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MARCH 2017 VOL.24 NO.02

Wrestle Mania!

It’s pin or be pinned on the wrestling mat. My son, and my daughter, love this intense sport. BY CATHY RESMER, P. 18

The Costs and Benefits of Paid Family Leave

PAGE 21

NEW TO KVT

The Best Calendar for Vermont Parents Gets Better Activity Section 'Just For Kids' PAGE 24

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CENTER SECTION


Outstanding Academics • Inspired Learning • Project-based Learning • Individual Learning Goals • Literacy & Math • STEM • Global Studies • Digital Literacy • Art • Music • Spanish • PE

Your child. Your orthodontist.

ORTHODONTICS

DRS. DRS.PETERSON, PETERSON,RYAN RYAN & & EATON EATON

Whether you’re considering clear aligners, retainers or today’s braces, an orthodontist is the smart choice. Orthodontists are specialists in straightening teeth and aligning your bite. They have two to three years of education beyond dental school. So they’re experts at helping you get a great smile—that feels great, too.

Braces for Children & Adults — champlainortho.net ST. ALBANS OFFICE 80 Mapleville Depot 527-7100

WILLISTON OFFICE 277 Blair Park Road 878-5323

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Now enrolling for Fall, 2017 Limited spaces available. Applications due March 15th. Contact us soon to schedule a tour. Check out our website for summer camp offerings! Visit our website vtdayschool.org for more information. Email: info@vtdayschool.org. Phone: 495-5150 • 6701 Shelburne Road, Shelburne k4t-vermontdayschool0317.indd 1

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Planning to send the kids to camp this summer?

Braces for Children and Adults Burlington Williston St. Albans 862-6721 878-5323 527-7100 www.champlainortho.net

A Lifestyle Loan from NEFCU can help!

Whether your child is going to art, soccer, science or adventure camp you can cover your camp

Call 866-80-loans, visit nefcu.com or stop by any branch.

MARCH 2017

KIDSVT.COM

expenses with a Lifestyle Loan from NEFCU.

KIDS VT

Local, affordable, and on your side™. 800-400-8790 · nefcu.com Federally Insured by NCUA

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Academics—Service—Values Call to schedule a tour 802-658-3992 Preschool-Grade 8 Follow us

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Vermont Ballet Theater School presents Celebration of Dance 2017!

Classes & Camps

Our annual showcase of talent from ages 4 through pre-professional will dance their way onto the Flynn Main Stage in Burlington for 2 exciting performances,

• Week-long ballet themed camps for ages 3-9; Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Nutcracker and more!

• Weekly ballet classes for young dancers - adults - beginner - advanced • Ongoing yoga and fitness classes for adults

VBT Summer Intensive 2017 Auditions Sat. March 11th for ages 8 & up. Visit website or call for details!

KIDS VT

This summer come dance with the best at VBTS! For schedule and enrollment information, visit us at WWW.VBTS.ORG, or call 878-2941, or email INFO@VBTS.ORG

MARCH 2017

For show & ticket information visit www.vbts.org.

• Week-long ballet Mini-Intensive for ages 12-18, for the serious dancer looking to stay in shape for various summer-long intensives

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Saturday May 27, 2017 at 1:00 & 6:30 pm.

2017 SUMMER

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SATURDAY, MARCH 18

presented by

KIDSVT.COM

SWALE | ROUGH FRANCIS | MADAILA JAMES KOCHALKA SUPERSTAR DWIGHT & NICOLE | BRASS BALAGAN HIGHER GROUND | Doors at 12:00 p.m

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tickets: highergroundmusic.com, at the Higher Ground Box Office or 877-987-6487

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STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS

EDITOR’S NOTE

STAFF QUESTION

What’s Your Favorite Way to Eat Maple Syrup?

COPUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Cathy Resmer

cathy@kidsvt.com COPUBLISHER

Colby Roberts

colby@kidsvt.com MANAGING EDITOR

Alison Novak

alison@kidsvt.com

I like making Brussels sprouts with bacon and maple syrup drizzle.

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Meredith Coeyman meredith@kidsvt.com

— KAITLIN MONTGOMERY, ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

ART DIRECTOR

Brooke Bousquet brooke@kidsvt.com

MARKETING & EVENTS MANAGER

I like to pour it on vanilla ice cream and pancakes.

Corey Grenier

corey@kidsvt.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

— COLBY ROBERTS, COPUBLISHER

Kaitlin Montgomery kaitlin@kidsvt.com

CALENDAR WRITER

My favorite is maple syrup on waffles, but I also love it as a glaze on ham.

Brett Stanciu

brett@kidsvt.com PROOFREADERS

Carolyn Fox, Katherine Isaacs, Elizabeth Seyler PRODUCTION MANAGER

— MATT WEINER, CIRCULATION MANAGER

John James CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Don Eggert DESIGNERS

Charlotte Scott, Rev. Diane Sullivan CIRCULATION MANAGER

Matt Weiner BUSINESS MANAGER

Cheryl Brownell CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Dan Bolles, Sarah Galbraith, Rachel Elizabeth Jones, Astrid Lague, Nicci Micco, Ken Picard, Erinn Simon, Autumn Spencer, Jessica Lara Ticktin PHOTOGRAPHERS

Matthew Thorsen, Tristan Von Duntz ILLUSTRATOR

Kym Balthazar P.O. BOX 1184 BURLINGTON, VT 05402 802-985-5482 KIDSVT.COM

Published 11x per year. Circulation: 25,000 at 600+ locations throughout northern and central Vermont. © 2017 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.

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— BRETT STANCIU, CALENDAR WRITER

CONTRIBUTOR’S NOTE

KIDS VT

Marc Nadel (Maple Maze, page 35) is an award-winning illustrator whose work has been published by Highlights for Children, Harcourt Publishing, Business Week, Random House and many other publications. He was the winner of the 2016 Vermont Design Award from AIGA Vermont for his caricatures in Seven Days. He has illustrated many children’s books, including Penelope Niven’s Carl Sandburg: Adventures of a Poet, and his portraits of poets appeared in Another Jar of Tiny Stars from Boyds Mills Press. Mr. Nadel is a lifetime member of the Painting Group in New York City, founded by his mentors, David Levine and Aaron Shikler. He has used the methods learned there to teach the traditional arts at Champlain College where, in 2015, he was recognized with the Francine Page Excellence in Teaching Award.

MARCH 2017

hether it’s a new backpack, a dramatically different hairstyle or a vacation to someplace you’ve never been before, change can be good — and result in a renewed sense of purpose and enthusiasm. In that spirit, we bring you a new-and-improved version of Kids VT this month. A little backstory: When Seven Days bought Kids VT in 2010, we overhauled the publication. Since then, we’ve made tweaks here and there, but no major alterations. We thought it was time to refresh our pages with new fonts, design elements and editorial content. So what’s new in this issue? On page 8, you’ll find “Short Stuff,” which includes a humorous advice column, helpful parenting hacks from our readers, and a “Trending” section with commentary on family-related local and national news. We’ve also decided to alternate some of our regular columns month to month. Our calendar looks a little different as well. Now, under each day of the month, you’ll see events filtered by county rather than category. And we have special colored boxes within the calendar that round up live performances, seasonal activities, gatherings geared to new parents and more. Starting on page 35, you’ll notice a section called “Just For Kids.” That’s where you’ll find our coloring and writing contests, contest winners, and kids’ activities. We’ve also got a brand-new interactive puzzle by illustrator extraordinaire Marc Nadel (see contributor’s note at right). This month, it’s an ooey-gooey maple maze. Just like last month, we’ve got a handy pullout camp guide with lots of info about local day and overnight programs. It’s time to start planning for summer, if you haven’t already! We’d love to know what you think about our latest changes. Drop us a note at ideas@kidsvt.com.

KIDSVT.COM

Editorial content in Kids VT is for general informational purposes. Parents must use their own discretion for following the advice in any editorial piece. Acceptance of advertising does not constitute service/product endorsement. Kids VT is a proud member of the Parenting Media Association. Kids VT distribution is audited for accuracy. Da Capo Publishing shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Da Capo Publishing may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Da Capo Publishing reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers.

Like Our New Look?

Fry thick-cut bacon, drain off the excess grease and drizzle with maple syrup while the bacon is still hot in the pan. Heat just slightly to glaze. The bacon is delicious on top of fresh spring greens.

ALISON NOVAK, MANAGING EDITOR 5


Want to Quit Smoking? VCBH can help

The Vermont Center on Behavior and Health is conducting a study to help mothers quit smoking. With your participation, you could earn up to $1,310. If you have at least one child under the age of 12, you may qualify for this study. To see if you qualify, go online at http://j.mp/1MSDgeE to take our online survey or call (802) 656-1906 to learn more about this study.

Thinking ahead? Add college savings to your plan.

Give your kids a jump on the future. Get your family a VT income tax credit. By saving for college, you’re creating opportunities that will last a lifetime. With Vermont’s state-sponsored 529 college savings program, you can open an account with as little as $25, and the Vermont Higher Education Investment Plan is the only college savings plan that qualifies families for a 10% Vermont income tax credit on annual contributions.

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Start saving now with as little as $25! Open an account or give a gift online today. vheip.org/529gift | 1-800-637-5860

MARCH 2017

KIDSVT.COM

ST. ALBANS, VERMONT

2017

EVENT MMERCHAMBER SUVERMONT OF COMMERCE

Sponsored by

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April 28th–30th

Generously Sponsored in Part by:

VHEIP is sponsored by the Vermont Student Assistance Corporation, a public nonprofit established by the Vermont Legislature in 1965 to help Vermont students and families plan and pay for college. VHEIP investment management is provided by Intuition College Savings Solutions, LLC. Consider the investment objectives, risks, charges, and expenses before investing and read the disclosure booklet (available online at vheip.org or by calling 800-637-5860). Investments in VHEIP are neither insured nor guaranteed, and there is the risk of investment loss. Before investing in a 529 plan, you should consider whether the state you or your designated beneficiary reside in or have taxable income in has a 529 plan that offers favorable state income tax or other benefits that are available only if you invest in that state’s 529 plan.

Illustration © Doug Ross

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51 and Let It Run

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Mylan Technologies Inc.~TD Bank~Price Chopper~CDL USA~WOKO WKOL WIZN WBTZ~ WCAX TV Lapierre USA~ Eagle Country.~Hannaford Supermarkets~Peoples Trust Co.~New England Federal Credit Union Leader Evaporator~Georgia Mountain Maples~Peoples United Bank~Coca-Cola NNE~Farm Family Ins. Butternut Mountain Farm~Vermont Maple Sugar Makers’ Assn.~Northwestern Medical Center~Community National Bank Yankee Farm Credit~Co-operative Ins. Cos.~Maple Fields~Hillside Plastics~ And ALL Our Supporting Sponsors!

Tap into all there is to SEE, LEARN, SAVOR and DO!

WWW.VTMAPLEFESTIVAL.ORG

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MARCH 2017 MATTHEW THORSEN

Summer Camp What advice do you give to nervous parents? CENTER PULLOUT

Calendar 24 Daily Listings 25 Maple Events 26 Live Performances 27 Classes 28 Science & Nature 29 New Parents 30 Story Times 32 Playgroups 33 Ongoing Exhibits

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M A RC H YHEM MA ese & Wine Sa Che

Great deals of up to 60% off throughout the store all week long! MARCH 17-26

1186 Williston Rd. So. Burlington, VT 05403 (Next to the Alpine Shop) 802.863.0143 Open 7 days 10am-7pm cheeseandwinetraders.com

MATTHEW THORSEN

It’s pin or be pinned on the wrestling mat. My son, and my daughter, love this intense sport.

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Investing in Nesting Vermont businesses, big and small, offer family-friendly policies for employees who welcome a new child. “This is good for society,” says Sascha Mayer, cofounder of Mamava, one of the companies featured.

le!

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Just for Kids 35 Maple Maze 36 Writing Contest 36 37 38 38

& Winners Coloring Contest Winners Coloring Contest Puzzle Page Birthday Club

On the Cover

Staff Question Contributor’s Note

MARCH 2017 VOL.24 NO.02

Wrestle Mania!

It’s pin or be pinned on the wrestling mat. My son, and my daughter, love this intense sport. BY CATHY RESMER, P. 18

The Costs and Benefits of Paid Family Leave

PAGE 21

CENTER SECTION

NEW TO KVT

The Best Calendar for Vermont Parents Gets Better Activity Section 'Just For Kids' PAGE 24

KIDS VT

PAGE 35

Kym Balthazar created a photo illustration of an action-packed wrestling match for this month’s cover.

Norwich, VT | Open daily 10 am – 5 pm

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Kids Say What? Throwback Parenting Hacks #InstaKidsVT Trending Kids Beat

FREE

MARCH 2017

Short Stuff Autumn Answers 8

Columns 11 One to Watch 12 Fit Families 13 Bookworms 14 Balancing Act 15 Destination Recreation 16 Mealtime 34 Habitat 39 Use Your Words

KIDSVT.COM

Welcome Editor’s Note 5

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CALENDAR CLUES

What’s the right age to give your child a cellphone?

AUTUMN ANSWERS

clips. So it makes sense that our kids want phones, too. It’s up to parents to decide when the time is right. Here’s what we need to think about: Why are you giving your child a phone? If the purpose of the phone is safety and communication, and you’re hoping to avoid the Pandora’s box of social media for now, a simple flip phone or a TracFone is reasonable. (Side note: Your kid will definitely not think this is reasonable, so please don’t tell him or her that it was my idea, thanks.) If your child desperately wants a phone because all of her friends already have one, and they’re socializing on Instagram with her, then consider that having a smartphone is a privilege, and — you know the drill — with privilege comes responsibility. Is your child mature enough to handle that responsibility? Will he or she respect the rules? If you’re looking for a second opinion, check out the independent, nonprofit organization Common Sense Media (commonsensemedia. org). It’s a wealth of research-driven information and thoughtful parent

Remember when rotary dialing your friend’s phone number took a solid 30 seconds? Remember begging your parents to buy a longer phone cord so you could drag the whole thing into your room and talk for hours? Yeah, those days are over. Now we’re always on our phones — googling, shopping, watching SNL

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MARCH 2017

KIDSVT.COM

KIDS SAY WHAT?

“I love that scarf you’re wearing Mommy …

when you die, I’m gonna take it.” —ELENA, AGE 7

and child media reviews, organized by age group. Their Cell Phone Parenting page includes guiding questions such as: Do your kids lose things? Will they use text and photo features responsibly and not to harass or embarrass others? It’s also important to educate yourself on best practices for staying safe on the internet, and to make sure your kids know how to be internet-wise. And if you’re feeling guilty about this whole phone thing, don’t. Your kid wants a phone like we wanted someone to pass us a note during lunch or ask us to slow dance to “Stairway to Heaven,” even though nobody ever knew what to do during the fast part. Learning how to socialize is an important aspect of developing into a well-adjusted adult. Just because it’s more technological than we ever imagined, doesn’t mean it’s wrong.  In this new monthly column, comedian, writer and mom Autumn Spencer answers tricky parenting questions. Have a question for Autumn? Send it to ideas@kidsvt.com.

#INSTAKIDSVT Share a picture of your kids doing something fun during the month of March. HERE’S HOW:

 

Follow @kids_vt on Instagram Post it on Instagram with the hashtag #instakidsvt. We’ll select a photo to feature in the next issue.

Shelburne Farms Maple Sugaring Celebration

Sunday, March 19, 9 a.m.2 p.m., at Shelburne Farms, Shelburne

Mini Mud Youth Variety Show

Saturday, March 25, 7 p.m., at the Chandler Center for the Arts, Randolph

Take Apart Day

Saturday, March 11, 1-4 p.m., at the Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich

See all the March calendar listings starting on page 24.


PARENTING HACKS This month, parents share tricks they use to bring order into their hectic lives. Send your parenting hacks to ideas@kidsvt.com

EVERY IDS TO READ K Y M R O F E SAG IRROR with a I write a MES BATHROOM M IR E TH N O G ’s a chore like MORNIN Sometimes it r. ke ar m d ar dressed before whitebo undry” or “Get la e th n w do y note. “Bring a sweet or sill ’s it en ft O ex ” t. breakfas arrett, Middles — Honi Bean B

We have a CHECKLIST AND MAGNETS ON THE FRIDGE with the things the kids need to do to get ready for school and for bed. Instead of nagging them for each item, I ask them to check their chart. They move the magnets from “must do” to the “all done” column, and the last item is always hugs and kisses. We’ve had way less whining happening, and I don’t feel like I’m nagging anymore. — Christine White, Burlington

American Girl introduces its firstever boy doll, a minihipster drummer from Nashville named Logan Everett. “Logan is 100% into kraft beer and mumford and sons,” one Twitter user writes in reaction.

Saturday Night Live it-girl Kate McKinnon will voice Ms. Frizzle in Netflix’s upcoming reboot of “The Magic School Bus” series. Moms and dads all over the country say “Hallelujah.”

I keep little BASKETS IN THE CAR, ONE FOR EACH KID, with an extra full set of clothes (including hats and mittens in the winter), a few diapers, wipes and an extra pacifier for the toddler. It comes in handy! — Emily Grimes, Colchester

Licorice during pregnancy may be linked to lower I.Q. and attention deficit disorder problems in offspring, according to new research. Put down the Twizzlers, Mama.

FILE: CALEB KENNA

THROWBACK

Habitat: Model-Train Room, Ripton

Sen. Bernie Sanders held a roundtable discussion with Vermont high school finalists in his State of the Union essay contest. What a yuuuge honor!

Vermont-owned Phoenix Books acquires Woodstock’s Yankee Bookshop. The booksellers now own a quarter of the state’s 20 independent bookstores. They prefer the term “family of stores” to “chain.”

MARCH 2014

MARCH 2017 KIDS VT

Read the full story at kidsvt.com/modeltrain.

Parenting website Romper suggested Ben & Jerry’s new flavor, Oat of This Swirled, may boost milk production in lactating moms due to the presence of oats — one of the most effective galactagogues, or foods thought to increase breastmilk supply. We’re skeptical … but we just learned a new word!

KIDSVT.COM

The memory of a broken toy train from childhood spurred Paul Bortz to start collecting model trains. The exact model, a 1925 Lionel, was one of the first trains he purchased five years ago. “I went back to my childhood after I retired,” explained the 72-year-old former reverend. A father of five and grandfather of 14, he has since amassed more than 800 train cars.

TRENDING

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BY MEREDITH COEYMAN AND ALISON NOVAK

COMMUNITY

Hospitable Hosts

COURTESY OF LAURA KALP

Choice with Charlie and Quinn Kalp

Since 1877, the FRESH AIR FUND has provided more than 1.8 million New York City children with free summer experiences in suburban, rural and small-town communities on the East Coast and in southern Canada. The organization is currently looking for new Vermont families to host boys and girls, ages 7 to 12, for one to two weeks this summer — in mid-July and again in early August. The Kalp family has welcomed Choice, a Fresh Air Fund kid, to their Wolcott home for the past two summers. Laura Kalp, a teacher and mom to two schoolaged boys, says she loved the idea of adding another friend to the mix to go on summertime adventures. Choice, she said, “has become a member of our family so quickly and we will look forward to watching him grow up with our boys.” She recommends the experience to any family considering it. “We Vermonters are so proud of our little state,” she said, “and it is amazing to see its beauty through the eyes of a city kid for the first time.” —AN For more information about hosting a Fresh Air Fund child, contact Laura Davidson at 728-6456 or visit freshair.org.

MUSIC

Smooth Sailin’

FOOD

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MARCH 2017

KIDSVT.COM

Veg Out

Has purchasing a local farm share been financially out of reach for your family? The FARM FRESH FOODS FOR HEALTHY KIDS project could put fresh veggies on your table. Eligible low-income families with kids ages 2 to 12 get half-priced local farm shares. In exchange, participants share information about what they eat and take part in other data collection. Weiwei Wang, a graduate research assistant at the University of Vermont’s Center for Rural Studies, is coordinating the project. Wang is working with a research team led by Cornell University to examine if supplying healthy food — and classes to learn how to prepare it — can improve participants’ diets. Wang explained that last year, the project’s first, they recruited 40 families from three Vermont counties and reported positive experiences. They hope to add 30 more families in 2017. —MC For more information about the Farm Fresh Foods For Healthy Kids project, visit farmfreshfoodsforhealthykids.org. To find out if you are eligible, contact Weiwei Wang at 656-0892 or wwang@uvm.edu.

Seeking some nautical tunes to take you into the warmer months? Look no further than local musician Ron Carter, better known as Rockin’ Ron the Friendly Pirate. The swashbuckling singer, who describes his style as “‘Sesame Street’ meets Monty Python,” recently released his third album, THE FLYING PIRATE CIRCUS. Some of its 28 songs are pure fun: “Bad Bad Blackbeard” is set to the tune of “Baa, Baa, Black Sheep,” while the jazzy “Shark in the Dark” warns about a sneaky predator with a “toothy grin.” Others are educational, like “Black Snake Tale,” the true story of pirates on Lake Champlain, and the doo-woppy “Bow to the Bow,” which demonstrates the directions on a ship, just in time for the sailing season. —AN Find the latest album from Rockin’ Ron the Friendly Pirate on iTunes, Amazon or Spotify. Learn more about the musician at rockinronthefriendlypirate.com.

CONTEST

Story Time

Creative kids have until the end of March to submit their entries to the VERMONT PBS KIDS WRITERS CONTEST. Now in its 22nd year, the contest asks kindergarteners through fifth graders to create their own stories with a minimum of five illustrations. A panel of local experts will select first-place winners and runners up for each grade level. The 12 chosen kids will be recognized at an awards ceremony at the Vermont PBS Studio this spring, and their work will be featured online. Last year, South Hero resident Sandra Cain’s son, Avery, was one of the kindergarten winners. “He was so excited!” she said. “His whole class was surprised and happy for him.” —AN

To enter the Vermont PBS Kids Writers Contest and check out previous winners’ stories, visit vermontpbs.org/writers.


MATTHEW THORSEN

ONE TO WATCH BY DAN BOLLES

Name Changer

A South Burlington teen speaks out against racism

S

ince South Burlington High School was established in 1961, its sport teams have been known as the Rebels. Some believe the moniker is a nod to Vermont’s long history of antiestablishment rabble-rousers — most notably Ethan Allen and the Green Mountain Boys. Others suggest the name is a subtle geographical dig at northern rival Burlington. Whatever the provenance, the name evokes an uncomfortable association for many: rebel soldiers of the Confederate south and a history of slavery and racism. That connection has never sat well with SBHS student and activist Isaiah Hines. He was born and raised in South Burlington and comes from a mixed-race background — his mother is half black and half white; his father is black and Puerto Rican. Isaiah is a track and cross-country athlete. Since high school nicknames are inextricable from athletics, he faced constant reminders of the Rebels name. “Every day at practice or at a game, it was, ‘One, two, three … go Rebels!’,” he said. “It was a constant reminder that this is a reference to the Confederacy. And I couldn’t stop thinking about that.” So he did something about it. Last month, thanks in part to his efforts, the South Burlington School Board voted unanimously to change the nickname. The decision, despite inspiring a good deal of backlash, ended a heated 15-month debate.

The push to remove the nickname began in August 2015 on the heels of a larger national discussion about Confederate iconography. Isaiah initially stayed out of the conversation. “I was genuinely too intimidated to voice my opinion, because there was such NAME: ISAIAH HINES strong student support AGE: 17 for keeping the name,” he TOWN: SOUTH BURLINGTON explained. “And I guess you could say there still is. But it didn’t feel like an environment in which I could express that opinion.” Mounting public pressure to change LaLonde assured Isaiah that the debate was far from over. the name led to a school board vote LaLonde voted — with deep reserthat October. The board voted unanivation, he says — to keep the Rebels mously to preserve the Rebels name. name in 2015. That vote came with In reaction to the board’s decision, conditions for the school to promote a Isaiah founded the Student Diversity Union. The group, which currently has culture of unity around the nickname, about 30 members, exists as an avenue including the creation of a school diversity board. When Isaiah joined for SBHS students to discuss issues the school board, he challenged the of race, racial identity and racism. It effectiveness of those conditions. organizes regular events, including “Isaiah is very thoughtful,” said lectures, community dinners and the LaLonde. “He’s soft-spoken, though occasional protest, all with the goal of what he’s saying packs a lot of punch.” promoting awareness of and dialogue In addition to his organizing around racial issues. efforts in South Burlington, Isaiah In January 2016, Isaiah applied is a member of Black Lives Matter to join the school board as a student Vermont, serving as a youth liaison adviser. “It was the only way I could to area schools. He also interns at the see to change [the nickname],” said Peace & Justice Center in Burlington Isaiah. “I figured it would be a lot and works as a bookseller at Barnes & easier to change it from the inside.” Noble. Isaiah credits longtime school Isaiah, who will attend Columbia board member Martin LaLonde as University in the fall, says the key to a key ally in his efforts. At a Student changing opinions about the Rebel Diversity Union event last spring,

name was raising awareness of the nickname’s insensitive history, both in person and on social media. “Almost no one knows that history unless they have followed the debate or have done research on their own,” he explained. For example, few current students knew that 20 years ago the school’s mascot was a caricature of a Confederate soldier, or that Confederate flags used to be a common sight at Rebels games. When presented with that knowledge, Isaiah said, it’s hard not to question a tradition that might otherwise seem harmless. “I know, from talking to students, that explaining that history does pretty easily sway people,” he said.  “One to Watch” shines a light on a young Vermonter who is going places. Know a local child or teen who’s recently done something amazing? Nominate him or her at kidsvt.com/onetowatch.

vermontpbs.org/writers

KIDS VT

Supported in part by:

MARCH 2017

Winners get their stories published & a prize.

KIDSVT.COM

Wanted: Kids’ Stories!

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FIT FAMILIES BY NICCI MICCO

Family Yoga PHOTOS COURTESY OF NICCI MICCO

Kai (middle) and friends

Get Out and Om

Try These Date-Night Combos

EVOLUTION PRENATAL FAMILY & YOGA CENTER has a monthly

Laughing River Yoga, (laughingriveryoga.com), Evolution Physical Therapy & Yoga (evolutionvt.com), Yoga Roots (yogarootsvt.com), Burlington Yoga (burlingtonyoga. com), and Sangha Studio (sanghastudio.org) all offer a large selection of classes, many at date-friendly times:

Parents’ Night Out, where kids engage in themed yoga activities and eat pizza while parents enjoy a couple of kid-free hours. The studio also offers drop-in Saturday classes for kids ages 3 to 7, and a variety of baby and kids’ class series and camps. evolutionprenatalandfamily.com

Nicci Micco and son Jules

I

The boys loved the website’s Harry Potter-themed class, particularly the Sorting Hat sequence, with poses that corresponded to each House mascot: Gryffindor (lion), Slytherin (serpent), Hufflepuff (badger), and Ravenclaw (eagle). Strike spontaneous poses. Teach your kids the names of yoga poses and, perhaps, how to say them in Sanskrit. When their energy is spiraling out of control, call out a pose for them to try. Balancing postures, such as eagle and tree (vriksasana) — which require a certain amount of concentration — are best To hold their FOR THE KIDS: bets for rowdy children. interest, I play If you have your phone Keep it fun. Engaging my guys in an all-out into their latest handy, snap a pic to show them how strong they yoga session takes some obsessions. These pics are extra effort. They’re usually Once I created a look. satisfying when taken in most receptive before Ninjago-themed a pretty setting. dinner or bedtime. To class. We did a Hook them with hold their interest, I play into their latest obseslot of warrior fascinating tales. At home, we talk so sions. Once I created a moves. much about Ganesh, Ninjago-themed class the Hindu god known with a custom playlist. We did a lot of warrior moves. Another as the remover of obstacles, that my kids scream his name any time they time, I integrated Lego Chima characsee an elephant. Myths of the Asanas: ters: Laval for lion pose (simhasana), The Stories at the Heart of the Yoga Eris for eagle (garudasana), and so Tradition, by Alanna Kaivalya and on. It was a raging success. Recently, Arjuna van der Kooij, delivers captiI started using Cosmic Kids Yoga vating stories about the deities and (cosmickids.com), which offers sacred animals behind yoga poses. My fun — and free — online yoga videos.

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’m a yoga teacher. I’m also the mom of two boys — 8-year-old Jules and 6-year-old Kai. I wish I could say the convergence of these roles means that every night I lead our family through thoughtful yoga sequences, and every morning I meditate away any chance of flipping out on my kids. But I’d totally be lying. However, I do try to weave yoga into our lives on most days. The result? Greater calm and enlightenment — of a certain sort. (A loud sort.) Looking for realistic ways to bring yoga into your family life? Try these tips.

SPARK YOUTH YOGA

hosts mindful movement classes for kids at a variety of venues. sparkyouthyoga.com KARMIC CONNECTION YOGA

offers Acro Yoga (think: yoga + acrobatics) events, including birthday parties. karmiconnection.com kids’ favorite story is the goriest one in the book, where Virabhadra — a fierce warrior the god Shiva creates from one of his dreadlocks — bursts through the ground, uninvited, into a fancy party, draws his sword and chops off the head of his lover’s father. For more yoga myths and philosophy set to dope beats, check out musician MC Yogi’s Elephant Power. FOR PARENTS: Roll out your mats. Making time to practice yoga may seem self-indulgent; consider it an investment in the common calm. Don’t believe me? Take it from Zen master Thích Nhat Hanh: “If you establish serenity and happiness inside yourself, you provide the world with a solid base of peace.” Have a co-parenting partner who could use some self-care, too? Consider starting date night with yoga. Heading to dinner all blissed-out, you’re more likely to talk about dreams or creative pursuits than needing cat litter or upcoming school obligations.

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Embrace yoga ethics. More than a physical practice, of course, yoga is based upon ethical principles, called yamas and niyamas, which include nonviolence (ahimsa), truthfulness (satya), and self-discipline (tapas), to name a few. Familiarizing yourself with these concepts may help you live and model a more peaceful life. They’ll also help you survive, or perhaps even find meaning in, tough parenting moments — like when your kid is throwing a tantrum at the grocery store. “If I can endure this experience without losing my sh*t, it will transform me.” That’s tapas. A great primer on the topic is The Yamas & Niyamas: Exploring Yoga’s Ethical Practice, by Deborah Adele. Breathe. When it feels like the world is crumbling down — the kid is throwing kumquats, school is cancelled and you have a giant presentation, current events are making you anxious — stop and center yourself. Like this: inhale, exhale, repeat. Sounds crazy, but it works. K


COURTESY OF TANYA LEE STONE

BOOKWORMS BY RA CH E L E L I Z A BE T H J ON E S

Girl Rising

An Interview With Local Author Tanya Lee Stone

I

n 2013, South Burlington author Tanya Lee Stone attended a screening of Girl Rising at Merrill’s Roxy Cinema with her two teenagers. Directed by Richard Robbins, the film tells the stories of nine girls around the world, from Haiti to Afghanistan, who overcame the challenges of poverty, arranged marriage, abuse and more in pursuit of their own education. Girl Rising’s straightforward premise is that when girls are educated, the world is a better place. Stone was struck by the fact that, weeks after seeing the film, her children remembered the weight of the girls’ stories but, she said, “they couldn’t really speak to what the obstacles to education were.” So Stone — who characterizes her work as “calling out unsung heroes and missing histories” — set out to expand upon the film, in book format. The volume, released in February by Wendy Lamb Books and recommended for teens ages 14 and up, builds on the filmmakers’ research, delving deeper into the lives of the dozens of girls around the world who were initially interviewed for the film. Compelling photography and infographics accompany the text, addressing both obstacles that threaten girls’ education and potential pathways to social change. Kids VT spoke with Stone about Girl Rising: Changing the World One Girl at a Time in advance of her March 9 reading at Phoenix Books in Burlington.

KVT: What was your biggest challenge in writing this book? TLS: The biggest challenge was that the film itself isn’t a strict documentary — [some parts are] fictionalized in an effort to protect a girl’s identity.

INFO

girlrising.com/book In honor of Women’s History Month, check out these picture books by Tanya Lee Stone featuring strong women: The House That Jane Built: A Story About Jane Addams

136 Locust Street, Burlington, VT 862-6696 • www.cksvt.org admissions@cksvt.org facebook.com/cksvt

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KVT: Who was this book written for? TLS: Anyone who has even the faintest inkling that they are able to effect change in the world — it’s written for them. It’s written for anyone who wants to understand the world a little bit better and embrace the fact that, no matter how big or small, they can do something to effect change for the good. 

Financial aid available!

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Elizabeth Leads the Way: Elizabeth Cady Stanton and the Right to Vote

KVT: What has your education meant for you? TLS: An education expands your perspective of the world. Without one, we’re in our own little bubbles. To be global citizens is more important now than ever. It widens our horizons; it helps us understand what “other” is, and isn’t. There aren’t other people in other places, there’s just people. We’re all people who all have basic human rights.

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Who Says Women Can’t Be Doctors?: The Story of Elizabeth Blackwell

But I wouldn’t put anything into a nonfiction book that wasn’t accurate. All of my journalistic skills were pulled into play for this project. I vetted every story I could with the adult women writers who had worked with some of these girls directly. After completing my story about Wendjie from Haiti, for example, I was able to get in touch with writer Edwidge Danticat and ask her if there was anything I had gotten wrong. One of the biggest challenges in general was providing enough grounding information about obstacles to education, like child marriage and modern-day slavery, so that readers would have enough of an understanding to really feel strong compassion for the [girls in the] stories. You have to be able to understand the obstacles to be able to understand how miraculous their stories are.

CKS serves learners from pre-school (3 years old) through 8th grade

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KIDS VT:: What were you most surprised and excited to learn in writing this book? TANYA LEE STONE: I was most surprised by how incredibly pervasive these problems are right now, and in how many places. And how many girls it affects. We have a tendency to downplay that stuff in our minds because it’s troubling. We live our daily lives in comfort here in the West. We don’t necessarily understand that life is dramatically different in a lot of places in the world. Some of the things I learned that

excited me were, simply, the extremely powerful stories of the girls [who] were able to go to school. I think the overall reality is that when girls are educated, the world literally changes for the better because of how females spend money and how they “spend” their education.

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BALANCING ACT BY JESSICA LARA TICKTIN MATTHEW THORSEN

The Sweet Life A sugaring family on teamwork and going with the flow or six weeks in late winter and early spring, Marsha and Bill F LaPorte of Underhill drop everything

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to sweat it out in their wood-fired sugarhouse over a giant pot of boiling sap. It’s a duty Bill and his brother, Jim, took over 12 years ago from their grandparents, who started the small sugaring operation in 1980. The LaPortes own a business in Cambridge that prints labels for glass maple-syrup containers. They leave the print shop mostly to their two employees during sugaring season, when time is of the essence. Lines need to be checked daily to ensure there are no tears or snags, and boiling sap must be constantly monitored. This is the family’s second year living in Underhill, in a house on the same property as their sugarhouse, purchased from Bill’s grandparents. Prior to that, they commuted from Cambridge during maple season, sometimes making the 30-minute drive in the middle of the night to check on the boiling sap. Now Bill doesn’t have to sleep in his truck anymore, and Marsha can huddle with him in the sugarhouse late into the evening as they make sweet syrup for family and friends. It’s their version of date night. On the morning routine: BILL: I get up at 5 a.m., take a shower, begin the lunches and wait for our daughter to get up because she likes to participate in making her lunch. MARSHA: The kids get up at 6:30 a.m. and pretty much get dressed and eat breakfast themselves. We help a little bit, but they can do most of it on their own. BILL: As long as the milk [ jug] is low! (They laugh.) MARSHA: They have to do a lot for themselves: Get their backpacks ready and make sure they have their hats, mittens, snow pants, shoes. BILL: We are big believers in kids

PARENTS: Marsha LaPorte, 38, and Bill LaPorte, 39, owners of Artisan Printing of Vermont and Burgess Sugarhouse SON: Charlie, 6 DAUGHTER: Ada, 4

participating and doing things for themselves. On the evening hours:

MARSHA: The chaos! You think the

witching hour goes away when your kids are no longer babies, but it doesn’t. BILL: Usually, whoever gets home first starts dinner. MARSHA: Right. But 95 percent of the time, it’s me. BILL: In sugaring season, all of this changes... MARSHA: ...Because we boil in the late afternoon and evening. Hopefully, this year the kids are older and will be able to spend more time at the sugarhouse. Last year, I would pick them up from the bus and they would pretty much go straight to Bill’s mom’s. The sugarhouse can be a dangerous environment because everything is hot. BILL: … or it’s cold outside. On the importance of timing:

BILL: When the sap runs, you have

to get as much as possible. You can’t

Also pictured: Cousins Sam, 12 (second from left) and Amelia, 9 (far right)

store sap very well; it will either freeze or it will spoil. MARSHA: We have tubing in the woods, so you have to make sure it’s all connected and working properly. It’s a job we both do. It just depends on who can leave their other work. BILL: Who can ignore their work [at the printing business] to go walk in the woods! You need to be in the woods, that’s a priority. Boiling has to happen; walking in the woods has to happen. The kids understand this, and our employees understand this. On prioritizing skiing:

BILL: We signed the kids up for the

Smugglers’ Notch ski program this year since we knew that would make us go. We have plenty of other things we could do on those Saturdays, but at least it makes us get the kids up there. I learned to ski when I was MARSHA very young, but LAPORTE Marsha did not. MARSHA: I can ski now, but it’s a huge regret that I didn’t ski as a child. We are close enough to Smuggs. Our kids should ski. Bill’s mom taught 3-, 4and 5-year-olds to ski for 30 years, and she’s now retired — she’s 70 — but she

This time of year, it’s survival of the fittest.

took the four grandchildren to Smuggs by herself last week. BILL: You’d never know she was 70. She is amazing! On bedtime duty:

MARSHA: We alternate. BILL: The kids expect it now. MARSHA: For a while we were both

reading, switching kids. BILL: And we were like, Why are we doing this? One person can do this and the other person can get a break or do something else that needs to be done! On how proximity to work and older kids have changed things: BILL: It’s much easier with employees now, more sleep involved. MARSHA: The kids are older now. It was really hard when they were 2 and 4. It was chaos doing it all with two businesses. BILL: Living next to the sugarbush, you can get a lot done. Instead of spending half a day splitting wood, you can do it in an hour or two. BILL: Whoever has time for something will do it — like me putting in the laundry, then folding it and putting it in the wrong kid’s drawers. (He laughs.) MARSHA: Yes! We are a team through it all: the house, the printing, the sugaring, the kids. K


DESTINATION RECREATION BY SARAH GALBRAITH

Middlebury Indoor Tennis 360 Boardman St., Middlebury

I

TRISTAN VON DUNTZ

’m always looking for inexpensive ways to help my 2-year-old daughter burn energy during the colder months. Family Play Day at Middlebury Indoor Tennis hit all the marks: free, fun, supportive and family-oriented. The indoor tennis facility, which operates as a membership-based tennis club, opens its doors to families on Sundays for free tennis. The

facility was opened in 2001 by local couple David and Eleanor Ignat, who donated it to the Addison Community Athletics Foundation in 2014 so that it could be run as a nonprofit organization. I checked it out with my partner, Tristan, and our daughter, Elise, on a snowy Sunday morning. We passed through a door and a layer of

Matt Cutts with daughter Robyn

FAMILY PLAY DAY at Middlebury Indoor Tennis takes place every Sunday from 10:30 a.m. to noon during the school year. FREE YOUTH MATCH PLAY, where kids participate in round-robin play, is held once a month. Residents of any town are welcome. Staff is available to help, but formal instruction is not provided. For more information, visit middleburytennis.com.

floor-to-ceiling safety nets to get to the three courts. Several older kids were hitting balls with their parents on one court. Another was divided into three smaller sections. In one area, we found an array of kid-friendly equipment — children’s tennis racquets, foam balls and a small obstacle course with cones, rings and low hurdles. The loud noises

and commotion made Elise feel shy at first, but it didn’t take long before we were tossing balls, hopping around the obstacle course and swinging racquets. At the court that day, we met Erin Morrison, program coordinator for the ACAF, playing with her own toddler daughter and husband. Morrison runs the weekly event with help from a local high-school tennis player. She explained that ACAF aims to get more families involved in tennis by removing barriers to playing the sport, like the cost of joining a membership facility. The foundation also provides a relaxed environment for beginners, with smaller courts and special tennis balls with 75 percent less bounce than regular ones. In addition to Family Play Day, ACAF brings tennis to schools throughout Addison County. After a three-week school program, Middlebury Indoor Tennis hosts a special night for students and their families to play tennis and eat pizza together. When the Sunday event started in the late fall of 2015, parents would often drop off their kids on the court and then wait in the lobby, Morrison said. But she and her staff would encourage the parents to play, too. “It’s another way for families to be active together,” she said. She points out that tennis can be played year-round, and it’s a great way to cross-train for other sports. “If you can get your family engaged early on and loving the sport, you can play together for life,” she said. K

KIDSVT.COM MARCH 2017 KIDS VT

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A French-Canadian Fave With a Twist Poutine Waffles

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TEACHER TEACHER TRAININGS TRAININGS

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few years ago, I decided to put a waffle-y spin on different dishes from around the world. I made taco waffles, pizza waffles, curry waffles and more. My family’s favorite? Poutine waffles. Poutine is a classic Québécois comfort food made up of French fries topped with gravy and cheese curds — the solid part of curdled milk that’s sometimes referred to as “squeaky cheese.” I didn’t grow up eating poutine, but came to know it through my husband, who has a French-Canadian background. As soon as I tasted the savory dish, I knew that it was something magical. This spin on poutine starts with a thin waffle made with potato batter. Waffles are a great base for the poutine gravy because of their nooks and crannies, but if you don’t have a waffle maker you can make the batter into pancakes instead. Sometimes cheese curds are hard to find in stores. I use Cheddar Bites from Bennington-based

You’ll Need…

Maplebrook Farms. They don’t have the “squeak” of some other cheese curds, but they’re still delicious. Try this recipe for brunch — or dinner — this month. Your stomach will say merci! 


DIRECTIONS

For the waffles

1. Peel potatoes and shred in a food processor or with a cheese grater.

(makes four):

3 large russet potatoes 1 tablespoon dried onion flakes (or half an onion, finely chopped) 3 eggs Around 1/4 cup flour (or more, depending on the size of your potatoes) 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 teaspoon Montréal steak seasoning (optional)

For the gravy (makes 2 cups): 1/4 cup flour 2 cups beef broth 2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce 1 teaspoon garlic powder 1/2 teaspoon pepper Salt to taste

3. To make the gravy, melt the butter in a saucepan over medium heat. 4. Whisk in the flour, making sure to smooth any visible lumps. Continue whisking and cook over medium heat until the mixture starts to turn a light brown, about five minutes.   5. Turn heat to medium-low, and slowly stir in the broth, Worcestershire sauce and seasonings, and whisk until smooth.   6. Turn heat up to medium-high and bring to a boil, stirring constantly until the mixture thickens, which should take about five more minutes.   7. Cook waffles in your waffle maker, at the highest setting, until they are nice and crispy. Top with gravy and a handful of cheese curds.

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2. Combine the rest of the waffle ingredients in a blender or food processor. Blend until a batter forms. If there are a few chunks, that’s okay. If the batter is very thin, add a little more flour. You want it to be pourable, but not drippy.

Visit the goats at the petting zoo, watch sap being boiled and enjoy a walk in the forest.

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“With ice cream,

1/10/17 11:39 AM

I say

‘Go big

or go home.’” — Mira, age 9

KIDSVT.COM

Kids say the darnedest things, right? We’d love to know about the funny, silly or weird things that have come out of you kids’ mouths recently. Shoot us an email at ideas@kidsvt.com with a kid quote, the context, and their first name and age. You might just see their wacky words in an upcoming issue of Kids VT!

MARCH 2017 KIDS VT

KIDS SAY WHAT?

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WRESTLEMANIA

MATTHEW THORSEN

T

1

How I learned to stop worrying and love youth wrestling

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MATTHEW THORSEN

BY CATHY RESMER

6

5

he Sunday before Valentine’s Day, I crouched at the edge of a padded mat on the floor of the gym at Lake Region Union High School in Barton. My son was getting ready for his first wrestling match of the season. Anxious and excited, I held up my smartphone to film it. Graham, 11, wore his black Colchester Cobras singlet and size 11 wrestling shoes. Tall for his age and husky, he looked like a future linebacker. His opponent from the Northeast Kingdom Pythons was roughly the same age and size. Both were in the tournament’s largest weight class for fifth and sixth grade wrestlers; neither wore headgear, which is optional for kids until the seventh grade. The boys walked to the center of the mat and faced each other. They shook hands, then dropped into their stances — knees bent, hands in front of their faces. When the referee blew his whistle, Graham’s opponent lunged forward and tried to grab the back of Graham’s neck. My son backed up, pushed the boy’s hands aside, and reached for the back of his neck. They lurched around the mat until Graham pressed the boy’s head down. Then Graham sprawled on top of him, putting his weight on the other boy’s shoulders and back. But his opponent twisted away, and Graham ended up flat on his stomach. The NEK wrestler scrambled on top of him, scoring two points for the takedown. “Come on, Graham!” I yelled encouragingly. “Be aggressive!” shouted the Python’s coach. “Push his head down!” The boy mashed Graham’s face into the mat with his left forearm and tried to dig his right hand into Graham’s armpit, to turn him onto his back. If he managed to flip Graham and pin his shoulders to the mat for three seconds, the match would be over. “Get

(1) Keegan Vance and Sawyer Prouty at practice. (2) The Cobras huddle. (3) Lahna Descheneau of the Northeast Kingdom Pythons makes the winning move against an opponent from the St. Johnsbury Prospectors. (4) Ivy Resmer and Hinesburg wrestler Allyson Gutierrez celebrate first place wins in 2016. (5) Coach Scott McPherson watches Ivy and Nicholas Forguitas practice. (6) A Springfield parent at a 2016 K-6 tournament.


MATTHEW THORSEN

4

Wrestle Like a Girl 2

whining,” declares a sign hanging from the low drop ceiling. The Cobras practice at least two nights a week. McPherson and his assistant coaches keep them moving for the whole 90 minutes, minus water breaks, doing calisthenics, skill drills and practice matches — usually to ’80s rock anthems from the Mötley Crüe station on Pandora. Near the end of a recent practice, the 20 Cobras who had shown up looked exhausted. “You guys wanna machine gun?” McPherson asked them. No one answered. “I think that’s a yes,” he said with a smile. The kids got into their wrestling stances. When he blew his whistle, they started pumping their feet rapidly up and down. “Empty the tank,” he urged them. “Empty the tank every time.” After 20 seconds, he blew his whistle. They dropped in unison onto the mat, for a 10-second rest. Another whistle blast and they were at it again. “I’m starting to see

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Bermuda shorts to practice that reveal his massive calves; his T-shirts fit snugly around his muscular arms. A no-nonsense buzz cut makes him look like a drill sergeant. For the most part, his wrestlers treat him like one. I’ve seen tiny kindergarteners and beefy teens respond to him obediently. But while McPherson is firm, he’s never mean. He doles out the occasional compliment and gives the kids his full attention during their matches, encouraging them and suggesting moves, consoling or congratulating them at the end. Like all of Vermont’s 20 or so K-6 youth wrestling clubs, Colchester’s operates independently of the schools. Parent-driven fundraising pays for the team’s equipment, uniforms and practice space. This year, the 32-member squad, with wrestlers from Colchester and nearby towns, practices in the basement of the Malletts Bay Congregational Church. The narrow room’s tile floor is mostly covered with wrestling mats. “No

MARCH 2017

dawn and be gone all day, though they might wrestle for just 12 minutes each — less if somebody gets pinned. And their matches can be hard to watch. I’ve seen my precious children squeezed, tripped and thrown to the ground. I’ve seen them strain with all their might to avoid being beaten, and cry when they lose — or sometimes even when they win. It’s bearable because I also see what they’re learning: how to win and lose graciously, for example, and how to support their teammates. They also learn the value of hard work and persistence. When my kids win medals and trophies, or T-shirts with the word “champion” on the back, they’re proud of themselves. They’ve earned those rewards. At their end-of-year banquet in 2015, the year the Cobras won the K-6 state championship, their head coach, Scott McPherson, told the team that wrestling was the toughest thing they’d ever do. I reminded him of that recently during a pre-practice interview. He insisted it’s true. “If you can make it through wrestling,” he said, “you can train yourself to make it through anything.” And, he added, “It makes you better at everything. It makes you a better person, a better student, a better athlete, a better child, a better parent.” He speaks from experience. McPherson, 49, grew up in Westford and started wrestling for Essex High School the summer before his freshman year. He’s competed or coached nearly every season since — lately while working as a technician at GlobalFoundries. He’s been with the Cobras since 2000. “I’ve coached the kids of kids,” he told me. “I’m on my second generation. That makes me feel kind of old!” He doesn’t look it. Trim and fit, the 5’7” father of two grown sons wears

When my daughter, Ivy, was 5, she saw her older brother wrestling and asked to join the team. The Colchester Cobra coaches were happy to have her. In Vermont, boys and girls compete against each other through high school. Wrestling is empowering for girls, but it can be tough for them to compete in such a male-dominated sport. Ivy was the only girl on her team for a couple of years. Fortunately, she made friends with girls she met at tournaments. It’s hard to know exactly how many K-6 girls are wrestling in Vermont this year. But anecdotally, parents and coaches say their numbers are growing. Two parents told me their daughters were inspired by a girl wrestler character on the sitcom, “Life With Boys.” For older girls, the trend is clearer. Nationwide, there were three times as many high school girls wrestling in 2015 as there were in 2013; the number went from 273 to 858. Colchester head coach Scott McPherson speculated that the increase is tied to women’s wrestling becoming an Olympic sport in 2004. If so, it may be about to get another boost. In the 2016 Summer Olympic Games, Helen Maroulis became the first American woman to win a gold medal in women’s freestyle wrestling. The 25-year-old Maryland resident has become an outspoken advocate for girls’ wrestling on her blog at helenmaroulis.com. Her recent posts have included “Why I Chose Wrestling” and “5 Reasons Wrestling Makes a Great Valentine.” In one called “Why Girls Should Wrestle,” she points out that there are many college scholarships available for wrestling — and the opportunity to travel the world competing for Team USA. “Which is not an unrealistic dream,” she writes, “since most of the competition is abroad.”

KIDSVT.COM

your arm in there!” urged the Python’s coach. “Stay on top!” Graham wouldn’t budge. When the ref blew his whistle at the end of the one-minute period, I exhaled audibly. I hadn’t realized I’d been holding my breath. During the next two periods, Graham scored three points by flipping his opponent onto his back for two seconds. He eked out a 3-2 win. When I recounted this match to one of my coworkers, she seemed astonished by the physicality of it. “In any other sport, the ref would call a foul if the kids even touched each other,” she marveled. I tried to convince her that her two boys would enjoy wrestling, but she seemed reluctant. “How long did it take to get used to watching your kids get beaten up like that?” she asked. I told her it’s never easy to see them lose. Both Graham and his sister, Ivy, 8, wrestle with the Cobras. This is their fourth season. Yes, wrestling is a coed sport (see sidebar). The K-6 level isn’t as intense as the middle and high school version. The kids are segmented into age groups: grades K-2, 3-4 and 5-6. Matches last three minutes instead of six. And the kids aren’t as worried about making a certain weight. At the start of each tournament, they’re separated into weight classes like A1 and B14 based on who’s shown up to wrestle. Bruises and bloody noses are common, but serious injuries are rare. The referees don’t tolerate violent behavior, and there are penalties for illegal moves. Still, the sport is physically, mentally and emotionally demanding — for kids and their parents. The weekend tournaments are definitely a slog. My kids will compete in seven of them, from February until mid-April, most at least an hour’s drive from home. We’ll leave before

3


Wrestlemania

CONTINUED FROM P. 19

Cruz Haran, Shay Prouty and Andrew Sullivan

pain in some faces,” McPherson said over the sound of their pounding feet. “I see grimaces; I see red faces. That’s good stuff!” He blew his whistle and they dropped again. Then McPherson switched tasks. “Stand-up drill,” he instructed.

HAPPY, HEALTHY AND SMART CHOOSE WIC UNTIL YOUR CHILD IS 5. WIC is here for you and your family. Choose WIC until your child turns 5 for healthy food, nutrition activities, and more! Together we can develop a lifetime of healthy habits. And with the new eWIC card, choosing healthy foods has never been easier. Sign up today! Get started with WIC by visiting healthvermont.gov/wic or call 1.800.649.4357 USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer

Proud of your project?

5/25/16 11:25 AM

20

KIDS VT

MARCH 2017

KIDSVT.COM

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Invite us over! ✱ HABITAT

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If you can make it through wrestling, you can train yourself to make it through anything. SCOTT MCPHERSON, HEAD COACH, COLCHESTER COBRAS

“We don’t have time,” one of his wrestlers complained meekly. “Yes you do,” he countered. “You have five minutes.” When they finished, he called them into a huddle to end practice. “One-two-three,” he said. “Cobras!” they shouted together. When I asked McPherson why he does this year after year, he grinned and quipped, “What else am I going to do in the winter?” Like all K-6 coaches, McPherson is a volunteer. In addition to working with the Cobras, he and assistant coach Jason Lavoie are trying to bring back Colchester’s high school Lakers wrestling program. The school district cut it years ago due to lack of participation. The Cobras subsidize the five current Laker wrestlers. They work with McPherson and Lavoie — and the seventh and eighth grade Cobra kids — in the church basement every weekday after school, and participate

in tournaments against other schools’ JV and varsity teams. Coach Lavoie, a former Laker wrestler who competed at Norwich University, told me he does it because “it’s in my blood.” When I pressed McPherson, he added that it’s gratifying to see his wrestlers improve. “To see how hard these kids can work, and see how they respond to asking them to work harder, it’s pretty amazing,” he said. I asked a few of the kids why they like the sport. “The energy I get when I’m on the mat, and the challenges,” said Ben Stapleton. “And the coaches, of course.” This is Ben’s tenth season; the lanky ninth grader is a Laker wrestler who helps out at Cobra practices. What does wrestling teach, I asked. “Self-confidence, discipline,” said Sawyer Prouty, 8. “Respect, self-defense,” said Jordan Lavoie, 11. He’s Jason’s son. His mom, Holly Lavoie, is the team’s manager. When I asked my own kids why they wrestle, both said they appreciate their coaches and their teammates. “I like how everybody encourages me,” said Ivy. Graham said wrestling has “helped me with my social skills.” It reminded me of what assistant coach Brian Lafond told me — “You can tell someone who’s wrestled,” he said. “These kids come up and shake your hand.” Graham also said that he’s gotten used to the chaotic tournament environment. He’s comfortable now under all that pressure. That should help him navigate stressful situations in sports and in life. At wrestling tournaments, he said, “I feel like I’m at home.” K

Learn more about Vermont’s wrestling scene at vermontwrestler.com. Many wrestling clubs have Facebook pages.


r e C m amp m u S

SCIENCE

s u c Fo n o ! n Fu

OUTDOORS ARTS

GYMNASTICS EDUCATION ANIMALS SPORTS

E X P L O R E

V E R M O N T

&

B E Y O N D


2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE

Cabin life promotes community and team work

All-elective program encourages self-confidence and decision making.

Campers at Betsy Cox and Sangamon have real independence. They make ALL their own choices every activity period, every day.

LEARN TO WINDSURF

WND&WVS is offering weekly half-day windsurfing camps from June 19th through August 25th. The camp runs from 8:45 to 1:45 Monday through Friday followed by a free lunch at The Spot. Visit wndnwvs.com/play for more information or call 802 540-2529.

OPEN MON-SAT 10-6 688 PINE ST, BURLINGTON Untitled-22 1

WNDNWVS.COM

802.540.2529 1/25/17 2:40 PM

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TODAY Lego Engineering, Robotic Programming, Stop Motion Animation, Minecraft

Burlington, Essex Junction, South Burlington, Winooski

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JUNE 19 - AUGUST 25, 2017

egal

SUMMER

Camps

REGAL GYMNASTICS ACADEMY

2 CORPORATE DRIVE ESSEX, VT

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DISCOVERY ADVENTURE CAMP JUNE 19-AUG 25 8AM-3:30PM After care available from 3:30PM - 5:30PM

For kids who are wild about animals

Ages 3-7

For kids who wild animals! Forare kids who areabout wild about animals! Kids Ages 5-7: $195

New age group this year!

Kids Ages 8-10: $195

Week 3: Monday - Friday, Animal Adventures (ages 7-9)

Week 1: Monday-Friday, Animal Adventures (ages 7-9) July 24-28 Afternoons only still available! July 10-14

Session Four: 9 AM - 12 PM

July 13-17 ● July 20-24 Session One: 9only AM - 12 PMavailable! Afternoons still Session Five: 1 PM - 4 PM SummerWeek Safari 4: (ages 10-12)- Friday, Week 2: Monday Friday, Monday July 13-17 ● July 20-24

July 17-21 Full-day camp: A few slots available July 31-August 4 Session Two: 9 AM - 12 PM Session Six: - 12 PM July 27– July 31● Aug 3-79●AM Aug.10-14 Session Three: 1 PM - 4 PM Session Seven: 1 PM - 4 PM Register: (802) 862-0135 x 12 Full-day camp: A few available Or slots visit chittendenhumane.org.

Summer Safari (ages 10-12)

July 27– July 31● Aug 3-7 ● Aug.10-14 Register: (802) 862-0135 x 12 Or visit chittendenhumane.org.

Kids Ages 11-12: $390 Week 5: Monday-Friday, August 7-11 Session Eight: 9 AM - 3 PM Week 6: Monday - Friday, August 14-18 Session Nine: 9 AM - 3 PM Before & after care hours are available. Scholarships funded by Redducs Foundation

Before & after care hours are available. Scholarships funded by Redducs Foundation

Regal’s science -based summer camp is designed especially for children ages 3-7 years old! Daily activities will focus on sensory play and science experiments. 2 Day, 3 Day & 5 Day options Every day of fun-filled camp Includes: • 1 hour of instructional gymnastics • Open gym time • Cooperative games • Outdoor explorations & play • Theme-based experiments, stories, crafts & activities • Nutritious lunch and snacks provided

Instructional Gymnastics Camp JUNE 19-AUG 25 8AM-3:30PM After care available from 3:30PM - 5:30PM

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Ages 6-14

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Come experience all that Regal has to offer! Our full-day camp includes morning meeting, group warm-ups, daily instructed gymnastics, open gym, daily challenges, cooperative games, outdoor activities including water slides and arts & crafts. Children will showcase their skills in an end of week gymnastics exhibition!

BEST. SUMMER. EVER.

Vermont Ninja Warrior Camp JUNE 26-AUG 25 8AM-3:30PM

Y Summer Camps

Alternating weeks and After care available from 3:30PM - 5:30PM

Ages 7+

• Boys and girls ages 5 - 16 • Burlington, Essex, Fairfax, Ferrisburgh, Georgia, North Hero, Waterbury

Our Ninja Camp is filled with a variety training from ninja warrior, parkour, trampoline, tumbling, free running, yoga. Outdoor activities including hiking and water slides. REGISTER N OW!

www.gbymca.org

802-655-3300

The Y’s Community Partner

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2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE

LOOK CLOSER…

Shelburne Museum LEAP (learn & play) Summer Camps

IT’S TIME TO DISCOVER SOMETHING NEW!

2017

Shelburne Museum’s summer art camps offer creative experiences for kids ages 4–13.

ATTENTION, CLASS INSTRUCTORS! French through cooking, arts and other hands-on activities. Join our immersion classes, camps, and language trips!

www.thehandsonlanguageprogram.com

List your class in Kids VT for only $15/month! Submit the listing by the 15th at kidsvt.com or classes@kidsvt.com

Camps available in June, July, & August. For a schedule visit www.shelburnemuseum. org/learn/families/summercamps/

Welcome, Campers!

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WEEK-LONG AND MULTI-ACTIVITY CAMPS BEGINNING JUNE 19

To register, email Mollie Trow at mtrow@shelburnemuseum.org or call 985-3346 x 3392.

2017 SUMMER CAMPS

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‛s All It‛s About

Girl Power.

LAKE ADVENTURE

CAMPS

Learn

more

GirlsO

at:

nTheR

unVer

mont.

org

FREE SHUTTLE FROM BURLINGTON AND MIDDLEBURY An after-school program unlike any other, GOTRVT teaches girls in grades 3-8 the importance of self-confidence, healthy choices, respect for one another, and community involvement.

Ag e s 7-16 INFO & REGISTRATION: Untitled-3 1

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Registration for our spring program in Northern VT ends March 15th.

Empower your girl and sign up today at www.gotrvt.org K4T-GOTR0317.indd 1

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) T R A ( T S MER NOW!

You’re You’re gonna gonna

FLIP over this

SUMMER SYMPHONY CAMP Fun introduction to symphony & jazz orchestra

JUNE 26TH – 30TH COLCHESTER, VT

Winds, brass, percussion entering grades 6-9 Strings entering grades 5-9

Limited space available Early-bird discount

VISIT WWW.VYO.ORG FOR MORE INFO

over this camp! camp! Swimming Swimming Dancing Dancing Watersports Watersports

SUM

GYMNASTICS! GYMNASTICS! 11 to to 88 week week sessions sessions

Counselor/Camper Counselor/Camperratio ratioof of1:5 1:5 Located Locatedon onbeautiful beautiful Lake LakeChamplain Champlainin inVermont Vermont

www.gymcamp.homestead.com www.dunkleysgymnasticscamp.com www.gymcamp.homestead.com Tel.: Tel.:802.899.3479 802.899.3479 email: Dunkleysgymcamp@aol.com dunkleysgymcamp@gmail.com email: Dunkleysgymcamp@aol.com

! R E M M U THINK S Think

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YWCA VT Camp Hochelaga! Residential and day camp for girls ages 6-17, in South Hero

HIRING FOR STAFF NOW! Information at: www.ywcavt.org • contactus@ywcavt.org • 802-862-7520 k6h-ywca0217indd.indd 1

1/23/17 3:42 PM

GYMNASTICS, FREESTYLE, PARKOUR, AND NINJA SUMMER CAMPS!

’s A C B r o f Register . s p m a C t r A r e m m Su 8 straight weeks of hands-on art-making at our new studios on Pine Street! June 19-August 18 • Ages 6-18

Visit GreenMountainTrainingCenter.com for more information

burlingtoncityarts.org

260 Avenue D, Suite 30 • Williston (off Industrial Ave.) • 802-652-2454

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2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE

W

v i e G t o u o N Y e o r v D o u e c s i v P d a A rents? t a h CAMP GUIDE

Hosmer Point, Craftsbury Common

COMPILED BY ALISON NOVAK ILLUSTRATIONS BY HATIYE GARIP

Sending kids to camp can be

nerve-wracking. Whether you’re worried about them sleeping away from home or being injured on an adventurous daycamp outing, parental concerns come with the territory. We asked local camp directors for advice they give to worried parents. Find their wise words here.

Parents should feel confident in the fact that their children are usually more ready to attend camp than parents are feeling. This usually means parents have instilled the values, confidence and love in their children to challenge themselves in the adventures of camp. Parents should ask the camp about the philosophies, trainings or tools the staff uses to welcome new campers. At Hosmer Point, we instill the feeling of being “home” in all of our campers and provide a parent camp blog as well. JON HAMMOND, DIRECTOR

Rock Point Camp, Burlington It’s normal to be nervous to send your child off to a new place. My first advice is to call the director and ask a lot of questions. The American Camp Association (acacamps.org) offers a great list of questions as a place to start. Ask to schedule a camp visit and meet the director in person. This is a great way for you and

your future camper to see where everyone sleeps, eats, swims and plays. This can make a big difference on the first day of camp for you both. Remember, camp is one of the best gifts you can give to your children! REV. SHERRY OSBORN, DIRECTOR

Pok-O-MacCready Camps, Willsboro, N.Y. Parents need to do their homework to find a camp that is the right fit for their child. The more comfortable you are with the camp you have chosen, the less apprehensive you will be about sending your child to camp. Talk with other parents whose children go to camp; ask what it is that makes the camp special. If possible, visit the camp and meet with the administration. If you are unable to do so, ask the director to do a home visit. SARAH DISNEY, DIRECTOR OF ADMISSIONS

Petra Cliffs SumMAT Day Camps and Expeditions, Burlington Talk to the camp director right away! Often, just understanding

the schedule for the day, hearing about the qualifications of the staff, about safety precautions and examples of activities their kids will be doing goes a long way. Thinking about sending your child to camp is often harder than actually doing it; so if it’s a reputable camp and looks like it will be a good fit for the child, jump in and trust! ANDREA CHAREST, PETRA CLIFFS CO-OWNER

Burlington Parks, Recreation & Waterfront, Burlington I would tell anxious parents to contact camp directors for information about staff training, sample day structure, policies and procedures for reluctant joiners, and goals of the camp in order to choose the best camp setting. Some campers find comfort in registering with a friend — and then you can carpool. I would stress the friendships made, skills learned and independence gained in a camp setting. SARAH JENNINGS, LEDDY ARENA CAMP DIRECTOR

YMCA Camp Abnaki, North Hero It’s very normal for both parents and campers to be nervous. It’s important for a parent to have the appropriate outlets to voice their worries, and it’s appropriate for the campers to have their own process. Both parents and campers should reach out to the camp staff to get a tour of camp, ask lots of questions and share their concerns. Think about the outcomes of a great camp experience and think about all the learning that they’ve had in their lives. True learning and growth happens when people step out of their normal lives, expand their horizons and take risks. Yes, a parent has to let go a bit as their camper heads off to camp, but it is worth it in the end. Campers return home better friends, stronger members of the family and better people. JON KUYPERS, DIRECTOR

The Schoolhouse Learning Center, South Burlington (school vacation camps) Ask about the staff so you feel comfortable about their training and ability to handle not only the “content” of the camp but also the group of kids, many of whom may be new to each other and to the camp itself. Confidence in the staff will go a long way toward allaying fears. You also want staff who like to play! LIZ SHAYNE, HEAD OF SCHOOL

Camp Paw Paw: Humane Society of Chittenden County, South Burlington We look at each child as an individual and make sure that they are getting what they need, having fun and learning about animals. Every child’s’ safety is important to us, and we take that responsibility very seriously. ERIN ALAMED, DIRECTOR OF VOLUNTEER & COMMUNITY OUTREACH


Scholarships & Discounts Available!

This Summer Let Nature Nurture...

vinsweb.org/nature-camp Contact us at 802.359.5000 or camps@vinsweb.org Locations in Quechee, South Pomfret, Washington, VT and Hanover, NH Untitled-4 1

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SCHOOLHOUSE

THE

2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE

Green Mountain Conservation Camp

Camp Programs Pre-K to 8th Grade

Canoeing, fishing, archery, campfires and s’mores. What a great way to spend a week this summer. Discover Vermont’s wildlife and master outdoor skills. Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department offers one-week sessions for girls and boys, ages 12 to 14. Sessions run from June through August at two beautiful lake-side locations.

Now enrolling grades K-8 for 2017-18

Observation Mornings: 3/9 &3/23 April Vacation Camp, too

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www.theschoolousevt.org

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Night Eagle

2/23/17 3:09 PM

Wilderness Adventures A unique summer camp for boys, ages 10-14, in the heart of Vermont’s Green Mountains tipi living ▲ nature crafts canoeing ▲ backpacking ▲ wilderness skills ▲ tracking atlatls ▲ ’hawk throwing swimming ▲ archery ▲ hiking ▲ cooperative work & play ▲ and much more! ▲ ▲

SUMMER CAMPS & RECREATION

Call for a full brochure:

((802) 802) 773-7866 446-6100

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Say you saw it in

1/4/12 2:01 PM

Register Today!

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Green Mountain Youth Symphony

Creative Arts & Music Program August 6-12 @ Johnson State College

Early bird discount until March 11

leah@gmys-vt.org • www.gmys-vt.org

Talent Development Institute

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Celebrating 20 Years! Summer 2017

Summer Day Camp for Adopted Children & Teens

Johnson State College June 18-24 & June 25-July 1

TWO ONE-WEEK SESSIONS

For advanced students entering grades 4-9 who want to have fun while learning!

“TDI has provided an environment where being intelligent is encouraged … TDI has given me confidence to be myself outside the camp and introduced me to friends I look forward to seeing each year.” — Camper

TDIVERMONT.ORG • 802-658-9941 LUCYBOGUE@YAHOO.COM

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2017 July 10-14 & July 17-21 Stowe High School in Stowe, Vermont With bus service from Burlington, Williston & Waterbury FOR AGES 7 – 17 Visit our website for registration forms and information: www.camp4me.org | info@camp4me.org

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Farm & Garden Ages 5-10

April Vacation Field & Forest Ages 10-13 Teen Camp

Shelburne, VT www.NewVillageFarm.com

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GUTTERSON ARENA UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT On- and off-ice training — Catamount style! 802-324-6876 ksneddon_21@hotmail.com | www.kshockeyschool.com k12h-KevinSneddonHockey0317.indd 1

August 14-17, 2017

Kevin Sneddon’s Hockey School

Ages 5-8, 9-12

2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE

Acr2528720295400963305598.pdf

2/17/17 1:29 PM

Building Confidence

1

1/25/17

10:23 AM

DAY CAMP VOICE

BALLET

ACTING

DANCE M U S I C A L T H E A T E R H I S TO RY

CLAYMATION STREET DANCE

JAZZ

MOVIE

MAKING

FILM RADIO SCIENCE

FOR AGES 4-19 plus adult & teen classes

802-586-2090 - HosmerPoint.com Untitled-34 1

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REGISTER NOW Financial aid is available.

FLYNNARTS.ORG A division of

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Summer Camps!

Art, Music, Movement & More! info@artistreevt.org www.artistreevt.org

rom k! F les oc Mi oodst 3 W nly

802.457.3500

2095 Pomfret Road, South Pomfret, VT

2017 SUMMER CAMPS

STEM Leadership Camp (overnight camp) for girls entering grades 9-10

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Vermont Tech | Randolph Center June 19-23, 2017 or July 10-14, 2017 learn more vtc.edu/rosies

3/23/16 3:54 PM

A fun, creative “hands-on” exploration summer camp with followup mentoring program. Activities and training help campers learn about leadership, skilled trades, and the STEM fields (science, technology, engineering & math).

CAMP ABNAKI

11001011001110

CODERr fo CAMP girls

REGISTRATION OPEN NOW • Overnight camp for boys that have completed grades 1-10 • 100 years on North Hero’s shores • Archery, sailing, camp fires, more • Learn skills, build confidence, have fun!

11001011001110

Coder Camp for Girls (day camp) for girls ages 13-16

Vermont Tech | Williston July 17-21, 2017 learn more vtc.edu/summer Coder Camp gives girls the chance to translate their creativity into computer programs using SCRATCH with loads of fun activities and field trips.

AeroCamp (day camp) for youth ages 12-18

Vermont Tech | Williston July 24-28, 2017 learn more vtc.edu/summer

campabnaki.org The Y’s Community Partner

AeroCamp is for youth ages 12-18 who want to learn about the exciting and dynamic world of aviation and the training that can lead to a career flying airplanes. Untitled-15 1

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SUMMER

CAMPS

FARMHOUSE CENTER

SUMMER CAMPS

SUMMER CAMP FULL DAY CAMP

F

Outdoor and Enrichment Activities

teen performing arts

VMT Performing Arts Center

8am-5pm $250/week Ages 4-18

TODDLER DAYS

The Frontier Express June 19-23

camps with the best

11am-3:30pm (MWF) (TThF) or full week $40/a day, Ages 3-6, 3 options

Cabaret: Song & Dance Camp

Seussical

July 31-August 4, Aug 7-11

Charlotte Camps Barn Camp: In Search of Mother Goose

June 26-30

June 19-23

MOM'S DAY

The Patchwork Girl of Oz

Wagon Tour One: The Phantom Tollbooth

At Farm 9am-4pm $100 last Saturday of Month (includes farm gourmet lunch)

Snow White and the Seven Dwarves

July 3-7

of summer fun

SESSIONS INCLUDE: Equestrian activities, swimming, cooking, arts, crafts, nature hikes and FUN!

July 24-28, Aug 1-4, Aug 7-11

Robin Hood and Maid Marian

Vergennes Camp

Cinderella July 24-28

BURLINGTON & EAST BURKE VERMONT 802-872-8712 • 802-399-6045 775 Poor Farm Road, Colchester farmhousecenter.org

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our website for our

WWW.SOCAPA.ORG

! l i a M Wee

1/25/17Untitled-9 5:18 PM 1

2017 Class Schedule

Teen Tour: Oklahoma!

July 10-14 July 17-21

FILMMAKING ACTING PHOTOGRAPHY DANCE MOUNTAIN BIKING MUSIC

June 26-30, July 3-7

Alice in Wonderland June 26-30

SIGN UP ONLINE su m 20 m 17 e r

www.verymerrytheater.org

Scholarships available for all activities Contact us at don@verymerrytheatre.org 333 N. Winooski Ave, Burlington VT

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2/20/17 11:06 AM

Just across Lake Champlain in the Adirondacks! Contact us for a free DVD and info packet

Attach this ad to your application & receive 10% off 2017 tuition!

Vermont’s only certified

Irish Dance School!

the way summer camp should be...

All Ages…All Levels Did you enjoy watching Riverdance? Why not learn some of the steps!

Call or email to hold a spot in our summer camps! Classes offered in Colchester & Middlebury

Beth Anne McFadden T.C.R.G. (802) 999-5041 celtikutie@aol.com www.mcfaddenirishdance.com

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Investing in Nesting

Vermont businesses see dollars and sense in helping employees bond with their babies BY KEN PICARD

MATTHEW THORSEN

J

Ricky and Kelly Klein of Groennfell Meadery

If I’m the reason someone misses a first ballet performance, that’s something I can never forgive. RICKY KLEIN, CO-OWNER, GROENNFELL MEADERY

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INVESTING IN NESTING, P. 22 »

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Though the U.S. doesn’t offer the benefit at the federal level, some states are taking matters into their own hands. California, New Jersey and Rhode Island have state-administered leave programs in place; New York’s is set to take effect in 2018. A coalition of lawmakers and childcare advocates is hoping that Vermont becomes the next state to adopt one. (See “Paid Family Leave Progress in Vermont” sidebar.) The Vermont Commission on Women recently surveyed 500 Vermonters and 427 Vermont business owners to gauge their interest in adopting a paid family and medical leave insurance program at the state level. The state agency’s findings are revealing. When asked broadly about whether they believed in establishing a program to guarantee access to paid family and medical leave in the state, more than 70 percent of individuals surveyed said it was “very important.”

MARCH 2017

mothers and fathers to take extended time off to be with new family members results in healthier babies and mothers, stronger parenting skills and, ultimately, happier and more productive workers. But generous family-leave policies like Chroma’s are more the exception than the rule in Vermont. Most employers in the state, especially small businesses, say they cannot afford to offer long-term paid leave to their

workers, though some provide shortterm disability insurance to cover part of their employees’ maternity leave. Companies can choose to pay their employees during their parental leave, but the federal government doesn’t provide any financial support. The United States is the only industrialized country in the world that doesn’t offer such a benefit. For Chroma, a 100-percent employee-owned company that does $30 million in global sales annually, providing paid parental leave makes financial sense. More than just a goodwill gesture to its employees, it’s seen as a long-term investment in the staff’s physical and emotional health and the company’s bottom line. “We feel that when parents are in the workplace and aren’t really able to be fully focused, then productivity declines,” explains Angela EarleGray, Chroma’s director of human resources. “So what we’re actually ‘losing’ by providing this benefit is less than what you might expect.”

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ames Marks of Putney is luckier than most new fathers in Vermont. His employer, Bellows Falls-based Chroma Technology, offers paid leave for all new parents. The high-tech optical coating manufacturer enacted a generous new parental leave policy for all of its 120 Vermont-based employees just weeks after his second daughter, Laura, was born in December of 2015. It covers all employees who are welcoming a new child into the family, including non-biological parents in same-sex marriages and parents adopting a child. Employees who’ve been with the company five years or more are eligible for up to 12 weeks of leave — without interrupting their health insurance or other benefits — at 80 percent of their salary. The percentage drops for employees with shorter tenures. Marks, who at the time had been with the company for three years, could receive 60 percent of his salary. Marks had initially planned to take off just one week to be at home with the new baby, his wife and their then2-year-old daughter Leila. But after the new policy was implemented, he decided to take advantage of it. Because Marks is his family’s sole breadwinner, it would have been financially difficult for him to take his entire paternity leave all at once. Instead, Chroma let Marks scale back his hours to three days a week and space out his leave over an entire year. For Marks, having a flexible work schedule enabled him to take his older daughter to playgroups, open gyms and other activities each week, giving his wife, Jennifer, more one-on-one time with their new baby. That would have been impossible, Marks notes, had Jennifer been at home with the newborn and toddler all by herself. “It’s good to have two parents there in the first months of life, which in a lot of ways are the most important, to establish that bond,” Marks says. Abundant research shows that paid family leave that enables both


Mamava cofounder Sascha Mayer (right) with pregnant employees Annie Ode (left) and Nikkie Kent

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CONTINUED FROM P. 21

While nearly half of Vermont businesses surveyed expressed support for a family-leave policy, fewer than one in six currently offer paid leave to their employees who become new mothers, and fewer than one in 10 offer paid leave to new fathers. The biggest reason most businesses gave for not offering it, unsurprisingly, was the cost. (See “By the Numbers” sidebar.) Such findings are consistent with nationwide trends, the study notes, where access to paid family and medical leave is a rarity. Nationally, only 11 percent of workers qualify for paid family leave through their employer, according to U.S. Department of Labor statistics. Since 1993, the federal Family and Medical Leave Act has guaranteed job protection to eligible employees who want to take up to 12 unpaid weeks off after the birth or adoption of a child. That law only applies to companies with at least 50 employees. Vermont’s law is more stringent — mandating job protection for companies with 10 or more employees. Still, the reality is that most American workers cannot afford to take three months off without drawing a paycheck. More Vermont parents are in a situation comparable to that of Tara Hodgkins. The 31-year-old Ludlow mother of two is employed by a local tech company, which she declined to identify, with fewer than 25 workers. She was eligible for up to 12 weeks of unpaid time off after the birth of her daughter in February 2016. However, because Hodgkins is her family’s sole breadwinner — her husband has a chronic health condition and can no longer work — she took off just 13 days after her daughter was born last year and only 10 days off after her son was born a few years ago. Hodgkins recalls the difficulties she faced in “mentally shifting gears” from giving birth to returning to work so quickly. The resulting stress and anxiety, she says, interfered with her ability to breastfeed and bond with her newborn. “That’s pretty hard to do when you’re sleep deprived and have more responsibility than you’ve ever had in your life,” she adds. “It was very difficult.” Some small Vermont businesses are forging ahead with their own paid

At Mamava, every employee qualifies for 12 weeks of fully paid maternity or paternity leave. family-leave policies, though it’s often very costly for those businesses and challenging to employees who have to pick up the slack when their coworkers are on leave. Consider the case of Groennfell Meadery in Colchester, which opened three years ago and now has six employees helping to make craft mead, a gluten-free alcoholic beverage. Co-owners Kelly Klein and her husband, Ricky, say that their familyleave policy was factored into their bottom line from the get-go. “When we started our business, before the very first bubble came through an airlock, we had already written rules for the company [that said], ‘Your family comes first,’” Ricky says. “We started this company so that people could support their families. We don’t want to be the reason people delay starting a family.” Ricky explains the small but growing meadery’s unique approach

to family friendliness. Every employee who works there full-time gets two weeks of paid time off annually. Additionally, everyone who works for the company “in any capacity, from bartender to marketing executive,” he says, can rewrite his or her job description to allow for working remotely in the event that a parent needs to stay home with a sick child, care for an elderly relative or attend a piano recital. The company also goes above and beyond what’s required by law. As a workplace with just six employees, they’re not mandated to keep employees’ jobs waiting for them if they go on maternity or paternity leave. But the Kleins say they’ll do it anyway. The couple is expecting their first child in June. Ricky admits that creating a family-friendly workplace isn’t cheap. Indeed, before Groennfell began turning a profit last year, the Kleins occasionally had to dig into their own pockets to ensure that all their employees got paid. But Ricky sees their policies as good for the company’s bottom line because it creates a happier and more dedicated workforce, thus reducing turnover, which is very costly for small businesses. “Your child is only 5 one time. We have the rest of our lives to put mead in cans and put it on the shelf,”

he adds. “If I’m the reason someone misses a first ballet performance, that’s something I can never forgive.” Few Vermont businesses have as much invested in promoting familyfriendly workplaces as Mamava, a Burlington startup that’s been at the forefront of transforming cultural norms and expectations around breastfeeding and keeping nursing mothers in the workplace. Mamava was inspired by the experiences of cofounders Christine Dodson and Sascha Mayer, who as businesswomen were forced to pump breast milk and breastfeed in lessthan-desirable locations, including public restrooms, cars, airports and windowed conference rooms without curtains or blinds. Today, Mamava designs and builds freestanding lactation “pods,” or suites, that enable new mothers to nurse or pump in a clean, relaxing and private setting. Currently, more than 155 lactation suites have been deployed, including at 22 airports nationwide as well as in an Army medical facility in Landstuhl, Germany. Mayer, who hired the company’s first paid employee in September 2015, says it was “never a question” that Mamava would offer its staff paid time off when they brought a new baby or child into the family. “From the very beginning we

MATTHEW THORSEN

Investing in Nesting


Paid Family Leave Progress in Vermont

or more. Vermonters at or near the poverty line — those earning $11,800 annually for a single person or $24,300 for a family of four — would likely reap the biggest benefit, with paid leaves projected to rise by 38 percent. One small business owner enthusiastic about the paid family and medical leave bill is Jaquelyn Rieke, founder and owner of Nutty Steph’s of Middlesex, maker of Vermont granola and chocolate confections. Rieke, who launched her business 14 years ago, has 12 full-time employees on staff. She currently offers them six weeks of paid maternity or paternity leave at 30 to 70 percent

BY THE NUMBERS In the fall of 2016, the Vermont Commission on Women, an independent, non-partisan entity dedicated to advancing rights and opportunities for women in the state, surveyed 427 Vermont business owners to gauge their interest in a statewide paid family and medical leave insurance program. Here are some of their findings:

89% offered some type of paid short-term leave.* 47% expressed support for family-leave plans. 16% offer paid maternity leave.

9% offer paid paternity leave. * Such as general paid time off (PTO), paid sick days, paid vacation and temporary disability insurance.

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of the employees’ pay, depending upon how long they’ve been with the company. Three employees have taken family leave so far. Rieke admits it’s not easy to be that generous, in part because she can’t afford to hire a short-term replacement. “It’s hard and stressful. I tend to take that [work] on personally,” she says. “But it’s so worth it. Maybe it’s just a feel-good thing but, for me, it makes our team feel whole. We’re really interested in what people’s mental health is and how it’s relating to their life outside of the job.” And if Vermont ultimately adopts a paid family-leave plan? “That would be phenomenal,” she says. “All of my employees would have better leave than they already do and it would cost me vastly less.” K

KIDS VT

well as for lower-income earners. The Vermont Commission on Women’s study on paid family leave bears out that assertion. According to its analysis, with a statewide leave insurance program in place, leaves taken by workers at smaller Vermont businesses — that is, those with fewer than 50 employees — would increase by 24 percent, compared with an increase of 15 percent for workers at larger businesses. Perhaps the most dramatic benefit would be reaped by lower-income workers, especially Vermonters with incomes at or near the poverty line. According to the study, the number of paid leaves taken by low-income workers — those earning $30,000 or less annually — would jump by 20 percent, compared with a 9 percent increase for workers earning $75,000

MARCH 2017

State lawmakers from across the political spectrum are looking to find a way to offer paid family and medical leave for all Vermonters. In February, a tripartisan bill was introduced in the House and Senate that would create a statewide family and medical leave insurance fund for working Vermonters. The bill would impose a statewide 0.93 percent payroll tax to cover up to 12 weeks of fully paid leave annually for workers who have a baby, adopt a child or temporarily leave work to care for a sick relative. The employee would need to have worked for their employer for at least six of the previous 12 months in order to qualify for this benefit. For a worker earning $18 an hour, that payroll tax would translate to a cost of $348 a year, divided equally between the employer and employee, according to Rep. Matthew Trieber (D-Bellows Falls), a sponsor of the bill. For a salaried worker earning $100,000, the employer and employee would each pay about $500 annually into a statewide insurance fund. According to the Vermont Commission on Women report, a paid family and medical leave program could result in $2.6 million to $4 million in annual savings to Vermonters in childcare expenses, health care costs for newborns and reduced public assistance. Currently, the bill has more than 40 cosponsors, including much of the House and Senate leadership and at least five committee chairs. The bill is also endorsed by the Main Street Alliance of Vermont, a coalition of more than 120 small business owners. Still, the legislation faces considerable hurdles, including opposition from Governor Phil Scott, who has already indicated his unwillingness to sign any bill that imposes new taxes or fees on small businesses.

the company’s bottom line in the long run because it helps retain employees like Kent. “We’re competing with the Johnson & Johnsons of the world, with Google, with Netflix, who all have excellent parental leave policies,” Mayer explains. “So for as much of a stressor as it might be in our particular company, I’m so excited to co-opt [our employees’] motherhood to tell their story — and have free mom models!” Predictably, Mayer is in favor of legislation to create a family and medical leave insurance program in Vermont, which she sees as a major boon for small companies like hers as

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knew it was a value set to have great family leave, or as good as we could possibly provide,” she explains. That means every employee qualifies for 12 weeks of fully paid maternity or paternity leave. That policy will put the company’s finances to the test in May, when two of the company’s 10 full-time staffers will be out on maternity leave. “So, this is not a hypothetical situation,” Mayer adds. “It’s very real.” One of those pregnant employees is Nikkie Kent, Mamava’s executive vice president of sales. Kent, who spent 10 years working in the male-dominated tech sector before being hired at Mamava, had her first child at age 31 while working for a medium-size tech company. There, her company’s maternity-leave policy was “zero.” Kent could use her paid vacation time to stay home with her baby, but she didn’t qualify for short-term disability pay. Why not? As Kent was told, she got pregnant “too quickly,” meaning that her insurance plan considered her pregnancy a “preexisting condition,” as she hadn’t been on the policy for at least 10 months when she conceived. Mamava, however, encourages mothers and fathers to stay at home with their new babies, largely because it’s part and parcel of the company’s underlying mission of boosting breastfeeding rates nationally. Kent cites the statistics showing that nearly eight in 10 new mothers initially try to breastfeed. However, by the time babies are 6 months old, rates of breastfeeding plummet to just 18 percent. As she points out, breastfeeding is not only healthier for the infant, but also helps lower the mother’s chances of developing type 2 diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and ovarian cancer. Moreover, Kent says that Mamava’s family-leave policy makes her feel “extremely supported” because she isn’t forced to choose between advancing her career and having a family. “This policy is really saying, We care and we value you as an employee. We’re going to talk the talk and walk the walk,” she adds. “This is good for society, just like breastfeeding is good for society.” Mayer won’t say what it costs Mamava to offer full paid leave but admits it will be a bit of a “strain.” Nevertheless, from a business standpoint, she insists it’s good for


CALENDAR

MARCH

SPONSORED BY:

Punch Pupp . r M et Sh o w Trilogy The creators of VERMONT VAUDEVILLE get the kiddie crowd roaring with laughter with three unique puppet shows featuring a handmade cast of characters, live music, popcorn, cider and a preshow gramophone DJ dance party. All ages. Saturdays, March 11, 18 & 25, at the Gohl Building in Hardwick.

Week to Week SAT

Storytime with Charles Norris-Brown: This anthropologist and children’s authorillustrator reads from his new book Did Tiger Take the Rain? 11 a.m. at Phoenix Books in Rutland.

SAT

Mardi Gras Fun Run: Mirthful athletes costumed in Mardi Gras finery sprint or saunter one merry mile, with a loop through Battery St. 2:15 p.m. at the intersection of Main and Church Streets in Burlington.

WED

Harlem Globetrotters: This world-famous basketball team cuts up the court. 7 p.m. at the University of Vermont’s Patrick Gymnasium in Burlington.

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KIDS VT

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MAR 4

MAR 11

MAR 29

Like the University of Vermont Medical Center on Facebook and get weekly updates from Dr. First! See “First With Kids” videos at uvmhealth.org.


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1 Wednesday CHITTENDEN Bolton Family Activity Week: This winter celebration includes campfires and s’mores, magic shows, ice cream socials, kids’ movies and balloon sculptures. Check boltonvalley.com for detailed schedule. Bolton Valley Resort, 6-8 p.m. Info, 434-6804. Dorothy’s List Book Club: Middle readers make merry conversation around DCF pick I Am Princess X by Cherie Priest. Ages 8-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6:30 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Dungeons & Dragons: Novice and experienced players use their imaginations together. Ages 10 and up. Regular attendance needed to follow the ongoing storyline. Jericho Town Library, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Info, 899-4686. FREE Evolution Prenatal Yoga: Mothers-to-be build strength, stamina, comfort and a stronger connection to their baby. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, 5:45-7:15 p.m. $15 or $130 for 10-class pass. Info, 864-9642. Game Day: Game aficionados of all ages bond over boards. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2:30-3:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

2 Thursday CALEDONIA 25 Years of ‘The Magic Tree House’ Celebration: These beloved Mary Pope Osborne books are fêted with a special storytime, including Magic Tree House passports and live Jack and Annie characters for all-age photoops. Galaxy Bookshop, Hardwick, 10:30 a.m. Info, 472-5533. FREE

CHITTENDEN Audubon Homeschool Program: Home-based learners use the outdoor classroom to explore a variety of seasonal topics, from insect life to bird habitat. Ages 6-8. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. $25; $15 each additional sibling; preregister. Info, 434-3068.

Evolution Postnatal Yoga: Moms tote their pre-crawling kids to an all-levels flowing yoga class focused on bringing the body back to strength and alignment in a relaxed and nurturing environment. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, 10:4511:55 a.m. $15; $130 for a 10-class pass. Info, 864-9642.

Bolton Family Activity Week: See March 1, 2-5 p.m.

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 12:301:30 p.m. Kids in the Kitchen: Pepperoni Pizza Macaroni: Junior chefs cook up a creamy sauce, layer it with tangy tomato and add spicy pepperoni, while learning stove safety. Healthy Living Market & Café, South Burlington, 11 a.m.-noon.; preregister. $25. Info, 863-2569.

Maple Events

Lego Club: Mini-makers participate in surprise challenges with colorful interlocking blocks. Ages 6-10. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Preschool Art Drop-In: Petite Picassos craft cool projects. Ages 6 months-5 years with accompanying adult. BCA Center, Burlington, 9:30-11:30 a.m. $5-6. Info, 865-7166. Preschool Music: Lively tunes with local musicians strike the right note among the wee crowd. Ages 5 and under with a caregiver. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.; limited to one session per week per family. Info, 878-4918. FREE

Mister Ethan Musical Concert for Children: Little ones revel in musical merriment with a special local guest. Ages 6 and under. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 4 p.m. Info, 482-2878. FREE One-on-One Tutoring: Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences students coach elementary-age kids in reading, math and science. Grades 1-6. Some assistance available for other grades in certain subjects with inquiry. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 5-8 p.m.; preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: Women prepare for birth through yoga, with a focus on strengthening the body and mind. See prenatalmethod.com for class descriptions. Prenatal Method Studio, Burlington, 12:15-1:15 p.m. $15. Info, 829-0211. Reading Buddies: Little readers pair up with volunteers for literacy and laughs. Kindergarten and up. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-4:30 p.m.; preregistration appreciated but not required. Info, 264-5660. FREE FRANKLIN Magician Tom Joyce: The whole family enjoys a funny guy with his bag of tricks. St. Albans Free Library, 2 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE RUTLAND Lego Club: Junior builders bust out the blocks and creativity in themed sessions. Ages 6 and up. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 3:15-4:15 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE

Maple-minded folks enjoy an afternoon in the outdoors, with sugaring activities, games and theater. Ages 3 and up. Living Tree Alliance Community, Moretown, Sunday, March 12, 2-5 p.m. $5-20 suggested SHELBURNE SUGAR-ON-SNOW donation. Info, 385-1039. PARTY: Families sample the state’s “liquid gold” on JOURNEY FROM SAP TO ice and delight in boiling SYRUP: Wee ones tap a demonstrations, a petting tree, collect buckets of sap zoo, walking trails and live and watch it boil into thick music. All ages. Palmer’s “liquid gold.” Taste tests Sugarhouse, Shelburne, guaranteed. Ages 3-5. Green Saturdays & Sundays, Mountain Audubon Center, Noon-4 p.m. except for Huntington, Thursday, Saturday, March 25 & March 16, 9-10:30 a.m. Sunday, March 26, 9 a.m.$8-10 per adult-child pair; 5 p.m. Info, 985-5054. FREE $4 for each additional child; preregister. Info, 434-3068. SUGAR ON SHELEG: Ohavi Zedek Synagogue hosts a seasonal celebration in Charlotte with tree tapping, a scavenger hunt, nature walks, barn visit and topped off with a vegetarian potluck brunch. Sunday, March 5, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Preregister. Info, 864-0218. FREE

HUNTINGTON SUGARON-SNOW PARTY: Seekers

of the sweet stuff tour the bird-friendly sugarbush, learn tapping techiques, observe sap boiling and taste the yummy result. All ages. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, Saturday, March 25 & Sunday, March 26, 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Food and syrup for sale. Info, 434-3068. MAPLE OPEN HOUSE WEEKEND: Sweet-toothed

visitors find satisfaction when sugar shacks all over the state open their doors. All ages. Various locations statewide. Saturday, March 25 & Sunday, March 26. Visit vermontmaple.org to find a list of participating sugarhouses. Info, 858-9444. FREE

Sound: Little ones listen to the world of noise and build their own musical instrument, with special guest Kurt Valenta. Ages 2-7. Fairfax Community Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 849-2420. FREE

WINDSOR Clay for Tots: Little potters practice, poke and play with a malleable medium. Ages 3-6. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 10:30-11:15 a.m. $12 per drop-in class; preregister. Info, 457-3500.

3 Friday CHITTENDEN Bolton Family Activity Week: See March 1, 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Early Bird Math Story Time: Little ones learn math literacy through games and play. Ages 2-5. Richmond Free Library, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 434-3036. FREE Essex Magic: The Gathering: Planeswalkers seek knowledge and glory in this trading-card game. New players welcome. Grades 6 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6-8 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 8:15-9:15 a.m. Family Gym: Indoor playground equipment gives tumblers a chance to run free. Ages 7 and under. Greater Burlington YMCA, 10:15-11:45 a.m. $5-8 per family; free for members. Info, 862-9622. Friday Free for All: Junior explorers investigate the world, from rocks to bugs. Ages 3-5. Charlotte Public Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m.; preregister. Info, 425-3864. FREE 3 FRIDAY, P.26

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Families tap a tree “the old way” by carving a spile, collecting birch bark and rock-boiling sap, then bring home a bit of the sweet stuff. Ages 6 and up with caregivers. EarthWalk Vermont, Plainfield, Saturday, March 11, 1-4 p.m. $10-25. Info, 454-8500.

The sugar season gets underway with a steaminghot pancake breakfast served up by the Shelburne Explorers 4-H Club, tours in the sugarbush and a meetand-greet with live birds. Shelburne Farms, Sunday, March 19, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Activities free; breakfast $4-8. Info, 985-8686.

syrup? Boiling demonstrations, an all-you-can-eat pancake breakfast until 11:30 a.m. and afternoon live music celebrate this year’s crop. Dakin Farm, Ferrisburgh, Saturday, March 25 & Sunday, March 26, 7:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Breakfast $4.95-7.95. Info, 800-993-2546.

KIDS VT

TRADITIONAL MAPLE SUGARING WORKSHOP:

SHELBURNE FARMS MAPLE SUGARING CELEBRATION:

FERRISBURGH SUGAR ON SNOW: Mad about maple

MARCH 2017

WINDSOR Sensory Lab for Tots: Tiny tots try out selfguided art stations, including finger painting, modeling dough, moon sand and more. Ages 5 and under; adult supervision required. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 9:3011:30 a.m. $5. Info, 457-3500.

celebrated with sticky stuff, doughnuts and dill pickles in a steaming sugarhouse. All ages. Morse Farm Maple Sugarworks, Montpelier, Fridays-Sundays, 10 a.m.4 p.m. Through March 26. $4-6. Info, 223-2740.

SUGAR AND SHMOOZE: VERMONT’S ONLY MAPLE SYRUP PURIM FESTIVAL:

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Rutland Winter Farmers Market: More than fifty vendors peddle produce, from fresh salad greens to apples and cider, alongside artisan cheese, homemade bread and other local products. All ages. Vermont Farmers Food Center, Rutland, 3-6 p.m. Info, 342-4727. FREE

MONTPELIER SUGAR ON SNOW: The sweet season is

FRANKLIN Lego Thursdays: Kiddie constructionists combine their creativity with the library’s supplies. All ages. Haston Library, Franklin, 2-5 p.m. Info, 285-6505. FREE


SUBMIT YOUR APRIL EVENTS FOR PRINT BY MARCH 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

CALENDAR MARCH 3 Friday (cont.) Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: Toe-tapping tunes captivate kiddies. Radio Bean, Burlington, 11 a.m. Info, 660-9346. FREE Music With Robert: Families sing along with a local legend. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE RUTLAND Magic: The Gathering: Novice and experienced players team up for card challenges. Ages 8 and up. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 3:15-4:15 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE

ORLEANS Lego Club: Youngsters build with plastic blocks and enjoy companionship. Ages 4-12. Craftsbury Public Library, Craftsbury Common, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 586-9683. FREE WASHINGTON Family Story Time: Librarian and storyteller Molly Pease leads little ones in stories, crafts, music and more. Bridgeside Books, Waterbury, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 244-1441. FREE

4 Saturday CALEDONIA First Saturday StoryTime: Little bookworms have a blast with stories, crafts and snacks. All ages. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 9-10 a.m. Info, 472-5948. FREE CHITTENDEN Bolton Family Activity Week: See March 1, 8:30 a.m.-10 p.m. Cleo the Therapy Dog: Canine and reading enthusiasts visit with a personable pooch from Therapy Dogs of Vermont. Ages 3 and up. Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE

EvoKids Saturday Yoga: Youngsters master basic yoga poses through games, songs and dance. Mindfulness activities improve focus and concentration. Ages 3-7. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:15 a.m. $15. Info, 864-9642. Kids Building Workshop: Handy helpers learn do-it-yourself skills and tool safety as they construct seasonal projects. Ages 5-12. Home Depot, Williston, 9 a.m.-noon.; preregister at workshops.homedepot.com. Info, 872-0039. Maker Lab: Toy Hacking II: Hands-on kiddos take apart toys and rebuild them. Ages 10-15. Milton Public Library, 10 a.m.-noon. preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE One-on-One Tutoring: See March 1, 9 a.m.3 p.m.

Vertical Challenge: Families enjoy recreational ski racing while working toward earning prizes. Registration opens at 7:30 a.m.; race begins at 11 a.m. Bolton Valley Resort, lift ticket required to participate. Info, 434-6804. Webby’s Art Studio: The museum’s temporary and permanent exhibits inspire specialized art activities for all ages. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Regular admission, $5-10; free for children under 5. Info, 985-3346.

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MARCH 2017

Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

KIDS VT

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FREE

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See March 1, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Storytime with Charles Norris-Brown: This anthropologist and children’s author-illustrator reads from his new book Did Tiger Take the Rain? All ages. Phoenix Books Rutland, 11 a.m. Info, 855-8078. FREE

WASHINGTON Capital City Winter Farmers Market: Root veggies, honey, maple syrup and crafts change hands at an indoor off-season celebration of locavorism. All ages. Montpelier City Center, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 223-2958. FREE WINDSOR Family Clay: Children and their parents make memories firing and glazing special pieces. All ages. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 10 a.m.-noon, $20 per parent-child pair; $5 per additional family member; preregister. Info, 457-3500.

5 Sunday CHITTENDEN Bolton Family Activity Week: See March 1, 8:30 a.m.-6 p.m. Essex Open Gym: Energy-filled kids flip, jump and tumble in a state-of-the-art facility. Ages 6 and under, 1 p.m.; ages 7-12, 2:30 p.m.; ages 13 and up, 4 p.m. Regal Gymnastics Academy, Essex, 1-5:30 p.m. $8. Info, 655-3300. Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See March 2, 12:151:30 p.m. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 10-11:30 a.m. COURTESY OF SESAME WORKSHOP

Rutland Book Sale: Bibliophiles thumb through hundreds of gently-used hardcovers, paperbacks, puzzles, CDs and DVDS. Proceeds support library collections and activities. Rutland Free Library, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, 773-1860. FREE

RUTLAND Rutland Book Sale: See March 3, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Live Performances SESAME STREET LIVE: MAKE A NEW FRIEND:

An audience of wee ones learns that Elmo, Abby Cadabby, Big Bird and more favorite characters can mend differences and merrily sing together. Flynn MainStage, Burlington,.Wednesday, March 1, 3:30 & 7 p.m. $23.68-64.22. Info, 863-5966.

‘THE KIDS ARE ALRIGHT’: An all-star local

lineup of Rough Francis, Swale, James Kochalka Superstar and more rock the house during this family-friendly concert, supporting the Integrated Arts Academy. Food and drink available for purchase. Doors open at noon. Higher Ground, South Burlington, Saturday, THE GROOVY GUY SHOW: A comic gets the March 18, 12:30 p.m. $5-7 for children; crowd giggling with his acrobatic antics. Stowe Elementary School, Thursday, March $10-12 for adults. Info, 652-0777. 2, 2-2:45 p.m. By donation. Info, 253-6138. ‘ELEPHANT AND PIGGIE: WE ARE IN A PLAY’: Mo Willems’ beloved books turn DARTMOUTH YOUTH WIND ENSEMBLE: Upper into a musical romp where two bosom Valley middle school musicians dazzle the buddies sing and dance through the audience with a new repertoire mentored by the Dartmouth College Wind Ensemble. challenges of friendship and what to wear to a pool party. The audience Ages 5 and up. Spaulding Auditorium, joins in the fun for the ‘Flippy Floppy Hanover, Saturday, March 4, 1:30 p.m. Info, Floory’ dance. Moore Theater, Hopkins 603-646-2422. FREE Center for the Arts, Dartmouth College, MASQUERADE JAZZ & FUNK WINTER MUSIC Hanover, Sunday, March 19, 3 p.m. CARNIVAL: Live music, an expansive taco bar, $10-23. Info, 603-646-2422. mask making and lots of fun are served up TRIP DANCE COMPANY: This competitive at this annual New Orleans-style festival. Costumes welcome. Masks encouraged. All Stowe-based dance company, with performers ages 6-18, shows off a ages. Barnard Town Hall, Saturday, March 4, 5-11 p.m. $10-20; free for children 6 and wide range of classical and original choreography. All ages. Spruce Peak under. Info, 234-1645. Performing Arts Center, Stowe, 7-9 MR. PUNCH PUPPET SHOW TRILOGY: The p.m. $20-25; proceeds benefit the dance creators of Vermont Vaudeville get the company. Info, 253-5151. kiddie crowd roaring with laughter in three MINI MUD YOUTH VARIETY SHOW: 48 young unique puppet shows with a handmade cast, performers ages 8-18 strut their stuff live music, popcorn, cider and a preshow during this showcase of music, magic tricks, gramophone DJ dance party. All ages. The Gohl Building, Hardwick, Saturdays, March dance and more. All ages. Chandler Music Hall, Randolph, Saturday, March 25, 7 p.m. 11, 18 & 25, 2 p.m. $5 suggested donation. $5-15; proceeds benefit youth programming Info, 472-1387. at Chandler. Info, 728-6464. SPRING RUG CONCERT: The Vermont NORTHEAST THEATRE ON ICE FESTIVAL: Youth Orchestra introduces little ones to orchestra instruments in a family-friendly Teams from around New England perform choreographic exercises and skate routines. setting. Ages 5 and under with caregivers. Tickets good for the entire day. Team Elley-Long Music Center, Colchester, practice on ice begins at 8 a.m.; exhibitions Saturday, March 11, 11 a.m.-noon. $5-10; at 1 p.m. Leddy Park Arena, Burlington, preregister. Info, 655-5030. Saturday, March 25. $5. Info, 865-7558. VERMONT PHILHARMONIC FAMILY CONCERT:

The VPO and Green Mountain Youth Symphony join forces for a pleasing performance for all ages, with student composer Emily Sinnott performing her ‘Starlit Waltz’ and audience participation in the ‘1812 Overture.’ Barre Opera House, Sunday, March 12, 2 p.m. $5-15. Info, 476-8188.

THE MAGIC OF ST. PATRICK’S DAY: Marko

the Magician mesmerizes the crowd with his marvels. Woodstock Town Hall Theatre, Friday, March 17, 7-8 p.m. $8-20; preregister; proceeds benefit Zack’s Place’s nonprofit programming for special needs people of all ages. Info, 457-5868.

‘WASABI: A DRAGON’S TALE’: The No Strings

Marionette Company tells a modern fable focusing on the plight of Princess Aja, who gets carried off by a fire-breathing dragon. The audience also enjoys a sing-along and a behind-the-scenes look at the puppets. Ages 3 and up with caregiver. Hopkins Center for the Arts, Hanover, Saturday, March 25, 11 a.m. Info, 603-646-2422. FREE HARLEM GLOBETROTTERS: This world-

famous b-ball team cuts up the court. All ages. UVM Patrick Gymnasium, Burlington, Wednesday, March 29, 7 p.m. $24-37, plus ticketing fees. Info, 678-497-1900.

Sesame Street Live

Family Concert: Calloway Taxi sings a cappella classic jazz and pop tunes. All ages. Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, Jericho, 2 p.m. Info, 899-5433. FREE Family Gym: See March 3. WASHINGTON Flapjack Fundraiser: Hungry eaters fill up with hearty pancakes topped with fresh maple syrup. All ages. Morse Farm Maple Sugarworks, Montpelier, 8-10 a.m. $8; proceeds benefit a local organization. Info, 223-2740.

6 Monday ADDISON PJ Story Time: Little ones in jammies join in for good night tales. Ages 3-7. Bixby Memorial Library, Vergennes, 6-7 p.m.; preregister. Info, 877-2211. FREE CALEDONIA Hardwick Music & Movement for Preschoolers: Educator Emily Lanxner gets the beat going with creative storytelling, movement and rhythm. Geared towards preschoolers, but all are welcome. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 10 a.m. Info, 472-5948. FREE


CHITTENDEN A Circle of Parents: Moms and dads come together to strengthen parenting skills and socialize. New Life Fellowship Church, Milton, 6:30-8 p.m.; preregister. Info, 498-0607. FREE Audubon Nature Playgroup: Little ones and their caregivers explore the woods, meadows, beaver and peeper ponds while meeting new friends. Ages birth to 5 years. Open to Richmond, Huntington, and Hinesburg residents. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9:30-11 a.m.; preregister. Info, 434-3068. FREE Bolton Family Activity Week: See March 1, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Essex Lego Club: Inventive kiddos press together plastic-piece creations. Ages 5-12. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 879-0313. FREE Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 5:45-7 p.m. Homeschool Parent Meeting: Parents of homelearners socialize and swap stories and resources. South Burlington Community Library, 6-8 p.m. Info, 652-7080. FREE Itty Bitty Public Skating: Tiny feet learn the art of sliding on ice through fun and games. Ages 2-5 with caregiver. Leddy Park, Burlington, 10-11:30 a.m. $8 per family; $1 skate rentals. Info, 865-7558. Milton Legos at the Library: Junior builders bust out interlocking blocks. Snacks served. Grades K-5. Milton Public Library, 3:30-5 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE Nurturing Fathers Program: Dads returning to the community from incarceration or probation receive parenting support to improve communication, develop empathy, practice self-care and empower their families. Light dinner included. First United Methodist Church, Burlington, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 498-0607. FREE One-on-One Tutoring: See March 1. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1. Preschool Music: See March 2, 11 a.m. Essex Junction Spanish Musical Kids: Niños celebrate Latin American culture through tunes and games en español. Ages 1-5 with a caregiver. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Stories with Megan: Little listeners learn and laugh. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Classes List your class or camp here for only $20 per month! Submit the listing by March 15 at kidsvt.com or to classes@kidsvt.com. See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

SPRING FRENCH COURSES FOR CHILDREN AND TEENAGERS: The Hands-On Language Program

offers classes on Sundays, Wednesdays and Thursdays in March and April for students elementary to high-school ages. Classes include games, storytelling, art projects, cultural exposure to French-speaking countries and more, all in French immersion and taught by a native from France. Register online. Burlington. Info: info@thehandsonlanguageprogram. com, thehandsonlanguageprogram.com. PRENATAL & POSTNATAL YOGA CLASSES AT EVOLUTION PRENATAL & FAMILY YOGA CENTER: Have

a more comfortable pregnancy and prepare for birth with stretching, strengthening and relaxation in prenatal yoga — and then bring your body back to balance and strength in postnatal yoga. Join our community of mothers at any point in your pregnancy, and 6 weeks or later in your postpartum time (until baby is crawling). No yoga experience necessary. Prenatal Yoga: Saturdays, 11:30 am; Sundays, 10 a.m.; Mondays, 5:45 p.m.; Tuesdays, 4:15 p.m.; Wednesdays, 5:45 p.m.; Thursdays, 12:30 p.m.; Fridays, 8:15 a.m. Postnatal Yoga: Sundays, 12:15 p.m.; Tuesdays, 11 a.m.; Thursdays, 10:45 a.m.; Fridays, 8:15 a.m.; Fridays, noon (postnatal core).  Drop-ins welcome; $15/class, $130/10 class pass, or $75/monthly unlimited. Location: Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info:evolutionprenatalandfamily.com, 899-0339

EVOKIDS AND EVOBABIES YOGA CLASSES AT EVOLUTION PRENATAL & FAMILY YOGA CENTER: Register now for our spring series of EvoKids and EvoBabies Yoga, ages 6 months

to teen. Weekday and weekend classes available. Location: Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info: evolutionprenatalandfamily.com, 899-0339.

BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU: The future of our nation lies in the courage, confidence and

determination of its people. Our Kids BJJ Program promotes self-esteem, self-confidence, character development and a physical outlet with discipline, cooperation with other children, respect for peers and adults, perseverance, and a healthy lifestyle. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu will help your kids to learn realistic bully-proofing and self-defense skills that they can use for the rest of their lives! Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu builds endurance, patience and self-respect. Give your kids the ability to get stronger, gain confidence and build resilience! Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them practices they can carry with them throughout life. Remember you are raising children, not flowers. First class is free! Please stop by our school at 55 Leroy Road, Williston; call 598-2839; visit our website vermontbjj.com or email julio@bjjusa.com to register your son or daughter!

FRANKLIN Crafternoon: Artsy ones bust out a bead project. St. Albans Free Library, 1-5 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: Little musicians ages 2 and under sing songs and engage in early literacy activities. Rutland Free Library, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 773-1860. FREE

7 Tuesday CHITTENDEN Bolton Family Activity Week: See March 1, 10 a.m.-8 p.m. Colchester Read to Willy Wonka the Chocolate Lab: A certified reading pooch listens patiently to emerging readers. Ages 3-8. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4:15 p.m.; preregister for a time. Info, 264-5660. FREE

Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See March 2, 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 4:15-5:30 p.m. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Preschool Music: Bitty ones dance and sing to a brisk beat. Ages 3-5. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Williston Read to a Dog: Pet-lovers peruse books with registered therapy pooches. All ages. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3:30-4:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 878-4918. FREE FRANKLIN Adoption Support Group: Families facing adoption issues and challenges join forces in a respectful setting. All welcome. Franklin County Senior Center, St. Albans, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Info, 524-1700. FREE Fairfax Family Game Night: Families take over the library’s tabletops for a lively evening. Ages 5 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 6-8 p.m. Info, 849-2420. FREE Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Gaming Tuesdays: Players of all skill levels team up for card playing. All ages. Haston Library, Franklin, 4-7 p.m. Info, 285-6505. FREE Swanton Nurturing Parent Program: Moms and dads deepen parent-child communication skills, discuss empathy and learn how to empower their families. A light dinner and childcare are included. Swanton Head Start, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 498-0607. FREE RUTLAND Chess Club: Strategists enjoy competition and camaraderie. All ages. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 3:15 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE

Crafternoon: Maker-minded kiddos create cool projects. Ages 7 and up. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 482-2878. FREE 7 TUESDAY, P.28

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CALENDAR MARCH 7 Tuesday (cont.) WINDSOR Lego Tuesdays: Young builders bust out blocks and get building. Children under 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Norwich Public Library, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 649-1184. FREE

8 Wednesday CHITTENDEN Burlington Nurturing Parent Program: In this weekly series, moms and dads deepen parent-child communication skills, discuss empathy and learn how to empower their families. A light lunch is included. Community Health Center of Burlington, 11 a.m.-1 p.m.; preregister. Info, 498-0607. FREE Colchester Dungeons & Dragons Night: Players don invented personas and use cleverness and luck to overcome challenges, defeat enemies and save the day. Beginners welcome. Ages 9-13. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6-7:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Dorothy’s List Group for Homeschooled Students: Books nominated for this esteemed award generate group discussion. Grades 4-8. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Dungeons & Dragons: See March 1. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1. Family Fun Night: The whole family turns out for games, Legos, crafts and more. All ages. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 5-6:30 p.m.; pizza available with preregistration. Info, 482-2878. FREE Green Mountain Book Award Book Discussion for Homeschooled Students: High-school homeschoolers spark lively conversation around What If? by Randall Munroe and Wolf by Wolf by Ryan Graudin. Grades 9-12. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Make A Glitter Jar: Crafty kiddos put together a swirling paradise. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

One-on-One Tutoring: See March 1. Photography Club: Amateur lens-lovers learn tips to improve their camera skills. Grades 6-8. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4-5 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1.

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Red Clover Group for Homeschooled Students: Budding book lovers bury themselves in bibliophile activities. Grades K-3. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Yoga for Kids: Young yogis engage their energy and explore breathing exercises and relaxation poses. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Young Writers & Storytellers: Small ones spin their own yarns. Ages 5-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4-5 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE

FRANKLIN Lego Club: Budding builders construct creatively with colorful blocks. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE RUTLAND Lego Club: See March 1.

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See March 1. WASHINGTON Song Circle: Community Sing-Along: Songbirds raise their voices with singer/ songwriter Heidi Wilson in the lead. All ages. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 6:45-8:15 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE WINDSOR Sensory Lab for Tots: See March 1.

9 Thursday CHITTENDEN ‘Girl Rising: Changing the World One Girl at a Time’: Author Tanya Lee Stone inspires readers of all ages to join a growing movement to change the world positively, with discussion and a brief viewing of a documentary. All ages. Phoenix Books, Burlington, 6:30-7:30 p.m. $3. Info, 448-3351. Audubon Homeschool Program: Home-based learners use the outdoor classroom to explore a variety of seasonal topics, from measuring forests to aquatic ecosystems. Ages 9-12. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. $25; $15 each additional sibling; preregister. Info, 434-3068. Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See March 2. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 12:301:30 p.m. Food for Thought Teen Group: Young adults polish off pizza as they ponder library projects. Grades 7-12. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4-5 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE Itty Bitty Public Skating: See March 6. Lego Club: See March 2. Mother Up! Monthly Meet-up: Families discuss the realities of climate change, what that means on a local level and how to transition to a safer and healthier world. Vegetarian meal and childcare for ages 3 and under provided. All ages. Unitarian Universalist Society, Burlington, 5:30-7:30 p.m; RSVP. Info, 765-3372778. FREE Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Preschool Art Drop-In: See March 2. Preschool Music: See March 2. Read to Archie the Therapy Dog: An attentive canine listens to little people read. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4 p.m.; preregistration appreciated. Info, 878-6956. FREE

FRANKLIN Lego Thursdays: See March 2. Parenting Workshop: Children’s Rivalry: Educator Scott Noyes leads a workshop about how to help children cope with rivalry, competition, resentfulness, envy and conflict. Fairfax Community Library, 6:15-8 p.m.; preregister. On-site childcare available. Info, 849-2420. FREE PJ Story Time: Children chill in their jammies while crafting and listening to stories. Ages 6 and under. Fairfax Community Library, 6-7 p.m. Info, 849-2420. FREE Read to a Dog: Little book lovers select stories to share with a furry friend. Ages 5-10. Fairfax Community Library, 3:15-4:15 p.m.; preregister for 15-minute time slot. Info, 849-2420. FREE St. Albans Library Legos: Aspiring architects engage in construction projects with their peers. St. Albans Free Library, 3-5 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

WINDSOR Clay for Tots: See March 2.

10 Friday CHITTENDEN Dungeons & Dragons: Players embark on invented adventures, equipped with their problem-solving skills. Grades 6 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Early Bird Math Story Time: See March 3. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 8:15-9:15 a.m. Family Gym: See March 3. Friday Free for All: See March 3.

Songs & Stories With Matthew: Musician Matthew Witten kicks off the morning with tunes and tales. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Teen Advisory Board: Adolescents plan the “Pun-Off,” a community event hosted by teens. Grades 9 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE RUTLAND Magic: The Gathering: See March 3. ORLEANS Lego Club: See March 3. WASHINGTON Family Story Time: See March 3.

Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See March 3. Music With Robert: See March 3.

Science & Nature

BUTTERFLY FESTIVAL: Visitors observe live butterflies, test their engineering skills with a butterfly fling challenge and participate in other hands-on activities. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, Through March 7. Free with regular museum admission, $13.50-16.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848. SCIENCE AND STORIES: Preschoolers rally ’round for nature-inspired tales and activities. Ages 8 and under. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m. Regular museum admission, $13.50-16.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848. VERMONT FLOWER SHOW: Fascinating displays of flora with a “Neverland” theme wow green-thumbed visitors, while a family room provides hands-on activities and entertainment. All ages. Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, Friday, March 3, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Saturday, March 4, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. & Sunday, March 5, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $5-16; free for children under 3; $25 for a two-day pass; $35 for three-day pass. Info, 425-5117. TOUR THE COSMOS: This 50-minute live presentation takes the audience on a journey deep into the universe. Ages 6 and up. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, Saturdays & Sundays, 1:30 p.m. $6 plus regular museum admission, $7-9; free for children under 5. Info, 748-2372. WINTER TRAILS DAY: The Green Mountain

Club hosts an active day of exploration on snow-covered terrain. All ages. See greenmountainclub.org for times and specific activities. Long Trail Brewing Company, Bridgewater, Saturday, March 4, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. $10 suggested donation; free for kids under 12. Info, 244-7037.

DISCOVERY SUNDAYS: Families have

fun with hands-on science experiments and investigations, using wheels, towers, magnets, feathers, water and bubbles. Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center, Quechee, Sundays, 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Regular museum admission, $12.50-14.50; free for children under 4. Info, 359-5001, ext. 228.

MONTSHIRE UNLEASHED: AN EVENING FOR ADULTS: The museum opens its doors after

hours so grown-ups can let their inner curiosity run wild. Beer, wine and food available for purchase. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, Friday, March 10, 6-9 p.m. $15 museum admission; free for members. Info, 649-2200. CORVID COMMUNITY NATURALISTS: This

monthly gathering explores Burlington’s urban wilds through the seasons. Bring a notebook, writing implement and your curiosity. Open to the community; ages 5 and up. Rock Point, Burlington, Saturday, March 11, 9 a.m.-noon. $10 suggested donation; $20 per family. Info, 557-7127.

SEED SWAP: Gardeners exchange their non-GMO gems and partake in a plantand-take seed-starting kids’ activity to welcome spring. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Saturday, March 11, noon-3 p.m. Info, 861-4769. FREE TAKE APART DAY: Curious kiddos of all ages

explore the “guts” of everyday items, from toasters to toys. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, Saturday, March 11, 1-4 p.m. Regular museum admission, $12-15; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200.

WINTERVALE: Outdoor activities, local food

and hot chocolate for purchase — plus three miles of groomed cross-country ski trails, with free rentals, weather permitting — await nature-loving Vermonters in Burlington’s backyard. Weather dependent. Burlington’s Intervale, Sunday, March 12, noon-3 p.m. Info, 660-0440. FREE

PLAY DATE! SPRING ON THE FARM: Little

ones drop in to meet wiggly worms, burrow underground like a woodchuck, tap a maple tree and greet a live owl, with the help of farm educators. Ages 2-5, accompanied by an adult. Families are welcome to bring a snack or lunch. Shelburne Farms, Saturday, March 25, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. $3-5 per child; preregister. Info, 985-8686.


SUBMIT YOUR APRIL EVENTS FOR PRINT BY MARCH 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

11 Saturday CHITTENDEN Burlington Winter Farmers Market: Local farmers, artisans and producers offer fresh and prepared foods, crafts and more in a bustling indoor marketplace made merry with live music. UVM Davis Student Center, Burlington, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 310-5172. FREE Chess Club: Teen players teach novices new strategies. All ages, but children 8 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 878-6956. FREE Craft School Saturday Drop-In: Artsy types make seasonal masterpieces in this everchanging weekly series. Projects available for pickup at a later date. Ages 5 and up with caregiver. Shelburne Craft School, 10-11 a.m. $10 per child. Info, 985-3648. EvoKids Saturday Yoga: See March 4. LuLaRoe Fundraiser for the Winooksi PTO: Fashion-conscious families check out spiffy clothing and support the school. Ages 8 and up. Winooski Middle/High School, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Info, 734-3076. FREE Magic Hat Mardi Gras Parade: Bead catchers boogie to music from festive floats and clap for the Bindlestiff Family Cirkus. Families with children under 10 can watch the parade roll by from the Little Jambalaya Viewing Zone located on the north side of Main Street, between South Champlain and Battery. Downtown Burlington, 3-4 p.m. Info, 658-2739. FREE Mardi Gras Fun Run: Mirthful athletes costumed in Mardi Gras swag sprint or saunter one merry mile, with a loop through Battery St. All ages and abilities. Church and Main Streets, Burlington, 2:15 p.m. $20; proceeds benefit the Vermont FoodBank. One-on-One Tutoring: See March 1, 9 a.m.3 p.m. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

New Parents

NEW MOMS PLAYGROUP: Mamas with tiny tots swap stories and socialize. All ages. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, Tuesdays, 11:15 a.m.-1:15 p.m. Info, 899-0339. FREE MOM AND BABY YOGA: Brand-new mamas and their littles relax, stretch and bond. Followed by a free mothers’ gathering. Embodied, Montpelier, Wednesdays, 10:30-11:30 a.m. $15. Info, 223-5302. MOTHER’S GATHERING: Moms and new babies spread out, sip tea, nurse and swap stories. Children under 2 welcome. Embodied, Montpelier, Wednesdays, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Info, 223-5302. FREE

SOUTH BURLINGTON PRENATAL EMPOWERMENT CLINIC: Expectant

mamas get guidance on health, nutrition and exercise. Hemmett Health, South Burlington, Wednesdays, 12-12:30 p.m. Through April 26; preregister. Info, 879-1703. FREE

ESSEX LA LECHE LEAGUE: Moms bring

their little ones to a discussion of parenting and breastfeeding. Siblings welcome. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, Thursday, March 2, 6:30-8 p.m.

FREE

MONTPELIER PRENATAL EMPOWERMENT CLINIC: Expectant mamas get guidance

on health, nutrition and exercise. Hemmett Health Montpelier, Thursdays, 12-12:30 p.m. Through April 27; preregister. Info, 879-1703. FREE NEW MAMA YOGA: New and experienced

WINDSOR Norwich Winter Farmers Market: Local growers present produce, meats and maple syrup, complementing baked goods and crafts from area artists. Tracy Hall, Norwich, 10 a.m.1 p.m. Info, 384-7447. FREE Second Saturdays: This child-friendly afternoon, a collaboration between the Norwich Public Library and the Norwich Bookstore, celebrates reading with various themed activities. Check norwichlibrary.org for location. 1-2 p.m. Info, 649-1184. FREE

12 Sunday CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See March 5. Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See March 2, 12:151:30 p.m. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 10-11:30 a.m. Family Gym: See March 3. Purim Party: Merry makers of all ages celebrate with general raucousness, a bouncy castle, musical cupcakes and a vegetarian/ dairy-free potluck. Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 864-0218. FREE WASHINGTON Dance, Sing & Jump Around: A lively intergenerational afternoon includes traditional dances, with instruction, live music and healthy snacks. Ages 3 and up. Plainfield Town Hall Opera House, 3-4:30 p.m. $5 suggested donation; free for children. Info, 223-1509.

13 Monday CALEDONIA Hardwick Music & Movement for Preschoolers: See March 6.

Spanish Musical Playgroup: Rhymes, books, songs and crafts en español entertain niños. Snacks provided. Ages 5 and under. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.noon. Info, 878-4918. FREE

moms tote their tiny ones to a relaxed and social class, followed by a playgroup. Bring a few blankets for your baby’s comfort. Ages 6 weeks to 6 months. Kula Yoga Center, Stowe, Saturdays, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m. $16.

CHITTENDEN Audubon Nature Playgroup: See March 6.

Webby’s Art Studio: See March 4.

BREASTFEEDING CAFÉ: Moms nurse their

Essex Lego Club: See March 6.

FRANKLIN Kids’ Movie Matinee: A PG-rated film furnishes amusement for families. St. Albans Free Library, 12:30 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE Vermont Rails Model Railroad Show: Little ones go loco for locomotives as they watch operating models chug on by. All ages. CollinsPerley Sports Complex, St. Albans, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. $1-5; free for kids under 6.

FREE

rienced moms join nursing experts for advice and support. Enter through the children’s section of the library. Siblings welcome. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, Tuesday, March 14, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 720-272-8841. FREE BREASTFEEDING FAMILIES GROUP:

Nursing moms (and supportive dads, too!) gather for snacks and advice. Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, Wednesday, March 15, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 888-3470. FREE

Nurturing Fathers Program: See March 6. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1. Preschool Music: See March 2, 11 a.m. Queer Care Support: Adult family members and caregivers of queer, and/or questioning youth swap stories and resources in a supportive space. Adults only. Outright Vermont, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Info, 865-9677. FREE Essex Junction Spanish Musical Kids: See March 6. Stories with Megan: See March 6. FRANKLIN Minecraft Perspective Drawing: Art-minded youngsters learn perspective basics using this popular game’s style. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420.

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 4:15-5:30 p.m. Kids in the Kitchen: Tofu and Veggie Spring Rolls: Junior chefs chop veggies and create Vietnamese-style rolls, with a side of fromscratch peanut sauce. Healthy Living Market & Café, South Burlington, 4-5 p.m.; preregister. $25. Info, 863-2569. Library Elementary Event Planners: Kids make plans for a K-4 Storybook Tea Time and chow down on munchies. For middle school students. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Preschool Music: See March 7. Burlington Spanish Musical Kids: Niños celebrate Latin American culture through tunes and games en español. Ages 1-5 with a caregiver. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:45 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE FRANKLIN Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Gaming Tuesdays: See March 7. Sewing Club: Aspiring seamstresses try out a sewing machine and stitch a project. Ages 10 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE Swanton Nurturing Parent Program: See March 7. WINDSOR Art Monkeys: With rotating weekly themes, this drop-in class encourages children to explore color, paint, markers, oil pastels, clay, movement and the joy of creativity. Ages 18 months to 5 years. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 9:30-10:30 a.m. $12 per drop-in class; preregister. Info, 457-3500. Lego Tuesdays: See March 7.

15 Wednesday CHITTENDEN Baby Charms: Non-walking babies sing silly songs, dance and make music. South Burlington Community Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 652-7080. FREE

Chess Club: Young players check out the game and improve their skills with rooks, pawns, and knights. All ages. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

Dungeons & Dragons: See March 1. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1.

RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See March 6.

KIDS VT

WASHINGTON Kids Trade & Play: Families exchange clean and gently-used clothing and toys, size newborn to 12. Capital City Grange, Berlin, 9:30-11:30 a.m. $3 per family. Info, 831-337-8632.

LA LECHE LEAGUE OF THE NORTHEAST KINGDOM: Expectant, novice and expe-

Itty Bitty Public Skating: See March 6.

CHITTENDEN Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See March 2, 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m.

MARCH 2017

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See March 1, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

BURLINGTON LA LECHE LEAGUE: New moms bring their babies and questions to a breastfeeding support group. Older children welcome. Lending library available. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, Tuesday, March 14, 10:15 a.m. Info, 985-8228. FREE

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 5:45-7 p.m.

14 Tuesday

KIDSVT.COM

RUTLAND ‘Sleep Tight Farm’ Storytime: Local author and farmer Eugenie Doyle reads her new picture book to avid listeners, supplemented by ‘show and tell’ items from her farm. All ages. Phoenix Books Rutland, 11 a.m.-noon. Info, 855-8078.

babies, chat and ask for answers from a certified lactation consultant. Pregnant women, supportive dads and older siblings welcome. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, Tuesday, March 14, 11:15 a.m.-1:15 p.m. Info, 349-3825. FREE

Crafts for Kids: Clever kiddos pursue artsy projects. Ages 5 and up. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

29

15 WEDNESDAY, P.30


CALENDAR MARCH 15 Wednesday (cont.)

Story Times Early literacy skills get special attention during these read-aloud sessions. Some locations provide additional activities such as music, crafts or foreign-language instruction. Most story times follow the school calendar. Contact the organizers for site-specific details. MONDAY

BARRE CHILDREN’S STORY HOUR: Aldrich

SOUTH BURLINGTON TINY TOT TIME: South

Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 476-7550.

Burlington Community Library, 9:15 & 10:30 a.m. Info, 652-7080.

COLCHESTER PRESCHOOL STORY TIME:

WILLISTON STORY TIME: Dorothy Alling

Burnham Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m.; preregister. Info, 264-5660.

ESSEX DROP-IN STORY TIME: Essex Free

Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313.

HYDE PARK STORY TIME: Lanpher Memorial

Library, 6 p.m. Info, 888-4628.

NORTHFIELD CHILDREN’S STORY TIME: Brown

Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 485-4621.

RICHMOND BABY LAP TIME: Richmond Free

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 434-3036.

SHELBURNE STORY TIME: Pierson Library,

10:30 a.m. Info, 985-5124.

ST. ALBANS STORY HOUR: St. Albans Free

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507.

STOWE STORY TIMES FOR 2-3-YEAR-OLDS:

Stowe Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 253-6145.

WAITSFIELD STORY TIME: Joslin Memorial

Library, 10 a.m. Info, 496-4205.

WATERBURY BABY & TODDLER STORY TIME:

Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 244-7036.

WOODSTOCK BABY STORY TIME: Norman

Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918.

WOODSTOCK PRESCHOOL STORY TIME:

Norman Williams Public Library, 10:3011:15 a.m. Info, 457-2295. WEDNESDAY

Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m.; preregister. Info, 264-5660.

CRAFTSBURY STORY TIME: Craftsbury Public

Library, 10 a.m. Info, 586-9683.

EAST BARRE STORY TIME: East Barre Branch Library, 10 a.m. Info, 476-5118. ESSEX JUNCTION BABY & TODDLER STORY TIME: Brownell Library, 9:10-9:30 a.m.;

preregister. Info, 878-6956.

ESSEX JUNCTION PRESCHOOL STORY TIME:

Brownell Library, 10-10:45 a.m.; preregister. Info, 878-6956.

FAIRFAX PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Fairfax

HYDE PARK STORY TIME: See Monday, 10 a.m.

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 524-4643.

Yoga for Kids: See March 8.

LYNDONVILLE STORY TIME: See Tuesday, 10:30

HUNTINGTON STORY TIME: Huntington Public

FRANKLIN Sewing Club: See March 14.

MARSHFIELD STORY TIME & PLAYGROUP:

KILLINGTON STORYTIME: Sherburne

a.m.

Memorial Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 422-9765.

MILTON RHYTHM & MOVEMENT TODDLER STORY TIME: Milton Public Library, 10 a.m.

LINCOLN STORY TIME: Lincoln Library, 10:30

Info, 893-4644.

NORWICH WORD PLAY STORY TIME: Norwich Public Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 649-1184. QUECHEE STORY TIME: Quechee Public

Library, 10 a.m. Info, 295-1232.

RANDOLPH PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Kimball

Public Library, 11 a.m. Info, 728-5073.

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 434-3036.

Burlington Community Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 652-7080.

STOWE STORY TIME FOR 3-5-YEAR-OLDS:

Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 868-7656.

WARREN PRESCHOOL STORY & ENRICHMENT HOUR: Warren Public Library, 10 a.m. Info,

595-2582.

THURSDAY

SOUTH BURLINGTON PAJAMARAMA: Barnes &

Noble, 7 p.m. Info, 864-8001.

ST. JOHNSBURY STORY TIME: St. Johnsbury

Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m. Info, 748-8291.

STOWE BABY & TODDLER STORY TIME: Stowe

Free Library, 10:15-11:15 a.m. Info, 253-6145. SWANTON STORYTIME: See Wednesday.

Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 655-6424.

KIDSVT.COM

Tuesday.

NORTHFIELD CHILDREN’S STORY TIME: See

Monday.

10-10:45 a.m. Info, 773-1860.

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 985-5124.

VERGENNES STORY TIME: Bixby Memorial

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 877-2211.

WATERBURY PRESCHOOL STORY TIME:

Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 244-7036.

WINDSOR Sensory Lab for Tots: See March 1.

16 Thursday CHITTENDEN Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See March 2.

Itty Bitty Public Skating: See March 6.

Phoenix Books Burlington, 11 a.m. Info, 448-3350.

COLCHESTER PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: See

HINESBURG YOUNGSTERS STORY TIME: See

Marshfield Family-Themed Movies: A wholesome flick fascinates viewers of all ages. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE

STORY TIME AT PHOENIX BOOKS BURLINGTON

Phoenix Books Essex, 11 a.m. Info, 872-7111.

FRANKLIN STORY TIME: Haston Library, 10:30

WASHINGTON Children’s Film Night: Cinema-lovers of all ages take in a short flick before a community dinner is served. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 5:30-6 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 12:301:30 p.m.

COLCHESTER SATURDAY DROP-IN STORY TIME:

a.m. Info, 285-6505.

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See March 1.

10:30 a.m. Info, 476-3114.

Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 453-2366.

Monday.

RUTLAND Lego Club: See March 1.

BARRE STORY TIME: Next Chapter Bookstore,

STORY TIME AT PHOENIX BOOKS ESSEX:

ST. ALBANS STORY HOUR: See Monday.

KIDS VT

RANDOLPH TODDLER STORY TIME: Kimball Public Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 728-5073.

BRISTOL STORY TIME: Lawrence Memorial

MILTON INFANT STORY TIME: Milton Public

30

MONTPELIER STORY TIME: See Tuesday.

SATURDAY

SHELBURNE MUSICAL STORY TIME: Pierson

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 223-3338.

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

SWANTON STORYTIME: Swanton Public

LYNDONVILLE STORY TIME: Cobleigh Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 626-5475.

MONTPELIER STORY TIME: Kellogg-Hubbard

MILTON PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Milton

WINOOSKI STORY TIME: Winooski Memorial

RUTLAND STORY TIME: Rutland Free Library,

Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

a.m. Info, 453-2665.

Stowe Free Library, 10:15-11:15 a.m. Info, 253-6145.

Carpenter-Carse Library, 9:30-10 a.m. Info, 482-2878.

HINESBURG YOUNGSTERS STORY TIME:

Library, 10:45 a.m. Info, 434-4583.

Jaquith Public Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 426-3581.

HIGHGATE STORY TIME: Highgate Public

Library, 11 a.m. Info, 868-3970.

Enosburgh Public Library, 9-10 a.m. Info, 933-2328.

Pajama Story Time: Small ones cozy up for bedtime tales, cookies and milk. Ages 18 months-5 years. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6:30 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Reading Buddies: See March 1, 3:30-4:30 p.m.

MARCH 2017

Community Library, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 849-2420.

ENOSBURG MOMMY & ME STORY HOUR:

GEORGIA PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Georgia

SOUTH BURLINGTON BABY BOOK TIME: South

COLCHESTER TODDLER STORY TIME: Burnham

Library, 2 p.m. Info, 247-8230.

CRAFTSBURY STORY TIME: See Tuesday.

Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313.

HIGHGATE STORY TIME: See Tuesday, 10 a.m.

TUESDAY

BARRE CHILDREN’S STORY HOUR: See Monday.

BRANDON STORY TIME: Brandon Free Public

Little One & Me Circle Time: Tiny tykes team together for movement, songs, play and snacks. Ages 5 and under. Jericho Town Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 899-4686. FREE

Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1.

RICHMOND STORY TIME: Richmond Free

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 796-6077.

FRIDAY

ESSEX MUSICAL STORY TIME: Essex Free

BARNES & NOBLE STORY TIME: Barnes & Noble, 11 a.m. Info, 864-8001.

Williams Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 457-2295.

ALBURGH STORY HOUR: Alburgh Public

WESTFORD STORY TIME: Westford Public Library, 11 a.m. Info, 878-5639.

Learning about Nonviolence: Children’s March of 1963: In a program presented by the Peace & Justice Center, participants view ageappropriate footage of this historic Birmingham march, and explore Kingian non-violence through discussion and song. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30 p.m. Info, 863-2345. FREE

Burnham Memorial Library, 10 a.m. Info, 264-5660.

ENOSBURG STORY HOUR: Enosburgh Public

Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 933-2328.

FRANKLIN WALK-IN STORY HOUR: Haston

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 285-6505.

MILTON DROP-IN SATURDAY STORYTIME:

Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

Lego Club: See March 2. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Preschool Art Drop-In: See March 2. Preschool Music: See March 2. Read to Archie the Therapy Dog: See March 9. FRANKLIN Lego Thursdays: See March 2. Parenting Workshop: Guiding Kids’ Safe Use of Technology: Digital learning specialist Angelique Fairbrother leads a workshop about how to teach children online safety, guiding choices and protecting privacy, and how parents can protect their children while allowing them to use the power of the Internet. Fairfax Community Library, 6:15-8 p.m.; preregister. On-site childcare available. Info, 849-2420. FREE PJ Story Hour: Tykes in nightwear nestle together for nursery rhymes, snacks and crafts. St. Albans Free Library, 6:30 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE WINDSOR Clay for Tots: See March 2.


SUBMIT YOUR APRIL EVENTS FOR PRINT BY MARCH 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

17 Friday Happy St. Patrick’s Day! CALEDONIA Fairbanks Homeschool Day: Students expand their scholastic horizons with a variety of programs. Call for specific topics and location. Grades K-8. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. $8-10 includes museum admission; $5 for planetarium; one free adult per paying child. Info, 748-2372. CHITTENDEN Early Bird Math Story Time: See March 3. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 8:15-9:15 a.m. Family Gym: See March 3. Family Movie: Viewers enjoy a family-friendly film while feasting on free popcorn. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Friday Free for All: See March 3. Jiggity Jog: A musical meet-up includes singing, dancing and instrument playing. Ages 2-5. South Burlington Community Library, 10 a.m. Info, 652-7080. FREE Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See March 3. Live-Action Role Play: LARPers create characters and plots in an amazing adventure of the imagination. For middle and high school students. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-5 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Music With Robert: See March 3. FRANKLIN St. Albans St. Patrick’s Day Parade: The crowd comes out for this short but spirited shindig, with side events including a corned beef and cabbage dinner and socializing. Parade begins at the court house and ends at the City Hall Auditorium. Main Street, St. Albans, 6-8 p.m. Info, 524-1500. FREE RUTLAND Magic: The Gathering: See March 3. ORLEANS Lego Club: See March 3. WASHINGTON Family Story Time: See March 3.

18 Saturday CHITTENDEN Cleo the Therapy Dog: See March 4. Craft School Saturday Drop-In: See March 11. EvoKids Saturday Yoga: See March 4.

Vermont Defenders vs. Vermont Enforcers Benefit Hockey Game: This family event features kid-friendly activities, local mascots, door prizes and raffle items, with a game start of 6 p.m. All ages. Essex Skating Facility, Essex Junction, 5 p.m. $5; proceeds benefit Vermont Soldiers and Law Enforcement Officers. Info, 338-3452. Webby’s Art Studio: See March 4. FRANKLIN Animal Tracks in Nature Walk: Naturalist Kurt Volenta leads young explorers on an outdoor journey into the woods, searching for winter signs of animals. Dress warmly. Ages 2-7. Fairfax Community Library, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 849-2420. FREE RUTLAND Meet the Cat in the Hat: Suess lovers of all ages sit down for a storytime with this beloved character. Phoenix Books Rutland, 11 a.m.noon. Info, 855-8078. FREE Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See March 1, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. WASHINGTON Capital City Winter Farmers Market: See March 4. Deaf Playgroup: Deaf and hearing families and caregivers enjoy company and a playspace geared towards children ages 5 and under. ASL and spoken English used. Family Center of Washington County, Montpelier, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 595-3932. FREE Woodbury Pie Breakfast: Hungry eaters fill up on the all-you-can-eat sweet and savory buffet, while listening to local musicians. Woodbury Elementary School, 8:30-10:30 a.m. $4-7; free for children under 4; proceeds benefit the Woodbury Community Library. Info, 472-5710.

19 Sunday CHITTENDEN Burlington Irish Heritage Festival: This multigenerational gathering gets the party going with dance, a bake sale, displays and a raffle for a trip to Ireland. Young Tradition Vermont takes the limelight from 3-5 pm. All ages. Contois Auditorium, Burlington, 1-5 p.m. By donation. Info, 658-0472. Essex Open Gym: See March 5. Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See March 2, 12:151:30 p.m. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 10-11:30 a.m. Family Gym: See March 3. Ruth Horowitz Visits Shelburne: This children’s author celebrate her new book, Are We Still Friends?, a story about a beekeeper and an apple grower who deepen their friendship. Ages 2 and up. The Flying Pig Bookstore, Shelburne, 1 p.m. RSVP appreciated. Info, 985-3999. FREE

Swanton Nurturing Parent Program: See March 7. See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

20 Monday CALEDONIA Hardwick Music & Movement for Preschoolers: See March 6. CHITTENDEN ‘Star Wars’ Club: Young fans channel the Force and chomp on popcorn. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Audubon Nature Playgroup: See March 6.

WINDSOR Art Monkeys: See March 14. Lego Tuesdays: See March 7. NEW YORK Plattsburgh Preschool Story Hour: Aspiring art connoisseurs and their caregivers listen to a picture book, look at original works and create a project to take home. Ages 3-5. Plattsburgh State Art Museum, 10 a.m.; preregistration appreciated. Info, 518-564-2474. FREE

22 Wednesday

Bedtime Yoga: Little ones in PJs rally round for stories and stretching. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6:30 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

CHITTENDEN Colchester Dungeons & Dragons Night: See March 8.

Essex Lego Club: See March 6.

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1.

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 5:45-7 p.m. Itty Bitty Public Skating: See March 6. Milton Legos at the Library: See March 6, 3:30-5 p.m. Nurturing Fathers Program: See March 6. One-on-One Tutoring: See March 1. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1. Preschool Music: See March 2, 11 a.m. Essex Junction Spanish Musical Kids: See March 6. FRANKLIN Lab Girls: Young women empower themselves by exploring science through hands-on experiments. Grades 6-12. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See March 6.

21 Tuesday CHITTENDEN Colchester Read to Willy Wonka the Chocolate Lab: See March 7. Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See March 2, 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 4:15-5:30 p.m. Kids in the Kitchen: Kids’ Chicken Tenders: Chefs-in-training learn about meat safety and frying techniques, get a sizzling demo and whip up a creamy ranch dressing for dipping. Healthy Living Market & Café, South Burlington, 4-5 p.m.; preregister. $25. Info, 863-2569. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Preschool Music: See March 7. Read to Daisy the Therapy Dog: Book buffs bring a selection from home or borrow from the library to amuse an attentive canine. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4 p.m.; preregistration appreciated. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Burlington Spanish Musical Kids: See March 14.

Lego Fun: Budding builders bust out the blocks. Grades K and up; kids under 5 are welcome to participate with adult supervision. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE One-on-One Tutoring: See March 1. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1. Yoga for Kids: See March 8. Young Writers & Storytellers: See March 8. RUTLAND Lego Club: See March 1. Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See March 1. WINDSOR Sensory Lab for Tots: See March 1.

23 Thursday CHITTENDEN Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See March 2. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 12:301:30 p.m. Itty Bitty Public Skating: See March 6. Jon Klassen and Mac Barnett: This writer and illustrator duo celebrate their newest creation, Triangle, a humorous picture book about the imaginative world of shapes. Shelburne Town Hall, 4 p.m. RSVP required. Info, 985-3999. FREE Lego Club: See March 2. Milton Community Dinner: A hot and healthy meal mixes with socializing to satisfy the community. All ages. Milton Middle School, 4:30-7 p.m.; donations appreciated. Info, 893-5501. FREE Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Preschool Art Drop-In: See March 2. Preschool Music: See March 2. Read to Archie the Therapy Dog: See March 9. FRANKLIN Homeschool STEM Project: Home learners check out engineering challenges. St. Albans Free Library, 1 p.m.; preregister. Info, 524-1507. FREE

Lego Thursdays: See March 2. 23 THURSDAY, P.32

31

Williston Read to a Dog: See March 7.

Dungeons & Dragons: See March 1.

KIDS VT

Junior Iron Chef Vermont: 72 teams of Vermont middle and high school students duke it out for cafeteria supremacy in a statewide culinary competition to create local and healthy dishes to inspire school meal programs. Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m. $3 per spectator; $5 per family (up to 4 people). Info, 434-2831.

Vermont Family StackFest: Competitors of all ages and abilities engage in this timed Junior Olympic Sport of stacking specialized plastic cups in specific sequences. See website for categories and to register. Doors open at 8:30 a.m. Jericho Elementary School, 9 a.m.-noon. FREE

MARCH 2017

Irish Heritage Children’s Crafts and Music: Kids count their lucky charms and celebrate Celtic culture through traditional music and crafts. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10 a.m.-noon. By donation. Info, 658-0472. FREE

FRANKLIN Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Gaming Tuesdays: See March 7.

KIDSVT.COM

Family Contradance: Movers and groovers swing to music by the Woodbury Strings Band Lab with various callers. All ages. The Schoolhouse Learning Center, South Burlington, 3-5 p.m. Sliding-scale admission. Info, 223-8945.

Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 10:30-11:30 a.m.


CALENDAR MARCH 23 Thursday (cont.) Parenting Workshop: Healthy Kids: Nutritionist Mallory James offers suggestions for tempting picky eaters, fostering active play, encouraging healthy eating and cooking on a budget. Snacks served; recipes and resources supplied. Fairfax Community Library, 6:15-8 p.m.; preregister. On-site childcare available. Info, 849-2420. FREE Read to a Dog: See March 9. St. Albans Library Legos: See March 9, 3-5 p.m. GRAND ISLE South Hero Nurturing Parent Program: Moms and dads deepen parent-child communication skills, discuss empathy and learn how to empower their families. A light dinner and childcare are included. Champlain Islands Parent/Child Center, South Hero, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 498-0607. FREE

Seed Starting Workshop: Master gardener Diane Xiques gets the library’s community garden going with junior horticulturists. Grades 1-5. Milton Public Library, 10 a.m.; preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Webby’s Art Studio: See March 4. LAMOILLE TRIP Dance Company: See March 24. RUTLAND Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See March 1, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. WINDSOR Norwich Winter Farmers Market: See March 11.

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 10-11:30 a.m.

Playgroups

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 8:15-9:15 a.m.

MONDAY

Family Gym: See March 3. Friday Afternoon Movie: Kids snuggle in for snacks and a screening. Children under 10 must be accompanied by a caregiver. CarpenterCarse Library, Hinesburg, 3 p.m. Info, 482-2878. FREE

Friday Free for All: See March 3. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See March 3. Songs & Stories With Matthew: See March 10. RUTLAND Magic: The Gathering: See March 3. ORLEANS Lego Club: See March 3. WASHINGTON Family Story Time: See March 3.

25 Saturday CHITTENDEN Burlington Winter Farmers Market: See March 11. Craft School Saturday Drop-In: See March 11. EvoKids Saturday Yoga: See March 4. KIDSVT.COM

Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See March 2, 12:151:30 p.m.

Early Bird Math Story Time: See March 3.

CHITTENDEN Dungeons & Dragons: See March 10.

MARCH 2017

CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See March 5.

Kids enjoy fun and games during these informal gettogethers, and caregivers connect with other local parents and peers. The groups are usually free and often include snacks, arts and crafts, or music. Most playgroups follow the school calendar. Contact the organizer for site-specific details.

24 Friday

KIDS VT

26 Sunday

Family Gym: See March 3.

WINDSOR Clay for Tots: See March 2.

32

Vermont Hands & Voices at the Montshire Museum of Science: This parent-driven organization supporting families of children who are deaf or hard of hearing enjoys a group excursion to the museum. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 1 p.m. Regular museum admission $12-15. Info, 552-0222.

Family Movie Matinee: Families snuggle down, see a big-screen PG-rated flick and savor snacks. All ages. Milton Public Library, 1 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE One-on-One Tutoring: See March 1, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

BURLINGTON CRAWLERS & TODDLERS: VNA Family Room,

10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Info, 862-2121.

BURLINGTON PLAYGROUP:

Robert Miller Community & Recreation Center, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 578-6471.

CAMBRIDGE PLAYGROUP:

Cambridge Elementary School, 9-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229.

CHARLOTTE PLAYGROUP:

Charlotte Central School Early Education Program, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 338-7021.

ESSEX JUNCTION PLAYGROUP:

27 Monday ADDISON PJ Story Time: See March 6. CALEDONIA Hardwick Music & Movement for Preschoolers: See March 6. CHITTENDEN A New View on Discipline: Toddler to Teen: Parenting coach Beth Martell offers an hour of inspiration and information about ways to reduce conflict with your child and increase enjoyment. Adults only. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Info, 881-4161. FREE Audubon Nature Playgroup: See March 6.

SHELBURNE PLAYGROUP: Trinity

Episcopal Church, 9:30-11 a.m.

SOUTH ROYALTON PLAYGROUP:

United Church on the Green, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 685-2264, ext. 24.

ST. JOHNSBURY TODDLER TIME:

St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m. Info, 748-8291, ext. 303.

Maple Street Recreation Center, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 876-7555.

THURSDAY

JERICHO PLAYGROUP: Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 899-4415.

Public Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 527-5426.

WINOOSKI PLAYTIME: O’Brien

ALBURGH PLAYGROUP: Alburgh

BURLINGTON DROP-IN FAMILY PLAY: VNA Family Room,

Community Center, 9:3011:30 a.m. Info, 655-1422.

9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 862-2121.

WOLCOTT PLAYGROUP: Wolcott Depot Center Preschool, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 888-5229.

Family Center of Washington County, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 262-3292.

WEDNESDAY

ESSEX JUNCTION PLAYGROUP:

ARTISTREE PLAYGROUP:

DADS AND KIDS PLAYGROUP:

See Tuesday.

ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, 9:3011:30 a.m. Donations accepted. Info, 457-3500.

HINESBURG BABY TIME:

BURLINGTON INFANT MASSAGE:

JOHNSON PLAYGROUP:

Morristown Elementary School, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229.

VNA Family Room, 11 a.m.noon, Info, 862-2121.

United Church of Johnson, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229.

BURLINGTON PLAYGROUP:

MILTON PLAYGROUP: See Monday.

OPEN GYM: Central VT

CHARLOTTE PLAYGROUP:

Montgomery Town Library, 9-11 a.m. Info, 527-5426.

MILTON PLAYGROUP: Milton

Public Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 893-1457. MORRISVILLE PLAYGROUP:

Gymnastics Academy, Fridays, 10-11:30 a.m. $7. Info, 882-8324. TUESDAY

BRADFORD PLAYGROUP: Grace

United Methodist Church, 9-11 a.m. Info, 685-2264, ext. 24.

BURLINGTON DADS’ NIGHT: VNA Family Room, 4-7 p.m. Info, 860-4420. BURLINGTON PLAYGROUP: See

Monday.

CHARLOTTE BABYTIME: Charlotte

Public Library, first Tuesday of every month, 9-10 a.m.

See Monday.

See Monday, 12:30-1:30 p.m. COLCHESTER PLAYGROUP:

Colchester Village Meeting House, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 316-2918

ESSEX BABY PLAYGROUP:

Essex Parks and Recreation Sunset Studio, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 876-7555.

FAIRFIELD PLAYGROUP:

Bent Northrop Memorial Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 827-3945.

HINESBURG FAMILY PLAYTIME:

Hinesburg Town Hall, 1011:30 a.m. RICHMOND PLAYGROUP:

Richmond Free Library, 8:4510:15 a.m. Info, 899-4415.

United Church of Hinesburg, 10-11:30 a.m.

MONTGOMERY PLAYGROUP:

MONTPELIER PLAYGROUP:

St. Augustine Church, 9:3011 a.m. Info, 262-3292. OHAVI ZEDEK SYNAGOGUE PLAYGROUP: Ohavi Zedek

Synagogue, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 864-0218. RANDOLPH PLAYGROUP: St. John’s Church, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 685-2264, ext. 24. WILLISTON PLAY TIME: Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 11 a.m.-noon. Info, 878-4918. WINOOSKI PLAYTIME:

See Tuesday.

FRIDAY

COLCHESTER PLAYGROUP:

See Wednesday.

HINESBURG PRESCHOOL PLAYGROUP: Hinesburg

Community School, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 482-4946. HUNTINGTON PLAYGROUP:

Huntington Public Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 899-4415.

MONTGOMERY TUMBLE TIME:

Montgomery Elementary School, 10-11 a.m. Info, 347-1780. OPEN GYM: See Monday. RANDOLPH TODDLER TIME:

Kimball Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 728-5073. RUTLAND PLAYGROUP:

Rutland Free Library, 9:30 a.m. Info, 773-1860.

STOWE PLAYGROUP: Stowe Community Church, 9:3011 a.m. Info, 888-5229. UNDERHILL PLAYGROUP:

Underhill Central School, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 899-4415. SATURDAY

MONTPELIER SATURDAY PLAYGROUP: Family Center of

Washington County, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292. MORRISVILLE BABY CHAT:

Lamoille Family Center, second Saturday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 888-5229. STOWE PLAYGROUP: Kula Yoga Center, 1-2 p.m. $10; or free with attendance at 11:45 a.m. yoga class


SUBMIT YOUR APRIL EVENTS FOR PRINT BY MARCH 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM Crafts for Kids: See March 13. Essex Lego Club: See March 6.

RUTLAND Lego Club: See March 1.

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 5:457 p.m.

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See March 1.

Itty Bitty Public Skating: See March 6.

WASHINGTON River Rock School Open House: Prospective parents meet the dedicated teachers and enrolled families behind the school’s innovative educational program for students ages 5-14. River Rock School, Montpelier, 7 p.m. Info, 223-4700. FREE

Nurturing Fathers Program: See March 6. One-on-One Tutoring: See March 1. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1. Preschool Music: See March 2, 11 a.m. Essex Junction Spanish Musical Kids: See March 6. RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See March 6.

28 Tuesday CHITTENDEN Adoption Support Group: Families facing adoption issues and challenges join forces in a respectful setting. Childcare and dinner provided. Howard Center, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 864-7467. FREE Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See March 2, 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 4:15-5:30 p.m. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Preschool Music: See March 7. Read to Daisy the Therapy Dog: See March 21. Read to Van Gogh the Cat: Feline fanciers sign up for literacy sessions with a furry friend. All ages. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3:30-4:30 p.m.; preregister for a reading slot. Info, 878-4918. FREE Burlington Spanish Musical Kids: See March 14. Storybook Tea Time: Middle schoolers don costumes as book characters, read picture books and perform a short play. Grades K-3. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Swanton Nurturing Parent Program: See March 7. WINDSOR Art Monkeys: See March 14. Lego Tuesdays: See March 7.

29 Wednesday CHITTENDEN Dungeons & Dragons: See March 1. One-on-One Tutoring: See March 1. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1.

Yoga for Kids: See March 8.

FAIRBANKS MUSEUM & PLANETARIUM Info, 748-2372 X-RAY VISION: FISH INSIDE AND OUT: This

traveling exhibit from the Smithsonian Institution illustrates the history of evolution through the translucent images of ancient fish, in an elegant union of science and art. Through May 2017. FLETCHER FREE LIBRARY Info, 863-3403

EXPLORING HUMAN ORIGINS: This traveling exhibition developed by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History explores our evolutionary journey through interactive kiosks, displays, and videos, examining how walking upright, creating technology, eating new foods, brain enlargement and developing language and complex societies makes us who we are. See fletcherfree.org for specific hours. Recommended for grades 2 and up. Through March 17. FREE

Kids in the Kitchen: Tomato Soup and Focaccia: This vegetarian classic takes center stage in a hands-on kids’ class about stove safety and soup basics. Healthy Living Market & Café, South Burlington, 4-5 p.m.; preregister. $25. Info, 863-2569. Lego Club: See March 2. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Preschool Art Drop-In: See March 2.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

31 Friday CHITTENDEN All-Ages Story Time: Picture books, finger play and rhymes amuse all. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Early Bird Math Story Time: See March 3. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 8:15-9:15 a.m.

Preschool Music: See March 2.

Family Gym: See March 3.

Ukulele Kids: Itty-bitty ones try out instruments and dance to traditional children’s songs. Ages 5 and under. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11:45 a.m. Info, 865-7216.

Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See March 3.

FREE

FRANKLIN Lego Thursdays: See March 2. Substance Abuse Prevention: Supporting Healthy Decisions During the Tween and Teen Years: Substance abuse counselors from Northwestern Counseling & Support Services lead a parenting discussion about drug use and what to do when trouble occurs. Fairfax Community Library, 6:15-8 p.m.; preregister. On-site childcare available. Info, 849-2420. FREE GRAND ISLE South Hero Nurturing Parent Program: See March 23. WINDSOR Clay for Tots: See March 2.

Friday Free for All: See March 3.

Preschool Yoga with Danielle: Simple movement, stories and songs satisfy children ages 5 and under and their caregivers. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE Pun-Off: Punsters participate in a fun-filled contest organized by teens, with an admiring audience of all ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 7-8 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE RUTLAND Magic: The Gathering: See March 3. ORLEANS Lego Club: See March 3. WASHINGTON Family Story Time: See March 3. WINDSOR Branch Out: Creative Activities for Teens: Teens have time together with open art studios for painting and mixed media projects, finger food and music. Grades 9-12. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 6-9:45 p.m. Info, 457-3500. FREE 

MONTSHIRE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE Info, 649-2200 MAKING MUSIC: THE SCIENCE OF MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS: The stories, ideas and

science behind the creation of musical instruments mesmerize visitors. Through displays, videos and hands-on opportunities, music-lovers make and play a variety of instruments, using Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. Through September 4. VERMONT FOLKLIFE CENTER Info, 388-4964 FAMILY TRAITS: ART, HUMOR AND EVERYDAY LIFE: Vermonter and artist

Stanley Lyndes uses his experience growing up on a multigenerational farm to capture the unique folklore of family life through art. Through May 15. FREE

33

Making Music: The Science of Musical Instruments at Montshire Museum of Science

KIDS VT

FRANKLIN STEM Club: Science-y types challenge their imaginations with themed activities. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

BUTTERFLIES, LIVE AT ECHO: A pavilion of fluttering creatures enchants visitors who learn about these winged beauties’ lifecycle and how their natural environment can be protected. Through September 4.

Itty Bitty Public Skating: See March 6.

MARCH 2017

TinkerBelles: Curious kids learn about working women in the wide worlds of science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics. Grades 3-5. Charlotte Public Library, 3:15 p.m.; preregister. Info, 425-3864. FREE

ECHO LEAHY CENTER FOR LAKE CHAMPLAIN Info, 864-1848

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1, 12:301:30 p.m.

KIDSVT.COM

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See March 1.

Ongoing Exhibits

CHITTENDEN Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See March 2.

COURTESY OF MONTSHIRE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE

FRANKLIN Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Gaming Tuesdays: See March 7.

WINDSOR Sensory Lab for Tots: See March 1.

30 Thursday


PHOTOS: MATTHEW THORSEN

HABITAT BY MERE D I T H COE Y M A N

Washi Tape Walls

T

gray piece in the upstairs hallway, inspired by a Josef Albers poster, where Doggett used an adjustable triangle and her drafting skills to create precise angles. For others, like the thick bands of color that snake over molding and onto the ceiling in her bathroom, she “let the space of the room inform the project.” Nestled under Isaac’s sunshine-yellow loft bed are two clusters Tips From Teal of Is with a retro-video• Look for packs of game vibe. “I like that multicolored tape on when you think of Amazon. Any washi tape different things, it looks will work well. different,” said Isaac. • Pick a wall you think That’s true of all needs some decoration, the installations, Isaac or a room that needs a explained. Like the little extra color. concentric rectangles • A level and an X-Acto on the back of the knife come in handy. kitchen island: “If you think about a pyramid, • Don’t be afraid — just go it looks like a pyramid. for it. It’s easy to remove and try again! If you think about a tunnel, it looks like you’re looking down a tunnel.” Washi tape is easy to peel off and reposition, which took the pressure off. “I don’t think it will be too hard for me to take them down,” Doggett said, “because I know I can always create something new.” K

Left to right: Isaac, Felix, Teal and Tyler Doggett

COURTESY OF TEAL DOGGETT

eal Doggett has two sons, 11-yearold Felix and 9-year-old Isaac. But it’s not their artwork that dominates the family’s home — it’s hers. Doggett created nine modernist wall installations throughout her house using strips of bright washi tape, a decorative Japanese masking tape made from natural fibers. The pieces match the dwelling’s midcentury modern style, expressed in its clean lines, ample windows and minimalist aesthetic. Built in 1964, the Doggetts’ home was designed by Vermont-born architect Marcel Beaudin, who also designed the Burlington Boathouse. When she and her husband, Tyler, moved into the house in 2015, Doggett — who is working on her masters of fine arts from the Vermont College of Fine Arts — wanted to create artwork for its many blank walls. She took inspiration from graphic designer Michael Bierut’s 100 Day Project. The idea is to complete a creative pursuit for 100 consecutive days and document it, usually on Instagram. Her goal was to finish one installation a month. She used a level to position the first piece of tape over holes in the wall for her first piece — lines that bounce across her dining room wall like a ’70s laser light show. Moving forward, she said, “I just started adding where I thought it looked nice.” Doggett completed pieces on the back of her kitchen island, in her hallways, bedrooms, her master bathroom, and even on a pocket door that, when closed, completes the design. Some took planning, like the dark

“Habitat” celebrates places where Vermont families live and play. Got a sweet space you’d like us to see? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

This is Home.

34

KIDS VT

MARCH 2017

KIDSVT.COM

THIS IS WHERE AWESOMENESS HAPPENS.

Bringing Vermonters home for over 45 years. Untitled-19 1

HickokandBoardman.com | 802.863.1500 2/23/17 10:32 AM


JUST FOR KIDS Maple Maze

36 36 37 38 38

Writing Contest & Winners Coloring Contest Winners Coloring Contest Puzzle Page Birthday Club

Mae and Pull are surprised that a sap bucket has sprung a leak! There’s only one way to help them solve this sticky situation. Can you find the proper path to the sugarhouse so that the slippery sap can be turned into maple syrup?

KIDSVT.COM MARCH 2017 KIDS VT

35


JUST FOR KIDS

Writing Contest

SPONSORED BY

In March, we celebrate Women’s History Month. Tell us about a woman who inspires you. It could be someone you know, someone in the news or a famous person in history. What has that person done that makes them inspiring? What qualities does that person have that you admire? Attach an extra piece of paper if you need more space to write.

COLORING CONTEST WINNERS The title of 4-year-old Liberty’s drawing, “Happy and Happy,” aptly describes this month’s marvelous coloring contest collection. Her wolves bay at a heart-shaped turquoise moon, with a brightly colored crayon rainbow overhead. Silas, 10, created a detailed masterpiece with an assortment of pen drawings, including a palm tree, yin-yang symbols and a chainsaw. Page upon page of joyful howling made this month’s contest magical. Keep the creativity flowing, kids!

The winners of annual family memberships to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium are…

HONORABLE MENTIONS HOWLING HEARTS OF LOVE

Emily Kneeland, 8, Fairfax SINGING WOLVES

Alex Maclure, 4, North Troy

5& “Big Hearts and Circles” u n 5 der ns, Bur Calynn COVENTRY

WOLVES IN LOVE

Juliet Lemons, 6, Sheldon FRISKY FOX WITH RAINBOW

Andrea Henderson, 6, Burlington WOLVES OF THE UNITED STATES

Maya Blake Menghesa Senecal, 5, Essex Junction Name ________________________________

Send your entries to: Kids VT, attn: Writing Contest, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

Email ________________________________

Rebecca Douglas, 9, Hinesburg

Phone ________________________________

FOX WITH HEARTS

Age __________________________________ Town ________________________________

KIDSVT.COM MARCH 2017 KIDS VT

In last month’s issue, we asked kids to write a poem about someone or something they loved. We judged the entries without looking at names — and the two winners turned out to be sisters this month! They each receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop in Burlington. You’ll find their poems below.

Poet Bigelow, 6 UNDERHILL CENTER

Love is in our hearts. Don’t you feel it? gold. I feel it like a stream of d, hea my ve abo y fl Robins l, Nature is soo! powerfu like our hearts.

Abigail Cribby, 9, Georgia HOWLING FOR YOU

Betty Marthaler, 4, Essex VALENTINE’S MOON

Brody Stanton, 8, Montpelier

WRITING WINNERS

36

SINGING AT THE SUNSET

We’ll pick two winners and publish their names and poems in the next issue. Winners receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop. Deadline to enter is March 15.

Blithe Kilee Bigelow, 9

UNDERHILL CENTER

My Beloved Wheeeeoooo. The wind whistles in my ear as I swing through empty air, my boo k tucked securely under my arm. An enormo us wave of relief washes over me as I feel my feet connect with the sturdy wood of my tree. Now, stranded between nothingn ess and my place of joy, I carefully transport the papers of wonderous adventures to ben eath my chin before reaching for the next branch. As my hand slowly unclasps from arou nd the limb connecting the small tree to the bigger, much loved one. In an instant, I am pressed against the soft-as-silk bark that I feel so safe with. Again, my book is beneath my arm and I am moving upwards. I reach my seat in the little mossy spot of comfort and settle down. The leaf green light shines down on me. I open up and float… to a magical land .

HOWLING FOR LOVE

“Starry Night” Lily Filan, 7 SOUTH BURLINGTON

6 to 8

Lyndsay Katon, 10, Walden LOTS OF LOVE

Jiya Sekar, 4, Montpelier HOWLING UNDER THE HEART MOON

Sophia Giammusso, 9, Calais

TOP TITLES “MOTHER WOLF AND HER PUP SHARE A HOWL ON VALENTINE’S DAY”

Abigail Russell, 10, Brookfield “PICTURE OF WOLVES HOWLING AT THE HEART”

Hayden Hopkins, 4, Woodbury “THE RAINING HEARTS”

Rosalie Martel, 7, Colchester

“Enchanted Wolves” Rose Pauly, 10 ORWELL

9 to 12


Coloring Contest! Three winners will each receive an annual family membership to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium. Send Kids VT your work of art by March 15. Be sure to include the info at right with your submission. Winners will be chosen in the following categories: (1) ages 5 and younger, (2) ages 6-8 and (3) ages 9-12. Winners will be named in the April issue of Kids VT. Send your high-resolution scans to art@kidsvt.com or mail a copy to Kids VT, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

Title _______________________________________________ Sponsored by

Artist _____________________________________________ Age ______________ Town __________________________ Email _____________________________________________ Phone _____________________________________________

KIDSVT.COM MARCH 2017 KIDS VT

37


JUST FOR KIDS

Jumble

Birthday Club

BY DAVID L. HOYT & JEFF KNUREK

The letters of these crazy words are all mixed up. To play the game, put them back into the right order so that they make real words you can find in your dictionary. Write the letters of each real word under each crazy word, but only one letter to a square.

ester SPENCER lives in Colch . He 18 rch Ma and turns 11 on k roc , all seb ba r, loves socce o als He . ing ski d an climbing ea los loves to read — and can . ok bo od whole day in a go two Spencer wins entry for t gh Ni y ida Fr ’ ffs Cli to Petra b. Clu s Kid

ALLISON

You are now ready to solve this month’s Jumble For Kids. Study the picture for a hint. Then play around with the letters in the circles. You’ll find you can put them in order so that they make your funny answer.

lives in South Burlington and turns 6 on March 1. She loves to have fun, laugh and make others smile. Allie also enjoys snowboarding, drawing, and playing with her sister and her dog, Bauer.

Print your answer here:

RUBY lives

Puzzles4Kids

BY HELENA HOVANEC

38

KIDS VT

MARCH 2017

KIDSVT.COM

Riddle Search — WEAR IT! Look up, down and diagonally, both forward and backward, to find every word on the list. Circle each one as you find it. When all the words are circled, take the UNUSED letters and write them on the blanks below. Go from left to right and top to bottom to find the answer to this riddle: Why did the chicken cross the clothing store? BALL GOWN BANDANNA BONNET BOW TIE CARDIGAN HAT HOODIE JUMPER

KILT LEGGINGS LEOTARD ROBE SHAWL SMOCK SUNDRESS TANK TOP

in Hinesburg and turns 11 on March 19. She loves creative writing, skiing, gymnastics, math and theater arts. She has a great sense of humor, a high tolerance for her older brother and a penchant for making time-lapse videos.

SOFIA lives

Riddle Answer:

ANSWERS P. 39

in Burlington and turns 11 on March 28. Her favorite school subjects are math, art and music. She enjoys cooking and baking, painting, swimming, and riding horses. She dreams of skiing in the Swiss Alps one day.

Congratulations to these March Birthday Club winners!

Join the Club!

To enter, submit information using the online form at kidsvt.com/birthday-club Just give us your contact info, your children’s names and birth dates, and a photo, and they’re automatically enrolled.

Allison, Ruby and Sofia each win a day pass to Petra Cliffs.


USE YOUR WORDS BY ERINN SIMON

hen the nurse opened the waiting room door and called “Eli!,” my son and I both stood up. “Oh no, we just need the young man right now, Mom,” she said brightly. “We’ll come get you when we need you.” “Oh, sure,” I said, trying to sound like I’d anticipated this change. After all, my son is a teenager. But truthfully, I was caught off guard. I instinctively turned to Eli to offer a reassuring smile, but he was already through the door — and he didn’t look back. I sat down awkwardly. Eli turned 13 in November, but clearly I’m still catching up. While I sat in the waiting room, I started silently listing

starts the wild trip through adolescence, I feel slightly lost. I know my role in his life is changing, whether I’m ready or not. But how do I adjust? Turns out the doctor had some ideas. When I made it into the exam room, she talked to us together. I nodded confidently as she described ways Eli and I could work together to keep screen time under control, felt only slightly uncomfortable when she offered reading suggestions on healthy relationships for teens, then lost my cool completely and fought back tears when she framed working on life skills like banking, cleaning and cooking in terms of college prep. College. In five years.

He learned how to make a killer vegetarian dinner,

and I learned more from him in that half hour than I had in weeks.

CALENDAR 8v-calendar.indd 1

PUZZLE PAGE ANSWERS

12/2/16 10:14 AM

SEE P. 38 FOR PUZZLES

KIDS KIDS VT VT

“Use Your Words” is a monthly essay in which writers reflect on parenting and childhood. Got a story to share? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com

Submit your info by March 15 online at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com

MARCH MARCH 2017 2017

39

She suggested Eli start cooking dinner with a parent at least once a week to build up a repertoire of healthy dishes he can prepare confidently on his own. I exhaled. Making dinner?, I thought. That, I can do. I’m a cook by profession; the kitchen is my comfort zone. And being the son of a cook and a lover of food, it’s a comfortable place for Eli, too. In fact, he already knows how to prepare some basic dishes. And, of course, I want him to be able to feed himself well when he’s, gulp, on his own. A few nights later we decided to make stuffed sweet potatoes for dinner. When we got to work, there was some mild eye-rolling about my semi-fussy instructions, like the correct number of times to pierce a sweet potato with a fork before baking (6 on each side, if you’ve sliced it down the middle).

List your events for free in the Kids VT monthly calendar.

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the signs of teenager-hood I’d been willfully ignoring: Eating as much as three adults? Increased moodiness? A jaunty “See ya!” instead of hugs and kisses as he leaves for school on his own? Check, check and check. But it wasn’t until he walked solo into the doctor’s office that the situation really hit home. Thinking further back, I’ve felt him starting the process of pulling away from his dad and me for a while now — little tugs here and there. Like the first time he responded to my enthusiastic request for details about middle school friends with an eye-roll and a jaded sigh. Or the nagging sense that we don’t have as much to talk about as we did just a few months before. Up until now, I’ve felt fairly confident about parenting. I wouldn’t call it easy, but I felt like I had things reasonably under control. Now, as Eli

But, after a few minutes, we both settled into a rhythm and started to chat. Along with the recipe’s finer points, we talked about the test he had taken earlier in the week and some funny things that happened in band practice. I told stories about improvising dinner from bizarre ingredients for my college roommates, and passed on my belief that one should always use slightly less water than the package calls for when cooking rice. We talked about the many ways to cook sweet potatoes, and the Beatles songs he’s teaching himself on the guitar. He learned how to make a killer vegetarian dinner, and I learned more from him in that half hour than I had in weeks. The conversation wasn’t earth-shattering, but it was real, and relaxed. I want to pass on our family’s favorite recipes to Eli. I want him to be able to feed himself and his own family some day. But, after that first night cooking together, I realized that, right now, the real reason I want to cook with him is the chance to bond with my teen. The resulting dinner is just a bonus. The sweet potatoes we made — stuffed with rice and beans, topped with cheese and broiled to perfection — were delicious. Our family of five devoured them. While we cleaned up, I declared, “I predict you’ll make some roommates very happy with this dish someday.” “Mom, don’t get emotional,” Eli scolded. “College is, like, so far away!” I wish that were true. In the meantime, I’ll try to cook — and bond — with him, one meal at a time. 

JUMBLES ZOO. PUCK. VENT. DUNK.

W

RIDDLE ANSWER: Her calculator wasn’t working, but her fingers could always be “COUNTED ON”

Why I’m (really) teaching my son to cook

RIDDLE SEARCH ANSWER: To get to the other size.

Dishing With My Teen

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Today’s Special:

Healthy Meals for Vermont Kids Making the Healthy Choice, the Easy Choice

Sugary drinks are the largest source of calories in kids’ diets.

Busy families on the run are grabbing meals out more often, and soda is usually the beverage served with kids’ meals. A child’s chance of becoming overweight increases every time they have a sugary drink. Parents need the healthy choice to be the easy choice. Vermont is already serving our kids better in schools and early childcare, where healthy drinks and meals are the default choice. Let’s serve our kids better at restaurants too. Learn more and get involved. Go to www.servingkidsbettervt.org or text HEALTHY to 52886

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12/1/16 12:06 PM

Kids VT, March 2017  

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