SPANISH 3 – HONORS (SPA 300)

This course focuses on the continued acquisition of verb tenses, vocabulary, and idiomatic expressions. As these tools are refined and perfected, a new world of reading, writing, and discussion opens up for students, one in which they are able to delve into more complex texts and analyze their meanings, characters, and 2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

24


ix. modern languages

ADVANCED PLACEMENT SPANISH LITERATURE (SPA 500)

This course forms the second half of the AP syllabus. The literature studied includes representative works from Spain’s Siglo de Oro, such as Tirso de Molina’s “Burlador de Sevilla,” and “Don Quijote,” by Cervantes. The techniques of literary analysis are further refined. Students are required to write analyses of each work, as well as essays on themes used by different authors. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Full year, 1 credit)

possible SPANISH COURSE SEQUENCING PATHS

Movement between and among the paths listed below is permitted, pending departmental approval. H = Honors course. Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

Spanish 1

Spanish 2

Spanish 3

Spanish 4

Spanish 2

Spanish 3

Spanish 4/5

Spanish 4/5 or Spain: History and Art or Intro to AP Span Lit

Spanish 2

Spanish 3

Electives

Electives

Spanish 2–H

Spanish 3–H

Intro to AP Span Lit

AP Spanish Lit

ELECTIVES SPAIN: HISTORY AND ART (SPA 420)

This honors-level course explores the importance of historical events from the reign of Catholic kings, the independence of the Americas, the Spanish Civil War, and contemporary Spain. In conjunction with the history of Spain, which developed via the convergence of a variety of cultures, students study the evolution of Spanish art through sculpture, architecture, and painting. Particular attention is paid to the many influences on Spanish art from the Roman occupation, Islamic period, and later trends from Europe. The works of contemporary Spanish painters, such as Picasso, Gaudi, and Miró, are also considered. This course is taught entirely in Spanish. (Full year, 1 credit)

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x. social sciences

Social Sciences Requirement: One semester each of Life Skills 1 and Life Skills 2.

artifacts. The culminating project is a field report based on their findings, supplemented by documentary research.

GRADES 9 AND 10 LIFE SKILLS 1 (SOC 101)

This course focuses on issues of transitioning into high school. Discussion-based classes concentrate on selected topics related to personal wellness, including taking care of all aspects of the self in the physical, mental, and social realms. Students focus on goal setting, decision making, self-values clarification, and building the skills of refusal, assertive communication, and self-advocacy. This course meets three days per rotation, and is required of all students in either Grade 9 or Grade 10. (Semester, Pass/Fail grading, .25 credit) GRADES 11 AND 12 LIFE SKILLS 2 (SOC 301)

This course focuses on building the skills that help students’ transitions into the post-high school world. Discussion-based classes focus on building the skills of refusal, effective communication, stress management, and empathetic listening. Guest speakers, topical videos, and role-play situations enhance classroom conversations throughout the semester. This course meets two days per rotation, and is required of all students in either Grade 11 or Grade 12. (Semester, Pass/Fail grading, .25 credit) ARCHAEOLOGY - FIELD SCHOOL (SOC 321) ARCHAEOLOGY - FIELD SCHOOL - Honors (SOC 330)

This course has two functions: to introduce students to the fields of prehistoric and historic archaeology and to teach field and lab methods used in archaeology. The first half of the course focuses on questions that have been answered through archaeology and highlights a number of case studies. In addition, basic research approaches to prehistoric and historic problems are reviewed. Students read a number of field reports, as well as more theoretical articles that use archaeological data and approaches. In the second half of the course, students conduct an archaeological dig at an historic site in Stamford. They conduct documentary research as well as field excavations. Lab classes are dedicated to cleaning and documenting

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

Students may take this course at the honors level with departmental approval. At the honors level, students are required to study topics in greater depth and demonstrate greater understanding of the material through different and more challenging assignments. (Semester 2, .50 credit) CRITICAL ISSUES IN AMERICAN GOVERNMENT (SOC 370)

This honors level course is designed to give students a perspective on government and politics in the United States through an in-depth focus on four primary areas of concentration: the Presidency, the Congress, civil liberties as interpreted by the Supreme Court, and the news media. The course is taught with the conviction that students want to understand the dynamic relationships among America’s governing institutions and how changes in the balance of power among those institutions impact their lives. In each concentration, after an initial introduction to the subject, a detailed case study involving a current controversial issue will be utilized. For example, with respect to the Presidency, the case study will explore issues associated with the expansion of Presidential powers during the War on Terror, focusing particularly on the tensions between the President and Congress over such issues as limitations on torture and warrantless eavesdropping on American citizens. Seminarstyle discussions will be the focus of the course, although there will be a number of debates and roleplaying exercises. Moreover, students will have the opportunity to interview a current or former government official or journalist in connection with several of the case studies. (Semester 2, .50 credit)

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x. social sciences

CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY (SOC 331)

This course examines living cultures – both traditional and westernized – around the globe. The focus is on a number of themes including the development of economic and political systems, trade and exchange, social structure, and the rise of complex societies. Archaeological cultures are also included to provide comparisons for analyzing the material record of group behavior. Culture contact, assimilation, and the forging of artificial identities as a result of colonialism and imperialism are also examined. Students read case studies of cultures and conduct anthropological projects of their own. (Semester 1, .50 credit) LITERATURE OF SOCIAL REFLECTION I: CHILDREN OF CRISIS (SOC 341)

Literature of Social Reflection I is a multi-disciplinary course in its approach to understanding what happens to human beings in a time of crisis, and how children and their families respond, psychologically, spiritually, and emotionally to poverty, prejudice, and geographic displacement. The course embodies the ideal of considering people – from small children to towering figures – with equal weight to their importance as humans. The curriculum is rooted in the studies of Dr. Robert Coles, of Harvard, and his book “Children of Crisis Reader.” Specific areas of focus are 1) African American children caught in the throes of the South’s racial integration (including Ruby Bridges) 2) young children of impoverished sharecroppers, migrant workers, and mountaineers in Appalachia 3) children whose families are transformed by the migration from South to North, from rural to urban communities 4) Latino, Native American, and Eskimo children in the poorest communities of the American West. (Semester 1, .50 credit)

LITERATURE OF SOCIAL REFLECTION II: AFFLUENCE AND POVERTY (SOC 343)

This course is multidisciplinary in its approach to understanding what happens to human beings wrestling with the burden of privilege, the burden of poverty and the ultimate humiliation in the 21st century of living on the streets. The syllabus is rooted in the studies and findings of Dr. Robert Coles, professor at Harvard University. The course combines academic study and hands-on community service work. The real world experience gives new relevance to academic work, and the coursework provides valuable perspective and analysis to the social issues one sees when volunteering. Students participate in a number of hands on activities including: a homeless project on campus, sleeping in cardboard boxes for two nights and living with little food and money; organizing a Midnight Run to New York City (bringing food, toiletries, and clothes to the homeless). The final project for the course is a life observed. Each student selects a person, interviews him or her and writes a life story. The interviewees are invited to attend class and share a portion of their stories. (Semester 2, .50 credit) Texts: “Children of Crisis Reader,” by Coles; “The Color Purple,” by Walker; “Amazing Grace,” by Kozol; “Nickel and Dimed,” by Ehrenreich;” Voices of Homeless Children,” by Bereck; and “The Mole People,” by Toth.

Texts: “Let Us Now Praise Famous Men,” by Agee; “Children of Crisis Reade,” by Coles; “The Power of Nine,” by Robinson and “Invisible Man,” by Ellison.

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x. social sciences

CHALLENGE 20/20 (soc 365)

This course is based on a program created under the auspices of the National Association of Independent Schools. It combines the efforts of domestic and international faculty and students in the common goal of addressing the most urgent science-based problems that will face the global community. They are described in the book, “High Noon: 20 Global Problems, 20 Years to Solve Them,” by Jean-Francois Rischard. This course requires students to develop skills in problem solving and critical thinking, communicate across borders, and exercise creativity. The common goal with other participating schools is to build student and faculty alliances and form authentic intellectual bonds in all endeavors. The topics to be examined include global warming, biodiversity, ecosystem losses, fisheries depletion, deforestation, water deficits, and maritime pollution. In addition, problems related to the lack of biotechnology rules, international intellectual property rights, and natural disaster prevention are explored. Team solutions are expected to lead to actual plans that can be instituted on local levels. (Full year, 1 credit) introduction to general psychology (SOC 355)

This course introduces students to the science of Psychology. The goals of the course are to expose students to the theories of great thinkers in the discipline, to provide them with a working knowledge of terms and concepts, and to examine research methodology through critical thinking about past and current experiments. Using case studies, film, group work, lecture, and self-examination, the course is designed to ensure a basic foundation for future exploration in the field. (Semester, .50 credit) ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY: (SOC 320 – Semester 1) MODERN PHILOSOPHY: (SOC 310 – Semester 2)

The first semester concentrates on Plato and Aristotle, and the second semester on modern philosophy from Descartes to present. The course also engages students in philosophical thought through film. A major research paper is required as the final assessment for each semester. Students may take this course in either semester, or for both semesters, resulting in a yearlong experience. (Semester, .50 credit; Full year, 1 credit) ADVANCED PLACEMENT MICROECONOMICS (SOC 500)

This course is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of the principles of economics as they apply to the functions of both producers and consumers. Emphasis is placed on the nature and function of product markets, including the study of factor markets and the role of the government in promoting both efficiency and equity in the economy. (Semester 1, .50 credit) ADVANCED PLACEMENT MACROECONOMICS (SOC 510)

This course is designed to provide students with a thorough understanding of the principles of economics in examining aggregate economic behavior. Various measures of economic performance are investigated and students learn how to apply them to evaluate the macroeconomic conditions of an economy. The aggregate demand and aggregate supply models and their applications in the analysis and determination of national income are also studied, as is an evaluation of the effectiveness of fiscal policy and monetary policy in promoting economic growth and stability. This course also examines the impact of international trade and international finance on national economies. Various economic schools of thought are introduced as solutions to economic problems. (Semester 2, .50 credit)

This honors-level course is designed to inspire in students a sense of philosophical wonderment through the study of classical and modern philosophy. The course involves students in such discussions as the problem of self-identity, the Soul, free will and determinism, happiness and virtue, appearance and reality, and the nature of knowledge.

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xi. strategy courses

Strategy Courses Strategy courses at all grade levels are designed to provide direct instruction in a variety of study skills, as well as active guidance in reading and writing, while reinforcing content specific to individual courses under the supervision of a certified learning specialist. Students work to develop strategy plans individualized to meet their needs to maximize their learning in future educational contexts. STUDY STRATEGIES (STR 101)

This course provides students with practical instruction in time management, organizational strategies, and test preparation. Students use materials and content based on their specific courses, so the syllabus does not create an additional workload for students. While classes are conducted in a small group, each student has time to focus on his/her unique learning challenges with the instructor, who is the Director of Assessment and Instruction. This course is offered at all grade levels. (Semester, .25 credit; Full year, .50 credit)

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xii. visual art

Visual Art The Visual Art Faculty helps students learn to use and manipulate a wide range of media and techniques to express themselves and develop their personal artistic vision. Through the development of skills and good craftsmanship, the enhancement of nuance and intuition, the seeking of alternative answers to problems, deep involvement in the artistic process, and the respect for and understanding of human creative endeavors from other cultures and points of view, students learn to view the world through the eyes of the artist. Requirement: .50 credit of Foundations of Art for Beginners FUNDAMENTALS OF ART FOR BEGINNERS – FAB! (ART 105 – GRaduation requirement)

This course is the foundation course and prerequisite for all other Visual Art electives, with the exception of Themes in Art History, (ART 333) It consists of a series of problems and projects designed to teach skills and techniques leading to the understanding and application of the elements of art and the principles of design to both two dimensional and three dimensional images. These basic principles and elements are enhanced further by examination of the art and artists of different periods and cultures. This course may be waived only by portfolio review and assessment by members of the Department. (Full Year, Pass/Fail grading, .50 credit)

graph. Understanding the uses of light, shadow, shape, and space is included. The fundamentals of using a digital camera are adressed as needed, depending on the needs of each students. The techniques and applications of Adobe Photoshop are examined and used as tools for making good photographs better, and for editing photographs and creating interesting, original images. Using Adobe Photoshop in and of itself is not the goal. A digital camera is necessary. There are homework assignments, usually involving shooting or printing pictures, and student are expected to complete these assignments on time. It is recommended that students purchase their own cameras. The School does have cameras available for sign-out. (Semester, Pass/Fail grading, .25 credit) DRAWING (ART 211)

Drawing is studied using a variety of subjects, media, and techniques. Students do observational drawings of the human figure, still life, and landscapes. A sense of proportion, scale, depth, form, and composition is explored. Pencil, charcoal, markers, and paints, as well as unconventional materials such as sticks are used. Class critiques explore ways to look at drawing, as well as the works of other artists. (Semester, Pass/Fail grading, .25 credit) EXPLORATIONS IN CLAY (ART 317)

CLAY WORKSHOP (ART 215)

In this course, students are exposed to a variety of techniques and forms using clay as the basic medium. Hand building, pinch, coil, and slab are employed methods. Instruction in wheel-thrown pottery is included. This is a class that explores clay as a medium that can surprise us with its many possibilities. Instruction includes glazing and firing the pieces. This course is a prerequisite for Explorations in Clay (ART 317). (Semester, Pass/Fail grading, .25 credit) DIGITAL PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP (ART 225)

This course is primarily a photography course, in which the elements of art and the principles of design and composition are applied to making a good photo-

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

In this course, students work toward improving skill in the major techniques for forming both functional and sculptural clay pieces. Emphasis in the first quarter is on mastering technique, refining craftsmanship, and using and experimenting with glazes, with the goal of producing an interesting and varied body of work determined by the student. Students also examine the work of both ancient and contemporary clay artists. The instructor and student evaluate together the student’s body of work at the quarter and semester. Clay Workshop (ART 215) is a prerequisite for this course. (Semester, .50 credit)

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xii. visual arts

PAINTING (ART 214)

ADVANCED ART 1 (ART 205)

Students experiment in tempera, watercolor, and acrylic paints. Drawing is an important part of this course. The work of other artists is viewed and discussed to gain a perspective on the vast variety of ways to paint. (Semester, Pass/Fail grading, .25 credit)

This course is for those who have completed the Fundamentals of Art for Beginners course, (ART 105) and wish to begin building a portfolio, and/or who love art and are motivated to learn and experience more in the discipline. Projects range from structured problem solving to projects that require more independent work. A variety of mediums and techniques are covered, and developing more original, inventive, and imaginative approaches is stressed. Group critiques and self-assessments are integral parts of the course. (Full year, 1 credit)

PRINTMAKING (ART 213)

In this course, the student is exposed to a variety of techniques, some of which may be stamping, collage, linoleum, and monoprints. Work is created by hand as well as on the large printing press. Graphic design is discussed as students critique their work and that of other professionals. (Second semester, Pass/Fail grading, .25 credit) SCULPTURE 1 (ART 221)

This course continues the principles learned and applied in Fundamentals of Art for Beginners, (ART 105) but with exposure to additional mediums and concepts, such as construction, assemblage, and carving. Conceptual projects and problem solving are an important part of the course. (Semester, Pass/Fail grading, .25 credit) Digital Studio: Photoshop (Art 229)

Are you captivated by images you see on the computer? Do you want to learn how to express your artistic side using a computer? Well, then take this class. You will learn how to use the creative workhorse, Adobe Photoshop, and manipulate images on the computer and create completely new pieces. So, if you have even the slightest creative urge and would like to learn how to express it digitally, or if you simply want to finally learn how to use Photoshop, take Digital Studio. You won’t regret it. (Semester, Pass/Fail grading, .25 credit)

ADVANCED ART 2 (ART 305)

This advanced art course is for students who are motivated to continue more frequent involvement in art and are/or preparing a portfolio. Juniors or seniors who wish to continue in Advanced Art 3 are encouraged to take this course. In addition to studio projects and portfolio preparation, field trips are taken to museums as time allows. Students are expected to use sketchbooks on a regular basis. Students learn to critique their own artwork and the work of others, experiment with a variety of materials and techniques, and push themselves beyond the conventional by developing imaginative and original pieces. Selfassessments are an integral part of the course. Advanced Art 1 (ART 205) is a prerequisite to this course. (Full year, 1 credit)

THEMES IN ART HISTORY (ART 333)

This course is a team-taught, discussion-based Art History course consisting of themes offered each semester for examination. Themes may include “The Human Figure in Art,” “Art of the 1920s and 1930s,” “The Landscape,” “Aboriginal Art,” or “Animal Imagery Throughout Art History.” Class participation is essential and in-class writing is included on occasion. This course has no prerequisite. (Semester, Pass/Fail grading, .25 credit)

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xii. visual arts

ADVANCED ART 3 (ART 405)

This advanced art course is for motivated students who want more frequent and serious involvement in art and/or are preparing a portfolio, or who wish to continue a deeper exploration of the discipline. A range of projects and problems in different mediums is presented and students are expected to work independently toward developing imaginative and original ideas. Experimentation is encouraged. Group critiques and self-assessment and evaluation are integral parts of the course. Advanced Art 2 (ART 305) is a prerequisite to this course. (Full year, 1 credit)

POSSIBLE VISUAL ART SEQUENCING PATHS

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

Fund for Beginners

Advanced Art 1

Advanced Art 2

Advanced Art 3

Fund for Beginners

Clay Workshop

Explor in Clay

Tutorial

Fund for Beginners

Sculpture 1

Clay Workshop

Explor in Clay

Fund for Beginners

Drawing

Printmaking Painting

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xiii. performing arts

Performing Arts The Performing Arts Faculty engages students in the use of their voices, hands, and/or bodies to express themselves and their ideas in the disciplines of vocal music, instrumental music, theater, and dance. Experiences in this program cultivate the development of intuition, reasoning, imagination, and self-confidence in ways and at a level not found in the traditional classroom setting. (Requirement: .50 credit) MUSIC CHAMBER MUSIC (MUS 213)

This course is intended for students who are interested in playing in a small ensemble for string and woodwind instruments. Instrumentalists who sign up for the class should have experience with the violin, viola, cello, string bass, flute, clarinet, oboe, French horn, or bassoon. This course should be a complement to continued outside private lessons. The literature in this class represents baroque, classical, romantic, and modern pieces for small ensemble. (Full year, .50 credit) BEGINNING GUITAR (MUS 216)

This course is designed for students brand new to the guitar or with minimal knowledge of the instrument. Students are taught all the open chords, beginning with bar chords, basic note reading, major and pentatonic scales. This knowledge is applied to as many pieces of music as possible. Students are required to have their own guitar to use for practice. (Full year, .50 credit) GUITAR WORKSHOP (MUS 217)

This course is designed for students who have taken the Beginning Guitar course, (MUS 216) or who have attained equivalent proficiency. Students in this course work on more advanced pieces of music in many different styles. Students explore jazz, classical, rock, folk, and other styles that may arise during class discussion. Students are required to have their own guitar to use for practice. (Full year, .50 credit) DANCE (MUS 221)

Dance is a semester-long course that allows students to explore their creativity and encourages their artistic expression. Whether students are experienced dancers or are dancing for the first time, the class will be geared toward each student’s individual ability 2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

level. They will have the opportunity to build their strength, flexibility, and coordination while discovering various styles of dance through choreography. Students will have an opportunity to perform at the end of the semester. Dance is a semester-long course that allows students to explore their creativity and encourages their artistic expression. Whether students are experienced dancers or are dancing for the first time, the class will be geared toward each student’s individual ability level. They will have the opportunity to build their strength, flexibility, and coordination while discovering various styles of dance through choreography. Students will have an opportunity to perform at the end of the semester. (Semester, .25 credit) Percussion Class (MUS 222)

The purpose of the class is to promote a better understanding of rhythm and the world of percussion. Students cover the rudiments of a variety of percussion instruments, giving them the ability to better read percussion notation. Students also learn the finer points of the tuning and maintenance of drums. Students perform percussion music from Africa, Latin America, and Brazil. Open to all ability levels. (Full year, Pass/Fail grading, .50 credit) Jazz Rock Ensemble (MUS 226)

This course creates small ensembles designed to help students find self-expression and a creative outlet by performing a variety of music styles ranging from jazz, funk, blues, rock, and other multicultural music that is centered on improvisation. In this course, students will form ensembles that range from standard jazz combos to rock ensembles. Students who play piano, bass, guitar, brass, woodwind, strings, or who sing are eligible to participate in these ensembles. These smaller ensembles allow students to develop their ability to read, perform, and compose music from a variety of styles by studying the forms and structures of the music they perform. Students have direct input into the music that they perform. Ensembles will be formed by instrumentation and ability level. (Full year, .50 credit)

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xiii. performing arts

CHOIR (MUS 237)

MUSIC THEORY (MUS 361)

This course is open to anyone interested in singing in a choral setting. Students have the opportunity to sing in four or more parts. Students study the Kodaly method of sight-reading, using solfege to develop their ear training. Other topics include proper breathing, vocal health, and mouth position. The repertoire for the course ranges from classical to contemporary. The choir has many performance opportunities throughout the year. (Full year, .50 credit)

This course is designed for students who wish to learn the theoretical aspects of music. Students learn about the basics of music such as rhythm, melody, harmony, and apply these concepts to many different pieces of music. Students learn to write chords and melody in different situations to demonstrate the various devices they have learned. The course culminates with a composition project that uses many of the concepts learned during the year. (Full year, .50 credit)

MUSIC COMPOSITION (MUS 303)

CHORAL AND MUSICAL THEATER PERFORMANCE (MUS 403)

This course is designed for students who have interest in writing their own songs and understanding the craft of song-writing. The course has grown out of the Music Composition club, started Fall 2003. Topics to be covered include melody, harmony, lyric writing, music theory, and analysis. The class culminates with either a recording of the original work or a live performance. Prerequisite for the course is two years of proficiency on a musical instrument, Music Theory (MUS 361), or permission from the Instructor. (Semester, .25 credit) PIANO KEYBOARD (MUS 333)

This course is designed for students who would like to learn how to play the piano. Students are taught how to read music and learn how the notes translate to the keyboard. Students are required to practice outside of class. Topics covered include rhythm drills, melody phrasing, and playing chords and various styles of music. There is no prerequisite for this course, though enrollment is limited to the number of keyboards the School has available for the semester. (Semester, .25 credit; Full year, .50 credit) INTERMEDIATE PIANO KEYBOARD (MUS 336)

Students explore advanced harmony, scales, and intricate rhythm patterns. Students are required to practice outside of class. Prerequisite for this course is Piano Keyboard (MUS 333) or permission from the instructor. (Semester, .25 credit; Full year, .50 credit)

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

This course is intended for students who would like to take Choir concurrently with a minor course in Musical Theater. In Musical Theater, students study acting, dance, and learn a variety of musical theater works. Students have many performance opportunities throughout the year. Prerequisite for this course is Introduction to Acting (DRA 101) or permission from the Instructor. (Full year, 1 credit) DRAMA INTRODUCTION TO ACTING (DRA 101)

This course is open to any student who has interest in learning the beginning techniques of acting. The syllabus includes physical warm-ups, pantomime, improvisation, theater games, and repetition exercises based on the Sanford Meisner system of acting. The primary text of this course is Hagen’s “Respect for Acting.” (Semester, Pass/Fail grading, .25 credit) ACTING (DRA 111)

This course is the next level of study from the Introduction to Acting course. The syllabus includes physical warm-ups, pantomime, improvisation, and also includes beginning scene and monologue work. Some of the texts in the course are Stanislavski’s “An Actor Prepares,” and Hagen’s “A Challenge to the Actor.” Students have an opportunity to perform their scene/monologue at the end of the semester. Prerequisite for the course is Introduction to Acting (DRA 101) or permission from the instructor. (Semester, Pass/Fail grading, .25 credit)

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xiii. performing arts

TECHNICAL THEATER 1 (DRA 115)

SCENE STUDY (DRA 311)

This introductory course focuses on set construction, assuming no prior experience with tools or building techniques. After an introduction to the theatrical production process, each student builds one flat as an introduction to construction concepts and tool usage. They then spend several classes building the set for that semester’s productions. They are required to see a performance of the Upper School play. The last portion of the semester is spent on individual projects, for which students research, design, draw, and build an object chosen from a list provided by the Instructor. (Semester, Pass/Fail grading, .25 credit)

This course concentrates on “taking apart” a scene. Students are paired with a partner to apply all that was learned in their previous acting courses. Students examine many different scenes, ranging from classic to contemporary. Topics include objectives, intentions, and character development. Students have the opportunity to perform their scenes as a culmination of their efforts in the course. Prerequisite for the course is Introduction to Acting (DRA 101), Acting (DRA 111), or permission from the Instructor. (Semester, .25 credit)

TECHNICAL THEATER 2 (DRA 117)

This course assumes that students have a basic knowledge of the construction techniques and tool usage taught in Technical Theater 1 (DRA 115). Students spend the first part of the semester building and painting the set for that semester’s productions, reviewing and reinforcing previously learned skills. Students are allowed to work with more advanced tools and techniques depending on their ability level and the needs of the shows. They are required to see the Upper School production. The last part of the semester is spent exploring other aspects of technical theater, based on the desire of the students. (Semester, Pass/Fail grading, .25 credit) PRODUCING AND DIRECTING THEATER (DRA 301)

This course is for students who have a strong interest in directing. In the first semester, students examine a particular play or musical that they have an interest in directing. Students examine acting techniques and rehearsal procedures, analyze a play, cast the play, and consider technical requirements. In the second semester, each student applies these skills to produce and direct the show they have chosen. Students concentrate on the actual rehearsal process, and on preparation of a live performance of the work in front of an audience. Prerequisite is Scene Study (DRA 311) or permission from the Instructor. This course has limited enrollment, and is only open to seniors and juniors. (Full year, .50 credit)

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xiv. computer science

Computer Science The Computer Science Faculty teaches students to use various digital media to express their creativity, model real-world phenomena, and/or discover innovative ways of posing and solving problems. Technology is used in an applied fashion to provide a space in which to conceptualize, design, and create, and as a tool to drive independent inquiry, collaboration, and exploration.

data structures, boolean expressions, iteration techniques, data types, exception handling, etc. All coding is performed in Java, and consists of several handson projects. Students are introduced to many of the standard Java packages, including an introduction to Swing. Students are also introduced to the Unified Modeling Language (UML). (Semester, .50 credit) COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 2 (COM 321)

ACCELERATED TOPICS IN‌

This honors-level course is a customized study for the advanced, highly motivated student who wants to explore and investigate a particular topic in technology. Such topics may include physics for game developers, three-dimensional movie short production, or advanced web site design. The course is ideally suited for students who have taken several different computer science courses and who wish to culminate this experience with a unique course that combines and applies many of the concepts mastered. The Department recommends candidates for this course. (Semester, .50 credit)

This course introduces students to many advanced programming techniques in Java. Concepts covered include threading, events, sockets, streams, and advanced swing usage. The course touches on various design patterns, as well. Students also learn more advanced modeling techniques in UML and learn the importance of clean object-oriented design and analysis before writing any code. (Semester, .50 credit)

WEB DEVELOPMENT 1 (COM 141) This course introduces students to web development. Students study what the World Wide Web is and how it relates to the Internet, what a web server is, and the HTTP protocol. Students develop a solid understanding of HTML, CCS, and of design and preparation considerations prior to developing their own web site. (Semester, .25 credit) WEB DEVELOPMENT 2 (COM 151)

This course focuses on the more advanced aspects of Web development. Students investigate server side vs. client side web development, and are introduced to JavaScript, Flash, Dream Weaver, and various advanced web development techniques. Included as well are basic CGI concepts, and connectivity, including Java, Pearl, and Php. (Semester, .25 credit) COMPUTER PROGRAMMING 1 (COM 311)

This course introduces students to software development. The course focuses on learning object oriented theories and ideas such as encapsulation, polymorphism, inheritance, delegation, etc. From this understanding, students are introduced to the more fundamental aspects of software construction, including

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xv. the athletic program

The Athletic Program The Athletic Program is an integral part of every student’s experience at the School. The Athletic Department offers a broad-based program designed to serve as a complement to the rigorous academic program. The School’s athletic offerings provide students with the opportunity to compete athletically through Varsity and JV team sports, and to participate in a noncompetitive environment through fitness and recreation opportunities. Because we believe so strongly in the many benefits that a quality athletics and fitness program provides to those who take part, participation in the Athletic Program is required of all students. Every student must participate in one of the department’s offerings in any one athletic season. To accommodate students who may not have as strong an interest in team sports, several non-team options are offered, such as strength training in the winter season and personal fitness in the spring. We also offer a limited number of sports exemptions to those students who are active competitors on teams outside of school. Exemptions are not automatic and are not available for sports offered through the Athletic Program.

League champions are recognized in all of the sponsored sports. JV programs are offered only as numbers and interest dictate and are not offered in all sports. Highly qualified coaches – most of whom are members of the Faculty in one of our three academic divisions – direct all teams. Contests are played both against FAA opponents and against other independent schools involved in both the Western New England Prep School Athletic Association (WNEPSAA) and the New England Prep School Athletic Council (NEPSAC).

Varsity teams are members of the Fairchester Athletic Association (FAA), comprised of independent schools in Fairfield County, CT, and Westchester County, NY. Our School competes in the FAA in the following sports:

Boys

Fall

Winter

Cross Country

Basketball Baseball

Spring

Football

Co-Ed Hockey

Golf

Soccer

Co-Ed Squash

Lacrosse Tennis

Girls

Cross Country

Basketball Softball

Field Hockey

Co-Ed Hockey

Golf

Soccer

Co-Ed Squash

Lacrosse

Volleyball

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Tennis

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xv. the athletic program

The Athletic Program has a strong tradition of success, including numerous FAA championships and New England tournament appearances:

Football Lacrosse Soccer

Boys 2009 FAA Champions 2009 Nutmeg Division Champions 2009 NEPSAC Champion Runners-Up 2008 FAA Champions 2008 FAA Nutmeg Division Champions 2008 NEPSAC Champion Runners-Up 2006 FAA Nutmeg Division Champions 2005 FAA Empire Division Champions 2008 WNEPSAA Participants 2010 FAA Tournament Runners-Up 2008 FAA Tournament Runners-Up 2007 FAA Champions 2007 FAA Tournament Champions 2006 FAA Tournament Co-Champions

Girls Basketball 2010 FAA Champions 2010 FAA Tournament Champions 2010 NEPSAC Champion Runners-Up 2006 NEPSAC Champions Cross Country 2009 Division 5 New England Runners-Up 2008 FAA Tournament Runners-Up 2008 Division 5 New England Champions 2007 FAA Tournament Runners-Up 2007 Division 5 New England Champions

Softball

Volleyball

2010 FAA Champions 2010 FAA Tournament Champions 2010 WNEPSAA Champions 2009 FAA Champions 2009 FAA Tournament Champions 2009 WNEPSAA Runners-Up 2008 FAA Champions 2008 FAA Champions 2008 FAA Tournament Champions 2008 WNEPSAA Champions 2007 WNEPSAA Champions 2004 WNEPSAA Champions 2004 FAA Champions 2008 New England – Class B Champions 2008 FAA Champions 2008 FAA Tournament Champions 2007 FAA Tournament Champions 2005 FAA Tournament Champions 2005 FAA Co-Champions 2004 FAA Co-Champions

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xvi. the theater arts program

The Theater Arts Program The School has a long history of strong commitment to the theater arts. Opportunities exist for all students to explore their talents in this area. Students in the Upper School are required to participate in at least two theater performances during their time here. Participation runs the gamut from all aspects of preproduction (set design and construction) to production (lights, sound, stage management) to performance (acting, singing, dancing). Typically, a full-length play is presented in the fall, a full-scale musical in the winter, and student-directed plays in the spring. Though all performances are supervised by members of the Performing Arts Department, most aspects of these performances are student-run. Leadership roles thus abound during the process of creating and presenting a theatrical performance. The teamwork and spirit of camaraderie evident in all phases of this process provide opportunities for character development not typically found in the traditional classroom. Though participation in only two productions is required, students often become involved in several more before they graduate. Over the past several years, US students have presented a wide variety of shows, including: “Once on this Island” (2011) “The Diary of Anne Frank” (2010) “The Wiz” (2010) “The Skin of Our Teeth” (2009) “Into the Woods” (2009) “Arsenic & Old Lace” (2008) “Pippin” (2008) “The Laramie Project” (2007) “Urinetown” (2007) “The Mousetrap” (2006) “Cabaret” (2006) “The Importance of Being Earnest” (2005) “Hair” (2005) “The Grass Harp” (2004) “Ragtime” (2004) “Dinner at Eight” (2003) “Peter Pan” (2003) “The Comedy of Errors” (2002) “The Sound of Music” (2002) “Great Expectations” (2001)

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xvii. activities program

Activities Program There are over 30 club activities from which US students may choose that provide them with opportunities for leadership, collaboration, and personal development not typically found in their academic courses. Many of our clubs have long associations with the School, while others reflect the interests of students who choose to form a new club. Meeting times are scheduled during morning break or lunch on a rotating basis, and students generally are able to participate in more than one activity in the rotation period of the schedule. The following clubs and activities are offered, divided into five distinct categories: •• Community Service and Humanitarian Causes •• Leadership •• Student Publications •• Educational Enrichment •• Personal Interests COMMUNITY SERVICE AND HUMANITARIAN CAUSES Amnesty International

The purpose of this student organization is to raise the level of awareness within the school community of human rights and of how these rights are infringed upon in today’s global socio-political arena. The club communicates regularly with representatives of Amnesty International and receives information on violations of human rights. Club members share knowledge of such violations and write letters of appeal. Presently the club is actively engaged in the Amnesty Regional Action Network and a special focus case. Build on

The purpose of this student organization is to enhance education and empower youth in the United States to make a positive difference in their communities while helping people of developing countries increase their self-reliance through education. Build On achieves its mission thanks to a team of many dedicated student and adult volunteers, project coordinators, teachers, and Build On staff who commit themselves to learning about others and themselves through cultural educa-

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

tion, community service activities, and sponsorship events. Students are required to participate in community service activities every month. This club is open to students in all grades. Canstruction

The purpose of this student organization is to combine the spirit of a design/building competition with a unique way to help feed the hungry. Competing teams, led by architects and engineers, showcase their talents by designing giant sculptures made entirely of canned foods. At the close of the exhibitions, all of the food used in the structures is donated to local food banks for distribution to pantries, shelters, soup kitchens, elderly and day care centers. This club is open to all grades, and is a great way to combine a love of architecture, math, and design with community service. Gay/Straight Alliance (GSA)

The purpose of this student organization is to promote understanding and acceptance, combat homophobia, and raise awareness of the difficulties and issues affecting LGBT people. These are parts of an overall goal to create an inclusive and safe environment in our school. The club sponsors events and fundraisers during the year. Environmental Club

The purpose of this student organization is to inform and educate the school community about the environment, with heavy emphasis on global warming, and to take action to help the local and global environment. The club seeks to have an activist orientation. Helping Other People Excel (HOPE)

The purpose of this student organization is to participate in community service opportunities within and beyond our community. HOPE completes service projects in which members participate and encourage non-members to come in order to experience the benefits of helping others. To receive credit for partipating in the club, students must attend at least three of the monthly projects during the year, and bring at least one non-member to a community service opportunity.

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xvii. activities program

rwanda club

The purpose of this student organization is to provide its members with an opportunity for community service abroad by forging an alliance with one or two needy orphanages in Rwanda. Members seek to derive greater knowledge of a small country in central Africa and, at the same time, through their actions and activities, acquire the tools and skills necessary for effective service to their communities (local, national, and global) when they take their place in the adult world. support the troops

The purpose of this student organization is to support U.S. troops serving overseas. Specifically, members of the club engage in letter-writing and supply drive campaigns and are currently in contact with a specific battalion. United Cultures Club

The purpose of this student organization is to promote understanding and tolerance among all members of the King community. Programs that raise awareness and encourage discussion about issues of diversity are the focus of this group. LEADERSHIP King Ambassadors

The purpose of this student organization is varied. First and foremost, members are responsible for marketing the School authentically to the greater community. Members give tours of the Upper School during available free periods to prospective students and parents who are interested in learning more about the School. They are also hosts to prospective students who visit for a day as part of the application process. Members are also important volunteers during Open Houses, serving as student-panelists and tour guides, in addition to assisting the Admission Office in its efforts during the year. In the spring, members serve as hosts for accepted candidates who are offered an opportunity to spend a day at King before they decide to enroll.

Milestone has a four-prong approach: •• develop age-appropriate ownership and leadership in the dialogue about diversity •• facilitate community building •• create “safe spaces” for conversations •• build positive racial identities

Meetings are designed to foster relationships between students of color across all three divisions and to inform program administrators of various needs in our programming, curriculum, and communitybuilding structures. Discussion groups typically occur on Fridays, after school hours.  Mentors meet with their mentees throughout the school day, at mutually agreeable times.   Peer Review

The purpose of this student organization is to provide a forum in which students in disciplinary difficulty have their cases heard by a board of their peers. Participants on the review board listen to the facts of each case, deliberate with the assistance of a faculty facilitator, and determine an appropriate peer response to the infraction in question. Three students from each class are elected by their peers at the beginning of the year to serve with the Student Council President on this important student leadership board. Student ActiVIties Club (SAC)

The purpose of this student organization is to partner with members of the Student Council to organize social events at King. The club seeks to provide opportunities for student socialization around events such as movie nights, talent shows, game nights, bowling, and dances. Student Council

The purpose of this student organization is to represent the interests and activities of the student body and to create a liaison with Faculty and Administration. The Council seeks to promote a positive school culture and school spirit through a variety of initiatives and offers important leadership opportunities.

milestone

The purpose of Milestone is to provide a forum for discussion for MS and US students who self-identify as students of color and to train US students to mentor MS and LS students throughout the school year. 2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

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xvii. activities program

Student publications Calliope Creative Writing club

The purpose of this student organization is to create an environment in which students have the freedom and support to write and present their own poetry, short stories, vignettes, and even chapters of developing novels to their peers each week. After receiving constructive criticism from club members, students are encouraged to rewrite and then submit their work to the club’s publication, “Calliope,” that is published once per year. This club ultimately aims to tap into and expand the School’s literary community. Kaleidoscope

The purpose of this all-school student publication is to provide an annual record of the people and events which comprise the King experience. Students participate in all aspects of the production of the yearbook, including deciding upon and developing a theme, coordinating the taking and placement of photographs, laying out pages, and participating in the proofing and editing process. “Kaleidoscope” is distributed at the end of each academic year. The Standard

A capella Female Singing Group

The purpose of this student organization is to provide an opportunity for young women to sing a capella. The club is student-run in the sense that students choose the songs and rounds to work on. Styles range from classic to contemporary. This club is open to any young woman interested in this type of singing experience. Art Club

The purpose of this student organization is to bring the benefits of the art abilities of students to others, primarily through frequent visits to local nursing homes to teach various crafts projects to residents. Book Club

The purpose of this student organization is to encourage students to build an interest in reading different genres and types of books, then holding in-depth conversations about them. Conversaciones fuera del aula

The purpose of this student organization is to improve students’ oral skills in Spanish with topics not related to academics, in a more informal setting.

The purpose of this student publication is to provide a quarterly journal of fact and opinion – providing the student body with an outlet of expression while simultaneously maintaining the formal and factual standards of a typical student newspaper. “The Standard” also provides a valuable opportunity for students to learn about newspaper production, organizational management, and leadership.

Debate Club

EDUCATIONAL ENRICHMENT

Drama Club

A cafellas

The purpose of this student organization is to provide an opportunity for young men to sing a capella and arrange pieces for the group. The group rehearses three times per rotation. The group performs numbers throughout the academic year at assemblies or for other school functions.

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

The purpose of this student organization is to promote poise and confidence in public speaking; to develop capacity for logical construction and presentation of arguments; and to foster the skill of ad hoc rebuttal. The club participates regularly in debate tournaments in the area, held by the Connecticut Association of Schools.

The purpose of this student organization is to promote interest in and awareness of our shows and in the greater theater world. Students are involved in offering service to the LS and MS productions, and participate in community service opportunities. Fundraising for specific theatre needs, creating a newsletter for current and past students in the Theater Arts, and visiting a theater production are included within the club’s objectives.

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xvii. activities program

investment club

The purpose of this student organization is to help students obtain a better understanding of the real world economy and our financial system, particualrly in terms of the stock market and how it works. The club includes a real-life investment portfolio as well as simulated online Internet investment activities. la table francaise

The purpose of this student organization is to improve students’ oral skills in French with topics not related to academics, in a more informal setting. Math Team

The purpose of this student organization is to foster an interest in mathematics outside of the classroom, and to provide those students who enjoy mathematics with an opportunity to represent our school in competitions with other public and private schools in Fairfield County. The team participates in the Fairfield County Math League.

PERSONAL INTERESTS Cooking Club

The purpose of this student organization is to introduce students to the art of cooking, teaching basic skills/techniques, and quick, healthful recipes that members can cook on their own or for their families. Students may take field trips to local restaurants to talk with professional chefs and visit local cooking schools. Students will help with preparing a community cookbook. Cultural Cuisines

The purpose of this student organization is to help students learn about other cultures and their native cuisines. The club samples food from different global regions once per month. Crocheting Club

The purpose of this student organization is to crochet and to teach others how to crochet. Members of this club donate some of their creations to charity.

Model United Nations

The purpose of this student organization is to promote student understanding of international issues and relations; to promote understanding of the role and procedures of the United Nations; to foster public speaking and negotiating skills; to enable motivated students to experience contact and to measure themselves in interaction with able and motivated college preparatory students from around the nation and the world. The club traditionally participates in the Harvard and University of Pennsylvannia Model UN conferences, held annually in Boston and Philadelphia, respectively. Project Vote Smart

The purpose of this student organization is to provide information about candidates for election in a nonpartisan way, under the mission that democracy, by its nature, works only in an educated public. Socrates Café

The purpose of this student organization is to provide a venue for philosophical thought within the school community. The club encourages uniqueness, increases critical thinking skills, and thrives on questions. Discussion forums are based on the actual implementation of “Socrates Café,” by Phillips. 2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

Design Club

The purpose of this student organization is to provide students with an opportunity to learn about different types of design (interior, fashion, architectural, landscape) by working on projects throughout the year. Students collaborate during meetings and discuss designs. An aim of the club is to have the opportunity to decorate a space in the School, applying what has been learned to a hands-on experience. Film Making Club

The purpose of this student organization is to provide members with the tools and skills necessary to create and produce their own short movies. Golf Club

The purpose of this student organization is to allow members of the School community to play golf and improve their games within a safe and fun environment. King Step Team

The pupose of this student organization is to expose students to the dance form referred to as “step.” The group performs at Pep Rallies and Half-Times for the King basketball teams.

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xvii. activities program

Outdoor Club

The purpose of this student organization is to provide students with the opportunity to practice collaborating, problem solving, and appreciating a wide range of perspectives in settings outside of the School. Students arrange a variety of group activities, including hiking, biking, and snowshoeing excursions. Running Club

The purpose of this student organization is to encourage participation in local 5K and 10K races and to support fitness runners by holding after-school group training/running sessions. The club is meant to support low-key fitness running at the club level. Both serious and beginner runners are encouraged to participate. Ski and Snowboard Club

The purpose of this student organization is to provide students with an opportunity to go skiing and snowboarding with friends and classmates in a safe environment at a reasonable cost. The club organizes its day trips through Ski Market, which provides bus transportation and a lift ticket for the day for one price. One overnight trip is planned, with the goal of exposing beginners to either boarding or skiing. Trips are to easy-to-reach resorts in Massachusetts and Vermont. Ultimate Frisbee Club

The purpose of this student organization is to give students an opportunity to experience the increasing collegic club sport of Ultimate Fisbee. Students play Ultimate Frisbee during breaks during the day and in organized tournaments under the guidance of Faculty.

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

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xviii. advisory program

Advisory Program PERSONAL ADVISORS

SCHOOL COUNSELOR

The Personal Advisor is the student’s primary advocate, monitoring student progress, discussing academic and/or social issues and concerns, and assisting with the academic planning process. The Personal Advisor also serves as the principal liaison between the student and his/her Teachers, and between the School and the student’s parents. Advisors also work closely with Teachers and Grade Deans if a student needs extra help and/or other types of support.

The School Counselor is available as a supportive resource to all students in Grades 9-12. The Counselor offers the opportunity for brief solution-focused sessions regarding issues that affect students’ academic or social health. If longer-term care is deemed necesary, the Counselor will provide an initial assessment and provide a referral to an outside community resource. The Counselor also takes the opportunity to meet with students new to the Upper School to discuss any issues which may arise during their transition to a new school environment.

Each student in the Upper School selects a Personal Advisor in May for the following year. Students new to the School and students entering Grade 9 are assigned an Advisor for their first year. Teachers are typically limited to 10 advisees each and meet with advisees to begin each day, and once per rotation for one full period. These meeting times allow the Advisor to go over the schedule for the day, apprise advisees of upcoming events, or simply to spend time talking to advisees about their school experience. Students often create a relationship with an Advisor in their first year in the Upper School and maintain that relationship for their four years here. GRADE DEANS

Grade Deans are assigned to each grade level to provide an administrative presence devoted entirely to the needs of those classes and their individual members. Together with the personal advisors, Grade Deans are responsible for monitoring a student’s overall progress from an academic, social, and emotional perspective. Typically, Grade Deans meet with students who are having academic or disciplinary difficulty, meeting with the student to discuss these areas of difficulty, and working with the student, Faculty, parents and Administration to determine the appropriate means of intervention to help the student through his/ her difficulty. Grade Deans also function as the Class Advisors for Grades 9 and 10, helping students with the planning of class activities and events. In Grades 11 and 12, a separate Class Advisor helps coordinate class activities and events.

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

Although most students come to the Counselor by their own referral, Administrators, Personal Advisors and/or parents can also refer students when they feel that some level of intervention is necessary. Director of assessment and instruction

The Director of Instruction and Assessment is the division’s primary resource for learning and teaching. As a certified learning specialist, the Director assists and guides students with certain aspects of their studies; coordinates action plans with students, parents, and Faculty, designed to capitalize on student strengths to aid in their academic improvent; and monitors student progress. The Director also teaches Strategy courses. Additionally, the Director functions as a resource for Faculty as they develop teaching approaches and create assessments that meet the individual needs of their students, demanding more of those students who are ready for a challenge, and assisting those in need of guidance. Finally, the Director compiles the Cognitive Profile Summaries and helps Faculty by pointing out areas of strength in each student’s profile which lead to individual programmatic changes aimed at developing student strengths.

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xviii. advisory program

COLLEGE COUNSELING

The objective of the College Counseling Program is to build genuine and honest relationships with students and their families. The program endeavors to help our students develop self-awareness and direct their own lives. We collaborate closely with our families and make every effort to provide a safe, comfortable, environment in which to talk. We listen with care and empathy, and we clarify with understanding. Our goal is to help students find the right match at a college where they will be successful and productive. College counseling is a developmental process and we work to educate the community. In support of this philosophy, the College Counseling staff engages our students and families in grade-specific information meetings. The following provides a brief summary of the material covered: Grade 9 Presentations during freshman class meetings emphasize the message that students do their best academically and also experience new and established interests. January’s evening informational introduces freshman parents to the college process with a handbook, “An Introduction to College Planning,” which provides an overview of the next four years. Transcripts are sent home at the end of the first semester to introduce the document to the family. Grade 10 Presentations during class meetings continue to place importance on academics and the pursuit of personal interests. Sophomores take both the PSAT/NMSQT and the PLAN in October. An evening informational meeting, “Getting From Where You Are to Where You What to Be,” is hosted in the fall. During January’s evening informational, sophomores and their parents are provided a handbook, “College Planning: The First Stages,” detailing steps relevant in the sophomore year for the college process, as well as additional insights regarding PSAT results and appropriate timing for upcoming SAT IIs. An updated transcript is sent home.

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

Grade 11 During the first week of school, the Junior Class visits a number of college campuses during its class trip. The purpose of the trip is to provide the class with exposure to the variety of college options that awaits them: urban, suburban, small liberal arts colleges, large universities, schools that are non-secular in philosophy, ivy league, and even specialized schools. One-on-one meetings occur with each junior and the Associate Director of College Counseling. Individual meetings with parents are also encouraged. Juniors take the PSAT/NMSQT in October. Juniors who have study hall are encouraged to meet with college representatives when they visit campus. An evening informational meeting, “Winning the College Admission Game,” is hosted in November. A Financial Aid Breakfast, hosted by a financial professional, occurs for junior parents in December. During January’s evening informational meeting, juniors and their parents are given an in-depth review of the college process and the corresponding “College Process and Planning Handbook” is distributed. Juniors are encouraged to take the ACT plus Writing in December (an on campus ACT Prep course is available in the fall) and again later at their option, plus the SAT I in March/April and June (an on campus SAT Prep course is available), and SAT Subject Tests in May and/ or June. If considered appropriate, the SAT I can be taken for a third time in the fall of senior year. In the spring semester, all juniors attend 10 mandatory, small group college counseling classes, where they learn to develop their personal criteria for their college experience, use appropriate web sites, and start to find colleges that have the right “fit.” Also in the spring, juniors meet one-on-one with the Director of College Counseling. The product of these meetings is the suggested personalized college list for each junior.

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xviii. advisory program

Grade 12 During the first week of school, an evening informational for seniors and their parents presents the final component of the college counseling program: “The Application Process, Start to Finish.” During the class trip time frame, seniors have three days available for personal college visits. Ongoing meetings are scheduled with each student to support this process to its completion. Throughout the fall, college representatives visit campus to meet with interested students. A Financial Aid Breakfast, hosted by a financial professional, occurs for senior parents in December. Several times during the year, the Director of College Counseling and the School Counselor meet with the seniors in small groups to provide an open forum for discussing the emotional aspect of the college process and the senior year itself. The Director of College Counseling writes a letter of recommendation for each senior incorporating information gathered by observations of the student as well as information from Faculty, Coaches, and information provided by parents. According to the deadlines specified, the Office of College Counseling submits the student’s transcript, school profile, Counselor recommendation, and the college’s and US reports to each college on the student’s list. Students are accountable for the timely securing of faculty recommendations, approval of their official transcript with the Registrar, and the mailing of their college applications. Every year, the College Counseling Office regularly updates and revises its programming and materials by incorporating the wisdom garnered from its students’ parents’ experiences, and through its membership and participation in professional associations. Students and their parents insights and wisdom are gathered annually through student questionnaires, and student and parent interviews. College Counseling is an ongoing process and the office is available as a resource throughout the year to students and parents alike.

2011-2012 Upper School Program Guide

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1450 Newfield Avenue Stamford, CT 06905 (203) 322-3496 www.klht.org

2011-2012 US Program Guide  

2011-2012 US Program Guide

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