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THE INTERNATIONAL DESIGN AUTHORITY NOVEMBER 2017

JULIANNE MOORE THE MOVIE STAR NEXT DOOR

KITCHEN OBSESSED!

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NEW IDEAS TO CREATE THE PERFECT SPACE

AMAZING RENOVATIONS, STUNNING MAKEOVERS


CONTENTS november 138 TWIST AND SHOUT

For his first ground-up project, a pool pavilion in the English countryside, Rafael de Cárdenas gives the owners a slide to remember. By Sam Cochran

142 CHAOS THEORY

Trash becomes treasure in the fantastical work of Brooklyn-based designer Misha Kahn. By Hannah Martin

104 JULIANNE MOORE IN HER GREENWICH VILLAGE TOWNHOUSE.

146 SHEAR GENIUS

The Bagot family of Levens Hall oversees a Seussian landscape that has been astonishing visitors since the 1690s. By Mitchell Owens 152 MODERN ENGLISH

Model and girl-on-the-go Poppy Delevingne puts down roots in a chic, light-filled house in a leafy London neighborhood. By Derek Blasberg (CONTINUED ON PAGE 16)

Features 104 FLIP THE SCRIPT

146

TOPIARY ART AT LEVENS HALL.

Julianne Moore brings new life to her beloved New York City townhouse. By Mayer Rus Rico and Joanne Zorkendorfer build their young family’s dream house in Jackson Hole. By Dominic Bradbury

126 FRENCH EVOLUTION

Under the watchful eyes of designer Tino Zervudachi, a 17th-century château is sensitively updated for life today. By Noga Arikha

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FROM TOP: ALEXI LUBOMIRSKI; MIGUEL FLORES-VIANNA

114 PEAK PERFORMANCE


CONTENTS november

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JOANNE AND RICO ZORKENDORFER’S WYOMING RETREAT.

Discoveries A masterfully curated New York City apartment provides the perfect backdrop for the Italian stylist’s charmed life. By Jane Keltner de Valle

40 WORLD OF: VINCENT DARRÉ

The dashing Paris decorator unveils a staggeringly beautiful oasis of style.

50 DEBUT: ON A ROLL

Le Manach, the French fabric house, turns 14 legendary patterns into delectable new wall coverings. By Mitchell Owens 52 SHOPPING: MOODY BLOOMS

This season’s bold, romantic blossoms prove that florals can work year-round. Produced by Parker Bowie Larson

By Mitchell Owens

44 DEBUT: POPULAR DEMAND

With his collection for Frontgate, Martyn Lawrence Bullard brokers a happy union between glamour and accessibility. By Mayer Rus 46 AD VISITS: CHANGE AGENT

Everyday objects become wondrous artworks in artist Ann Carrington’s clever hands. By Shax Riegler

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62 ART SCENE: NOBLE SPIRIT

A family of collectors transforms a historic German castle into Europe’s latest must-see art destination. By Stephen Wallis

66 CASE STUDY: TRUE TO FORM

For a little-known house in Palm Springs, Marmol Radziner devises a thoughtful update to the midcentury-modern gem. By Stephen Drucker

Culture

(CONTINUED ON PAGE 20)

57 LEGACY: OVERDUE NOTICE

Rediscovered by aesthetes in the know, the late designer Ward Bennett gets his place in history with the monograph he long deserved. By Pilar Viladas ON THE COVER JULIANNE MOORE’S MANHATTAN TOWNHOUSE. “FLIP THE SCRIPT,” PAGE 104. PORTRAIT BY ALEXI LUBOMIRSKI. STYLED BY MICHAEL REYNOLDS.

TOP: TREVOR TONDRO

37 AT HOME WITH: GIOVANNA BATTAGLIA-ENGELBERT


CONTENTS november 34 INTRODUCING: CLEVER

A new place on archdigest.com with all the answers to your decorating, renovating, and tiny-budget-eventinier-floor-plan woes.

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A KEN FULK–DESIGNED KITCHEN IN SONOMA, CALIFORNIA.

Great Kitchens 73 Today’s top appliances,

surfaces, fixtures, and more create a cook space that’s as efficient as it is eye-catching.

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POPPY DELEVINGNE IN HER WEST LONDON HOME.

In Every Issue 28 EDITOR’S LETTER By Amy Astley

30 OBJECT LESSON: FOOT FETISH

How John Dickinson transformed a cheap import into a trophy of chic. By Hannah Martin

160 RESOURCES

The designers, architects, and products featured this month. At designer Pierre Yovanovitch’s Provence château, a deconsecrated chapel offers space for contemplation. By Mitchell Owens

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FROM TOP: DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN; SIMON UPTON

162 LAST WORD: PRAY TELL


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editor’s letter

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1. JUMPING FOR JOY AT A NEWLY CONSTRUCTED STONE-AND-WOOD HOUSE IN JACKSON HOLE, WYOMING. 2. A BEDROOM IN A LOVINGLY RESTORED 17TH-CENTURY LOIRE VALLEY HOUSE. 3. THE BATHROOM IN JULIANNE MOORE’S NYC TOWNHOUSE. 4. CELEBRATING AT AN AD/BRIZO EVENT WITH OUR COVER STAR.

3

Julianne, I feel your pain! It can be jarring to enter an old structure and discover that the insides do not even remotely match the (landmark-preserved) outside. On the other hand, living in the past is not necessarily the ideal option, either. This, our annual renovation issue, highlights several examples of sensitive-yet-stunning makeovers that respect a building’s history while updating it for contemporary taste—and life. In the case of our cover star, who is a major design enthusiast, the solution lay in retaining the charming details of her Greek Revival Manhattan home (shutters, floors, fireplaces, staircase—things many townhouse dwellers actually do remove) but changing up the layout. Taking liberties with tradition, Moore moved her kitchen from the darker downstairs (“where it is supposed to be,” comments the Oscar winner) to the sunny parlor floor, a place where Moore admits the family rarely gathered when it was a living room. The lower level has been transformed into a casual, cozy family hangout, and Moore’s triumphant final verdict is “Now we use the whole house.” In the Loire Valley, designer Tino Zervudachi was tasked with restoring a 17th-century house without destroying its spirit, and our photos offer proof of his successful balancing act. AD also visits the recently refurbished London home of British It girl Poppy Delevingne, who signals approval with the observation “Since moving in, I’d definitely say, I’ve become more of a homebody. We spend most of our time around the kitchen island!” And finally, in scenic Jackson Hole, one family with vision purchased a decades-old cabin and replaced it with a new building so thoughtfully designed and sited that it disappears into the sublime landscape as though it were always there. Mission accomplished.

AMY ASTLEY Editor in Chief @amytastley 4 28

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1. TREVOR TONDRO; 2. RICHARD POWERS; 3. FRANÇOIS DISCHINGER; 4. ZACH HILTY/BFA.COM

“It’s shocking to me how many townhouses have the soul renovated out of them.” —Julianne Moore


object lesson

THE STORY BEHIND AN ICONIC DESIGN

Foot Fetish

IN HIS SAN FRANCISCO HOUSE, A FORMER FIRE STATION, JOHN DICKINSON USED A PINE VERSION OF HIS AFRICAN TABLE.

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FRED LYON

How John Dickinson transformed a cheap import into a trophy of chic


object lesson

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1. A 1970S PLASTER HOOFED TABLE IN DEALER LIZ O’BRIEN’S PENNSYLVANIA BATH. 2. A SIXLEGGED VERSION OF THE AFRICAN TABLE, PRODUCED IN FIBERGLASSREINFORCED CONCRETE BY SUTHERLAND. 3. DICKINSON AT THE FIREHOUSE.

—HANNAH MARTIN

1. ANTHONY COTSIFAS; 2. AND 3. COURTESY OF SUTHERLAND

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he last place you 2 might expect to find John Dickinson— the debonair San Francisco decorator whose tailored modernism captivated 1970s cognoscenti before his untimely death in 1982—was a kitschy imports shop. But that’s exactly where he spotted one of his most recognizable muses: an African wood stool perched on three feet. “Its brutal, primitive look was the antidote to the chichi modernity that prevailed,” explains R. Louis Bofferding, the Manhattan decorativearts dealer and Dickinson expert. “So he started to make his own versions in different materials and sizes.” Early examples, like the two owned by designer Michael Formica, were hewn from pine by a carpenter. Soon, though, Dickinson began casting his stools and tables in plaster, with a dash of resin to prevent staining and metal rebar to reinforce the brittle legs. In no time, the African table got a foot in the door with early adopters like Angelo Donghia and Michael Taylor. A herd of like-minded and equally popular spin-offs (Hoofed, Etruscan, Footed) followed. Dickinson loved the plaster’s weight—it forced clients to quit rearranging his furniture—but the material’s fragility meant that the tables were constantly shattering. Not surprisingly, only a few originals still stand (owned by 3 collectors such as Reed Krakoff, Liz O’Brien, and Jane Holzer) and go for soaring prices: One sold for more than $15,000 at Wright in June. Fans less obsessed with provenance can purchase Sutherland’s licensed repros, fashioned from fiberglassreinforced concrete, for a fraction of the cost. “They’re perfect punctuation marks in any room,” says Formica of the designs. “And they make you smile!” sutherlandfurniture.com


archdigest.com Introducing

Clever

A new place on archdigest.com with all the answers to your decorating, renovating, and tiny-budget-even-tinier-floor-plan woes

ALWAYS HANG CURTAINS AT CEILING HEIGHT (UNLESS YOU LIKE FEELING CRAMPED)

BIG, EMPTY WALL? PAINT A LARGE CANVAS THE SAME COLOR, PRETEND YOU BOUGHT IT AT AUCTION MAKE ART, NOT WAR (SIMPLE WHITE FRAMES ARE YOUR FRIEND!)

ALYSSA ROSENHECK

WHO SAYS YOU CAN’T UPHOLSTER A VINTAGE CHAIR IN SHEARLING?

A LONG, LOW SHELF ADDS EXTRA DISPLAY SPACE—WITHOUT CLUTTERING THE ROOM

708 square feet in Austin, TX A once-dim 1980s condo was transformed by designer James Saavedra (and his knack for DIY art that looks like it cost a boatload).

archdigest.com/clever 34

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HAIR BY HIKARU HIRANO; MAKEUP BY LUCA CIANCIOLO FOR CLOSE UP MILANO USING SMASHBOX

EDITED BY JANE KELTNER DE VALLE

Living Large A masterfully curated New York City apartment provides the perfect backdrop for Giovanna Battaglia-Engelbert’s charmed life PH OTO G R A PH Y BY F RANÇOIS DISCHINGER

STYL ED BY MI C HAEL BARGO

DISCOVERIES

THE BEST IN SHOPPING, DESIGN, AND STYLE

STYLIST GIOVANNA BATTAGLIA-ENGELBERT, IN A GIAMBATTISTA VALLI DRESS, PERCHES BENEATH A BARBARA KRUGER WORK. POUL KJÆRHOLM DAYBED AND TABLE. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.

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DISCOVERIES at home with 1. IN THE ENTRANCE HALL, A JOSEF FRANK MIRROR FROM SVENSKT TENN HANGS ABOVE A VINTAGE SCANDINAVIAN DESK; WILHELM KÅGE GREEN VASE. 2. BATTAGLIA-ENGELBERT’S NEW STYLE MEMOIR.

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ever trust a man who has no books,” declares Giovanna Battaglia-Engelbert, floating atop a library ladder in a cotton-candy cloud of a Giambattista Valli gown. When the Italian stylist started dating Swedish real-estate mogul Oscar Engelbert, now her husband, they bonded over art and design tomes—Giovanna collects books as voraciously as she does fashion. “The library was half full when we met,” she says. To borrow a phrase from Jerry Maguire, she completed him—or at least his shelves. Couple and books now happily commingle in the Annabelle Selldorf–designed Manhattan apartment with en suite sky garage and views over the Hudson River. Furnished with modern classics, from Pierre Jeanneret’s teak dining table and chairs to a Stilnovo tricolor floor lamp, it is perhaps more reflective of Oscar’s style than his wife’s. (The place was already decorated when she moved in.) “He likes midcentury a lot, whereas I am also very comfortable with Baroque and all that Italian mess,” Giovanna says. “We meet at Gio Ponti,” she adds with a laugh. Not to say that she hasn’t made her mark. The Barbara Kruger artwork that hangs at the top of their 23-foot-high living space was tucked away in Oscar’s office when Giovanna moved in. “I was like, Are you crazy?” she recalls. “She is my favorite contemporary artist.” Oscar initially thought it was too big for the space, but after some coaxing—and two cranes to hoist it into place—Giovanna triumphed.

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The fashion diehard has 2 been steadily expanding her repertoire into the art-and-design realm lately, as the 670K-plus followers of her intoxicating Instagram can attest. Giovanna dresses masterfully for every occasion, from fashion show to art fair. For a Yayoi Kusama exhibit in Moscow, she paired a crimson Comme des Garçons jacket with the red-and-white polka-dot art. A graphic poncho served as the perfect foil for a visit to one of Luis Barragán’s color-block homes in Mexico. Giovanna’s artful snaps illustrate her new book, Gio_Graphy: Fun in the Wild World of Fashion (Rizzoli), which chronicles her adventures in dressing up. One laugh-out-loud anecdote finds her at the Met gala, unable to zip up her Dolce & Gabbana gown following a bathroom break. After a bit of hyperventilation, she sutured the entire back of the dress with safety pins—a move that won her accolades the rest of the evening. Of course, given Giovanna’s extensive outfit changes and expansive wardrobe, the question arises: Was it as easy blending closets as it was libraries? “Oscar offered to convert our garage into a closet for me, but I felt a bit bad about that.” So her wardrobe is divided between their homes in Sweden and the overflow kept in the Manhattan guest room—at least that’s her story. As Oscar quietly confides, “There have been a few occasions when our car couldn’t fit in the garage.” —JANE KELTNER DE VALLE

BOOK: COURTESY OF RIZZOLI

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DISCOVERIES world of 1

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Vincent Darré The dashing Paris decorator unveıls a staggeringly beautiful oasis of style 1. IN VINCENT DARRÉ’S PARIS SHOWROOM, ANTIQUE BOISERIE MEETS A ROBERT FOUR TAPESTRY–CLAD CHAIR AND TAHER CHEMIRIK OCCASIONAL TABLES. 2. DARRÉ AT HIS JANSEN DESK. 3. TAILLARDAT CABINET IN THE BEDROOM.

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he trouble with being a tastemaker is that admirers want to own what you live with. Paris decorator Vincent Darré’s protectionist solution? Conjure up a virtual home that serves as a byappointment office and showroom. “It’s an exploration of what I can do with the elegant proportions of salons with dix-huitième-siècle boiseries,” he says, in an accent he laughingly calls “pure Maurice Chevalier.” And, as the thrillingly dapper designer points out—to his fans’ satisfaction— everything is for sale, from cushions to chandeliers. Darré’s professional premises occupy a handful of high-ceilinged rooms on the third floor of 13 Rue Royale, a limestone mansion that was constructed in the 18th century by architect Louis Le Tellier. To Darré’s delight, the building is just a few grand doors up from another Le Tellier building that once housed

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P HOTOGRAP HY BY J ÉRÔM E G A L L A N D


DISCOVERIES world of 1. ROMAN-RUINS WALLPAPER ENNOBLES A CORRIDOR. 2. IN THE BATH, SCONCES BY VADIM ANDROUSOV AND ANDRÉ ARBUS FACE ANTONIO PIPPOLINI DRAWINGS. 3. THE BEDROOM FEATURES A MARC BANKOWSKY PENDANT AND A DARRÉ-DESIGN CARPET.

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“I made this like a dream appartement for me.” —Vincent Darré 3

the legendary Jansen design studio. “My desk is Jansen,” he proudly says of the vintage metal writing table standing center stage in the silver office. Here, past and present unite with a contemporary charge, marrying a new line of home furnishings and accessories—sparked by Baroque, Renaissance, and mythological grotesqueries, Darré’s great aesthetic touchstones—with the expertise of artisans who are close friends. Vivid memories of a childhood trip to Rome come to life in the Forum’s worth of architectural fragments that march across a long corridor’s custom-made wallpaper. Lamps by Patrice Dangel and Kim Moltzer and a lava-stone console by Eric Schmitt are poised beneath the lounge’s blood-orange ceiling. Terra-cotta sconces by Vadim Androusov and André Arbus illuminate the bath, and a shimmering Manuela Paul-Cavallier mirror fashioned of burned and gilded wood joins an Osanna Visconti di Modrone table in the bedroom. Darré is so pleased with the effervescent mise-enscène that he’ll be hosting everything from lunches to cocktail parties there, inviting painters, designers, actors, writers, and the like, in the manner of a mod Proustian salon. And if anybody wants the venerable china they just so handsomely dined upon, it can be had, for a price. maisondarre.com —MITCHELL OWENS


DISCOVERIES debut 1

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Popular Demand

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1. QUINN TRAY. 2. BURNETT ARMCHAIR. 3. BULLARD’S PALM SPRINGS HOUSE, DECKED OUT IN FRONTGATE. 4. CROWLEY BAR CABINET. 5. THE DESIGNER’S NEW WEST HOLLYWOOD SHOP, WITH A SELECTION OF HIS OWN DESIGNS.

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esigner Martyn Lawrence Bullard has never been shy about making a statement, but his latest project— a sprawling collection of furniture, accessories, and art for retail goliath Frontgate—shifts the designer’s global ambitions into overdrive. “I’ve had such a public platform for so long. Now I’m finally able to bring a taste of my work to a much larger audience,” says the effervescent Bullard, who counts a gaggle of megawatt celebrities among his fans. “Frontgate distributes about 86 million catalogs a year,” he continues, “so the opportunity to connect with consumers is extraordinary.” His signature line covers the entire home field, from cabinets, coffee tables, and lighting to cushions and pot racks. The collection reflects the designer’s renowned dexterity in working with many different styles—updated traditional, clean-lined modern, nouvelle Moroccan, and everything in between. “The idea is to give the customers a broad enough range to make the look their own,” he explains. “We’ve even designed gorgeous things to hang on the wall.” Yet Bullard’s relationship with Frontgate extends beyond his own designs. As a creative éminence grise, he charts directions for style trends that filter out to the company’s entire range, and that influence will be unmistakable in Frontgate’s brick-and-mortar shops. Strategic launch parties ratchet up the visibility of the design partnership, too. Bullard’s dazzling new West Hollywood boutique—which encapsulates his worldview in a kaleidoscopic display of products—will be transformed periodically into a Frontgate pop-up. “They’re really trying to move their vision forward,” he says. “This first launch is a big splash, but we’ve only begun making waves.” frontgate.com —MAYER RUS

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: ROGER DAVIES; LU TAPP (2); COURTESY OF FRONTGATE (3)

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With his massive collection for Frontgate, Martyn Lawrence Bullard balances glamour and accessibility


DISCOVERIES AD visits

Change Agent Everyday objects become wondrous artworks in artist Ann Carrington’s clever hands

W

ho knew that steel soup spoons could be assembled into perfect peonies? Or that soft silver teaspoons are just right for delicate rose petals? In British artist Ann Carrington’s fanciful vision, the bowls of berry spoons are linked to mimic hydrangea blossoms, and fork tines make great protea blooms. Before any of that could happen, though, Carrington had to learn to weld, solder, and braze. “They’re quite difficult to make,” she says during some downtime at her light-filled studio in a former railway yard in Margate, a seaside resort east of London. Composed of castoff flatware, Carrington’s lush floral arrangements take about three months to create, from sorting to composition to completion. “Each flower requires a different kind of spoon,” she says, “and each metal requires a different heating technique.”

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Inspiration for the sculptures struck while she looked at 17th-century vanitas pictures during a visit to the Rijksmuseum in Amsterdam. “I’ve always been attracted to the tradition of memento mori, art that reminds us of the passing of time,” Carrington says. “In looking at those pictures of half-consumed food and fading flowers, I realized that one of the only things that could have survived to today was the silverware, and I thought, Wouldn’t it be fun to try to make something out of that?” Throughout her career, upcycling the detritus of modern life has been Carrington’s modus operandi. She has transformed buttons into giant postage stamps bearing Queen Elizabeth II’s profile, shaped strings of faux pearls into galleons, and assembled souvenir coins into giant vases. She also has been known to unexpectedly deploy scraps of fabric, vintage horse brasses, seashells, old tires, and aluminum beverage cans. “I love that she works with everyday objects and puts them together in a way that’s surprising and beautiful,” says longtime fan David Barry, a partner in London’s hip Chiltern Firehouse hotel, where one of Carrington’s flatware florals sits on the restaurant bar, providing an Instagrammable ahamoment for many delighted patrons. The Victoria and Albert Museum acquired one of the flower pieces at last year’s Carrington exhibition at the Royal College

P HOTOGRAP HY BY J OONEY WO O DWA R D

HAIR AND MAKEUP BY LUCIE PEMBERTON USING BOBBI BROWN AND BUMBLE AND BUMBLE

ANN CARRINGTON—SAFELY SUITED-UP FOR WELDING—IN HER MARGATE, ENGLAND, STUDIO.


DISCOVERIES AD visits 1

1. A “MAGIC CARPET” MADE OF VINTAGE HORSE BRASSES WITH SPOON-HANDLE FRINGE. 2. DEVIL’S TRUMPET, A FLATWARE-FLORAL SCULPTURE NOW IN THE COLLECTION OF LONDON’S VICTORIA AND ALBERT MUSEUM. 3. FLATTENED ALUMINUM CANS ARE SEWN TOGETHER AND EMBOSSED WITH AN OVERSCALE INDIAN-HEAD COIN DESIGN.

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“It’s just a bit perverse to sculpt flowers, because you’re competing with nature.” 3

SCULPTURE: ALEXA CLARKE KENT

of Art, where she studied sculpture in the 1980s. Titled Devil’s Trumpet, after a psychotropic flower from the Amazon with trumpet-like petals, the name is a wry comment on her creations. “The plant is said to create an inability to differentiate fantasy from reality, which I felt was very apt for an artist making surreal flower sculptures!” The arrangement, with just one of the beautiful but deadly blossoms mixed in with more familiar flora, went on view in the V&A’s contemporary-silver gallery in August. “Ann’s piece satisfies three criteria: It’s well designed, it’s well crafted, and it has the impact of surprise,” explains Eric Turner, a curator in the department of sculpture, metalwork, ceramics, and glass. “It’s a startling use of redundant silverware, and I think it will stretch people’s imaginations.” Acclaim aside, Carrington admits that she has completed only 11 of the bouquets in the past four years. “To be honest, making them is not a pleasurable process,” she admits with a laugh. “It’s just a bit perverse to sculpt flowers, because you’re competing with nature. Plus,” she adds, “it’s rather filthy.” Dangerous, too: Once, while she was welding a lily, an errant drop of molten metal fell into a work boot, burning her heel so badly she had to wear flip-flops all last winter. This month, more of Carrington’s inventions, including four new floral sculptures, can be seen from November 15 to 29 in the gallery at Paul Smith’s London flagship on Albemarle Street in tony Mayfair. The fashion-designer knight has been following the artist’s career and collecting her creations since her final student show in 1987. “From safety pins to two-pence pieces,” Sir Paul says, “she has this amazing ability of transforming something very ordinary into something very extraordinary.” anncarrington.co.uk —SHAX RIEGLER


DISCOVERIES debut 1

On a Roll Le Manach, the French fabric house, turns 14 legendary patterns into delectable new wall coverings 2

1. BATIK, LE MANACH’S MOST FAMOUS PATTERN, SPLASHES WRITER LOUISE DE VILMORIN’S SALON BLEU IN THE 1960S (DECOR BY HENRI SAMUEL). 2. ALIZARINE IS AMONG THE FRENCH FIRM’S NEW WALLPAPER LINE. 3. BATIK RAISON. 4. HANEKOU.

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eople are crazy about wallpapers,” marvels Patrick Frey, the gregarious textile magnate known for the iconoclastic prints manufactured by Pierre Frey, the company that his father launched back in the 1930s. No wall coverings, though, had ever been produced by Le Manach, the small, deluxe fabric house that the family firm acquired in 2014, when it was on its deathbed, and then swiftly resuscitated. That oversight has been remedied, thanks to Frey’s deep dive into Le Manach’s extensive archive. Fourteen patterns, some dating back to the firm’s 1829 founding, are being translated into decidedly lively wallpapers, screened by hand in—of all places—New Jersey. “This type of work isn’t done anymore in France,” Frey explains. He adds that the line, developed over a period of two years, will be making its American debut in November and in Europe in January. (Seven new fabrics are part of the launch, too.) “I wanted the quality to be exactly as it was in the past.” Doused in Le Manach’s hallmark strong, vibrant colors, the range encompasses kicky chinoiseries, an exotic ikat, luxuriant florals, even a whimsical offering that incorporates faintly smiling neoclassical lions. Adding to the allure is that each pattern is as unique and captivating as the last. As Frey points out, with a proud grin, “Nobody else is doing them—and it’s Le Manach.” lemanach.fr; pierrefrey.com —MITCHELL OWENS

1. ROGER GUILLEMOT/CONNAISSANCE DES ARTS/AKG-IMAGES; 2., 3. AND 4. LIAM GOODMAN

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DISCOVERIES shopping

ALEXANDER McQUEEN FOR THE RUG COMPANY CHIAROSCURO. 4" X 6"; $9,456. THERUG COMPANY.COM

WEDGWOOD TEA GARDEN THREEPIECE SET IN BLACKBERRY. $113. WEDGWOOD.COM

HOUSE OF HACKNEY LIMERENCE “LODDIGES” CHAIR IN INDIGO. 26" W. X 26" D. X 36.25" H.; $3,092. HOUSEOFHACKNEY.COM

Moody Blooms PATCH NYC NOSEGAY PILLOW IN BLUE/BROWN. 14" X 20"; $132. PATCHNYC.COM

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This season’s bold, romantic blossoms prove that florals can work year-round P ROD U C ED BY PARK ER BOW I E L A R S O N

COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

MARCIN RUSAK STUDIO FLORA LOW TABLE II. 45.75" DIA. X 12" H.; $38,000. MARCIN RUSAK.COM


CULTURE

WHERE TO GO, WHOM TO KNOW, WHAT TO SEE

EDITED BY SAM COCHRAN

ADRIAN GAUT

Overdue Notice Rediscovered by aesthetes in the know, the late designer Ward Bennett gets his place in history with the monograph he long deserved THE LIVING ROOM OF A 1970 AMAGANSETT HOUSE BY WARD BENNETT, WHO ADDED THE SLATTED SCREENS IN THE 1990S AT THE BEHEST OF THE HOME’S THEN OWNERS, JANN AND JANE WENNER. AR C H DI G E S T. CO M

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CULTURE legacy

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1. THE 1970 ROME APARTMENT THAT BENNETT DESIGNED FOR GIANNI AND MARELLA AGNELLI. 2. HIS 1960S SCISSOR CHAIR, STILL PRODUCED BY GEIGER. 3. BENNETT’S 1969 HAMPTONS HOUSE FOR TELEVISION PRODUCER MARVIN SUGARMAN. 4. THE DESIGNER POSING IN HIS ALEXANDRIA CHAIR. 5. A VINTAGE WICKER SLED CHAIR.

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has been a fan for more than a decade, since he saw the imposing modernist house in Southampton that Bennett had designed in the 1960s for television producer Marvin Sugarman. “It made a great architectural statement— almost Brutalist—while the neighboring houses were very sweet and 4 charming,” Maier says. Reed Krakoff, the chief artistic officer of Tiffany & Co., discovered Bennett’s work around the same time and was similarly smitten by the designer’s I Beam table and his plush, channel-tufted Shellback chair. For Krakoff, these pieces “are what American design is about, born out of functionality and natural simplicity.” (As fate would have it, Bennett had designed tableware for Tiffany in the 1970s, including a sterling-silver flatware pattern that bore his name.) Bennett’s life was a classic American success story. Born Howard Bernstein in New York, the son of a vaudeville performer, he left home at 13 and delivered fabrics in the

1. KAREN RADKAI; 2. COURTESY OF GEIGER/HERMAN MILLER; 3. ADRIAN GAUT; 4. MICHAEL PATEMAN; 5. COURTESY OF WRIGHT

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ention the name Ward Bennett and you’ll likely get a puzzled look. But from the 1960s through the 1980s, Bennett—who was born 100 years ago this month and who died in 2003—was one of America’s best-known designers. He was famous for his luxurious brand of modernism and for pared-down, sumptuous interiors that skillfully integrated antiques and contemporary pieces. (Clients included Gianni and Marella Agnelli and Jann and Jane Wenner.) His furniture designs made contemporary refinements to historical prototypes. He incorporated industrial forms and materials into his work a decade before the High Tech trend of the 1970s. And his own homes— a striking, minimalist aerie in the famed Dakota and a monastically spare weekend house in East Hampton—were known around the world. But fame is a fickle thing, and after his death Bennett’s name disappeared from view. Today, however, he is enjoying a renaissance among tastemakers in the worlds of design and fashion. Tomas Maier, the creative director of Bottega Veneta,


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1. PHOTOGRAPHED BY HORST P. HORST FOR THE NOVEMBER 15, 1964, ISSUE OF VOGUE, A MODEL POSES IN BENNETT’S APARTMENT AT THE DAKOTA. 2. BENNETT’S OWN HOUSE IN EAST HAMPTON. 3. VINTAGE BUTTON-TUFTED CLUB CHAIR. 4. BENNETT’S ICONIC I BEAM SIDE TABLE. 5. FLATWARE HE DESIGNED FOR TIFFANY IN THE 1970S.

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city’s garment district, soon sketching dresses and then designing them. Bennett (it is not known when he changed his name) was around 16 when he was sent to the Paris collections, a trip that sparked a lifelong love of travel, architecture, and art. But fashion was not to be his calling. Bennett’s art studies, including evening classes with the great postwar painter Hans Hofmann, convinced him that his true creative potential lay elsewhere. Soon his sculpture was being exhibited; his jewelry designs were featured in a show at the Museum of Modern Art; and interiors beckoned. By the late 1940s, Bennett was designing an elegant Fifth Avenue apartment, the first of many interior-design commissions; by the mid-1950s, his early furniture designs were in production; and by the mid-1960s, he was ensconced as the sole designer for the furniture manufacturer Brickel Associates, where for more than 20 years he created high-end furniture that was equally at home in boardrooms and living rooms. His output included both historically minded upholstered pieces and sleek modernist designs like the I Beam table; the Sled chair, with its polished steel frame; and the Scissor chair, which was inspired by 19th-century Brighton folding beach chairs. (These three pieces are among a selection of his designs still produced by Geiger, a subsidiary of Herman Miller.) As architect Lee Mindel, a longtime fan, says of Bennett’s work, “You can’t add or take anything away—it’s reduced to its essence.” Thus far, those looking for documentation of Bennett’s work have been limited to magazine articles and books in which his designs are shown, but Ward Bennett (Phaidon, November 2017), a book edited by Elizabeth Beer and Brian Janusiak, will finally offer a comprehensive look at the designer’s career. (Full disclosure: I contributed an essay to the book.) Janusiak and Beer, partners in the New York creative office Various Projects, designed an installation of Bennett’s work for Herman Miller in 2015 and wanted to know more about the designer. As Beer says, “We realized we had an affinity for his approach— problem-solving through design. He invented his own method.” And in today’s freewheeling design climate, Bennett’s method, which sought to balance elegance and utility, bears a second look. —PILAR VILADAS

1. HORST P. HORST; 2. PETER AARON/OTTO; 3. COURTESY OF 1STDIBS; 4. COURTESY OF WRIGHT; 5. COURTESY OF TIFFANY & CO.

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1. SLEEPING FIELD (2015–16), BY ANTONY GORMLEY, IS JUST ONE OF THE MANY WORKS ON VIEW AT SCHLOSS DERNEBURG, A HISTORIC CASTLE IN NORTHWESTERN GERMANY THAT WAS RECENTLY TRANSFORMED INTO A MUSEUM BY THE HALL ART FOUNDATION. 2. THE BUILDING WAS PREVIOUSLY OWNED BY ARTIST GEORG BASELITZ.

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Noble Spirit A family of collectors transforms a historic German castle into Europe’s latest must-see art destination 2

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ver dinner some ten years ago, art dealer Leo Koenig and artist Georg Baselitz made an offhand suggestion to collectors Christine and Andy Hall that would turn out to be pivotal. The Halls had a particular fondness for German Neo-Expressionism, and Koenig had just helped the couple buy Baselitz’s personal trove of artworks, many by his contemporaries. “I told Andy and Christine that they should buy his castle as well,” recalls Koenig, referring to Schloss Derneburg, a sprawling complex in northwestern Germany where Baselitz had lived and worked since the 1970s. “I’m not sure I was serious, but a year later the whole thing was consummated.” This past summer, the couple unveiled a spectacular renovation of the castle as a museum, part of their family’s Hall Art Foundation. Set amid rolling farmland and forests, Schloss Derneburg was originally built in the 11th century as a fortified castle. For nearly 700 years it served as a home for various religious groups, before a German count hired architect Georg Laves to reconfigure the property as a private residence in the early 19th century. Later, during World War II, Derneburg was used as a military hospital, and by the time Baselitz acquired it, in 1974, much of the estate’s land and some of its buildings had been sold to the state of Lower Saxony. When the Halls purchased the castle, they didn’t have a clear vision. “That evolved subsequently and is still evolving,” says Andy, a prominent investment manager. “The fact that Baselitz

1. HEINRICH HECHT/COURTESY OF THE HALL ART FOUNDATION; 2. STEFAN NEUENHAUSEN/COURTESY OF THE HALL ART FOUNDATION

CULTURE art scene


lived there for 30 years makes it a natural home for our collection,” a trove that includes important works by Anselm Kiefer, Markus Lüpertz, A. R. Penck, and others. “Plus it’s a beautiful property with an intriguing history.” The renovations by architect Tammo Prinz would take the better part of a decade. While much of the work involved meticulous restoration, more radical interventions were undertaken to convert the warrenlike monks’ quarters and other domestic spaces into galleries for postwar and contemporary art. In the meantime, Christine and Andy, who are based in Palm Beach, Florida, established the Hall Art Foundation in 2007 and converted a Vermont dairy farm into their first art center. That venue, opened in 2012, boosted the Halls’ art-world profile, but as Koenig notes, “Derneburg is on another level.” Featuring 70,000 square feet of gallery space, Schloss Derneburg opened on July 1 with no fewer than seven exhibi1

“The fact that Baselitz lived there for 30 years makes it a natural home for our collection,” says Andy Hall. 1. AN AERIAL VIEW OF THE SPRAWLING CASTLE REVEALS REFRESHED GROUNDS BY LANDSCAPE DESIGNER MARTIN DIEKMANN. 2. JULIAN SCHNABEL’S AHAB (2000) IN THE RESTORED ENTRANCE HALL. 3. PASSING CLOUD (OVER DERNEBURG), A 2011 STAINEDGLASS INSTALLATION BY SPENCER FINCH.

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tions, including two large group shows: a selection of movingimage works curated by Chrissie Iles of the Whitney and “Für Barbara,” a survey of works by female artists that Koenig organized as homage to his late stepmother, the influential Berlin dealer Barbara Weiss. In addition there are solo presentations devoted to Antony Gormley, Barry Le Va, Malcolm Morley, Hermann Nitsch, and Julian Schnabel. The Gormley show provides some of the most dramatic moments, among them Sleeping Field (2015–16), a group of 700 abstract figures installed in a former chapel. “It’s this interplay of art and architecture,” says Andy, “that makes Derneburg a true Gesamtkunstwerk.” The plan is to keep the castle open on Wednesdays and weekends through December, close for a period, and then reopen in the spring. (Visitors must make reservations for guided tours.) Derneburg’s off-the-beaten-path location will no doubt appeal to those cultural insiders who can’t resist a good pilgrimage. And it’s really like nothing else. “Every little nook and cranny has a unique character,” says Koenig. “What the Halls have done is embrace the history and quirkiness of this place and the many lives it has gone through.” —STEPHEN WALLIS

1. GEMEINDE HOLLE/COURTESY OF THE HALL ART FOUNDATION; 2. HELEN DURING/COURTESY OF THE HALL ART FOUNDATION; 3. STEFAN NEUENHAUSEN/COURTESY OF THE HALL ART FOUNDATION

CULTURE art scene


CULTURE case study IN PALM SPRINGS, A 1960S BUFF & HENSMAN HOUSE HAS BEEN FRESHLY UPDATED BY MARMOL RADZINER. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.

True to Form For a little-known house in Palm Springs, Marmol Radziner forgoes a textbook restoration in favor of a thoughtful update to the midcentury-modern gem

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as there ever an odder movie star than Laurence Harvey? In unsettling films like BUtterfield 8 and The Manchurian Candidate, he was the definition of the smooth, handsome devil, that strange light behind his eyes making clear that in real life, too, he was trouble: never without a cigarette and drink, bellicose, sexually all over the map, and doing his best to die young. He made it to 45. Harvey lived only four years to enjoy this house, which he built in Palm Springs, California, in 1969. The wild man liked his 1963 Beverly Hills house so much that he commissioned the same architecture firm—venerable Southern California modernists Buff & Hensman—to create this oasis of tranquillity in the desert. After nearly 50 years it has passed the truest test of architecture: It looks even better today than when it was built, after a fine-tuning by architects Marmol Radziner and in the care of Rea Laccone and Paul Perla, the couple who have found their own bliss here.

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Amazingly, this house is barely on the radar in Palm Springs, where trophy properties by midcentury masters, particularly those with an Old Hollywood provenance, are paraded like dogs at Westminster. It’s in a fine old neighborhood where once you might have bumped into Kirk Douglas or Dinah Shore taking a morning walk. As big as the compound is, little of it can be seen from the street—only a long, low stone wall and two seemingly impenetrable front doors. Solid walnut, they swing open slowly, and when they do the last thing you expect happens: You are still outdoors, in a vast garden room surrounded by glass pavilions, under the spell of towering Mount San Jacinto. There’s hardly any color. The furniture is spare and quiet. Every element is strong and deliberate. All the local kitsch suddenly seems very far away as a deep calm sets in. “No makeup required,” says Laccone, who cofounded the fashion brand Vince because she couldn’t find a good T-shirt. It might easily have gone a different route. Palm Springs has a taste for fanatical midcentury restorations, down to original appliances and an Avanti in the driveway. Partly because

P HOTOGRAP HY BY ROGER DAV I ES

S T YLED BY ANI TA S A R S I DI


CULTURE case study

1. MARMOL RADZINER ACCENTUATED THE HOME’S UNDERLYING FRAMEWORK WITH A DEEPBROWN FINISH. 2. SLIDING GLASS WALLS ERASE ANY INDOOROUTDOOR DIVIDE.

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Laccone and Perla are fashion people, and partly because Marmol Radziner have so much experience with important modern houses, there was a healthy impulse to move forward rather than backward, with much more interesting results. “The trick to any renovation is not to lose the soul of a building,” says Ron Radziner, the firm’s design principal, making it sound considerably easier than it is. Exactly where does a building’s soul lie? Buff & Hensman were known for post-and-beam houses, so the spirit of this home lay in the rhythm of its skeleton, which Marmol Radziner emphasized by changing its outlines

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“The trick to any renovation is not to lose the soul of a building.” —Ron Radziner

from white to brown-black. Radziner was also fascinated by how the plan pushed indoor-outdoor living “to the limit.” The 5,500-square-foot house, two casitas, and a poolhouse open through floor-to-ceiling glass to what is essentially a second alfresco house, with sheltered living rooms, a kitchen, a dining room, a pool—everything but bedrooms. By using the same terrazzo floor inside and out, Radziner wove the two together more tightly than ever. “Terrazzo feels seamless,” he says. Often you’re not quite sure which side of the glass you’re on. Although some very 1960s orange and yellow tile was preserved, Radziner found that “the original materials weren’t great for longevity. And the layout had the usual problems, with a separate kitchen. Especially in a vacation house, people today live fluidly.” Now everywhere you have life’s real luxuries: a peaceful atmosphere; a feeling of shelter in the desert air; the sense that this house is going to look just like this forever. It all seems so right, it’s hard to believe everything was not the original architects’ intent. Although modern Palm Springs and Albert Einstein are not dots ordinarily connected, something he once said happens to describe this house perfectly: “Everything should be made as simple as possible, but not simpler.” —STEPHEN DRUCKER


Good kitchens function, but dream kitchens perform, whisking together bold colors and playful patterns with the best new tech. For AD’s latest Great Design Awards, our editors have polled the experts and scoured the market, bringing home today’s top appliances, surfaces, fixtures, and more—all the ingredients for designing a cook space that’s as efficient as it is eye-catching.

TIM STREET-PORTER

THE MÉRIDA, MEXICO, KITCHEN OF ROBERT WILLSON AND DAVID SERRANO.

AD GREAT DESIGN AWARDS 2017

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BENJAMIN MOORE Aura interior paint in hot tamale; $70 per gallon. benjaminmoore.com

bright ideas

SUZANNE KASLER USED BENJAMIN MOORE’S NEWBURYPORT BLUE FOR A MAINE HOME; THE RANGE IS BY THERMADOR.

With kitchen staples now made in rainbow shades, cooking with color is the rule rather than the exception

brave faces Forgo standard-issue white cabinetry in favor of storage that’s anything but run-of-the-mill

S SMALLBONE OF DEVIZES Original

Hand Painted cabinetry in a bespoke blue; price upon request. smallbone.co.uk S WATERWORKS

X PLAIN & FANCY

Belden cabinetry in grasshopper; price upon request. waterworks.com

Austere cabinetry in denim blue; to the trade. plainfancy cabinetry.com

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punctuation marks Make a splash with countertop appliances clad in electrifying shades and sassy motifs 1. DOLCE & GABBANA FOR SMEG two-slice toaster; $499. smegusa.com 2. KITCHENAID

Artisan Series five-quart, tilt-head stand mixer in buttercup; $460. kitchenaid .com 3. VITAMIX Ascent Series A2500 blender in red; $520. vitamix.com

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INTERIORS FROM TOP: WILLIAM WALDRON; FRANÇOIS DISCHINGER; PAINT SAMPLE: PAUL ARMBRUSTER; ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

GIO PONTI– INSPIRED LACQUERED CABINETS IN A MIAMI BEACH PROJECT BY FRANK DE BIASI.


People gather in the kitchen, so I believe in making it beautiful. Colorful ranges can elevate a space and transform it into something new—they’re timeless, not trendy. —SUZANNE KASLER

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burning desires Turn up the heat with ranges and hoods drenched in dazzling jewel tones

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IN EL SALVADOR, A COLORFUL HOOD ENLIVENS A KITCHEN BY CINCOPATASALGATO.

semiprecious-stone surface in indigo; to the trade. caesarstoneus.com

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CORIAN BY DUPONT surface in imperial yellow; price upon request. corian.com

opening statement Lined in brilliant blue, this dual oven is a beauty inside and out

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CAMBRIA quartz surface in

bala blue; from $85 per sq. ft. cambriausa.com 5

1. SMEG Portofino hood in yellow; $1,499. smegusa.com 2. BERTAZZONI six-burner, griddle, and electric

double oven in azzurro; $8,599. us.bertazzoni.com 3. LA CORNUE Château 150 cooker in quintessential orange; from $60,000. lacornue.com 4. ROBERT BRUNNER FOR ZEPHYR Horizon wall hood in red; to the trade. zephyronline.com 5. VIKING Professional 7 Series range in cobalt blue; $17,659. vikingrange.com

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counter offers Get into the groove with vibrant solid surfaces

NATE BERKUS FOR LG STUDIO double

built-in wall oven; $3,499. lgstudio.com

INTERIOR: GAELLE LE BOULICAUT; PORTRAIT: ERICA GEORGE DINES; ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

CAESARSTONE CONCETTO


forward facing Clean lines and unexpected materials put an urbane spin on farmhouse-classic apron-front sinks

ROCKY MOUNTAIN HARDWARE Alturas

apron-front sink in silicon bronze light; from $5,911. rockymountain hardware.com SUN VALLEY BRONZE

apron-front farmhouse sink; price upon request. sunvalleybronze.com

KAST Nors basin in blue; $1,750. kastconcretebasins.com

ELKAY Quartz Luxe farmhouse sink in ricotta; $1,395. elkay.com A SHAWS APRONFRONT SINK BY ROHL IN A SAN FRANCISCO HOME BY MILES REDD.

boiling points From minimalist to traditional, there’s a pot filler for every style

DELTA Traditional wall-mount pot filler in Venetian bronze; $614. ferguson.com

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range of motion The best pull-down faucets are elegantly arced, equipped with spring spouts or flexible hoses 1. GROHE Essence semi-pro single-handle faucet in blue and chrome; $784. grohe.com 2. KOHLER Tournant semi-professional faucet in stainless steel; $720. us.kohler.com 3. BRIZO Litze articulating faucet in brilliance luxe gold; $1,352. brizo.com 4. ROHL Modern Architectural

Pro pull-down faucet in satin nickel; $2,532. rohlhome.com

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KALLISTA One wallmount pot filler in unlacquered brass; $1,348. kallista.com

PERRIN & ROWE BY ROHL

wall-mount, swingarm pot filler in polished nickel; $1,531. rohlhome.com

INTERIOR: ROGER DAVIES; ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

DXV Contemporary pot filler in ultra steel; $1,134. dxv.com


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1. STEVEN GAMBREL FOR THE URBAN ELECTRIC CO. Harford pendant; $4,021. urbanelectricco.com 2. HUDSON VALLEY LIGHTING Altamont pendant;

$1,300. hudsonvalleylighting.com 3. ALISON BERGER GLASSWORKS FOR HOLLY HUNT Lantern pendant; to the trade. hollyhunt.com 4. KELLY WEARSTLER FOR VISUAL COMFORT

Precision large pendant; $1,470. circalighting.com 5. ETHAN ALLEN Wyla hood pendant; $469. ethanallen.com

island life Statement pendant lights and sculptural barstools add instant personality to communal gathering spots

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center stage Customizable or off-theshelf, freestanding industrialinspired islands anchor today’s chic kitchens

W MICHAEL YOUNG FOR SCAVOLINI

Tetrix collection. Made to order in custom sizes; price upon request. scavoliniusa.com

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6. PHILIPPE STARCK FOR EMECO Broom counter stool in yellow; $400. dwr.com 7. POLIFORM Ipsilon

stool in Spessart oak; $1,396. poliform.com 8. ROCHE BOBOIS Aida barstool in orange; $1,160. roche-bobois.com 9. MAXALTO FROM B&B ITALIA Fulgens

stool in black; from $2,866. bebitalia.com

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S MASSIMO IOSA GHINI FOR SNAIDERO

W BLAKE TOVIN FOR CRATE AND BARREL French

Frame island. 102" l. x 54" d. x 36" h.; price upon request. snaidero-usa.com

Kitchen large island. 72" l. x 40" d. x 36" h.; $3,499. crateand barrel.com

INTERIOR: DOUGLAS FRIEDMAN; ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

GEORGE NAKASHIMA WOODWORKER STOOLS IN A GROVES & CO. PROJECT IN NAPA VALLEY.


 DEKTON BY COSENTINO Xgloss

A COMMUNE PROJECT IN LOS ANGELES FEATURES CUSTOM CONCRETE FLOOR TILES.

 KELLY WEARSTLER FOR ANN SACKS Swell

tile in ivory. 8" sq.; $20 per sq. ft. annsacks.com

floor show

 ANTOLINI Impala Black Rio

stone; price upon request. antolini.com

Cut loose with the exuberant motifs, styles, and scales of the black-and-white floor tiles and solid surfaces of the moment

against the grain Lushly painted or laid in intricate compositions, today’s wood flooring is all about graphic appeal 1. EXQUISITE SURFACES Ardeche

reclaimed French oak; $100 per sq. ft. xsurfaces.com 2. CARLISLE WIDE PLANK FLOORS

Columbus Circle herringbone white oak; $21 per sq. ft. wideplankflooring.com 3. MIRTHFUL HOME Kiawah hardwood; $27 per sq. ft. mirthfulhome.com

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INTERIOR: FRANÇOIS HALARD; ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

Magicians Box design; from $45 per sq. ft. parisceramicsusa.com

SAMSUNG Family Hub refrigerator; $4,799. samsung.com

DACOR Modernist gas cooktop; $2,525. dacor.com

 PARIS CERAMICS

double wall oven; from $5,149. jennair.com

get smart Meet the next wave of hightech appliances

JENN-AIR Connected

stone custom stripe pattern in aura and spectra; from $58 per sq. ft. dekton.com


repeat that

Whether tiling a backsplash or an entire wall, go for glam with graphic geometries, exotic florals, and other punchy options CUSTOM FLOORTO-CEILING TILE WORK IN A HAMPTONS KITCHEN BY DAVID NETTO; THE RANGE IS BY WOLF.

 POPHAM DESIGN

Hex Knot tile in saffron and milk. 9" x 8"; from $25 per sq. ft. annsacks.com

  WALKER ZANGER

Cambrillo tile in multicolor. 8" sq.; $25 per sq. ft. walkerzanger.com   DE FERRANTI

totally gripping Glorious pulls in glimmering metals and eclectic silhouettes

Appoggi tile in red and white. 8" sq.; $814 per sq. m. deferranti.com

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2  CAMPANA BROTHERS FOR BISAZZA Brazilian

3

Agata tile in green. 8" sq.; $24 per sq. ft. bisazza.com

For a huge kitchen with very tall ceilings you need something cheerful and graphic lıke tile to visually complement the scale. —DAVID NETTO

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1. H. THEOPHILE

Two-tone wire pull; to the trade. htheophile.com 2. RH Jules 6" pull by Jonathan Browning; $35. rh.com 3. THE NANZ CO. Reeded pull; to the trade. nanz.com 4. EMTEK Sandcast pull; price upon request. emtek.com (CONTINUED ON PAGE 90)

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INTERIORS FROM TOP: PIETER ESTERSOHN; SIMON WATSON; PORTRAIT: RON HAMAD; 2. LIAM GOODMAN; ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

A BACKSPLASH OF ANTIQUE TILES AT A MOROCCAN RIAD.


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WEST ELM SHELVES IN STYLIST BETH KIRBY’S TENNESSEE HOME.

bare it all Stylish open-storage solutions, from exposed shelving to pot racks, call for snappy accessories 1. ENCLUME copper oval

pot rack; from $1,320. frontgate.com 2. FAUSTA GAETANI DESIGN dessert plates; $380 for a set of six. artemest.com 3. STAUB nine-quart round cocotte; $380. abchome.com 4. RH Carrara 36" marble shelf and square brass brackets; $245 and $65 each. rh.com 5. FELT+FAT nesting bowls; from $24 each. fair-design.com

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6. PETER RATH FOR LOBMEYR

Persian Flowers tumbler; $223. ateliercourbet.com 7. LA FORNASOTTA Piera Murano glass tumbler; $360 for a set of six. artemest.com

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preservation column; $6,399. thermador.com

THERMADOR 24" w. wine-

TRUE 30" w. dual-zone wine column; price on request. true-residential.com

wine storage; from $3,940. subzero-wolf.com

SUB-ZERO 24" w. undercounter

MIELE 27.75" w. wine-storage system; $6,999. mieleusa.com

LIEBHERR 24" w. WU 4500 wine cabinet; $2,062. home.liebherr.com

Wine-refrigeration units can be utilized as illuminated features that animate a corridor or the end of a view. —STEPHANIE GOTO

hitting the right notes Keep it cool with wine fridges that offer distinct temperature zones and adjustable shelving for splits and jeroboams alike

KITCHEN: BETH KIRBY; PORTRAIT: DOMINIQUE PALOMBO; ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

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A NOGUCHI LANTERN ILLUMINATES MOORE’S LIVING ROOM, FORMERLY HER HOME OFFICE. MARTIN EISLER CHAIRS FACE A GEORGE NAKASHIMA COCKTAIL TABLE. MACRAMÉ WALL HANGING BY SALLY ENGLAND. PAINTING ON LEFT BY FRIEDRICH KUNATH. OPPOSITE MOORE, WEARING A NILI LOTAN PANTSUIT, ON A VINTAGE CHARLES PFISTER FOR KNOLL SOFA. FASHION STYLING BY RACHEL WIRKUS. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


MAYER RUS FRANÇOIS DISCHINGER PORTRAIT BY ALEXI LUBOMIRSKI STYLED BY MICHAEL REYNOLDS TEXT BY

HAIR BY RYAN TRYGSTAD FOR STARWORKS ARTISTS USING ORIBE; MAKEUP BY GUCCI WESTMAN; NAILS BY GINA EPPOLITO

INTERIOR PHOTOGRAPHY BY

Flip the Script

By shuffling the arrangement of rooms, Julianne Moore brings new life to her beloved New York City townhouse


t

he word normal doesn’t get a lot of play in glossy shelter magazines. It has the slightly pejorative connotation of something ordinary—the antithesis of the magic and wonder that fabulous design is meant to inspire. Yet, when one enters the Manhattan home of actress Julianne Moore, the first impression is of surprising normality. Teenagers buzz about, doing whatever it is that teenagers do, and dogs bark affectionately for attention. The rooms possess the kind of engaging homeyness that emerges, seemingly without effort, in spaces where someone has paid close attention to proper scale, proportion, and period detail. There is no indoor lap pool, Turkish-style hammam, James Turrell skyspace, or any other conspicuously lavish signifier of luxury. It feels like a home—delightfully, unapologetically normal.

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“For years I dreamed about living in a townhouse in the West Village,” says the Oscar-winning actress, who lights up the big screen this fall with a hat trick of high-profile films: Todd Haynes’s Wonderstruck, George Clooney’s Suburbicon, and Matthew Vaughn’s Kingsman: The Golden Circle. “The first time I walked into this one, I knew this was it—I fell in love,” Moore recalls. That was 15 years ago. At the time, the fivestory house had been carved up into apartments, but the original front-and-back-parlor configuration was intact, as were the floors, shutters, fireplaces, and staircase. “There was enough character left that we could bring the house back to its Greek Revival roots without destroying the soul and texture of the building,” Moore says. Before the renovation began, Moore married her longtime partner, writer/director Bart Freundlich, in the garden at the rear of the house. Both of their children—Cal, now 19 and a sophomore in college, and Liv, a 15-year-old high school student—were present for the low-key ceremony, effectively putting the family’s stamp on the property even before the


IN THE KITCHEN, A JACK PIERSON PHOTOGRAPH HANGS ABOVE A CUSTOMMADE CABINET BY IVORY BUILD WITH VOLA SINK FITTINGS. CUSTOM TABLE; VINTAGE FRENCH CHAIRS AND MOROCCAN RUG. OPPOSITE IN THE SAWYER | BERSON–DESIGNED GARDEN, AN ALMA ALLEN SCULPTURE STANDS AMID THE BOXWOOD.


A NAN GOLDIN PHOTOGRAPH HANGS IN THE MASTER BATH. KOHLER TUB WITH CARRARA MARBLE SURROUND; GROHE FITTINGS. CABINET BY WILLY VAN DER MEEREN. OPPOSITE A CUSTOMMADE BED SITS ON AN ODEGARD RUG. TRIANGLE CHARLOTTE PERRIAND STOOL; PAAVO TYNELL FLOOR LAMP; AXEL EINAR HJORTH CHAIR; DAVID ARMSTRONG PHOTOGRAPH; WYETH SCONCES.


OPPOSITE: THE FRENCH FAMILY BEFORE THE BATH, NEW YEAR’S DAY, SAG HARBOR 2000/ © NAN GOLDIN, COURTESY OF MATTHEW MARKS GALLERY

“If it’s coming into my home, it has to have real meaning.” clan moved in. In fact, the renovation itself was something of a family affair, orchestrated by Bart’s architect brother, Oliver Freundlich, and his thenpartners Ben Bischoff and Brian Papa, in collaboration with Moore, a passionate design junkie. The makeover lasted a year and a half, after which the actress stocked the house with an enticing array of decorative treasures that evidence a distinct predilection for organic forms, warm materials, and spruce midcentury lines: a George Nakashima cocktail table, lamps by Isamu Noguchi, a Florence Knoll credenza with rattan doors, and a host of un-pedigreed but sympathetic vintage finds. “I like things that have real personality and authenticity,” Moore says. “I hate a knockoff.” As months and years passed, the actress expanded her collections, refined the rooms they inhabit, and implemented an extensive redesign of her garden by Brian Sawyer of the AD100 firm Sawyer | Berson (AD, March 2012). But something was still not quite right with Moore’s dream house. “We originally put

the kitchen downstairs, where it’s supposed to be. That’s where we always ended up, crammed on a love seat, watching television. We never gathered in the living room on the parlor floor,” she recalls. And then the epiphany struck—why not move the living room downstairs, where it could serve as a casual, semi-cloistered family hangout, and bring the kitchen upstairs? “I cannot recommend more strongly putting your kitchen somewhere with lots of natural light. It changed everything. Now we use the whole house,” Moore says. The transformative spatial inversion—again executed by brother-in-law Oliver Freundlich—may have taken liberties with period orthodoxy, but the effect is anything but jarring. The kitchen feels like an inviting social space, centered on a slender Parsonsstyle table (custom-made to fit the room’s proportions) that sits atop a Moroccan carpet. Cooking and storage functions are held to the perimeter. “I don’t really like traditional kitchen cabinets or islands, so I wanted everything to feel like furniture. I copied

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LEFT IN THE DOWNSTAIRS LIVING ROOM, EDELMAN LEATHER COVERS THE HARVEY PROBBER SOFA AND VINTAGE OTTOMAN. VINTAGE DANISH CHAIR AND EAMES ROCKER IN SHEEPSKIN; CARL AUBÖCK SIDE TABLE. ABOVE A LOUISE BOURGEOIS ARTWORK HANGS OVER THE UPSTAIRS LIVING ROOM’S BLACK MARBLE MANTEL.

the hood from a Vincent Van Duysen design I had seen. I met him not long afterward, and I copped to stealing his design,” Moore says. “Ultimately, this is probably not the ideal cook’s kitchen, but then again I’m not the ideal cook.” As part of the latest spatial reorganization, Moore moved her office from the front parlor on the main floor, where foot traffic and street noise were frequent distractions, to a quieter room on an upper floor. She works at a Pierre Jeanneret desk, sitting in a Jeanneret chair, beneath a Paavo Tynell hanging light. The bookshelves beside the desk neatly encapsulate the Julianne Moore story: Family photographs mingle amicably with her Academy Award and a bevy of other professional laurels, alongside stacks of old decorating magazines and monographs on the work of her favorite designers. “It’s shocking to me how many townhouses have had the soul renovated out of them. You end up with all the inconvenience of vertical living but none of the charm,” Moore observes. “I like things that feel human, things that tell a story. If it’s coming into my home, it has to have real meaning.”

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design notes

THE DETAILS THAT MAKE THE LOOK

ODE TAPESTRY, BY SALLY ENGLAND. PRICE UPON REQUEST; SALLYENGLAND.COM

CONOID COFFEE TABLE. $8,800; NAKASHIMA WOODWORKER.COM

CAST-BRONZE FOOT BY ANNE RICKETTS. $165; SHOP.GETTY.EDU

SMALL ROBOT VASE IN MATTE PINK. $230; BZIPPYANDCOMPANY.COM

I select each piece individually, and then a vocabulary emerges.”

BRASS PLANT MISTER. $26; SHOPTERRAIN.COM

TABOURET MÉRIBEL BY CHARLOTTE PERRIAND. $1,015; CASSINA.COM

A LA CORNUE RANGE STARS IN THE KITCHEN, BENEATH A MINIMALIST HOOD BY BEST.

INTERIORS: FRANÇOIS DISCHINGER; LAMP: © 2017 THE ISAMU NOGUCHI FOUNDATION AND GARDEN MUSEUM, NEW YORK/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK; ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

AKARI TABLE LAMP 22N, BY ISAMU NOGUCHI. $175; SHOP.NOGUCHI.ORG


MIDCENTURY MOROCCAN RUG; $7,600 FOR 6' X 13'; NAZMIYALANTIQUERUGS.COM

FLOOR LAMP BY PAAVO TYNELL FROM THE EXCHANGE INT. $13,500; 1STDIBS.COM

SOMEWHERE IN THE MEDITERRANEAN, BY JACK PIERSON. PRICE UPON REQUEST; CHEIMREAD.COM

FELT BALL BY MONA KOWALSKA. $375; ADETACHER.COM

THE OFFICE FEATURES MAGNETIC WALL COVERING BY WEITZNER, PAAVO TYNELL LIGHTS, AND A PIERRE JEANNERET DESK AND CHAIR.

ASTON LOUNGE CHAIR BY RODOLFO DORDONI. $3,150; MINOTTI-LA.COM

I developed relationships with dealers by walking into their stores and talking about design. With so much buyıng online today, that kind of connection is disappearing.”

ARCH, BY JULIAN WATTS. $2,000; JULIANWATTS STUDIO.COM

SOBREMESA LARGE HIGUERILLA-WOOD BOWL. $290; ABCHOME.COM MARILYN MINTER. PUBLISHED BY GREGORY R. MILLER & CO. $60; BARNESANDNOBLE.COM

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peak performance

THE AIRY LIVING AREA OF JOANNE AND RICO ZORKENDORFER’S JACKSON HOLE, WYOMING, GETAWAY SHOWS THEIR AFFINITY FOR NATURAL, WIDE-OPEN SPACES—

BOTH INSIDE AND OUT. SOFA BY RH; MALLORCAN IKAT OTTOMANS BY OLLI. BRASS PENDANT LIGHTING FROM SCHOOLHOUSE ELECTRIC & SUPPLY CO. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.


Rico and Joanne Zorkendorfer build their young family’s dream house— long, lean, and environmentally discreet—on the edge of Wyoming’s most famous valley TEXT BY

DOMINIC BRADBURY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

TREVOR TONDRO

STYLED BY

STEPHEN PAPPAS


LEFT OAKLEY STONE COVERS THE WALLS OF THE ENTRANCE HALL. STAIR OF DOUGLAS FIR; HANDWOVEN BASKET FROM GHANA. RIGHT JOANNE AND HER CHILDREN ON THE NORTHEAST DECK, WHICH OVERLOOKS FLAT CREEK AND THE NATIONAL ELK REFUGE.

p

erched on a butte that overlooks the mountain-ringed Wyoming valley known as Jackson Hole, Joanne and Rico Zorkendorfer’s family getaway feels like an observatory. One’s gaze is constantly drawn outside, taking in epic views that forge a deep sense of connection with the natural world. The long, low house has an organic quality, too, made of stone and wood and sited so sensitively, Joanne says, that it “almost disappears into the land.” Designed by Fiona McLean, a principal of the London architectural firm McLean Quinlan, the house perfectly answers the Zorkendorfers’ request for a true refuge. “The brief was for a house that felt restorative, serene, and elemental,” says Joanne, the founder of Olli, a San Francisco firm that specializes in home furnishings using robes de llengües textiles from Mallorca and Otomi embroidered fabrics from Mexico. Given the couple’s cultural roots—Joanne was born and raised in New Zealand, and Rico, an industrial designer at Apple, hails from Munich—Jackson Hole’s attraction is obvious. “It reminds us of our homelands,” Joanne says as she recounts their first winter vacation there, in 2011. They casually looked at some

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The materials are organic and plainspoken, though so perfectly joined and ďŹ nished as to be poetic.


THE DINING NOOK FEATURES SWEEPING CANYON VIEWS. OPPOSITE CLAD IN STONE FROM MONTANA, THE HOME WAS DESIGNED TO BLEND WITH THE LANDSCAPE.


“I have a love affair with New Zealand’s wideopen beach houses, and Rico has an affinity for chalets,” explains Joanne Zorkendorfer. real-estate listings at the time, the most arresting being a log cabin that occupied an extraordinary position on four elevated acres. The cabin, built a few decades ago, was in poor condition, but the Zorkendorfers saw the potential in replacing it with something new and original for themselves and their growing family (they now have a young son and daughter). A few months later, the property was theirs, and ideas began to percolate, fueled by historic alpine architecture, especially the warm, earthy buildings of the Engadin region of Switzerland. “I have a love affair with New Zealand’s wideopen beach houses, and Rico has an affinity for chalets, so we wanted to create something that was a marriage of those two things,” Joanne explains. And it turned out that a number of their favorite houses had been created by McLean Quinlan. “What was appealing to us about Fiona,” she adds, “is her ability to create new buildings that feel as though they have been around a long time but are also ageless.” McLean was struck by the magical site and spent some quality time in the area studying what would become her creative touchstone: the J. P. Cunningham Cabin, an 1880s ranch house in what is now Grand

Teton National Park. There the rooms flank a breezeway left open on the ends so livestock could take shelter. That visit reinforced McLean’s concept for the Zorkendorfers: a central living space bordered by expanses of glass and accessing intimate zones for dining, napping, and the like. Everyone agreed that stone would be used for the exterior of the house, which is tucked into the hill, beneath a shingled roof. “The stone, which is from Montana, gives the house a European feel in some ways and also this sense of sitting very firmly in the landscape,” McLean observes. (Skilled stonemasons and artisans erected the house over two years, with breaks for the winter months.) Indoors, the materials are organic and plainspoken, though so perfectly joined and finished as to be poetic. Fir and hemlock predominate, their golden tones complemented by more stone and pebbles sourced from the Snake River, a waterway that whiplashes across the valley below. “We wanted a very clear, simple architectural language and to not overcomplicate things,” the architect explains. “Limiting the palette of materials helps hugely.” Olli ottomans add yet another layer of craftsmanship to the proceedings, as well as

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THE FAMILY IN THE KITCHEN. BESPOKE ISLAND BY WILLOW CREEK WOODWORKS; VERSALYS MARBLE COUNTERTOP AND BACKSPLASH.


CLOCKWISE FROM NEAR RIGHT THE COZY MASTER BEDROOM. AN OLLI OTTOMAN IN MALLORCAN IKAT BRIGHTENS THE BUNK ROOM. THE MASTER BATHROOM IS SHEATHED IN VERSALYS MARBLE. VOLA SHOWERHEAD AND FITTINGS. A CUSTOM HEMLOCK DAYBED IS PILED HIGH WITH PATTERNED PILLOWS BY OLLI. SHEEPSKINS FROM IKEA; VINTAGE RUG.


“We wanted a very clear, simple architectural language and to not overcomplicate things,” says architect Fiona McLean. some discreet dashes of non-neutral color. Rico also conceived and made several of the home’s elements, notably the shapely wood door handles. The main family space, where sliding glass windows access plank terraces, is open-plan. Seating and dining areas flow into a kitchen outfitted with a breakfast nook, a snug morning destination that frames a breathtaking vista. At one end of the multifunctional gathering place soars a double-sided fireplace that warms the adjacent family room, too. This level of the house also features a bunk room for the kids and their friends (it can sleep eight in a pinch) and a master suite. A spa with a steam room and a sauna are located on the lower floor, joined by a guest bedroom and a study. The Zorkendorfers spend almost every vacation here, and as many long weekends as they can manage.

Skiing, hiking, and mountain biking are always on the agenda, but it’s the relationship to nature— direct and vivid—that is especially savored. Elk and deer amble constantly into view, providing endless opportunities for the children to break out their sketch pads, while owls, bald eagles, and red-tailed hawks dart overhead. Then there are the moose that occasionally settle down at the base of the stone walls, warming themselves in the sun as the Zorkendorfers and their kids, wide-eyed, look on. “It’s a privilege to live in Jackson Hole,” Joanne says. “We are surrounded by national parks, and there is an incredible Native American history here too. Building a house in an area like this demands that you create something really special.”

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THE SPA’S FLOOR STONES WERE SOURCED LOCALLY FROM THE SNAKE RIVER. RICO MADE THE DOOR HANDLE. OPPOSITE PLAYTIME ON THE SOUTHEAST DECK.

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FRENCH E


VOLUTION Under the watchful eyes of designer Tino Zervudachi, a 17th-century château in the Loire Valley is sensitively updated for life today

NOGA ARIKHA RICHARD POWERS STYLED BY ANITA SARSIDI TEXT BY

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

A ROBERT LONGO CHARCOAL DRAWING HANGS IN THE ANTIQUE-FILLED ENTRANCE HALL. 19TH-CENTURY DUTCHSTYLE CHANDELIER; 16TH-CENTURY SCAGLIOLA-TOPPED FLORENTINE TABLE; 19TH-CENTURY CLOISONNÉ LAMPS SIT ON 19TH-CENTURY SIDE TABLES. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.

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“By improving on what was there and carefully adding new things, Tino brought the house into the 21st century,” says the owner. 128

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PREVIOUS SPREAD: © 2017 ROBERT LONGO/ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK

OPPOSITE ORIGINAL OAK BEAMS FRAME THE TOPFLOOR GAMES ROOM, WHERE TWO VINTAGE PHILIP ARCTANDER CLAM CHAIRS CONVERSE WITH AN OTTOMAN UPHOLSTERED IN A LE MANACH PRINT. BELOW THE EXTERIOR FROM THE GARDENS, WHICH WERE UPDATED BY LOUIS BENECH.


h

ow do you revive a much-loved but wellworn house without destroying the longcherished spirit of the place? Such was the dilemma of the woman who inherited a very old château in France’s Loire Valley and couldn’t quite determine what to do. Then, when she happened upon the work of Tino Zervudachi in an issue of AD, she suddenly knew she had found a designer up to the task. Acquired by the owner’s grandfather in the late 1940s, the house originally dates from the 17th century, although the main façade was constructed in the 18th when the house was partly burned, and further additions accrued during the 1800s. As the current chatelaine relates, its first owner was one Michel Bégon, a marine official and administrator under King Louis XIV, born in nearby Blois, site of one of the greatest châteaux of the Loire. He is not a major historic figure, nor is the residence he built of major historic importance, despite its location in the heartland of the French nobility. But his name lives on in the begonia, the flower discovered by the botanist Charles Plumier, whom he befriended in the French Antilles in the 1680s. As it happens, when the grandfather bought the house, he planted a whole parterre of his favorite flowers, begonias, unaware that Plumier had named them after Bégon. The coincidence is noteworthy, but then a house is often more than the sum of its physical parts. Restoring a home without destroying its spirit and the memories that dwell within it is a delicate matter. This one is the sort of place where extended family gathers for holidays, and every nook and cranny is replete with memories. By the time Zervudachi was called in, it had not been updated since the 1950s and was in obvious need of repair. It took thoughtful care and three years of construction to give the château a new lease on life. “Tino doesn’t impose a style; he works with you and with the existing furniture,” the owner explains. “By improving on what was there and carefully adding new things, he brought the house into the 21st century.” From top to bottom, all was reconfigured, repurposed, and reorganized. Storerooms were converted into up-to-date bathrooms. Magnificent 19th-century beams emerged from behind mid–20th century plaster ceilings. Light shone again through a blockedup window in the master bedroom, where a new dressing room was created. A summer sitting room

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was set up at the south end of the house, a winter library at the north. The old, depressing servants’ hall became a new, inviting kitchen, and a cramped, dreary pantry became a sunny breakfast room. The ancient water-pumping system was removed from the basement to make space for a vaulted wine cellar and a capacious new pantry that now accommodates the jams and pickles yielded by the vegetable garden. The best of the existing furniture remained, but it was restored, reupholstered, and moved into new groupings that made better practical and aesthetic sense. And it was complemented by newly purchased antiques and new pieces designed by Tino Zervudachi & Associés. The art was reframed, rehung, and relit. Zervudachi did bring in one new work, a large drawing of a knight by Robert Longo— “the guardian of the château,” quips the designer— to hang in the hall. “In these big old houses, very often the trick is simply to make them comfortable again,” says Zervudachi. And when the family gathered for a first Christmas in the newly finished home, the unanimous verdict was that its welcoming spirit was more powerfully present than ever. “All the cousins came and were just blown away by how the place had been brought back to life. It was the greatest compliment.” One of the most challenging transformations was performed on the main staircase, which initially turned counterclockwise and stopped at the second floor. Zervudachi and architect Sébastien Desroches designed a new staircase to turn clockwise and rise one more story, to the top floor, where the design team remodeled a warren of tiny children’s rooms into a suite of cozy guest rooms and bathrooms, and an attic into a large TV-and-games room under the eaves. When the cornice was raised there, it revealed that the staircase was being returned to its original shape. Perhaps this is why it felt exactly right to the family. “They couldn’t even remember the way it had been!” Zervudachi exclaims. Landscape designer Louis Benech took a similar approach to the garden. Car-free views and open vistas were reframed by hedges, and now giant sequoias shield the house from the driveway. The park was filled in with new evergreens—and a well-placed Bernar Venet sculpture. Yew hides the pool, and water plants now grow on the far bank of a stream that runs beyond it. Benech also pared down the old orchard, planting young fruit trees and a mix of flowers and vegetables. A diminutive garden features a pair of formal parterres planted— “in a wild spirit,” says Benech—with heathers and grasses. From the house, one sees oaks, magnolias, and once again, luxuriating by a wall of the house, shaded by a large cedar: begonias.


IN THE CHAMBRE À FLEURS BEDROOM, A CUSTOM-MADE TINO ZERVUDACHI & ASSOCIÉS– DESIGNED BED IS DRESSED WITH FABRICS BY MARTYN LAWRENCE BULLARD AND NICOLE FABRE DESIGNS. ANTIQUE AUBUSSON TEXTILE ON TOP OF A SHYAM AHUJA RUG; 19TH-CENTURY PROVINCIAL BENCH.


IN THE LIBRARY, A CUSTOM FOUR-PIECE OTTOMAN IN AN EDMOND PETIT FABRIC SITS BETWEEN A LOUIS XV BERGÈRE IN AN ANDREW MARTIN FABRIC AND A PAIR OF 19TH-CENTURY SLIPPER CHAIRS IN AN ANTIQUE STRIPED LINEN; ANTIQUE OUSHAK RUG.

This house is the sort of place where extended family gathers for holidays, and every nook and cranny is replete with memories.


OPPOSITE AN OSBORNE & LITTLE CURTAIN ENVELOPS A DRUMMONDS TUB WITH VOLEVATCH FITTINGS IN THE CHAMBRE BLEUE BATHROOM. BELOW A BRAQUENIÉ COTTONLINEN FABRIC COVERS THE WALLS, HEADBOARD, AND CURTAINS IN THE CHAMBRE BASSE BEDROOM. PAUL DUPRÉ-LAFON CHAIR IN JEAN ROZE FABRIC; LOUIS XV SIDE CHAIR IN MALABAR FABRIC; VINTAGE TURKISH RUG.

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design notes

THE DETAILS THAT MAKE THE LOOK

It had been my grandfather’s house,” says the owner. “My goal was to give it a new lease on life, but not turn it into something that it wasn’t.” CHATEAU RENAUD FABRIC BY BRAQUENIÉ; TO THE TRADE. PIERREFREY.COM

ROI SOLEIL MIRROR BY LINE VAUTRIN; PRICE UPON REQUEST. MAISON GERARD.COM

KRB DRINKS TABLE IN OXBLOOD AND NICKEL; $1,750. KRBNYC.COM

SUZANI CUSHION 4853P; $543. YASTIKBYRIFATOZBEK.COM

INTERIORS: RICHARD POWERS; ALL OTHERS COURTESY OF RESPECTIVE COMPANIES

TYLER ARMCHAIR BY MICHAEL S. SMITH FOR JASPER; TO THE TRADE. MICHAELSMITHINC.COM

THE KITCHEN FEATURES A CUSTOM HOOD DESIGNED BY TINO ZERVUDACHI & ASSOCIÉS ABOVE A LA CORNUE RANGE.


IN THE DINING ROOM, A COZY BANQUETTE-LINED ALCOVE IS HUNG WITH ANTIQUE IZNIK PLATES COLLECTED BY THE OWNER’S GRANDMOTHER.

VINTAGE SAMARKAND CARPET; TO THE TRADE; DORISLESLIEBLAU.COM

STYLE 15548 FABRIC IN GOLD AND RED; TO THE TRADE. DURALEE.COM

We reused as much as we could, reupholstering and relocating as needed,” says Zervudachi.

ABBOTSFORD LAMP; TO THE TRADE. ROBERT KIME.COM

IZNIK DESIGN CIRCULAR GLASS PLATTER; $65. SCULLYAND SCULLY.COM

COHASSET CHANDELIER IN AGED BRASS; $1,196. HUDSONVALLEY LIGHTING.COM

GREEN WINE GOBLET BY BILLY COTTON; $20. MARCHSF.COM

CHINESE BOUQUET TUREEN WITH BRANCH HANDLES BY HEREND; $1,350. MARYMAHONEY.COM

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For his first ground-up project, a pool pavilion in the English countryside, Rafael de Cárdenas pushes expert craftsmanship to ıts luxurious limits—and gives the owners a slide to remember TEXT BY

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RAFAEL DE CÁRDENAS CONCEIVED A FACETED CEILING OF CAST-FIBERGLASS PANELS TO CONTROL THE ACOUSTICS. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.

D SHOUT


A TRIANGULAR SKYLIGHT CROWNS TWIN CORKSCREWING SLIDES; THE WALLS AND FLOOR ARE CLAD IN BOTTICINO MARBLE, WHILE THE POOL IS LINED WITH BOOKMATCHED AZUL MACAUBA QUARTZITE.

PHOTOGRAPHY BY POLLY TOOTAL

“Slides are typically an eyesore. We wanted to make them an architectural feature, like a staircase,” says Rafael de Cárdenas.


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hatever you do, don’t call Rafael de Cárdenas a maximalist. “Using color doesn’t make you a maximalist,” quips the designer, reflecting on a word that has dogged him throughout his career. “But I don’t care to define my style.” In truth, he does resist easy categorization. Since founding his Manhattan firm, Rafael de Cárdenas Ltd./Architecture at Large, in 2006, he has completed some 100 projects, from museum installations to furniture to retail and residential spaces, arguably his bread and butter. The whole mix is surveyed in his first (self-titled) monograph, hitting shelves in October. And while through-lines do appear—graphic motifs, unexpected materials, faceted forms—what ultimately emerges is a range of moods, both exuberant and subdued. “We have always been interested in geometric patterns, but ten years out we have had the opportunity to elevate our techniques,” notes Cárdenas. “Maybe the effect is more diffuse as opposed to more buzzy.” As a case in point, he refers to a recently completed pool pavilion in the English countryside that marks his first ground-up building—as well as his first waterslide. Completed in collaboration with London’s Purcell architecture firm, the structure puts signature Cárdenas touches to elegantly atmospheric use. After the clients—a couple with lively young kids—approached him, Cárdenas knew that controlling acoustics would be a crucial design component, managing decibel levels while still making a visual splash. He responded with a sculptural noisedampening ceiling of finned fiberglass panels, each one requiring its own hand-sanded mold. “We wanted the fins to be as sharp as possible,” he explains. “That meant sanding the molds so that the fiberglass wouldn’t stick and then manually pushing the material in to fill every groove.” The same attention to detail was given to all other surfaces, like the full slabs of creamy Botticino marble that cover the walls and floor. (To prevent people from slipping, the latter was roughly scored.) The pool itself, meanwhile, is lined in sheets of Azul Macauba quartzite that were meticulously bookmatched on-site after a trial run at the fabricator’s studio. Never mind that the exquisite stone now resides underwater. “It was important for us that the grain line up perfectly,” Cárdenas notes. As for the slide, he settled on twin corkscrewing designs made of resin-coated fiberglass—perfect, he says, for racing. The pool house is a highlight in a book that reveals a designer who embraces idiosyncrasies. Projects are grouped thematically by vibe, rather than chronologically, with four chapters loosely governed by some favorite films: Dune, Flashdance, The Hunger, and Pee-wee’s Big Adventure. “Every single thing I’ve ever looked at is a reference,” Cárdenas says. “I do things when things are right for me. If something is in the air, I try to stay away from it.”

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CHAOS T Trash becomes treasure in the fantastical work of Brooklynbased designer Misha Kahn TEXT BY

HANNAH MARTIN JASON SCHMIDT

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

MISHA KAHN AMID A PHANTASMAGORIA OF HIS CREATIONS IN HIS BROOKLYN STUDIO; A SHOW OF NEW WORK RUNS OCTOBER 26 THROUGH DECEMBER 22 AT MANHATTAN’S FRIEDMAN BENDA GALLERY (FRIEDMANBENDA.COM).

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1. KAHN’S RESIN-ANDCOPPER SENTINEL OF INEVITABILITY LAMP. 2. A BRONZE FLOOR LAMP. 3. KAHN SCREWS A BLOWNGLASS SHADE COVERED IN OSTRICH FEATHERS INTO A STEEL LIGHT FIXTURE. 4. THE WILD ONE CHINA CABINET WAS WOVEN FROM BANANA LEAVES, CACTUS, BONE, WOOD, GRASS, AND GLASS BY ARTISANS IN SWAZILAND. 5. CONCRETE STOOLS.

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hatever could this have been?” asks Misha Kahn, plucking a contorted, seemingly plastic piece of garbage from a shelf at his Bushwick, Brooklyn, studio. “A man-made product went into the ocean and came out like this, totally mangled.” Over the last year, Kahn has spent a lot of time contemplating trash as he combed Dead Horse Bay, a swath of littered sand near Rockaway Beach, in Queens, for treasures to incorporate into his furniture and lighting designs. “Sea begets sea,” he muses. “The ocean has this way of turning everything into languid, entangled forms.” It’s an idea Kahn explores in “Midden Heap,” an immersive exhibition that opens at New York’s Friedman Benda gallery on October 26. Sorting through his bags of beach trash—along with cartloads of scrap metal from a nearby junkyard—he has combined everyday refuse with tack-welded steel, cast bronze, candy-colored glass, and woven natural fibers to create sculptural (if at times functionally ambiguous) pieces. Working with found objects is nothing new for Kahn, who, as a kid in Minnesota, fused old toys and foraged stones into a sofa using cement. He recalls with a laugh, “I remember saying, ‘Take this to New York and sell it for $10,000.’ ” Turns out, his adolescent craft projects were right on the money. Since graduating from the Rhode Island School of

1., 2., 4., 5., AND 9. ADAM REICH/COURTESY OF FRIEDMAN BENDA AND MISHA KAHN; 3. JASON SCHMIDT; 6. JAMES ORLANDO/COURTESY OF FRIEDMAN BENDA AND MISHA KAHN; 7. AND 8. COURTESY OF FRIEDMAN BENDA AND MISHA KAHN

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6. STEEL-AND-GLASS LIQUOR LOCKER. 7. A SATURDAY MORNING MIRROR. 8. A RESIN SCONCE FROM THE SAME SERIES. 9. CAST-ALUMINUM KON TIKI TABLE.

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Design in 2011, Kahn has quickly emerged as a leading talent in Brooklyn’s growing scene of designers—including his friends and fellow RISD alums Katie Stout and Chris Wolston— who are challenging conventions of taste and functionality. His Saturday Morning series of balloon-like mirrors and lamps (made by pouring glossy resin into soft, sewn molds) landed him a coveted spot in the Museum of Arts and Design’s 2014 NYC Makers biennial and later a place on the roster of Friedman Benda, where he mounted his first solo show in early 2016. Now the cult of Kahn is mushrooming, thanks to fans like Kelly Wearstler, Peter Marino, and even Barbie, who Instagrammed a studio visit with the designer back in June. (Kahn made her a fingernail-size resin iPhone case.) Admirer and Design Miami chief creative officer Rodman Primack recalls his first encounter with the pieces at FOG San Francisco in 2015: “These aggressively bright mirrors literally leaped off the walls. He was upending this decorator trope of the ‘statement mirror’ by making it something garish, almost ugly. I liked it immediately.” These days, though, Kahn’s fantastical fixations have moved from Saturday-morning ’toons to science fiction, albeit with Art Nouveau riffs. “I keep having this recurring dream that everything is underwater and there’s a carnivorous plant controlling us through fiber-optic roots,” he says. Sounds a bit like what he is hatching for Friedman Benda,

where the work will hover loosely between two aesthetics that Kahn describes as “earth becomes sea” and “sea becomes earth.” In the former case, tack-welded steel bejeweled with colored-glass orbs (“it looks very homemade submarine”) may have a gothic–meets–Mad Max vibe. In the latter, sticks and garbage will be woven with straw into cabinets by artisans in Swaziland, and bronze tabletops will perch on hulking boulders. Viewing the works in progress requires some imagination. “These all clip together to make a 100-foot snake,” Kahn says of silvery tubes that look vaguely like chopped-up air ducts. “Or I might just turn it into a chair.” A torpedo-shaped form of the same sheet metal will become a floor lamp, with a glass hand that lights up. Examining two large panels of twisted metal and trash, Kahn explains, “This is going to all get filled in with glass and more trash, and they’ll be these sumptuous trash princess doors that weigh, like, a thousand pounds.” Surveying his studio, Kahn says of the chaos, “Isn’t it all lovely, in an apocalyptic, deteriorating kind of way?” And while he still accepts the occasional balloon-mirror commission, there’s a bit more cynicism in the new stuff—about both the design world and beyond. After all, Kahn explains, “functional things, even if you really have to squint, provide an interesting way into people’s subconscious. They’re sort of the Trojan horse of art.”

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YEW AND BOXWOOD TOPIARIES—SOME PLANTED MORE THAN 300 YEARS AGO—RISE ALONGSIDE LEVENS HALL, THE BAGOT FAMILY’S ANCESTRAL HOME IN ENGLAND’S LAKE DISTRICT. OPPOSITE RICHARD BAGOT TRIMS AN ENGLISH YEW; MAINTENANCE OF THE FORMS LASTS FROM SEPTEMBER TO FEBRUARY.


SHEAR GENIUS

Corkscrews, pyramids, and umbrellas, oh, my! The Bagot family of Levens Hall oversees a Seussian landscape that has been astonishing visitors since the 1690s

TEXT BY

MITCHELL OWENS

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ngland’s Glorious Revolution left many a Catholic out of a job in 1688. One was the country’s monarch, James II, who fled to France, pushed off the throne by his Protestant daughter Mary and her Dutch consort. Another was Colonel James Grahme, keeper of the privy purse. Accused of high treason and briefly imprisoned, the elegant Jacobite cooled his heels at Levens Hall, a newly purchased house in the Lake District. A third was Guillaume Beaumont, a royal gardener. Rosary-clutching employees not being much in demand in William and Mary’s court, the Frenchman made his way to Levens, where he sharpened his secateurs and took the grounds in hand. What the obscure émigré wrought over the next several years can only be described as horticultural tomfoolery, a lookingglass realm eventually crowded with more than 100 towering yews (green and golden varieties) and chubby boxwoods scissored into all manner of evergreen absurdity. Arched doorways are cut through immense mounds of yew. Sixsided pyramids appear to wear top hats. Squat shrubs look like PreColumbian figures, while several trees, amorphously pruned, seem to channel the works of Henry Moore. An enchanting example of the topiary craze that seized all Europe with wonder around 1700, Levens’s living sculpture garden survives, shockingly intact, unmolested by time and proudly unimproved by fashion. Chalk up the garden’s preservation to oversight, disinterest, and, arguably, sentiment. Grahme’s daughter Catherine married a cousin, the eleventh Earl of Suffolk, an alliance that brought her “lots of houses, bigger ones, so Levens became something of a backwater,” explains Chris Crowder, Levens’s head gardener and an international topiary expert. “It was a holiday home that you’d visit a couple of times a year or where an ancient aunt or a motherin-law might live.” As for sentiment, surely nothing else could have led Lady Suffolk, in 1757, to refuse a prospective tenant’s request to ax the topiaries of her childhood, each one more deliciously bizarre than the one before, so he could raise sheep on the cleared land. “Most of the designs are abstract,” Crowder explains, adding that he isn’t particularly fond of trees shaped into animals, though a few venerable birds—namely a quartet

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of peacocks—exist at Levens, emerging from a tall, deftly sheared hedge. “I like tiered shapes that resemble cake stands, if you like,” he continues, “where a large disc is topped with a smaller disc and so on.” Those grow in multiples at Levens, some of them thick with age, while others are of more recent vintage and therefore still maturing. All are eye-catching masterpieces of what Richard Bagot, the estate’s latest chatelain, laughingly calls “the art of persuasion.” Richard, a 30-something Grahme descendant, and his wife, Naomi, revel in the captivatingly odd demesne that is now their responsibility as well as the perfect playground for Oliver, their lively (“He’s at the destructive stage”) toddler son. “Three years ago, my dad told us that Levens needed younger people with the energy to take it forward,” recalls Richard, who worked at Sotheby’s furniture department in London before returning home to manage the 9,500-acre farm, where sheep and cattle are raised. “One day he said, ‘Here’s the key; get on with it. Your part of the relay now.’ ” That generational handover has resulted, over time, in each new owner making a subtle mark on Levens. During their tenure Richard’s parents, Susie and Hal, established the Fountain Garden, where high tunnels of hornbeam intersect at a glittering circular pool. The younger Bagots, at present, gladly let Crowder lead the way, given that he’s been head gardener since the 1980s and their horticultural knowledge is nascent. “We do a lot of reading, but Naomi’s overtaking me,” Richard says, “because she has a better memory, as women often do.” Still, plans are afoot. Ardent foodies, the couple cultivate an impressive herb garden and hope to broaden the property’s horticultural mix. (The house and gardens are open to the public on a seasonal basis; levenshall.co.uk.) “I’m very interested in planting trees and to create perhaps more of an arboretum kind of feeling,” Richard explains, “with more exotic species and not to rely too much on homegrown varieties,” such as lindens and oaks. Next year the Bagots anticipate opening a visitors’ café. Designed by Haigh Architects, from the nearby town of Kendal, the discreet modern structure nods to the manor house’s Elizabethan vernacular, from slate roof shingles to limestone walls. Levens and its preservation have become such a focus of the Bagots’ daily lives, in fact, that they admit that they have to force themselves to explore other topics of conservation when they are alone. Earlier this year, Naomi and Richard traveled to New York City to celebrate her 30th birthday, and she had but one request of her husband: “You’re not going to talk about Levens for a week, are you?” Richard eventually agreed but admits, “It can be difficult to switch it off.”


YEW HEDGES ENCLOSE AN ORCHARD (CENTER) AND THE HERB GARDEN (BOTTOM) AS WELL AS THE FOUNTAIN GARDEN (TOP), A FEATURE THAT WAS ADDED IN 1994. OPPOSITE NAOMI AND RICHARD BAGOT, THE OWNERS OF LEVENS HALL, AND THEIR SON, OLIVER.


ANNUALS ARE PLANTED BENEATH THE TOPIARIES SO THE SCULPTED TREES APPEAR TO BE SET ON PLINTHS.


More than 100 trees are scissored into all manner of evergreen absurdity.


MODERN ENGLISH


POPPY DELEVINGNE, WEARING SILK PAJAMAS BY OLIVIA VON HALLE, IN THE KITCHEN OF HER WEST LONDON HOME. (FASHION STYLING BY AURELIA DONALDSON.) PENDANT FIXTURE BY KAIA LIGHTING; SAARINEN TABLE FOR KNOLL; RATTAN CHAIRS BY COX & COX. OPPOSITE PAPERS AND PAINTS’ MURREY RED COVERS THE WALLS OF THE BAR. MIRRORED SCREEN FROM OKA. FOR DETAILS SEE RESOURCES.

Model and girl-on-the-go Poppy Delevingne puts down roots in a chic, light-filled house in a leafy London neighborhood TEXT BY

DEREK BLASBERG

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

SIMON UPTON

STYLED BY

SEBASTIAN SERGEANT


AN OPENING IN THE STUDY FLOOR OFFERS A VIEW INTO THE LIVING ROOM BELOW. CUSTOM NEON SIGN; VINTAGE BRASS DESK; SQUIGGLE LAMPSHADE BY LUCY JANE COPE; CHAIR BY FIONA

McDONALD IN A HOUSE OF HACKNEY FABRIC. OPPOSITE MARTINIQUE WALLPAPER COVERS THE POWDER ROOM. CUSTOM SINK BY JOANNA PLANT WITH FITTINGS BY LEFROY BROOKS.


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oppy Delevingne is the ultimate British It girl, a sassy blonde model and Chanel ambassador known around the world for being the life of the party. So fashion and society swells were shocked to hear that she and her husband, James Cook, the CEO of a British aviation company, had decided to take up residence in a cozy, family-friendly house on a blossom-lined street in Shepherd’s Bush, a residential neighborhood in West London. “Since moving in, I’d definitely say, I’ve become more of a homebody,” Poppy says. “We spend most of our time around the kitchen island, me cooking roast chicken—badly, by the way—and James pouring wine.” A mischievous smile crosses her face as she adds, “But friends come over and we end up dancing around, sometimes on the kitchen island, too!” Phew. Poppy grew up a true London insider. One of her grandmothers was a lady-in-waiting to Princess Margaret; her mother, Pandora, was another girl-about-town in her early

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years (she’s now working on a memoir chronicling the ups and downs of those wild days); and her handsome father, Charles, a property developer, is as suave as an Englishman can get. And don’t forget her younger sister, top model and actress Cara Delevingne. The girls were raised in a comfy English family home in posh Belgravia, and Poppy was determined to find something similar for herself and James. (The couple married in 2014.) “I didn’t move out of my parents’ house till the grand old age of 28,” Poppy, now 31, says with a laugh. “I know: Pathetic!” James was born in the city but grew up in the countryside, where the couple now spend half their time. So this house, only the second one they looked at before buying, is perfectly located for their town-and-country lifestyle. “We can get to our place in West Sussex in an hour, which is a miracle when it comes to London traffic,” Poppy says of her new neighborhood. Also, in quintessential English style, one last comfort tipped the scales: “It’s no coincidence that our favorite pub is a stone’s throw away. The Oak serves the best pizzas and pints in the city.” They discovered the property by word of mouth. When one of the mothers on Poppy’s aunt’s school run mentioned her family was moving, the aunt passed along the intel and the couple knew that the house would be perfect. “It was a gut instinct and instant attraction,” James says.


HAIR BY LARRY KING FOR STREETERS USING REDKEN; MAKEUP BY AMANDA HARRINGTON USING CHANEL

ABOVE POPPY, IN AN ALBERTA FERRETTI DRESS, IN THE GARDEN. JUTE RUG FROM THE CONRAN SHOP. OPPOSITE IN THE SITTING ROOM, A CUSTOM SOFA BY JOANNA PLANT IS UPHOLSTERED IN A GARNET VISCOSE BLEND BY DESIGNERS GUILD. LIGHTNING MIRRORS BY BRIDE AND WOLFE; HANS KOEGL PALM-TREE LAMPS.

However, it was no minor refurbishment. The reno, which they did with architect Alex Tart, took well over a year and included relocating the central staircase, raising some ceilings and lowering others, and even digging down and out into the garden to excavate space for Poppy’s study. Planning permissions were complicated, and James personally trotted drawings over to the neighbors’ houses to seek their approvals. At one point, Poppy says, “I remember standing on the doorstep, and I could see from down in the basement all the way to the roof. It was just a shell of a house, and I thought, What have I gotten myself into? Thank God for James, who was always so positive and in control. I felt safe and knew it would get done.” James says of his biggest effort: “I had to keep a tight grip on the budget!” Once the ordeal was over—and the roof in place—the couple turned their focus to kitting out the interiors with the help of London-based designer Joanna Plant. “I met them through Poppy’s aunt, but the decorating deal was cut between Pops and my husband on the fields of Glastonbury,” Plant explains, referring to the outdoor music festival that takes place in the English countryside every summer. “If you knew Poppy, you wouldn’t be surprised!” The aesthetic she followed was “grown-up fun,” which started with the bar because, well, “every house needs one!”

With Poppy traveling around the world for fashion shoots and events, James based in West Sussex and Heathrow, and Joanna in London, the decorator says she eschewed sketches or mood boards and coordinated most of the decisions via group SMS. “Often we’d decorate by text. I’d send a photo or an idea; everyone would respond instantly in whatever time zone they were in. And, presto, a decision was made.” The couple’s travels inspired their favorite rooms. James is partial to the sitting room, which has glossy walls and velvet curtains in a vibrant teal inspired by the Hôtel Costes in Paris. “We wanted it to feel mysterious and naughty,” Poppy explains. Poppy loves the sitting room, too, but she is “obsessed” with the small powder room on the ground floor, which was carved out under the new staircase and wrapped from floor to ceiling in iconic Beverly Hills Hotel banana-leaf-print wallpaper. “I get a real kick out of people’s reactions when they go in there for the first time,” she says. “It’s kinda wild!” Like all couples in the midst of remodeling, they had to reach multiple compromises, most of which have been forgotten in their delight with the final result. But one room was completely nonnegotiable, per Poppy’s request. “All I ever wanted was a pink bedroom, but James wasn’t convinced,” Poppy says. “Now he loves the pink because it’s so calming and cocoon-like in the winter.” Her mischievous smile returns: “Or so he pretends.”


LEFT THE MASTER BATH IS CLAD IN A HAND-PAINTED SILK WALL COVERING BY DE GOURNAY. TUB AND FITTINGS BY C. P. HART. BELOW A ROSE-PINK LINEN BY FROMENTAL COVERS THE WALLS OF THE MASTER BEDROOM. VINTAGE PEACOCK CHAIR; HEADBOARD

BY ENSEMBLIER IN A MOHAIR VELVET BY CLAREMONT; QUILT FROM OKA; BED LINENS FROM THE WHITE CO. OPPOSITE IN THE LIVING ROOM, LINOCUTS BY HUGO GUINNESS HANG ABOVE A CUSTOM SOFA DRESSED IN A DESIGNERS GUILD VELVET.

“All I ever wanted was a pink bedroom, but James wasn’t convinced,” says Poppy. “Now he loves the pink.”

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resources Items pictured but not listed here are not sourceable. Items similar to vintage and antique pieces shown are often available from the dealers listed. (T) means the item is available only to the trade. LIVING LARGE PAGE 37: On Battaglia-Engelbert, gown by Giambattista Valli; giambattistavalli.com. Coffee table and PK80 leather daybed, both by Poul Kjærholm for Fritz Hansen; fritzhansen.com. PAGE 38: Josef Frank mirror with lacquered-birch mirror frame, in red, from Svenskt Tenn; svenskttenn.se. Jean Royère Five-Arm Bouquet sconce, in painted tubular metal, from Magen H Gallery; magenxxcentury.com. CASE STUDY: TRUE VALUE PAGES 66–68: Architecture, interiors, and landscape design by Marmol Radziner; marmol-radziner.com. PAGE 66: Baia Sun beds by Paola Lenti from Niche Beverly (T); nichebeverly.com. PAGE 68: In living room, Vladimir Kagan Free Form Curved sofa, covered in Pillow Talk viscose-blend, in high cotton, by Great Plains, both from Holly Hunt (T); hollyhunt.com. Vintage Arthur Umanoff walnut three-legged table from Red Modern Furniture; redmodernfurniture.com. Vintage Maison Lunel three-light iron floor lamp from Habité Décoration; habitela.com. On lounge chair, Arrowhead viscose linen, in marshmallow, by Holly Hunt (T). Klaus bronze end table from KGBL; kgblnyc .com. Vintage Dick Cordemeijer Cleopatra daybed from Full Effect; fulleffect.be; covered in Cotton Velvet, in pear, by Maharam (T); maharam.com. Angelo Mangiarotti Eros low table, in Carrara marble, from Agapecasa; agapecasa .it. Reverso wool rug by Bowles and Linares, in soft brown and off white, from Christopher Farr; christopherfarr.com. FLIP THE SCRIPT PAGES 104–113: Architecture by Oliver Freundlich Design; oliverfreundlich.com. Landscape architecture by Sawyer|Berson; sawyerberson.com. PAGE 104: Akari light sculpture by Isamu Noguchi; shop.noguchi .org. Vintage cocktail table by George Nakashima; nakashimawoodworker .com. At left, Paavo Tynell lamp from Hostler Burrows; hostlerburrows.com. Wall hanging by Sally England; sallyengland.com. On sofa, fabric from Diamond Foam & Fabric; diamondfoamandfabric.com. Black felt balls by A Détacher; adetacher.com. Piano by Kawai; kawaius.com. Vintage Moroccan rug from Nazmiyal Collection; nazmiyalantiquerugs.com. Pitch Black paint by Farrow & Ball; farrow-ball.com. PAGE 105: On Moore, pantsuit by Nili Lotan; nililotan.com; Shoes by Gianvito Rossi; gianvitorossi.com. PAGE 106: Vintage chairs by Woodard Furniture; woodard-furniture .com. PAGE 107: Akari light sculpture by Isamu Noguchi; shop.noguchi.org. On table, lamps from JF Chen; jfchen.com. Custommade cabinet by Ivory Build; ivorybuild.com. Sink fittings by Vola; vola.com. Vintage Moroccan rug from Nazmiyal Collection; nazmiyalantiquerugs.com. PAGE 108: Tub (customized with marble surround) by Kohler; kohler.com. Atrio Roman tub filler, in Starlight chrome, by Grohe; grohe.com. Pendant light by Venini; venini.com.

PAGE 109: Custom-made bed by Sawyer|Berson; sawyerberson.com; in fabric from Diamond Foam & Fabric; diamondfoamandfabric.com. Plain rug, in willow, from Odegard Carpets (T); odegardcarpets.com. Paavo Tynell floor lamp from Galerie Eric Philippe; ericphilippe.com. Axel Einar Hjorth chair from Hostler Burrows; hostlerburrows.com. George Carwardine sconces from Wyeth; wyeth.nyc. Curtains of linen by Rogers & Goffigon (T); rogersandgoffigon.com. Akari light sculpture by Isamu Noguchi; shop.noguchi.org. Bedding by Matteo; matteohome.com. PAGES 110–11: Sofa by Harvey Probber from Wyeth; wyeth.nyc; in leather by Edelman Leather (T); edelmanleather.com. Vintage Danish chair (on left) from B4; b4decor.com; in sheepskin from Global Leathers; globalleathers.com. Side table by Carl Auböck from Sigmar; sigmarlondon.com. Uno and Östen Kristiansson Giraffen lamps from Galerie Half; galeriehalf.com. On sofa, pillows by Matteo; matteohome.com. Shelving by Vitsoe; vitsoe.com. Vintage Moroccan rug from Nazmiyal Collection; nazmiyalantiquerugs.com. PEAK PERFORMANCE PAGES 114–125: Architecture and interiors by McLean Quinlan; mcleanquinlan.com. Landscape architecture by Verdone Landscape Architects; verdonelandarch .com. PAGES 114–15: Cloud Modular Sectional Sofa, in linen, by RH; rh.com. Mallorcan ikat throw pillows, ottoman, and lounger by Olli; olliatelier.com. Cullen pendant lights, in natural brass, by Schoolhouse Electric & Supply Co.; schoolhouse.com. PAGES 116–17: In entrance hall, woven basket from Clover Artisans; cloverartisans.com. On northeast deck, Cabo Beach chairs by James Perse; jamesperse .com. Solid cylinder stool, in reclaimed teak, by EQ3; eq3.com. PAGE 118: Custom-made Dinesen Douglas fir table by McLean Quinlan; mcleanquinlan.com. Sheepskins by Shepherdess; shepherdess.co. PAGES 120–21: Custom island by Willow Creek Woodworks; willowcw.com. Sink fittings, in brushed copper, by Vola; vola.com. PAGES 122–23: In master bedroom, bedding by Matteo; matteohome.com. Mushroom teak stools by EQ3; eq3.com. In bunk room, custom bed by McLean Quinlan; mcleanquinlan.com. Mallorcan ikat ottoman by Olli; olliatelier .com. In master bathroom, showerhead and fittings, in brushed copper, by Vola; vola.com. In family room, custom-made hemlock daybed by McLean Quinlan. Rens sheepskins from Ikea; ikea.com. Mallorcan ikat low seat and patterned pillows by Olli. Vintage wool rug from Davies-Reid; daviesreid.com. PAGE 124: In spa, Original cedar hot tub by Northern Lights; northernlightshottubs .com. Brooklyn 31 tub fittings by Watermark; watermark-designs.com. FRENCH EVOLUTION PAGES 126–137: Interiors by Tino Zervudachi & Associés; mhzlondon.com. Landscape design by Louis Benech; louisbenech.com. Curtains and upholstery throughout by Cousins Associés; cousinsassocies.com. PAGES 126–27: Curtains of Indian Pear Red linen by Robert Kime (T); robertkime.com. Pillows of Volpi linen, in camel/tint, by Tissus D’Hélène (T); tissusdhelene.co.uk. PAGE 129: On ottoman, Toiles de Tours Vache cotton blend by Le

ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST AND AD ARE REGISTERED TRADEMARKS OF ADVANCE MAGAZINE PUBLISHERS INC. COPYRIGHT © 2017 CONDÉ NAST. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. PRINTED IN THE U.S.A. VOLUME 74, NO. 11. ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST (ISSN 0003-8520) is published monthly by Condé Nast, which is a division of Advance Magazine Publishers Inc. PRINCIPAL OFFICE: Condé Nast, 1 World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. S. I. Newhouse, Jr., Chairman Emeritus; Robert A. Sauerberg, Jr., President and Chief Executive Officer; David E. Geithner, Chief Financial Officer; James M. Norton, Chief Business Officer, President of Revenue. Periodicals postage paid at New York, NY, and at additional mailing offices. Canada Post Publications Mail Agreement No. 40644503. Canadian Goods and Services Tax Registration No. 123242885-RT0001. POSTMASTER: Send all UAA to CFS. (See DMM 507.1.5.2); NON-POSTAL AND MILITARY FACILITIES: Send address corrections to ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST, P.O. Box 37641, Boone, IA 50037-0641.

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Manach (T); lemanach.fr. On armchair (center), Chic linen by Pierre Frey (T); pierrefrey.com. On Louis Philippe armchairs (back left), Toile Montrichard viscosecotton by Jean Roze (T); soieries-jean-roze .com. Custom-made sofa by Tino Zervudachi & Associés; mhzlondon.com; in Horsehair linen-wool, by Holland & Sherry (T); hollandsherry.com. Pillows of Timba organic cotton, in brique and tallow, by Malabar (T); malabar.co.uk. Cotton rug by Cindy Singh, in chocolate/beige, for Shyam Ahuja (T); shyamahuja.com. PAGE 131: Custom-made bed by Tino Zervudachi & Associés; mhzlondon.com. Exterior canopy, exterior bed curtains, headboard, bedskirt, and window curtains of Sultan Gardens linen, in saffron, by Martyn Lawrence Bullard Design; martynlawrencebullard.com. Interior canopy and interior bed curtains of Chancy linen-cotton, in chaya, by Nicole Fabre Designs (T); nicolefabredesigns.com. Custom-made brass wall sconces, in patine antiquaire, by Dutruc-Rosset (T); dutrucrossetluminaires.com. Adjustable bedside table lamps, in brass, by Robert Kime (T); robertkime.com. Antique Aubusson textile atop Goosebay wool-linen rug, in blue/cream, by Shyam Ahuja (T); shyamahuja.com. PAGES 132–33: On custom-made ottoman, Kilim viscose-blend, in dark brown, Edmond Petit (T); edmondpetit.fr. On Louis XV striped bergère, Santos cotton-blend, in pink, by Andrew Martin (T); andrewmartin.co.uk. Curtains of Grapes crewel cotton with wool embroidery, by Chelsea Textiles (T); chelseatextiles.com; with trim by Declercq Passementiers; declercqpassementiers.fr. Bridgewater sofa (center) by Howard Chairs; howardchairs .com; in Velours Moquette silk velvet, in fauve, by Le Manach (T); lemanach.fr; with custom-made fringe and cord by Declercq Passementiers. On custom-made sofa (right), Point de Tours cotton-blend, in laurier, by Le Manach (T). Swing-arm sconces, in dark bronze finish, by Soane; soane.co.uk. PAGE 134: On walls and headboard—and bedskirt and curtains of—Chateau Renaud cotton-linen, in rouge, by Braquenié (T); pierrefrey.com. On bed, linens by Marquise de Laborde (T); marquisedelaborde.com. Custom-made brass wall sconces, in patine antiquaire, by Dutruc-Rosset (T); dutrucrossetluminaires .com. On Louis XV side chair, Croquet cotton by Malabar (T); malabar.co.uk. On Paul Dupré-Lafon club chair, Toile Montrichard viscose-cotton by Jean Roze (T); soieriesjean-roze.com. Vintage Turkish Sarköy kilim rug from Galerie Triff; triff.com. PAGE 135: Tay tub by Drummonds; drummonds-uk .com. Fittings by Volevatch (T); volevatch.fr. Custom-made shower curtain of fabric by Osborne & Little (T); osborneandlittle.com. Window curtains of Croisé Collobrières viscose-linen, in creme, by Pierre Frey (T); pierrefrey.com. TWIST AND SHOUT PAGES 138–141: Architecture by Rafael de Cárdenas Ltd./Architecture at Large; architectureatlarge.com; in collaboration with Purcell; purcelluk.com. MODERN ENGLISH PAGES 152–159: Interiors by Joanna Plant Interiors; joannaplantinteriors.com. Architecture by Alex Tart Architects; alextartarchitects.com. PAGE 152: On walls, Murrey Red paint by Papers and Paints;

FOR SUBSCRIPTIONS, ADDRESS CHANGES, ADJUSTMENTS, OR BACK ISSUE INQUIRIES: Please write to ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST, P.O. Box 37641, Boone, IA 50037-0641, call 800-365-8032, or email subscriptions@archdigest.com. Please give both new address and old address as printed on most recent label. Subscribers: If the Post Office alerts us that your magazine is undeliverable, we have no further obligation unless we receive a corrected address within one year. If during your subscription term or up to one year after the magazine becomes undeliverable, you are ever dissatisfied with your subscription, let us know. You will receive a full refund on all unmailed issues. First copy of new subscription will be mailed within four weeks after receipt of order. Address all editorial, business, and production correspondence to ARCHITECTURAL DIGEST, 1 World Trade Center, New York, NY 10007. FOR REPRINTS: Please email reprints@condenast.com or call Wright’s Media, 877-652-5295. For reuse permissions, please email contentlicensing@condenast.com or call 800-897-8666. Visit us online at archdigest.com.

papersandpaints.co.uk. Lempicka mirrored screen from Oka; oka.com. Custom-made Sputnik chandelier and cabinetry by Joanna Plant Interiors; joannaplantinteriors.com. Map Room adjustable sconces by Hector Finch; hectorfinch.com. Vintage table from Valerie Wade; valeriewade.com. PAGE 153: On Delevingne, Coco Amethyst silk pajamas by Olivia von Halle; oliviavonhalle.com. Lum suspension light by Kaia Lighting; kaia.at. Eero Saarinen round dining table for Knoll from Design Within Reach; dwr.com. Flat rattan chairs by Cox & Cox; coxandcox.co.uk. Linen pillows from the Conran Shop; conranshop.co.uk. PAGE 154: Custom neon sign from Gods Own Junkyard; godsownjunkyard.co.uk. Squiggle lampshade by Lucy Jane Cope; ritakonig.com. On Ruby chair by Fiona McDonald; fionamcdonald .com; a Palmeral cotton-linen, in white/ azure, by House of Hackney; houseofhackney.com. On walls, Khaki Mists 5 paint by Dulux; duluxtradepaintexpert .co.uk. PAGE 155: Martinique wallpaper from Designer Wallcoverings; designerwallcoverings.com. Custom-made sink by Joanna Plant Interiors; joannaplantinteriors.com; with fittings by Lefroy Brooks; lefroybrooks.com. Antique hand towel from Guinevere; guinevere.co.uk. PAGE 156: Custom-made sofa by Joanna Plant Interiors; joannaplantinteriors.com; in Velveto viscose-blend, in garnet, by Designers Guild (T); designersguild.com. Lightning mirrors by Bride & Wolfe; brideandwolfe.com.au. Hans Koegl golden palm table lamps; 1stdibs.com. Velvet pillows from Oka; oka.com. Custom-made iron-andleather side table by Joanna Plant Interiors. PAGE 157: On Delevingne, dress by Alberta Ferretti; albertaferretti.com. Jute rug from the Conran Shop; conranshop.co.uk. Flat rattan chairs by Cox & Cox; coxandcox.co.uk. PAGE 158: In bath, Earlham silk wall covering, in emerald green, by de Gournay (T); degournay.com. Rolltop freestanding bath, and Original bath shower mixer, by C.P. Hart; cphart.co.uk. Blue Asiatic pheasant tea set by Burleigh; burleigh.co.uk. Marble floor tiles by Vitruvius; vitruviusltd .co.uk. In master bedroom, linen wall covering by Fromental; fromental.co.uk. Vintage peacock chair from Phoenix on Golborne; phoenixongolborne .co.uk. Livia headboard by Ensemblier; ensemblierlondon.com; in a mohair velvet by Claremont (T); claremontfurnishing.com. Karaikal quilt, in dusty pink, and silk pillows, both from Oka; oka.com. Bed linens by the White Co.; thewhitecompany.com. Custom-made curtains by Joanna Plant Interiors; joannaplantinteriors.com; of Burley linen, in pink, by Veere Grenney Assoc. (T); veeregrenney.com. Heston sconce from Lorfords; lorfordsantiques.com. Antique bench from Hilary Batstone; hilarybatstone.com. Vintage rug from Joshua Lumley Ltd.; joshualumley.com. PAGE 159: Linocut prints by Hugo Guinness from Wilson Stephens & Jones; wilsonstephensandjones.com. Custom-made sofa by Joanna Plant Interiors; joannaplantinteriors.com; in Velveto viscoseblend, in olive, by Designers Guild (T); designersguild.com. Silk pillows from Oka; oka.com. Jute rug from the Conran Shop; conranshop.co.uk.

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last word

Pray Tell Chapels bring one closer to God. But in the deconsecrated 17th-century house of worship at designer Pierre Yovanovitch’s Provence château, visitors are connecting with themselves, thanks to a new fresco he commissioned from L.A.-based artist Claire Tabouret. “One day I opened the door and saw a woman sitting there crying,” Yovanovitch says, plainly moved. Eighty-five costumed children, solemn and mysterious, gaze at chestnut benches that await silent contemplation. As the designer says, “Everyone has something they need to think about.” Open by appointment; pierreyovanovitch.com —MITCHELL OWENS

P HOTOGRAP H BY ALLAN POLLOK-MORRIS


Architectural_Digest_USA__November_2017  

Xem thêm tạp chí khác tại Website: http://kientruc.online/

Architectural_Digest_USA__November_2017  

Xem thêm tạp chí khác tại Website: http://kientruc.online/

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