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APRIL 2014 V OL.21 NO.3

2014 CAMP GUIDE


With more than 89,000 member-owners, NEFCU is more than a financial institution. It’s a reflection of the community. Which is why we make sure your money stays right here in Vermont. Why our mortgages are processed and serviced here. And why the Credit Union’s business decisions are made right here – by Vermonters for Vermonters. Local ... and then some. That’s NEFCU.

800-400-8790 · nefcu.com NMLS#446767 Federally insured by NCUA

Local, affordable, and on your side™.

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Kids VT money issue sponsored by New England Federal Credit Union

April 2014

kidsvt.com

NEFCU is…LOCAL

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Money Issue The

VOL.21 NO .3

APRIL 2014

April is tax time, and money is on everyone’s minds. It’s also NATIONAL FINANCIAL LITERACY MONTH, which prompted us to offer this package of stories about money matters. We’re grateful to our sponsor, New England Federal Credit Union, for supporting our work. THIS ISSUE SPONSORED BY:

Editor’s Note....................................................................5 See & Say ..........................................................................6 Coloring-Contest Winners ................................7 Birthday Club..................................................................54 Drawing on History: John Deere ...................55 Use Your Words: Essay ..........................................59

NEFCU is local, affordable and on your side when it comes to personal finance.

Play to Pay

...18

Hard-working Vermonters remember their first jobs

EAT. LEARN. PLAY The Kids Beat ..................................................................8 Digital Dilemmas.........................................................10 Ask the Doctor: Medical Tests..........................10 Fit Families: Jiu-Jitsu ..............................................11 Bookworms: Seasonal Reads............................13 Book-Review Winners ...........................................13 Mealtime: Solid Foods for Baby.....................15 Go Ask Dad: Talking About Money ...............16 The Art of Creative Reuse ...................................17

Tax Day

Skipping School ....22

(Next to the Alpine Shop)

802.863.0143

Open 7 days 10am-7pm

Vermont’s Premier 3/26/14

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ON THE COVER

STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS cathy@kidsvt.com colby@kidsvt.com megan@kidsvt.com brooke@kidsvt.com alison@kidsvt.com corey@kidsvt.com kaitlin@kidsvt.com

Dance Apparel & Footwear ext. 74 ext. 77 ext. 73 ext. 41 ext. 75 ext. 76 ext. 72

Editorial in Kids VT is for general informational purposes. Parents must use their own discretion for following the advice in any editorial piece. Acceptance of advertising does not constitute service/product endorsement. Kids VT is a proud member of the Parenting Media Association. Kids VT distribution is audited for accuracy.

Published 11x per year. Circulation: 25,000 at 500+ locations throughout northern and central Vermont.

Da Capo Publishing shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Da Capo Publishing may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Da Capo Publishing reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers.

Contributing Writers: Nancy Stearns Bercaw, Kathryn Flagg, Tricia Kennedy, Thea Lewis, Mary Ann Lickteig, Ken Picard, Becky Tharp, Elaine Young

Are you ready for your end of year performances, recitals, and summer dance camps and intensives? ~ We’re here to help you find everything you need on stage and off! Owned & operated by dedicated professional dancers

Photographer: Matthew Thorsen Illustrators: Ian Webb, Kym Balthazar

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P.O. Box 1184 Burlington, VT 05402 802-985-5482 kidsvt.com

Copy Editor Paula Routly Proofreaders Hayley Lamberson Meredith Coeyman Production Manager John James Creative Director Don Eggert Designers Aaron Shrewsbury Rev. Diane Sullivan Circulation Managers Steve Hadeka Matt Weiner Business Manager Cheryl Brownell

It’s that time of year again!

KIDS VT MONEY ISSUE SPONSORED BY: NEW ENGLAND FEDERAL KIDSVT.COM MARCHCREDIT 2014 UNION KIDS VT

Illustrator Kym Balthazar created the face of our Money Issue: a plucky young entrepreneur with an eye on the prize.

12:28 PM

APRIL 2013

DANCE APPAREL & FOOTWEAR RETAILER

Vermont kids tell us why they love camp

Fit Kids Quiz ....................................................................26 Habitat: Knee-Hockey Rink .................................53 Puzzle Page ......................................................................54 Coloring Contest .........................................................56 Project: Start a Bank Account..........................57 Book-Review Contest .............................................58

1186 Williston Rd., So. Burlington VT 05403

KIDSVT.COM

2014 Camp Guide ...29

HANDS-ON

© 2014 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.

Discounts on Natural, Gluten-Free and Kid Friendly Foods

Web & Mobile site: www.cheesetraders.com

Daily Listings ..................................................................39 Classes ..................................................................................40 Story Times ......................................................................41 Ongoing Exhibits ........................................................46 Playgroups ........................................................................51

PRICE

Teaching my son why — and what — we pay

CALENDAR

Cathy Resmer Colby Roberts Megan James Brooke Bousquet Alison Novak Corey Grenier Kaitlin Montgomery

PAY A L

...27

Too many kids are truant; what Vermont is doing about it

Copublisher/Executive Editor Copublisher Managing Editor Lead Designer Calendar Writer Marketing & Events Manager Account Executive

HE HIGH LIVE T OW LIFE

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3/27/14 11:59 AM


Receive Your Primary Care from the Specialists in Natural Medicine Dr. Katina Martin & Dr. Sarah E. Wylie

Naturopathic Medicine • Midwifery • Acupuncture • Maya Abdominal Therapy • • • • • •

Providing primary care for families Pediatric Care & Well-child Check-ups Well-woman annual exams Fertility & family planning Prenatal & Postpartum Care Homebirths

• • • • • •

Botanical medicine Clinical nutrition Homeopathy Vaccination counseling Food allergy testing Chinese medicine

We Accept Vermont Insurance! Offices in Salisbury & Burlington • 352-9078 • www.VermontNaturalFamilyHealth.com k6h-vnfh0813.indd 1

SUMMER ART CAMPS

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Kids VT money issue sponsored by New England Federal Credit Union

April 2014

kidsvt.com

STARTING JUNE 16 FOR AGES 3-18

7/23/13 1:21 PM

To learn about our camps, the schedule or to sign up please visit: BURlINGTONCITyARTS.ORG or call 865.7166

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3/27/14 11:38 AM

t s e B m i S ply the 48th Vermont

Maple Festival

Vermont Maple!

APRIL 25–27

Tap into it!

Maple Exhibit Hall & Contests • Sugarhouse Tours (Sat. Only) Pancake Breakfast • Carnival • Crafts, Antiques, Youth Talent & Fiddlers’ Variety Shows • Grand Parade • Free Main Street Stage Entertainment Amateur Photo Contest • Face Painting (Sat. Only) Kids’ Entertainment Center with 2 Marionette Shows & The Big Blue Trunk (Sat. Only)

Saturday in Taylor Park:

Super Nova Disc Dogs • Dux the Balloon Man • Handicapped Accessible SPONSORED IN PART BY: Mylan • TD Bank • Hannaford Supermarkets • CDL, USA Peoples Trust Co. • New England Federal Credit Union • Lapierre USA, Inc. Leader Evaporator • Peoples United Bank • Hall Communications • Key Bank • Walmart Coca-Cola • Farm Family Insurance • AT&T • Georgia Mountain Maples Northwestern Medical Center • Price Chopper • Yankee Farm Credit ACA Cooperative Insurance Companies • Eagle 97.5 Homestead, A Pillsbury Senior Community • GMTA

Schedule at VtMapleFestival.Org

Located on Main Street & Taylor Park in St. Albans k4t-VTMapleFest0414.indd 1

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Money Issue The

ediTor’s noTe

hopkins center for the arts presents DALLAS CHILDREN’S THEATER

Change agent

Some of this month’s Kids VT contributors: Thea Lewis (“Survey Says”) lives in Burlington with her husband and their three teenagers. A writer by day, she spends evenings leading haunted history tours as Vermont’s unofficial Queen of Halloween.  Tricia Kennedy (“Fit Families”) lives in Shelburne with her husband, fatherin-law and three children. She works with special-needs students at Shelburne Community School and contributes regularly to Burlington VT Moms Blog. 

faM iLY pri -frie cin nD G LY

E.B. White’s classic tale comes to life from the page to the stage when this sensitive adventurer encounters challenges in the super-sized world of humans while discovering the true meaning of family and friendship.

hop.dartmouth.edu | 603.646.2422 | Dartmouth College | Hanover, NH k6h-HopkinsCenter0414.indd 1

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FAN APPRECIATION DAY Saturday, April 26, 12 - 1:30 p.m. Virtue Field

Our chance to thank our fans for supporting us this year! Enjoy food, music, a bouncy castle, and more in between the Women’s and Men’s Lacrosse games.

Men’s Lacrosse vs. UMBC, 1:30 p.m.

Women’s Lacrosse vs. Stony Brook, 11 a.m.

www.uvmathletics.com

2014 Rally Awards Tuesday, May 6, 7:15 p.m. Flynn Theater Join the University of Vermont Athletic Department and student-athletes at the 2014 Rally Awards, a year end celebration of the academic and athletic achievements of the 2013-2014 season.

Alison Novak (“Use Your Words”) Kids VT’s calendar writer, is a former teacher and current mentoring program coordinator. She lives with her husband, 6-year-old daughter and 4-year-old son in a Shelburne house that’s becoming less cluttered by the day.

The event is free and open to the public.

Presented by

Kids VT Money issue sponsored by new england Federal KidsVT.coM marchcrediT 2014 union Kids VT

Megan JaMes, Managing editor

sun | MaY 4 | 3 pM

april 2014

Daniel talked me into sitting down with him to create an Excel spreadsheet. He wanted to show me how much money I was hemorrhaging over time by paying off my debt incrementally. I begrudgingly agreed — and was horrified by what I saw. That’s when we decided to start our first ever joint savings account. Since then, we’ve contributed a portion of our paychecks to it each month. It’s thrilling. Never before have I seen money in my account actually grow. It may not be enough to buy a house, or to put our daughter through college, but it’s a start. In this month’s Kids VT, we’re talking about money — how kids can learn to earn it, save it and spend it wisely. In “Play to Pay” (p. 18), Mary Ann Lickteig talks to Vermonters about their first paying jobs and the lessons they learned from them. In “Go Ask Dad” (p. 16), we find out how some local fathers respond when their kids ask for that fancy new pair of shoes their friends just got. In the “Art Of” (p. 17), Alison Novak catches up with some South Burlington high school students who have turned trash into treasure in an art class on creative reuse. And in “Tax Talk” (p. 27), Nancy Stearns Bercaw gives her tax-obsessed 10-year-old son a lesson in why we pay. Want to set your child up with his or her own bank account? Several Vermont financial institutions offer special programs and incentives for kids. Learn more in this month’s “Project” (p. 57). It’s never too early to start saving; just ask my husband.

KidsVT.coM

My husband, daniel, is the consummate frugal New Englander. He prefers to travel only when it’s absolutely necessary. When he shops for groceries, he returns with enough cans of beans to get us through a nuclear winter. Just a couple years out of college, he had paid off his student loans. This past daniel summer, when a Houghton friend’s teenage daughter accidentally backed into his 2000 Volvo station wagon, denting the door, Daniel refused to let her pay for the repair. Instead, he asked her to buy a rubber mallet — then enlisted her help pounding out the dent. Daniel and I have separate bank accounts, in part because of our very different spending styles. It’s not that I’m reckless; I’m just impulsive. If the timing is right and I want to fly off to South America for a month — and spend the next year paying off the bill — I’ll do it. You can’t put a price on experience. Still, we’re good together. Daniel keeps me in check, and I convince him it’s OK to indulge every once in a while. Without me, he might never travel or go out to dinner. He might still be toughing it out wearing a vest over a hoodie sweatshirt in the dead of winter because he can’t stomach buying a real coat. I’m thankful our daughter will grow up under the influence of our push and pull: Daniel’s responsibility, my spontaneity. Last July, appalled at the interest mounting on my credit card bill,

stuart LittLe

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KIDS VT MONEY MARCH ISSUE 2014 SPONSORED KIDSVT.COM BY NEW ENGLAND FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

APRIL 2014

KIDSVT.COM

SEE AND SAY

Readers Respond

Best of the Kids VT Blog

Letting Grandparents Go

Read more at kidsvt.com.

I wanted to say how much I loved your Editor’s Note [March 2014]. My inlaws insisted on their kids and grandkids calling them by their first names, Dotti and Bert. They were “hip” that way, and my four kids — now 12 to 24 — loved the grown-up-ness of it all. Your letter was particularly poignant as I’m headed home with a heavy heart to share the sad news with them that their grandfather has cancer and has elected to forego treatment. He lost Dotti to cancer a year ago and has been dying of a broken heart since her passing. The Grandparent Issue reminded me of how important it will be to talk about and treasure happier times in the weeks and months ahead. Chrystie Heimert

Book Review: All Joy and No Fun

BURLINGTON

Coloring Joy

BY A L I SON N OVA K

Jennifer Senior writes about how parenthood affects a person’s ability to feel “flow,” which she describes as “a state of being in which we are so engrossed in the task at hand — so fortified by our own sense of agency, of mastery — that we lose all sense of our surroundings, as though time has stopped.” Feeling flow leads to happiness. The early years of parenting, full of distractions and redirection and quickly changing moods are characterized by very little opportunity to enter the flow state. That’s why parenting young children can often feel boring and unsatisfying in the moment…

Home Cookin’: Maple-Roasted Chicken and Sweet Potatoes BY TA SHA L EHMA N

[The coloring contest] is a very simple but amazing activity. Hanna looks forward to it every month, and I know of other children who feel the same. It’s wonderful to see a child’s face light up with such joy when the paper comes out, during the coloring and with the final product. They love to win but even getting honorable mention or acknowledgement for a cool title is a big deal to them. Keep it coming! Tricia Gustafson SOUTH BURLINGTON

A Great Read I was recently out and about and picked up Kids VT. What a helpful publication; I found some playgroups I didn’t know existed. As a newcomer to the area, this was tremendous!  Meghan DelGiacco GOT A COMMENT? Email us at feedback@kidsvt.com.

ST. ALBANS

It’s sugaring season in Vermont, and we all know what that means: maple-syrup recipes galore! I found this one at Real Simple. As I read through the steps, I could practically hear my fresh bottle of maple syrup calling out, “Cook with me!” And when maple syrup calls...

Other recent web exclusives: BUMP ON A BLOG: INEXPLICABLE CRYING: Kids VT managing editor Megan James writes about the unexpected things — Ke$ha, Dumbo and a swimming pool — that have brought her to tears during her third trimester. BOOK REVIEW: PAUL MEETS BERNADETTE: In the gorgeous debut picture book by Paris-based painter and sculptor Rosy Lamb, goldfish Paul swims around in circles until Bernadette drops into his bowl and shakes things up.

DOLLARS & CENTS

Money Issue The

We asked Kids VT staff and contributors how they learned about money and what lessons they’re passing on to their kids. When I was 16, my dad bought me a wicked-sweet, red Jeep Cherokee Sport. The catch? I had to pay for half of it!  He also set me up with a savings account and told me I was never allowed to take money out of it; it was for emergencies only. At the time, I was working at a coffee shop where I made minimum wage and got tips. I kept the tips for spending money. The paychecks went toward my car and my savings. Dad told me to put my car money into a manila envelope and to keep track of how much I had paid him. I stapled a piece of paper to the front of the envelope and wrote $7,000 at the top. Each week, I would subtract the amount I had put in and write out the new balance. I became obsessed with paying it off. I finally finished paying for that car at age 21. It felt amazing to say, “Hey, Dad, here’s your last $100 bucks!” I’m so thankful that my dad developed this system for me. It taught me how to budget my money. I actually called my dad the other day to ask him about my savings. I said, “Hey, Dad, I’ve been saving my money for the last 10 years but I have no idea what I’m saving for. What do you consider an emergency?” To this day, I still haven’t touched it because he told me not to. COREY GRENIER, MARKETING & EVENTS MANAGER

We’ve done a chore chart in the past that’s allowed Noah, our 5-year-old, to earn money to purchase a variety of items. We check off boxes on the chart as he completes chores — readying himself for school without nagging, emptying the trashcans, making his bed — and, at the end of the week, he earns $2. The chart is useful when I’m frustrated with having to ask him repeatedly to get himself ready in the morning or if he really, really wants something. I think the first items he bought were a stapler and tape dispenser. The next time he dreamed a little bigger and earned a Transformer. Now, he’s working on a ride-on car; we’ve agreed to split the cost. BROOKE BOUSQUET, DESIGNER


These winners get $25 gift cards to Creative Habitat in Burlington and their artwork framed for free.

My family is going on vacation to Cape Cod this summer and we’re all saving money together for some special activities. We have a translucent bank that tallies coins as you drop them in. The kids love adding money and get so excited to see the loot growing. So far, we have about $50 saved. The kids were shocked to learn that this would barely cover one family round of miniature golf, though they were psyched about the prospect of buying 25 creemees! TRICIA KENNEDY, CONTRIBUTING WRITER

COLORING CONTEST

COLCHESTER

PRETTY POINTILLISM Rachel Porth, 9, Jericho CUTEST CAMEL Emmett Waite, 8, Burlington ARTISTIC ALLIGATOR

6 to 8

FANTASTIC FISH FRY Alex Rice, 9, Panton BEST USE OF A COTTON BALL Karen Marie Meyer, 10, New Haven

“Crocodile at Work” Sophia Van Zyl, 6

SOUPIEST SCENE

Anna Stilwell, 7, Lincoln CRAZIEST CACTUS

Gwendolyn Houghton, 5, Milton POLKA-DOT PERFECTION

Veda Chojnicki, 5, Roxbury SPECTACULAR STRIPES

Hallie Miller, 4, Colchester

TOP TITLES “SHAMROCKODILE”

Erin Perry, 9, Colchester

“COO-COO CROCK”

Tess Fontana, 7, South Burlington Find this month’s coloring contest on page 56. The deadline for submissions is April 15.

“Mator the Rainbow Gator” Cecileya Leduc, 10 SOUTH BURLINGTON

9 to 12

KIDS VT MONEY ISSUE SPONSORED BY NEW ENGLAND FEDERAL KIDSVT.COM MARCHCREDIT 2014 UNION KIDS VT

ADDISON

BEAUTIFUL BRUSHSTROKES Olivia Johnson, 8, Essex

“DOTAGATOR”

APRIL 2014

Emily Kneeland, 5, Cambridge

Katelyn Reagan, 6, Williston I want my kids to understand that they shouldn’t get paid for everything they do. I wish I could say we were doing volunteer work together, but we haven’t gotten there yet. For now, I’m drilling the concept that if you live in the house, you help take care of the house. What do I say? “No, I’m not going to pay you for drying the dishes.” MARY ANN LICKTEIG, CONTRIBUTING WRITER

“Irish Alligator Camping in his PJs” Keira McCullagh, 5

HONORABLE MENTIONS

STYLISH SHORTS Elsa Lindenmeyer, 11, Addison

When my kids are looking for something to do, I’ll sometimes have them sort money. As they put coins in their respective piles, we count by 5s and 10s and talk about concepts such as how many nickels are in a quarter. Still, my 4-year-old son remains pretty shaky with his number concepts. Whenever he hears a number he thinks sounds kind of big, he always asks me, “That’s bigger than a hundred, right?” ALISON NOVAK, CALENDAR WRITER

5 and under

KIDSVT.COM

I remember going car shopping with my father when I was a kid. While I was enthralled with the higher-end, fancy cars, he bought a boring and utilitarian Ford. He explained to me that if he had gotten one of the cars I wanted, he’d probably end up with a loan, paying the car company more than the price of the car when all was said and done. Buying a car they could pay for outright allowed my parents not to think twice about those ever-important ski trips I loved taking. I realized that no matter how much money you have, when you spend it on one thing, you can’t also spend it on something else, so you should choose wisely.  CHERYL BROWNELL, BUSINESS MANAGER

Was it an alligator? A crocodile? A dragon? Last month’s coloringcontest entrants weren’t exactly sure — and, to be honest, neither were we. One thing was clear: This grinning reptile was reveling in St. Patrick’s Day celebrations. Contest participants adorned their entries with shamrocks, rainbows, leprechauns and pots of gold. Others created scenes entirely unrelated to the luck o’ the Irish: a superhero gator rescuing a baby, a dino grilling hot dogs on the beach. We loved them all. Congratulations to the winners!

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Money Issue The

THE

BEAT

B Y M EG A N JA M ES & A L I S ON N OVA K

Liam Lustberg

MUSEUMS

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KIDS VT MONEY ISSUE SPONSORED BY NEW ENGLAND FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

APRIL 2014

KIDSVT.COM

Exhibits for Everyone COMMUNITY

Spelling Test On Memorial Day weekend, 250 fourth through eighth graders will descend on National Harbor, Md., to compete in the 2014 Scripps National Spelling Bee. Eighth grader LIAM LUSTBERG of South Burlington will be the only Vermonter. The Frederick H. Tuttle Middle School student earned the honor by beating 40 other contestants from across the state at the Vermont Spelling Bee last month. He went 26 rounds before clinching the title by correctly spelling the word “pogrom.” Definition: an organized massacre. Lustberg prepared for the state bee by practicing words for 15 minutes with his parents during dinner each day. He admits he thought he had a chance of being crowned state champ but was still pretty surprised. “It honestly felt a little surreal,” he said. “When I won I was actually thinking, Is this happening?” —A.N. LIAM LUSTBERG: The Vermont Spelling Bee champion is headed to the Scripps National Spelling Bee on May 27-29 in National Harbor, Md. Find more information at spellingbee.com.

WARM WELCOME PROGRAM: The museum offers $2/person admission and $15 memberships to any family that shows an EBT or Medicaid card, or a letter confirming their participation in the Free or Reduced Price School Meals Program. For more information, visit montshire.org.

Want to check out the cool exhibits at the Montshire Museum of Science but can’t afford it at $11 per kid? The Norwich museum recently expanded its WARM WELCOME PROGRAM, which gives admission discounts to low-income families. For many years, the museum has offered passes to social-service agencies, which in turn distributed them to local families. But associate director Jennifer Rickards says making arrangements to get the pass created an unnecessary barrier to entry. “We wanted to make it easier for people to just walk through the door,” she says. Now, all families need to do is show an EBT or Medicaid card to gain entry at a much lower cost. Says Rickards, “Our goal is to make the museum feel like a place for everyone.” —M.J.

ANIMALS

Hello, Kitty Cats do the darnedest things. And their human friends often catch those antics on film. Some even make it big on the internet, where the viral cat video is king — think “Kitten in a Hamster Ball” and “Keyboard Cat.” The Humane Society of Chittenden County’s PLANET CAT: VERMONT’S FIRST ACATEMY AWARDS SHOW showcases the best locally made kitty videos. Tim Kavanagh and Kerrin Jeromin will emcee the event, which was inspired by a similar festival in Oakland, Calif. Audience members cast votes for their favorites and then head to lunch at McGillicuddy’s Irish Ale House. Meow! —M.J. PLANET CAT: VERMONT’S FIRST ACATEMY AWARDS SHOW: Sunday, April 6, 10 a.m. to noon, at Majestic 10 Cinemas in Williston. $10; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Chittenden County. For more information, visit chittendenhumane.org.


EAT. LEARN. PLAY. BOOKS

Special Delivery

The Glorkian Warrior, a three-eyed alien with a talking backpack, is on a mission: Deliver a peanut-butter-and-clam pizza to someone in need. Who would order a pie with such weird toppings? That’s just one of many mysteries in THE GLORKIAN WARRIOR DELIVERS A PIZZA, the new graphic novel by James Kochalka, Vermont’s first-ever cartoon laureate. “Stuffed with playful fun and awesome sound effects, this feisty intergalactic journey delivers a good-natured sucker punch of glee,” writes Booklist. Plus, it’s filled with gross-out humor, which kids love. Don’t want the adventure to end? Download the game, Glorkian Warrior: Trials of Glork, at the iTunes App Store. Kochalka himself voiced the fearsome Magic Robot. —M.J.

“A smile is happiness you’ll find right under your nose.” — Tom Wilson, actor/writer/comedian

Timberlane Dental Group was founded in 1973 to provide comprehensive dental care extending throughout a patient’s life—from the first infant oral exam through adulthood. Today, 40-plus years later, we’re as happy as ever to be caring for Vermonters.

Pediatric Dentistry General & Cosmetic Dentistry

THE GLORKIAN WARRIOR DELIVERS A PIZZA: The 112-page graphic novel is appropriate for ages 5-10. Published by First Second Books. Available at Phoenix Books in Burlington.

Burlington, 1127 North Avenue • Essex Junction, 87 Main Street South Burlington, 60 Timber Lane • Shelburne, 5070 Shelburne Road 802-559-1190 • timberlanedental.com k4t-TimberlaneDental0414.indd 1

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All Gussied Up

KIDSVT.COM

COMMUNITY

Orthodontics Periodontics & Implant Dentistry

APRIL 2014 KIDS VT MONEY ISSUE SPONSORED BY NEW ENGLAND FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

When 40 girls showed up at Highgate Public Library last spring, they weren’t looking for books; they wanted prom dresses. The children’s room had been transformed into a pop-up boutique stocked with about 80 donated gowns — all free for the taking. This year, in collaboration with Abenaki Outreach’s Project Prom and Karen’s Hair Studio in Swanton, the library is hosting another PROM DRESS DRIVE & SWAP. The idea is to give all Franklin County girls the opportunity to wear something special to their prom or end-of-the-year banquet. “There are so many families that really are just struggling to make ends meet,” says library director Liza Comiskey. But the swap isn’t just for them. “It’s open to everybody.” —M.J.

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PROM DRESS DRIVE & SWAP: Drop off gently worn dresses through April 17 at Highgate Public Library, Missisquoi Valley Union High School or Karen’s Hair Studio in Swanton. The swap takes place at the library, Monday, April 21, 2-4 p.m. For more information, and to RSVP for the swap, contact Liza Comiskey at 868-3970 or highgatepublic@comcast.net.


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KIDS VT MONEY ISSUE SPONSORED BY NEW ENGLAND FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

APRIL 2014

KIDSVT.COM

Q: At what age, or by what metrics, are kids old enough to have their own digital presence, such as a Twitter handle or Facebook page?   A: This is such an important question. Our digital content now follows us around in ways none of us envisioned when the internet first became mainstream. With new social-media tools popping up every day, we need to be even more diligent about the content we create. With every post, we leave behind a digital footprint. So when should children go live online? There’s no easy answer. Each child, and each family, is different. Here are some guidelines to help you decide: Ask yourself how you feel about your child having a digital presence that is open for family, friends, schools, employers and strangers to see. Ask him or her the same thing. This is a big responsibility; is your daughter ready for it? Does she understand what it means to have content online for anyone to see? Read the End User License Agreement (EULA) of the social media channel your child wants to join. (A quick Google search will help you find it.) Make sure he or she is old enough to have an account. Many social networks are specifically designed for ages 13 and up. Social networks oriented to younger children exist; find a list here: commonsensemedia. org/lists/social-networking-for-kids. Think carefully about how your child will use the social network. Is it to connect with family and friends? To express his creativity and individuality? Different sites serve different purposes. A Facebook page is great for connecting, but if your child likes to write or create videos, a blog or a YouTube channel might be better. Once you decide to jump in, set ground rules as a family. The younger the child, the more monitoring is necessary to make sure she understands the significance of what she’s doing. Invite her to share what she’s doing with you. Go onto the site with her. Agree on what is OK to post and what isn’t, and be sure to set firm consequences for breaking the rules — including losing access to that social network. Elaine Young is the author of Tuned-In Family: How to Cope, Communicate & Connect in a Digital World, and is a professor at Champlain College, where she specializes in digital marketing and social media. Got a question about navigating the digital world with your family? Send it to her at ideas@kidsvt.com.

DU DY

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: AN

ANSWERS TO QUESTIONS ABOUT THE EVER-EVOLVING ONLINE WORLD

BA

F IL E

✱ DIGITAL DILEMMAS

✱ ASK DR. FIRST

B Y K EN PI C A R D

How do you decide which medical tests are necessary?

MODERN MEDICINE OFFERS MANY TOOLS for diagnosing and treating children. But how do parents decide which ones are necessary? This month, Dr. Lewis First, chief of pediatrics at Vermont Children’s Hospital at Fletcher Allen Health Care, discusses the American Academy of Pediatrics’ Choosing Wisely campaign, which aims to educate parents about the risks and benefits of common procedures and treatments so they can play a more active role in their kids’ health care.

KIDS VT: Antibiotics are among the most overused treatments for children. Why?

DR. LEWIS FIRST: When a child has respiratory symptoms, or a fever, many parents who know that antibiotics kill germs think, “Why not give my child an antibiotic?” The problem is, most of the germs that make us sick are viruses, which don’t respond to antibiotics. The more we use antibiotics, the more we put our kids at risk for other problems.

KVT: Such as?

LF: When bacteria are routinely exposed to antibiotics, they can change their structure to become resistant to that particular antibiotic, making them more difficult to treat later on. Many bacteria are now resistant to the common antibiotics we used to treat them as recently as 10 years ago. This requires us to use more expensive and complex antibiotics, which can have side effects such as allergic reactions and severe gastrointestinal distress.

KVT: When should parents feel comfortable using antibiotics?

LF: If your child tests positive for strep throat, or if a doctor says your child has a bacterial pneumonia, those are good reasons to use an antibiotic. But ear or sinus infections aren’t always bacterial. In fact, most are caused by viruses. We’d rather observe the child, stay in touch with the family and then decide whether to prescribe an antibiotic based on your child’s age, symptoms and medical history. Also, when parents are given an antibiotic for their child, they should use the full course, even if the child gets better in two days. Don’t save it for later. If we aren’t good stewards of our antibiotics, we all pay the price.

KVT: Why do you advise against using cough and cold medicines for children under 4?

LF: Research shows, across the board, that they offer few benefits for kids. In small children, such medications can cause

serious side effects, including dangerous heart rhythms, sedation, hyperactivity and breathing difficulties. Parents can get better results using a humidifier, good hydration and saline nose drops.

KVT: What about X-ray imaging when a child has a head injury?

LF: Just because a CT (computed tomography) scan is available, it shouldn’t automatically be used. Nowadays, doctors have clear criteria for assessing a child’s neurologic system after a mild traumatic brain injury. If the doctor is concerned, he or she will explain when a CT scan is needed. But if a child has an unremarkable physical exam, it’s better to follow this child’s recovery than expose him or her to unnecessary X-rays.

Got questions for the doctor? Send them to ideas@kidsvt.com.

see and require medical attention, febrile convulsions are not dangerous.

KVT: MRIs don’t use radiation, so what’s the concern?

LF: Not only is an MRI expensive, but it often requires the child to be sedated and stay in the machine for a long time. If a child has a normal exam after coming through a febrile convulsion, it’s better to keep the fever under control and figure out why he or she is sick. If the doctor or parent is worried, or if the seizures persist, then we’d want to get that image.

KVT: Are CT scans recommended for kids with abdominal pains?

LF: No. A child should not automatically get a CT scan just because the doctor doesn’t know what is causing a belly pain.

There’s strong evidence that CT scans increase children’s risk of brain tumors and leukemia. KVT: Why?

LF: One CT scan of the head exposes a child to 100-500 times more radiation than a chest X-ray. There’s strong evidence that CT scans increase children’s risk of brain tumors and leukemia; they also increase the cost of the entire health care system.

KVT: What if a child has a seizure?

LF: Doctors won’t automatically order a CT scan or MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) if your child has had a convulsion with fever, also known as a febrile seizure. Again, we don’t want to radiate a child for something that’s fairly common. Fewer than 1 percent of kids will go on to have complications related to epilepsy, and in those rare cases, we typically see other signs that warrant the CT scan. Parents need to know that while they’re scary to

The risk and expense associated with this kind of imaging outweigh the potential benefits — unless we know exactly what we’re looking for. We can do a lot more with a careful medical history, thorough physical examination and some laboratory tests.

KVT: How should parents question a physician if they think a test or procedure is unwarranted?

LF: Parents should be asking, “What is your medical decision based upon?” Nowadays our goal is to provide patient-focused, family-centered care. That means we’ll have a conversation so we can work together to heal your child. We want to empower families to feel comfortable asking these questions so they can play a more active role in the health of their child. 


EAT. LEARN. PLAY. ✱ FIT FAMILIES

Teens!

B Y T RIC IA KE NN E DY

Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu MATTHEW THORSEN

Champlain Discovery

cooperation with peers and overall health co-ed Kayak Adventure and well-being. His classes are multiage, This Summer! ages 13-16 which he believes keeps students motivated to emulate their older peers. We dove right into footwork drills focused on balance and coordination. Using a prop resembling a ladder on the floor, Fernandez showed us how to leap in and out of the rungs, encouraging and cheering us on as though we were in the ring. The fast-paced drills felt awkward at times, but Fernandez’s playfulness kept us engaged. Our favorite move? The equally challenging and silly “gorilla,” which involved getting on all fours while strategically moving our hands and feet around the rungs. After floor drills, we moved on to some punch exercises using pads: left punch, right punch, squat, repeat. My 7-year-old, Sean, was timid at first, but with a little (802) 475-2022 encouragement from Fernandez, all three www.lcmm.org kids were turning, punching and ducking at a whirlwind pace. In between sparring exercises, k8v-LCMaritime0214.indd 1 1/22/14 3:37 PM Fernandez taught us several different types of jumping jacks. If a student displays bad behavior in class, he said, he often makes the whole class sweat it out with a set of jumping jacks. Fernandez wants his students to have fun, but he expects respect, too. Belt promotions, he told us, are “earned, not given.” In our final exercise, Fernandez taught us defense skills using a swimming noodle to swipe at our heads and bodies. He showed us how to quickly move our arms into defense positions in order to block his attacks. It was exhausting, but exhilarating. Sweaty and tired, we took turns at the water fountain after class wrapped up. Fernandez loves to watch as kids learning jiu-jitsu develop “confidence, energy and spirit,” he told me later. For Fernandez, the sport is about much more than physical strength; it’s about building inner strength to “resist peer pressure and overcome tough times and negative aspects of life.” As we headed home, my kids were full of energy, clamoring to talk about what they’d learned. The older two begged to enroll in more classes. Five-year-old Sophia couldn’t believe what she’d done. “Wow,” she remarked. “I never knew I was that strong!” 

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Japanese martial art Judo. Jiu-jitsu is designed to enhance strength, flexibility, balance and cardio-respiratory fitness. It’s built around the concept that with the right technique, a smaller, weaker person can effectively defend against a bigger, stronger opponent. My petite 5-year-old, Sophia, was delighted to hear this. Fernandez has trained in jiu-jitsu for 35 years, including under Brazilian jiu-jitsu legend Carlson Gracie Sr., whose family brought the sport to the U.S. Fernandez designed his children’s class to promote self-esteem, discipline, “bully-proofing,”

APRIL 2014

I HAD SOME RESERVATIONS when I signed my family up for an introductory class at Vermont Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu and Self-Defense Academy in Williston. I didn’t know much about the South American martial art, so I pictured the brutal attacks I’ve seen on the TV show “The Ultimate Fighter.” My fears vanished as soon as I met instructor Júlio “Foca” Fernandez. A former champion Brazilian surfer, who holds a sixth-degree black belt in jiu-jitsu, Fernandez has an infectious smile and warm sense of humor. My children — Sean, 7, Sophia, 5, and Maggie, 3 — had also been apprehensive about the class, but Fernandez’s friendliness put them at ease. Class began with a proper handshake, which Fernandez demonstrated. Confidence and respect are paramount in jiu-jitsu. Eye contact, a firm grip and a clear self-introduction are as important as sparring skills, he explained. My children stood a little taller after their handshake lesson and were ready to get down to jiu-jitsu basics. The sport, which focuses on grappling and ground fighting, originated from the

KIDSVT.COM

With the right technique, a smaller, weaker person can effectively defend against a bigger, stronger opponent.

11

“Fit Families” is a monthly feature that offers easy and affordable ways to stay active. Got an idea for a future FF? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com. k8v-PreventChildAbuse0211.indd 1

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✱ BOOKWORMS

Money Issue

EAT. LEARN. PLAY.

The

Seasonal Reads

In keeping with our April theme — money! — Kids VT asked local educators and librarians to recommend books that deal with dollars and cents. Find more financial literacy lessons at Vermont libraries during Money Smart Week, April 5 through 12, and at MoneyEd.vermont.gov.

Book-Review Winners Congratulations to these enthusiastic young critics who shared their reading recommendations with us in March. Each wins a $25 gift certificate from Crow Bookshop in Burlington. We loved reading about all the entrants’ literary adventures and have included some excerpts below.

Jenny Found a Penny

Hiba Ali, 10

On a quest to save up for a special dollar-store purchase, Jenny earns money by doing chores and collecting stray coins she finds in the car and under the bed. She’s surprised to learn that she still doesn’t have enough to cover the sales tax. Tricia Allen, children’s librarian at Ilsley Public Library in Middlebury, says this rhyming picture book is an excellent choice for early elementary students Ages learning about earning and saving money. While an adult 5-8 reads the book aloud, kids can practice their math skills by tallying the coins they spot on each page. “Her final purchase of a plastic piggy bank will encourage kids to start saving for their own special purchases,” Allen says.

recommends:

Lemonade in Winter

Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

BY TRUDY HARRIS

BY EMILY JENKINS

Tim wants a skateboard for his birthday but knows his family can’t afford it. To fund his purchase, he starts collecting cans, competing with a local homeless man for the refundable loot. Ultimately, though, Tim chooses generosity over his own self-interest. “The book allows adults to teach the costs and benefi ts of our choices, the value of earning our own Ages money and how to evaluate whether something is a 8-12 ‘want’ or a ‘need,’” says Lisa Helme, director of financial literacy for the Vermont State Treasurer’s Office. Parents can find activities and a lesson related to this book at the “Reading is an Investment” page at MoneyEd.vermont.gov. Recommendations compiled by Alison Novak

“My favorite part was when Deza found her sick father at the end. They get back together as a family.”

Mateo Doris, 9 MIDDLESEX

recommends:

BY J.K. ROWLING

“I like the part when the full moon rises and Professor Lupin turns into a mad werewolf. I imagine it’s scary to be next to a mad killing monster!”

Marissa Johnson, 8 VERGENNES

recommends:

Ramona’s World

BY BEVERLY CLEARY

“I liked the part when Ramona saw a girl all alone and became friends with her.”

Firdaus Muhammad, 10 ESSEX

recommends:

Turtle in Paradise BY JENNIFER L. HOLM

“My favorite part was when Turtle said to Beans, ‘At least I am not named after something that makes you have gas.’”

13

Find the Book-Review Contest for April on page 58. The deadline is April 15. Happy reading!

2014 UNION KIDS VT KIDS VT MONEY ISSUE SPONSORED BYKIDSVT.COM NEW ENGLANDFEBRUARY FEDERAL CREDIT

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BY CHRISTOPHER PAUL CURTIS

APRIL 2014

The Can Man

The Mighty Miss Malone

KIDSVT.COM

Ages 4-8

Pauline and her younger brother, John-John, decide to start a lemonade stand to make money — in the middle of winter. The children don’t make a profit, but they make enough to buy themselves a special treat to celebrate. Lemonade in Winter is on this year’s Red Clover Book Award list, which recognizes exemplary picture books. “The illustrations are engaging, and it captures the spirit of being a kid,” says Jessica Summer, children’s librarian at Winooski Memorial Library. “It’s a stand-out money book because it touches on the issue of supply and demand and its effect on a business without being confusing or too technical.”

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QUINOA-BANANA PANCAKES WITH LIME CRĂˆME FRAICHE & BLUEBERRIES 1/2 cup white quinoa

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1 large ripe banana 3 large eggs 1/2 tsp. salt 1/2 tsp. cinnamon 1 Tbsp. sugar

1 cup Crème Fraiche, sour cream or Greek yogurt 1 lime fresh blueberries & maple syrup

DIRECTIONS

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Kids VT money issue sponsored by New England Federal Credit Union

April 2014

kidsvt.com

Rinse quinoa under cool water until water runs clear. Bring 3/4 cup water to a boil, add quinoa, reduce heat to a simmer, cover and cook 12 minutes. When all the water is absorbed, turn o the heat, u with a fork, replace cover and let it steam for 5-10 minutes. Peel banana and place in a food processor, pulse to coarsely chop. Add eggs, salt, sugar, and cinnamon; process until well blended. Transfer to a mixing bowl, stir in quinoa, our and milk. The desired texture is that of a medium-thick pancake batter; add our or milk to adjust. Using a non-stick or oiled skillet, cook pancakes until the bottoms are golden brown, ip and cook second side. To make the Lime Crème Fraiche, add the zest of lime and about a tablespoon of lime juice to the Crème Fraiche, stir well, taste, adding more juice if needed. Serve pancakes topped with Lime Crème Fraiche, a drizzle of maple syrup and fresh berries.

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Q Mealtime By Kat hry n Fl agg

EAT. LEARN. PLAY.

Introducing baby to solid foods

I tried rice cereal. He spit it back. So too with “gauca-de-mama,” a concoction of avocado and breast milk that a friend recommended.

“All of these foods are new to your baby. Everything is variety.” Plus, she told me, breast-fed babies have already experienced a variety of flavors in their early lives; the flavor and aroma of breast milk change according to a nursing mother’s diet. Yon had plenty of other practical advice, which I wished I’d heard before Asa’s first bite. She recommended introducing babies to solid foods while holding them, rather than strapping them into a high chair; their experience of nourishment up to that point has been tied closely with proximity to their caregivers. Steer clear of honey in the first year of life, she reminded me, because it may contain the Clostridium bacteria that puts babies at risk of infant botulism. No salt and added sugars, either, she advised. Allow for some mess, and let food be a playful experience for babies. Most of the calories in a baby’s first year of life still come from breast milk or formula. I suspect that much of my early bewilderment and anxiety about feeding Asa stems from the importance that popular science attaches to early-childhood nutrition. One recent study found that a child’s “weight fate” is largely set by age 5; nearly half of children who became obese by the eighth grade were already overweight when they entered kindergarten. As a new mother, I want to nourish my baby today, but also to instill healthy eating habits and an enjoyment of good food that will follow him through his adult life. But even I’ll admit that’s a lot to load onto one tiny spoon. Asa is now almost 9 months old. Just as breastfeeding, with time, felt natural and intuitive, so too will this new phase of feeding. I’ve let go of a lot of my anxiety about solid foods, and, as Yon recommended, am following my baby’s lead. I’m cherishing these months when his favorite food is still mama’s 24-hour milk bar, but already, having a new little person at the dinner table is a joy. Sure, it’s messy — but then again, what isn’t? K

Kids VT money issue sponsored by New England Federal marchCredit 2014 Union kidsvt.com Kids VT

15

“Mealtime” is a new feature about families and food. Got a topic you’d like us to explore? Email it to ideas@kidsvt.com.

kidsvt.com April 2014

the get-go; “the mush stops here,” proclaims the website of midwife Gill Rapley, who coined that term. It turns out that Asa is much happier eating when he’s the one shoveling food into his mouth. In a high chair pulled up to the table, he selects from the options we put in front of him. Instead of sweet-potato purées, we started steaming wedges roughly the size of a large index finger: big enough for Asa to grab, steer awkwardly to his mouth and gum with a curious look. Bananas, green beans, broccoli — he’s taken to them all. I enjoy preparing wholesome, homemade foods for him, but what he likes best, to my chagrin, are Baby Mum-Mums, the prepackaged rice rusks I picked up at our local co-op. Asa seems as pleased by the accomplishment of getting food to his mouth as he is by the satisfaction of eating something tasty. His gag reflex occasionally kicks in, which can be a little terrifying to watch, but we’ve learned to trust that this is his way of spitting up anything too big to chew or safely swallow. Of course, as much of it lands on the floor as it does in his mouth, to our dog’s great delight, but Asa’s getting surprisingly good at palming mashed carrots or slippery steamed apple slices into his mouth. He’ll let us spoonfeed him oatmeal or purées, especially if he gets to hold his own spoon in the process. Regardless of whether a family chooses purées, baby-led weaning or something in between, Yon suggests taking things slow, and not introducing more than one new food each week. When I expressed some concern about variety — was I mixing things up enough? — she laughed. “The concept of variety — this is all new!” she said.

courtesy of kathryn flagg

Before my son, Asa, was born last July, other mothers warned me that breastfeeding might be difficult. The cautionary tales were well intentioned, I think — meant to prepare me for the worst. Accordingly, I approached the goal of nursing my firstborn with a sort of battle-hardened determination. Within a few weeks, though, Asa and I had settled into an easy rhythm. As the months passed, and my newborn grew into a hearty, babbling baby, I took great pleasure in the knowledge that my body was sustaining him. “Chow train’s here,” my husband and I would joke when I returned home after a day at work. “The milk bar is open.” For the next step, though, I was ill prepared: Feeding my baby solid food — a variation of the kind I’d been feeding myself more or less successfully for nearly three decades — proved to be much more confusing and problematic than I expected. Where were the war stories, the kindly advice and helpful hints? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends exclusive breastfeeding until around 6 months old. When Asa reached that age, almost to the day, I whipped out the applesauce I’d lovingly prepared, puréed and frozen in one-ounce servings. As I nudged a silicone-tipped spoon into his mouth, he made a face that suggested utter revulsion. Several days later, I tried rice cereal. He spit it back. So too with “gauca-de-mama,” a concoction of avocado and breast milk that a friend recommended. Puréed sweet potatoes? Bananas? Nope. We gave up for a little while, and I reasoned, as any rational person might, that my baby would have to be breastfed until he left for college. Bethany Yon, a research associate in Nutrition and Food Sciences at the University of Vermont, reassured me. Particularly among some breast-fed babies, she said, the first reaction to solid food is often: “You want me to eat what?” For a lot of breast-feeding mother-baby pairs, she said, “there is something much more going on here than just food filling tummy.” The introduction of solid foods can be a jarring transition for babies. It was comforting to learn that Asa’s initial reaction might have been reflexive; many babies hold on to a “tongue thrust” reflex, which protects them from swallowing what they shouldn’t, until several weeks after that six-month mark. “Look for developmental signs as opposed to looking at the date on the calendar,” Yon advised. Ultimately, what worked for our family was handing the reins to Asa. We waited a few weeks, then began dabbling in “baby-led weaning.” Proponents of this approach advocate letting babies feed themselves from


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Son Miles, 12; daughters Emma, 9, and Delaney, 5 When I was a kid, I understood our standard of living; I knew that I couldn’t ask for a sports car. My parents taught me that everything costs money. If you spent money on one thing, you wouldn’t have it for the other — and that other might be a necessity. It was a good lesson. Our kids are not at the point yet where they ask for a certain article of clothing or a particular pair of shoes. But, with electronic devices, they will see the latest and greatest thing, usually at school, and ask for it around their birthday or Christmas. Sometimes, instead of buying something they’ve asked for, like an iPad, we’ll buy a less expensive technology that serves the same purpose. We’ve taken a lot of time to teach our kids the value of a dollar, so if they ask for something outrageous, we just explain to them it’s an expensive item and they can’t shoot that high. When we say no, they know why we’re saying no.

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“Go Ask Dad” is a monthly feature in which we ask fathers to answer a question. Got a question or a pop you’d like to hear from? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com. 1/23/13 4:45 PM


✱ THE ART OF

EAT. LEARN. PLAY.

BY A LISON NOVAK / PHOTOS B Y MATT HE W T HOR SE N

CORRETT ARTISTS: SONNY MONTEIRO, MEGHAN CLEARY, ELAINE

didn’t know they would be so difficult to break,” she says. As a teacher, Divoll-Painter loves the project because, she says, it encourages problem-solving skills and gives her k8v-BillingsMuseum0414.indd students the opportunity to exhibit their work in a juried show. It’s also a chance to celebrate kids whose work is nontraditional, even a little wacky. “Artists, fashion designers and techies don’t always get their chance to shine in school,” says John Powell, school outreach coordinator for Chittenden Solid Waste District. “This showcase offers an outlet to show off how smart and creative they are.” 

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introduces the concept of creative reuse by bringing a collection of her own junk into the studio for the kids to see. She dumps fabric, bottle caps, computer parts and metal scraps into a heap in the center of the room. “It starts out as just a disorganized pile of stuff,” she says. Then she shows her class samples of students’ work from previous years, and they watch “The Story of Stuff,” a short animated documentary about the

detrimental effects consumerism has on our world. The teens then get to work, figuring out what they’d like to create and which materials to use. “So often in art class we say, ‘You’re making this,’” DivollPainter explains. Creative reuse is much more open-ended. Senior Kindra Lundie says the assignment came naturally to her — she’s been digging through the recycling bin for art materials since she was little. This year, she created a fancy gold chandelier out of hundreds of spray-painted, flattened beer-bottle caps she procured from Magic Hat Brewing Company. Hammering out each and every cap was “tedious,” she says, but it was rewarding to make “something pretty out of something gross.” For some students, the assignment’s open-endedness proves challenging. “It’s harder than you think to come up with an idea,” says sophomore Aster O’Leary, who ultimately decided to make the CD mosaic. She laughs as she describes hitting the CDs with a hammer, shattering them into little pieces that flew all over her clothing. “I

“Old Vinyl Warrior”

APRIL 2014

“Off the Record”

“Not Too Shabby Chandelier”

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NEARLY EVERY INCH OF WALL SPACE in Lisa Divoll-Painter’s large art studio at South Burlington High School is covered with colorful paintings, drawings and mobiles. But her advanced art students — a mix of sophomores, juniors and seniors — have recently finished a more unconventional assignment: They’ve transformed materials bound for the landfill into games, clothing, sculptures and objets d’art. Their projects, which took several months to complete, were inspired by Chittenden Solid Waste District’s annual Creative Reuse Showcase competition, which challenges Chittenden County high school students to turn trash into treasure. During a visit to the high school in March, some of Divoll-Painter’s students’ recycled creations were laid out around the studio: a bicycle-wheel dream catcher; a dress constructed from bubble wrap and milk-bottle labels; and a tree-shaped mosaic made with CD fragments and beads. Some works weren’t there because they’d been selected for CSWD’s annual exhibition at Burlington’s Frog Hollow. Divoll-Painter, whose students participate in the competition each year,

ARTIST: KINDRA LUNDIE

Creative Reuse

3/26/14 11:39 AM


Play to Pay Hardworking Vermonters remember their first jobs BY MARY ANN LICKTEIG

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rowing up on an Iowa farm in the 1970s meant not having to look far for a first job. In my case, it meant not being able to escape it either. My dad was a farmer, and fields surrounded me, so from the time I was 7 years old, I was “walking beans.” That means walking through soybean fields cutting out weeds with a hoe. I dreaded it. School got out in late May, and my four siblings and I basked in sweet freedom until that morning in mid- or late June when the beans — and the weeds — were deemed tall enough. My dad would wake us up with the words, “Why don’t we go out and hoe a few beans?” First jobs teach kids skills, instill responsibility and deliver the thrill of a paycheck — all over a giant safety net. A less-than-stellar performance won’t land on a permanent work record. I learned to identify cockleburs, smartweed, nightshade and button weeds. I worked in the heat, got blisters, took swigs from a communal water jug and rolled up my shorts to get a better JOVAN ELLIS tan. I used to joke that I got into the news business to get out of the field, but I knew, even as a kid, beanwalking wasn’t so bad. At church on Sundays, my friend Theresa McGuire’s dad would look at my hands and admire my calluses. I was doing honest work, and no job since has offered such an immediate sense of accomplishment. Leaving the field for the day, you could look back over the rows and see exactly how far you had come. When I graduated from high school, my dad gave me a hoe. Kids VT spoke to Vermonters about what they took away from their earliest work experiences. Harry Bliss learned to stand up for himself. Betsy Martin found that if she worked hard, she could go places. And Jovan Ellis learned to respect the most menial jobs and the people doing them. Read on.

I didn’t make much at all, but I liked the feeling of being selfsufficient.

First job:

making pizza  

Harry Bliss, 50 SOUTH BURLINGTON

cartoonist, illustrator for the New Yorker and several children’s books including Diary of a Worm, Diary of a Spider, Diary of a Fly, and, coming this spring, Anna & Solomon Kids: son alex, 20, and stepdaughter delia, 14 As best he can recall, Bliss spent his earliest paychecks at Empire Comics in Rochester, N.Y., which was six miles from his house. He made the journey on a banana-seat bike.

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y first job was in a pizza joint: Cilino’s Pizza in Henrietta, N.Y. My older sister, Rachel, was working there, and she asked the owner, Vince, if I might work there, too, making pies. I wasn’t sure it would happen because I was 15 — pretty young — but Vince trusted my sister and gave me a shot. I believe I made about $3 an hour. I honestly don’t recall; it was 1979! Before long, my sister left, and I suggested to Vince that he hire my best friend, Darren Eggleston, and he did. Vince would leave each night around 7 to go to a disco club called 747. (The inside was like an airplane, I’d heard.) Me and Darren made pies,

took phone orders and pretty much ran the whole operation. One night we got into a fight — a pretty serious fistfight — and ended up throwing handfuls of pepperoni at each other. Fortunately, we’d cleaned up before Vince returned to count up the register. I learned to take pride in the fact that I was this kid running a business along with my buddy. I eventually was fired from Cilino’s. Vince accused me of stealing money from the jukebox, which I never did, and the whole experience left me feeling angry. I wasn’t mature enough to argue my defense. A week or so later, I got a job at a Carvel ice cream place a few doors down from Cilino’s. I got fired from that job, too. The owner, a nice man, told me I “just wasn’t working out.” It’s not easy serving soft ice cream — very tricky, in fact.


Money Issue The

First job:

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Kids: daughter Mariah, 27, and son Jonathan, 24 The summer after eighth grade, Betsy Martin moved with her family from California to southern Florida. She hated the culture and missed her friends. So she babysat her way back.

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pay to play… p. 20 »

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e had a lot of doctors in the area, and I started babysitting [for their kids]. Doctors pay really well, especially if you’re reliable! I worked every Friday night for one doctor and every Saturday night for another, so it was really consistent. And I just saved my money.

At the end of the school year, I bought a plane ticket to California and visited my friends for five weeks. Next school year, I did the same thing. I flew alone; it was a different time. Between my sophomore and junior years, I started teaching gymnastics and getting paid pretty darn well. I decided, well, I really kind of need to stay at my job over the summer, and so I didn’t go back [to California]. By then, I had lots of friends [in Florida]. I think I was making $15 an hour or something because they’d pay you by the class. So you’d teach three classes and you’d get a good chunk of money. I was very independent. I knew I had that money. I could go do what I wanted and, yeah, I was psyched.

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was 19 and in college in Chicago. There was a cattle call for models for a beauty show, and my hairdresser suggested I go. That was the beginning. I was picked up by an agency in Chicago when a representative of the agency saw the show. Over the next two years, I did numerous shows — mostly hair and makeup shows rather than clothing and fashion — but I also did ad work for Marshall Field’s department store. My parents were actually upset that I had a job. My dad always told me that my job was to get good grades, and that I would have to work for the rest of my life so I should enjoy my youth. As I became more educated and furthered my college career, I became a feminist and hated the

First job:

April 2014

While in college, Griffith learned a valuable lesson: what she didn’t want to do for work.

kidsvt.com

chair and associate professor of media studies, journalism and digital arts at St. Michael’s College Kids: son Jaden, 7

whole notion of being judged solely on my looks. I learned that there are many sad people in the industry who need the validation of others and are willing to sell themselves to get it. I saw drug use and bulimia. I saw body mutilation and ethnocentric issues. Models, to their detriment, were trying to become the ideal. I was a college kid who was doing this temporarily and wasn’t particularly invested. It’s a horrible industry that preys on women’s vulnerabilities. I wouldn’t want anyone I love to make a living doing this.


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had my first job when I was 12. I helped out at my stepfather’s restaurant and bar by opening up shop in the morning, helping prepare meals in the kitchen, getting ice and change for the bartenders, things like that. I didn’t make much at all, but I liked the feeling of being self-sufficient. My first bit of money often went toward trying to buy Nike sneakers or Dickies-brand pants. In middle school, your social status is often determined by your ability to keep up with the latest fashion trends, and bargain-bin attire can be disastrous!

By 16, I worked at a local pizza shop. The conditions were miserable, especially during an air conditionless summer. I have such respect for people doing jobs they don’t like, working in difficult conditions to make ends meet. It makes you want something. It makes you aspire to greater things. It was also around this time when I began putting most of my money toward helping my mom. Our household certainly needed the help, but my mom didn’t let me help her out with the most expensive bills. Instead, she asked that I pay the entirety of one of the smaller expenses, like the water bill. I’m not sure why, but somehow paying off all of something made it feel like I was doing measurable good.

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when to work? The righT age For a FirsT job is somewhere between 11 and 15, according to penny bishop, UVM professor of middle level education and the director of the Tarrant institute for innovative education. bishop says kids that age crave a sense of responsibility, a feeling that they are trusted and that people count on them. They need to develop competence and want to feel independent. “They are really at the time of life when they are beginning to define themselves as more than a family member … They are seeing themselves as an individual,” bishop says. “so having a job is an opportunity to respond to that need.” before your child pounds the pavement for that babysitting or lawn-mowing gig, bishop says, consider these three things:


To help him see hope, we looked at care through a child’s eyes.

First job:

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Tom sullivan, 65 burlingTon

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• Is It realIstIc? Will the job fit into the family schedule? say your son plans to walk a dog every day after school, bishop says. “What happens on Tuesday when he goes to violin lessons or soccer or the dentist?” The last thing you want to do is add a family stressor.

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• Is the work approprIate? you don’t want to set up a child to fail. “it’s really important that an early job provide that feeling of confidence,” says bishop, mother of two sons, ages 13 and 15. To prepare your kid for a specific job, look for community courses, such as babysitting classes or programs offered by

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s soon as I was able to learn all the safety mechanisms, I started mowing lawns at age 10. I had at least five or six different lawns I did every week — ours, plus all the neighbors’. And that was my first paying job. My father never touched the lawn mower again after that. I’ve had a job ever since — no break. I continued to do the lawn at our house until the time I went to college. But at age 13, I also started working in a caddy shop at a golf course. From age 16 to 21, I worked every summer on a highway construction crew — air hammer, blacktop, concrete, tearing up roads, putting in new ones. These days, when lanes are

stopped and there are flag people out there, I always wave to them and thank them. [My wife] asked me, “Why do you do that?” And I said, “Because I had to do that occasionally. I know what it’s like standing out in that hot sun and working on a highway crew and sometimes being the flag person.” From age 12 to 16, I also worked part-time on a farm in the summer — mostly baling hay. [Having a job] is about managing — and being disciplined about managing — one’s schedule, whether you’re 10 or 62 years old. If the neighbors all want that lawn mowed by noon on Saturday, well, I’ve got to figure out how to get five or six of these in, particularly if it’s raining. I think people would tell you I’m a fairly focused, organized, disciplined, kind of strict manager of a calendar. I think it all started early on because I had to figure out how to get those jobs done and do the stuff I wanted to do as a kid, too. K

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Too many kids are truant; what Vermont is doing about it B y Ken P ic a rd In his 27 years as a teacher at Bellows Free Academy in St. Albans, Neal Smith says he hasn’t seen much improvement in the problem of truancy — children failing to attend public school. For example, he knows of a 14-year-old student who’s missed at least three quarters of the school year to date. The girl’s chronic absences aren’t due to a severe illness or family tragedy; Smith says her family either can’t, or won’t, get her to school. Smith isn’t at liberty to identify the teen by name but virtually everyone involved in truancy prevention in Franklin County — school administrators, community justice advocates, the

state’s attorney, and caseworkers at the Vermont Department for Children and Families — appears to be familiar with the case. Smith says he and his colleagues feel “a high degree of powerlessness” to do anything about it. “What the hell happens when you have a 14-year-old kid who stays home 60 out of 80 days? Pretty much nothing,” Smith says. “It’s not like I want kids put in jail. I want them in school. But the law has no teeth.” What sounds like a worst-case scenario is actually “not uncommon with a subset of students,” according to Marc Wennberg, director of the St. Albans Community Justice Center. During the

2011-12 school year, more than 1,800 students in Franklin and Grand Isle counties each missed more than 10 days of school, including 680 students who were absent more than 20 days. One year ago, Wennberg helped launch the Franklin and Grand Isle Truancy Response Project, a federally funded collaboration among five supervisory unions, the St. Albans Community Justice Center, the DCF and the locally designated mental health agency, Northwestern Counseling & Support Services. Its goal is to find truant kids in grades 1 through 8 and try to re-engage them and their families with the school system — using a


®

could vermont Fight truancy By raising the age of compulsory education to 18?

with students and their families at the beginning of this school year. Though she had expected to get referrals after kids missed 15 days of class, due to the volume of truant students, she says she typically doesn’t see clients until they’ve missed 40 or more days of school. Students are supposed to be in school for 175 to 180 days each year. Initially, Seeholzer expected to have a caseload of six to eight kids at a time. But due to the intensive nature of the work — she can spend as much as four hours a day with just one child and family — her team, which meets once

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whatever-it-takes approach — before their cases end up in court. Jamie Seeholzer works to make sure her clients never reach that point, even if it means showing up at their homes at 6 a.m. to help brush their teeth, get them dressed and fed, then drive them to school and sit in the car until they go inside. Seeholzer is neither a nanny nor a social worker. She’s a part-time truancy specialist with Wennberg’s project. When it comes to keeping kids in school, she’s where the rubber meets the road. Seeholzer was hired at the program’s launch and began working directly

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suggests the law should be changed to address 21st-century realities. would such legislation improve truancy rates? thus far, the evidence from other states is mixed. new Hampshire’s law took effect in the 2009-10 school year. the next year, the state halved its high school dropout rate, from 1.7 percent in 2008-09 to 0.9 percent. in 2009, the rennie center for education research & Policy looked at whether massachusetts should raise its age of compulsory education to 18. the resulting study found that, while there were some tangible benefits in other states that have done so, there’s “no credible empirical evidence to support this policy alone as an effective strategy to combat the dropout crisis.” in effect, the rennie center concluded that raising the age of compulsory education only works when states adopt and fund other policies and programs, such as alternative educational options meant to help at-risk youth graduate. vermont’s compulsory education age isn’t rising any time soon. nitka’s fellow windsor democrat, sen. dick mccormack, who chairs the senate education committee, says the bill won’t move this session. it’s not due to any philosophical opposition to the idea, mccormack says, but because there’s more pressing business to address.

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why does vermont allow students to leave high school at age 16? countless studies have shown dropouts are much more likely to end up poor, unemployed and incarcerated. sen. alice nitka (d-windsor) has been trying to change that for years with legislation to increase vermont’s age of compulsory education from 16 to 18, as some other states — including new Hampshire — have done. the closest nitka’s got to passage was in 2012, when it passed the senate but died in the House. “i’ve worked with children all of my life, and there’s absolutely no reason they shouldn’t be in school” until they graduate, nitka says. “to let a kid drop out of school at 16, what are they going to do? there’s a good chance they’ll just get in trouble.” Phil lovely, a social worker and licensed school counselor with the lamoille valley truancy Project, bolstered that theory when he testified last year in support of nitka’s bill. He said that going from middle school to high school is “one of the most dangerous transitions … and not a good time to let go of these kids.” vermont’s aversion to compulsory education to age 18 dates to its agrarian roots, when most teenagers left school at 16 to work on the family farm. But now that a shrinking number of vermont kids grow up on farms or return to work there, nitka

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a month, now identifies just one or two “heavy hitters” for Seeholzer to work with. Seeholzer has observed many of the common causes of truancy, such as substance abuse and mental health issues, but points out that many cases don’t conform to the usual stereotypes about juvenile delinquency, heroin addiction or abusive parents. For example, she says some kids don’t go to school simply because they worry about bullying or poor performance in the classroom. Sometimes, the parents lack basic time-management skills and can’t get their kid on the school bus each morning. In other cases, the student doesn’t mind attending school; it’s the parents who are distrustful of the school system. Seeholzer says she tries not to focus on past conflicts but on “turning the page” on those fractured relationships. Because she’s not a school employee but is contracted through Northwest Counseling and Support Services, she says many families see her as a constructive third party who’s not there to take sides or mete out punishment. Because she’s not employed by the school district, Seeholzer has the freedom to do things — such as enter a home and drive the kids to school — that teachers and guidance counselors cannot. Technically, Seeholzer’s position is only 20 hours per week, though she admits she works far more than that. And, because the number of truant students far exceeds her capacities, she says “we could use 17 of me” to handle all her referrals. Currently, she’s the only one doing her job. Yet despite the obvious need, the future of Seeholzer’s job — indeed, of the entire Truancy Response Project — remains uncertain. According to Wennberg, the program is only funded through the end of December. Chittenden, Rutland and Lamoille counties have had anti-truancy programs for years — and, not surprisingly, graduation rates in those areas are improving. Chittenden County also has a family court docket and prosecutor specifically devoted to truancy cases. At what point does the state consider a student truant? Currently, Vermont has no universally accepted standard. Some districts differentiate between “excused” absences — such as those resulting from illness, bereavement, family vacations or religious observances — and “unexcused” ones. Others count an excess of both excused and

It’s not like I want kids put in jail. I want them in school. But the law has no teeth. TEACHER NEAL SMITH unexcused absences as grounds for intervention, often in the form of a mandatory meeting with administrators, DCF caseworkers and other social-service agencies. In 2009, Vermont’s then-Department of Education directed all the state’s school districts and supervisory unions to adopt clear and consistent truancy policies countywide that would begin in the 2010-11 school year. Following DOE’s guidelines, most schools will now send letters home to parents after no more than 10 absences and will file paperwork with DCF and/or the county’s state’s attorney after no more than 20 absences. How well has that worked? It’s difficult to assess, partly because no one at DCF or the Vermont Agency of Education oversees truancy cases or even tracks the figures. But according to teachers, administrators, prosecutors and other experts interviewed for this article, truancy remains as intractable as ever — in part because it’s usually a symptom of larger problems in a child’s life. Those can include mental illness, emotional or behavioral problems, drug

and alcohol abuse, domestic and sexual violence, homelessness, and neglect. Notes Deputy State’s Attorney Andy Strauss, who’s handled Chittenden County’s truancy docket for the last five years: “These are very difficult cases. With truancy, you don’t know what the problems are until you start to unpack them.” Considering the high rates of absenteeism in Franklin and Grand Isle schools, one might assume that their family courts would be deluged with truancy cases. They’re not, and BFA’s Smith thinks that’s part of the problem. In the 2013 fiscal year, Grand Isle saw one truancy case referred to family court; Franklin County had none. In that same year, Chittenden County had 46 truancy cases pending from the previous year and added 43 new ones. Similarly, Rutland County had five truancy cases pending at the start of 2013 and filed another 40 throughout the year. Under current policy, Franklin County schools are supposed to send a letter home to parents after five unexcused absences, requesting a meeting with administrators and counselors.

After 10 unexcused absences, a second meeting is called, this one involving DCF and local social-service providers seeking the underlying causes of the unexcused absences. If the problem persists, only then will the school file a legal affidavit with the state’s attorney to involve the judicial system. That front-heavy system is one reason there are so few truancy cases in his county, according to Franklin County State’s Attorney Jim Hughes. Another is that a child’s long-term absence from school may be wrapped up in more serious and complex family or criminal issues, as is the case with the 14-year-old who’s missed most of this school year. Lastly, in hard-core truancy cases, Hughes says, “by the time we get into court, we really don’t have the teeth to enforce getting the kid to go to school.” Why? If a child is under 16, Hughes can file criminal charges against the parents for not complying with Vermont’s compulsory education law, but that offense carries no more than a $1,000 fine. And even at its speediest, he says, the criminal justice system typically won’t bring a misdemeanor case to trial in fewer than six to eight months. By then, the length of an entire school year has passed. Hughes’ only other option is to file a CHINS — child in need of supervision — petition in family court, alleging that the child is either beyond the parents’ control, or lacks parental support. In either case, he says, the end result is usually the same. “We don’t lock kids up. We can try to put them in foster care, but foster homes are a rare commodity,” Hughes says. “I’ve had judges say, ‘I am not going to remove a child from his or her home just because they’re not going to school.’” For his part, Smith says that while he was glad to see the Franklin and Grand Isle Truancy Response Project finally get up and running this year, he points out that it’ll do nothing to help the 14-year-old girl who’s already missed more than 75 percent of the school year. As a ninth grader, she’s outside the parameters of the truancy project’s targeted population. “I think the state of Vermont is turning its back on high school kids and their families,” he says. “Is this the best we can do? I hope not.”  A version of this story originally appeared in the March 12 issue of Seven Days.


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WIC Income Eligibility Family of 2: up to $2,392/mo. Family of 4: up to $3,631/mo. Family of 6: up to $4,871/mo. Already on Medicaid/ Dr. Dynasaur? You are income eligible for WIC.

Contact us today to find out how WIC can help.

800-649-4357 healthvermont.gov/wic k4t-VTDeptHealth0213.indd 1

1/24/13 4:41 PM

A fun-filled day for families with children age six and under.

Fit Kids Quiz Calling all kid runners! Take this quiz for a chance to win one free entry into the MVP Health Care YAM Scram on Saturday, May 24, at the Burlington Waterfront. Kids ages 4-14 are eligible to participate in a half-mile, one-mile or two-mile race.

1. How much water should you drink each day? a. 64 oz. b. 12 oz. c. 8 oz. d. 100 oz.

6. Why should you stretch? a. To show your friends you can stretch more b. To become more flexible c. To lose weight d. To grow big and strong

2. How much physical activity should children get? a. 15 minutes a day, three days a week b. One hour a day, two days a week c.  30 minutes a day, five days a week d. Three hours a day, one day a week

7. Why is sleep important? a. So you can eat bigger meals b. Sleeping makes your muscles stronger c. It gives you energy for the day and helps you recover d. To be able to read more books

3. What are some ways to strengthen muscles? a. Eating fruits and nuts b. Lifting weights, doing pushups and sit-ups or working with resistance bands c. Reading a book d. Going shopping 4. Which of the following foods would be the healthiest choice? a. Smoothie b. French fries c. Taco d. Chicken nuggets 5. Which is healthier? a. Eating fast food b. Going to the movies c. Playing video games d. Riding your bike

Pony rides

Live music

fAce PAinting

Lunch

crAfts

Admission is free

www.lakechamplainwaldorfschool.org

359 Turtle Lane (off Harbor Road in Shelburne) (802) 985-2827

26

KIDS VT MONEY XXXXXX ISSUE 20XX SPONSORED KIDSVT.COM BY NEW ENGLAND FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

APRIL 2014

KIDSVT.COM

WIC is an equal opportunity provider and employer.

âœą CONTEST

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3/27/14 11:35 AM

Complete the quiz on our Facebook page, or mail this page to 255 South Champlain Street, Burlington, Vt. 05401 by Friday, April 25.

8. Who is most responsible for making healthy choices for your life? a. Your mom b. Your dad c. Your teachers d. You 9. When is the best time to exercise? a. Whenever you can b. Midnight c. After dinner d. Right when you wake up 10. What does exercise do for your bones? a. Helps them grow more b. Helps make them strong c. Makes them weaker d. Makes them heavier

Name ________________________________ Age __________________________________ Town ________________________________ Email ________________________________ Phone ________________________________


Money Issue The

Tax Day

by nAncy steArns bercAw

Teaching my son why — and what — we pay

M

David thought the program was a game and tested many different equations, including the homestead tax rate for a $545,694,300 property.

to sign up your kids and don’t forget to make your dinner reservations ASAP. Weekend tables will fill up fast!

vermontrestaurantweek.com 3/28/14 11:15 AM

27

4h-restoweek14-ymca.indd 1

Friday, April 25, 6-8:30 p.m., Saturday, April 26, 5:30-8 p.m. $12 (members), $20 (non-members) per child. Participation is limited to 42 children/night. Pre-registration is required.

Call 862-9622

KidsVT.com XXXXXX crediT 20XX union Kids VT Kids VT money issue sponsored by new england Federal

launched by President Obama to explain how our federal income tax dollars are being spent. It invites taxpayers to plug in their income, then estimates how many dollars the government spends in areas such as health care, international affairs,

Even foodies with kids have no excuse to miss out on Vermont Restaurant Week. Parents can enjoy a Friday or Saturday night on the town while their kids (ages 2-12) have fun at the Y!

APRIL 25-MAY 4

job and family security, and responses to natural disasters. We used fake numbers, which made me feel less selfconscious about sharing our actual income with David. He deemed the site “cool.” Then, I decided to lean on the good old Boston Tea Party of 1773. Outraged by taxes on tea, the original revolutionary tea partiers tossed 45 tons of British East India Company tea into Boston Harbor. With the help of a few websites, David and I figured out the value of the tea today and what its tax burden would be in 2014. Then, we used various sites to see how it might add up in the context of our lives. The tea would cost nearly a million bucks today. If that were my salary, the income tax owed, at the current rate of 35 percent, would be $350,000. Owning a million-dollar home in Burlington comes with an annual bill of $22,841 in municipal taxes. Our one-hour inquiry into taxes elicited “oohs” and “ah-has” from my son. David shifted from worry about the concept to excitement over the calculations. Staring at a stack of tax forms, I wish I felt the same. K

April 2014

typically 0.2 to 4 percent. Have the students calculate the property tax for three properties at different values using the same tax rate.” I asked David to use his solid fourth-grade math skills to determine how much is due on a $100,000 property at a 1 percent rate. He was troubled that the answer meant the property owner needed to mail a $1,000 check to the authorities every year. “That’s a lot of money, Mom,” said my boy, who, over the course of four years, has managed to save $200 in his bank account. We reviewed the city of Burlington’s online property tax calculator — burlingtonvt.gov/CT/ PropertyTaxes/Calculate — which shows how taxes are calculated based on the homestead exemption rate of 1.5257 percent. David treated the program like a game and tested many different equations including the homestead tax rate for a $545,694,300 property. Suddenly ditching his concern about the city’s share, which was well over $10 million a year, he exclaimed, “This is fun!” I’m not sure many people have ever equated taxes with fun, but why not give him this financial freedom for a few seconds? I also showed David whitehouse. gov/2012-taxreceipt, an initiative

KidsVT.com

y 10-year-old son, David, is obsessed with taxes. He glares at the tax on restaurant receipts. He even ponders our property tax bill. When I broke the news about annual income taxes, due April 15, he was transfixed. “Why do we have to pay all this extra money?” he wanted to know. When we both stayed home for a March snow day, I decided to teach him about the sensitive subject of paying our dues to society. After all, it’s not something he’s learning in school. We mostly steered clear of politics. We didn’t talk about our hometown of Burlington’s school budget, for example, which was voted down on Town Meeting Day. And I didn’t attempt to answer the question, “How much should we pay?” But we managed to cover the basics of this complex civic endeavor, with help from some resources I found online. We started with the lesson plan on kids.gov, which includes this superb, simple taxation explanation: “Taxes are collected to pay for things that we all share, like roads, parks and playgrounds. We also share in the cost of services such as the public school system or the police department.” It offers a number of suggested activities, such as this one: “U.S. property tax rates vary from state to state,


SUGARBUSH ADVENTURE CAMPS

2014

MINI ADVENTURE CAMP (ages 3-5) Mon – Fri, 9 AM – 4 PM Jun 23 – Aug 22 (excluding July 4) Activities include swimming, hiking, rock climbing, arts and more. Early drop-off and late pick-up available. $265/child/week. ADVENTURE CAMP (ages 6-12) Mon – Fri, 9 AM– 4 PM Jun 30 – Aug 22 (excluding July 4) Biking, ziplining, hiking, naturalist tours, swimming, climbing and more. Lunch included. $315/child/week. SATURDAy ADVENTURE CAMP (ages 6-12) Saturdays, 9 AM – 1 PM (half-day) or 9 AM – 4 PM (full-day) Jul 5 – Aug 23 Same as the Adventure Camp, but offered as a single day camp on Saturdays. Lunch included. $90/child/full-day; $60/child/half-day. MOUNTAIN BIKE ADVENTURE CAMP (ages 8-17) Mon – Fri, 9 AM – 4 PM Jul 21 – 25, Aug 11 – 15, and Aug 18 – 22 $420/child/week.

JUNIOR GOLF CAMP (ages 6-17) Tue – Fri, 9:30 AM – 12 PM Jul 8 – 11 and Aug 12 – 15 Camp focuses on intro to golf, instruction, course knowledge, rules, games and more. Taught by accomplished PGA Professionals. Lunch and gift included. $375/child/week. JUNIOR TENNIS CAMP (ages 8-14) Tue – Fri, 9:30 AM – 12 PM Jul 8 – 11 and Aug 12 – 15 Hit the tennis courts each afternoon for drills and games led by the coaches of New England Tennis Holidays (NETH). For reservations, call NETH at 800.869.0949. $175/child/week. ALSO AVAILABLE • Day rates for Mini Adventure, Adventure and Mountain Bike Adventure Camps • First Timer One- and Three-Day Mountain Bike Lesson Packages • Private and Group Mountain Bike Guide Service for all levels

hike • bike • swim • rock climb • zipline • golf • tennis

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Kids VT money issue sponsored by New England Federal Credit Union

April 2014

kidsvt.com

For reservations and more information, visit SUGARBUSH.CoM or call 800.53.SUGAR.

The Balancing Act Enrichment Center

• • •

Preschool program ages 3-5 years After-school program options available ages 3-12 Experienced teachers dedicated to the development of the whole child Encouraging learning, laughter and positive social interactions while focusing on stages of early childhood development Weekly lessons with USAG-certified gymnastics coaches Daily play in our gymnastics facility and outdoor exploration in our play yard & nature trails Nutritious snacks and lunch provided and prepared on site

For preschool information, email: Regal.TheBalancingAct@gmail.com 2 Corporate Drive, Essex • 655-3300 • RegalGym.com Owners - Tom & Erika Reeves k2h-regalgymnastics0314.indd 1

Discovery adventure camp

Ages 3-7 • June 16-August 22 week-by-week, 3-day & full-day options

at • • • •

two new summer camps

Gymnastics camp

Boys & Girls • Ages 6-14 • July 14-August 22

register now! For more information, visit regalgym.com/summer-camps NEw!

Regal Graph ics & Embroidery 324-2069 for more info

Preschool Director - Kathleen Casey 2/27/14 12:25 PM


CAMP GUIDE

2014

Survey Says... Part III: Vermont kids tell us why they love camp B Y T HE A L E W IS

IN THIS MONTH’S KIDS VT CAMP GUIDE, we hear from the real experts: Vermont kids who have attended camp in summers past. We asked them to tell us, in their own words, what made their experiences memorable, and why they can’t wait to go back again. Want to hear from their parents, too? Find feedback from our first-ever camp survey in the February and March installments of the Camp Guide, available at kidsvt.com. SURVEY SAYS… P. 30 »

KIDSVT.COM

®

APRIL 2014

NCIAL AID is availab le. FINA

camps for

ages 4-19

plus adult & teen classes

AGES 6-8: Shipwrecked! Pirates & Palaces; Secret Agent Academy; Horses, Snails, & Fairy Tales; Magic Tree House Adventures; Broadway Kids; Ultimate Superheroes; Fairy & Unicorn Ballet; Musical Playground AGES 8-10: Broadway From Start to Finish;

Wizards, Wands & Magical Lands; Aliens vs. Vampires; Lights... Camera... Action; Star Wars: Jedi Training; Camp Half Blood; Jazz Improv; Zombie vs. Ninjas!; History Comes Alive!

AGES 11+: Broadway From Start to Finish; Broadway Bound; Hip-Hop & Jazz Dance; Radio Plays; The Hunger Games... a Comedy!; Jazz Improv; Summertime Jazz Program; Flash Mob & Music: Video Dance Camp; Monty Python Sketchfest; History Comes Alive! AGES 13-19: Queer & Allied Youth Theater; Summer Musicals (performances in July)

l

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Y DAY CAMPS: ROLLICKING FROLICKING FUN!

· Camp Abnaki (for boys 6-10yrs) · Camp Curiosity (Preschool age 3-5yrs) · Camp Koda (coed 5-12 yrs) · Camp Greylock (coed 6-15yrs) · Leaders in Training (14-16yrs)

Y Day Camps are everywhere including Addison, Chittenden, Franklin, Grand Isle & Washington Counties.

gbymca.org | 862-YMCA (9622) Financial assistance is available. k4t-GBYMCA0414.indd 1

29

www.flynnarts.org 802-652-4548

SUMMER UNPLUGGED

APRILCREDIT 2014 UNION KIDS VT KIDS VT MONEY ISSUE SPONSORED BY NEWKIDSVT.COM ENGLAND FEDERAL

creative summer fun

3/20/14 12:49 PM


2014 CAMp GUide

survey says‌

ContinUed froM p.29

mackenzie Bruce, 11 Stowe

Mackenzie is an avid writer who practices karate and plays hockey in the winter. last year, she attended the TalenT deVelopmenT insTiTuTe at Johnson state College.

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Kids VT money Aprilissue 2014 sponsored KidsVT.com by new england Federal crediT union

April 2014

KidsVT.com

Kids VT: what stood out about Tdi? MACKENZIE: You could pick your own activities. You could work on math or writing or investigative skills. One thing that was really fun was, we got to write choose-yourown-adventure stories. I wrote one about a tiger in the jungle.

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KidsVT_Camps_Mudfest14_4.75x11.25.pdf 1 3/24/2014 3:25:46 PM

a m PS

maya, 11 & eli standard, 14 Burlington

last summer, eli attended camp dudley in Westport, n.y., and Maya went to its sister camp, camp Kiniya, in Colchester. both programs focus on developing leadership skills, and they share a motto: “The other fellow first.”

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ELI: One of the last days of camp, our cabin leader woke us and we went to watch the sunrise and played soccer in the very early morning when no one else was up. That was really special.

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KVT: do you have a favorite memory from camp? MAYA: There are so many good memories, I can’t even count them. Everyone in my cabin was really good friends. One of the girls was from Minnesota, and I still write to her.

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KVT: what’s cooking in the mess hall? MAYA: The food is so good! I can’t even tell you how good it is. If you have an allergy, it’s OK; they’ll make special stuff for you.

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KVT: what kinds of activities can you choose? ELI: I got to do a lot of things, like archery and team sports I hadn’t tried before. You can bring musical instruments. There’s a jazz band, and you can major in rock band.

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KidsVT.com

KVT: what do you think about the camp motto? MAYA: “The other fellow first” means thinking of another person, putting them before yourself. I try to remember that even if I’m not at camp.

kid

CM

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April 2014

K

Quinn shelley, 7 Burlington

JOIN

OR SF

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il Apr

12

ril - Ap

27

KVT: what did you think about the counselors? QUINN: The counselors are good. Some come back each year. My favorite counselors were Kim and George. When I had a minor concussion, George let me play with his iPhone.

p

ens at EC

C O H

ECHO offers School Vacation Camps and Summer Camps for children K - 6th grade. For more information visit echovermont.org/camps or call 1.877.324.6386 ext. 142. ECHO Lake Aquarium & Science Center @ECHOvt

BURLINGTON, VERMONT k2h-ECHO0414.indd 1

ECHOVERMONT.ORG

877.324.6386

31

survey sAys… p. 34 »

pp

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ha

AprilcrediT 2014 union Kids VT Kids VT money issue sponsored by newKidsVT.com england Federal

nly

KVT: what did you like best about Bca camps? QUINN: In Free Wheelin’, we made a thing called a “shoe temple.” It didn’t really have a purpose. We made it and then we got to smash it. I liked Aliens vs. Monsters. I like making sculptures, and I like making stuff out of tinfoil.

It o

Quinn has been attending BurlingTon ciTy arTs camps since he was 4. last year he chose the Free wheelin’ camp for pottery and a session called painT iT. He and his 4-year-old brother, Wells, also participated in a aliens Vs. monsTers project that produced a tinfoil hat that Wells still wears. Quinn will be at bCA again this year.

3/27/14 11:33 AM


Camp ForMe

Center for Technology, Essex Reggio Inspired Preschool at Essex High School

Day Camp For Adopted Children & Teens

Preschool Openings for 2014-2015 School Year

TWO ONE-WEEK SESSIONS

Classes for 3-5 years of age State licensed preschool Licensed Supervisor and student teachers provide a low ratio and individualized attention.

July 7 – 11

With bus service from Burlington, Williston & Waterbury FOR AGES 7 – 17 Visit our website for registration forms and information: 802-338-7382 www.camp4me.org

Call 879-8150 or visit www.ccsuvt.org/cte/cte-preschool

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3/27/1416t-CampForMe0214.indd 4:52 PM 1

Field Trips Include: Lake Iroquois Shelburne Museum Audubon Center Ben & Jerry’s Factory Carnival Day

adventure day camp University of Vermont

Camp Dates: June 18 - August 3

July 14 - 18

Stowe High School • Stowe VT

TM

Ages: 5 - 11 years

Online registration is open!

www.uvm.edu/recreation/adc

See you in July! 1/9/14 3:01 PM

Daily Activities: swimming & water games sports & games arts & crafts and more!

Registration Now Open for Freestyle & Gymnastic Camps!

GreenMountainFreestyle.com

802.652.2455 For more info contact Rachel Valyou 802.656.3070 / rachel.valyou@uvm.edu

802.652.2454

260 Avenue D, Suite 30 • Williston (off Industrial Ave.)

kidsvt.com

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2/21/13 3:31 PM

Kids!

&B-Tru Dance

April 2014 Kids VT money issue sponsored by New England Federal Credit Union

32

GreenMountainGymnastics.com

MUSIC DAY CAMP 2014 JUNE 23 – 27 • 8:45 AM – 4 PM DAILY WITH 2:30 PM CONCERT ON JUNE 27

Explore a great variety of musical activities with some of the best music educators in Vermont.

May 2014 Auditions for Orchestras & Choruses School-year programs for students K-12 Visit www.vyo.org for more information.

Music Day Camp has two levels of Band and String Orchestra, chamber music, and fun electives that may include jazz band, chorus, conducting, composition, improvisation, art, outdoor recreation and others. BAND STUDENTS woodwind, brass, percussion Must be entering grades 6-10 in Fall 2014

ORCHESTRA STUDENTS string players must be entering grades 4-10 in Fall 2014

Tuition: $295 • Early Registration Discount: $275 with full payment by April 15 Register by May 30, 2014 • Financial Aid available • Visit www.vyo.org to enroll. k4t-VYO-0214.indd 1

1/22/14 6:41 PM

SPRING & SUMMER BREAK CAMPS!

Limited spots available

Yoga Dance Full Day Camp SPRING BREAK April 21-25 | ages 8+ | $250 | 9-3pm

Breakin Hip Hop June 30-July 3 | age 7-13 $250 9-4pm

Creative Move it July 21-25 | age 4-7 | $150 1:30- 4:30pm

Freestyle Hip Hop June 16-20 | age 6-10 $250 9-3pm

Mini Hip Hop July 21-25 | age 4-7 | $150 10:30-1:30pm

Yoga Camp Aug 4-8 | age 8-14 $250 9-3pm

Funkstyles Hip Hop June 23-27 | Age 8-14 $250 9-3pm

Hip Hop Choreography July 14-18 | Age 8-14 $250 9-3pm

Kids Yoga Camp Aug 4-8 | age 4-7 | $150 10:30-1:30pm

ASK ABOUT FAMILY & MULTIPLE DISCOUNTS 150 Dorset Street (The Blue Mall) South Burlington 497-0136 www.honestyogacenter.com k4t-HonestYoga0414.indd 1

3/28/14 10:59 AM


Camps sChedule Weeks of April 21 | June 16 | June 23 July 7 | July 21 | August 4th | August 11th

Ages 5 to 13, a fun week of engaging physical activity. Kids respond to the action and excitement of the martial arts, while parents appreciate the discipline, focus, and important life skills it teaches. Fun, active, and educational.

GreAt For mArtiAl Art beGinners Come AWAy With An exCitinG neW hobby. 5 Chrisemily lane milton | 893-8893 martialwayvt.com k8h-HosmerPoint0414.indd 1

242 Main Academy presents

3/27/14 5:01 PM

Hip Hop, Broadway/Tap & African/Latin 12-18 years • June 16-20 6-11 years • June 23-27 M-F 9-2:30

Jazz dance for kids!

Onstage at Memorial Auditorium Burlington, VT Monday-Friday 9AM-2:30PM amirault@burlingtontelecom.net

1/23/14 4:05 PM

Summer 2014

For advanced students entering grades 4-9 who want to have fun while learning! Johnson State College June 22-28, 2014

k12v-LCWaldorf0214.indd 1

“TDI has provided an environment where being intelligent is encouraged….TDI has given me confidence to be myself outside the camp and introduced me to friends I look forward to seeing each year.” — Camper

1/16/13 11:52 AM

kidsvt.com

2/20/14 10:42 AM k16t-tdi0213.indd 1

April 2014

some of your hidden talents this Summer...

Paddling Swimming Paddling Swimming Climbing Climbing HikingHiking CrossFit Mt Biking CrossFit Mt Biking Berlin, VT 802-229-4131

Kids VT money issue sponsored by New England Federal Credit Union

www.theconfluencevt.org/summer_camp www.confluencevt.org/summer_camp

33

July 14-18, 2014 9am-4pm

2014 Confluence Adventure Camps 2014 Confluence Adventure Camps

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Join us at America’s Family Resort for the ultimate in Summer fun! Choose from our traditional camp program or one of our special interest camps — including backpacking or survival camp.

1/21/14 10:26 AM

June 23rd-27th: Ages 6-106-10 June 23rd-27th: Ages 2014 Confluence Adventure Camps

July 7th-11th: Ages 11-16 July 7th-11th: Ages 11-16 June 23rd-27th: Ages 6-10 August 11th-15th: Ages 6-10 August 11th-15th: July 7th-11th: AgesAges 11-16 6-10 August 11th-15th: Ages 6-10 August 18th-22nd: Ages August 18th-22nd: Ages 11-1611-16

Ages 7 - 12. Available Monday - Friday for six weekly sessions, June 16 - Aug. 1, 2014. Shuttle service included.

August 18th-22nd: Ages 11-16

For more info call 802.332.6841 or visit www.smuggs.com/kidsvt

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1/23/14 1:25 PM

For more info and electronic version of brochure, please go to vermontgifted.org and tdivermont.com. Or contact Lucy Bogue at lucybogue@yahoo.com or 658-9941.

2014 Summer Dance with Karen Amirault k8h-KarenAmirault0314.indd 1

Talent Development Institute

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Berlin 802-229-4131 Berlin, •VT 802-229-4131 www.theconfluencevt.org/summer_camp

1/24/14 10:30 AM k16t-confluence0214-1.indd 1

1/22/14 5:49 PM


2014 cAmp Guide

survey says…

continued from p.31

GOOD GReeN FaMiLY FUn CaMP COMMOn GROUnD!

Zanipolo lewis, 10

700 Gorgeous Acres in Starksboro, VT Spend an All-Inclusive Week With Us!

Burlington

www.cgcvt.org

cello-playing “Zani” is excited about attending the two-week junior session at KinhaVen music school in Weston this year. last summer, he and his brother, Gabriello, did the enchanTmenT camp in shelburne.

802.453.2592

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2/26/14 12:08 PM

Summer Camp • Afterschool • April Vacation Camp

Register online now at

KVT: what makes enchantment camp magical? ZANI: We got to play quidditch! You learn about your power animals, animals that you meet when you’re meditating. We made up our own spells. I made an electrocuting spell and an air-conditioning spell. It was pretty hot at camp.

newvillagefarm.com

New Village Farm

register online at

newvillagefarm.com

Shelburne, VT

KidsVT.com

k8h-NewVillage0212.indd 1

1/19/12 11:46 AM

ONE-WEEK CAMP - JULY 14-19, 2014 Vermont Tech Williston Campus | Cost: $1,500

Aprilissue 2014 sponsored KidsVT.com Kids VT money by new england Federal crediT union

April 2014

(Includes 5-night, 6-day camp plus lodging, meals and field trip transportation. Scholarships may be available.)

AEROCAMP AT VERMONT TECH AeroCamp is a program designed to give young people a unique opportunity to explore the world of aviation and aerospace. p.

AeroCamp is for youth ages 12-18 who want to learn about the exciting and dynamic world of aviation and the training that can lead to a career flying airplanes.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT:

Doug Smith, Aviation Program Director 802-324-5464 or dsmith4@vtc.edu

Space is limited! Participation limited to 15 campers.

34

Register by April 1, 2014.

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3/28/14 9:49 AM

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3/26/14 11:38 AM


emmett Block, 7 StarkSboro

For kids who are wild about animals!

last year, emmett tended sheep and practiced needle felting at mayBelle Farm’s Kids FiBer Fun camp in Wardsboro. This year, he’s opting for sessions at the VermonT auduBon cenTer.

  ●●

  ●●   

KVT: what was the best thing at maybelle Farm? EMMETT: The crafts. We made fairy houses. And I made an egg and a chick out of felt. I’m holding it right now.

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KVT: did you make friends? EMMETT: I made a lot of friends, but I don’t remember their names. I remember the sheep names — Justin and Juliet! They were nice, but one sheep kept trying to charge me. I had to ignore him so he would leave me alone. This year, at the Audubon Center, I’m going to learn how to build a fire. I taught myself once, but there were ashes in it. I’m going to learn to build one this year without the ashes.

Night Eagle

3/26/14 11:20 AM

Wilderness Adventures A unique summer camp for boys, ages 10-14, in the heart of Vermont’s Green Mountains tipi living ▲ nature crafts canoeing ▲ backpacking ▲ wilderness skills ▲ tracking atlatls ▲ ’hawk throwing swimming ▲ archery ▲ hiking ▲ cooperative work & play ▲ and much more! ▲ ▲

April 2014

((802) 802) 773-7866 446-6100

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1/4/12 2:01 PM

LEAP!

(Learn + Play) Summer Camps Creative fun for children ages 5-13! FIND OUT MORE: visit the Museum web site or call 802-985-3346 x3395

Jericho

Josie has attended many camps, but the one she looks forward to year after year is camp HocHelaga in south Hero. KVT: How many summers have you attended camp Hochelaga? JOSIE: This summer will be my eighth. When my mom suggested it, I didn’t know much about it. I just thought sleepaway camp would be fun.

AprilcrediT 2014 union Kids VT Kids VT money issue sponsored by newKidsVT.com england Federal

www.nighteaglewilderness.com

Josie lewis, 16

KidsVT.com

Call for a full brochure:

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Green MountAin Youth SYMPhonY

“the music is just the beginning...”

Creative Arts & Music Program August 10th - 16th • 2014

For more information visit: www.gmys-vt.org info@gmys-vt.org or find us on Facebook facebook.com/Green Mountain Youth Symphony

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Visit 1/23/14 k16t-Catamountoutdoor0214.indd 12:30 PM 1

our website for our

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3/26/14 10:59 AM

2014 Class Schedule

Now in its 15th Year! | Developed by Nancy Clements

FRIENDS FOREVER

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Vermont’s only certified

Irish Dance School! Did you enjoy watching Riverdance? Why not learn some of the steps?

Petra Cliffs 8h

Call now for information on Summer Mini Camps Classes offered in Williston & Middlebury

YMCA CAMP ABNAKI Resident and Day Camp For Boys Ages 6-16 On Lake Champlain

CampAbnaki.org FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE IS AVAILABLE

Beth Anne McFadden T.C.R.G. (802) 999-5041 www.mcfaddenirishdance.com k8h-PetraCliffs0214.indd 1

1/24/14 11:45 AM k8v-McFaddenAcademy0214.indd 1

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Covenant hills 4h

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Kids VT money issue sponsored by New England Federal Credit Union

3/26/14 11:35 AM

All Ages…All Levels

April 2014

kidsvt.com

Strengthen your social communication skills Dynamic experiences & theme-based activities Coached by Speech Language Pathologists

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2/27/14 2:36 PM


2014 cAmp Guide

survey says…

josie lewis continued from p. 35

KVT: you attend back-to-back sessions. what do you pack? JOSIE: All my favorite clothes. It’s nice to bring things to do with your hair and makeup, and do that with friends. I brought a full-length mirror last year. Everyone used it. We all wear shorts and T-shirts, but it’s nice to be able to show off your own fashion sense, or check your hair, because you’re in the water a lot. KVT: what makes Hochelaga your favorite? JOSIE: I really like the activities. During the day, there’s sailing and archery. Each night, there’s an evening program, and I get to see all my friends — that’s the thing I like most. We keep in touch through texting and Facebook.

3/28/14 9:46 AM

April 2014

COME

SP @G

Burlington

samantha attended girl scouT camp in new Hampshire last summer. she’s not sure yet whether she’s going to camp this year. KVT: How was it being a first-time camper? SAMANTHA: I was worried that I would be scared or miss my mom, but it was fun. Once, we got to dress all of the counselors up with beads and tape and glue, like a fashion show. KVT: any advice for other kids? SAMANTHA: If someone was worried about being scared, I would tell them to go. It’s totally worth it. I would go again. K

Where childhood is a journey. Join us. K4t-GoodShepPreschool0414.indd 1

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Take a tour of our preschool at gspvt.com/takeatour or call 899-3989

AprilcrediT 2014 union Kids VT Kids VT money issue sponsored by newKidsVT.com england Federal

BUILD

samantha dean, 10

KidsVT.com

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GUTTERSON ARENA UNIVERSITY OF VERMONT Professional Coaching... Affordable Price!

June 16 - August 22

802-324-6876

ksneddon_21@hotmail.com | www.kshockeyschool.com

Art & nature stop motion Animation Drawing & Painting sculpture Fashion Design mixed media

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SUMMER ART CAMPS imAgine, CreAte & LeArn

kidsvt.com

www.helenday.com 802-253-8358 education@helenday.com 90 Pond st. stowe, Vermont

April 2014 Kids VT money issue sponsored by New England Federal Credit Union

38

START JUNE 16 FOR AGES 3-18

2/20/14 10:16 AM

Schoolhouse Vacation and Summer Camps

Get your Fun on! www.theschoolhousevt.org

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To learn about our camps, the schedule or to sign up please visit:

B U R l i N G T O N C i T yA R T S . O R G or call 865.7166

Ready, Set, Run

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July 28th-Aug 1st, 2014

2014 Summer Camps

Ages 5-8, 9-12

Kevin Sneddon’s Hockey School

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SummeR

Camp

pre-school summer camp

June 23 – June 27, 2014 9:00am – 12pm Ages 5 – 7 and 8 – 11 Waterfront Shelter, Burlington A one-week camp including running, nutrition, goal setting and helping hands.

Weekly themed camp sessions (Science, Magic, and more) for ages 3, 4, and 5 from June 23-August 15 $200/week n 7:30 to 5:30 (half-days: $100/week)

Learn more and register now at

802-658-3992 n WWW.MCSCHOOL.ORG

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APRIL

Sponsored by:

Like Fletcher Allen Health Care on Facebook and get weekly updates from Dr. First! See “First With Kids” videos at fletcherallen.org/firstwithkids.

CALENDAR SPOTLIGHTS AND LISTINGS BY ALISON NOVAK

Animal enthusiasts will be hot to trot for HORSIN’ AROUND ON SATURDAY NIGHT, a 90-minute variety show featuring ponies and pooches of all sizes and breeds. The high-energy presentation includes horse and rider drill teams, musical freestyle riding, and dog agility and obedience exercises. There’s even an “I can do what you do” challenge between a horse and a dog. Want more? Pop into Everything Equine & Canine Weekend — with informative seminars, demonstrations and entertainment — at the Champlain Valley Exposition.

KIDS VT

HORSIN’ AROUND ON SATURDAY NIGHT: Saturday, April 26, 6:30 p.m. at the Champlain Valley Exposition in Essex Junction. $13.50. All ages. Info, spetrie@cvexpo.org. cvexpo.org

KIDSVT.COM APRIL 2014

39

COURTESY OF BUTTERNUT MOUNTAIN FARM

Featured Creatur es


april calendar

Classes

1 TUESDAY

List your class or camp here for only $20 per month! Submit the listing by the 15th at kidsvt.com or to classes@kidsvt.com.

Aikido of Champlain Valley: Martial Arts and Conflict Resolution for Children: The Japanese martial art of aikido integrates self-defense with a philosophy of nonviolence and compassion. Children’s classes include physical conditioning, bully awareness/prevention and methods to cultivate inner peace. Visitors are always welcome, and children can try a free class. Ages 5-6: Thursday, 4 p.m.; ages 7-12: Tuesday and Wednesday, 4 p.m. and Saturday, 9 a.m. Aikido of Champlain Valley, 257 Pine St., Burlington. Info: bpincus@burlingtonaikido.org, 951-8900, burlingtonaikido.org. EvoKids at Evolution Yoga: Join us this spring for kids yoga! Our children’s classes offer a consistent way to bring yoga into your family’s life, whether you are looking for a way to bond with your child, tap into your toddler’s imagination, or give your child tools to focus and find confidence. Sessions begin April 7. New Explorers Yoga (fast crawlers-18 months): Mondays, 9:45-10:30 a.m. and 10:45-11:30 a.m.; Tots on the Move (ages 1.5-2.5): Wednesdays, 9:45-10:30 a.m.; Kids Creative Yoga (ages 2.5-5): Wednesdays, 10:45-11:30 a.m.; Storytime Yoga (ages 2-4): Fridays: 9:45-10:30 a.m.; Nature Yogis (ages 3-5): Fridays, 10:45-11:30 a.m.; New Explorers Yoga (fast crawlers-18 mo.): Saturdays, 9:15-10 a.m.; Tots on the Move (ages 1.5-2.5): Saturdays, 10:15-11 a.m. $117/9 weeks. Evolution Yoga, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info: evolutionvt.com, 864-9642. EvoKids Drop-In Classes at Evolution Yoga: Come once, or come every week for these kids yoga drop-in classes. AfterSchool Special (K and up): Wednesdays, 4:30-5:30 p.m.; EvoKids (ages 4-9): Saturdays, 11:15-12:15 p.m.; YoGirls (ages 7-11): Sundays, 2:30-3:30 p.m. Five-class EvoKids Pass for $60 or $15/class. Evolution Yoga, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info: evolutionvt. com, 864-9642. 

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Kids VT

April 2014 kidsvt.com

Environmental Sculpture: Students get outside and use found objects from nature to create art while learning the value of leaving no trace. Think sticks, stones, branches, leaves, grasses and dirt! Looking at textures, shapes and colors, the group will observe and celebrate our natural surroundings. Ages 3-6. Instructor: Kelly Holt. Weekly on Thursdays, April 24 through June 5, 3-5 p.m. No class May 1. $110/members; $135/nonmembers. Helen Day Art Center, 90 Pond St., Stowe. Info: education@helenday.com, 253-8358, helenday.com. Infant Yoga and Massage at Evolution Yoga:  This sweet class for babies up to 6 months provides the opportunity to mindfully connect with your little one through movement, massage, song and relaxation. Thursdays, 12:30-1:15 p.m., 6 weeks-6 months. $15/class or use a 10-class pass for $130. Online preregistration suggested. Evolution Yoga, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info: evolutionvt.com, 864-9642. Make Your Spring Swimsational! At our YMCA we believe the ability to swim is a critical life skill for every child, teen and adult. We begin our programs at age 6 months in our parent-child program, 3-5 years old for preschoolers and 6-14 for

youth swimmers. Adult and private lessons are also offered. Spring season runs April 28-June 22, Tuesdays, Wednesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. Registration begins April 7. $104/members; $168/nonmembers. Pomerleau Family YMCA, 266 College St., Burlington. Info: Jess Lukas, assistant aquatics director, jlukas@gbymca. org, 652-8143. Paper Marionettes Workshop: Art comes alive as kids make movable marionettes of their own design! Participants use fun and innovative paper-engineering techniques and a variety of art media to construct a working puppet on strings complete with colorful style and personality. Ages 5-10. Instructor: Judy Sgantas. April 12, 9:30-11:30 a.m. $25. Helen Day Art Center, 90 Pond St., Stowe. Info: education@helenday.com, 2538358, helenday.com. Sculpture from Around the World: Students study the artistic traditions of cultures around the world and create sculptural pieces out of clay, beads, metals, wood and stone. Young sculptors discover ancient and modern skills and techniques and develop a greater understanding of the history, use and manipulation of each material. Ages 8-12. Instructor: Stephanie Drews-Sheldon. Mondays, April 28 through June 9, 3-5 p.m. No class May 26. $110/members; $135/nonmembers. Helen Day Art Center, 90 Pond St., Stowe. Info: education@helenday.com, 253-8358, helenday.com. Stop-Motion Animation with Clay Spring Break Camp: From storyboard to camera, campers develop a script and make clay characters, cardboard sets and sound for their own animation. Campers study innovative short animation from around the world, make a flipbook and learn about optical toys. Camp wraps up with a special screening. Ages 8-12. Instructor: Leif Goldberg. April 14-18, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. $275/ members; $300/nonmembers. Helen Day Art Center, 90 Pond St., Stowe. Info: education@helenday.com, 253-8358, helenday. com. Study Strategies for Success: Does your teen leave projects until the last minute? Have difficulty with organization? Struggle with multistep assignments? If so, join us on April 10. This seminar covers strategies for improving organization, time management, homework completion and study skills. $35/ person. Info: 878-2332, sterncenter.org. WildThings! Nature Program: Calling all librarians, daycare providers and preschool teachers: Gather up your 3- to 8-year-olds for a 45-minute program focused on teaching children about the wonders of the natural world, led by a certified elementaryeducation teacher. Each month, we’ll explore a different nature theme through literature, art and outdoor exploration. Call to book a time; I’ll travel to you! Cost: $75 per visit. Info: wildthingsvt.com, wildthingsvt@ gmail.com, 872-9987.

Arts & Crafts

Creative Tuesdays: Artists engage their imaginations with recycled crafts. All ages, but kids under 10 must be accompanied by an adult. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 3-5 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

Baby & Maternity

Burlington Postnatal Yoga: Moms bring their pre-crawling kids to an all-levels flowing yoga class addressing sore shoulders and back pain through gentle core work. Evolution Yoga, Burlington, 10:40-11:55 a.m. $14. Info, 864-9642. Burlington Prenatal Yoga: Mothers-to-be build strength, stamina, comfort and a stronger connection to their baby in this all-levels class. Evolution Yoga, Burlington, 4-5:30 p.m. $14. Info, 864-9642. Shelburne Prenatal Yoga: Yoga postures, breathing exercises and relaxation techniques nurture bodies and create a loving connection between moms-to-be and their babies. Women at all stages of pregnancy are welcome. Yoga Roots, Shelburne, 5:45-7:15 p.m. $15; first class free. Info, 985-0090.

Community

Month of the Military Child Statehouse Kickoff: Children of service members mingle with state legislators and witness the signing of a proclamation and resolution at this event sponsored by Operation: Military Kids. Ages 6 and up. Vermont Statehouse, Montpelier, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 656-0346.

Dance

Broadway/Hip-Hop/Jazz Dance Class: Rhythmic kids learn challenging and fun choreography in a variety of styles from one of Very Merry Theatre's teen performers. An adult is present at each class. Very Merry Theatre, Burlington, 5-6 p.m. $8; drop in or preregister by email. Info, bangkourk@bsdvt.org.

Education

Homework Help: Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences students tutor individuals and small groups in reading, math and science. Grades 1-8. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 4:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

Food

Chocolate-Bar Making: Budding chocolatiers temper and mold the sweet stuff, then create and wrap four goody-filled bars to take home. Children under 9 must be accompanied by an adult. South End Kitchen, Burlington, 3-4 p.m. $25. Info, 864-0505. Kids in the Kitchen: An Egg-cellent Breakfast: Fledgling chefs hone their culinary technique by learning how to prepare perfect omelettes, accompanied by bread and freshly churned butter. Recommended for ages 6 and up. Healthy Living Market and Café, South Burlington, 4-5 p.m. $20 per parent-child pair; preregister. Info, 863-2569.

Health & Fitness

Essex Open Gym: Energy-filled kids flip, jump and tumble in a state-of-the-art facility. Ages 6 and under. Regal Gymnastics Academy, Essex, 11 a.m.-noon, $8. Info, 655-3300. Open Gym with Kati Furs: Active ones ages 5 and under tumble and jump during a drop-in gymnastics class. River Arts, Morrisville, 1011:30 a.m. $5 for one child; $8 for two children; $10 for three or more children. Info, 888-1261. Shelburne Open Gym: Tumbling tots burn energy on trampolines, balance beams, rings and more. Gymstar Gymnastics, Shelburne, noon & 2 p.m. $3-6. Info, 985-8948. Tiny Tumblers Open Gym: Petite gymnasts bounce, bend and balance. Ages 9 months-6 years, accompanied by an adult. Green Mountain Gymnastics, Williston, 9:30-11 a.m. $10 per child; $15 per family. Info, 652-2454. Yoga Tots: Young yogis stretch it out in

exercises meant to build self-esteem and positive attitudes toward physical activity. Ages 1- 7. Highgate Public Library, 9-9:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 868-3970.

Library & Books

Gaming For Teens & Adults: Players of all skill levels engage in Magic: The Gathering and other tabletop amusements. Children under 13 must be accompanied by an adult or have parental permission to attend. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 5-7:45 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. Williston Read to a Dog: Rookie readers share tales with pooches from Therapy Dogs of Vermont. All ages. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-4918.

Music

Children's Sing-Along With Lesley Grant: Parents sip coffee while wee ones break into song with a local musician and educator. Preschool-age kids and younger. The Bees Knees, Morrisville, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 888-7889.

Nature & Science

ECHO Story Explorers: Water: Little scientists listen to Water by Frank Asch, then explore the magical properties of H20. ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Regular museum admission; $10.5013.50; free for members and children under 3. Info, 864-1848. Night Sky: Out-of-this-world kids and adults take a 30-minute tour of stars, planets and constellations. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, 3:30-4 p.m. $2; $5 per family. Info, 748-2372.

2 WEDNESDAY

Arts & Crafts

Spin into Spring: Creative types wind down with spiral art. South Burlington Community Library, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080.

Baby & Maternity

Montpelier Postnatal Yoga: Brand-new mamas and their littles relax, stretch and bond. For moms with babies one year and under. Emerge Yoga, Montpelier, 10-11 a.m. $12. Info, 778-0300. Shelburne Postnatal/Baby & Me Yoga: Tots from 6 weeks to pre-crawling join their moms for this class that focuses on gentle poses to help strengthen and energize the body and mind. Yoga Roots, Shelburne, 10:30-11:30 a.m. $15. Info, 985-0090.

Health & Fitness

Essex Open Gym: See April 1. EvoKids Afterschool Yoga: Parents can attend a by-donation community yoga class one room over from this workout for kids. Grades K and up. Evolution Yoga, Burlington, 4:30-5:30 p.m. $15; $20 for two children. Info, 864-9642. Music & Movement: Children’s educator and local musician Lesley Grant gets kiddos singing and dancing while exploring rhythm and vocal dynamics. Ages 5 and under. River Arts, Morrisville, 10-11 a.m. $5. Info, 888-1261. Shelburne Open Gym: See April 1. Tiny Tumblers Open Gym: See April 1. Vergennes Kids Yoga: Flexible yogis stretch out, play, meditate and rejuvenate. Grades K-3. 2 Wolves Holistic Center, Vergennes, 3:15-4:15 p.m. $14. Info, 870-0361.

Library & Books

Book Discussion for Homeschoolers: In separate groups, kids in grades K through 3 and 4 through 8 participate in activities related to award-winning reads. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6956. Dorothy Canfield Fisher Book Discussion: Wonder by R.J. Palacio is at the center of a


spirited conversation between 8- to 11-yearolds. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660. Early Bird Math: Young children and their caregivers are exposed to early math concepts through books, songs and hands-on activities. Participants receive math manipulatives to take home at the end of the last session. Rutland Free Library, 11-11:45 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 773-1860. Maker Space: Hackers-in-training learn the skill of soldering, then build a unique minielectronic project with the help of staff from Burlington's Laboratory B. Ages 9-adult. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6 p.m. Free; preregistration required. Info, 878-4918. Read to a Dog: Book lovers choose stories to share with a furry friend. Ages 5-10. Fairfax Community Library, 3:15-4:15 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420.

Waterbury Lego Club: Building fanatics make theme-based creations. Grades 4-6. Waterbury Public Library, 3-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 244-7036.

Music

Preschool Music With Derek: Kids tap their toes in time to a fun, tune-filled gathering. Ages 3-5. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660. Rockin' Ron the Friendly Pirate: Small scallywags "ooh" and "aargh!" during swashbuckling songs, movements and guessing games. Ages 7 and under, with their parents. Buttered Noodles, Williston, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 764-1810.

Story Times MONDAY Barre Children's Story Hour: Aldrich Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 476-7550. Colchester Preschool Story Time: Burnham Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 264-5660. Essex Drop-In Story Time: Essex Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 879-0313. Milton Infant Story Time: Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 893-4644. Northfield Children's Story Time: Brown Public Library, Thursdays, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 485-4621. St. Albans Story Hour: St. Albans Free Library, Thursdays, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 524-1507. Stowe Story Time for 2- to 3-Year-Olds: Stowe Free Library, 10:15-11 a.m. Free. Info, 253-6145. Waitsfield Story Time: Joslin Memorial Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 496-4205. Waterbury Baby & Toddler Story Time: Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 244-7036. Woodstock Baby Story Time: Norman Williams Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 457-2295. TUESDAY

Arts & Crafts

Pollywog Preschool Art Drop-In: Multimedia projects involving Play-Doh, paint and paper introduce young kids to artistic expression. Ages 6 months-5 years, accompanied by an adult. BCA Center, Burlington, 9:30-11:30 a.m. $6. Info, 865-7166.

Baby & Maternity

Burlington Prenatal Yoga: See April 1. 5:457:15 p.m. Essex La Leche League: Moms bring their little ones to a discussion of parenting and breastfeeding. Pregnant and planning moms are also welcome. First Congregational Church of Essex Junction, first Thursday of every month, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 383-8544.

Shelburne Prenatal Yoga: See April 1. 8:45-10 a.m.

Health & Fitness

Essex Open Gym: See April 1. Open Gym with Kati Furs: See April 1. Shelburne Open Gym: See April 1.

Library & Books

Food for Thought Teen Group: Young adults chow down on pizza as they discuss the library's special events and book and DVD selection. Grades 7-12. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. 3 THURSDAY, P.42

Early-literacy skills get special attention during these read-aloud sessions. Some locations provide additional activities such as music, crafts or foreign-language instruction. Contact the story-time organizer or visit kidsvt.com for details. Schedules generally follow the school calendar; call ahead to confirm.

Highgate Toddler and Preschool Story Time: Highgate Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 868-3970. Hinesburg Preschool Story Time: Carpenter-Carse Library, 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 473-2597. Hinesburg Toddler Story Time: CarpenterCarse Library, first Tuesday of every month, 9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 482-2878. Milton Preschool Story Time: Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 893-4644. Montpelier Story Time: Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. Richmond Story Time: Richmond Free Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036. Sheldon Story Time: Sheldon Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 933-2524. South Burlington Tiny Tot Story Time: South Burlington Community Library, 9:15 & 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 652-7539. Williston Story Time & Crafts: Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. Williston Story Time With Corey: Buttered Noodles, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 764-1810. Winooski Preschool Story Time: Winooski Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 655-6424. Woodstock Preschool Story Time: Norman Williams Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 457-2295. WEDNESDAY

THURSDAY Essex Preschool Story Time: Essex Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 879-0313. Fairfax PJ Story Time: Fairfax Community Library, first Thursday of every month, 6:307:30 p.m. Free. Info, 527-5426. Jericho Preschool Story Time: See Wednesday. 10 a.m. No story time on April 24. Northfield Children's Story Time: See Monday. Rutland Story Time: Rutland Free Library, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 773-1860. Shelburne Story Time With Mary Catherine Jones: Pierson Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 985-5124. St. Albans Story Hour: See Monday. Vergennes Story Time: Bixby Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 877-2211. Westford Story Time: Westford Public Library, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 878-5639. FRIDAY Brandon Preschool Story Time: Brandon Free Public Library, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 247-8230. Enosburg Story Hour: Enosburg Public Library, 9-10 a.m. Free. Info, 370-4797. Essex Musical Story Time: Essex Free Library, third Friday of every month, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 879-0313.

Georgia Preschool Story Time: Georgia Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 524-4643. Huntington Story Time: Huntington Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 434-4583. Lincoln Toddler/Preschool Story Time: Lincoln Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 453-2665. Milton Toddler Story Time: Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 893-4644. Montpelier Story Time: See Tuesday. Moretown Story Time: Moretown Memorial Library, 11:15 a.m. Free. Info, 496-9728. South Burlington Pajamarama: Barnes & Noble, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 864-8001. South Burlington Story Time Adventures: South Burlington Community Library, 9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 652-7539. St. Johnsbury Story Time: St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 748-8291. Stowe Baby & Toddler Story Time: Stowe Free Library, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 253-6145. Waterbury Preschool Story Time: Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 244-7036. SATURDAY Barre Story Time: Next Chapter Bookstore, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 476-3114. Burlington Story Time at Phoenix Books: Phoenix Books, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 448-3350. Colchester Saturday Drop-In Story Time: Burnham Memorial Library, 10 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 264-5660. South Burlington Story Time: See Wednesday. St. Johnsbury Story Time: See Friday. First Saturday of every month. Winooski Stories with Jess: Winooski Memorial Library, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 655-6424. SUNDAY Williston Russian Story Time: Buttered Noodles, 11-11:45 a.m. Free. Info, 730-2673. 

KIDS VT

East Barre Realms of Reading Crafts: East Barre Branch Library, 3-5 p.m. Free. Info, 476-5118. Essex Junction Preschool Story Time: See Tuesday. Essex Toddler Story Time: Essex Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 879-0313. Grand Isle Preschool Story Time: Grand Isle Free Library, 10 a.m. Free; newcomers should preregister. Info, 372-4797. Hardwick Preschool Story Time: Jeudevine Memorial Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 472-5948. Highgate Toddler and Preschool Story Time: See Tuesday. 11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Jericho Preschool Story Time: Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. No story time on April 23 or 30. Free. Info, 899-4962. Johnson Story Time: Johnson Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 635-7141. Marshfield Story Time & Playgroup: Jaquith Public Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

Norwich Story Time: Norwich Public Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 649-1184. Quechee Story Time: Quechee Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 295-1232. Randolph Morning Story Time: Kimball Public Library, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 728-5073. Richford PJ Story Time: Arvin A. Library, Every other Wednesday, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 370-4797. Richford Story Hour: Arvin A. Library, 9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 848-3313. South Burlington Baby Book Time: South Burlington Community Library, April 2, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 652-7539. South Burlington Story Time: Barnes & Noble, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 864-8001. Swanton Story Hour: Swanton Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 868-7656. Warren Preschool Story & Enrichment Hour: Warren Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 595-2582. Williamstown Story Time: Ainsworth Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 433-5887.

KIDSVT.COM APRIL 2014

Alburgh Story Hour: Alburgh Community Education Center, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 796-6077. Barre Children's Story Hour: See Monday. Colchester Toddler Story Time: Burnham Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 264-5660. East Barre Kids Story Hour: East Barre Branch Library, 9:30 & 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 476-5118. Essex Junction Baby & Toddler Story Time: Brownell Library, 9:10-9:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6956. Essex Junction Preschool Story Time: Brownell Library, 10-10:45 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6956. Fairfax Preschool Story Time: Fairfax Community Library, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 849-2420. Georgia Pajama Story Time: Georgia Public Library, third Tuesday of every month, 6:307:30 p.m. Free. Info, 524-4643. Grand Isle PJ Story Time: Grand Isle Free Library, first Tuesday of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 527-5426.

3 THURSDAY

41


april calendar

PJ Story Hour: Sleepyheads get ready for bed, then go to the library for a read-aloud and craft project. Ages 6 and under. Fairfax Community Library, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 849-2420.

Music

Music for Preschoolers: Lively tunes with Peter Alsen or Derek Burkins strike the right note among the wee crowd. Ages 5 and under with a caregiver. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Free; limited to one session per week per family. Info, 878-4918. Music With Mr. Chris: Singer and storyteller Chris Dorman leads kids in music and dance. All ages. Buttered Noodles, Williston, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 764-1810. Spanish Musical Kids: Niños celebrate Spanish through Latin American songs and games. Ages 1-5 with a caregiver. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

Courtesy of echo lake aquarium and science center

3 thursday (Continued)

Take it Oozy Do your kids like getting dirty? They’ll be right at home at ECHO’s MudFESt, a 16-day festival celebrating Vermont’s swampiest season. Daily activities include worm exploration and a mud table equipped with creative play tools. During a “mud fling” every afternoon, visitors learn how soil is made, then watch as the goopy stuff is ricocheted from the science center’s balcony to a target below. Amid all this messiness, Re-Bop Records’ Muddy Music Festival — April 19-22 — provides familyfriendly music from acclaimed Vermont musicians. Rubber boots recommended.

4 FRIDAY

Arts & Crafts

Essex Junction Crafternoons: Students in grades 4 through 8 bring their creativity to the library for a fun art-making session. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. Family Wheel Drop-In: Parents and kids make bowls, cups and sculptures from clay. All ages. BCA Print & Clay Studio, Burlington, 5:30-7:30 p.m. $6 includes one fired and glazed piece per participant; additional pieces are $5 each. Info, 865-7166. Kinder Arts: Preschoolers get their hands dirty while exploring mixed media, painting, drawing, sculpture, printmaking and more during creative hands-on sessions. Ages 3-5. River Arts, Morrisville, 10:30 a.m.-noon. $12 per child; $8 for the second child. Info, 888-1261.

MUDFEST: Saturday, April 12, to Sunday, April 27, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center in Burlington. Regular admission, $10.50-13.50; free for members and children under 3. All ages. Info, 864-1848. echovermont.org

Baby & Maternity

New Parents Playgroup: Moms and dads of young babies provide support to each other as they navigate the adventures of parenthood. Birth Journeys, Burlington, first Friday of every month, 9:30-11:30 a.m. $3 per family. Info, 324-8809.

Community

Campers Night Out: Indoor tents, S'mores, crafts and a movie make for a fun-filled, parentfree evening. Pizza dinner provided. Ages 5-12. Founders Memorial School, Essex, 6-8 p.m. $8 per child; preregister. Info, 862-9622.

Education

Early Bird Math: Young children and their caregivers put two and two together using interactive books, songs and games to explore arithmetic concepts. Richmond Free Library, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036.

Games

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April 2014 kidsvt.com

Magic: The Gathering: Planeswalkers seek knowledge and glory in this trading-card game. New players welcome. Grades 6 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Health & Fitness

Essex Open Gym: See April 1. Shelburne Open Gym: See April 1. noon, 2 & 6 p.m. Tiny Tumblers Open Gym: See April 1. Toddler Yoga & Stories: Mini yogis convene for simple stretches and stories. Ages 1-5.

Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:15 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-4918.

Kids Music With Linda 'Tickle Belly' Bassick: Toe-tapping good tunes captivate kiddies. Radio Bean, Burlington, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 660-9346. Music With Derek: An immature audience shakes out their sillies with tune-filled activities. All ages. Buttered Noodles, Williston, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 764-1810.

at a later date. Shelburne Craft School, 10-11:30 a.m. $12; $10 each with a friend or participating parent. Info, 985-3648. Family Clay: Creative kids and their parents make memories firing and glazing special pieces to be picked up later. All ages. ArtisTree Community Arts Center, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-noon. $20 per parent-child pair; $5 per additional family member; preregister. Info, 457-3500. Free Wheelin': Clay enthusiasts learn their way around the potter's wheel. Price includes one fired and glazed piece per participant. Ages 6-12. BCA Print & Clay Studio, Burlington, 1-3 p.m. $25; preregister. Info, 865-7166. Kids Craft: Tissue-Paper Chicks: Young artists create a springtime tableau with a variety of materials. Ages 5 and up. Creative Habitat, South Burlington, 1-3 p.m. $5. Info, 862-0646.

Nature & Science

Community

Library & Books

Essex Drop-in Story Time: Babies, toddlers and preschoolers stop by for picture books and finger plays. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Music

Night Sky: See April 1.

Theater

'Les Misérables': Lyric Theatre Company brings this epic musical about the survival of the human spirit to the stage. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, 7:30 p.m. $21-35. Info, 863-5966.

5 SATURDAY

Submit your May events for print by April 15 at kidsvt.com or calendar@kidsvt.com.

Arts & Crafts

Craft School Saturday Drop-In: Artsy types create seasonal clay objects in this ever-changing weekly series. Projects available for pickup

Burlington Egg Hunt: Kiddos hop around in search of hidden treats, decorate cookies, get their faces painted and hobnob with a certain bunny. Younger children hunt for eggs first, followed by older children. Ages 2-12. Oakledge Park, Burlington, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7552. Fairfax Birthday Bash: This annual party boasts an open gym, crafts and more. All ages. BFA Fairfax, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 849-2420.

do-it-yourself skills and tool safety as they construct seasonal projects. Ages 5-12. Home Depot, Williston, first Saturday of every month, 9 a.m.-noon. Free; preregister at workshops. homedepot.com. Info, 872-0039. Piano Deconstruction Event: Curious kids learn about the instrument's "guts" as they participate in a take-apart session sponsored by the Vermont Music Teachers Association and Vermont Guild of Piano Technicians. Children 12 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Trinity Baptist Church and School, Williston, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free; RSVP to pianodeconstruction@gmail.com. Info, 448-2889.

Food

Chocolate-Bar Making: See April 1. 10-11 a.m. Middlebury Winter Farmers Market: Crafts, cheeses, breads, veggies and more vie for spots in shoppers' totes. All ages. Mary Hogan Elementary School, Middlebury, 9:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 537-4754. Rutland Winter Farmers Market: More than 50 vendors sell local produce, cheese, homemade bread and other made-in-Vermont products. All ages. Vermont Farmers Food Center, Rutland, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 753-7269. Sugar-on-Snow Party: Families sample the state's "liquid gold" on ice and enjoy boiling demonstrations, a petting zoo, hay rides and live music. All ages. Palmer's Sugarhouse, Shelburne, noon-4 p.m. Free. Info, 985-5054.

Education

Kids Building Workshop: Handy helpers learn

5 saturday, p.44


10

DAYS!

APRIL 25-MAY 4 TO BENEFIT

$1 provides 3 meals to Vermonters in need.

Thursday, April 24, 7-9 p.m. Higher Ground Ballroom, 1214 Williston Road, S. Burlington. Limited tickets available. $15 adv./$20: highergroundmusic.com.

vermontrestaurantweek.com PREMIER SPONSORS

SALON: FARM-TO-BOTTLE

Round out your Restaurant Week adventure with this cocktail contest. Bartenders from five area restaurants compete for your votes using Vermont Spirits Black Snake Whiskey. Saturday, May 3, 3-5 p.m. Red Square, 136 Church Street, Burlington. $10 at the door. Info, 864-5684.

CULINARY PUB QUIZ

Compete for prizes in seven rounds of foodie trivia. Winners receive an epic bowling party at Champlain Lanes! Preregistration required at vermontrestaurantweek.com Tuesday, April 29. Doors: 6 p.m. Trivia: 6:30-9 p.m Arts Riot, 400 Pine Street, Burlington. Free. Info, 864-5684.

Are cider apples more valuable than “eating” apples? Will Vermont brewers ever be able to rely solely on local grains and hops? Just how many people travel to Vermont to sip our drinks? Join a trio of drinks producers — as well as UVM agronomist Heather Darby — as they discuss the challenges and opportunities of Vermont’s growing beer, wine, cider and spirits industries. Wednesday, April 30, 5:30-7 p.m. South End Kitchen, 716 Pine Street, Burlington, $5 donation. Info, 864-0505.

CHILDCARE: PARENTS’ NIGHT OUT

Childcare for kids ages 2-12 at the Greater Burlington YMCA. Friday, April 25, 6-8:30 p.m. & Saturday, April 26, 5:30-8 p.m. $12/$20. Preregistration required: 862-9622.

ADDITIONAL SUPPORT FROM

Kids VT money issue sponsored by New England Federal Credit Union

D

essert comes first at this Restaurant Week-eve kick-off battle where pastry chefs from every corner of the state compete and foodies feast. Scores from celebrity judges and votes from you decide the winner of Vermont Restaurant Week’s Signature Sweet.

Tampopo, arguably the finest film by the late master director Juzo Itami, uses an unconventional story structure to celebrate, question, and marvel at all things gustatory. If you ever wanted to know how to make the perfect bowl of ramen, or what you should eat when you’re trapped in a yakuza shootout, Tampopo can help. It is also guaranteed to make you hungry. Sunday, April 27. Cocktail hour 4 p.m., movie 5 p.m. Big Picture Theater, 48 Carroll Road, Waitsfield. $9. Info, 496-8994.

BARTENDAR BRAWL

April 2014

special events

FOODIE FLICK: TAMPOPO

*at participating locations

kidsvt.com

The Vermont Community Foundation’s Food and Farm Initiative is matching our total donation up to $5000. Help us connect all Vermonters with local healthy food. Donate today at vermontrestaurantweek.com.

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locations offer inventive dinners for $15, $25 or $35 per person. Lunch and breakfast* are $10 or less!

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1t-restaurantweek040214.indd 1

3/28/14 11:01 AM


april calendar 5 saturday (Continued)

Games

Table Top Day: Strategic thinkers learn new games or revisit old favorites, including Ticket to Ride, Get Bit, Pandemic, Settlers of Catan, Monopoly and Memory. Ages 8 and up. Winooski Memorial Library, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 655-6424.

Health & Fitness

EvoKids Saturday Yoga: Youngsters master basic yoga poses through games, songs and dance. Mindfulness activities help them improve their focus and concentration. Ages 3-9. Evolution Yoga, Burlington, 11:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. $15; preregister. Info, 864-9642. Shelburne Open Gym: See April 1. 9 & 10 a.m.

Library & Books

'Swimmy' Puppet Show: PuppeTree presents this underwater extravaganza, featuring animation, video projections and shadow puppets. All ages. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. Cleo the Therapy Dog: Canine companions visit with a friendly pooch from Therapy Dogs of Vermont. Ages 3 and up. Milton Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 893-4644. Spanish Musical Playgroup: Rhymes, books, songs and crafts en español entertain niños. Snacks provided. Ages 5 and under. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. Welcome Infant Social: Recently-born babes get treated to a bookish celebration. Fairfax Community Library, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 849-2420.

Movies

'The Wizard of Oz' Sing Along: This classic family film becomes an interactive experience with the help of on-screen lyrics. All ages. Hopkins Center for the Arts, Hanover, N.H., 4 p.m. $5. Info, 603-646-2422.

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Music

Green Mountain Youth Symphony Spring Concert: The young musicians of the Repertory and Concert Orchestras perform a wide variety of music, including works by Vaughn Williams, Brubaker and Rodgers, as well as themes from The Addams Family and Edward Scissorhands. Barre Opera House, 3:30 p.m. $5 suggested donation; free for children under 18. Info, 888-4470. HopStop Family Series: Imani Winds: This Grammy-nominated quintet plays short classical works that introduce kids to the power of wind instruments. Ages 3 and up with an adult. Hopkins Center for the Arts, Hanover, N.H. 11 a.m. Free; seating is limited; doors open at 10:30 a.m. Info, 603-646-2010. 'Mustard's Retreat': Seasoned musicians David Tamulevich and Michael Hough encourage singing along and talking back in this folksy show for families. All ages. Chandler Music Hall, Randolph, 11 a.m. $6. Info, 728-6464. Three Centuries of American Women Composers: The Green Mountain Youth Symphony Senior Orchestra showcases the work of females from the 19th century to the present. Ages 10 and up. Barre Opera House, 7 p.m. $1518 for adults; $10-12 for children under 18. Info, 888-4470.

Nature & Science

Creeping Colors: Small scientists watch capillary action as water rises up their paper strips and separates out marker dyes. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m.

Submit your May events for print by April 15 at kidsvt.com or calendar@kidsvt.com.

Regular museum admission, $11Planetarium Presentation: See 14; free for members and children April 5. under 2. Info, 649-2200. ECHO Story Explorers: Water: Theater See Dr. First videos See April 1. 'Les Misérables': See April 4. 1 “First With Kids” at My Sky: Astronomy enthusiasts p.m. fletcherallen.org/ learn about celestial objects in firstwithkids this program geared toward kids 7 MONDAY ages 3-8. 12:30-1 p.m. $2; $5 per family. Info, 748-2372. Baby & Maternity Night Sky: See April 1. Montpelier Prenatal Yoga: Pregnant mamas Planetarium Presentation: An astronomy focus on movements that will ready their bodies expert offers a guided tour of the cosmos. Ages 5 for the next phase of life. Yoga Mountain Center, and up. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Montpelier, 5:30-7 p.m. $15. Info, 778-0300. Johnsbury, 1:30-2:30 p.m. $5. Info, 748-2372. Vergennes Prenatal Yoga: Moms-to-be learn Skulls: Neophyte naturalists explore skeletal different breathing techniques and positions in remains of local wildlife. All ages. Montshire preparation for birth. 2 Wolves Holistic Center, Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Regular Vergennes, 5:30-7 p.m. $14. Info, 870-0361. museum admission, $11-14; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200.

Parenting

Beyond Begging, Bossing & Bribing Workshop: Parents and caregivers learn effective ways to help children listen and respond to directions. Light breakfast and snack provided. Bring a bag lunch. Soar Learning Center, St. Albans, 9 a.m.-2:45 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 393-6591.

Theater

'Les Misérables': See April 4. 1 & 7:30 p.m. Saturday Drama Club: Thespians help Very Merry Theatre produce a show in just three hours. Ages 5-12. Very Merry Theatre, Burlington, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $15 or pay what you can. Info, 863-6607.

6 SUNDAY

Baby & Maternity

Burlington Postnatal Yoga: See April 1. first Sunday of every month, 12:15-1:30 p.m. Burlington Prenatal Yoga: See April 1. 10:0511:30 a.m.

Education

Homework Help: See April 1. Noon-4:30 p.m.

Food

Sugar-on-Snow Party: See April 5.

Health & Fitness

Essex Big Kids Open Gym: Agile tumblers practice their moves on state-of-the-art equipment. Ages 7-12. Regal Gymnastics Academy, Essex, 2:30-4 p.m. $10. Info, 655-3300. Essex Open Gym: See April 1. 1-2:30 p.m. YoGirls Yoga Class: Fierce females acquire self-confidence, emotional stability and a positive body image through yoga poses, mindfulness activities, games and crafts. Ages 7-11. Evolution Yoga, Burlington, 2:30-3:30 p.m. $15; preregister. Info, 864-9642.

Movies

Planet Cat Festival: Feline fanciers view original cat web videos made by Vermonters, then vote for their favorites. All ages. (See “Kids Beat” on p.6.) Majestic 10, Williston, 10 a.m.noon. $10; proceeds benefit the Humane Society of Chittenden County. Info, 862-0135.

Nature & Science

Cells!: Budding biologists compare plant and animal cells using a compound microscope and their own cheek cells. Ages 9 and up. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Regular museum admission, $11-14; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200. Night Sky: See April 1. Parachutes: Curious kids make their own 'chutes to test air resistance. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Regular museum admission, $11-14; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200.

Education

'Understanding the Meaning of Children's Play': Psychotherapist and St. Michael's College professor Naomi Shapiro speaks to parents about the importance of playtime in meeting kids' emotional needs. South Burlington Community Library, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080.

Games

Lincoln Chess Club: Board gamers of all abilities strategize and make moves in this brain-building game. Ages 5-9 play from 3:30-4 p.m. Ages 10 and up play from 4-5 p.m. Lincoln Library, Free. Info, 453-2665.

Health & Fitness

Essex Open Gym: See April 1. Little Yogis: Music, games and creative movement encourage the bitty set to play and learn. Ages 18 months-3 years with a caregiver. 2 Wolves Holistic Center, Vergennes, 9-10 a.m. $14. Info, 870-0361. Preschool Yoga: Preschool posers develop their practice away from caregivers with music, storytelling and creative movement. Ages 3-5. 2 Wolves Holistic Center, Vergennes, 10:30-11:30 a.m. $14. Info, 870-0361. Shelburne Open Gym: See April 1. 9 a.m., noon, 2 & 5 p.m.

Library & Books

Babies & Toddlers Rock: Little musicians ages 24 months and under sing songs and engage in early literacy activities. Rutland Free Library, first Monday of every month, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 773-1860. Count Me In!: Preschoolers and their parents learn hands-on activities to incorporate into their daily lives that will foster a love of math. Optional pizza dinner from 5:15-5:45 p.m. followed by workshop. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 5:45-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-4918. Elementary Reading Buddies: Students in grades K-5 partake in one-on-one reading time with eighth-grade volunteers. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6956. Milton Lego Club: Builders fashion architecturally sound constructions. Ages 7-12. Milton Public Library, 3:30-5 p.m. Free. Info, 893-4644. Stories for Preschoolers: Books, songs and rhymes entertain the preschool set. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. Write Now!: Best-selling authors-to-be get inspired to start penning a book or poem. Ages 12-18. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660. Young Adult Advisory Board: Sixth through 12th graders help make the library a destination for their peers. Ages 12-18. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

Music

Kids Music with Raphael: Local favorite

Raphael Groton plays tunes to make the little ones dance and giggle. All ages. The Skinny Pancake Burlington, 11 a.m. $5 suggested donation. Info, 540-0188. Music for Preschoolers: See April 3. 10:45 a.m.

Nature & Science

Books & Beyond: Science for Preschoolers: Children’s literature and hands-on activities combine for fun science learning and exploration. Ages 3-5 with a parent or caregiver. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 10:1511 & 11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Regular museum admission, $11-14; free for members and kids under 2. Info, 649-2200.

8 TUESDAY

Arts & Crafts

Creative Tuesdays: See April 1. Teen Art Studio: Guest artists share their stories and get young adults inspired about their own work and artistic goals. Ages 11-18. Helen Day Art Center, Stowe, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 253-8358.

Baby & Maternity

Baby Time: Board books, lap rhymes and songs please babies 18 months and under. Siblings welcome. Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, Jericho, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 899-4962. Burlington La Leche League: New moms bring their questions to a breast-feeding support group. Babies and older children welcome. Lending library available. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, second Tuesday of every month, 10:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Free. Info, 879-3000. Burlington Postnatal Yoga: See April 1. Burlington Prenatal Yoga: See April 1. Glowmom's Parenting Club: Expecting Moms Lounge: Mamas-to-be share their experiences in a supportive environment, then conclude the session with meditation. Fresh-squeezed juice, tea and snacks provided. Rainbow Institute, Burlington, second Tuesday of every month, 5:30-7 p.m. $12 suggested donation. Info, 777-0199. Shelburne Prenatal Yoga: See April 1.

Dance

Broadway/Hip-Hop/Jazz Dance Class: See April 1.

Education

Homework Help: See April 1.

Health & Fitness

Essex Open Gym: See April 1. Open Gym with Kati Furs: See April 1. Shelburne Open Gym: See April 1. Tiny Tumblers Open Gym: See April 1.

Library & Books

Gaming For Teens & Adults: See April 1. Science Story Time: Wh-oooo Needs a Cavity?: Science educator Kristen Littlefield demonstrates how holes in trees are pretty sweet places for wildlife. Ages 3 and up. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. Williston Read to a Dog: See April 1.

Movies

Book Signing Event with Granny Snow: Vermont author Brenda Snow reads from her collection, The Silas Series: The Adventures of Silas and Opal. All ages. Highgate Public Library, Highgate Center, 10 a.m. Free; books available for purchase; preregister. Info, 868-3970.

Music

Children's Sing-Along With Lesley Grant: See April 1.


Nature & Science

ECHO Story Explorers: Turtles: Budding biologists learn about the different kinds of shelled creatures that live in Vermont, then go on a scavenger hunt. ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Regular museum admission; $10.50-13.50; free for members and children under 3. Info, 864-1848. Night Sky: See April 1.

9 WEDNESDAY

Arts & Crafts

After-School Craft Club: Amateur artists end the day with a creative project. Grades 3-5. Milton Public Library, 3:30-5 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 893-4644. Spin into Spring: See April 2.

Baby & Maternity

Food

Montpelier Postnatal Yoga: See April 2. Shelburne Postnatal/Baby & Me Yoga: See April 2.

Kids in the Kitchen: Marvelous Meatball Subs: Kids sweat onions, press garlic and shape meatballs, then cook them in a delicious local pasta sauce and dig in. White shirts not recommended! All ages. Healthy Living Market and Café, South Burlington, 4-5 p.m. $20 per child-adult pair; preregister. Info, 863-2569.

Education

History for Homeschoolers: Reading, writing and hands-on activities hosted by the Vermont Historical Society offer a new perspective on the past. Ages 6-12. Vermont History Center, Barre, 1-3 p.m. $4-5; free for parents and nonparticipating children; preregister. Info, 828-1314. Stress & You Training: Adults learn how to cope with daily stressors that impact their families. NCSS Family Center, Alburgh, 6-8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 393-6591.

Games

Library & Books

Health & Fitness

Music for Preschoolers: See April 3. Music With Mr. Chris: See April 3.

Essex Open Gym: See April 1. EvoKids Afterschool Yoga: See April 2. Music & Movement: See April 2. Shelburne Open Gym: See April 1. Tiny Tumblers Open Gym: See April 1. Vergennes Kids Yoga: See April 2.

Music

COURTESY OF spruce peak performing arts center

Moving & Grooving With Christine: Tots let loose to the rhythms of rock-and-roll and world music. Recommended for ages 2-5, but all are welcome. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. Music Together with Ellen Leonard: This early childhood music and movement program gets children from birth to age 7 tapping their toes. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. Preschool Music With Derek: See April 2. Rockin' Ron the Friendly Pirate: See April 2.

Nature & Science

Little Explorer Program: Preschoolers discover their community through hands-on exploration of nature topics including farming, sugaring and gardening. Ages 3-5. Highgate Public Library, Highgate Center, 11 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 868-3970.

Theater

'Click Clack Moo': Captivated audiences watch to find out if Farmer Brown will give into his animals' silly demands in this musical based on a popular picture book. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 10 a.m. $6.75. Info, 775-0903.

10 THURSDAY

Arts & Crafts

Baby & Maternity

Burlington Prenatal Yoga: See April 1. 5:457:15 p.m. Shelburne Prenatal Yoga: See April 1. 8:45-10 a.m.

Education

'Nearly Lear': Actress and clown, Susanna Hamnett, retells Shakespeare's King Lear from the perspective of the king's fool. Recommended for ages 11 and up. (See calendar spotlight.) Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe, 10 a.m. $20. Info, 760-4634. 'Les Misérables': See April 4. 'War Horse': The National Theatre presents an original stage production of this moving drama, featuring life-sized galloping puppets, broadcast live to Woodstock from London's West End. Ages 10 and up. Woodstock Town Hall Theatre, 7:30 p.m. $12 for children under 18; $20 for adults. Info, 457-3981.

11 FRIDAY

Arts & Crafts

Essex Junction Crafternoons: See April 4. Family Wheel Drop-In: See April 4. Kinder Arts: See April 4. Maggie's Knit Night for Youth: Veteran knitter Maggie Loftus provides advice to novices about their works-in-progress. Children under 9 must bring an adult. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 6curly2@ gmail.com.

Baby & Maternity

Postpartum Group: New moms discuss nutrition, adjustments at home, and self and newborn care over tea. Babies welcome. Tapestry Midwifery, Vergennes, second Friday of every month, 12:30-2 p.m. Free. Info, 877-0022.

Community

Stowe Kids Night Out: Parents relax while their kids have a blast playing games, skating and hanging out. Ages 5-15. David Gale Recreation Center, Stowe, 6-10 p.m. $10; preregister. Info, 253-6138.

Education

Early Bird Math: See April 4. Homeschool Project Day: Out-of-classroom learners share their current projects with an audience of parents and siblings. Grades K-12. Milton Public Library, 2:30 p.m. Free. Info, 893-4644.

Games

Dungeons & Dragons: Players exercise their problem-solving skills in imaginary battles and adventures. Grades 6 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Health & Fitness

Disco Dance Party: Hoofers young and old learn dance moves from UVM Ballroom Dance Team member Selene and groove to tunes spun by DJ Rockin' Ron. Buttered noodles for all. Buttered Noodles, Williston, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 764-1810. 11 Friday, p.46

45

St. Albans Legos: Building-block lovers keep busy with the library's giant collection. All ages.

Theater

Kids VT

Games

Music

kidsvt.com April 2014

Fairfax Maker Series: Jewelry enthusiasts fold and assemble origami bracelets and chains. Ages 8 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 849-2420. Pollywog Preschool Art Drop-In: See April 3.

History for Homeschoolers: See April 9.

nearly lear: Thursday, April 10, 10 a.m., at Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center in Stowe. $20. Recommended for ages 11 and up. Info, 760-4634. sprucepeakarts.org

Essex Open Gym: See April 1. Open Gym with Kati Furs: See April 1. Shelburne Open Gym: See April 1. Jericho Evening Family Story Time: Kids and their parents gather for books, an activity and light refreshments. Grades pre-K-2. Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, Jericho, 6:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 899-4962.

Early Bird Math: See April 2. Poetry Slam: Folks of all ages bring original works to read and copies to share — or just come and listen — at this celebration of words moderated by UVM professor and poet Tony Magistrale. South Burlington Community Library, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Waterbury Lego Club: See April 2. 1-2 p.m.

It’s not uncommon for teens to find the Bard’s work inaccessible. Susanna Hamnett attempts to change that with her one-woman show, Nearly Lear. In a production targeted at young audiences, the British-born actress and clown tells the tragedy of King Lear from the point of view of the King’s Fool, playing multiple characters against a no-frills backdrop. Using storytelling, music and film, Hamnett creates a mischievous and funny interpretation of one of Shakespeare’s greatest works. The New York Times called Hamnett “an energetic, virtuosic performer with a touch of the endearing goofball.” Only a fool would miss her show.

Health & Fitness

Family Game Night: Players sit down for friendly competitions of Candy Land, checkers and Monopoly. Visitors are welcome to bring their own games. Georgia Public Library, Fairfax, second Wednesday of every month, 6:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 524-4643.

Library & Books

Shakespeare Revisited

St. Albans Free Library, second Thursday of every month, 3-5 p.m. Free. Info, 524-1507.


april calendar 11 FRIday (Continued)

12 SATURDAY

Essex Open Gym: See April 1. Shelburne Open Gym: See April 1. Noon, 2 & 6 p.m. Tiny Tumblers Open Gym: See April 1. Toddler Yoga & Stories: See April 4.

Arts & Crafts

Library & Books

'The Three Little Pigs': The Traveling Storyteller presents a fun, creative presentation of this classic tale. All ages. Highgate Elementary School, Highgate Center, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 868-3970. Songs & Stories With Matthew: Musician Matthew Witten helps kids start the day with tunes and tales of adventure. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Movies

Family Movie: 'Frozen': Disney fans are entranced as fearless optimist Anna teams up with Kristoff to rescue her ice princess sister, Elsa. Popcorn and soda provided. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:20 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. Kids Music With Linda 'Tickle Belly' Bassick: See April 4. Music With Derek: See April 4. Music With Robert: Families sing along with a local legend. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

Nature & Science

Education

Night Sky: See April 1.

Theater

'Les Misérables': See April 4.

Ongoing Exhibits ECHO LAKE AQUARIUM AND SCIENCE CENTER Info, 864-1848 'Alice's Wonderland': This traveling exhibit encourages curious minds to go down the rabbit hole to explore math and science topics inspired by the classic Lewis Carroll tale. Ages 3 to 8.

April 2014 kidsvt.com

MONTSHIRE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE

Kids VT

Community

Big Rig Day: Families get up close and personal with large vehicles, listen to stories, eat snacks and take home free books. All ages. Swanton Elementary School, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 868-5077. Essex Egg & Scavenger Hunt: Little gatherers collect eggs and treats to celebrate the start of spring. Grades Pre-K-4. Maple Street Park, Essex Junction, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 878-1375.

Music

46

Craft School Saturday Drop-In: See April 5. Kids Camera Club: Happy snappers learn how to build an old-school camera, capture an image and develop their film in the darkroom. Ages 8 and up. ArtisTree Community Arts Center, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-noon. $20; preregister. Info, 457-3500. Kids Craft: Candlestick Bunny: Interior decorators-in-training make a wooden candleholder to give their home a little flare. Ages 5 and up. Creative Habitat, South Burlington, 1-3 p.m. $5. Info, 862-0646. Paper Marionettes: Young artists design their own moveable puppets. Ages 5-10. Helen Day Art Center, Stowe, 9:30-11:30 a.m. $25. Info, 253-8358. Webby's Art Studio: Build a Book: Young bibliophiles construct personalized books using fanciful papers and other materials. Ages 5 and up. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Regular winter museum admission, $3-10; free for children under 5 and members. Info, 985-3346.

Info, 649-2200 'Sustainable Shelter: Dwelling with the Forces of Nature': Through graphics, cartoons, interactive computer games and more, this new exhibition explores biodiversity, human and animal architecture, energy and water conservation, and ecosystems, all from the perspective of the home. WONDERFEET KIDS' MUSEUM Fridays and Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Info, 282-2678 Wonderfeet Kids' Museum: This children's museum features interactive exhibits that allow kids to explore, role-play and create. Ages 3-8.

Routines, Rhythms & Stories for a Healthy Family Meal: Psychologist and FolkFoods cofounder Jason Frishman leads parents in a discussion about how to make mealtimes at home meaningful and fun. Children will join the last part of the workshop with their families. Lake Champlain Waldorf School, Shelburne, 9:30 a.m.-noon. Free; complimentary childcare and healthy snack provided; preregister for childcare. Info, 985-2827, ext. 12. Sharing the Secrets of Spring: Preschool and primary-grade educators, parents and young adults ages 16 and up learn new ways to share nature with children while exploring signs of life emerging from their winter slumber. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 12:303:30 p.m. $10-15; preregister. Info, 434-3068.

Fairs & Festivals

MudFest: Young ecologists celebrate Vermont's messiest season with 16 days of activities, games, live music and a "Mud Fling" every day at 2:30 p.m. All ages. (See calendar spotlight on page 42.) ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Burlington, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Regular museum admission, $10.50-13.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848.

Food

Capital City Winter Farmers Market: Root veggies, honey, maple syrup and more change hands at an off-season celebration of locally grown food held in the gymnasium. All ages. Vermont College of Fine Arts, Montpelier, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 223-2958. Middlebury Winter Farmers Market: See April 5. Norwich Winter Farmers Market: Farmers offer produce, meats and maple syrup, which complement baked goods and handcrafted items from local artists. All ages. Tracy Hall, Norwich, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 384-7447. Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See April 5. Sugar-on-Snow Party: See April 5.

Games

Essex Junction Chess Club: Board gamers have fun with the library's new sets. Ages 9 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Brownell

Theater

Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Health & Fitness

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at fletcherallen.org/ firstwithkids

EvoKids Saturday Yoga: See April 5. Kids Night Out for Knights & Princesses: Little ones ages 2-4 get active with sports equipment and mats followed by a movie while 5- to 12-year-olds create armor, wands, shields and crowns, then take a swim. Greater Burlington YMCA, 5:30-8 p.m. $10-19 per child; preregister. Info, 862-9622. Parents Night Out: Adults looking for some alone time drop off their young yogis for dancing, game playing, pizza eating and relaxation activities. Ages 4-11. Evolution Physical Therapy and Yoga, Burlington, 5:30-7:30 p.m. $25 for one child; $15 for siblings; preregister. Info, 864-9643. Shelburne Open Gym: See April 1. 9 & 10 a.m.

Library & Books

Meet Curious George: Monkey-themed stories, crafts and activities please fans of the mischievous character at the center of the classic books. Buttered noodles for everyone. Buttered Noodles, Williston, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 764-1810. Meet Sarah Dillard: The Waitsfield author and illustrator reads from Extraordinary Warren, her new picture book about a chicken who discovers what makes him super — inside and out. All ages. Brown Dog Books & Gifts, Hinesburg, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 482-5189. Mr. Monkey's Muddy Play Day: April showers bring ... mud. Curious kids play, explore and create with a secret spring recipe – clean mud. South Burlington Community Library, 9-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 652-7080.

Movies

'Les Misérables': See April 4. 1 p.m. Saturday Drama Club: See April 5.

13 SUNDAY

Baby & Maternity

Burlington Prenatal Yoga: See April 1. 10:0511:30 a.m.

Community

Pancake Breakfast: Firefighters fix a full spread of morning eats for community members. All ages. Williston Fire Department, 8 a.m.-noon. $5-8; free for children under 2. Info, 878-5622. Shelburne Easter Egg Hunt: Springtime revelers bring an Easter basket to collect hidden eggs with special surprises inside. Ages 12 and under. Vermont Teddy Bear Company, Shelburne, 10:30 a.m. & 2:30 p.m. Free. Info, 985-3001.

Education

Fort Fever Series: 'An Army Rows and Marches on its Stomach': History lovers explore how diaries, military manuals and archaeological remains are being used to reconstruct how American soldiers cooked and ate at Ticonderoga in 1776. All ages. Fort Ticonderoga, N.Y., 2-5 p.m. $10. Info, 518-585-2821. Homework Help: See April 1. Noon-4:30 p.m.

Fairs & Festivals

MudFest: See April 12. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Food

Sugar-on-Snow Party: See April 5.

Health & Fitness

Movies for Everyone Series: A family flick entertains viewers of all ages. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

Essex Big Kids Open Gym: See April 6. Essex Open Gym: See April 1. 1-2:30 p.m. YoGirls Yoga Class: See April 6.

Music

Library & Books

Taiko Drummers: Fans of percussion groove to the beat of traditional Japanese instruments. BFA Fairfax, 1 p.m. Free; bring a donation for the Fairfax Food Shelf. Info, fairfaxsx6@gmail. com. VYO Chorus & Concert Chorale: Rising-star singers and instrumentalists perform music written by composer-in-residence Robert Paterson and "Prayer of Black Elk," a new setting of a Sioux Indian prayer. Elley-Long Music Center, Colchester, 7:30 p.m. $7-12. Info, 863-5966.

Nature & Science

Bird Monitoring Walk: Beginning birders embrace ornithology on an identification walk. Appropriate for older children. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 8-10 a.m. Donations accepted. Info, 434-3068. ECHO Story Explorers: Turtles: See April 8. Egg Drop Contest: Can a raw egg survive an 18foot plunge? Kids design protective containers and put them to the test. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, noon-3 p.m. Regular museum admission, $11-14; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200. Leaping Lambs & Shear Delights: Families have a wild and wooly time washing, spinning and felting, then watch as a real sheep is shorn. All ages. Shelburne Farms, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $10-12 per adult-child pair; $5-6 for each additional child. Info, 985-8686. My Sky: See April 5. Night Sky: See April 1. Planetarium Presentation: See April 5. Vermont Home & Garden Show: Greenthumbed families learn how to prepare their outdoor spaces for spring. Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. $6; free for children under 12. Info, 876-6200.

Book Release Party: The Flying Pig Bookstore hosts the release of Emily Raabe's magical debut novel, Lost Children of the Far Islands. Ages 9 and up. Shelburne Town Hall, 4 p.m. Free; RSVP. Info, 985-3999.

Nature & Science

Adventures in Orienteering: Trailblazers of all levels learn basic map and compass skills, then put them to the test in the field. Adults and children ages 12 and up. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, noon-4 p.m. $20-25; preregister. Info, 434-3068. Microscopic Investigations: Microscopes help kids discover there's more to the world than meets the eye. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Regular museum admission, $11-14; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200. Mirror, Mirror: Little ones use looking glasses to investigate reflection and symmetry. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Regular museum admission, $11-14; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200. Night Sky: See April 1. Planetarium Presentation: See April 5. Vermont Home & Garden Show: See April 12. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

Theater

'Les Misérables': See April 4. 1 p.m.

14 MONDAY

Baby & Maternity

Montpelier Prenatal Yoga: See April 7. Vergennes Prenatal Yoga: See April 7.


Courtesy of perceptions, inc.

Maple Times Two The sticky stuff has staying power. During the last week of April, St. Albans’ VERMONT Maple Festival — celebrating its 48th year — gives visitors the chance to chow down on pancakes, trot around on ponies, marvel at marionettes, and peruse craft, specialty foods and antique shows. Farther east, the World Maple Festival in St. Johnsbury kicks off with a parade, followed by a community Ice Cream Social on Friday night. On Saturday, a street festival with kids’ entertainers, live music and more than 100 vendors promises a sweet time for all.

vermont maple festival Friday, April 25, 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.; Saturday, April 26, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m.; and Sunday, April 27, 7 a.m. to 4 p.m. in downtown St. Albans. All ages. Most events are free. Visit vtmaplefestival.org for a full schedule of events. World Maple Festival Friday, April 25, at 6 p.m. and Saturday, April 26, 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., in downtown St. Johnsbury. All ages. Free. Visit worldmaplefestival.org for a full schedule of events.

Fairs & Festivals

15 TUESDAY

MudFest: See April 12. 10 a.m.4 p.m.

Games

Lincoln Chess Club: See April 7.

Health & Fitness

Arts & Crafts

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at fletcherallen.org/ firstwithkids

Essex Open Gym: See April 1. Little Yogis: See April 7. Preschool Yoga: See April 7. Shelburne Open Gym: See April 1. 9 a.m., noon, 2 & 5 p.m.

Library & Books

Elementary Reading Buddies: See April 7. Pajama Story Time With Abby Klein: Flannelclad kiddos bring their favorite stuffed animals for tales, crafts and a bedtime snack. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 876-7555. Stories for Preschoolers: See April 7.

Music

Nature & Science

Burlington Postnatal Yoga: See April 1. Burlington Prenatal Yoga: See April 1. Glowmom's Parenting Club: Postpartum Moms Oasis: Moms of wee ones speak of joys and challenges, then conclude the session with meditation. Fresh-squeezed juice, tea and snacks provided. Pre-crawling babies welcome. Rainbow Institute, Burlington, third Tuesday of every month, 5:30-7 p.m. $12 suggested donation. Info, 777-0199. Shelburne Prenatal Yoga: See April 1.

Community

Purple Up! for Military Kids: Patriotic people statewide wear an amethyst hue to thank military children for their strength and sacrifices as part of an Operation: Military Kids initiative. Various locations statewide, free. Info, 656-0346.

Dance

Broadway/Hip-Hop/Jazz Dance Class: See April 1.

Education

Homework Help: See April 1.

Lego Fun: Budding builders share blocks. Grades K and up; kids under 5 are welcome to participate with adult supervision. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Health & Fitness

Essex Open Gym: See April 1. Open Gym with Kati Furs: See April 1. Shelburne Open Gym: See April 1. Tiny Tumblers Open Gym: See April 1.

Library & Books

Gaming For Teens & Adults: See April 1. Read to Van Gogh the Cat: Feline fanciers sign up for 10-minute sessions with a furry friend. All ages. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-4918.

Music

Children's Sing-Along With Lesley Grant: See April 1.

Nature & Science

ECHO Story Explorers: Mud: Lovers of the ooey-gooey stuff listen to Mud by Mary Lyn Ray, explore soil science and groove to a muddy tune. ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Regular museum admission; $10.50-13.50; free for members and children under 3. Info, 864-1848. Hoopster Gliders: Creativity soars as kids craft a flying contraption. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Regular admission, $11-14; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200. Night Sky: See April 1.

16 WEDNESDAY

Arts & Crafts

After-School Craft Club: See April 9. Spin into Spring: See April 2.

Baby & Maternity

Montpelier Postnatal Yoga: See April 2. Shelburne Postnatal/Baby & Me Yoga: See April 2.

Fairs & Festivals

MudFest: See April 12. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Food

Kids in the Kitchen: Backyard Garden Samosas: Young chefs learn to cook potatoes, soften veggies, roll out dough and create puffy pockets of yumminess, accompanied by cucumberand-cilantro raita for dipping. All ages. Healthy Living Market and Café, South Burlington, 4-5 p.m. $20 per parent-child pair; preregister. Info, 863-2569.

Health & Fitness

Essex Open Gym: See April 1. EvoKids Afterschool Yoga: See April 2. Music & Movement: See April 2. Shelburne Open Gym: See April 1. Tiny Tumblers Open Gym: See April 1. Vergennes Kids Yoga: See April 2. Yoga Tots: Young yogis stretch it out in exercises meant to build self-esteem and positive attitudes toward physical activity. Ages 1-7. Highgate Sports Arena, Highgate Center, 11:15 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 868-3970. 15 tuesday, p.48

47

Submit your May events for print by April 15 at kidsvt.com or calendar@kidsvt.com.

Games

Turtle Discovery: Young explorers get up close and personal with shelled reptiles, feeding them and learning about their habitat. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Regular museum admission, $11-14; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200.

Kids VT

Exploring Magnets: Budding scientists experiment with invisible pull. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Regular museum admission, $11-14; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200. Straw Rockets: Imaginative inventors use air power to make space contraptions fly. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Regular museum admission, $11-14; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200.

Baby & Maternity

MudFest: See April 12. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

kidsvt.com April 2014

Kids Music with Raphael: See April 7. Music for Preschoolers: See April 3. 10:45 a.m. Music with Lesley Grant: Tuneful kids sing along with a local musician and educator. Ages 18 months to 4 years. Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 244-7036.

Creative Tuesdays: See April 1. Ukranian Egg Workshop: Young adults learn the centuries-old art of Pysanky. Ages 12 and up. Colchester Bayside Activity Center, 6 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 264-5660.

Fairs & Festivals


april calendar 15 tuesday (Continued)

Library & Books

Baby Charms: Non-walking infants get silly as they sing, dance and make music with Miss Susan. South Burlington Community Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 652-7539. Pajama Story Time: Small ones curl up for bedtime tales, cookies and milk. Ages 18 months to 5 years. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660. Read to a Dog: See April 2.

Music

Preschool Music With Derek: See April 2. Rockin' Ron the Friendly Pirate: See April 2.

Nature & Science

Optical Tops: Small scientists explore how rotational motion can create visual illusions. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Regular museum admission, $11-14; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200. Parachutes: See April 6. 3 p.m.

17 THURSDAY

Arts & Crafts

Music

Fossils: Evidence of the Past: Youth sleuths clue into the origins of preserved remains. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Regular museum admission, $11-14; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200. Mirror, Mirror: See April 13. Spring Discovery Preschool Program: In celebration of spring, small naturalists and their parents play migration tag, search for wildflowers and bask in the sun by the beaver ponds. Ages 3-5. Meet at the sugarhouse parking area. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9-10:30 a.m. $8-10 per adult-child pair; $4 for each additional child; preregister. Info, 434-3068.

18 FRIDAY

Arts & Crafts

Essex Junction Crafternoons: See April 4. Family Wheel Drop-In: See April 4. Kinder Arts: See April 4.

Baby & Maternity

Kids Music With Linda 'Tickle Belly' Bassick: See April 4. Music With Derek: See April 4. Music With Robert: See April 11.

Egg-cellent Story Time: Books, crafts, games and an egg hunt delight young library-goers. South Burlington Community Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Fairfax Legos: Mini-makers build houses, vehicles and more with colorful interlocking blocks. All ages. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 849-2420. Middle School Planners & Helpers: Students play games and plot cool projects for the library over snacks. Grades 6-8. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Movies

Middle School Books-to-Film Discussion: Bookworms read Mr. Popper's Penguins by Richard Atwater in advance, then watch the movie version over snacks. Milton Public Library, 3:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 893-4644.

Music

Music for Preschoolers: See April 3. Music With Mr. Chris: See April 3. Spanish Musical Kids: See April 3. Swing Peepers Concert: Bookish kids learn about the library's summer reading club and partake in an ice cream sundae bar while enjoying springtime music and storytelling. All

Library & Books

Cleo the Therapy Dog: See April 5. Easter Egg Hunt at Buttered Noodles: Little scavengers search for eggs and have their faces painted. Each participant goes home with a prize. Egg hunt at 9-10 a.m. for ages 1-4, and 10-11 a.m. for ages 5-8. Minipancakes served. Buttered Noodles, Williston, 9-11 a.m. Free. Info, 764-1810. Manga Club: Like-minded peers share their favorite Japanese comics. Grades 6 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Music

Kids Creating Music: Bob Brookens leads children in a toe-tapping playtime with instrument activities, song and dance. 18 months-4 years. Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 244-7036.

Nature & Science

Craft School Saturday Drop-In: See April 5. Family Art: Little and big people use a variety of materials to create unique masterpieces. All ages. ArtisTree Community Arts Center, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-noon. $20 per parent-child pair; preregister. Info, 457-3500. Kids Craft: Glass Egg Ornament: Creative kiddos use tissue paper and glitter to decorate an Easter-themed bauble. Ages 5 and up. Creative Habitat, South Burlington, 1-3 p.m. $5. Info, 862-0646. SMArt Series: EGG-STREME Spring: Youngsters have an egg-ceptional time rolling, decorating and playing with awesome ovoids. Ages 3 and up. Shelburne Museum, 1-4 p.m. Regular winter museum admission, $3-10; free for children under 5 and members. Info, 985-3346.

Co-ed Fitness Club: Acting, hip hop, yoga, parachute games and more give active kids a chance to build their self-esteem, attention span, and physical and social skills. Ages 6-10. Move You Fitness Studio, Essex, 5:30-6:30 p.m. $7. Info, 863-4330. Essex Open Gym: See April 1. Shelburne Open Gym: See April 1. Noon, 2 & 6 p.m. Talented Toddlers Class: Wee ones engage in games and activities that exercise their minds and bodies in this educational and fun class. Ages 1-3. Move You Fitness Studio, Essex, 10:1511 a.m. $7. Info, 363-4330. Tiny Tumblers Open Gym: See April 1. Toddler Yoga & Stories: See April 4.

Community

Theater

Library & Books

Fairs & Festivals

Food

Food

Health & Fitness

Arts & Crafts

Library & Books

EvoKids Saturday Yoga: See April 5. Shelburne Open Gym: See April 1. 9 & 10 a.m.

Baby Animal Day: Visitors “ooh” and “ah” over cute and cuddly calves, lambs, chicks, ducklings and goslings. Horse-drawn wagon rides, tours of the heirloom garden and children's activities round out the day. All ages. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Regular museum admission, $4-14; free for members and children under 3. Info, 457-2355. ECHO Story Explorers:Mud: See April 15. Fingerprints: Kids get up close and personal with their prints, exploring what makes them unique. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Regular museum admission, $11-14; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200. Glaciers: Geologists-in-training explore the properties of ice while making arctic models. Ages 9 and up. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Regular museum admission, $11-14; free for members. Info, 649-2200. My Sky: See April 5. Night Sky: See April 1. Planetarium Presentation: See April 5.

Community

Essex Open Gym: See April 1. Open Gym with Kati Furs: See April 1. Shelburne Open Gym: See April 1.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at fletcherallen.org/ firstwithkids

Batteries & Motors: Light bulbs flicker — both literally and metaphorically — as kids make and measure electricity. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Regular museum admission, $11-14; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200. Night Sky: See April 1. Sound Science: Keen listeners explore how audio travels through different materials. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Regular museum admission, $11-14; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200. The Science of Sound: Educator Kurt Valenta uses a Slinky and laser to demonstrate the properties of sound in this hands-on presentation. Ages 3-6. Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 244-7036.

Baby & Maternity

Health & Fitness

Health & Fitness

Nature & Science

19 SATURDAY

MudFest: See April 12. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

April 2014 kidsvt.com

Nature & Science

Pollywog Preschool Art Drop-In: See April 3.

Fairs & Festivals

Kids VT

Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 652-7539.

New Parents Playgroup: See April 4. Third Friday of every month, 9:30-11:30 a.m.

Burlington Prenatal Yoga: See April 1. 5:457:15 p.m. Montpelier La Leche League: Breastfeeding moms make new friends as they discuss the joys and challenges of nursing. Snacks provided. Lending library available. Babies and toddlers welcome. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, third Thursday of every month, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 244-1254. Shelburne Prenatal Yoga: See April 1. 8:45-10 a.m.

48

ages. Rutland Free Library, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 773-1860.

Lickity Splitz Kids' Consigment Spring Sale: Deal seekers browse through high-quality, gently-used infant and children's clothes. Mid Vermont Christian School, White River Junction, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Free. Info, 779-5347.

Education

Early Bird Math: See April 4.

Fairs & Festivals MudFest: See April 12. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Games

Magic: The Gathering: See April 4.

Health & Fitness

Essex Drop-in Story Time: See April 4. Jericho Family Movie Night: Pajama-clad kids and their parents come with a pillow and stay for a flick and popcorn. All ages. Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, Jericho, 6:30-9 p.m. Free. Info, 899-4962. Jiggity Jog: A musical meet-up with Miss Susan includes singing, dancing and instrument playing. Ages 2-6. South Burlington Community

Submit your May events for print by April 15 at kidsvt.com or calendar@kidsvt.com.

Lickity Splitz Kids' Consigment Spring Sale: See April 18. 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Trivia Family Night Out: Kids and adults alike have a blast with open swim, gym activities and quiz show questions. Snacks and pizza available to purchase. All ages. Greater Burlington YMCA, 5-8 p.m. $6-8; preregister. Info, 862-9622.

Dance

Hip Hop for Preschoolers: Funky tots learn basic dance moves while burning energy and having fun with friends. Ages 3-6. Move You Fitness Studio, Essex, 11 a.m.-noon. $7. Info, 363-4330. MudFest: See April 12. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Middlebury Winter Farmers Market: See April 5. Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See April 5. Sugar-on-Snow Party: See April 5.

Games

Vermont Scholastic Chess Championships: Checkmate! Students in grades K through 12 study the board and make calculated moves in competitions matched up according to grade level. Berlin Elementary School, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. $12-20 to register; free for spectators. Info, 223-1948.

Saturday Drama Club: See April 5.

20 SUNDAY

Baby & Maternity

Burlington Prenatal Yoga: See April 1. 10:0511:30 a.m.

Education

Homework Help: See April 1. Noon-4:30 p.m.

Fairs & Festivals

MudFest: See April 12. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sugar-on-Snow Party: See April 5. Essex Big Kids Open Gym: See April 6. Essex Open Gym: See April 1. 1-2:30 p.m. YoGirls Yoga Class: See April 6.

Nature & Science

Color Mixing: Mini mixologists blend primary colors into brand-new hues. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Regular museum admission, $11-14; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200. Leafcutter Ants: Nature fans examine the secret lives of insect fungus farmers during this hands-on investigation. All ages. Montshire


21 MONDAY

Baby & maternity

montpelier Prenatal Yoga: See April 7. Vergennes Prenatal Yoga: See April 7.

community

Partners of operation: military Kids Vacation camp: Kids of service members enjoy a ropes course, nature excursions and hands-on activities during this weeklong program. Grades 4-8. Camp Johnson, Colchester, 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 656-0346.

Fairs & Festivals

mudFest: See April 12. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Food

Kids cooking class: Pasta with Pesto sauce: Those with culinary inclinations whip up a batch of pesto using garlic, olive oil, nuts and cheese, then serve it up with noodles and a side salad. Ages 6-12. McClure Multigenerational Center, Burlington, 5:30-7 p.m. $5-10 per parent-child pair; free for mentor pairs. Info, 861-9757. Lego Fun: See April 15. 2-3:30 p.m. milton chess club: Strategic thinkers of all abilities make winning moves on a black-andwhite board. Ages 6-14. Milton Public Library, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 893-4644. south Burlington Game days: Spring breakers beat the boredom blues by playing board games with friends. South Burlington Community Library, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080.

Health & Fitness

Essex open Gym: See April 1. Little Yogis: See April 7. Preschool Yoga: See April 7.

Library & Books

Babies & Toddlers Rock: See April 7. Third Monday of every month, 10-10:30 a.m. milton Lego club: See April 7. sculpey clay Workshop: Young sculptors mold this ceramic-like compound into unique creations. Ages 10-12. Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 893-4644. stories for Preschoolers: See April 7.

movies

Young Adult Film crew: Wannabe actors, directors and audiovisual buffs put together a program for Lake Champlain Access Television. Ages 12-18. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

music

Nature & science

creeping colors: See April 5. Paper-cup Telephones: Talkers and listeners discover whether sound can really travel through a string. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Regular museum admission, $11-14; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200.

creative Tuesdays: See April 1. south Burlington crafternoons: School breakers make spring-themed crafts during this drop-in session. All ages. South Burlington Community Library, noon-1 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Teen Art studio: See April 8.

Baby & maternity

Burlington Postnatal Yoga: See April 1. Burlington Prenatal Yoga: See April 1. Glowmom's Parenting club: Retreat for moms of All Ages: Mamas rejuvenate with conversation, meditation, fresh-squeezed juice and a healthy snack. Rainbow Institute, Burlington, fourth Tuesday of every month, 5:30-7 p.m. $12 suggested donation. Info, 777-0199. shelburne Prenatal Yoga: See April 1.

community

Partners of operation: military Kids Vacation camp: See April 21. 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

dance

Broadway/Hip-Hop/Jazz dance class: See April 1.

Education

Homework Help: See April 1.

Fairs & Festivals

mudFest: See April 12. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Games

south Burlington Game days: See April 21. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

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Health & Fitness

3/7/12 3:12 PM

3/25/14 3:34 PM

Adventures to Fitness: Kids work up a sweat following along with this engaging exercise program on the library's SMARTboard. Ages 5-10. South Burlington Community Library, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Essex open Gym: See April 1. Tiny Tumblers open Gym: See April 1.

Library & Books

Fairy stories & craft: Spritely kids hear whimsical tales, followed by a fairy house construction session. Children under 9 must be accompanied by an adult. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. Gaming For Teens & Adults: See April 1. milton movie day: School-age film buffs watch a flick on the big screen. Snacks provided. Call for movie title. Milton Public Library, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 893-4644. Pirate Party: Ahoy matey! Wee lads and lassies partake in stories and crafts inspired by the high seas. Snack provided. Ages 6 and under. Fairfax Community Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 849-2420.

movies

Vacation movie: 'The Pirate Fairy': Zarina, a dust-keeper fairy, flees Pixie Hollow to join forces with swashbucklers in this G-rated flick. Popcorn and beverage provided. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

music

children's sing-Along With Lesley Grant: See April 1. EcHo story Explorers: mud: See April 15. Hoopster Gliders: See April 15. 11 a.m.

• Week long ballet themed camps for ages 3-9 • Week long ballet Mini-Intensive for ages 12-18, for the serious dancer looking to stay in shape for various summerlong intensives • Weekly ballet classes for young dancers - adults - beginner - advanced

Summer Intensive for Teens Ages 13 - 18 Beginner-Intermediate July 28 - August 1 & August 4 - August 8 Week long dance intensive for the teen dancer who wants to take their dance training to a higher level, prepare for dance in college, musical theater, or high school dance team. Or maybe your dream has been to dance en pointe? Classes offered in ballet, variations, pointe, pointe prep, jazz, lyrical, modern, choreography and more.

Join us for one week or two, dance all day, every day and we’ll help you to reach your goal!

22 TuEsdAY, p.50 k4t-VBTS-0414.indd 1

3/20/14 5:34 PM

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This summer come dance with the best at VBTS! For schedule and enrollment information at both the Essex & Shelburne Campuses visit us at WWW.VBTS.ORG OR CALL: 802-878-2941 OR EMAIL US AT: INFO@VBTS.ORG

Kids VT

Nature & science

Classes & Camps 2014 SUMMER

KidsVT.com April 2014

Kids music with Raphael: See April 7. music for Preschoolers: See April 3. 10:45 a.m.

Arts & crafts

S

Games

22 TUESDAY

e

Museum of Science, Norwich, 11 a.m. Regular admission, $11-14; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200. Night sky: See April 1. Planetarium Presentation: See April 5.


april calendar owls grace the library with their presence. All ages. Milton Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 893-4644.

22 tuesday (Continued)

Dining à Deux Eating out with little ones is often more trouble than it’s worth. During Seven Days’ Vermont Restaurant Week, parents can spare themselves the messy meltdowns by leaving little ones at the Greater Burlington YMCA for a fun-filled parents’ night out. While kids play games and take in a flick, moms and dads can choose from three-course dinners priced at $15, $25 or $35 per person at a variety of local restaurants. And there’s no babysitter to drive home.

parents’ night out Friday, April 25, 6 to 8:30 p.m. and Saturday, April 26, 5:30 to 8 p.m., at the Greater Burlington YMCA. Ages 2-12. $12 per child members/$20 nonmembers. Preregistration required. Info, 8629622. vermontrestaurantweek.com

Kitchen Chemistry: Mad scientists combine common household products, which yield unexpectedly entertaining results. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Regular museum admission, $11-14; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200. Night Sky: See April 1.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at fletcherallen.org/ firstwithkids

23 WEDNESDAY

Arts & Crafts

South Burlington Crafternoons: See April 22. Spin into Spring: See April 2.

Baby & Maternity

Montpelier Postnatal Yoga: See April 2. Nursing Beyond a Year: Moms gather to discuss the joys and challenges of an older nursling. Discussion topics include nighttime parenting, weaning and setting limits. Bring a snack to share. Aikido of Champlain Valley, Burlington, fourth Wednesday of every month, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 879-3000. Shelburne Postnatal/Baby & Me Yoga: See April 2.

Community

Partners of Operation: Military Kids Vacation Camp: See April 21. 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

Fairs & Festivals

MudFest: See April 12. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Games

South Burlington Game Days: See April 21. 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Wii Gaming: Gamers check out LEGO Star Wars and Wii Sports Resort, in addition to classics like Mario Kart. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2-3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Health & Fitness

April 2014 kidsvt.com

Crafternoon: Local artist Nicole Vance provides kids with an afternoon of creativity and fun. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420. Pollywog Preschool Art Drop-In: See April 3. South Burlington Crafternoons: See April 22.

Baby & Maternity

Burlington Prenatal Yoga: See April 1. 5:457:15 p.m. Shelburne Prenatal Yoga: See April 1. 8:45-10 a.m.

Community

Partners of Operation: Military Kids Vacation Camp: See April 21. 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

Fairs & Festivals

MudFest: See April 12. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Food

Teens Take Over the Kitchen: Taco Night: Top chefs-in-training whip up three tasty versions of the popular folded tortilla pocket — chicken ranch, sweet-and-spicy shrimp and spiced beef with guacamole. Ages 12-and up. Healthy Living Market and Café, South Burlington, 4-5 p.m. $30; preregister. Info, 863-2569.

Games

Essex Junction Chess Club: See April 12. Lego Creations: Young builders make masterpieces for display at the library. Ages 5 and up. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 1-2:30 p.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. South Burlington Game Days: See April 21. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

Health & Fitness

Library & Books

Movies

Movies

Kids VT

Arts & Crafts

Essex Open Gym: See April 1. EvoKids Afterschool Yoga: See April 2. Hoopapalooza for Teens: Young adults shimmy their hips to create routines in preparation for the annual Hoopapalooza in Burlington on May 3. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-5 p.m. Free. Info, maryk@brownelllibrary.org. Tiny Tumblers Open Gym: See April 1. Vergennes Kids Yoga: See April 2. Castle Construction: Fledgling architects choose from a variety of materials to build a Medieval structure and a pom-pom catapult. South Burlington Community Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Toy Hacking: Inquisitive kids examine the insides of playthings. Tools and toys provided. Grades 4-6. Waterbury Public Library, 10:3011:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 244-7036.

50

24 THURSDAY

Stories On The Screen: Ice princesses and princes chill out with a screening of Frozen and snacks. South Burlington Community Library, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080.

Music

Moving & Grooving With Christine: See April 9. Preschool Music With Derek: See April 2. Rockin' Ron the Friendly Pirate: See April 2.

Nature & Science

Mirror, Mirror: See April 13. Parachutes: See April 6. 3 p.m. Raptor Encounters: Live falcons, hawks and

Essex Open Gym: See April 1. Hoopapalooza for Teens: See April 23.

Library & Books

Tales to Tails: Beginning readers practice skills by sharing books with trained therapy dogs. Rutland Free Library, last Thursday of every month, 4-4:45 p.m. Free. Info, 773-1860. Family Movie Matinee: Popcorn choppers say goodbye to winter with a showing of the newest Disney sensation, Frozen. All ages. Highgate Public Library, Highgate Center, 1-3 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 868-3970. 'Singin' in the Rain' Film Presentation: Retro families tap their toes along to this 1950s musical, featuring Gene Kelly and Debbie Reynolds performing elaborate song-and-dance numbers. Ages 6 and up. Woodstock Town Hall Theatre, 7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 457-3981.

Music

Music for Preschoolers: See April 3. Music With Mr. Chris: See April 3.

Nature & Science

Color Mixing: See April 20. Skulls: See April 5.

Submit your May events for print by April 15 at kidsvt.com or calendar@kidsvt.com.


Community

25 FRIDAY

Partners of Operation: MIlitary Kids Vacation Camp: See April 21. 8 a.m.-3:30 p.m.

Arts & Crafts

Family Wheel Drop-In: See April 4.

Education

Baby & Maternity

Early Bird Math: See April 4.

Postpartum Group: See April 11. Fourth Friday of every month, 12:30-2 p.m.

Fairs & Festivals

MudFest: See April 12. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. St. Johnsbury World Maple Festival: A celebration featuring a parade, ice cream social, 5K run, pancake breakfast and street fair culminates with the crowning of the 2013 World Maple Syrup champion. (See calendar spotlight on page 47.) All ages. Downtown St. Johnsbury, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 626-4124.

Vermont Maple Festival: Come on, get sappy! Marionette shows, Main Street entertainment, specialty foods, a giant parade and more showcase Vermont's signature sweet. (See calendar spotlight on page 47.) All ages. Downtown St. Albans, 10 a.m.-7 p.m. Most events are free. Info, 524-5800.

25 FRIDAY, P.52

Playgroups

Kids enjoy fun and games during these informal get-togethers, and caregivers connect with other local parents and peers. The groups are usually free and often include snacks, arts and crafts, or music. Contact the playgroup organizer or visit kidsvt.com for site-specific details. Schedules generally follow the school calendar; call ahead to confirm.

MONDAY Barre Open Gym: Sunrise Gymnastics, Wednesdays, 10 a.m.-noon. $10 per child. Info, 223-0517. Burlington Crawlers, Waddlers & Toddlers: St. Joseph School, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 999-5100. Burlington Early Learning Readiness Class: VNA Family Room, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 652-8147. Cambridge Playgroup: Cambridge Elementary School, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 888-5229. Colchester Playgroup: Malletts Bay School, Tuesdays, 9-11 a.m. Free. Info, 264-5900. Jericho Playgroup: Jericho Community Center, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 899-4415. Morrisville Hometown Playgroup: Morristown Elementary School, 9-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 888-5229. St. Albans Afternoon Fun: Barlow Street Community Center, Fridays, 3-5:30 p.m. $11-14 per session. Info, 524-1500, ext. 266. Swanton Playgroup: Swanton Elementary School, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, swantonbbf@ gmail.com. Williston Playgroup: Alice in Noodleland: Buttered Noodles, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 764-1810. Winooski Fathers & Children Together: Winooski Family Center, 5-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 655-1422. TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY Barre Open Gym: See Monday. Enosburg Playgroup: American Legion, Enosburg, 9-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 370-4797. Essex Building Bright Futures Baby Playgroup: Move You Fitness Studio, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 876-7555. Fairfield Playgroup: Bent Northrop Memorial Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 827-3945. Hinesburg Playgroup: Hinesburg Town Hall, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 482-4061. Milton Playgroup: Milton Public Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 893-1457. Richford Tumble Time: Richford Elementary, Every other Wednesday, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Free; alternates every other Wednesday with PJ Story Time. Info, 370-4797. Richmond Playgroup: Richmond Free Library, 8:45-10:15 a.m. Free. Info, 899-4415. Shelburne Playgroup: Trinity Episcopal Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 734-1233. South Royalton Playgroup: United Church on the Green, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 685-2264. St. Albans Afternoon Fun: See Monday. St. Albans Playgroup: NCSS Family Center, St. Albans, 8:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426. Vergennes Playgroup: 2 Wolves Holistic Center, 12-2 p.m. $5 suggested donation. Info, 870-0361. THURSDAY

FRIDAY Bradford Story Hour: Bradford Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 222-4536. Burlington Early Learning Readiness Class: See Monday. Burlington Family Gym: Greater Burlington YMCA, Saturdays, 10:30 a.m.-noon. $5 for families with one child; $8 for families with multiple children; free for YMCA members. Info, 862-9622. Charlotte Playgroup: Charlotte Central School, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 764-5820. Essex Center Toy Library Playgroup: Memorial Hall, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 876-7555. Fairfax Community Playgroup: BFA Fairfax, 9-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, fairfaxsx6@gmail.com. Ferrisburgh Open Gym: Ferrisburgh Central School, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 388-3171. Georgia Tumble Time: Georgia Elementary & Middle School, April 11, 1:50-2:35 p.m. Free. Info, 528-5470. Huntington Playgroup: Huntington Public Library, 10:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Free. Info, 899-4415. Isle La Motte Playgroup: Isle La Motte School, 8:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 796-3309. Montgomery Tumble Time: Montgomery Elementary School, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 347-1780. Norwich Lunch at the Library: Norwich Public Library, 11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Free. Info, 649-1184. Randolph Toddler Time: Kimball Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 728-5073.

St. Albans Afternoon Fun: See Monday. St. Albans MOPS: Church of the Rock, first Friday of every month, 8:45-11 a.m. First meeting is free; $4 dues per each meeting that follows. Info, 393-4411. Stowe Playgroup: Stowe Community Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 888-5229. Swanton Playgroup: Holy Trinity Episcopal Church, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 868-3033. Underhill Playgroup: Underhill Central School, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 899-4415. Williston Playgroup: Allen Brook School, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 876-7555. YMCA Early Learning Readiness Program at VNA: VNA Family Room, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 652-8147. SATURDAY Bakersfield Tumble Time: Bakersfield Elementary/Middle School, second Saturday of every month, 9-10 a.m. Free. Info, 370-4797. Burlington Family Gym: See Friday. Fridays, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Enosburg Tumble Time: Enosburg Elementary School, first Saturday of every month, 9-10 a.m. Free. Info, 370-4797. Essex Junction Building Bright Futures Preschool Open Gym: Maple Street Recreation Center, 3-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-1613. Franklin Tumble Time & Playgroup: Franklin Central School, April 12, 9-11 a.m. Free. Meets December 7 and January 11. Info, 285-6678. Morrisville Weekend Baby Chat: Lamoille Family Center, second Saturday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 888-3470. Montpelier Morning Playgroup: Family Center of Washington County, 9:30-11 a.m. Free; no session April 26. Info, 262-3292. Swanton Tumble Time: Swanton Elementary School, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 868-3033. 

KIDS VT

Alburgh Playgroup: NCSS Family Center, Alburgh, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426. Brandon Stories & Crafts: Brandon Free Public Library, 9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 247-8230. Burlington EvoMamas Playgroup: Evolution Yoga, second Thursday of every month, 1:152:45 p.m. Free. Info, 864-9642. Burlington Family Play: See Tuesday. Essex Junction Building Bright Futures Playgroup: Essex Junction Recreation and Parks Department, 9:30-11 a.m. Free; bring indoor shoes. Info, 876-7555. Johnson Hometown Playgroup: United Church of Johnson, 9-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 888-5229. Milton Playgroup: See Wednesday.

Montgomery Infant/Toddler Playgroup: Montgomery Town Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 347-1780. Montpelier Baby Play: St. Augustine Parish, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 262-3292. Montpelier Dads & Kids Playgroup: Family Center of Washington County, 6-7:30 p.m. Free; no session on April 24. Info, 262-3292. Morrisville Baby Chat: First Congregational Church of Morrisville, first Thursday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 888-3470. South Hero Playgroup: South Hero Congregational Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 796-3309. St. Albans Afternoon Fun: See Monday. Winooski Early Learning Readiness Class: See Tuesday. Worcester Playgroup: Doty Memorial School, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 223-1312. YMCA Early Learning Readiness Program at Echo: See Tuesday. YMCA Early Learning Readiness Program in Winooski: See Tuesday.

KIDSVT.COM APRIL 2014

Bristol Playgroup: Bristol Baptist Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 388-3171. Burlington Dad's Night: VNA Family Room, 3-7 p.m. Free. Info, 860-4420. Burlington Family Play: VNA Family Room, Thursdays, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 860-4420. Colchester Playgroup: See Monday. Essex Junction MOPS: Essex Alliance Church, April 8, 8:45-11 a.m. & 6:30-8:45 p.m. $5 includes childcare and a meal; first meeting is free. Meets every other Tuesday. Info, 310-6489. Fletcher Playgroup: Fletcher Elementary School, 9-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 849-9368. Georgia Playgroup: Georgia Elementary & Middle School, 9-11 a.m. Free. Info, 528-5470. Hardwick Playgroup: Hardwick Elementary School, 8:15-10:15 a.m. Free. Info, 652-5138. Johnson Baby Chat: Church of the Nazarene, fourth Tuesday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 888-3470. Middlebury Playgroup: Middlebury Baptist Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 388-3171. Montpelier Tulsi Morning Playgroup: Tulsi Tea Room, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 223-0043. Richford Playgroup: Cornerstone Bridges to Life Community Center, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 370-4797.

St. Albans Afternoon Fun: See Monday. Winooski Early Learning Readiness Class: Y Early Childhood Program Winooski, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 652-8147. YMCA Early Learning Readiness Program at Echo: ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, 9-11 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 652-8147. YMCA Early Learning Readiness Program in Winooski: Y Early Childhood Program Winooski, 9-11 a.m. Free, preregister. Info, 652-8147.

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april calendar Food

Vermont Restaurant Week: Parents’ Night Out: Dining out? Make it a table for two. Parents drop off their kids for an evening of fun and games. (See calendar spotlight on page 50.) Ages 2-12. Greater Burlington YMCA, 6-8:30 p.m. $12-20; food and beverage provided; preregister. Info, 862-9622.

Games

Dungeons & Dragons: See April 11. South Burlington Game Days: See April 21. 9 a.m.-4 p.m.

Health & Fitness

Bike Ride on Essex Bike Path: Kids and parents break out their 'cycles for a springtime jaunt on wheels. Grades K-5. Call to find out meeting location. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2-3 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. Essex Open Gym: See April 1. Family Yoga: Flexible families bring calm to their minds while learning new poses, breathing techniques and games. Barlow Street Community Center, St. Albans, last Friday of every month, 6-6:45 p.m. $5 per child; free for adults; preregister. Info, 524-1500, ext. 266. Tiny Tumblers Open Gym: See April 1.

Library & Books

Songs & Stories With Matthew: See April 11. Teen Advisory Board: Adolescents gather to plan library programs and munch on snacks. Grades 9-12. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 4-6 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Movies

Teen Movie: 'Saving Mr. Banks': To fulfill a promise to his daughters, Walt Disney tries to obtain movie rights to P.L. Travers' beloved book, Mary Poppins, in this 2013 film starring Tom Hanks and Emma Thompson. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:15 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Music

April 2014 kidsvt.com Kids VT

27 SUNDAY

29 TUESDAY

Arts & Crafts

Baby & Maternity

Arts & Crafts

Craft School Saturday DropIn: See April 5.

Community

Big Truck Day: Large vehicles, a bouncy house and music provide fun for all ages. BFA Fairfax, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, fairfaxsx6@gmail.com.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at fletcherallen.org/ firstwithkids

Fairs & Festivals

'Horsin' Around on Saturday Night': This dog and pony variety show features 90 minutes of musical freestyle riding, dog agility and obedience demonstrations and horse and rider drill teams. (See calendar spotlight on page 39.) All ages. Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, 6:30 p.m. $13.50. Info, 878-5545. Everything Equine & Canine: Seminars, demos and entertainment please pooch and pony enthusiasts. All ages. Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. $9 in advance; $10 day of show, free for children under 5. Info, 878-5545. MudFest: See April 12. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. St. Johnsbury World Maple Festival: See April 25. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. Vermont Maple Festival: See April 25. 7 a.m.-7 p.m.

Food

Capital City Winter Farmers Market: See April 12. Middlebury Winter Farmers Market: See April 5. Norwich Winter Farmers Market: See April 12. Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See April 5. Vermont Restaurant Week: Parents Night Out: See April 25. 5:30-8 p.m.

Games

Magic: The Gathering: Fantasy fans bring their own deck of cards or borrow one from the library for some competitive fun. Beginners welcome. Ages 8 and up. Winooski Memorial Library, 1-3 p.m. Free. Info, 655-6424.

Nature & Science

Health & Fitness

Say you saw it in

Burlington Prenatal Yoga: See April 1. 10:05-11:30 a.m.

Education

Fort Fever Series: 'Amazing Things!': History lovers spend the afternoon with the Fort's curator of collections, pouring over old autographs, books and weapons. All ages. Fort Ticonderoga, N.Y., 2-5 p.m. $10. Info, 518-585-2821.

Kids Music With Linda 'Tickle Belly' Bassick: See April 4. Music With Derek: See April 4. Music With Robert: See April 11. Mr. K Nature Program: Little ones learn about the five senses from a science educator. Fairfax Community Library, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 849-2420. Night Sky: See April 1. Sound Science: See April 18. Straw Rockets: See April 14.

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26 SATURDAY

Fairs & Festivals

Everything Equine & Canine: See April 26. 8:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m. MudFest: See April 12. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Vermont Maple Festival: See April 25. 7 a.m.-4 p.m.

Health & Fitness

Essex Big Kids Open Gym: See April 6. Essex Open Gym: See April 1. 1-2:30 p.m. YoGirls Yoga Class: See April 6.

Nature & Science

Fingerprints: See April 19. Fossils: Evidence of the Past: See April 17. Night Sky: See April 1. Planetarium Presentation: See April 5. Wildlife Wanderers Club: Families connect with Mother Nature during an outdoor adventure full of games and investigative activities. Meet at the park gate. Red Rocks Park, South Burlington, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 846-4108.

Creative Tuesdays: See April 1.

Baby & Maternity

Burlington Postnatal Yoga: See April 1. Burlington Prenatal Yoga: See April 1. Shelburne Prenatal Yoga: See April 1.

Dance

Broadway/Hip-Hop/Jazz Dance Class: See April 1.

Education

Homework Help: See April 1.

Health & Fitness

Essex Open Gym: See April 1. Open Gym with Kati Furs: See April 1. Shelburne Open Gym: See April 1. Tiny Tumblers Open Gym: See April 1.

Library & Books

Gaming For Teens & Adults: See April 1.

Music

Children's Sing-Along With Lesley Grant: See April 1.

Nature & Science

28 MONDAY

ECHO Story Explorers: Green: Little ones explore the lush emerald hues of Vermont through books and games. ECHO Lake Aquarium and Science Center, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Regular museum admission; $10.50-13.50; free for members and children under 3. Info, 864-1848. Night Sky: See April 1.

Baby & Maternity

30 WEDNESDAY

Montpelier Prenatal Yoga: See April 7. Vergennes Prenatal Yoga: See April 7.

Games

Arts & Crafts

Spin into Spring: See April 2.

Baby & Maternity

EvoKids Saturday Yoga: See April 5.

Beat the Clock: Competitive types try to win prizes by helping a knight scale a marshmallow tower before time runs out. South Burlington Community Library, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Lincoln Chess Club: See April 7.

Library & Books

Health & Fitness

Essex Open Gym: See April 1. Little Yogis: See April 7. Preschool Yoga: See April 7. Shelburne Open Gym: See April 1. 9 a.m., noon, 2 & 5 p.m.

Essex Open Gym: See April 1. EvoKids Afterschool Yoga: See April 2. Music & Movement: See April 2. Shelburne Open Gym: See April 1. Tiny Tumblers Open Gym: See April 1. Vergennes Kids Yoga: See April 2.

Library & Books

Library & Books

Intergenerational Dessert Book Discussion: Lit lovers gather for a good read-and-rant session, complete with something sweet. Grades 6 and up. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660. Stories for Preschoolers: See April 7.

Read to a Dog: See April 2. Scratch for Kids: Technology-minded fourth through sixth graders learn how to create their own interactive stories and animations using this computer program. Waterbury Public Library, 3-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 244-7036.

Music

Music

Meet Biscuit: Children of all ages meet the sweet yellow dog from Alyssa Satin Capucilli's popular series, listen to hourly stories, have their faces painted, and participate in activities and crafts. Free buttered noodles for everyone. Buttered Noodles, Williston, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Free. Info, 764-1810.

Nature & Science

Balance: Young investigators explore ups and downs, then make a toy to take home. Ages 9 and up. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 3 p.m. Regular museum admission, $11-14; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200. Crafting With Raptors: Fans of feathers make owl puppets or raptor mobiles and learn about birds of prey by meeting some in person. Shelburne Farms, 10 a.m.-noon. $10-12 per adult-child pair; $5-6 for each additional child; preregister. Info, 985-8686. Creeping Colors: See April 5. 11 a.m. ECHO Story Explorers: Mud: See April 15. My Sky: See April 5. Night Sky: See April 1. Planetarium Presentation: See April 5.

Kids Music with Raphael: See April 7. Music for Preschoolers: See April 3. 10:45 a.m.

Nature & Science

Bird Monitoring Walks: Experienced birders lead monthly jaunts in search of feathered friends, followed by warm drinks. Appropriate for older children and adults. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, 8-9:45 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 434-2167.

Montpelier Postnatal Yoga: See April 2. Shelburne Postnatal/Baby & Me Yoga: See April 2.

Health & Fitness

Moving & Grooving With Christine: See April 9. Preschool Music With Derek: See April 2. Rockin' Ron the Friendly Pirate: See April 2.

Theater

'Peter Pan': Kids' imaginations take flight as they watch this adaptation of J.M. Barrie's timeless tale of a forever-young boy. Paramount Theatre, Rutland, 10 a.m. $6.50. Info, 775-0903. K

Theater

Saturday Drama Club: See April 5.

Submit your May events for print by April 15 at kidsvt.com or calendar@kidsvt.com.


hands-on

Q habitat matthew thorsen

kidsvt.com April 2014

• Use laminated, ¼-inch-thick, medium-density fiberboard panels supported with 2-by-3-inch lumber to create sides high enough to contain the ball — five feet behind the goals; 2.5 feet everywhere else. Doors to access the rink and players’ box can be framed with 1-by-3-inch pine boards and finished with hinges and latches. • Lay down cushy carpeting to keep knees comfortable. • Kids can get involved by marking rink lines on the carpeting with colored duct tape, printing images for the boards or writing up original house rules.

Knee-Hockey Rink By Be cky T h ar p

Ice is nice, but April is better known Sean Saia and his 10-year-old son, Parents: Sean for, well, rain. That’s when the hockeyCameron, built their 12-by-20-foot baseand Melanie Saia crazed Saia family takes its favorite sport Kids: Sierra, 16, ment rink in a weekend, but they’re still inside. perfecting it, with finishing touches such Kelsey, 14, and Cameron, 10 “Knee hockey” is played with a small as a ceiling-mounted model Jumbotron foam ball instead of a puck and shorter made from a cardboard box. Logos from sticks than the kind used in a regular local and national companies are disrink. Players scoot around on their knees, obeying played on the boards that circle the rink — just like ice-hockey rules as they attempt to chase the ball in the NHL. into the other team’s goal. The only thing missing are the cheering fans. K

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“Habitat” is a feature celebrating places where Vermont families live and play. Got a sweet space you’d like us to see? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

marchCredit 2014 Union Kids VT money issue sponsored by New England Federal kidsvt.com Kids VT

Tips for making your own knee-hockey rink:


HANDS-ON ANSWERS P.59

PUZZLE PAGE

Birthday Club Winners get gift certificates to:

Congratulations to these April Birthday Club winners! GRAND-PRIZE WINNER DAMIEN lives in Waterbury Center and turns 8 on April 2. He is smart, sweet and generous. He often travels to the Dominican Republic to see family and leaves some toys for children who otherwise wouldn’t have any. Damien wins a birthday-party package for 10 friends.

To enter, submit information using the online form at kidsvt.com/birthday-club. Just give us your contact info, your children’s names and birth dates, and a photo, and they’re automatically enrolled.

KIDSVT.COM

Annie, Jacques and Leah each win a $25 gift certificate.

APRIL 2014 KIDSVT.COM KIDS VT MONEY ISSUE SPONSORED BY NEW ENGLAND FEDERAL CREDIT UNION MARCH 2014

54

Join the Club!

ANNIE lives in Middlebury and turns 10 on April 16. She loves to ride horses and play basketball.

Puzzles4Kids

VT’S BIRTHDAY CAPITAL

BY HELENA HOVANEC

Riddle Search — SPRING

Look up, down and diagonally, both forward and backward, to find every word on the list. Circle each one as you find it. When all the words are circled, take the UNUSED letters and write them on the blanks below. Go from left to right and top to bottom to find the answer to this riddle: How does the Easter bunny stay in shape?

APRIL BASEBALL CANDY CHICK CHOCOLATES DAFFODILS FEAST GRASS HAM JELLY BEANS

LILIES MARCH MAY RABBIT ROBIN SPRING

JACQUES lives in Essex Junction and turns 8 on April 21. He would like to be a veterinarian when he grows up.

Riddle Answer:

___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ -___ ___ ___ ___ ___ ___ .

LEAH lives in Colchester and turns 9 on April 19. She loves her hamster, tickle fests, reading, drawing and playing piano. When she grows up, she would like to be a fashion designer with a boutique in Paris!

More to do under one roof than anywhere in VT! MINI-GOLF • GIANT PLAY STRUCTURE PIZZA • CAKES • LASER TAG ARCADE • BATTING CAGES BIRTHDAY CROWN OR TIARA

1205 Airport Pky • So. Burlington (802) 862-7888


Q drawing on history B y t he a l e w is a n d i a n w e bb

John Deere

Inventor of a Signature Steel Plow, 1804 - 1886

At 17, he became an apprentice blacksmith to a wealthy man, Captain Benjamin Lawrence. For four years‛ work, he received room and board, a suit and $45.

John Deere was born on February 7, 1804, in Rutland, Vermont. Soon after, his family moved to Middlebury.

In his 20s, John married Demarius Lamb, a pretty student at a local boarding school.

Finally, he borrowed money to build his own blacksmith shop in central Vermont, but fire destroyed the business.

Discouraged, he moved to Grand Detour, Illinois, where he saw frustrated farmers trying to use flimsy cast-iron plows to dig up heavy soil. With a broken saw blade, Deere designed a steel plow that pushed dirt aside as it made grooves in the earth.

Thus the “center draft plow,” and the John Deere Company, was born. Soon after it moved to Moline, Illinois, the company began producing upwards of 2,100 plows a year.

Deere wasn‛t just successful in business; he also served as president of the local bank, mayor of Moline and director of the public library.

Today, the company he started manufactures construction, military and forestry equipment, as well as lawnmowers and machines we use at home. But he is best remembered for his first creation. A historic marker in Middlebury reads: “John Deere, Inventor of the Plough That Broke The Plains.”

55

“Drawing on History” is a monthly feature about a notable Vermont person, place or event from days of yore. Want to suggest a future topic? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

marchCredit 2014 Union Kids VT money issue sponsored by New England Federal kidsvt.com Kids VT

They spent 10 years moving around the state so he could find a job.

kidsvt.com April 2014

When John was 4, his father was lost at sea, leaving John‛s mother, Sarah, to raise him and his five brothers and sisters.


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KIDS VT

APRIL 2014

KIDSVT.COM

COLORING CONTEST!

Title _______________________________________

Three winners will receive $25 gift cards to Creative Habitat and free framing of their artwork for its Kids Gallery, located at the store on 555 Shelburne Road in Burlington. After a monthlong display of the winning artwork, Creative Habitat will give each artist the framed print to display at home.

Artist _____________________________________

Send Kids VT your work of art by April 15. Be sure to include the info at right with your submission. Winners will be chosen in the following categories: (1) ages 5 and younger, (2) ages 6-8 and (3) ages 9-12. Winners will be named in the May issue of Kids VT. Send your high-resolution scans to art@kidsvt.com or mail a copy to Kids VT, PO Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

Address ___________________________________

Age _______________________________________ Email _____________________________________ Phone _____________________________________


hands-on

Q projecT

by T he a l e w i s

Looking for a babysitter? • Babysitters & Event Sitters • Full & Part Time Nannies • Temporary Nannies Available • Gift Certificates Available We are Vt’s oldest & most experienced childcare placement agency. Our providers have undergone an intensive screening process.

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And the winner is…

3/26/14 1:32 PM

Kids VT won first-place “gold” in its circulation category at the Parenting Media Association awards for: BEST OVERALL WRITING

Start Saving

“Kids VT is full of good, clean fun.” — PMA JUDGE

We couldn’t have done it without you!

Thanks to our talented and passionate staff, our dedicated readers, and our fantastic advertisers for making our third year so successful.

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3/28/14 10:34 AM

ORTHODONTICS

D R S . P E T E R S O N , R YA N & E AT O N opporTuniTies crediT union With the Superduper Saver Account, kids ages 18 and under get two free movie tickets when they make monthly deposits of any amount for three consecutive months. Young account holders also get a tiny safeshaped bank to save their pennies in at home. For more information, call 660-4751. Td BanK The Young Saver Account has no minimum balance and lets kids improve their minds while growing their bottom line. Youngsters who read 10 books through the bank’s summer reading program get $10 added to their accounts. Learn more at tdbank. com/summerreading. K

Share your fun project and craft ideas with us!

Rethink Your Drink

Check out how much sugar that is in these popular drinks. Tooth decay is just a sip away! WILLISTON • 878-5323

ST. ALBANS • 527-7100

www.champlainortho.net

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send them to ideas@kidsvt.com.

Kids VT money issue sponsored by neW england federal KidsVT.com marchcrediT 2014 union Kids VT

neW england federal crediT union As kids get older, financial literacy becomes even more important. Savers ages 16 to 21 can sign up for New England Federal Credit Union’s online financial seminars. The payoff ? Some valuable know-how, and a $25 deposit. For more information, visit nefcu.com, click on “Plan and Learn” and select the Young Adults program. 

JUNE 2013

april 2014

ciTizens BanK Parents looking to save enough dough to send their little Einsteins to college should check out Citizens Bank’s CollegeSaver Program. If you open the account for a child under 6 and make a savings commitment of $25 a month, the investment pays off: When the kid turns 18, the bank hands over an additional $1,000. For children ages 6 to 11, a $50 monthly deposit has the same result. Learn more online at citizensbank.com.

Money Issue

BEST ILLUSTRATION COVER >> Newsprint (June 2013)

FREE

✱ GEARI NG UP FOR A TRIP TO THUND ER ROAD ✱ GAY DADS DISCUSS THEIR JOURN EYS TO PAREN THOOD ✱ FIT FAMIL FUN ON IES HAVE THE RUN

KidsVT.com

WanT your child To undersTand The Value of a dollar? Take that birthday check or full piggy bank to your local bank or credit union. Starting a savings account is a terrific way to introduce your kid to the ritual — and satisfaction — of setting money aside for something special. It’s less tempting than keeping money at home — and safer, of course, because the deposits are insured. Why a savings account? Most kids don’t need a checking account until they are old enough to hold a job. Still, ask your bank if debit cards are available. It’s smart to reward kids’ good habits with access to their money when they need it. To open an account, you’ll need to provide the child’s birth certificate and social security number, and most financial The institutions require a parent to cosign on the account. Some financial institutions offer sweet perks for young investors. Here are just a few:

BEST OVERALL DESIGN

Dads Rock!

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3/26/14 11:52 AM


✱ CONTEST FOR YOUTH DEVELOPMENT FOR HEALTHY LIVING FOR SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

Book Review Sponsored by

HEALTHY KIDS DAY SATURDAY, MAY 3, 9AM-2PM The Pomerleau Family Y in Burlington

Get a jump on summer at the 14th annual Healthy Kids Day, a FREE community event packed with fun. • Open swim

Calling all bookworms! Send us a thoughtful paragraph about a recent read for the chance to win some literary loot.

Book:

• Bounce castle and itty bitty play area

_______________________________________________________________

• Community booths • Get your caricature from Carl

Author:

• Make your own snacks

_______________________________________________________________

• Meet Y camp, education staff and UVM’s Rally Cat

Describe your favorite part of the story. What did you like about it?

• Face painting

Feel free to use additional pages!

Learn more at gbymca.org or 862-YMCA

_______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________

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KIDS VT MONEY ISSUE SPONSORED BY NEW ENGLAND FEDERAL CREDIT UNION MARCH 2014 KIDSVT.COM

APRIL 2014

KIDSVT.COM

_______________________________________________________________ k4t-YMCA0414.indd 1

3/27/14 11:37 AM

Does your child love to run?

_______________________________________________________________

Turn to page 26 of this issue or visit us on Facebook and answer 10 health-related trivia questions in our Fit Kids Quiz. All participants will automatically be entered to win one waived entry into the MVP Health Care YAM Scram.

_______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________

_______________________________________________________________ We’ll pick the four most creative entries and excerpt them in the next issue. Winners receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop. Deadline to enter is April 15. Send your entries to: Kids VT, attn: Book Review, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

New Books, Used Books, Remainders at GREAT PRICES! Deadline to enter: Friday, April 25 at 5 p.m. 4t-Fit KidsQuiz0414.indd 1

3/28/14 10:43 AM

Name ________________________________ Age __________________________________ Town ________________________________ Email ________________________________ Phone ________________________________

14 Church Street Burlington crowbooks.com 862-0848


USE YOUR WORDS

Less is More

A Vermont mom experiments with Simplicity Parenting BY A LISON N OVAK

List your event for free in the Kids VT monthy calendar. Submit your info by the 15th of the month online at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com

Decluttering increases a child’s capacity to pay attention and play deeply.

8v-calendar.indd 1

3/25/11 8:24 AM

PUZZLE PAGE ANSWERS (see p.54) RIDDLE ANSWER: What goes up when rain comes in? — AN UmbRELLA

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RIDDLE SEARCH ANSWER: With lots of eggs-ercise.

KIDS VT MONEY ISSUE SPONSORED BY NEW ENGLAND FEDERAL CREDIT UNION

JUmbLES bug. fell. comb. farm.

APRIL 2014

“Use Your Words” is a monthly essay in which writers reflect on parenting and childhood. Got a story to share? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

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ALMOST 10 YEARS AGO, my husband, Jeff, and I moved to My fears dissipated as I settled into a semicircle with four Vermont from New York City. We weren’t quite ready to start other moms and one dad. The instructor, Anne Shapiro, had a a family but, when we imagined raising kids, we envisioned friendly and casual vibe that assured me she was there to help, something less complicated than Manhattan. The city’s not admonish. competitive school admissions, cramped living spaces, That evening’s class — the second in the five-part series — rampant materialism and status as a potential terrorism focused on two concepts: Soul Fever and Home Environment. target influenced our decision to leave. Vermont, we thought, Soul Fever? Shapiro described it as what a child would provide a simpler life. experiences when he or she is out of sorts or emotionally Jeff and I settled into a routine; we hiked, went overloaded. It’s a parent’s job to notice when their kids are snowshoeing, watched movies, strolled through farmers overwhelmed and respond to it. markets. We often remarked to each other how easy our Next, we discussed the home environment. “If you have new life felt. too many things, it makes the child feel Then we had kids. like they have to make so many choices I had heard from a number of people so much of the time,” Shapiro explained. that life as you know it totally changes Decluttering increases a child’s capaconce you become a parent. It certainly ity to pay attention and play deeply. did for me and Jeff. We embraced our Before class wrapped up that night, roles of mom and dad to our daughter, we each had to decide on a “small, doable Mira, and our son, Theo. But there was no change” we would undertake that week. I pictured Theo’s room and the three deep question: These little people complicated bins of toys he never touches. I made a our lives immensely. plan to go through them, get rid of the Now that Mira is almost 7 and Theo undesirable stuff and display just a few is 4, we’ve recovered from some of of his favorites in a more accessible and the headaches of the baby and toddler appealing way. years — the sleep deprivation, the messy diaper changes, the chronic ear infections Several days later, while and grocery-store meltdowns. But the kid the kids played downstairs, I stage has brought new challenges: sibling dumped out the bins in Theo’s squabbling, messy rooms and getting room. I found a broken gyroto school on time, to name a few. scope, an array of plastic party So my interest was piqued favors and plenty more stuff recently when I saw a flyer advertishe hadn’t touched in ages. ing a series of Simplicity Parenting I put three quarters of classes at the Lake Champlain the toys in a box bound for Waldorf School in Shelburne. I was Goodwill. Then I replaced skeptical about the oxymoronic name the bins with an old bookshelf, — there’s nothing simple about raising where I neatly lined up a small selection children. But I liked the idea of learning of toys I knew he liked. I put a desk in some new parenting skills to help me manage the his room and filled it with 4-year-oldchaos. appropriate art supplies. Before my first class, I familiarized myself with After about an hour, I stepped back to survey my the ideas of Simplicity Parenting by reading Kim John work. I felt giddy. Theo’s room looked much more inviting. Payne’s 2010 book of the same name. The philosophy centers And when I called him in to see what I’d done, his eyes around the idea that slowing life down is a good thing. When widened and a smile spread across his face. we declutter our homes, carve out more family time and pare He played happily in his room for hours that afternoon down scheduled activities, our children thrive. Sounded while Jeff and I undertook a covert mission to remove the reasonable to me. junk from the house. I’m sure Theo would have protested But some of the recommendations, such as lighting a every single item we discarded. But, out of sight, it was truly candle for children to eat breakfast by, struck me as a bit out of mind. hokey. And the author’s assertion that children under age Since becoming a parent, I’ve spent so much time trying 7 should have absolutely no screen time to figure out what more my family seemed just plain unrealistic. needs to make us happy. For the Visit kidsvt.com to read Alison My heart beat quickly as I walked down the first time in years, I focused on Novak’s interview with a Waldorf School’s long hallway on a Thursday how we can work with what we Simplicity Parenting coach evening. I wondered how much I’d be expected already have. Rearranging Theo’s and a mom who has applied the to share with strangers, and I worried that the room was just a small change, but philosophy to her family life. instructor might try to tell me the “right” way it felt like the start of something to parent. bigger. 

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3/26/14 1:18 PM


Kids VT, April 2014