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Vol. 50 FASHION, LIFE and CULTURE

25th ANNIVERSARY The Photography in kid’s wear. A retrospection.

15 Euro

4 194596 412500

Spring / Summer 2020

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proudlly presents its

Available at www.kidswear-magazine.com and selected shows worldwide


Editorial THE FIRST 50 EDITIONS I once read somewhere that time doesn’t change us – we simply evolve. I think the same applies to our first 50 editions: in essence, we have always stayed true to ourselves. Our intention remains, and has always been, to take our subject serious and to present it from as many perspectives as possible. Our constant endeavour is to capture something of the beauty, energy, poetry as well as the highs and lows of childhood and adolescence. From an early stage, we were able to attract not only renowned, established contributors but also upand-coming young photographers, artists, illustrators and authors from all over the world, each able to bring their own very individual perspective without sugarcoating the issues. More than this, kid’s wear is also my own personal platform, enabling me to communicate and express myself as a photographer, to make a contribution, to experiment and tread new paths. Together, we have now brought out 50 editions and our idea of an alternative magazine about childhood and adolescence in the context of fashion, life and culture has steadily evolved throughout. In our jubilee edition, we should therefore like to show you not only what’s to come, but also what has been in a best-of collection of photo series and essays. I hope you enjoy this look back in time as much as we’ve enjoyed putting it together! Achim Lippoth Publisher

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Contents Editorial 26 Contributors 34 Imprint 36 Collection 38 Tommy Hilfiger 68 Current Ghana 72 We Can Be Anything 102 Pleased to meet you 128

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Contents Anniversary Edition

Vol. 50 Between the lines Best of essays (rearranged) 129

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Contents Best of 161

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Contributors

Achim Lippoth, Alice Neale, Anton Corbijn, Anuschka Blommers & Niels Schumm, Ari Marcopoulos, Beat Streuli, Bruce Weber, Daniel Riera, Ed Templeton, Eva Baales, Greg Reynolds, Heji Shin, Hellen van Meene, Henrike Stahl, Hubertus Hamm, Ingar Krauss, Jamie Morgan, Jelka von Langen, Jessica Craig-Martin, Jonas Unger, Julie Morstad, Jun Takashi, Justine Kurland, Kira Bunse, Lise Sarfati,Manuela Pavesi, Marcel Odenbach, Marina Faust, Mark Borthwick, Markus Jans, Martin Fengel, Martin Parr, Michel Comte, Mike MeirĂŠ, Miles Aldridge, Nan Goldin, Ola Rindal, Oliver Sieber, Oliviero Toscani, Pierpaolo Ferrari, Richard Kern, Ryan McGinley, Shelby Lee Adams, Takashi Homma, Tierney Gearon, Tolia und Uwe Tobias, Viviane Sassen, Zoe Ghertner Vol. 50


Imprint PUBLISHER AND EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Achim Lippoth EDITORIAL DIRECTOR Ann-Katrin Weiner DIGITAL DIRECTOR/DEPUTY EDITOR Petra Barkhof DIGITAL EDITOR Enrico Fragale Esposito MANAGING EDITOR Patricia Barkhof FASHION ASSISTANT Francesca Bisceglia ART DIRECTOR Mike Meiré GRAPHIC DESIGN Charlotte Cassel, Tim Giesen, Marie Lautsch EDITORIAL CONSULTANTS Kröger Schulz, k ro eg er- sc hulz . d e

WE WOULD LIKE TO THANK Astrid Ellen Joscha Karl Leo Lucian Lukas Maya Niklas

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Michael Kröger, Heiko Schulz COPY-EDITING ed_it!, Heike Tekampe, Cologne LAYOUT Frank Pesch, Sachsstrasse 28/8, 50259 Pulheim-Brauweiler, Germany PRINTING Litopat S.P.A., Via dell’Elettronica 11, 37139 Verona, Italy Editorial Head Office: Via Privata Cascia, 6/8 20128 Milan, Italy Tel. +39 0283424307 36

PHOTOGRAPHERS Achim Lippoth Alice Neale Anton Corbijn Anuschka Blommers & Niels Schumm Ari Marcopoulos Beat Streuli Bruce Weber Daniel Riera Ed Templeton Eva Baales Greg Reynolds Heji Shin Hellen van Meene Henrike Stahl Hubertus Hamm Ingar Krauss Jamie Morgan Jelka von Langen Jessica Craig-Martin Jonas Unger Julie Morstad Jun Takashi Justine Kurland Kira Bunse Lise Sarfati Manuela Pavesi Marcel Odenbach Marina Faust Mark Borthwick Markus Jans Martin Fengel Martin Parr Michel Comte Mike Meiré Miles Aldridge Nan Goldin Ola Rindal Oliver Sieber Oliviero Toscani Pierpaolo Ferrari Richard Kern Ryan McGinley Shelby Lee Adams Takashi Homma Tierney Gearon Tolia und Uwe Tobias Viviane Sassen Zoe Ghertner

EDITORIAL OFFICES AUSTRALIA: Belinda Blooman, belinda@kidswear-magazine.com BELGIUM: Anne Kurris, anne@kidswear-magazine.com BRAZIL: Lucia Coimbra, lucia@kidswear-magazine.com DENMARK: Olivia Rohde, olivia@kidswear-magazine.com FRANCE: Ann-Kathrin Obermeyer, ann-kathrin@kidswear-magazine.com GREAT BRITAIN: Katie Kendrick, katie@kidswear-magazine.com THE NETHERLANDS: Anne-Claire Petit, anne-claire@kidswear-magazine.com SPAIN: Alicia Armet, alicia@kidswear-magazine.com USA: Jennifer Irizarry, jennifer@kidswear-magazine.com PUBLISHING HOUSE: kid’s wear Verlag Marienburger Strasse 22 50968 Köln Germany Tel. +49 221 88 88 66 0 Fax +49 221 88 88 66 22 kidswear-magazine.com ISBN 978-3-941179-48-6 ISSN 16140206 © 2020 for all contributions: kid’s wear Verlag All rights reserved. Reproduction with written permission only. No liability can be assumed for unsolicited manuscripts, photos, etc. Annual subscription fee: EUR 30,– plus postage/shipment. In the event of non-appearance/non-delivery due to force majeure it shall not be possible to demand replacement or a refund on paid subscription fees. Kid’s wear Magazine is published twice yearly by the publishing house kid’s wear Verlag. The price list for placing ads dated 2020 shall apply. The place of jurisdiction is Cologne, Germany.

ILLUSTRATIONS Pete Keizers


Photography by Achim Lippoth

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SPRING / SUMMER 2020

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Gioseppo Kids

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Il Gufo

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Raspberry Plum

Soft Gallery

Liilu

The New Society


Pèpè Children Shoes

Bellerose

Patrizia Pepe Junior Girls

Munsterkids


Wolf & Rita


Kisse

Loud Apparel

Tommy Hilfiger

Tago


Moschino Baby Kid Teen


Péro


Carbon Soldier


Bobo Choses

Atelier Parsmei

Sarabanda

Maison Mangostan


Diesel


Paade Mode

Ocra

The Campamento

Angulus


Fay Junior


Sometime Soon

Donsje

Simonetta

Knast by Krutter


Belle Chiara

N°21 Kids

Andorine

Infantium Victoria


The Animals Observatory


Blauer Junior


Molo


Guess Kids


Dolce & Gabbana


Dolce & Gabbana


Marni

Trussardi Junior

Weekend House Kids

Repose Ams


Marcelo Burlon Kids of Milan


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Production: Petra Barkhof Digital Assistant: Marco Mazzone Styling: Francesca Bisceglia Styling Assistant: Giorgia Pipoli Hair & Make-up: Antonella Gaglio @ CloseUp Hair & Make-up Assistant: Mara Liquadri @ CloseUp Models: @B-Talent Scout @Moda ModĂ @Annaemme @Pepperkids @Baby Fashion @Piccolissimo Me


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Cool Kids View on TOMMY HILFIGER Photography ACHIM LIPPOTH Styling PETRA BARKHOF


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CURRENT G H A N A

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sweatshirt MOSCHINO BABY KID TEEN cap on top LOUD APPAREL caps below THE ANIMALS OBSERVATORY

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lef t T-shirt MOLO skirt THE ANIMALS OBSERVATORY rig ht shirt PAADE MODE pants MOLO 86


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dress CARBON SOLDIER

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shirt PAADE MODE shorts WEEKEND HOUSE KIDS

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dress CARBON SOLDIER

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dress WOLF & RITA

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jacket WEEKEND HOUSE KIDS

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Photographer ACHIM LIPPOTH Assistant MAX KOPP Postproduction www.ralf-schneider-retouching.com


f ro m t o p c lo c k w ise sweatshirt LOUD APPAREL shorts RASPBERRY PLUM shorts BIKKEMBERGS KID waistcoat BLAUER JUNIOR T-shirt BLAUER JUNIOR pants DSQUARED2 vest BOBO CHOSEs 100


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swim THE ANIMALS OBSERVATORY


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126 sweatshirt MOLO Photographer ACHIM LIPPOTH

Propstyling ELKE RÃœSS at LIGANORD


Models SUGARKIDS

Postproduction www.ralf-schneider-retouching.com


Pleased to meet you. In Cologne.


Concept, Editing, Text: Michael Krรถger & Heiko Schulz

Anniversary Edition Vol. 50 Between the lines Best of essays (rearranged) Taken from:

The

CauliflFROM ower Ear To the Violet

I remember

A

DRAMA FESTIVAL EAT.

SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS SYSTEMS

HU MAN NESS

Dossier Rewind

THE INTERVIEW ISSUE

TO

DRINK.

Dearest Father

THINK.

B 129


About Loss

Chapter 1: Origin

Vladimir Nabokov Speak, Memory

ORI The Russian-American writer Vladimir Nabokov, born in 1899 in Saint Petersburg, died in Montreux in 1977. He is one of the most exceptional authors of the last century. Nabokov was and remains a style model for many authors who came after him. Little Vladimir’s parents had money, influence and broad horizons. He grew up in the care of an English nanny and private teachers, and enjoyed extensive travel throughout Europe. Vladimir read a lot, fell in love with literature, and soon spoke French and English. At 17 he published his first volume of poetry. His autobiographical book, Speak, Memory, written during the period between 1943 and 1951 is, on the one hand, a memoir of long, exciting holiday journeys, of the family’s beautiful country estate, and of all the smells and colours of his childhood. On the other – and perhaps above all else – Speak, Memory is a recollection of his Russia before the revolution: his lost childhood paradise.

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Chapter 1: Origin

Never eat off the floor – except in Eritrea!

GIN Global table manners

INDIA eats cleanly. Saliva is considered unclean in India so, for safety reasons, nuts, for example, are thrown into the mouth from some CHINA eats reverentially. distance. Never put your own chopsticks in the rice bowl, except at a funeral to honour the dead. RUSSIA eats in an inhibited manner. FRANCE eats strictly. It’s considered much too pushy to look JAPAN eats loudly. Belching and slurping are It’s considered extremely rude each other in the eye when eating. considered a compliment toto blow on a hot soup to cool it. the cook. It shows how goodYou must always use cutlery, even to eat fruit. And salad is the food is and that the folded not cut. guest feels at home. GERMANY eats in an organised manner. All dishes are served from the left, except soup. Drinks are served from AMERICA eats always wellthe right. ITALY eats prepared. ENGLAND eats generously. Americans rest their left arm on puritanically. At the end of their lap while eating. Legend Never insert the a meal (in a has it that this is a leftover from whole of your spoon restaurant) the Wild West. Because you in your mouth or you always always had to be on your guard lick it clean! This ask for one against enemies, you kept a is considered most joint bill. hand on your revolver at all unseemly and even times – even when eating. obscene! ERITREA eats attentively. AFGHANISTAN eats politely. As a particular courtesy, your neighbour at table The guest sits at the head of the table, and will place the food directly into your mouth. this is usually as far a possible from the door. When the family is gathered, this place goes to the grandparents.

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Chapter 1: Origin

Andy Warhol, pop artist

ORI The Bedridden Child

Andy is the youngest of three sons. His parents have Slovak roots (immigrants from the village of Miková). Their real name is “Varchola”, which is turned into “Warhola” in the United States. Until Andy, who is really “Andrew”, later turns it into “Warhol”. At the age of eight Andy not only has a nervous breakdown (and another one later), but also a pigment disorder. For this reason he is regarded as an albino for some time. The sick, bedridden Andy is addicted to comics, magazines and cine films. He listens to the radio and starts to draw and paint. His mother Julia, with whom a deep, intense bond is formed during this period, reads Dick Tracy to him at his bedside. They have Campbell’s tinned soup for dinner and Coca-Cola to drink. When Andy is 13 his father, a pit worker, dies in an accident. Rewind

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Chapter 1: Origin

GIN 01 The system: Family

02 Elements of the system: Father Mother Child/children

03 Sub-systems: Married couple Siblings Allies (mother/daughter, father/son or vice versa) Grandparents Uncles/aunts 04 How the system remains functional and alive: Love Desire Affection Goodwill Tolerance Habit Fear

05 How integration of the individual elements is achieved: Loyalty Commitment Willingness to compromise Sharing Going without 06 Important interaction: Loving/being loved

07 Where differentiation from the surrounding world is particularly obvious: Holiday Apartment block Playground quarrels 08 Interdependence of the individual elements of the system: Very high: Father needs mother needs son needs sister needs mother needs son needs father... 09 Possible cause for a system crisis: A divorce

Photo Michael Danner

365 Days of Father and Daughter During the course of a year we used a self-timer to take photographs of ourselves in the same spot at home and in different places when we were travelling.

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000

VIELLEICHT KÖNNTE ICH DANN BESSER STREITEN Ein Gespräch mit Anja Steinig, Einzelkind.

Was für ein Einzelkind warst du? Ich war schüchtern, ich war gerne alleine und bestimmt auch etwas egoistisch; aber altklug oder nölig war ich nicht.

Fühltest du dich (oft) allein oder gar einsam? Nee. Ich hab nichts vermisst, weil immer jemand da war. Ich bin aufgestanden und meine Mutter war da und es war super. Außerdem bin ich auf einer Straße aufgewachsen, auf der noch vier andere Mädchen

Verwöhnst du gern? Total gern. Es macht mich glücklich, wenn andere glücklich sind. Aber mich selbst verwöhne ich überhaupt nicht.

Würdest du sagen: „Ich hatte eine glückliche Kindheit.“? Ja. In mir ist Glück.

Wurdest du verwöhnt? Ja, ich bin mit extrem viel Liebe und Harmonie aufgewachsen. Und das heißt auch: ohne Streitkultur. Ich musste mich nie gegen jemanden durchsetzen. Ich kann mich aus meiner Kindheit auch nur an eine einzige Situation erinnern, in der meine Mutter mal richtig sauer auf meinen Vater war und sogar geheult hat. Das war furchtbar für mich. Das ist schon eine Art Grundverwöhnung, oder?

Erzähl mal von deinen Eltern. So ein klassisches Einzelkind war ich nicht. Denn ich hatte eigentlich drei Mütter und einen Vater, meine richtigen Eltern und dann im selben Haus noch Zweiteltern, Mutter und Tochter Thiemann, denen das Haus in Bochum gehörte. Die haben mich wirklich wie eine Tochter behandelt und stark geprägt. Als ich ein Jahr alt war, fingen Mutter und Tochter Thiemann an, für mich mitzusorgen. Ich hatte also vier sehr enge Bezugspersonen, habe zum Beispiel ganz oft bei meinen Zweiteltern im Doppelbett, zwischen Mutter und Tochter Thiemann, geschlafen. Meine Eltern hatten dann ihre Ruhe.

Chapter 1: Origin

Interview He i ko SCHULZ

ungefähr in meinem Alter wohnten. Wir waren ständig zusammen, unterwegs und draußen. Und – jetzt kommt’s: Ich hatte als relativ kleines Kind schon einen S/W-Fernseher. Ich habe jeden Abend die Sesamstraße und Telekolleg geguckt. Da lief immer ein Englischkurs oder jemand, der menschliche Organe auseinander nahm. Das hab ich mir immer angeguckt, mehr aber auch nicht. Es gab also für mich keine Einsamkeit. Ich hatte Menschen und einen Fernseher – und immer mal wieder Tiere: zwei Schildkröten, Tanzmäuse, zwei Kaninchen und Wellensittiche. Den Verlust dieser Tiere fand ich dann allerdings so furchtbar, dass ich irgendwann keine mehr haben wollte.

Beschreib mal, wie es früher war in eurer Familie. Zum Beispiel beim Verreisen. Wir waren fast immer mit anderen Leuten im Urlaub, glaube ich. Wir sind zum Beispiel zu fünft nach Italien gefahren, also meine Erst- und meine Zweiteltern und ich. Und wenn ich mal nur mit den Ersteltern wegfuhr, hab ich eigentlich immer schnell Anschluss und neue Freunde gefunden.

Was wäre in deinem Leben anders gelaufen, wenn du Geschwister gehabt hättest? Ich könnte besser streiten.

Wenn du allein im Zimmer warst: Was hast du am liebsten gespielt? Ich hab vor allem viel gelesen.

Was ist das absolut Traurigste, das du als Einzelkind erlebt hast? Einmal in der Grundschule und einmal so mit 15 oder 16 habe ich Ausschlüsse aus Mädchencliquen erlebt oder besser erlitten; also wirklich extremes Mobbing. Komischerweise bin ich da zwar immer als Verlierer rausgegangen, danach ging es mir aber immer besser und den anderen schlecht. Das hat mich stark geprägt. Ich habe unglaubliche Verlustängste. Auch ziemlich traurig: Ich war ab dem 3. Schuljahr praktisch immer verliebt. Und natürlich immer unglücklich. Ich habe Kladden voll geschrieben mit meinem Liebeskummer: „Heute habe ich ihn wiedergesehen, und er hat kurz in meine Richtung geguckt.“ Und so weiter. Ich habe mich ohne Ende gequält.

Hattest du viele Freunde, die Geschwister hatten? Ja, und das fand ich auch immer super, dass die Geschwister haben; ich hab aber nie darüber nachgedacht, wieso ich keine habe.

Wie viele Geschenke gab es für dich an Weihnachten im Schnitt? Von meinen Eltern immer ganz viele. Geschätzt: bis zu 30. Meine Zweiteltern haben mich immer besonders unterstützt, wenn ich wirklich dringend etwas brauchte, das für meine Zukunft wichtig war. Im Studium zum Beispiel einen Computer oder eine Kamera.

Wie W ie war es, wenn Anja ungezogen war? Ich war und bin nie ungezogen. Ich bin nur ausgezogen, mit 19. Nachdem ich mit 16 meinen ersten festen Freund hatte, haben meine Eltern mich nämlich nicht mehr so festgehalten und auf mich aufgepasst, wie sie es bis dahin gemacht hatten. Auf einmal haben sie mich losgelassen. Auf einmal durfte ich alles, sogar ausziehen.

ORI

Wer ist der Mittelpunkt deiner Welt? Ich, glaube ich. Obwohl ich immer ziemlich viel für andere mache.

Was fällt dir als Einzelkind zu folgenden Begriffen ein:

Überversorgung Meine Eltern haben mich so geliebt und so harmonisch erzogen und versorgt, dass ich ihnen später einiges übel genommen habe. Ich durfte selbstverständliche Sachen nicht machen, durfte zum Beispiel nicht mit anderen zum Schlittschuhfahren. Da fahren die dir die Finger ab, hat meine Mutter gesagt.

Wut Ich kann mich an einen krassen Pubertätswutanfall erinnern: Ich war mit 14 auf einem Depeche-ModeKonzert und unglaublich verliebt in Martin Gore, diesen blonden Gitarristen und Sänger. Eine Woche später gab es noch ein Depeche-Mode-Konzert irgendwo in der Nähe, und ich wollte da noch mal hin, durfte aber nicht. Da war ich so sauer, dass ich meiner Mutter einen wirklich sehr, sehr bösen Brief geschrieben habe. Sie hat mich dann am nächsten Morgen heulend geweckt und mit mir über diesen Brief gesprochen.

Abendgebet Ich war mit meinen Eltern sehr oft bei meiner Großtante in Bielefeld. Die hat meinem Vater ihr Haus vererbt. Das habe ich damals irgendwie mitgekriegt, obwohl ich bei der Entscheidung nicht dabei sein durfte. Ich war wahrscheinlich in einem anderen Zimmer, wusste aber, da geht es um das Haus und um Bielefeld. Ich hatte totale Angst, dass wir aus Bochum wegziehen. Von diesem Tag an hab ich jahrelang jeden Abend gebetet: Bitte nicht nach Bielefeld!

Du hast jetzt (bald) zwei Kinder. Wolltest du deiner Erstgeborenen das Einzelkindschicksal unbedingt ersparen? Das Einzelkinddasein ist kein Schicksal. Ich glaube, ich möchte Clara nur ersparen, dass sie so überbehütet aufgezogen wird, wie ich aufgezogen wurde. Und wenn ich an mein Schicksal denke: An dem Tag, als Clara geboren wurde, ging mir so ein Satz durch den Kopf: „Jetzt hab ich dem Tod ein Schnippchen geschlagen.“

Und mit zwei Kindern: zwei Schnippchen? Ja, damit hab ich’s noch gefestigt.

000


Was ist gut daran, viele Geschwister zu haben? Es ist immer jemand da, der dir helfen kann oder dem geholfen werden muss: bei Hausaufgaben oder beim Schlittschuhzubinden. Und es ist immer etwas Spannendes im Gang. Wir haben zum Beispiel Holzhütten im Wald hinterm Haus gebaut. Andererseits war ich mit zehn oder elf Jahren auch schon so etwas wie die Mutter für die beiden Kleinsten. Ich bin in der Nacht aufgestanden und hab sie gefüttert. Heute – als Erwachsene – erkennen wir, dass wir uns als Kinder auch gegenseitig erzogen haben.

mit Tennisplatz, Swimmingpool etc. Im Urlaub selbst war es immer sehr spannend. Vor allem, weil wir kaum beaufsichtigt wurden. Wir waren ziemlich frei.

000

Wer ist der interessanteste deiner Geschwister? Für meinen jüngsten Bruder habe ich eine große Vorliebe, er ist 28, schwul, Schauspieler und lebt in New York City zurzeit ein sehr spannendes Leben. Aber ich könnte trotzdem nicht sagen, dass er interessanter ist als die anderen sieben.

Würdest du sagen: Ich hatte eine glückliche Kindheit? Ich empfinde meine Kindheit als toll und etwas ganz Besonderes. Aber mit Abstand muss ich auch sagen: Ich hätte an manchen Tagen gern etwas weniger Geschwister und etwas mehr Begleitung von meinen Eltern gehabt. Wir mussten viel alleine regeln, mussten sehr „Montessori sein“ (ohne, dass uns jemand gesagt hätte, was das ist).

Das lustigste Geschwisterereignis? Sehr lustig war und ist auch heute immer noch Thanksgiving. Das ist ein genialer Feiertag, weil es nur ums Essen und nicht um Geschenke geht. Da ist keine Eifersucht im Spiel, es ist einfach ein schönes Zusammenkommen. Wir sind dann immer mindestens elf, mit Verwandten oft 15 bis 20 Leute an einer langen Tafel. Einige meiner Geschwister sind superlustig, perfekte Stimmenimitatoren. Wenn die zusammenkommen und gut drauf sind, dann ist das besser als Fernsehen und Theater zusammen.

Gab’s innerhalb der großen Geschwistergruppe kleine Gruppen? Immer wieder neue, altersabhängig. Meine zweitälteste Schwester spielte viel mit uns, als wir klein waren. Irgendwann gab es dann aber den Teenagerbruch (da war ich zehn und sie 13), und ab da habe ich mich dann den Kleinen zugewendet. Auch jetzt, als Erwachsene, bilden sich immer wieder neue Gruppen. Besonders spannend daran ist ja: Als Erwachsene lernen wir Geschwister uns als Menschen noch mal neu kennen. Ich habe einen Bruder und keine Ahnung, wer er wirklich ist, wie er tickt. Ich habe ihn eigentlich nur als Kind in meinem Kopf. Ich weiß nicht, was er tut, wie er als Vater oder als Mann ist. Er ist mir fremder als manche Freunde.

GIN

Wie war das Verreisen? Hatten deine Eltern einen Omnibus? Damals gab es ja keine strengen Kindersitzvorschriften wie heute. Mein Vater hatte immer einen ziemlich großen Kombi, vorne saßen die Eltern und ein Kind, in der Mitte waren immer mindesten vier Kinder und in der hintersten, aufklappbaren Sitzreihe der Rest. Kannst du dir vorstellen, heute mit all deinen Da wir nicht angeschnallt sein mussten, Geschwistern in einem Haus zu wohnen? hingen wir natürlich zum Teil übereinander. Auf gar keinen Fall. Das würde mich wahnsinnig machen. Wir sind als Erwachsene Und eure Reiseziele? weit auseinander gegangen – und das war Einmal ging es mit dem Campingwagen nach notwendig, damit wir alle unsere Ichs entwickeln New Mexico. Ansonsten haben wir uns öfter können. Lustigerweise scheinen heute die am nach New Hampshire aufgemacht, vier Stunden glücklichsten zu sein, die am weitesten von Autofahrt. Da blieben wir dann für zwei Wochen „zu Hause“ weg wohnen. Wir Geschwister in einem Haus zur Miete. Oder wir sind nach genießen uns, wenn wir uns jetzt mal wieder Vermont gefahren, in eine Art Ferienhausanlage treffen. Aber noch mal zusammen leben? Nee.

Wie sah denn ein Familienfrühstück bei euch früher aus? Ihr wart zu elft? Zu zehnt. Mein Vater war Arzt, also fast nie zu Hause. Entweder war das Frühstücksmotto bei uns: komplette Selbstversorgung. Oder meine Mutter hat Cornflakes und Müsli serviert oder – als wir noch kleiner waren – etwas Warmes für uns gemacht: Eier, Speck, kleine Pfannkuchen, Toast, Haferbrei. Es war immer chaotisch morgens, immer ein Kommen und Gehen, weil die älteren Kinder früh in die Schule mussten. Es war nie so, dass wir uns gemeinsam zum Frühstück hingesetzt haben und gemeinsam aufgestanden sind. Das war eher eine Art Familienkantine. Und es war immer laut.

Du hast acht Geschwister. Ja, Paul, Pamela, Julie, James, Thomas, Erin, Michael, Nicholas. Der jüngste ist 28 und der älteste dürfte um die 46 sein. Die ersten vier Kinder sind alle ein Jahr auseinander, dann 20 Monate, 20 Monate, ein Jahr, dann vier, zuletzt fünf Jahre. Ich bin Kind Nummer fünf, direkt in der Mitte.

Ein Gespräch mit Lisa Magel, Geschwisterkind.

RUHE? ES GAB KEINE RUHE

Das hab ich behalten. Da ist ein kleiner Engel, der uns hilft.

Angel of God My guardian dear To whom God’s love commits me here Ever this day Be at my side To light and guard To rule and guide.

Dein Lieblingsgebet?

000

Gutenachtgeschichte Wir haben eher nachmittags Geschichten gelesen. Abends ging es eher um Gebete. Meine Eltern waren sehr katholisch, es gab sozusagen Gebetpflicht. Meine Mutter hat mit jedem von uns das Abendgebet gesprochen. Bis zum Teenageralter.

Ruhe Es gab keine Ruhe. Ich hab zum ersten Mal allein gelebt, als ich 25 war. Erst da hab ich verstanden, was Ruhe ist. Als Kind hatte ich keine Rückzugsmöglichkeit im Haus. Ich musste mich mit Buch und Taschenlampe unters Bett verziehen. Oder ich bin raus und versteckte mich in unserer kleinen Holzhütte. Wir neun kommen auch jetzt als Erwachsene nicht komplett voneinander los, brauchen aber alle viel Ruhe, weil wir die als Kinder nie hatten. Das Natürlichste für mich ist Chaos, Lärm, Action, aber es ist nicht gut für mich. Das, was ich kenne, ist nicht das, was ich mag.

Wut Wut habe ich zum ersten Mal mit Mitte 20 richtig gespürt. Da habe ich ein Jahr lang nicht mit meinen Eltern gesprochen. Ich war so wütend auf sie, weil ich gespürt habe, dass ich sie immer in Schutz genommen habe. Sie machen ja nur ihr Bestes, es sind ja auch so viele Kinder, es ist ja auch viel Stress etc. Ich war auch so wütend, weil ich als Kind einiges entbehren musste, nur weil meine Eltern nicht verhütet haben. Jetzt habe ich keine Wut mehr gegenüber meinen Eltern. Auch nicht meinen Geschwistern gegenüber.

Was fällt dir zu folgenden Begriffen ein?

Chapter 1: Origin


Magic Formula

Chapter 2: Fate

Joe Brainard I Remember

FA Joe Brainard, born in 1942 in Arkansas, grew up in Oklahoma. He was a precocious, highly talented visual artist and occasional writer. At the age of 27 he had a brilliant idea: the magic formula of “I remember”, which enabled him to shape his memories so they no longer seemed random and incoherent. He was euphoric about the discovery of this structural principle. He felt like “God writing the bible”. He believed that everyone could and should apply this formula for his own enrichment and inspiration. (He’s certainly right to try it out ). Brainard’s book of the same title is a collage of memories of his family, food, clothing, art, church, body, things, friends, jokes, findings. Highlights are the memories of childhood. His include the history teacher who threatened to jump out of the window (on the second floor) if the class didn’t settle down immediately.

136

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Chapter 2: Fate

0 44 /1 Without a father you can become anything. For instance queen. Avenger. Standout philosopher. Legend. Character in a novel. Or you go crazy.

Fa th

a herle it hou fath s, les er

Lis t

Fatherless

TE – Elizabeth Alexandra Mary from the House of Windsor (lost her father at the age of 25) – John Lennon (his father left him at the age of five) – Julius Caesar (lost his father at the age of 16) – Notorios B.I.G. (his father left him at the age of two) – Bill Clinton (his father died three months before his birth) – Bruce Wayne (lost his father at the age of ca. five) – Thomas Bernhard (never met his father) – Charlie Chaplin (his father left him at the age of two) – Oliver Twist (never met his father) – Plato (lost his father at the age of three)

you bF e c o anyth insta q u e e v e n g tand

ather t h o u father c a n b e a n y t h i n instance v e er. tandout oph e haracter novel. r crazy. zabe fathe er

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137


Chapter 2: Fate

To

by John Clare A Dead Tree

Old tree thou art wither’d – I pass’d thee last year,

And thou wert as green as thy mates of the spring.

The clown passeth by thee and heedeth thee not,

I think, while I view thee and rest on the stile,

Fond friends may bend o’er the rais’d turf where I’m laid, And warm recollection the past may look o’er, And say by my life, as I say by thy shade, “Last spring he was living, but now he’s no more.”

FA And the blackbird snug hid in thy branches did sing,

Thy shadow stretch’d dark o’er the grass sprouting near,

How alter’d since then! not a leaf hast thou got,

Thy honours brown round thee that clothed the tree;

But thou’rt a warm source of reflection for me.

Life’s bloom is as frail as the leaves thou hast shed;

Like thee I may boast of my honours awhile,

But new springs may blossom, and mine may be fled:


Chapter 2: Fate

“ Al l y o u h a v e t o d o i s l o o k a t h e r f a c e . ”

TE JASPER, 18 CARE HOME INSIDER

DOES ANYONE KNOW HOW THE OLD PEOPLE ARE DOING?

currently doing a voluntary social year in a senior home. These old people all seem extremely lonely to me. Most of them look sad or somehow helpless. This soon changes if you just spend a little time with them. Listen to them, even though you might not understand a word, because the sentences don’t make sense in the normal way. Because their brain is broken and that makes them forget how to speak. Or because at some point they go back to just speaking in their original native language and have completely forgotten German. A number of these elderly have dementia. Be prepared to ask or say the same thing five times in as many minutes. One woman here only says two or three words, which she always says in a different order. Somehow she makes herself understood anyway. All you have to do is look at her face. I can tell what she means or wants just by the emotions in her face. I think I get it right, anyway. The woman has such a kind nature when you look at her and speak to her. If you look at her, listen to her, maybe just brush her arm. I find that the elderly have love to show, if you just offer them some time. It’s all genuine. I find it interesting that after a bit of time there is a sense of familiarity, although many of them forget almost everything immediately. You become a part of their own little world. Maybe it’s all stored somewhere else than in the brain. It would be weird to know what they think of us. Their impression of me. One woman once said quite seriously that I was an angel. I think she thought she was in heaven, already dead. I hate the idea that you can live your whole life doing what you want to do, then suddenly it all goes downhill or you’re written off. No more freedom. Nothing left, all gone. I think there are hundreds of people in these homes who can never really feel settled, right up until they die.

WHAT I FIND REALLY CRAP IS THAT FOR TWENTY-FIVE OLD PEOPLE THERE ARE TWO TO THREE NURSES OR CARERS, WHICH IS PROBABLY THE CASE EVERYWHERE.

You can tell that this extremely hard work leaves a lot of them bitter. I’m sure it’s because of the poor pay. The atmosphere isn’t great most of the time. Some of them are also pretty harsh and rude to the old people, or unforgiving. Like when it comes to meal times. But despite all the stress and anger, some are still very nice and warmhearted to the old folk, which can only be admired. In my case, I think the time I’ve spent with the elderly has made me more empathetic.

139


EDMOND

Son of a Jewish family in Paris. WHEN EK IS FOUR, HIS FATHER DIES.

KAISER

BORN IN 1914 IN PARIS, DIED IN 2000 IN COIMBATORE.

THE STORY OF:

Chapter 2: Fate

FA While scarred from the death of his son and the horrors of war, he is also fascinated by Brother Pierre, a French priest, who founded the aid organisation, Emmaus. EK wants to help more than anything in the world.

Unbearable experiences: While EK is away at war, his two-year-old son, Jean-Daniel, drowns while playing.

EK is acquitted and goes to Lausanne with his family.

In occupied France, EK is charged with treachery and jailed.

AT 17, HE FOLLOWS HIS STEPFATHER TO LAUSANNE TO WORK AS A SALESMAN. EK DOESN’T GET ON AS A SALESMAN AND GOES BACK TO PARIS. IN PARIS HE’S ENLISTED INTO THE FRENCH ARMY. HE WITNESSES LIFE ON THE FRONTLINE AND DEATH.

EK FOUNDS THE CHILDREN’S AID PROJECT, TERRE DES HOMMES.

A NUMBER OF LEGALLY INDEPENDENT ORGANISATIONS HAVE SPRUNG UP UNDER THE NAME TERRE DES HOMMES. UNDER THE UMBRELLA OF

TERRE DES HOMMES (IFTDH)

140

THEY ALL FIGHT AGAINST HUNGER, CHILD LABOUR, CHILD SLAVERY, CHILD PROSTITUTION AND ABUSE AS CHILD SOLDIERS.


356

Fischli/Weiss als Ratte/Bär, über Kunst redend

Bewusst oder unbewusst sind sich Fischli/Weiss früh einig, nicht nur die Rolle des genialen Künstlers in Frage zu stellen, sondern auch die des Betrachters. Wer will, kann ihre Arbeiten ganz naiv und mit viel Freude einfach nur anschauen. Wer anders

Alles könnte immer auch anders sein

Zu dieser Zeit liegt die erste gemeinsame Arbeit bereits acht Jahre zurück: die Wurstserie.. Fischli/Weiss bauen Alltagsszenen mit Wurst nach und fotografieren sie. Zum Beispiel einen Teppichladen, in dem Blutwurst- und Mortadellascheiben übereinander liegen. Als Sitzgelegenheit dient Gebäck, Verkäufer und Kunden sind Essiggurken.

PLÖTZLICH DIESE GEMEINSAMKEIT ÜBER DAS KÜNSTLERPAAR FISCHLI/WEISS, BRÜDER IM GEISTE — „Das Zentrum ist das Übersehene, das, was so gewöhnlich ist und so stark unseren Alltag bestimmt, dass wir eigentlich nicht merken, dass da Stoff für philosophische Überlegungen und eben für Kunst ist.“ 1987 zeigen die beiden Schweizer Peter Fischli und David Weiss im Rahmen der Documenta 8 in Kassel ihren Film Der Lauf der Dinge.. Inhalt: Eine Kettenraktion, ausgelöst durch chemische Prozesse, weitergeführt durch Dosen, Reifen, Messer, Bretter, Feuerwerkskörper und andere Dinge. Erst nach 29 Minuten und 45 Sekunden kommt der Lauf zum Stillstand. Reaktion von Publikum und Kritikern: große Begeisterung. Im Anschluss sind Fischli/Weiss international bekannt.

Te x t : M i c h a e l KRÖGER

356

Das Künstlerpaar hat jedoch nicht nur eine gemeinsame Vorstellung davon, was Kunst bedeuten könnte, sondern auch vom Kunstmarkt. Medienscheu seien sie nicht aus Schüchternheit, sondern aus Erfahrung, hat Peter Fischli, der jüngere der beiden Geistesbrüder, einmal in einem der raren Interviews geantwortet. Dass sie heute ohne Zweifel die gefragtesten oder sogar beliebtesten zeitgenössischen Schweizer Künstler sind, können sie trotzdem nicht verhindern. Bestimmt auch wegen Gedanken wie diesem: „… Es gibt ein eindeutiges Richtig bei unseren Versuchen; das ist, wenn es funktioniert, wenn dieses Gestell zusammenbricht. Dann gibt es noch ein Schön gleichsam über diesem Richtig; das ist, wenn es knapp wird oder wenn dieses Gestell zusammenbricht, wie wir es wollen, nämlich langsam und kompliziert, dann ist es schön zusammengebrochen. Also liegt die Ästhetik auf dem Funktionieren drauf wie die Butter auf dem Butterbrot, ziemlich dünn und gleichmäßig.“

So eng scheinen die persönlichen Bande der beiden, dass das Künstlerpaar immer mal wieder mit Gustave Flauberts Figuren Peter Fischli studierte Kunst in Italien, David Weiss besuchte die Kunstgewerbeschulen in Bouvard und Pécuchet verglichen wird: Zürich und Basel. Das Künstlerpaar vertrat die Zwei Pflastertreter, die beim ersten KenSchweiz bei der Biennale in Venedig, nahm an nenlernen augenblicklich eine Geistesverder Documenta in Kassel teil und hatte unter wandtschaft spüren und anschließend eine anderem Einzelausstellungen in den großen Partnerschaft fürs Leben eingehen. Sie Museen in Paris, London, Barcelona, Los ziehen mit geerbtem Geld aufs Land, um Angeles, Köln und Wien. Peter Fischli wurde sich dem Studium aller möglichen Wissen1952, David Weiss 1946 in Zürich geboren. Beide schaften zu widmen. Fischli/Weiss zogen leben und arbeiten noch heute dort. gemeinsam in ein Atelier.

Wie wir es wollen

Von 1981 stammt auch die Werkgruppe Plötzlich diese Übersicht, die uns anhand von ungefähr 150 kleinen Tonplastiken die Welt erklärt. Landschaften und Vorstadtsiedlungen, Autobahnen, ein Brot, ein Backstein, Schlüsselmomente der Weltgeschichte wie Mick Jagger und Brian Jones befriedigt auf dem Heimweg, nachdem sie ,I Can’t Get No Satisfaction‘ komponiert haben oder Anna träumt den ersten von Freud analysierten Traum. Jede Plastik für sich total lustig. Alle zusammen total erhellend. Man hat eben „plötzlich diese Übersicht“.

will, kann das Werk aber auch tiefgründig verstehen. Wie das geht, hat das Künstlerpaar im Film Der geringste Widerstand von 1981 gut veranschaulicht: Als Ratte und Bär verkleidet stehen Fischli/Weiss in einer Galerie und versuchen, sich intelligent über Kunst zu unterhalten.

TE Peter Fischli/David Weiss, Fragen & Blumen, Eine Retrospektive, JRP|Ringier, Zürich, ISBN: 978-3-905770-08-7, Preis: 32 EUR

Chapter 2: Fate


Chapter 3: Angst

Thanatophobia Julian Barnes Nothing to Be Frightened of Death. Not the first thing that springs to mind when thinking about childhood unless you are Julian Barnes, the British writer born in 1946. The young Julian dreamt about being buried alive or dragged under water in the jaws of a crocodile. He regularly pounded his pillow and cried out loud in his efforts to rid himself of his chronic fear of death. Death also permeates his memories of his cold family. Several heart attacks robbed his introverted father of any zest for life, and his mother, a control-freak who dominated his father, died “better�, according to Julian: quicker, more efficiently than simply wasting away. Then there was his know-it-all brother Jonathan with his tendency to philosophise, and for whom death was nothing to be frightened of. This plain and simple negation was not enough for the tortured Julian. He searched for other answers and found them most easily in art. Being able to look into the abyss with chosen companions such as Stendhal, Flaubert, Mozart and Stravinsky reduces the horror by half.

ANG 142

kw 50


Chapter 3: Angst 1.

Favourite Loser

Charles Brown, nicknamed Charlie, is the son of a hairdresser, the well-behaved big brother of naughty Sally and master of a nutty beagle named Snoopy. From the outside he appears to live in a nice, neat American suburb. But take a closer look and you’ll see it’s a world of absurdities, failures and bizarre disasters. Charlie is always well dressed and smart, very well-spoken with extraordinary social skills, but unfortunately he’s an eternal loser and incredibly unlucky in life. Anything that has a slightest hint of competition – be it in the spelling bee or on the athletics track – there’s only ever one loser, Charlie Brown. Through the turmoil of destiny, he becomes the baseball team’s manager, and when the team experiences their one and only win (which was stripped later on), he gets a taste of victory. Charlie Brown teaches us to empathise with losers and what it means to be disillusioned, humiliated, disheartened and lonely in sport.

GST After the team’s umpteenth loss, he lies awake at night and wonders, “What did I do wrong?” He hears a voice, “It won’t happen overnight.”


Chapter 3: Angst

Dearest Father Ten character traits that Franz Kafka ascribed to his father (in the famous Letter to His Father). – Worldly superiority – Loud voice – Appetite – Eloquence – Health – Self-satisfaction – Stamina – Presence of mind – Knowledge of human nature – A certain generosity

ANG Dearest Father

Franz ascribed in the a t

Ten character traits that to famous h

his Letter e

Kafka father ( to His F r )

Letter to His Father

Loud voice

Appetite

Health

Self-satisfaction

Dearest Father 144

Eloquence

– –

List 1/10

Worldly superiority

Stamina

Presence of mind

Knowledge of human nature

A certain generosity


Chapter 3: Angst

Birds in Alarm

The fi retail tells the boys when nests are nigh And tweets and fl ies from every passer-bye. The yellowhammer never makes a noise But fl ies in silence from the noisy boys; The boys will come and take them every day, And still she lays as none were ta’en away.

GST

The nightingale keeps tweeting-churring round But leaves in silence when the nest is found. The pewit hollos “chewrit” as she fl ies And flops about the shepherd where he lies; But when her nest is found she stops her song And cocks [her] coppled crown and runs along. Wrens cock their tails and chitter loud and play, And robins hollo “tut” and fly away.


Chapter 3: Angst

Hope for vegetables

Lachanophobia – fear of vegetables Chi ldren often don’t like veg Human evolutionary historyetables and this is determined by evolution. can account for many eating dur ing chi ldhood: preferences and aversions In the course of time, homo sapiens populated virtually all the climate zones on earth from the lush tropics to the vegetable-free Antarctic. During this process, man was continually searching for new sources of nourishment – an undertaking not without risk. The resources available included not only potential foods but also plenty that was inedible, even deadly (some resemble each other so deceptively like belladonna and blueberry). When choosing a food, man therefore had to be extremely cautious and astute. Some inborn preferences improved his chances of survival. So, our ancestors’ sense of taste helped to classify what nature had to offer roughly into: sweet, albuminous and fat = unproblematic food rich in energy; bitter and sour = eat with caution (unripe, possibly foul or poisonous). These genetic dispositions ensured the survival of man for hundreds of thousands of years – and still leave their mark on us today. No wonder that children with their more delicate organs are usually averse e.g. to vegetables. Although today’s range of vegetables clearly taste less bitter than their wild forerunners, they contain traces of bitterness to which children’s tongues and palates are more sensitive. What parents regard as a sign of bad manners when children exclaim “ugh” at the prospect of spinach is, in reality, an evolutionary-psychologically “aversive behavioural disposition”, part of an impulsive, subconscious defence mechanism.

ANG To overcome fear of vegetables, parents in all continents should perhaps look to the Japanese way of chopping vegetables. Handicrafts are, after all, a behavioural disposition. Chopping vegetables Japanese-style: mijin giri = finely grated

sainomo giri = diced sogo giri = long diagonal cuts hana giri = petals

hyoshi giri = sticks sen giri = thin Juliennes tanzaku giri = thin rectangles hangetsu giri = semicircles

146

icho giri = quarter circles


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JANUSZ KORCZAK Chapter 4: Empathy

THE STORY OF:

PROBABLY BORN IN 1878 AS HENDRYK GOLDSZMIT IN WARSAW. DIED 1942.

Parents: Cecylia and Josef Goldszmit, middle-class Polish Jews. His father, Josef, dies after getting himself into debt and almost bankrupting the family. Hendryk learns what social descent means.

LIFE AT THE GRAMMAR SCHOOL IS HARD; CORPORAL PUNISHMENT IS ‘IN’. HENDRYK STARTS WRITING IN EARNEST FROM AN EARLY AGE. IN 1899 HE WINS A LITERARY COMPETITION UNDER THE PEN NAME OF JANUSZ KORCZAK. THE PEN NAME STICKS.

E M PA JK STUDIES MEDICINE, WANTS TO BECOME A PAEDIATRICIAN.

WORKS IN A CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL. AS AN INDEPENDENT PRACTITIONER, HE CHARGES RICH PATIENTS SO HE CAN TREAT POORER CHILDREN FOR FREE.

RUSSO-JAPANESE WAR. AFTER THE WAR HE GOES ABROAD. IN LONDON, JK DECIDES NOT TO HAVE A FAMILY OF HIS OWN, CHOOSING INSTEAD TO SERVE ‘THE CHILD’.

JK GIVES UP HIS VERY SUCCESSFUL MEDICAL PRACTICE AND BECOMES A FULL-TIME GUARDIAN AS DIRECTOR OF THE JEWISH ORPHANAGE. HIS DAILY WORK GIVES RISE TO HIS APPROACH TO RAISING CHILDREN, FOCUSING ON THE CHILDREN’S WELFARE.

1914–18. Another war. In field hospitals, train carriages and on marching leave, JK writes his major pedagogical work,

HOW TO LOVE A CHILD.

JK FOUNDS THE FIRST NEWSPAPER FOR CHILDREN BY CHILDREN (JUNIOR NEWS) AND EXPERIMENTS WITH THE WAYS CHILDREN CAN LIVE TOGETHER DEMOCRATICALLY (INCLUDING A CHILDREN’S PARLIAMENT, FRIENDSHIP COURT AND SET OF LAWS) LAND. GERMAN TROOPS INVADE PO

ALONG WITH THE NURSES AND 200 JEWISH CHILDREN, JK IS FIRST MOVED INTO THE WARSAW GHETTO BEFORE BEING DEPORTED TO THE TREBLINKA CONCENTRATION CAMP AND KILLED. HE REFUSES SEVERAL ATTEMPTS TO FREE HIM.

148

JK IS THE FIRST PERSON IN THE HISTORY OF PEDAGOGY TO FORMULATE A CHARTER FOR CHILDREN’S HUMAN RIGHTS.


1 4 9

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Chapter 4: Empathy

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FROM D ARK N E S S I N TO TH E L I G H T --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------9 8 p e r ce n t o f a l l b l i n d p e o p l e w o r l d - w i d e l i ve i n d e ve l o p i n g co u n t r i e s. Ma n y o f t h e m o n t h e r o o f of the world: 30,000 of the 2.5 million inhabitants o f Ti b e t e i t h e r ca n n o t se e a t a l l o r h a ve ve r y p o o r vi si o n .

Th e c h i l d r e n a r e p r e p a r e d f o r t h e i r l i f e o u t s i d e s c h o o l . They gain self-confidence and the skills and attributes t h e y n e e d t o i n t e g r a t e i n t o Ti b e t a n so ci e t y .

Th e ca u se s i n cl u d e e xt r e m e l y st r o n g U V r a d i a t i o n , vitamin A deficiency, infections and smoke from yak dung which is used in open fires for cooking a n d h e a tin g .

AT H Y Th e oc n se q u e n ce s f o r hc i l d r e n : o n l y a ve r y sm a l l p r o p o r t i o n o f b l i n d hc i l d r e n h a ev t h e hc e ve r t o g o t o chs o o l.

a n ce

A

Ag lim m e r o f lig h t: I n 1 9 9 8 , S a b r yi e Te n b e r ke n ( a G e r m a n w o m a n w h o w a s h e r se l f l e f t t o t a l l y b l i n d a t t h e a g e o f t w e l ve f o l l o w i n g a n e ye i n f e ct i o n ) a n d h e r l i f e co m p a n i o n , D u t ch m a n P a u l K r o n e n b e r g , opened the first school for the blind in Lhasa.

D u r i n g h e r Ti b e t a n st u d i e s i n Bo n n , S a b r yi e w h o , a g a i n st a l l t h e o d d s, w a s d e t e r m i n e d t o b e oc m e a n a i d w o r ke r , d e ve l o p e d a Ti b e t a n Br a i l l e os t h a t sh e co u l d m a ke n o t e s. When she finally arrived in Tibet, Sabryie was d e e p l y sh o cke d b y w h a t sh e f o u n d : N o t o n l y d i d t h e b l i n d n o t h a ve t h e i r o w n scr i p t , t h e y w e r e so m e t i m e s ke p t l i ke a n i m a l s i n st a b l e s. ( Ma n y Ti b e t a n s co n si d e r b l i n d n e s t o b e a p u n i sh m e n t f o r si n s co m m i t t e d i n a n e a r l i e r l i f e . ) Fo c h a n Th Br

r b l i n d ch i l d r e n , t h a n c e o f a life tim e . d d a y st u d e n t s f r o e su b j e ct s t a u g h t a i l l e , m a t h e m a t i cs,

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Chapter 4: Empathy

The Ants

by John Clare

E M PA 150

What wonder strikes the curious, while he views The black ant’s city, by a rotten tree, Or woodland bank! In ignorance we muse: Pausing, annoyed, – we know not what we see, Such government and thought there seem to be; Some looking on, and urging some to toil, Dragging their loads of bent-stalks slavishly: And what’s more wonderful, when big loads foil One ant or two to carry, quickly then A swarm flock round to help their fellow-men. Surely they speak a language whisperingly, Too fine for us to hear; and sure their ways Prove they have kings and laws, and that they be Deformed remnants of the Fairy-days.


Chapter 4: Empathy 10. Sumo Catalogue

1. At 15, Sumo wrestlers enter a Sumo stable which is like entering a monastery. They live here and wrestle by rules inspired by the ascetic spirit of the Samurai. So is Sumo not a real sport? More like a cult or religion? 2. The first years of Sumo life are tough for the youngsters, almost unbearable. Young Sumo wrestlers start out as servants to the Sumo Grand Master, running errands, cleaning toilets and not getting enough sleep. Coping with hardship is seen as character-building. 3. There is no sport on earth which sees more beginners quit. The main reason is that they’re demoralised. 4. This is what happens in Sumo: two heavy-set boys (or later, men) stand in a clay-based ring. The outer boundary of the ring is formed by a rope sunken into the clay. Anyone who touches the rope, so anyone who leaves the ring first, or touches the ground with anything other than the soles of the feet, loses. To win you can push, shove, heave, hit the other person on the arms, apply tricky throwing techniques – basically everything except hair pulling, eye-gouging and kicking soft parts.

AT H Y 5. Sumo is about one thing only (literally): stand on your feet.

6. Sumo is the shortest contact sport in the world, with one fight lasting just 15 seconds on average.

7. Sumo wrestlers, especially the very young ones, have to eat a lot. A typical Sumo calorie bomb is called a chankonabe, a stew made of fish, vegetables, meat, soy curd and rice, made slightly more palatable with beer and rice wine.

8. Sumo wrestlers have to sleep a lot, and always on their stomachs to de-stress the heart and breathing. Sleeping is part of their training routine. Only through extended rest periods can the gigantic meals be converted into fighting weight.

9. The hair is very important. Daily hair care – washing, oils, tying up – there’s always a specialist in the stable. Even more important, however, is the only piece of clothing that Sumo wrestlers wear; the several metres long mawashi. You can’t put that on on your own. 10. When they get large, heavy and hard to beat, Sumo wrestlers become yokozunas. That’s the highest title you can get in Sumo, along the lines of Grand Master. Or demi-god.

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Chapter 4: Empathy outdoor area. I always have to be there at 1.15 pm, then I have fifteen minutes of preparation t i m e , m a yb e t o co p y cr a f t t e m p l a t e s o r t o b u i l d a ska t e b o a r d co u r se o r so m e t h i n g i n t h e r e cr e a t i o n r o o m . At h a l f p a st o n e , t h e ch i l d r e n co m e i n , t h e y a l l w a i t h a l f a n h o u r o u t si d e t h e d o o r a n d ca n ’ t w a i t t o g e t i n a n d a l r e a d y st a r t scr a p i n g a n d kn o cki n g a t t h e d o o r . An d t h e n w e ’ r e o f f u n t i l 5 pm, that’s three and a half hours of care. C h i l d r e n d o n ’ t o f t e n co m e t o t h e cr e a t i ve a r e a a t half past one and stay until 5 pm. Most of them co m e , st a y f o r m a yb e o n e o r t w o h o u r s, t h e n g o t o a n o t h e r r o o m . S o m e o n e f r o m t h e ch u r ch o f t e n co m e s t o t a ke th e m o u t so m e w h e r e . An d t h e n t h e r e ’ s a l s o a l a n g u a g e l e a r n i n g p r o je c t r u n b y th e u n iv e r s ity in th e s u p p o r t a re a s . O f c o u r s e , if y o u ’v e k n o w n a c h ild fo r h a lf a y e a r a n d th e y c o m e r u n n in g u p to y o u , c a llin g y o u r n a m e w ith c o m p le te jo y , th a t p u lls a t t h e h e a r t s t r i n g s . Th e y l e a r n u n b e l i e v a b l y q u ic k ly . A t th e s ta r t y o u c a n ’t g e t a w o r d o u t o f th e m b u t w ith in a fe w w e e k s y o u c a n c o m m u n i c a t e w e l l w i t h t h e m i n G e r m a n . It ’ s r e a lly im p r e s s iv e . W e h a ve ch i l d r e n f r o m S yr i a a n d Af g h a n i st a n i n t h e f a ci l i t y , t h e n w e h a ve a n o t h e r g r o u p o f ch i l d r e n f r o m Al b a n i a a n d S e r b i a a n d t h o se I w o r k in a n a s y lu m c e n t r e f o r r e f u g e e s . p a r t s. W h a t st r i ke s m e i s t h a t t h e ch i l d r e n f r o m t h o se g r o u p s a r e m o r e l i ke l y t o l o o k f o r t r o u b l e . A c t u a lly , it ’s c a lle d a n in c o m in g a s y lu m c e n t r e . M o s t p e o p l e s t a y h e r e f a r l o n g e r t h a n Th e ch i l d r e n f r o m S yr i a a n d Af g h a n i st a n a r e n o t a s co n f r o n t a t i o n a l , t h e y a r e q u i e t e r – t h a t ’ s th e y s h o u ld . Th e c e n t r e h a s a s p e c i a l a r e a f o r c h i l d r e n a n d y o u n g p e o p l e . Th e y c a n g o t h e r e a l l d a y u n t i l 5 p m , i f t h e y d o n ’ t g o t o s c h o o l . Th e y a r e s u p e r v is e d a n d e n te r ta in e d a n d ta u g h t. Th e c h i l d r e n a n d t e e n a g e r s l i v e w i t h t h e i r fa m ilie s in th e c e n tr e in v e r y s m a ll r o o m s , th e y ju s t n e e d a c le a n p la c e to s ta y a n d fe e l s a fe . C h ild c a r e is a ls o g u a ra n te e d fo r p a re n ts so t h e y ca n a t t e n d l a n g u a g e co u r se s a n d so r t i n m y e xp e r i e n ce a n yw a y , a n d o f co u r se a o u t t h e i r p a p e r s a n d so o n . I t w o r ks f o r e ve r yo n e . g e n e r a l i sa t i o n . Bu t i t ’ s n o t su r p r i si n g , b e ca u se Th e r e a r e va r i o u s t h e m e d r o o m s – a g a m e s t h e ch i l d r e n w h o co m e f r o m Al b a n i a a n d S e r b i a r o o m , a r e cr e a t i o n r o o m , a c r e a t i ve a r e a , t w o a r e l e s l i ke l y t o b e g r a n t e d a syl u m . S o , t h e y’ r e su p p o r t r o o m s, a r o o m f o r a l l u n d e r si x ye a r s o f t e n f r u st r a t e d a n d h a ve l i t t l e p a t i e n ce i n o l d . An d t h e r e ’ s a n o t h e r yo u t h a r e a f o r p e o p l e themselves and with others. You get a sense b e t w e e n t w e l ve a n d e i g h t e e n ye a r s o f a g e . I f r o m t h e ch i l d r e n w h e n t h e y’ r e o n t h e ve r g e o f l e a vi n g . I n so m e ca se s t h e y h a ve a l r e a d y b e e n w o r k t h e r e t w i ce a w e e k, o n e d a y i n t h e cr e a t i ve a r e a a n d t h e o t h e r i n t h e r e cr e a t i o n r o o m . I d e p o r t e d – a n d c o m e b a ck a g a i n . a m so l e l y r e sp o n si b l e f o r t h e ch i l d r e n i n t h e Th e ch i l d r e n o f t e n co m e f r o m e xt r e m e co n d i r o o m a n d a l w a ys p r e p a r e a r a n g e o f t h i n g s t i o n s co m p a r e d t o w h a t w e a r e u se d t o . S o m e t o d o a n d a ct i vi t i e s t h a t su i t t h e sp a ce . I n t h e ch i l d r e n may officially have two mothers, for cr e a t i ve a r e a , w e m a ke t h i n g s, p a i n t , g l u e , cu t e x a m p l e , a n d t h e y c o m e t o u s w h e r e m e n a n d w o m e n h a v e e q u a l r i g h t s . Th e y h a v e t o a n d p r o d u ce so m e t h i n g cr e a t i ve . I ’ m a l w a ys co m i n g u p w i t h so m e t h i n g . Th e e a si e st t h i n g s a c c e p t t h a t , i f y o u d o n ’ t a c c e p t i t , y o u g e t a r e p i ct u r e s t o co l o u r i n . I a l w a ys a sk t h e ki d s k i c k e d o u t . B a s i c a l l y , i f s o m e o n e d o e s n ’ t w h a t t h e y w a n t t o d o , w h a t t h e y w a n t t o d o n e xt b e h a v e , t h e n y o u h a v e t o s i t o u t f o r a d a y o r fo r a n h o u r. A n d n o t b e h a v in g m e a n s w e e k. An d t h e y sa y , n e xt w e e k w e w a n t t o h a ve a p i ct u r e o f a n I n d i a n g i r l t o co l o u r i n – a n d h i t t i n g o t h e r c h i l d r e n , s p i t t i n g , i n s u l t i n g , I g e t t h a t f o r t h e m . Or w e m a ke o u r o w n p l a y d i s r e s p e c t i n g t h e i r c a r e - g i v e r s . Vi o l e n c e i s d o u g h , a n d t h e ch i l d r e n kn e a d i n t e r e st i n g t h i n g s n o t t o l e r a t e d . a n d l e a ve t h e m t o d r y so t h e y ca n so m e t h i n g Ve r b a l v i o l e n c e i s n o t t o l e r a t e d , n o r i s sm a l l t h e y m a d e t h e m se l ve s t o p l a y w i t h . s c r e a m i n g , d e s t r o y i n g t h i n g s , n o n e o f i t . I C h ild r e n a r e a llo w e d in th e r o o m fr o m th r e e o f t e n t h in k h o w c a n y o u m a k e t h e s e c h ild r e n u n d e r s ta n d th a t w e h a v e v e r y d iffe r e n t ye a r s t o t w e l ve . I t ’ s q u i t e a l a r g e a g e g a p , w h i ch sometimes makes it a bit difficult. You often r u l e s a n d v a l u e s . A n d h o w c a n y o u b e a n g r y w ith th e m fo r n o t a c c e p tin g a n d a d o p tin g h a ve t o h a ve a w i d e r a n g e o f t h i n g s o n o f f e r so t h a t r i g h t a w a y ? Th e y p l a y a n d l e a r n i n t h e everyone can find something they want. I ’ m ve r y n e w t o t h e r e cr e a t i o n r o o m . W e u su a l l y c r e a t i v e o r s u p p o r t a r e a s , t h e n t h e y g o u p t o d o d i f f e r e n t m o ve m e n t g a m e s. Th e y l o ve p l a yi n g t h e i r f a m i l i e s , w h e r e e v e r y t h i n g i s d i f f e r e n t Fire, Water, Lightning. I a l w a ys ca l l o u t t h e a g a i n , o t h e r r u l e s a p p l y a n d t h e y a r e t r e a t e d differently. That’s the biggest conflict co m m a n d s i n t h e r o o m . I f I sa y “ Fi r e ! ” , yo u h a ve t o r u n t o o n e w a l l , i f I sa y “ W a t e r ! ” yo u r u n t o t h e o t h e r w a l l a n d i f I sa y “ L i g h t n i n g ! ” yo u h a ve p o te n tia l lu r k in g th e r e . t o st o p . I t ’ s si m p l e , b u t a l o t o f f u n . Or w e p l a y so m e t h i n g l i ke Hacky Sack. I n t h e yo u t h a r e a , we often make smoothies or watch films. With t h e yo u t h s w e p a y sp e ci a l a t t e n t i o n t o m a ke su r e t h e y g e t w h a t t h e y w a n t , w e d o a s m u ch w i t h t h e m a s p o si b l e . An d t h e r e ’ s a l so a n i ce

Milena, 23, Asylum Centre Insider

t h e hc i l d r e n o p e n l y a n d e q u a l l y w h e r e p o si b l e . We also want to show them that they have the chance to live the way they want – and that they don’t necessarily have to live as their parents do. One of the older boys, Amar, I have totally taken to heart. He’s a boy from Afghanistan, he has three brothers, all younger than him, and he gives his all into caring for them. The youngest brother is slightly handicapped, he comes to us in the children’s area. Although he’s ten, he often wets himself, which makes his parents angry at him. Amar really does everything for his brothers, at the same time he’s also very good at school. Many of the refugees can’t be bothered with classes, perhaps because they didn’t go at home and some of them had to work from the age of twelve. Amar even goes to a grammar school now. He is so engaged and has the desire to be successful here

E M PA How do children live in an asylum centre?

They’re always stuck between two worlds. You have to treat

somehow, to play his part. It’s so impressive how he cares about his siblings.

Hard family stories are the norm here.

Amar’s big sister was killed by the Taliban. The mother is severely traumatised, she has been living in Germany for three or four years now, and once told me that she is only still alive so that her sons can somehow get a good start in Germany – she herself is dead inside. Amar is so strong and somehow keeps his head held high. He told me that even though he’s at the grammar school, he probably can’t do his A levels because he doesn’t speak French or Spanish. He speaks four languages, but not the right ones. So, he has to go to college and get a language, which he doesn’t really want to do. Amar is my role model. How he shrugs off the setbacks … Such a good person, who is also there for others. It’s not often you meet people like that.


153

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Chapter 5: Journey

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Chapter 5: Journey

Roald Dahl, the son of Norwegian parents, was born on 13 September 1916 in Llandaff near Cardiff in Wales. Because he was the only son amongst several sisters, he was simply called “boy”. Boy is also the title of his memories of childhood, both happy and sad. One of the most traumatic ordeals of his young life was surely the loss of one of his sisters followed just a few weeks later by the death of his beloved father. “Boy” went to Repton, a posh public school that he hated, before completing a commercial apprenticeship at the Shell Oil Company in London, which he liked rather more because he was often out on assignments, which sometimes took him as far as Africa. At the outbreak of the Second World War, he enlisted as a pilot in the Royal Air Force and served in Africa, Greece and the Near East. After having been seriously wounded, he became attached to the British Embassy in Washington where he began to write. To begin with, he wrote largely as a form of therapy and mainly about his experiences as a flyer, but the critics were impressed. Dahl remained in the USA after the war and enjoyed success as a Hollywood scriptwriter (e.g. on the James Bond film You Only Live Twice) and author of short stories. An ever-growing public

t h e

loved the macabre fantasy of his tales. In 1961, his brilliant career as an author of children’s books was launched with James and the Giant Peach. There followed a virtual assembly line of witty, imaginative, often creepily beautiful (but never banal or cosy) stories for children and their parents: Matilda, The Witches, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, The BFG – all featuring unforgettable characters like Augustus Gloop, Willy Wonka, The Notsobig Crocodile and the OompaLoompas. And, of course, he invented the three horrible farmers, Boggis, Bunce and Bean, and their crafty archenemy, the Fantastic Mr. Fox. The fantastic Mr. Dahl died on 23 November 1990 in Oxford.

JOUR b o y

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While millions more, that every heart impress, Still brighten up throughout eternal space. O Power Almighty! whence these beings shine, All wisdom’s lost in comprehending thine.

The countless numbers speak a Deity: In numbers numberless the skies are crown’d, And still they’re nothing which my sight can see, When science, searching through her aiding glass, In seeming blanks to me can millions trace;

O who can witness with a careless eye The countless lamps that light an evening sky, And not be struck with wonder at the sight! To think what mighty Power must there abound, That burns each spangle with a steady light, And guides each hanging world its rolling round. What multitudes my misty eye have found;

A Look At The Heavens by John Clare

Chapter 5: Journey

RNEY

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It’s muktuk today!

Chapter 5: Journey

Six favourite children’s recipes from different continents which we found on the wonderful website diercke.de: Cheveux d’anges (Angel Hair) Algeria, Africa A must on every Algerian child’s birthday party! Ingredients: 500 g Kadayif (a dough available ready-made in specialist Arab or Turkish shops), 500 g margarine, 250 g roughly chopped walnuts, ½ litre water, 500 g sugar, the juice of ½ lemon, and 1 shot of rose water. To make Angel Hair: tear the dough into pieces, melt the margarine and knead with the pieces of dough. Put half the dough mixture into a greased roasting tin and sprinkle with walnuts. Lay the second half on top and press firmly together. Bake for about 40 minutes at 160 degrees until the surface is golden brown. For the syrup, heat the water and sugar for 1 hour. As the syrup thickens, add the lemon juice and rose water and pour over the cooked cake while still hot. After about 1 hour, the syrup will be absorbed. Divide the Angel Hair into portions and Baked Beans serve to your delighted guests. England, Europe For non- English children an absurdity, for Briti sh youth a kind of happiness in a tin: buy 1 tin of baked beans (e.g. Heinz Blubber ba ked beans) from a ic th Amer Canada, Nor ow ” from w h, “o th d e supermarket. ne it a stun This may elic ld: children or w He e at th the beans in a of e rest children in th t whale fat, saucep ea ly on t no an and serve nada in Northern Ca on wh . ite w toasted t it ra they often ea bread. Enjoy.

Dulce de leche Argentina, South America This super-sweet milk is enjoyed by children all over South America but particularly in Argentina. It’s given as a kind of sedative by stressed parents to their little ones. Dulce de leche is so frightfully sweet that it keeps children quiet for hours. To make it you will need: 1 litre milk, 1 kg sugar and ½ teaspoon vanilla powder. Mix it all together in a pan and let it simmer for 1–2 hours, stirring frequently so it doesn’t burn, until this sickly mixture is golden brown and becomes firm. Ideal for spreading on bread or as it is with fruit.

JOUR 156

Muktuk Arctic zone Muktuk is a traditional food of the Inuit people. The outer skin of the white whale is cut into platesized pieces and cooked, or eaten raw by hardcore little Inuit. See “Blubber”, Canada. Muktuk is said to taste like coconut or hazelnuts.

na pudding) Barfi (colourful semoli Sri Lanka, Asia n dish is more popular tha Natives insist that this , na oli sem t ea wh g e 500 the national holiday. Tak d un gro ly ne fi ar, 100 g ½ litre milk, 200 g sug ast ly chopped raisins. Ro ne fi g 0 10 cashew nuts, , tes nu mi 5 heat for the semolina over a low the h a wooden spoon. At wit y usl uo stirring contin te ara sep a in il bo lk to the same time, bring the mi ue tin Con er. eth two tog saucepan then mix the for about 10 minutes, at he low a r to cook ove til the mixture thickens stirring continuously, un cy. Gradually add the to a porridge consisten o Divide the porridge int rest of the ingredients. 1/ red r ou col 3 to ourings 3 portions. Use food col al l third retains its natur na fi The 1 w. and /3 yello er, lay lly efu car 5 hours semolina colour. After to cool. Before serving, set d an er press togeth slices in the pan. briefly reheat in small


Chapter 5: Journey

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RNEY Photo Casey McKee

01 The system: Sweatshop

02 Elements of the system: Adult workers Children and youth workers Overseers Global companies

03 Sub-systems: Amateur trade unionists who want to improve the situation selectively Spies who watch the above 04 How the system remains functional and alive: Poverty Need Hope Pressure Greed Share price and business figures

05 How integration of the individual elements is achieved: Work till you drop Just do, don’t ask Turning a blind eye Unscrupulousness 06 Important interaction: Cheap workforce/subsistence wage 07 Where differentiation from the surrounding world is particularly obvious: On the edge of legality Or even illegal (child labour) 08 Interdependence of the individual elements of the system: High on the one hand: The workers and child workers depend on the small amount of money. Medium on the other hand: The global companies use their profits to make even more profits due to even lower wage costs. Given their position, it could also be done differently. 09 Possible cause for a system crisis: Public ostracism (including consumer boycott) of the “sweatshop” system by way of increased news coverage and exposure.

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Es geht um den 20-jährigen verhinderten Bankangestellten Simon Tanner, der auf der Suche nach seinem Platz im Leben ist. Seine vier Geschwister, die smarte Lehrerin Hedwig, der strenge Gelehrte und Doktor Klaus, der schöngeistige Maler Kaspar und der irre gewordene Emil … können ihm dabei so gut wie gar nicht helfen. Simons Weg ist steinig, aber nicht schwer (für ihn). Er geht ihn mit freakiger Lockerheit. Schon am Anfang wird klar, wie isoliert Simon, der Innerliche, in der Welt steht. Mit dem modernen Arbeitsleben und seiner Tendenz zur Funktionalisierung des Menschen kann er nämlich nichts anfangen. Er weigert sich, Teil des großen Entfremdungsprozesses zu werden. Da er mit sehr wenig (Geld) auskommen kann, schlendert er von einer Anstellung zur nächsten, geht jeder Karrieregelegenheit konsequent aus dem Weg. Er wird Buchhandlungsgehilfe, Krankenwärter, arbeitet bei einem Advokaten, findet eine Anstellung bei einem Bankhaus von Weltrang, versucht sich als Journalist und beteiligt sich an der Inventur in einer großen Maschinenfabrik. Er bleibt nie lange. Oft ist er bizarr dreist gegenüber der Obrigkeit (den Chefs). „Ich bin noch überall, wo ich gewesen bin, (…) bald weitergegangen, weil es mir nicht behagt hat, meine jungen Kräfte versauern zu lassen in der Enge und Dumpfheit von Schreibstuben.“

Sein Bruder Kaspar ist Simon der nächste. „Wir sind nur zufällig Brüder, aber Freunde sind wir mit Bewusstsein, und das ist viel wertvoller.“ Mit Kaspar wohnt er am Stadtrand bei Klara Agappaia, einer schönen, geheimnisvollen, bisweilen von epileptischen Anfällen geplagten Frau, die beide Brüder liebt. Kaspar, der Maler, hat aber Probleme mit einer festen Verbindung zu Klara. Er möchte vor allem der Kunst dienen („Kunst ist der Erklärungsversuch des Unerklärlichen“).

Text: Heiko SC H ULZ

Auch Simon hält es nicht lange bei Klara aus. Nach einer mehrtägigen Winterwanderung gelangt er in das Dorf, in dem seine Schwester Hedwig ein leicht

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frustriertes Lehrerinnendasein führt. Simon bleibt bis zum Sommer bei ihr, liegt im Gras, sinniert vor sich hin, hält den Haushalt in Ordnung und macht sich Sorgen, dass ihn die sesshafte Schwester als Tagedieb fortjagen wird.

Der älteste Bruder Klaus kommt zu Besuch und nimmt sich Simon zur Brust. Simons Flatterhaftigkeit, seine dauernden Berufswechsel gefallen dem Ältesten gar nicht, aber richtig böse kann er dem kleinen Bruder auch nicht sein. Hedwig und Simon sind froh, als der „gestrenge Inspektor“ wieder fort ist, und vertrödeln weiter Zeit miteinander. Hedwig verachtet Simon allerdings ein wenig („Du hast etwas Blödes und Unzurechnungsfähiges“) und jagt ihn schließlich tatsächlich fort.

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Vielleicht machen Sie sich die Arbeit, in die nächste Buchhandlung oder ins Internet zu gehen. Um sich die Geschwister Tanner zu kaufen oder zu bestellen. Es lohnt sich. Schon Walsers Kollege Kafka hat mal über Simon Tanner gesagt: „Läuft er nicht überall herum, glücklich bis an die Ohren, und es wird am Ende nichts aus ihm als das Vergnügen des Lesers?“

Simon trifft Klara auch in Wirklichkeit wieder. Sie ist Fürsorgerin für die Armen geworden und übt das Amt mit fürstinnenhafter Würde aus. Simon aber denkt nicht daran, sein Leben als Träumerle zu ändern. Sein Credo ist gleichermaßen seine Untauglichkeitsentschuldigung: „Ich habe den Tag als zu schön empfunden, als dass ich den Übermut hätte besitzen können, um ihn durch Arbeit zu entweihen.“

Außer seinen Geschwistern begegnet Simon aber auch neuen Menschen, nach seiner Rückkehr in die Stadt zum Beispiel der Vermieterin Frau Weiß. Er legt sich ins gemachte (Miet-)Bett und träumt von Klara. Sie ist Zauberin geworden und präsentiert ihm die Geschwister wie folgt: Klaus schreibt an seinem Lebenswerk. Hedwig liegt tot da, sie hat ausgelitten. Kaspar darf beim Kreieren nicht gestört werden.

Zurück in der Stadt und nach nur drei Wochen wieder aus dem Dienst einer Dame entlassen, hört Simon eines Tages im Wirtshaus, wie von einem jungen Mann berichtet wird. Es geht offensichtlich um seinen Bruder Emil, der zunächst ein Lehrerseminar besuchte, reicher Leute Kinder unterrichtete, sich mit seinem Direktor zerstritt, nach Italien und England ging, Politiker, Dichter, Dramatiker, Komponist, Zeichner, zuletzt wieder Lehrer war – und schließlich geisteskrank und Irrenhäusler wurde. Die Ähnlichkeit mit Simons Mentalität ist deutlich: „Nirgends konnte man ihn lange gebrauchen.“

Robert WALSER, Ende der 1890er Jahre

ICH HABE SO EIN GELENKIGES GEFÜHL ÜBER ROBERT WALSERS ROMAN GESCHWISTER TANNER — Robert Walser, selber eins von acht Geschwistern, hat Geschwister Tanner Anfang 1906 in nur sechs Wochen in Berlin geschrieben.

JOUR Simon geht, denkt, träumt und redet viel und intensiv: über die Angst vor dem Dunkeln und über die Vergesslichkeit Gottes zum Beispiel. Wenn er sozialen Kontakt hat, dann vor allem zu seinen Geschwistern.

Chapter 5: Journey


Chapter 5: Journey

RNEY Big Journey

A nine-year-old American runaway made it alone from Seattle (Washington State) to San Antonio (State of Texas). A distance of 3000 kilometres. He travelled with two planes and a car. Nobody knows where he learnt to drive.

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Vol. 50 Between the lines Best of essays (rearranged)

Sources Joe Barnard: I remember Julian Barnes: Nothing to be frightened of. bbc.com brainyquote.com Brewer’s Dictionary of modern Phrase & Fable, 2nd Edition Roald Dahl. The boy. dradio.de Die freien Enzyklopädien artcyclopedia, brauchwiki.de, indiepedia und wikipedia Jonathan Franzen: Die Unruhezone Geo Magazin Hans Ullrich Gumbrecht: Lob des Sports janusz-korczak.de juicemagazine.com Franz Kafka: Brief an den Vater Kindlers Neues Literaturlexikon Janusz Korczak: Wie man ein Kind liebt Vladimir Nabokov: Speak, Memory. nationalgeographic.de  nytimes.com perlentaucher.de Carlo Petrini: Slow Food. Genießen mit Verstand Reto U. Schneider: Das Buch der verrückten Experimente Ben Schott: Schotts Sammelsurium, Essen und Trinken slowfood.de ted.com terredeshommes.org theguardian.com vice.com Robert Walser: Geschwister Tanner To A Dead Tree, Birds in Alarm, The Ants, & A Look At The Heavens by John Clare Drawings by Jasper, Lily & May Kröger

Page 01 Photo: ullstein bild – Teutopress John McEnroe, tennis player, USA – July 1987 Illustration: Martin Fengel Page 02 Vladimir Nabokov Speak, Memory London: Penguin Books, 2000 Page 03 Illustration: Martin Fengel

Page 04 ullstein bild – Meller Marcovicz Warhol, Andy – pop artist, film producer, USA – in front of a painting by Arnold Böcklin (Im Spiel der Wellen, 1883), Pinakothek, Munich, 1971

Page 14 Julian Barnes Nothing to Be Frightened of London: Vintage Books, 2009

Page 08 Joe Brainard I Remember New York: Granary Books, 2011

Page 18 Illustration: Martin Fengel

Page 15 Illustration: Stefhany Yepes Lozano

Page 19 Photos: Martin Fengel

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Page 21 Photos: Martin Fengel Page 23 Illustration: Stefhany Yepes Lozano Page 25 Photos: Martin Fengel Page 26 Illustration: Thea Barkhoff Page 28 Illustration: Martin Fengel


50 issues full of love, hope, beauty, courage, diversity, joy, attention, depth, sensitivity, energy and poetry. The Photography in kid’s wear. A retrospection.


Markus Jans, Vol. 19, 2004/05


Mark Borthwick, Vol. 19, 2004/05


Mark Borthwick, Vol. 50, 2020


Achim Lippoth, Vol. 19, 2004/05


Shelby Lee Adams, Vol. 50, 2020 (The Rooster, 2013)


Martin Parr, Vol. 50, 2020, Berlin, 2002 Š Martin Parr / Magnum Photos


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Mike MeirĂŠ, Vol Vol.. 50, 2020 V


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Nan Goldin, Vol. 23, 2006/07


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Lise Sarfati, Vol. 23, 2006/07


Anton Corbijn, Vol. 23, 2006/07


Anton Corbijn, Vol. 50, 2020


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Takashi Homma, Vol. 50, 2020


Nan Goldin, Vol. 24, 2007


Nan Goldin, Vol. 24, 2007


Nan Goldin, Vol. 24, 2007


Hellen van Meene, Vol. 24, 2007


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Jun Takashi, Vol. 24, 2007


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Heji Shin, Vol. 25, 2007/08


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Bruce Weber, Vol. 25, 2007/08


Justine Kurland, Vol. 25, 2007/08


Charles Bukowski, Vol. 25, 2007/08


Richard Kern, Vol. 25, 2007/08


Beat Streuli, Vol. 25, 2007/08


Beat Streuli, Vol. 50, 2020


Mike MeirĂŠ, Vol. 26, 2008


Hellen van Meene, Vol. 26, 2008


Ari Marcopoulos, Vol. 26, 2008


Nan Goldin, Vol. 26, 2008


Manuela Pavesi, Vol. 26, 2008


Mike Meire, Vol. 26, 2008


Ed Templeton, Vol. 26, 2008


Anuschka Blommers & Niels Schumm, Vol. 26, 2008


Jessica Craig-Martin, Vol. 27, 2008/09


Achim Lippoth, Vol. 28, 2009


Oliver Sieber, Vol. 28, 2009


MikeOliver Meiré, Vol. 28, Sieber, 20082009


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Vol.29

FASHION, LIFE AND CULTURE

Anuschka Blommers & Niels Schumm, Nan Goldin, Achim Lippoth, Mike Meiré, Manuela Pavesi, Ronald Stoops, Bruce Weber, Sascha Weidner

Autumn/Winter 2009/10

Youth & Media

Photo BRUCE WEBER


Manuela Pavesi, Vol. 29, 2009/10


ily

Photo Nan Goldin

F am

Nan Goldin, Vol. 30, 2010

Geburztaklit: LiBa Papa wir Liben Dichso ser ALZ GeburztakKint feltes Dir sicher Schwer Aba es Get Hin und Her Der Kuchen stet Bereit und ale schnapen zu Ja Daz war Das Geburztaklit Fon papa Ja JuHu HeBi Birztei JuHu ( B irt hd a y s o n gw rit t en b y L ily ,7 , f o rh erf a t her) SubTEENAGE 2010


Achim Lippoth, Vol. 31, 2010/11


Achim Lippoth, Vol. 31, 2010/11


Nan Goldin

Nan Goldin, Vol. 31, 2010/11


Ingar Krauss, Vol. 50, 2020


Ryan McGinley, Vol. 31, 2010/11


Mike MeirĂŠ, Vol. 32, 2011


Mike MeirĂŠ, Vol. 33, 2012


Miles Aldridge, Vol. 33, 2012


dress MONNALISA

GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOL IN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOL IN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOL IN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOL IN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOL IN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN 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GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOL IN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOL IN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOL Nan Goldin, Vol.NAN 33, GOLDIN 2011/12 NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN IN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN


LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN

NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN LDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN NAN GOLDIN


Nan Goldin, Vol. 33, 2011/12


Michel Comte, Vol. 34, 2012


Bruce Weber, Vol. 35, 2012/13


Achim Lippoth, Vol. 36, 2013


AUTUMN/WINTER 2013/14

VOL. 37

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Tolia und Uwe Tobias, Vol. 37, 2013/14


Michel Comte, Vol. 38, 2014


Daniel Riera, Vol. 38, 2014


Beat Streuli, Vol. 39, 2014/15


Jonas Unger, Vol. 39, 2014/15


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Alice Neale, Vol. 40, 2015

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Martin Parr, Vol. 40, 2015


Pierpaolo Ferrari, Vol. 41, 2015/16


Zoe Ghertner, Vol. 42, 2016


Mike MeirĂŠ, Vol. 42, 2016


Jessica Craig-Martin, Vol. 42, 2016


Eva Baales, Vol. 42, 2016


Henrike Stahl, Vol. 44, 2017


Takashi Homma, Vol. 47, 2018/19


Jelka von Langen, Vol. 48, 2019


I ON , V OL . 4 8 FAS H L I FE AN D C U L TU RE S P RI N G / 1 9 S U M ME R 2 0 48

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2nd Edition P.Leisure Industries Mike MeirĂŠ pleisureindustries.com


Profile for kid's wear Magazine

kid's wear Magazine VOL.50  

The 25th Anniversary Issue - With a little yelp of delight we proudly present kid's wear Magazine Vol. 50! Since 1995, the kid’s wear concep...

kid's wear Magazine VOL.50  

The 25th Anniversary Issue - With a little yelp of delight we proudly present kid's wear Magazine Vol. 50! Since 1995, the kid’s wear concep...