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SEPTEMBER 2017

VOL.24 NO.08

FREE


Vermont Ballet Theater and School CENTER FOR DANCE 2017-2018 CLASS REGISTRATION Now Open!! Classes begin on September 11th!

Ballet • Pointe Modern • Jazz Lyrical Contemporary Hip-Hop • Yoga • Pilates Cardio and more. Ages 3-Adult, Beginner-Pre-Professional Register at vbts.org today!

TWO LOCATIONS! Essex Campus: 21 Carmichael Street, Suite 203 Shelburne Campus: 4066 Shelburne Road

“Simply the Best” Main Office: 802-878-2941 The Dance Shop at VBTS: 802-879-7001 www.vbts.org • info@vbts.org

Vermont’s Own

Nutcracker Auditions

September 30th!

Visit the Nutcracker link on our website or call for details.

Official School of Vermont Ballet Theater, Winner of Readers Choice Award Best Ballet School, Alexander Nagiba Director. 8/23/17 10:28 AM

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KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

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Season Sponsor

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daniel tiger’s neighborhood live! Wednesday, October 11

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SEPTEMBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

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P E R F O R M I N G

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A R T S

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EDITOR’S NOTE

STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS COPUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Cathy Resmer

Back to School

cathy@kidsvt.com COPUBLISHER

Colby Roberts

colby@kidsvt.com MANAGING EDITOR

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Meredith Coeyman ART DIRECTOR

Brooke Bousquet brooke@kidsvt.com

MARKETING & EVENTS DIRECTOR

Corey Grenier

corey@kidsvt.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Kaitlin Montgomery kaitlin@kidsvt.com

CATHY RESMER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR

CALENDAR WRITER

Brett Stanciu

brett@kidsvt.com

PRODUCTION MANAGER

John James CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Don Eggert DESIGNERS

Kirsten Cheney, Rev. Diane Sullivan, Richele Young CIRCULATION MANAGER

Matt Weiner BUSINESS MANAGER

Cheryl Brownell CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Jordan Adams, Sarah Galbraith, Astrid Hedbor Lague, Grace Per Lee, Ken Picard, Erinn Simon, Autumn Spencer, Katie Titterton, Sadie Williams PHOTOGRAPHERS

Sam Simon, Matthew Thorsen, Jeb WallaceBrodeur ILLUSTRATOR

Published 11x per year. Circulation: 25,000 at 600+ locations throughout northern and central Vermont. © 2017 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.

B

ALISON NOVAK, MANAGING EDITOR

KEN PICARD, SEVEN DAYS STAFF WRITER AND KIDS VT CONTRIBUTOR

MR. WOLFE, my second and third grade teacher at Eastman School in Concord, N.H. There were no desks in his classroom — it was a functional city, complete with bank, post office, wood shop, stores and more. I always had a blast, and it never felt like school. MEREDITH COEYMAN, CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

CONTRIBUTOR’S NOTE KATIE TITTERTON (“Tricks of the Tray,” page 28) loves cooking, nature walks and asking questions. She likes to investigate the systems that underpin how we eat, use resources, and care for our families and neighbors. In addition to writing, she consults with nonprofits on their communication needs. Find her online at clearspotvt.com.

KIDS VT

efore working at Kids VT, I was an elementary school teacher. One aspect of the job I liked most was its cyclical nature. Regardless of what had happened the previous school year, September was a chance to start fresh. I could rethink routines, reorganize my classroom and plan new units of study. Plus, I got a whole new batch of students. Although my job now as an editor and writer is different in many ways (I spend a lot more time sitting in front of a computer screen, for one), being part of a monthly publication affords me the same opportunity to start anew, in this case every four to five weeks. I’m invigorated by the challenge of putting out one issue and getting to work on the next — with a new theme, a different mix of writers, and a fresh set of articles about the people, places and things in this cool, quirky state of ours. I’m especially excited about the stories in this month’s Back to School Issue, including contributor Katie Titterton’s illuminating piece on school food programs (“Tricks of the Tray,” page 28). Most people know that Vermont is at the forefront of the Farm to School movement, but Katie digs in to the financial realities of feeding our kids, and providing them with nutritious, farm-fresh food. Also on that theme, calendar writer Brett Stanciu interviewed a science teacher at Salisbury Community School who created a nature guide to help elementary school kids identify the most common animals and plants in Vermont (“Bookworms,” page 17). And I’ve written about a new cookbook from a pair of Canadian moms that’s all about school year food prep, with lots of tips and recipes for easy, nutritious and versatile meals (“The Art of School Year Food Prep,” page 15). I’m planning to take the wisdom I gleaned from the book into this new school year. Because, as I see it, September is also the perfect time to start fresh as a family, which means changing things that didn’t work in the past — from dinner menus to bedtime routines. And in that spirit, I wish all of you a smooth transition back to school.

SEPTEMBER 2017

Editorial content in Kids VT is for general informational purposes. Parents must use their own discretion for following the advice in any editorial piece. Acceptance of advertising does not constitute service/product endorsement. Kids VT is a proud member of the Parenting Media Association. Kids VT distribution is audited for accuracy. Da Capo Publishing shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Da Capo Publishing may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Da Capo Publishing reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers.

Blank Slate

My favorite teacher was JAMES MCPARTLIN who taught English for 25 years at Syosset High School in Syosset, N.Y. His lessons were more like casual conversations with his students: full of humor, passion and inspiration without being overly sentimental. Once a year he’d invite his students to join him to watch the sunrise, then serve us bagels.

KIDSVT.COM

P.O. BOX 1184 • BURLINGTON, VT 05402 802-985-5482 • KIDSVT.COM

I was lucky enough to have TOM SCATCHARD as a teacher for both 4th and 5th grade at Charlotte Central School. He always let us fully explore our own creativity and laid the groundwork for my love of multimedia arts.

My high school Human Physiology teacher, SISTER BLANDINE, made sure her students — her “honey bunnies,” she called us — memorized the names for bones, muscles, organs and systems of the body. Whenever anyone I love has a serious medical issue, I’m grateful for the strong foundation she gave me.

meredith@kidsvt.com

Katherine Isaacs, Kara Torres

Who was your favorite teacher?

JORDAN ADAMS, SEVEN DAYS MUSIC EDITOR AND KIDS VT CONTRIBUTOR

Alison Novak

alison@kidsvt.com

PROOFREADERS

STAFF QUESTION

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Cool for School

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Are you ready?

Come pick apples and shop at the cider house farm market

EXPANDED KIDS SELECTION

Seasonal Hours September & October Monday–Saturday 9–6 Sunday 9–5 16th Annual Pie Fest

Senior Citizen's Days

Sunday, September 24, 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m.

Thursday & Friday, October 12 & 13

Ringo Matsuri - Taiko Drumming Festival in the Orchard

Truckload & Carboy Weekend

Saturday & Sunday, October 14 & 15

Saturday, September 30, 11 a.m.

BURLINGTON

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COLCHESTER

SHELBURNE

216 Orchard Road, Shelburne (802) 985-2753 www.shelburneorchards.com

ST ALBANS

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SEPTEMBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

FREE Kids Passes for Kids 12 & Under*

FAMILY MAD CARDS ONLY $219 Family Mad Card! Gets you 3 transferable tickets plus more savings all season long! *Free Kids Passes for Kids 12 & Under with purchase of Family Mad Card or any Adult Season Pass!

KIDS VT

Photo credit: TJ Greenwood

Best Place to Bring Your Kids Up Skiing!

- Powder

Magazine

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JEFF DREW

SEPTEMBER 2017

Back to School

JUST FOR KIDS

Writing Contest & Winners, p. 24 Coloring Contest Winners, p. 24 Coloring Contest, p. 25 Puzzle Page, p. 26 INSID E! Birthday Club, p. 26 Puzzle Answers, p. 27

ese & wine Your chaend m ore! place

Silly School Bus Danielle was all ready to get back to school, but when the bus arrived, she noticed that something was odd. Actually, she noticed 17 things that were really, really odd! Can you help her find all the things that are wrong with the bus, so that she can get to school on time?

KIDSVT.COM SEPTEMBER 2017 KIDS VT

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Just for Kids 23 School Bus Puzzle 24 Writing Contest

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Tricks of the Tray

25 26 26

Birthday Club

CALENDAR SEPTEMBER

A Walk in the Woods

SPONSORED BY:

Nature lovers explore history and ecology while enjoying horse-drawn wagon rides, woodworking and portable sawmill demonstrations, hikes with foresters, and crafts for kids at FOREST FESTIVAL WEEKEND. Saturday, September 23 & Sunday, September 24, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., at the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park in Woodstock.

Week to Week SAT & SUN

SEP 23 & 24

SAT

SEP 30

Glory Days Festival: This family-oriented shindig fêtes White River Junction’s choo-choo history with children’s entertainment including a model train show, a Lego exhibit and Green Mountain Railroad Excursion rides along the Connecticut River in downtown White River Junction.

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Sleep Savior

CaterpillarFest! Youngsters marvel at hundreds of native critters, enjoy outdoor bug walks and tag monarch butterflies at the North Branch Nature Center in Montpelier.

Welcome Editor’s Note 5

Short Stuff Autumn Answers 8

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On the Cover SEPTEMBER 2017

FREE

Over 140 Hands-On Exhibits Daily Activities Featured Exhibitions David Goudy Science Park Nature Trails Live Animals VOL.25 NO.08

Artist Jeff Drew spells out the theme of our September issue with cafeteria food in this original illustration.

WWW.MONTSHIRE.ORG 802.649.2200

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KIDS VT

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Trending Calendar Clues Kids Say What? Parenting Hacks #InstaKidsVT Throwback Kids Beat

Calendar 34 Daily Listings 35 Fall Festivals 36 Live Performances 37 Classes 38 Science & Nature 40 New Parents 42 Story Times 44 Playgroups 45 Ongoing Exhibits

Wh

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SEPTEMBER 2017

Staff Question Contributor’s Note

Columns 12 Checkup 13 Parent Portrait 14 Fit Families 15 The Art of 16 Mealtime 17 Bookworms 18 Ones to Watch 21 Habitat 47 Use Your Words

Like the University of Vermont Medical Center on Facebook and get weekly updates from Dr. First! See “First With Kids” videos at uvmhealth.org.

ll Wi

You

KIDSVT.COM

Essex mom Alexis Dubief uses research and humor to help parents find sleep solutions for their babies.

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Champlain Mini Maker Faire: Tech enthusiasts celebrate the DIY mindset at this quirky science fair featuring robotics, student experiments, arts and crafts, and more at Shelburne Farms.

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

SEP 9 & 10

SAT & SUN

1186 Williston Rd. So. Burlington, VT 05403 (Next to the Alpine Shop) 802.863.0143 Open 7 days 10am-7pm cheeseandwinetraders.com

COURTESY OF MARSH-BILLINGS-ROCKEFELLER NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK

MATTHEW THORSEN

How do Vermont schools provide healthy, local food and try to break even? It takes hard work and creativity.

& Winners Coloring Contest Winners Coloring Contest Puzzle Page

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Discounts on Natural, GlutenFree and KidFriendly Foods ARGAIN PRICES ! ALL AT B

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TRENDING AUTUMN ANSWERS

WalletHub ranks Vermont the number one state to have a baby, with high scores in health care, babyfriendliness and family-friendliness. Not to mention the postcardworthy view from UVM Med Center’s Labor Lounge.

How do I know when my kids are ready to stay home alone?

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

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hildren grow from pantspooping, mashed peas-loving, dependent little goobers to opinion-having, self-aware mini-adults seemingly overnight. Meanwhile, parents go from imagining all the accidents that might befall our babies when we look away to longing for them to be more independent. It’s not just that we want them to become healthy, functioning adults; their independence is a matter of necessity. We have jobs, meetings, appointments and errands. We also need time away from our kids to care for ourselves. And, let’s be honest, it’s also about saving money. Who couldn’t put those reclaimed babysitter dollars to good use? My brother and I had a series of sitters until my parents decided we were old enough — at 10 and 14 — to be latchkey kids. Once my brother left for college and I was truly alone, my afterschool routine consisted of me watching “Guiding Light” while

eating boxes of Ho Hos. It was theoretical independence, poorly executed. I don’t recommend it. So, how do we know when it’s okay to leave our kids home alone? The Child Welfare Information Gateway (childwelfare.gov), a division of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, offers general guidelines to consider: Is your child physically and mentally able to care for herself ? Does your child feel comfortable with the idea? Does he usually follow the rules? Another essential question: How do we leave them alone? The blog Thirty Handmade Days has a great post called “Guidelines for Leaving Kids Home Alone,” which provides basic age-based guidelines for how long children should be left alone. (Under 7? Never. Eleven? Less than three hours, and never at night.) The article also recommends specifically outlining rules: Can the children use the kitchen? Can

Calendar Clues Saturday, September 16: WONDERPAWS FESTIVAL & PAW PARADE PARADE, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., at Wonderfeet Kids’ Museum in Rutland. Sunday, September 24: VERMONT PUMPKIN CHUCKIN’ FESTIVAL,, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., at Stoweflake Mountain Resort & Spa in Stowe. Sunday, September 24: THEATREWORKS USA ‘DRAGONS LOVE TACOS’, 3 p.m., at Hopkins Center for the Arts in Hanover, N.H.

they go outside? Are they allowed to use electronics? As always, expert recommendations are best used in conjunction with what you already know about your child. Follow the answer in your gut, and if you think your kid is ready to go solo, plan and prepare for success. This means creating a list that includes the rules of the house and emergency contacts. Also, provide some structure for how they can spend the time — chores, homework, play — and let them know you’ll hold them accountable. Yes, trust is important. But physical, mental and emotional safety are, too. Being home alone is a responsibility and, ideally, involves more than just eating junk food and watching TV.  In this monthly column, comedian, writer and mom Autumn Spencer answers tricky parenting questions. Have a question for Autumn? Send it to ideas@kidsvt.com.

KIDS SAY WHAT?

“Mommy,

that guy parks worse than you. —KIERSTEN, AGE 9

Ninety-fouryear-old widower Keith Davison installs inground pool in his Minnesota backyard to give neighborhood kids a place to swim and to combat his loneliness. It even has a diving board!

The Great Vermont Corn Maze in Danville carved four teddy bears into its cornfield this year. Don’t be fooled by the gentle theme — this maze has teeth.

Paleo mom launches Serenity Kids, a company that makes baby food high in protein and healthy fat, with flavors like liquified uncured bacon with organic kale and butternut squash. What’s next? CrossFit for Crawlers?

Expecting Toronto meteorologist gives an impassioned on-air speech after body-shaming viewer calls her maternity attire “disgusting” on Twitter. Mess with a 34-week pregnant mama, and you’ll get a storm.


PARENTING HACKS

Need some reading suggestions now that school is back in session? This month, parents shared their kids’ favorite book titles.

Big Nate, Geronimo Stilton and Star Wars Jedi Academy: A New Class are my oldest’s favorites right now — he’s super into graphic novels. My youngest son is loving Elephant and Piggie and the Pigeon books (both by Mo Willems).

Send your parenting hacks to ideas@kidsvt.com. Both our boys hold a special place in their hearts for My Father’s Dragon. It was the first chapter book that really hooked them.

—ANGIE FERENC

I Know a Shy Fellow Who Swallowed a Cello Random, but perfect for my music-obsessed little guy.

—JESSICA STEHMEYER

It’s the Little House series right now, but also books by Arnold Lobel and Kevin Henkes are forever favorites.

—BECKY GROBERG

Right now it’s The Book With No Pictures. My son thinks it’s hilarious!

—STEPHANIE WILLIAMS

Last year when my son was 5 years old, we made a top 5 list after reading over 150 children’s books over summer break. His favorite was Prince William by Gloria Rand, about a child saving a baby seal from an oil spill. This year, it might be Star Stuff: Carl Sagan and the Mysteries of the Cosmos by Stephanie Roth Sisson.

—LISA MARIE BERRY

Currently we are reading How to Track a Truck by Jason Carter Eaton and Pet Show! by Ezra Jack Keats nearly constantly.

—RACHEL O’DONALD

—KATHERINE GUTTMAN

THROWBACK SEPTEMBER 2016

Back to School

Lessons in Kindness: A Vermont Nonprofit Helps Kids Learn Empathy

@skithegreens This little girl loves to ride her bike.

HERE’S HOW: Follow @kids_vt on Instagram. Post your photos on Instagram with the hashtag #instakidsvt. We’ll select a photo to feature in the next issue.

KIDS VT

 

SEPTEMBER 2017

Read the full story at kidsvt.com/empathy.

Thanks for sharing your photos with us using the hashtag #instakidsvt. We loved this joyful bike-riding snapshot, taken at Perry Hill trails in Waterbury! Share a picture of your kids going back to school this month!

KIDSVT.COM

In last year’s Back to School Issue, we wrote about Changing Perspectives, a Vermont-based nonprofit that aims to help students learn about each other’s differences and build empathy. The organization, founded by teacher Sam Drazin (pictured), brings guest speakers and simulation activities into schools to help kids better understand what it feels like to have a disability.

#INSTAKIDSVT

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VHEIP-KidsVT-Sept2017 rev8-14_Layout 1 8/15/17 7:21 AM Page 1

P L A N B E T T E R . PAY S M A R T E R . A I M H I G H E R .

Adventure Center, Bike Park Gondola Rides, hiking center and 18 Hole-Golf Course— you can’t ask for more.

September is College Savings Month

MORE Adventure. Discover the Killington Bike Park— Learn To Ride packages from $95.

Join the celebration! Sign up during September for a chance to win a $100 Vermont college savings account. killington.com/bikepark

#beastmtb

By saving for college, you’re creating opportunities for your child that will last a lifetime. And Vermont’s

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state-sponsored 529 college savings program is the only college savings plan that qualifies families for a 10% Vermont income tax credit on annual contributions—as much as $250 ($500 for couples filing jointly) per child per year.

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

Open or contribute to your account today!

vheip.org/kidsvt 1-800-637-5860

Your child. Your orthodontist. Administered by

VHEIP is sponsored by the Vermont Student Assistance Corporation, a public nonprofit established by the Vermont Legislature in 1965 to help Vermont students and families save, plan, and pay for college. VHEIP investment management is provided by Intuition College Savings Solutions, LLC. Consider the investment objectives, risks, charges, and expenses before investing and read the disclosure booklet (available online at vheip.org or by calling 800-637-5860). Investments in VHEIP are neither insured nor guaranteed, and there is the risk of investment loss. Before investing in a 529 plan, you should consider whether the state you or your designated beneficiary reside in or have taxable income in has a 529 plan that offers favorable state income tax or other benefits that are available only if you invest in that state’s 529 plan.

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ORTHODONTICS

DRS. DRS.PETERSON, PETERSON,RYAN RYAN & & EATON EATON

Braces for Children & Adults — champlainortho.net ST. ALBANS OFFICE 80 Mapleville Depot 527-7100 k4t-ChamplainOrtho0215.indd 1

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Whether you’re considering clear aligners, retainers or today’s braces, an orthodontist is the smart choice. Orthodontists are specialists in straightening teeth and aligning your bite. They have two to three years of education beyond dental school. So they’re experts at helping you get a great smile—that feels great, too.

WILLISTON OFFICE 277 Blair Park Road 878-5323 1/16/15 10:54 AM


B Y A L I S ON N OVAK AN D B R ET T STAN C IU

COMMUNITY

United in Song

Vermonters can participate in a musical flash mob and show their support for highquality, affordable childcare thanks to a new creative initiative from public awareness campaign Let’s Grow Kids. The KIDS OUT LOUD project aims to recruit 1,000 participants of all ages to sing an original song titled “Something Beautiful” that celebrates the importance of nurturing children. The tune was cowritten by local luminaries Kat Wright and Chris Dorman (better known as Mister Chris). Choreographer Lois Trombley created an accompanying dance. Leading up to the event, Let’s Grow Kids will work with childcare providers to help teach children the song and dance. Video tutorials will be available on the Let’s Grow Kids website. On the day of the event, participants will convene at Burlington’s Hood Plant, then parade with African drummers up Church Street while performing an a cappella version of the song, followed by a sing-along with Mister Chris. Let’s Grow Kids has spent a lot of time in diverse communities around Vermont talking to people about the importance of high-quality, affordable childcare, said the campaign’s creative director Megan Stearns. The flash mob will be “a public, visible way to show solidarity.” —AN The Kids Out Loud flash mob happens on Sunday, October 1, starting at 11:30 a.m. To sign up, visit letsgrowkids.org/kids-out-loud. Families who sign up by Friday, September 8, will get free superhero capes for kids to wear at the event.

PARTY TIME

Modern Pop starts on Tuesday, September 19, from 6-8 p.m., and meets once a month for nine consecutive months. To learn more and sign up, visit evolutionprenatalandfamily.com/modernpop.

LITERACY

Telling Tales Twenty of the state’s public libraries celebrate stories, both traditional and lesser known, at the first-ever VERMONT FAIRY TALE FESTIVAL, this month in Killington. Each participating library will sponsor a booth focused on a different tale — from Jack and the Beanstalk to The Musicians of Bremen — giving visitors a chance to learn the story and create a related item to take home. Food and craft vendors, Viking reenactors, professional storytellers and local artists will provide additional fairy-focused fun. The library will also be working with nearby Gifford Woods State Park to install fairy houses along one of the park’s hiking trails and provide free passes to the park on the day of the festival. Guests are encouraged to come in costume — and pose for photo ops with volunteers dressed like they just stepped out of a storybook. —AN

KIDS VT

The Vermont Fairy Tale Festival takes place on Saturday, September 23, from 10 a.m.-4 p.m., at the Sherburne Memorial Library in Killington. The event is free with a nonperishable food donation or an item for the Humane Society. For more information, visit the events page at sherburnelibrary.org.

SEPTEMBER 2017

Find Whim of Whimsy at facebook.com/whimofwhimsy or whimofwhimsy.com. Contact the business at whimofwhimsy@gmail.com.

After his daughter was born 14 months ago, Keegan Albaugh of Burlington says he found himself feeling “kind of jealous” of the opportunities his wife, Stephanie, had to connect with other mothers. While new moms can commiserate in postnatal yoga, breastfeeding meetings and support groups like VerMamas at Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, there’s no similar local forum for dads to talk amongst themselves. That became the inspiration for MODERN POP, a conversation-based support group for fathers that Albaugh will run in the Evolution space starting in September. The monthly group will give new dads the opportunity to talk candidly about raising kids, dealing with stress, finding work-life balance and more. Albaugh said his work as an educator at alternative school Centerpoint, where he runs community circles for teenagers, makes him well suited to the role of facilitator. Becoming a parent is a “life-changing experience,” he said, and he hopes that Modern Pop will be a way to help new dads feel less isolated. —AN

KIDSVT.COM

Three years ago, Cambridge moms Nicole Howard and Raelyn Ward met through Front Porch Forum after responding to a post looking for Girl Scout leaders. The two quickly realized that, in addition to having a knack for cookie selling, they both loved planning Pinterest-inspired celebrations. In August, the pair launched WHIM OF WHIMSY, a party planning and decor rental company that takes some of the pressure off throwing a birthday bash, Halloween shindig or baby shower. The business rents out conventional items like glassware, banners and cake stands, in addition to specialty décor like a ship’s steering wheel for a pirate party or sparkly blue deer figurines for a forest-themed fête. They also offer services like filling jelly-bean jars, personalized shopping and party design. Howard and Ward offer a free 15-minute phone consultation to prospective customers, followed by a fee structure based on services and products. The pair’s aim, they say, is to help turn their customers’ party dreams into reality. —BS

Rad Dads

The WOW Factor

PARENTING

11


CHECKUP WI T H D R. RI CH A RD H U B B ELL • IN T ER VIEW C O M PIL ED AN D C O N DEN S ED B Y K EN PIC AR D

What Can Parents Do About Kids’ Persistent Nosebleeds? N

osebleeds are a messy part of childhood. They can be a frightening experience for children, especially the first time, but usually they’re nothing more than a minor nuisance that stains kids’ sheets and clothing. But what if nosebleeds happen frequently? Dr. Richard Hubbell, a pediatric otolaryngologist — or ear, nose and throat specialist — at the University of Vermont Medical Center, offers reassurance and advice for stanching the flow. KIDS VT: What are some of the most common causes of kids’ nosebleeds? RICHARD HUBBELL: It’s certainly seasonally related, and worse in the wintertime and during allergy seasons. The air in your house is so dry; it’s like a desert. So the lining of your nose dries out and breaks a blood vessel. The vessels in the nose are very close to the surface. Nosebleeds tend to be more common in children than adults because they have thinner mucus membranes.

Nosebleeds tend to be more common in children than adults because they have thinner mucus membranes. DR. RICHARD HUBBELL

forward for five to 10 minutes. If you tip it backward, the blood is going to run down the back of their throat. To prevent re-bleeding, don’t pick or blow the nose, and don’t stuff anything into the nostrils. If the bleeding continues after 10 minutes, pinch

both nostrils with the thumb and forefingers for another 10 minutes. If the bleeding continues, go to the emergency room. KVT: Can parents help prevent kids’ nosebleeds? RH: The simple things are, keep the nose nice and moist with saline nasal sprays. I also recommend using ointment, such as Bacitracin, Neosporin antibiotic ointment or Vaseline. Apply it with a cotton swab or your finger and then spread it around the inside of the nostrils. In winter, be sure that kids drink plenty of fluids and use a humidifier in their bedroom at night. KVT: At what point should parents seek medical help? RH: It’s completely individualized. I’d start with the child’s primary care physician. They can take care of most of these problems. KVT: What can you do to correct the problem? RH: From my standpoint, I can look in there and see if there are any blood vessels that can be cauterized [sealed off by burning or freezing]. Of course, that’s entirely age dependent. If they’re little, often we can’t

do that in the office. So we have to figure out how often they’re having nosebleeds, how long they last, how much it is affecting the family’s daily activities, and then we decide what to do. Occasionally I take them to the operating room to cauterize the vessels. In those cases, the child has to be sedated. KVT: Can nosebleeds be an early indicator of underlying health problems? RH: I take a good medical history to see if there’s any family history of bleeding disorders just to rule those out. For example, does the child have any other problems such as easy bruising? Only then do we decide to order some blood work just to make sure their clotting functions are OK. KVT: Are there any other reasons why kids might be getting frequent nosebleeds? RH: You can certainly have some benign tumors, but those would be very rare. We worry more about those things in teenagers, especially male teenagers. With young kids, this is standard stuff and nothing for parents to worry about. Most kids outgrow this problem. K

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KVT: About what percentage of kids suffer from regular nosebleeds? RH: I’d bet a good 5 percent of the population.

KVT: What should the first response be when a nosebleed occurs? RH: The child should sit up and apply pressure on the lower half of the nose, below the nasal bones. If you squeeze on the nasal bones, you’ll squeeze until you’re blue in the face. Nine out of 10 nosebleeds come from the lining on the inside of the front of the nose, so just like any bleeding, pressure is the way to go. Tip the child’s head

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2017

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PARENT PORTRAIT P H OTO BY S A M S I M ON • I N T ER VIEW B Y ER IN N S IM O N

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Amy, Zoe & Cooper What is it like parenting two teenagers?

Amy: I feel so thankful that I have two kids because I feel like one relationship will often buoy me up when the other one is feeling challenging.

Want to be featured in an upcoming Parent Portrait? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

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Amy: Art galleries! We like to go to Shelburne Museum together. Cooper and his dad go fast, and Zoe and I go slowly, but we’re together! Cooper: Yeah, we’re usually done way before you! Amy: We do pretty well when we all get out in the woods. Getting there can be a battle, but once we’re there, it’s good. Zoe: Yeah, it can definitely be a battle. Cooper: See! They always agree!

Amy Cudney, 50, K-4 school library teacher at Milton Elementary School, with son Cooper, 13, and daughter Zoe, 15

SEPTEMBER 2017

What is something you like to do all together?

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COURTESY OF BROOKE BOUSQUET

FIT FAMILIES BY S A RA H GA L BRA I T H

Trails for Two Wheels Five top spots for kid-friendly mountain biking

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ith crisp mornings and sunny afternoons, fall days are perfect for mountain biking. It’s a great way to enjoy the vibrant foliage this time of year. And, thanks to Vermont’s world-class trail network with plenty of excellent beginner rides, it’s an activity both kids and adults can enjoy. So grab your helmets, pack up the bikes and head out to these five locations, chosen with the whole family in mind. 1. Pine Hill Park, Rutland This wonderful 16-mile multiuse trail network sits on 300 acres in the northwest corner of Rutland City.

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

RIDE RIGHT

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• Before you head out, check trail status and conditions on the trail club’s website. Be good stewards by holding off on riding when the ground is wet or when trails are closed, such as after a significant rain event. Trail systems close for the season in late fall. • Mountain bike trails are marked for difficulty with the same system as ski trails: green circle for beginners, blue square for intermediate riders, and black and doubleblack diamonds for advanced riders. • Twenty-eight local chapters of the Vermont Mountain Bike Association build and maintain these trails. Consider supporting their work by joining VMBA at vmba.org/2017-2018membership. Members not only get the pleasure of knowing their dollars go to increased trail access, but they also enjoy a long list of benefits like deals at bike shops, restaurants and ski resorts.

The spot is easily accessible, but has the feel of remote woodland and includes several tranquil streams and the shores of peaceful Rocky Pond. The trails are host to kids’ groups and summer camps, and some of them were even built by local school groups. The trails were designed in a stacked loop system so that the beginner trails are closest to the parking lot and the intermediate trails take riders up bigger climbs and over longer distances (although some advanced trails are closer to the parking lot, affording quick and easy access). Mountain bikers, runners, dog walkers and hikers use these trails, so bikers should ride slowly when approaching others and yield to other users. The trails are well marked using a numbering system. Maps are available at the park and on the Rutland Recreation and Parks Department website (rutlandrec. com/pine-hill-park) 2. Blueberry Lake, Warren These fun trails swoop and turn over gentle features, like berms and rollers. The trails were built with kids, families and beginners in mind, but are designed to be fun for advanced riders as well. Tootsie Roll is a great warm up and is short enough to take several laps — try riding it in both directions! Lenord’s Loop is a longer ride that takes riders to the top of the ridge and back down, with the option of a winding side loop near the top of the ridge named Flying Squirrel. Signage is excellent and maps are available from Mad River Riders (madriverriders.com). Pack your swimsuits and towels, too; on a warm day, enjoy a post-ride swim in pristine Blueberry Lake, with the beautiful Green Mountain National Forest as your backdrop. 3. Kingdom Trails, East Burke This is perhaps the best network in the state for families to ride because the trails can accommodate all ability levels. With over 60,000

Noah Bousquet at Saxon Hill

mountain-biker visits each year, it’s the mecca for riding on the East Coast. A day pass is required: Adults are $15, kids 8-16 are $7, and kids 7 and under are free (riders 70 and older are free as well!). The Welcome Center, located behind the Northeast Kingdom Country Store in East Burke Village, is the place to start. The staff will set you up with passes, maps and recommended routes. More information is available online, including a web page about riding with kids: kingdomtrails.org/trails/familybeginner-trails. The Country Store is an excellent place to grab a post-ride sandwich. Save room for dessert at the ice cream stand across the street. 4. Saxon Hill, Essex These trails have a smooth flow, with Extendo and Lower Flo being the best options for beginners and young riders. Extendo is a loop that makes a great warm-up, with a tiny bit of climbing and fun berm turns. The

sandy trail makes for a soft landing for any falls. Lower Flo is a great place to introduce kids to features like bridges, rocks and roots. There is a trail map on the kiosk at the trailhead (pro tip: take a photo of it with your phone to use during your ride), or maps can be accessed online by purchasing an annual membership to the Fellowship of the Wheel (fotwheel.org) 5. Sunny Hollow, Colchester Located behind Costco, this trail network is extremely popular and easily accessible for Chittenden County families who don’t want to spend a lot of time driving to a trailhead. The upper loop, known as Blueberry Loop, is relatively flat and smooth with far fewer rocks and roots than other trails, making this a great option for kids and new riders. As with Saxon Hill, there is a map on the kiosk at the trailhead, or find one online with an annual FOTW membership. K


School Year Food Prep I

n the summer, my family gets pretty lax about cooking. From wanting to avoid the stove on hot days to the many opportunites to eat locally sourced tacos and burgers al fresco, there are plenty of reasons to skip home-cooked meals. When the school year begins, it’s hard to hop back into the kitchen. Early morning breakfasts, packed lunches and quick weekday dinners can feel like insurmountable challenges. So my interest was piqued when a press release for The School Year Survival Cookbook, coming out this month from Random House imprint Appetite, landed in my inbox. The book’s subhead — Healthy Recipes and Sanity-Saving Strategies for Every Family and Every Meal (Even Snacks) — described exactly what I needed. The guide, written in a relatable, humorous style by Toronto-based journalists/moms Laura Keogh and Ceri Marsh, is a collection of recipes peppered with tips for managing meals, like setting up an efficient pantry and repurposing dinner leftovers. I liked how the recipes were broken down into four digestible categories: breakfast, lunch, dinner, and snacks and treats. But as I thumbed through the book, highlighter in hand, anxiety

ALISON NOVAK

THE ART OF BY A LIS ON N OVA K

Back to School

Broccoli and cheese patties

And the book inspired me to try new recipes, with my 10-year-old daughter, Mira, as my sous-chef. We made four items — chocolate avocado chia pudding, broccoli and cheese patties, Hawaiian pizza muffins, and lemon ricotta cookies — over the course of a couple of days. With the exception of the pudding (I liked it, but Mira had a hard time with the color and texture),

the recipes were big hits. They also pushed us to try new ingredients, like spelt flour, and interesting combinations, like pineapple, basil and ham. More importantly, laughing, chatting and cooking with Mira was a much-needed reminder that meal prep can be more than just getting food on the table or in the lunchbox. Sometimes, it’s actually fun. 

TOP TAKEAWAYS

KIDS VT

• Embrace leftovers. The dinner recipes were all created with the idea that they’d be good in a kid’s lunchbox the following day. Keogh and Marsh also share recipes they call “Transformers,” which can be turned into different meals later in the week (e.g., spicy beef becomes tacos, enchiladas or stuffed peppers). They also suggest incorporating leftover proteins and veggies into frittatas, grain bowls, quesadillas and savory bread pudding for quick and healthy meals.

SEPTEMBER 2017

• Plan ahead. The authors recommend sketching out a meal plan for the week (guidance is provided, if you’re a meal-planning novice like me), setting aside two hours a week for meal prep, and cooking and refrigerating or freezing two to three of those recipes before the week begins. • Get creative. I often feel like I’m always making the same thing for my kids (cheese sandwich, I’m looking at you). Clever ideas, like serving yogurt-fruit popsicles for breakfast or turning pizza ingredients into packable muffins, got me thinking about presenting food in different ways to make it more appealing.

KIDSVT.COM

crept in when I read about labeling glass containers of dry goods with waterproof labels. What are waterproof labels? And where do I get them? I thought, my grip on the pen tightening. Flipping through the recipes, I felt a bit skeptical. Salmon with a basil and sun-dried tomato crust? My kids don’t like fish! At that point, I slowly backed away from the book to regroup. A couple of days later, I returned with a different mindset: Some things wouldn’t work for my family, but I’d look for ones that might. The first thing I did was tackle my pantry. Keogh and Marsh recommend doing a thorough cleanout of cabinets, fridge and freezer before the school year gets under way. They instruct readers to take everything out, wipe down surfaces with soapy water, and get rid of items that fit into three categories: 1) Things you don’t use regularly. 2) Things older than a year. 3) Things you don’t recognize. I found plenty of goods to ditch, from ancient sunflower butter and quinoa to a case of single-serve microwave lentils from Costco. As much as I dreaded it, the pantry purge was liberating — and only took a few hours. With my improved attitude, I discovered more practical ideas I look forward to using (see sidebar).

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MEALTIME B Y A S T RI D H E D B OR L A GUE

PHOTOS: ANDY BRUMBAUGH

Czech Fruit Dumplings

DUMPLINGS (MAKES ABOUT 16): • 4 1/2 teaspoons active dry yeast • 1/4 teaspoon plus 1/4 cup sugar • 1/4 cup lukewarm water • 1/4 cup roomtemperature milk • 1/2 teaspoon vanilla • 1/2 teaspoon lemon zest • 1/2 teaspoon salt • 1 egg

KIDS VT

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A sweet Eastern European treat

y husband and I originally planned to go to Scotland for our honeymoon, but our timing was off. The mad cow epidemic had been sweeping the British Isles, so the prospect of staying on a few farms during our visit seemed unwise. We decided to go with our second choice — Prague. Before going, I discovered that most of the cuisine in the Czech Republic involves variations on the meat-and-potato theme, usually with some sort of dumpling as an accompaniment. Bread dumplings, potato dumplings, flour dumplings ... the Czech palate is fond of this carb-heavy side dish. According to my guidebooks, a not-to-be-missed variety was the fruit dumpling. I looked for a restaurant near our B&B that served the treat, and was pleased to find one near the Astronomical Clock in Old Town Square. Turns out the sweet delicacy was worth the search. I made sure to buy an English-language cookbook that included a recipe for fruit dumplings before we left. It’s been 16 years since our trip, but reading through my travel journal brought me back to the cobblestone streets of Prague, and I wanted to cook everything. Most of all, I wanted to make fruit dumplings. The traditional filling for this dish is a whole pitted plum. I decided on

DIRECTIONS a slightly different take by using a variety of local plums, in addition to plumcots and apriums (plum/apricot hybrids). For a Vermont twist, I also stuffed some with tart apples and toasted pecans.

The dumplings that we had in Prague were finished with a hard Czech cream cheese called tvaroh, which grates much like Parmesan but has a very mild flavor. I have not been able to locate it stateside, so I served ours with a dollop of plain Greek yogurt, which has a similar flavor. These dumplings are not going to win any beauty contests, but the pillowy dough around the sweet, tart fruit is delightful, especially when finished with a generous brush of melted butter, a sprinkle of confectioner’s sugar and a dusting of cinnamon. K

1. Mix together the yeast with the 1/4 teaspoon of sugar and water, and allow to “bloom” for about 5 minutes, or until the yeast mixture is nice and bubbly. 2. Transfer to a bowl or stand mixer and stir in the milk, vanilla, lemon zest, 1/4 cup sugar, salt, egg and flour. Knead, either by hand or with the dough attachment on your mixer, for several minutes, or until a nice, pliable dough forms. If it’s too sticky, add a little flour. If it is too dry and not readily forming a ball, add a little more water. Cover with a clean dishtowel and allow to rise for about 30 minutes. 3. While you wait, peel, core and coarsely chop the fruit into bite-size pieces. 4. When the dough is finished rising, punch it down and separate into two equal pieces. Roll out each piece into a thin rectangle, about 15” x 9”. You want the dough thin, but not so thin that it will tear. 5. Before you start filling the dumplings, bring a pot of about 6 quarts of water to a boil.

• 2 cups flour • approximately 8 assorted fruit (plums, apricots, or tart apples like Granny Smith or Gala) • 3 tablespoons chopped toasted pecans (optional, for apple filling)

GARNISH: • 3 tablespoons salted butter, melted • confectioner’s sugar • cinnamon • plain Greek yogurt 6. Cut each rectangle of dough into about 8 squares of approximately equal size. Place a little fruit on the center of each rectangle and, using wet fingers, pinch together the edges so the dough forms a ball around the fruit. Repeat for remaining dough and fruit. If you are using apples, add a few chopped pecans to the filling if desired. 7. Begin poaching the first batch of dumplings while you make the second half from the remaining rectangle of dough. To poach, carefully place dumplings in boiling water and reduce heat to medium. Simmer for 6 minutes, then carefully flip with a spoon, and continue cooking for another 6 minutes. 8. Gently remove the dumplings from the water with a slotted spoon, drain well and carefully poke a hole in each one to release trapped steam. Set aside on a plate, and brush with melted butter, then dust with confectioner’s sugar and cinnamon. 9. Serve warm, with a dollop of plain Greek yogurt if desired.


BOOKWORMS BY BRE TT S TA N CI U

Natural Connection W

hen I was homeschooling my daughters five years ago, I would have loved a copy of Amy Clapp’s nature guide, Naturally Literate Vermont. This slim book, geared to kids in kindergarten through sixth grade, features checklists of the most common Vermont species of mammals, reptiles, trees, flowers and more. The book’s premise is simple: If kids learn to identify all the items on the checklist, they’ll know the most common plants and animals in Vermont. Amy Clapp

Kids VT: Why did you create this book? AMY CLAPP: A few years ago, when I first got into birding, I went on a trip to Costa Rica. I don’t know how much you know about birders, but they’re really hard core, and every night we sat down and went over checklists of birds. I was truly a beginner, and I was among good birders who knew so much more than I did. But every night I was able to check off a few more birds because I had to pause and think about where I had seen birds. By the end of the week, I began to know what I was doing. I had a big Aha! moment when I realized the importance of that checklist. I had that insight again when I was traveling in Colorado with my family, and my 7-year-old son wanted to write down everything. He was “collecting,” he said, and while he was collecting, he was also learning a lot.

my way of combating all the negative things going on in our country right now. The next generation really will inherit the world, and this is where I have power to make a positive change and get children ready for that inheritance. If kids learn the names of the things around them, they’ll come to know who and what those things are. In that process, they’ll connect with what’s living and growing outside their doors, like beavers and marsh marigolds. And when kids connect with their world, they’re much more likely to make positive choices — everything from turning off the lights to caring for the world we live in.

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Bring Learning Home This Year! Discover heart-centered learning with Oak Meadow's quality, adaptable homeschooling curriculum for K-12, or enroll in our accredited distance school with one-to-one teacher support. • Start anytime and work at your own pace. • Engage with comprehensive print curriculum that supports student interests. • Earn an Oak Meadow diploma or take individual courses for enrichment or credit recovery.

KVT: How would you describe your teaching philosophy? AC: I’m a place-based educator. We forget that for kids finding a grasshopper in the field can be just as thrilling as seeing an elephant in the zoo. That grasshopper is the thing connecting them to their world.  Naturally Literate Vermont costs $10 and is available at Phoenix Books in Rutland, the Vermont Book Shop in Middlebury, and the gift shop at the ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain. Educators and schools should contact Clapp directly at naturallyliterate@gmail.com for a discounted rate of $2 per copy.

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KVT: I’m sensing your book has a naturalist bent, but also a social and educational one. AC: In a corny sort of way, this is

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KVT: Did you create these lists yourself? AC: Oh, no. I couldn’t have done it by myself. I knew enough naturalists to ask specific people for the 10 to 20 reptiles and amphibians every sixth grader should know, and then flowers, insects and so on. I chose particular people who had special knowledge in each area. Then I cross-referenced the answers to come up with the final list. Beside each photograph are eight checkboxes. The idea is that once kids have seen, for example, a trout lily eight times, kids will know that flower. The checklist gets kids to look thoughtfully at things they might have passed by many times but haven’t examined all that well. Kids can identify many corporate symbols but how many things in their own backyards do they know?

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A science teacher at Salisbury Community School and mother of three, Clapp says the book is intended to engage kids with the natural world. Photographs accompany each item on the checklist, and a convenient space for note-taking follows each section. Clapp’s friend, Nini Crane, contributed attractive and scientifically accurate watercolors to the durable front and back covers. Over the past two years, Otter Creek Audubon has provided copies of Clapp’s guide to Salisbury students through educational grant funds. Recently, Clapp revised the guide and secured money through GoFundMe to offer copies to schools at a reduced cost. This school year, she’s hoping to get it into the hands of as many curious young Vermonters as possible. We called Clapp at her home in Hubbardton to talk to her about her inspiration for the guide, and what she hopes kids will learn from it.

Back to School

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ONES TO WATCH BY S A D I E WI L L I A M S

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n early September, Burlington hosts the South End Art Hop. The lively three-day celebration of the arts includes exhibits, activities and events. But for a cohort of fashion-oriented creatives, the STRUT Fashion Show is the focus. This year, the 13th annual STRUT takes place on Saturday, September 9, and features more than 100 models sporting creations by 13 designers. According to STRUT organizer Gina Tron, 60 percent of them are students from area high schools, including designers Campbell Whalen, Zoe Crane and Megan Mahoney. The rising

seniors — Whalen and Mahoney from Champlain Valley Union High School, and Crane from Burlington High School — have participated in STRUT for several years. Tron believes that young designers gravitate toward the show for a few reasons. One is the satisfaction of working with their hands. “We are so tech-based these days, especially the younger generation,” Tron said. “Getting involved in a real-world craft makes you a more well-rounded person. Plus it’s just fun.” The work of preparing for the show gives young designers a glimpse into COURTESY OF ZOE CRANE

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

COURTESY OF ZOE CRANE

STEPHEN MEASE

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sewing machine. I also learned a lot about fashion and sewing from the Davis Studio summer fashion camps that I did for years. I now work at the same camp. MEGAN MAHONEY: In 2013 I made a collection of duct-tape dresses. That was the first year I designed for STRUT. When I was younger, I would hand-sew clothes for my dolls, but I only got a sewing machine after my first year of STRUT. I learned to sew from my mom and grandma, but also Teresa Davis’ sewing camps. Anything else I just figured out through trial and error. ZOE CRANE: I started drawing outfits in fifth grade and then started to teach myself how to sew clothes from YouTube. I learned how to use the sewing machine when I lived in Switzerland in fourth grade, at public school.

Kids VT: When did you start making clothes? CAMPBELL WHALEN: I started after seeing my neighbor design for STRUT five or six years ago. She taught me to sew after I begged for a

Sketches from Crane’s STRUT 2017 collection

Zoe Crane (third from left) with models wearing her designs in STRUT 2016

what a fashion-industry job might be like. “Particularly with teens that plan to go to college,” Tron explained, “they can use this opportunity as a way to learn if it’s the right future career for them.” The experience helped Whalen and Mahoney define designing as a hobby. Crane said she’s in it for the long haul, and plans to apply to art schools this fall. All three teens agreed that STRUT’s tight-knit community and fun atmosphere keep them coming back. Kids VT recently caught up with the designers to learn more about their work and inspiration.

A detail from Crane’s STRUT 2017 collection

KVT: What inspires you? CW: This year my line was inspired by my work as a Girls on the Run coach. I found their message about confidence and strength to be really inspiring for young girls, so I decided to design my line for 8- to 13-year-old girls. The line hits on feminism and self-acceptance. MM: My collections have been sort of all over the place, however every year I try to have something different. In 2014, Campbell and I designed dresses out of white T-shirts. In 2015, [it was] 1920s-inspired dresses, [and in] 2016, bathing suits. This year I’m designing an all-red line, which is powerful and more mature. ZC: For this STRUT, I was inspired by my artwork when I was little because I’m interested in the way that young

STEPHEN MEASE

STRUT’s Teenage Designers

Megan Mahoney (center) with models from STRUT 2016


STEPHEN MEASE

Campbell Whalen (third from left) at last year’s STRUT

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Painted jacket and dress by Campbell Whalen for STRUT 2017

children view things and I wanted to explore this perspective. Maison Margiela is a [design house] that gave me inspiration for this line, especially the faces on [its] garments. 

COURTESY OF ZOE CRANE

WE’RE HERE FOR YOU, EVERY STEP OF THE WAY.

If you’re a family of four with a household income up to $3793/month, or your child is covered by Dr. Dynasaur then WIC is for you. Income guidelines vary based on family size.

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Maison Margiela-inspired details from Crane’s STRUT 2017 collection

Sign up for WIC today! Call 8OO-649-4357 or visit healthvermont.gov/wic

SEPTEMBER 2017

WIC provides healthy food, nutrition education, and personalized support to pregnant women, moms and their babies, and kids up to five years old. Come meet with our nutritionists and peer counselors – they’re ready to listen and share information.

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Get the full South End Art Hop schedule, including Kids Hop activities, at seaba.com/ art-hop.

“One to Watch” shines a light on a young Vermonter who is going places. Know a local child or teen who’s recently done something amazing? Nominate him or her at kidsvt.com/onetowatch.

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It's a bird, it's a plane it's....

One to Watch Do you know a local kid (age 17 or under) who's recently done something amazing? Won a spelling bee? Written an opera? Raised a bunch of money for a great cause? Tell us more! He or she could be featured as One to Watch in an upcoming issue of Kids VT. Visit Kidsvt.com to tell us about this local superhero.

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Core Academics • STEM • Global Studies • Digital Literacy • Art • Music Spanish • PE • Project based learning• Individual Learning Goals

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Back to School

PHOTOS: JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

HABITAT BY A LISON N OVA K

School Garden & Chicken Coop I

the school, where they’re sold to families during the summer months and incorporated into cafeteria meals during the school year. The school’s food scraps are used to feed the chickens, completing the cycle. Working in the chicken coop not only instills a sense of responsibility in kids, Dubois said, but it teaches them about where food comes from and connects them to Vermont’s agricultural roots. When kids return to school in the coming weeks, they’ll be back in the coop and the garden with their teachers. Curtis proudly described their annual event held in September, during the school’s pre-K through 4 open house. A spaghetti dinner for families incorporates tomatoes, garlic and basil harvested from the garden, and the gym holds a farmers market where their produce is sold alongside items from local farmers and artisans. Money raised is used to purchase compost, soil, mulch, seeds and supplies. And another school year in the garden begins.  “Habitat” celebrates places where Vermont families live and play. Got a sweet space you’d like us to see? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

THE GARDEN’S GOODS

Rowan Moran, 8, and mom, Karen, harvest vegetables

• Around 30 raised beds are surrounded by a fence to keep out critters. • Crops include lettuce, tomato, garlic, herbs, kale, pumpkins, beans, carrots and flowers. • A vine-covered pergola and picnic tables function as an outdoor classroom.

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THE SCOOP ON THE COOP

Twins Jordan and Taylor Parker-Martin, 10, feed the chickens

KIDS VT

• The 10-by-10-foot coop includes a larger section that houses eight chickens. • A smaller area stores chicken feed, plus muck boots and smocks for kid helpers. • A 10-by-12-foot covered chicken run is attached.

SEPTEMBER 2017

t takes a village to grow a garden. That’s one lesson to be gleaned from Barre Town Middle and Elementary School, where teachers, staff, students and volunteers work together to nurture a collection of raised beds throughout the year. The project, called Crops by Kids, was established in the spring of 2005 as part of the school’s efforts to teach kids about healthy food choices. Deborah Curtis, a University of Vermont Extension Master Gardener, is the school’s part-time garden coordinator. She runs an after-school garden club for students in the fall and spring, in addition to a weekly summer program for families that incorporates literacy and gardening. In the winter, she organizes a seedselling fundraiser and, as the weather gets warmer, heads into the garden with kids and teachers to weed, haul compost and mulch. Throughout the spring, students in grades pre-K through 4 use some of their physical education class time to plant seeds and work in the garden. There’s also a pergola, where sixth-grade teacher Jess Van Orman said she occasionally brings her students to read and write. Before school gets out in June, families sign up to tend the raised beds during the summer, when the space functions as a “community garden,” said Curtis. Families are free to bring home produce that’s ready to harvest. The school’s chicken coop is also a year-round endeavor. Teacher Kyle Dubois designed and built the structure three summers ago, after brainstorming with his third-grade class. On weekdays during the school year, classes take turns replenishing the chickens’ food and water and collecting eggs. During summer and on weekends, families sign up for coop duty on a website Dubois created, complete with a Google calendar and informational chicken-care videos. Kids bring the eggs they’ve collected into

21


AT PLAY IT AGAIN SPORTS we know kids and how to outfit them for sports. We have been buying and selling new and used kids sports equipment FOR THE PAST 24 YEARS.

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

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22

Youth TENNIS Club

HAVE YOUR KIDS OUTGROWN THEIR GEAR OR WANT TO TRY A NEW SPORT?

Session 1: Tennis Basics & Match Play

We have everything you need for soccer, field hockey, football and hockey

Mon. & Wed. || Sept. 11-Oct. 18 || 3:30-5:00pm 6th-9th Grade Middlebury Rec Park Outdoor Tennis Courts For more information regarding this opportunity or other programs, please visit www.acafvt.org From beginners to advance tennis players, this club focuses on learning the basics of tennis and match play skills. All equipment, afternoon snacks, and transportation can be provided. Youth Tennis Club is taught by instructors and volunteers from the Addison Community Athletics Foundation (ACAF) and is a collaborative program between ACAF, Addison Central Teens (ACT), and our local high school tennis players.

150 Dorset St. So. Burlington, VT 05403 802-865-3021 • playitagainsportssoburlington.com Open 7 days a week k2v-PlayItAgainSports0917.indd 1

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JUST FOR KIDS

Writing Contest & Winners, p. 24 Coloring Contest Winners, p. 24 Coloring Contest, p. 25 Puzzle Page, p. 26 Birthday Club, p. 26 Puzzle Answers, p. 47

Silly School Bus Danielle was all ready to get back to school, but when the bus arrived, she noticed that something was odd. Actually, she noticed 17 things that were really, really odd! Can you help her find all the things that are wrong with the bus, so that she can get to school on time?

KIDSVT.COM SEPTEMBER 2017 KIDS VT

23


COLORING CONTEST WINNERS

JUST FOR KIDS

Writing Contest

SPONSORED BY

In honor of our Back to School Issue, write a poem or paragraph about the best teacher you’ve ever had. What is his or her name? What makes this person special? What is the most fun or interesting thing you’ve done with him or her? Attach an extra piece of paper if you need more space to write.

Summer sure is sweet! This month’s competitors sent us dozens of colorful bears roasting marshmallows over a campfire. Twelve-year-old Mackenzie gave her teddy the tie-dye treatment, topping off her entry with a golden crescent moon. Rylee, 6, embellished her masterpiece with shining silver bear eyes and a sparkling red fire. Fiveyear-old Max’s cute creature sports a button-up vest with lime-green pockets and a brilliant red, blue, orange and yellow blaze. Enjoy the start of a brand-new school year, kids, and be sure to send us your awesome artwork in September.

HONORABLE MENTIONS SLEEPOVER UNDER THE STARS

Juliana Van Zyl, 8, Addison

The winners of annual family memberships to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium are…

“Solar Eclipse Marshmallows” Finn Nunery, 4

5& under

HYDE PARK

HAPPY CAMPER

Jenny Blanshine, 9, Charlotte SMOKEY THE BEAR

Hayden Smith, 11, Berlin M IS FOR MARSHMALLOW

Jupiter May, 4, Montpelier RAINBOW RAMBO

Livia Renzalli, 10, Jericho CAMPING CUB

Jordan Zucker, 7, Burlington We’ll pick two winners and publish their names and poems in the next issue. Winners receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop. Deadline to enter is September 15.

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

Send your entries to: Kids VT, attn: Writing Contest, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

24

Name ________________________________ Age __________________________________ Town ________________________________ Email ________________________________ Phone ________________________________

GRAPES GALORE

Rose Dudley, 9, Rutland RAINBOW BABY

Sophia Bandy, 7, Cambridge MAGIC ’MALLOW ROASTING

Julia Hill, 5, Moretown

“Watermelon Land” Whitney Butnor, 8

6 to 8

CHARLOTTE

MR. MUSTACHE

WRITING WINNERS

Broderick Deeley, 7, Hinesburg

In last month’s issue, we asked kids to write a poem or paragraph about their favorite sweet treat in the summertime. Below, find the winning entries. Eden and Emily each receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop in Burlington.

Laurelanise Tackett, 5, Montpelier

Eden Leckey, 6 HINESBURG

tongue. Slurp! It is cold on my my teeth. in y nch cru is It Crunch! d. han my Drip! It is sticky on in. bra my rts hu Ouch! It Can you guess? treat — It is my favorite sweet erry twist pb ras A maple and black inkles! spr ow nb rai th wi creemee

RAINBOW BRIGHT

Emily Bandy, 9 CAMBRIDGE

Ice cream, frozen foods smooth as a nickel, None is as good as a chocolate fudgsicle! Sometimes, I want to go and nick a fudgsicle so I can give it a lick! And now, like that, like a candle with no wick, too late, it’s gone and you’re left with the stick.

BLUE BEARY

Madeline Kolb, 3, Charlotte

TOP TITLES “S’MORE, PLEASE”

Catherine St. Marthe, 4, Essex Junction “I LIKE THEM A LITTLE BIT BURNT”

Kayden Deschamps, 8, Georgia “A STARRY NIGHT WITH FUZZY WUZZY”

Mark Manchester, 11, Hardwick

“S’mores in Space” Gretchen Diem, 9 ESSEX JUNCTION

9 to 12


Coloring Contest! Three winners will each receive an annual family membership to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium. Send Kids VT your work of art by September 15. Be sure to include the info at right with your submission. Winners will be chosen in the following categories: (1) ages 5 and younger, (2) ages 6-8 and (3) ages 9-12. Winners will be named in the October issue of Kids VT. Send your high-resolution scans to art@kidsvt.com or mail a copy to Kids VT, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

Title _______________________________________ Sponsored by

Artist _____________________________________ Age ______________ Town _________________ Email _____________________________________ Phone _____________________________________

KIDSVT.COM SEPTEMBER 2017 KIDS VT

25


Birthday Club

JUST FOR KIDS

Jumble

BY DAVID L. HOYT & JEFF KNUREK

The letters of these crazy words are all mixed up. To play the game, put them back into the right order so that they make real words you can find in your dictionary. Write the letters of each real word under each crazy word, but only one letter to a square.

d ELI lives in Charlotte an He’s a 9. er mb pte Se on 5 turns art he ge spirited kid with a hu o wh n tio and wild imagina . The loves to run everywhere joys en r ne rte rga de rising kin up, sssoccer, superhero dre d an es rri hiking, picking be . playing poker rty Eli wins a birthday-pa . ge packa

You are now ready to solve this month’s Jumble For Kids. Study the picture for a hint. Then play around with the letters in the circles. You’ll find you can put them in order so that they make your funny answer.

LAYLA lives in Middlesex and turns 4 on September 7. She loves to swing, dance and play in the sand at the beach. She just learned to swim independently and enjoys being silly and making her family laugh.

Print your answer here:

Puzzles4Kids

BY HELENA HOVANEC

MEGAN lives in Fairfax and turns 6 on September 8. She loves to swim, watch movies and play with her brother, Teddy, and dog, Snoopy.

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

Riddle Search — FOOD MADE WITH HONEY

26

Look up, down and diagonally, both forward and backward, to find every word on the list. Circle each one as you find it. When all the words are circled, take the UNUSED letters and write them on the blanks below. Go from left to right and top to bottom to find the answer to this riddle: What do bumblebees get when they put honey under their pillows? BAKED APPLE BAKED BEANS CAKE FLAN FUDGE GRANOLA JAM MOUSSE MUFFIN

PARFAIT PECAN PIE POWER BAR PUDDING SAUCE SMOOTHIES TART YAMS

MIKAYLA lives

Riddle Answer:

ANSWERS P. 47

in Huntington and turns 14 on September 15. She enjoys hanging out with her friends and playing soccer, basketball, softball and track. This summer she received the Sportsmanship Award at Community Sailing Center camp.

Congratulations to these September Birthday Club winners!

Join the Club!

To enter, submit information using the online form at kidsvt.com/birthday-club Just give us your contact info, your children’s names and birth dates, and a photo, and they’re automatically enrolled.

Layla, Megan and Mikayla each win a $20 FunZone 2.0 gift card.


2 017 T A L E N T S H O W F O R

CASTING CALL!

VERMONT’S RISING STARS

Auditions held Saturday, November 11, noon-3 p.m. on the Higher Ground stage. Live show takes place in December. To participate you must try out in front of a panel of judges. Visit kidsvt.com/talentshow to register your act.

SPONSORED BY:


Tricks of the Tray

Back to School

How school food programs nourish students, buy local and try to break even

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

BY KATIE TITTERTON

28

V

ermont is a national leader in the movement to serve kids fresh, nutritious and locally sourced food in K-12 schools. To see how it’s earned that reputation, visit the cafeteria at Milton Middle School at lunchtime. On a hot day last June, food service staff set out options for a colorful fruit and veggie bar, removing lids on containers full of fresh blueberries, orange cantaloupe chunks and slaw made of purple cabbage and carrots. The spread isn’t just appetizing, explained Milton food service director Steve Marinelli — it empowers diners to choose what they like. As a result, they actually eat what they take, and he doesn’t have to deal with kids throwing away whole bananas that have been forced onto their trays. This fruit and veggie bar is one of

Marinelli’s signature achievements. In the six years he’s been at Milton, he’s transformed both the food and how it’s served. Gentle, bearded and bespectacled, he stood behind the cash register and addressed kids by name as he rang up trays of stuffed breadsticks and Caesar salad with homemade dressing. “School lunch is changing for the better,” he said. Before Marinelli arrived in 2011, the district had a “freezer to oven” approach to food prep, he said, which meant lots of packaged and processed food. Now meals are prepared from scratch. Marinelli swapped out long tables for round ones and diner-style booths, and nixed plastic cutlery in favor of silverware. Diners can build their own salads or yogurt parfaits.

percent of students — and only a single staff member — ate cafeteria meals regularly. By contrast, last school year, the district’s food service staff fed more than half of Milton high school students, 70 percent of elementary and middle school students and around 100 staff members regularly. A quick glance around the cafeteria revealed that most kids are indeed eating school meals, and that nearly all of them have something healthy on their trays. Based on a reporter’s informal poll, students’ favorites include burgers, breakfast for lunch, roast turkey with mashed potatoes, General Tso-style chicken and, yes, salad. His customers aren’t the only people who’ve noticed these improvements. In 2013, a blog post Marinelli wrote about the success of his fruit and veggie bars was reposted on the website of Let’s Move!, the child-health campaign led by thenfirst lady Michelle Obama. Marinelli and several students were invited to Washington, D.C., twice, first to plant a garden, then to harvest it and bake flatbread alongside the first lady. During the second trip, thengovernor Peter Shumlin happened to be in Milton signing legislation giving free lunch — rather than a discount — to all Vermont kids under 130 percent of the poverty line. While students shook hands with president Barack Obama, Marinelli recalled, he talked with the first lady. “She was so aware of what was going on within our school,” he said. He mentioned the bill signing, and “she looked right at me and said, ‘I know, Steve, I keep up on you.’” Why isn’t every school district in Vermont more like Milton? Turns out that even in a locavore, agricultural state like Vermont, it still takes a lot of work — and creativity — to change what’s served on school lunch trays.

Marinelli has also made healthy food available all day, so every student — whether well-fed or food insecure — can feel comfortable wandering in to the kitchen for a slice of leftover pizza or piece of fruit when they are hungry. And thanks in part to both national and state Farm to School grants, Milton students now learn about food and where it comes from through school gardens, field trips and nutrition-based lessons integrated into the curriculum. And that makes them more eager to cook — Marinelli estimates 70 percent have prepared food in the school kitchen themselves. Milton has sent multiple contenders to the Jr. Iron Chef VT competitions. All of these changes are bringing more people to the table. In 2011, before Marinelli arrived, just 27

Funding school food

It’s widely known that kids do better in school when they have access to nutritious food. “There’s greater academic success when students are well fed,” stated Burlington School Food Project director Doug Davis.


It’s the only place in our schools where kids are categorized by their parents’ income and treated differently.

TRICKS OF THE TRAY, P. 30 »

KIDS VT

Mexico banned the practice in April, the USDA announced it would begin requiring school districts to have written meal-charge policies. “There’s no rule about this, either at the state or federal level,” said Horton. “Every district is writing their own policy.” In June, Vermont’s Agency of Education released a memo with the USDA’s new requirements, which went into effect July 1. Districts must communicate their meal-charge policies to families at the beginning of the school year. In addition, the memo says, debts too difficult to collect must be written off as operating losses and may not be covered by the food service account, but by finding money “which may come from the district’s general fund, special funding from the state or other local sources, or any other non-Federal sources.” In other words, it’s up to each school district, and by extension the community that agrees to its budget, to figure out how to cover the debts of kids who can’t pay for meals. And while unpaid meal debt is a large factor in budget shortfall, it may not even be the largest. According to Davis, at least 80 percent of Vermont school meal programs finish in the red, because unlike any other school employees, food-service workers’ benefits are paid out of the food-service budget — not the school’s general fund. Horton said school boards and administrations need to demonstrate to the communities they serve how school meals are “critical for fulfilling the mission of the school, and stop seeing them as a separate program that needs to break even.” Davis said he thinks a shift in priorities is in order when he hears people talk about “bailing out” school meals programs. “Often we see childnutrition program investment as one that is done begrudgingly,” he mused. “We need to change the dialogue a little bit.”

SEPTEMBER 2017

income eligible for free meals, but many families who aren’t eligible still struggle to come up with the money to pay for their meals. At the end of the 2016-2017 school year, Milton had $24,000 in unpaid lunch bills. That number has been going up by about 10 percent each year, he said. It’s a symptom of something he calls “hidden hunger.” The two root factors, Marinelli suggested, are student loan debt and opioid addiction. What to do about unpaid cafeteria bills is a significant stressor for school meal programs. Most meal programs in Vermont operate in the red, according to Horton, because government reimbursement rates are lower than the actual costs of food, labor and worker benefits. When unpaid debts cause programs that are expected to run independently to end the year short on funds, schools must spend time and money trying to collect debts, or find a way to make up the difference. “It’s a big problem,” said Alexander. “We’re trying to run a business in the school. There’s the rub: the fact that it’s in a school, and it’s kids, and they don’t have control over getting food any other way. We don’t refuse meals.” Nina Hansen, vice president of operations for the Enosburg Fallsbased Abbey Group, which runs the food service programs at 70 Vermont public and private schools, as well as schools in New York and New Hampshire, said these unpaid bills are a problem in many districts, but none of the schools her company serves would stop a student from eating because of it. “I don’t know one school that would ‘lunch shame,’ or pull trays from kids,” she said. But some schools around the country do. Earlier this year, a burst of national press covered that practice, in which students are publicly implicated when their parents can’t or won’t pay school meal bills, sometimes by throwing away a child’s hot lunch or distributing meal bills in class. When the state of New

KIDSVT.COM

Hungry kids not only Addison Northeast struggle to learn, he and Addison pointed out, but are Northwest school more likely to be districts, put it disruptive in class, this way: “We’re which hampers all trying to fit a kids’ learning. restaurant busiSo if kids’ school ness into a school performance depends education model, on full bellies, why and it doesn’t aren’t universal work.” meals built into our And the public school system? structure of the For starters, meal program isn’t school nutrition the only issue. and academics are Even with free ANORE HORTON, NUTRITION separated institumeals available, INITIATIVES DIRECTOR AT tionally, regulated many eligible HUNGER FREE VERMONT by different federal children still don’t agencies. Meal programs fall under participate and may go hungry. Why? the Department of Agriculture, while Horton suggests the eligibility form everything else school related falls mandated by the USDA is intimidatunder the Department of Education. ing, intrusive and complicated to fill American public schools didn’t out. She also points to parents who start out serving meals. During World don’t apply because of shame, and War II, a third of recruits showed kids — particularly older ones — who up too malnourished to serve. That are signed up but too embarrassed to prompted the creation of the USDAhave their low-income status outed in administered National School Lunch the lunch line. Program in 1946. The agency bought It’s in the school’s best interest to surplus crops from farmers to support make sure all children who qualify subsidized school meals for hungry for free meals apply for them: The children. more children who are eligible for Anore Horton, nutrition initiatives free meals, the higher the reimbursedirector at the nonprofit Hunger Free ments the school receives from the Vermont, explained that the way federal government. That’s one reason the government funds school meal Alexander is proactive about enrolling service has led to the perception that families, trying to make the process it’s “a program for poor kids” that’s as easy as possible. “We tell them it separate from the work of the school. helps us out,” she said of the families The result is that today, unlike they serve. “The more people fill out any other school department, most the application and become eligible, meal programs must create their own the better we do.” revenue. A portion of all school meals If the number of kids who are is publicly subsidized by federal reeligible for free meals is high enough — imbursement, but families still must and if a high percentage of the student contribute, unless they’re financially body meets the criteria for other social eligible for free meals. services — that school may be eligible To Horton, this is the key issue. “It for free universal breakfast and lunch should be universally publicly funded for all students. Throughout Vermont for every kid. We never ask, why are an increasing number of schools math books publicly funded?” she benefit from universal free meals, noted. “But that’s what we do with including small schools in the rural the school meal program. It’s the only counties of the Northeast Kingdom, place in our schools where kids are some schools in Burlington, the entire categorized by their parents’ income Winooski school district and the entire and treated differently.” Southwest Vermont Supervisory Kathy Alexander, Union. food services In Milton, Steve Marinelli said director of the that just under half of students are

29


Tricks of the Tray

50%

CONTINUED FROM P. 29

Keeping lunch local

1

$

spent by Vermont schools in local food adds an additional

60¢ to the local

economy.**

5.6%

of all school food spending goes to local food, or about $1 million a year. **

Vermont families of four making below

45,510

$

annually qualify for free lunch.***

* Goals in the Rozo McLaughlin Farm to School bill signed by Gov. Scott in June 2017 **Source: Vermont Farm to School ***Source: USDA

back into the Vermont economy,” she said. Governor Phil Scott recently committed the state to the goal of buying 50 percent of school food from local and regional sources by 2025. But local food can be expensive. School meal programs must budget each meal for sometimes as little as $1.25, said Rosenbluth. “The advantages are, the farmers who are selling to schools are really committed to kids growing up with Vermont product. It’s a stable market, a wholesale market.” But, she said, distribution — getting food from farm fields to school

plates for a competitive price — is a challenge. The Abbey Group is large enough to be able to buy large quantities of food at competitive prices and distribute it to various schools — and is already sourcing 30 percent of its food regionally, from Vermont and New Hampshire; the percentage goes up to 40, Hansen said, if milk is included. Schools with independent food service programs don’t have the same buying power of this regional network. Enter the Food Service Directors Association. The cooperative procurement group represents 180 Vermont public schools, and

is cochaired by Burlington’s Doug Davis, along with founder Bob Clifford, food service director of Chittenden Central Supervisory Union. Davis explained that 25 years ago, small, rural food programs were overpaying for, or unable to get goods because distributors had no incentive to send delivery trucks to schools with small orders in remote locations. The association solved this problem by putting large Chittenden County food service programs, like Essex and Burlington, on the same contract as small ones. “If you want to serve us, there is no minimum delivery size, no delivery fee, no minimum number of boxes,” said Davis of the bid process. “You serve all of us or you serve none of us.” All of the school food service directors interviewed for this story are members of the association. “It makes us a stronger voice, saying we want more product locally,” explained Steve Marinelli. While the association has been able to leverage more local agriculture in school food, programs that want to go even more local, and purchase directly from small farms in their towns, are free to put out their own bids as well. The association continues to update its model. For specialty products like the Vermont popcorn

The Vermont Cub Project Vermont Teddy Bears are more than fur & stuffing. Everyday we see Bears come to life in the arms of children, and we knew we needed to share this love with our fellow Vermonters. This is why we created The Vermont Cub Project.

Back to School! Lo c at e d i n t h e

KIDS VT

of schools will engage significantly in Farm to School programming. by 2025.*

Jamie Two Coats Toyshop

SEPTEMBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

Vermonters love their local farm-to-table restaurants, so it’s not surprising that the Farm to School movement — whereby schools buy and feature locally produced, farm-fresh foods on their menus — originated in Vermont. In 2006, state lawmakers passed legislation establishing a Farm to School grant program, which helps fund school gardens, teacher professional development, farm field trips, local food taste tests and the integration of nutrition into the curriculum. Since its inception, the program has given more than a million dollars to Vermont schools, and it serves as a model for a national Farm to School grant program. Local farms benefit from these partnerships as well, according to Betsy Rosenbluth, project director of VT FEED (Food Education Every Day), a collaboration between the Northeast Organic Farming Association of Vermont (NOFA-VT) and Shelburne Farms. “We’re talking healthier kids, kids ready to learn and money going

of food will be purchased from local and regional sources by 2025.*

75%

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4-5pm Hula Hoop age 6-9 5-6pm Jazz Intermediate 9+ 6-7pm Ballet 9 plus 7-8:30pm Repetoire ( must take ballet )

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KIDS VT

honestyogastudio@gmail.com | 802-497-0136 More info on the web at www.honestyogacenter.com 150 Dorset Street, S. Burlington (Blue Mall)

SEPTEMBER 2017

Wednesday

KIDSVT.COM

company Yolo like tomatoes that Snacks, Vermont can be purchased Smoke & Cure, cheaply and reliably Vermont Bean from an out-ofCrafters and state grower, but Vermont Village is also grown by applesauce, Davis Vermont farms. It and Clifford work makes sense to buy KATHY ALEXANDER, CHILD a local farm’s more with the company NUTRITION DIRECTOR OF to contract for the ADDISON NORTHEAST AND pricey harvest for a product and get it ADDISON NORTHWEST community dinner SCHOOL DISTRICTS in compliance with and spotlight it on federal regulations. the plate, he said, When that’s complete, any member but not to purchase it from them school can buy that product. wholesale year-round. Really, it’s “Wherever you are, you can open about deciding what to invest in, up your book and get local food Davis said. delivered,” Davis said. “Not too long Hansen, of the Abbey Group, ago, you couldn’t.” pointed out that Winooski has prioritized serving food that’s familiar The beef on budgeting to its many refugee and immigrant Ask Kathy Alexander how to fund students. That means offering local local food in schools, and she goat meat on occasion, and giving reframes the question. “The more students an option of rice with important question is, how do we every meal. fund our programs and figure out The Burlington school district is our financial sustainability?” she now prioritizing protein. The city said. “Once we figure that out, we has just committed to buying and simply budget for local food.” serving only Vermont beef for the Alexander says she can earmark 2017-2018 school year. 15 percent of her budget, or about Decisions like investing in local $45,000 per year, for food from beef address several key issues. nearby Addison county farms. A VT FEED’s Rosenbluth suggested larger portion goes to food that it’s an ethical decision to not buy would, by most standards, still be the so-called “pink slime” ground considered local. “I’m not countbeef from factory farms “that’s ing all the Cabot cheese we buy really cheap, that we’re competing through Reinhart [Foodservice],” against, that doesn’t excite kids or she said, referring to the food help Vermont farmers.” distributor. And educating kids about For Alexander, buying the changes like these help them think products she wants to serve just about food sources and nutrition. takes wise budgeting. For example, “If I was able to help a kid think she spends more cash during twice about their food today, I harvest season when diverse did my job and I’m really happy,” and exciting produce like berries Alexander said. comes out of the fields, and uses For the food service directors, USDA allotment funds on locally it’s all rooted in the desire for kids produced commodity items (think to eat well, so they can learn well. apples) later. “It’s the best people in the world Food service directors need to doing this work,” Davis said. “You be practical about how to budget don’t move into Lunch Lady Land their limited funds, said Davis. for the fame and fortune. It’s a “What people sometimes miss is passion, and a calling.” the vast majority of things schools We’re contributing a ton toward need to purchase are not going to the success of our kids,” he said. be local,” he explained. “Vermont’s “I’ve had so many kids say over the not going to make garbage bags. years, ‘Thank you for the food.’”  We’re not going to grow oranges.” Cathy Resmer contributed reporting He gives the example of an item to this story.

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MATTHEW THORSEN

Sleep

Savior

A local mom uses research to help babies — and parents — rest easy BY GRACE PER LEE

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

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f you have an infant who’s having trouble sleeping, you might have heard of Alexis Dubief. Her website, Precious Little Sleep, gets four million visits annually. On it, she writes about all things related to baby sleep — from white-noise machines to infant reflux to breaking the swing-to-sleep habit. All of her posts are rooted in current sleep and early childhood development research. She’s an internationally renowned sleep expert — a parenting rock star — and she does it all from her home in Essex, Vermont. Dubief, her husband and their two children, now 8 and 10, share an unassuming brick and clapboard house on a well-kept suburban street. When her children were born, like many parents, Dubief struggled to understand their sleep issues. In 2011, she began blogging about her experiences as a way to build community, on a site she originally called Troublesome Tots. Dubief — who earned degrees in technical writing and finance and worked in the tech industry in Silicon Valley — quickly developed a loyal following of sleep-starved parents from around the world. In July, she released her first book, Precious Little Sleep: The Complete Baby Sleep Guide for Modern Parents. As of press time, out of more than 9,000 sleep disorder titles on Amazon, her book was the site’s sixteenth top seller. I recently visited Dubief for a chat about her work in her basement home office.

Kids VT: Is this office where it all began? ALEXIS DUBIEF: No, no. It all started when my kids were little and they were napping upstairs while I was at the kitchen table on a dinky old laptop. The short story was, we had just moved here and got pregnant immediately. So we had a baby. And we had no network. We didn’t know anybody, and had a baby in November: dead of winter. My husband blew out his knee like six months later, so he’s having surgeries, on crutches. Duncan is not sleeping; we have every nursing problem under the sun. We have no friends or family. It was a bad time. And I had read all the books, and we took the baby classes. And then the sh*t hit the fan and I was like, Nothing is going right and, all the books, nothing they’re telling me is working and he’s screaming and not sleeping and everything is a problem. The pediatrician says, “Well, you know, some kids are hard.” And I’m thinking, Why is this so hard? Why do I have to have 10 books and be in 14 different forums and groups and websites? This should not be so hard and so confusing. So I’m in the thick of it, and I’m reading and researching about sleep, among other things, and then I started blogging. Not because I was trying to build an empire but because I kind of wanted an outlet. Just to give me a little project to do, so it wasn’t all just diapers and baby food. Kids VT: What do you think you’re putting out there that wasn’t there before? AD: One is: I am, at heart, a researcher. So my first thought was,

Here’s what these Vermont — the mecca books are telling me, of all things hippie. but what do we really And now I’m putting know? Because a lot my name on the of what we’re told internet and speaking as parents is sort of openly about the fact anecdotal, experienthat, you know, this is tial stuff. Like one of an OK thing to do. And the classic examples [attachment parenting is: Put cereal in a proponent Dr. William] baby’s bottle or feed Sears is wrong, and we them cereal before have options to consider. bedtime and they’ll sleep better. I mean, Kids VT: So, tell me this is one of those more about how your things that everybody blog took off, and is told. There is no why you kept it up, evidence that that’s even as a busy mom. true. In fact, zero. AD: Well, I think it Zero evidence that it becomes a positive makes any difference. feedback loop. All of And, especially a sudden I was like, in baby sleep, the Wow, OK. There’s like world is full of things 1,000 people reading like that that are just my website today. ALEXIS DUBIEF sort of passed down. There’s 5,000 people And so I took the reading it a day. Now approach: What do we really know? there’s 15,000 people reading it a day. What’s really true and what’s just like, When you’re getting all these kind 100 years people have been saying this emails from people who are like, and we do it? “You saved my life, we were dying, we I think I also have a pretty good couldn’t figure out what to do. Thank sense of humor and most baby stuff you so much!” that feels really good. is dry and serious. And, frankly, But we’re not wealthy people, things really blew up for me when I and now I’m spending $500 a month started talking openly about sleep just to keep it running. More readers training, which I had a lot of shame means costs go up, too. So I started about because, I mean, here we are in offering one-on-one consultations.

Most of the baby sleep books say Do this, and in my opinion that’s why they fail.


PHOTOS COURTESY OF ALEXIS DUBIEF

sleep cycles.” And you’re tired and you’ve been nursing for six hours and you’ve got a C-section that’s healing… Dubief with her children in the early years of parenting

out two weeks, but so far people say it’s really funny and great, which is what I wanted. To be really funny and practical and smart.

TEST RUN

KIDS VT

During the course of my conversation with Dubief, we discussed my 11-month-old, George. In particular, how he was waking up three to five times every night to nurse. Dubief asked me a few questions to get at the root of the problem (which was that I’d created a sleep association with nursing, so he felt he needed it each time he woke) and gave me some great advice, the gist of which is that I needed to change that association by changing up our bedtime routine and doing some gentle sleeping training through the night. I’ve followed most of it, and now George is up just once a night. If I could just bring myself to follow the rest of her advice — letting him cry a bit in the night — I’m sure I’d be getting a full night’s sleep. Point is, the woman is brilliant. -GPL

SEPTEMBER 2017

Kids VT: I like how you’re pairing this levity with intense research. AD: Well, it’s really dry stuff to be like, “Let’s talk about the infant sleep cycles and how they vary from adult

Kids VT: How do you manage selfcare when you have so much going on? AD: So the first thing is I don’t spend time taking care of the house. I am a terrible housekeeper. You’ve seen our overgrown yard. I am not a cool house decorator, a cleaner, a make-it-looknice person. I would love to have, like,

Dubief’s new book, Precious Little Sleep: The Complete Baby Sleep Guide for Modern Parents, can be ordered online or requested through your local bookshop. Find more information at preciouslittlesleep.com.

KIDSVT.COM

Kids VT: You are funny! AD: I try very hard to be funny because when you’re in the grind, it gets dark. It’s just so serious and it’s so anxiety-producing and isolating, and I feel like the least we can do is have a little fun with it. In one of the online book reviews, they said, “You’ll have to overlook her oddball sense of humor.” I was like, [pantomimes stabbing herself in the heart] Gah! I killed myself for three years to be funny! Overlook it?!

Kids VT: Anything else? AD: I guess I just want to make sure that I’m expressing gratitude, because it wasn’t just me in the basement writing a book. It was a collective effort. It wouldn’t have happened without Kickstarter. It wouldn’t have happened without people on the website offering help and advice. It’s only through all of these kindnesses on everybody’s part that this book has come to be, and I’m really grateful. K

And then one of my clients had a friend who was a book agent, and so then I’m talking like, Oh my God, a book? Should I write a book? So I spent three months researching the whole process of writing a book. And through that whole research process I decided I didn’t really want to pursue traditional publishing, for a variety of reasons. And every time I’ve asked readers for help, they’ve been amazing. So I’m like, Wow, I need help. So we do the Kickstarter campaign, and it’s amazingly successful, and I am floored and honored and grateful and terrified. So now I’m on the hook. It’s no longer a theoretical book. I’ve been given money by people who are saying, “We have faith in you.” So now it has to be done and I’m so terrified that it won’t be awesome. So I ended up doing a ton of research like, I’m going to fact-check everything. So it took forever. And now it’s only been

Kids VT: Why is it important to you to present all of the research and information rather than just saying: Do this. AD: Most of the baby sleep books say “Do this,” and in my opinion that’s why they fail. Because there is a wide range of normal for babies, and yet all of these books are so prescriptive. They’re like, “Kids should sleep 12 hours a night and kids should sleep three and a half hours a day.” And, well, that’s going to work for 20 percent of kids, and then the rest of us are trying to shoehorn something unnatural onto our child that isn’t who they are. It’d be like saying all adults should wear a size 7 shoe. Right? That would be absurd. I also think there are a range of parenting styles. And my goal was to say, “Listen, you are the parent. You know you and you know your child.” So what I do is give you some tools and say, “Use these tools that are best aligned with where you’re at, where your child is at and what feels right to you.” Also, I want to empower people to be able to diagnose if what they’re doing is working. You have to understand how things work so that you can go, Oh, now I see why what we’re doing isn’t getting the results we hoped for. Now I see why we’re getting stuck here, and now I can figure out what I need to do.

a gracious home that’s well appointed but it’s just not my thing. Whenever we have free time we’re never like, “Hey, we should repaint the bathroom.” We’re always like, “Hey, let’s go mountain biking!” So self-care for me: I manage the crazy with exercise. That’s how I stay balanced. Running, trail running, mountain biking and CrossFit are my things. The stress builds up and then I sweat it out.

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k l a W A in the s d o o W

Nature lovers explore history and ecology while enjoying horse-drawn wagon rides, woodworking and portable sawmill demonstrations, hikes with foresters, and crafts for kids at FOREST FESTIVAL WEEKEND. Saturday, September 23 & Sunday, September 24, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., at the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park in Woodstock.

Week to Week SAT & SUN

KIDSVT.COM

SAT & SUN

SEPTEMBER 2017

SEP 9 & 10

SAT

SEP 23 & 24

Champlain Mini Maker Faire: Tech enthusiasts celebrate the DIY mindset at this quirky science fair featuring robotics, student experiments, arts and crafts, and more at Shelburne Farms. CaterpillarFest! Youngsters marvel at hundreds of native critters, enjoy outdoor bug walks and tag monarch butterflies at the North Branch Nature Center in Montpelier.

KIDS VT

SEP 30

Glory Days Festival: This family-oriented shindig fêtes White River Junction’s choo-choo history with children’s entertainment including a model train show, a Lego exhibit and Green Mountain Railroad Excursion rides along the Connecticut River in downtown White River Junction.

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COURTESY OF MARSH-BILLINGS-ROCKEFELLER NATIONAL HISTORICAL PARK

CALENDAR SEPTEMBER

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1 Friday CALEDONIA Hardwick Farmers Market: Local produce, plants, artisan cheese, syrup and more fill shoppers’ market baskets. Diverse dinner fare available. Atkins Field, Hardwick, 3-6 p.m. CHITTENDEN ArtsRiot Truck Stop Burlington: Foodie families enjoy an eclectic array of local grub and live music during this hip block party. ArtsRiot, Burlington, 5-10 p.m.; cost for food. Info, 540-0406. Baby Yoga: Mamas and papas stretch themselves and their wee ones, strengthening general health and gross motor skills. Ages 1 and under. Jericho Town Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregistration required. Info, 899-4686. FREE

Burger Night: Picnickers bring a blanket or chair to this local feast of grilled fare and festive music. Bread and Butter Farm, Shelburne, 4:30-7:30 p.m., free admission; cost of food and drink. Weather dependent; visit breadandbutterfarm.com for latest updates. Info, 985-9200. Family Gym: Indoor playground equipment gives tiny tumblers a chance to run free. Ages 7 and under. Greater Burlington YMCA, 10:15-11:45 a.m., $5-8 per family; free for members. Info, 862-9622. Friday Free for All: Mini explorers investigate the world, from rocks to bugs. Ages 3-5. Charlotte Public Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m.; preregister. Info, 425-3864. FREE Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: Toe-tapping tunes captivate kiddies. Radio Bean, Burlington, 11 a.m. Info, 660-9346. FREE Richmond Farmers Market: Vendors peddle handheld pies, dinner delectables, homemade pickles, just-picked produce and much more at this lively showcase of locavorism. Volunteers Green, Richmond, 3-7 p.m. Info, 391-0806.

Visitors stroll among spruced-up vehicles and participate in a raffle and corn hole tournament. All proceeds benefit an athletic scholarship fund. Brigham Academy, Bakersfield, Saturday, Sep. 2, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., free admission, $15 per car registration; food available for purchase. Info, 393-1055.

NEW WORLD FESTIVAL: More than 70 musicians take over the town of Randolph and celebrate Vermont’s Celtic and French Canadian heritage through traditional tunes, children’s activities and dance. Chandler Music Hall, Randolph, Sunday, Sep. 3, noon-midnight, $12-40; free for children under 13. Info, 728-6464. SOUTH END ART HOP: Queen City artists come out of the woodwork for a visual art exhibition spread over city blocks. Visit seaba.com for a complete schedule of events, including ones geared toward kids. Various South End locations, Burlington, Friday, Sep. 8, 5-10 p.m.,

Saturday, Sep. 9, 10 a.m.-10 p.m. and Sunday, Sep. 10, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, 859-9222. FREE GLORY DAYS FESTIVAL: This 25th annual

family-oriented shindig fêtes the town’s choo-choo history with children’s entertainment, a model train show, a Lego exhibit, a mini steam engine and more. Green Mountain Railroad Excursion rides on both days; check website for specific times. Downtown, White River Junction, Saturday, Sep. 9, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sunday, Sep. 10, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., $15-20 for train excursion; free for children under 3. Info, 295-5036. KIDS HOP: This kid-friendly complement to SEABA’s South End Art Hop offers creative opportunities including children’s crafts and various demonstrations. See seaba.com for events and locations. Designed for kids ages 3-12. SEABA Tent, Burlington, Saturday, Sep. 9, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 859-9222. FREE VERMONT GRANITE FESTIVAL: The local

COLORS OF THE KINGDOM: Fall family

fun spreads through the town with free admission to the Fairbanks Museum and Planetarium, scenic train rides along the Connecticut River, a traditional crafts fair and more. Downtown St. Johnsbury, Saturday, Sep. 16, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., fees for some events. Info, 748-2372. SHELBURNE FARMS HARVEST FESTIVAL:

Families embrace the autumn traditions of Vermont’s farms with live entertainment on multiple stages, horse-drawn hayrides, artisan craft demonstrations, fresh food and farm animals. Shelburne Farms, Saturday, Sep. 16, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., $5-10; free for members and children under 3. Info, 985-8686. WONDERPAWS FESTIVAL AND PAW PARADE: This dog-loving downtown

day features a pooch parade, kid- and canine-friendly activities, contests, and vendors. Registration for leashed dogs begins at 10 a.m.; parade starts at noon. Wonderfeet Kids’ Museum, Rutland, Saturday, Sep. 16, 11 a.m.-2 p.m., free to attend, $10 per dog; proceeds benefit Wonderfeet Kids’ Museum. Info, 282-2678.

BRISTOL HARVEST FESTIVAL: A pancake breakfast kicks off this day of bandstand music, craft vendors. horse-drawn wagon rides and kids’ activities. Bristol Town Green, Saturday, Sep. 23, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, 453-5885. FREE FAIRY HOUSE FESTIVAL: Visitors delight

in small structures made of acorn caps, soft moss and lichens, birch bark, and pinecones, then create their own petite dwellings in the gardens and enjoy crafts. Picnicking encouraged. The Nature Museum at Grafton, Saturday, Sep. 23, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Sunday, Sep. 24, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., $4-12; light refreshments available for purchase. Info, 843-2111. FOREST FESTIVAL WEEKEND: Woods lovers

explore the park’s history and ecology while enjoying horse-drawn wagon rides, woodworking and portable sawmill demonstrations, hikes with foresters, and crafts for kids. Marsh-BillingsRockefeller National Historical Park, Woodstock, Saturday, Sep. 23, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. and Sunday, Sep. 24, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Events at National Park are free, admission charged at Billings Farm & Museum. Info, 457-3368.

19TH-CENTURY APPLE & HARVEST FESTIVAL:

In celebration of Johnny Appleseed’s birthday, visitors press cider, sample heirloom apples and ice cream, play old-fashioned games, and listen to live jazz and old-timey banjo and fiddle tunes from Out on a Limb. Justin Morrill Homestead, Strafford Village, Sunday, Sep. 24, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., $5-10 includes lunch. Info, 765-4288.

BETTER L8 THAN NEVER CAR SHOW: Speed enthusiasts marvel at hundreds of shiny, sporty vehicles. Live DJ, raffles, kids’ activities and food galore add to the highoctave action. Bristol Recreation Fields, Sunday, Sep. 24, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., donations accepted for Camp Ta-Kum-Ta, $15-20 to register a vehicle. Info, 388-7951, ext. 101. VERMONT PUMPKIN CHUCKIN’ FESTIVAL:

Homemade trebuchets catapult orange orbs into the sky at a daylong throwing contest, complete with a chili cook-off and live music. Proceeds benefit the Lamoille Restorative Center. Stoweflake Mountain Resort & Spa, Sunday, Sep. 24, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., $10; free for children under 5. Info, 603-630-4800. STOWE OKTOBERFEST: Oompah bands, sing-alongs and a Family Bike Parade Saturday at 9:30 a.m., beginning at the Village Green and traversing the Rec Path, transform this mountain town into a traditional Bavarian village. Visit stoweoktoberfest.com for schedule. Mayo Events Field, Stowe, Friday, Sep. 29, 7-10 p.m. and Saturday, Sep. 30, 9:30 a.m.-8 p.m., $5-10; free for children under 9 with paying family member. Info, 253-7321. BURKE FALL FOLIAGE FESTIVAL: Families

fall in love with autumn during daylong festivities including a parade at 10 a.m., a rubber duck race, bounce houses, wagon rides, a farm animal petting zoo and an interactive show from Wildlife Encounters of NH. Village Green, East Burke, Saturday, Sep. 30, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Info, 626-4124. FREE

HERITAGE HARVEST & HORSE FESTIVAL:

Equestrian demos of sport and work horses, a fall market in the colorful King’s Garden, and a visit to the corn maze make for autumn fun. Fort Ticonderoga, Saturday, Sep. 30, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m., regular museum admission, $9-21; free for children under 5. Info, 518-585-2821. PUMPKIN & APPLE CELEBRATION: Apple tasting, cider pressing, ice cream churning, pumpkin bowling and wagon rides combine for a seasonal celebration. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, Saturday, Sep. 30, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., regular museum admission, $4-15; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

KIDS VT

history of stonecutting is honored through folk music, performances, demonstrations, exhibits and hands-on kids’ activities. Vermont Granite Museum, Barre, Saturday, Sep. 9, 10 a.m., $3-5, $10 per family. Info, 476-4605.

old-fashioned agricultural extravaganza features a nineteenth-century village main street, pig races, music and livestock shows. Tunbridge Fairgrounds, Sep. 14-17, $10-15, $35 season pass; free for children under 12, additional charge for midway rides. Info, 889-5555.

SEPTEMBER 2017

WINDSOR Foodways Fridays: Guests tour the heirloom garden, then watch as veggies make their way into historic recipes prepared in the 1890 farmhouse kitchen. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., regular museum admission, $4-15; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

DAWSON PERLEY MEMORIAL CAR SHOW:

THE TUNBRIDGE WORLD’S FAIR: This

KIDSVT.COM

WASHINGTON Montpelier Mother Up! Monthly Meet-Up: Families discuss the realities of climate change, what that means on a local, state and national level, and how to create a more just and nature-friendly world. Vegetarian dinner and childcare offered. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; RSVP requested. Info, 229-0041. FREE

CHAMPLAIN VALLEY FAIR: Cotton-candy fun and carny curiosities collide at the state’s largest fair, complete with midway rides, daily parades and live entertainment. Midway opens at 11 a.m. Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, Through Sep. 3, $6-12; free for children under 5, 25% off advance discount tickets available at Price Chopper stores until August 24, ride bracelets $30, additional tickets required for grandstand concerts. Info, 878-5545.

ORLEANS Lego Club: Petite ones build with plastic blocks and chat companionably. Ages 4-12. Craftsbury Public Library, Craftsbury Common, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 586-9683. FREE

Fall Festivals

VERMONT FAIRY TALE FESTIVAL: Twenty public libraries each feature a fairy-tale booth, where families learn stories and make take-home projects. Professional storytellers, themed craft vendors, an encampment and fight demo by the Vikings of Ullr and more add to the day’s whimsical merriment. Costumes encouraged. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, Saturday, Sep. 23, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., free with a donation for the food bank or humane society. Info, 422-9765.

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COURTESY OF THEATREWORKS USA

CALENDAR SEPTEMBER 2 Saturday ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: Crafts, cheeses, breads, veggies, eggs and more vie for spots in shoppers’ totes. Middlebury VFW, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: Freshly baked goods, veggies, beef and maple syrup figure prominently in displays of “shop local” options. St. Johnsbury Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 592-3088. CHITTENDEN Burlington Farmers Market: Growers and artisans offer fresh and ready-to-eat foods, crafts and more in a bustling marketplace. Burlington City Hall Park, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 310-5172. Kids Building Workshop: Handy helpers learn do-it-yourself skills and tool safety as they construct seasonal projects. Ages 5-12. Home Depot, Williston, 9 a.m.-noon; preregister at workshops.homedepot.com. Info, 872-0039. FREE Over the Edge for the Flynn: 100 intrepid adventurers rappel nine stories down one of the tallest buildings in Burlington to raise funds for the theater’s cultural and educational programs. Courtyard Marriott Harbor Hotel, Burlington, 8 a.m.-5 p.m., free to view. Info, 652-4533. Saturday Drama Club: Junior thespians create a character, spin a story, and put on a performance, all in three hours. Ages 6-12. Old North End Community Center, Burlington, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., $15. Info, 355-1461. Shelburne Farmers Market: Musical entertainment adds merriment to this exchange of local fruits, veggies, herbs, crafts, maple syrup and more. Shelburne Village Green, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 482-4279.

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

GRAND ISLE Champlain Island Farmers Market: Growers, specialty food businesses and artisans sell their high-quality wares. St. Joseph Church, Grand Isle, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 372-1883.

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RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: Local vendors peddle farm-fresh produce and fruits, handcrafted breads, artisan cheese and more at this outdoor emporium. Downtown Rutland, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 342-4727. ORLEANS Craftsbury Common Farmers Market: Locals load up on garden-fresh produce, Vermont-made crafts, baked goods and more. Craftsbury Common, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. WASHINGTON Capital City Farmers Market: Veggies, honey, maple syrup and more change hands at a celebration of farm-grown food and handmade crafts. Downtown Montpelier, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 223-2958. Waitsfield Farmers Market: Saturday shoppers search out handmade crafts and local produce, meat and maple products, while enjoying lunch fare and live music in this grassy outdoor venue. Mad River Green, Waitsfield, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

3 Sunday CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: Energy-filled kids flip, jump and tumble in a state-of-the-art facility. Ages 6 and under, 1 p.m.; ages 7-12, 2:30 p.m.; ages 13 and up, 4 p.m. Regal Gymnastics Academy, Essex, 1-5:30 p.m., $8-14. Info, 655-3300. Family Gym: See September 1. The Tale of Beatrix Potter: Curated by “food anthropologist” and chef, Richard Witting, and lead by In Tandem Arts’ Trish Denton, a processional theater picnic playfully explores this famous conservationist, illustrator and author through strolling the farm’s grounds and enjoying live storytelling combined with food, drink and history. Dress in outdoor clothing and appropriate footwear. Shelburne Farms, noon-3 p.m., $10-40; free for children under 5; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

Live Performances LEVITT AMP CONCERT SERIES AT DOG MOUNTAIN: Produced by Catamount

Arts, these family and canine-friendly Sundays at Dog Mountain include fourlegged agility exhibitions and musical pre-performances beginning at 2 p.m., food truck vendors, games and activities, with the main stage shows from 4-7 p.m. The Stephen Huneck Art Gallery opens at 10 a.m. Dog Mountain, St Johnsbury, Sundays. Through Sep. 17; food and drink available for purchase. Info, 800-4492580. FREE WINOOSKI WEDNESDAYS: City folks sprawl out in a summer evening with live bands and free meals for kids under 18. Rotary Park, Winooski, first Wednesday of every month, 6 p.m. Through Sep. 6; food and drink available to purchase. Info, 777-1621. FREE HOPSTOP: ‘MODERN TIMES THEATER’:

This ‘Punch and Judy’ old-fashioned puppet show captivates the audience with comedy and novelty musical instruments including the ukulele, an upright bass and a bicycle pump. Ages 3 and up. Hopkins Center for the Arts, Hanover, N.H., Saturday, Sep. 9, 11 a.m. Info, 603-646-2422. FREE CHORAL CELEBRATION: GATHERING & BLESSING OF THE WATERS: Under the

direction of Rufus Patrick, the voices of the All Souls Choir and the South County Chorus and faith leaders from diverse traditions offer blessings for the planet’s health and healing. The Breeding Barn is unheated; please dress for the weather. Shelburne Farms, Sunday, Sep. 24, 4 p.m., donations accepted. Info, 985-3819. FREE WINDSOR Labor & Leisure Day: Families pitch in on the farm, helping to build a split-rail fence and scrub laundry on a washboard. Come quittin’ time, they hop a wagon ride and sample some fresh-churned ice cream or watch a game of historic baseball. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., regular museum admission, $4-15; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

CONCERT ON THE GREEN: Music lovers

revel in an open-air evening. Gates open at 6 p.m. for picnicking. Shelburne Museum, Sunday, Sep. 24, 7 p.m., $45-55; free for children under 13. Info, 877-987-6487.

THEATREWORKS USA: ‘DRAGONS LOVE TACOS’: Five favorite children’s books

spring to life on the stage with song and dance performed by this touring theater for young people. Titles include Mercy Watson Goes for a Ride and Interrupting Chicken. Recommended for grades K-5. Hopkins Center for the Arts, Hanover, N.H., Sunday, Sep. 24, 3 p.m., $13-23. Info, 603-646-2422. ‘SWAN LAKE’: The Russian Grand Ballet mesmerizes the audience with Tchaikovsky’s magical tale of love and deception, including a rarely seen Waltz of the Black Bears performed by Russia’s brightest stars. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, Thursday, Sep. 28, 7:30 p.m., $30-70. Info, 863-5966. VERMONT VAUDEVILLE: Old-school enter-

tainment combines with cutting-edge music, acrobatic stunts and comedy for a one-of-a-kind theater experience. A food truck serves up savory fare. Hardwick Town House, Thursday, Sep.

28, 7:30 p.m., Friday, Sep. 29, 7:30 p.m. and Saturday, Sep. 30, 2 & 7:30 p.m., $8-15. Info,

472-1387.

Vermont Lake Monsters Game: Fans have fun cheering on the home team, with the bonus of a bobblehead giveaway. Gates open at 4 p.m. Centennial Field, Burlington, 5:05 p.m., $5-15. Info, 655-6611. Winooski Farmers Market: Local produce, farm goods, artisan crafts, kids activities and tunes come together on the banks of the Winooski River. Champlain Mill, Winooski, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. LAMOILLE Stowe Farmers Market: Live music and agricultural and craft vendors make for a bustling atmosphere. Stowe Farmers Market, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Info, 279-3444.

4 Monday CHITTENDEN Richard Tom Foundation Kids’ Criterium: Young bikers circle city blocks in a noncompetitive version of the Burlington Criterium, in honor of the late cyclist Richard Tom. Ages 7-11. Registration opens at 11 a.m. St. Paul Street, Burlington, 12:25 p.m. Info, 849-9863. FREE

Vermont Lake Monsters Game: Baseball aficionados flock to the stadium for this classic American pastime. Gates open at noon. Centennial Field, Burlington, 1:05 p.m., $5-15. Info, 655-6611.

5 Tuesday Theatreworks USA: ‘Dragons Love Tacos’

Traditional Craft Saturdays: Local artisans demonstrate making rag rugs, basket and chair-seat weaving, leather tanning, and woodworking. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., regular museum admission, $4-15; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

CHITTENDEN Tuesday Night Trail Running: Athletes of all ages and abilities choose between 2.5K and 5K courses or a short ‘Cubs’ option — with a 10K held on the second Tuesday of each month — during this fun evening race. Catamount Outdoor Family Center, Williston, 6 p.m., $4-12; free for children under 9. Info, 879-6001. Vermont Lake Monsters Game: Baseball buffs applaud the home team in their last regular season home game of the year. Gates open at 6 p.m. Centennial Field, Burlington, 7:05 p.m., $5-15. Info, 655-6611. Winooski Lego Club: Budding builders bust out plastic-block creations in the weekly Lego challenge. Winooski Memorial Library, 3-6 p.m. Info, 655-6424. FREE


Classes FRANKLIN Adoption Support Group: Families facing adoption issues and challenges join forces in a respectful setting. All welcome. Franklin County Seniors Center, St. Albans, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Info, 524-1700. FREE Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Gaming Tuesdays: Players of all skill levels team up for card playing. Haston Library, Franklin, 4-7 p.m. Info, 285-6505. FREE Music & Movement With Ellie: Toddlers and preschoolers jump around to jolly tunes. Ages 5 and under. Highgate Public Library, Highgate Center, 10 a.m. Info, 868-3970. FREE RUTLAND Chess Club: Strategists enjoy competition and camaraderie. All ages. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 3:15-4:15 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE WINDSOR Lego Tuesdays: Young builders bust out blocks and get busy. Children under 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Norwich Public Library, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 649-1184. FREE

6 Wednesday ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See September 2. CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: See September 2. Danville Village Green, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. CHITTENDEN Family Game Day: Families rally for a weekly round of tabletop fun. Winooski Memorial Library, 3-6 p.m. Info, 655-6424. FREE Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: Novice and experienced players put their imaginations together. Ages 10 and up. Regular attendance needed to follow the ongoing storyline. Jericho Town Library, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Info, 899-4686. FREE Leddy Park Beach Bites: Families relax during a lakeside afternoon lavish with kids’ activities, food trucks and entertainment. Leddy Park, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Info, 864-0123. FREE

GRAND ISLE Champlain Island Farmers Market: See September 2. St. Rose of Lima Parish, South Hero, 3-6 p.m. Info, 372-1883. RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See September 2, 3-6 p.m.

PRENATAL & POSTNATAL YOGA CLASSES:

Have a more comfortable pregnancy and prepare for birth with stretching, strengthening and relaxation in prenatal yoga — and then bring your body back to balance and strength in postnatal yoga. Join our community of mothers at any point in your pregnancy, and 6 weeks or later in your postpartum time (until baby is crawling). No yoga experience necessary. Prenatal Yoga: Saturdays, 11:30 a.m.; Sundays, 10 a.m.; Mondays, 5:45 p.m.; Tuesdays, 4:15 p.m.; Wednesdays, 5:45 p.m.; Thursdays, 12:30 p.m.; Fridays, 8:15 a.m. Postnatal Yoga: Sundays, 12:15 p.m.; Tuesdays, 10 a.m.; Thursdays, 10:45 a.m.; Fridays, 8:15 a.m.; Fridays, noon (postnatal core). Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Drop-ins welcome; $15/class, $130/10 class pass, or $75/monthly unlimited. Info: evolutionprenatalandfamily.com or 899-0339. EVOKIDS AND EVOBABIES YOGA CLASSES:

Register now for our fall series of EvoKids and EvoBabies Yoga, ages 6 months to teen. Weekday and weekend classes available. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info: evolutionprenatalandfamily.com or 899-0339. FAMILY WHEEL DROP-IN: Explore BCA’s

clay studio while hanging out with the family. Try the pottery wheel or create amazing clay sculptures while our staff gives demonstrations. There is a $5 additional fee per clay piece to be kept, fired and glazed. No registration necessary, but access to wheels is limited. Groups larger than six people are encouraged to set up a private workshop. All ages. Instructors: Alex Costantino, Alissa White & Kate McKernan. Weekly on Fridays, September 22 through December 15, 5-7 p.m. No class November 10 or 24. BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington, $10/person, $9/BCA members. Purchase a drop-in card and get the 6th visit for free! Info: burlingtoncityarts.org or 865-7157.

WINDSOR Woodstock Market on the Green: Fresh vegetables, farm eggs, local meats and cheeses, cut flowers, and seasonal fruits and berries represent the best of the growing season, with the accompaniment of live music. Woodstock Village Green, 3-6 p.m. Info, 457-3555. FREE

TRUE NORTH: A GUIDE TO YOUR BEST PARENTING: Learn the power of

relationship and role-modeling, how to nurture brain maturation, how to set expectations, and how to communicate to reduce conflict. Get answers to your questions. Tuesday, October 3, 5-7 p.m. Holy Family Church, Essex Jct. $25. Info: martellbeth.wixsite.com/ bethmartellcoaching

BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU: The future of our nation lies in the courage, confidence and determination of its people. Our Kids BJJ Program promotes self-esteem, self-confidence, character development and a physical outlet with discipline, cooperation with other children, respect for peers and adults, perseverance and a healthy lifestyle. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu will help your kids to learn realistic bully-proofing and self-defense skills that they can use for the rest of their lives! Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu builds endurance, patience and self-respect. Give your kids the ability to get stronger, gain confidence and build resilience! Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them practices they can carry with them throughout life. Remember you are raising children, not flowers. First class is free! Please stop by our school at 55 Leroy Road, Williston; call 598-2839; visit our website vermontbjj.com or email julio@bjjusa.com to register your son or daughter!

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. CHITTENDEN Audubon Homeschool Program: Homebased learners use the outdoor classroom to explore a variety of seasonal topics, from insect investigations to wilderness skills. Ages 6-8. Parent attendance optional. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., $20-25; preregister. Info, 434-3068. Jericho Farmers Market: Local growers offer heirloom tomatoes, fresh greens, fragrant herbs, wildflowers and more at this familyfriendly market made merry with live music. Mills Riverside Park, Jericho, 3-6:30 p.m. Info, 343-9778. Lego Club: Mini-makers participate in surprise challenges with interlocking blocks. Ages 6-10. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Milton Farmers Market: Farmers, foodies and crafters come together to celebrate the bounty of the growing season. Hannaford Supermarket, Milton, 3:30-7 p.m. Info, 893-1009. Williston Preschool Music: Lively tunes with local musicians strike the right note among the wee crowd. Ages 5 and under with a caregiver. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m., limited to one session per week per family. Info, 878-4918. FREE FRANKLIN Fairfax PJ Story Time: Children chill in their jammies while listening to stories. Fairfax Community Library, 6-7 p.m. Info, 849-2420. FREE

Lego Thursdays: Kiddie constructionists combine their creativity with the library’s supplies. Haston Library, Franklin, 2-5 p.m. Info, 285-6505. FREE RUTLAND Fair Haven Farmers Market: Fresh produce, meat, greens, and locally-made maple products swell shoppers’ totes. Fair Haven Park, 3-6 p.m. Info, 342-4727.

8 Friday CALEDONIA Hardwick Farmers Market: See September 1. CHITTENDEN ArtsRiot Truck Stop Burlington: See September 1.

7 Thursday CALEDONIA Lego Club: Young architects construct collaboratively with colorful blocks. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 3-4 p.m. Info, 472-5948. FREE

Burger Night: See September 1. Family Gym: See September 1. Friday Free for All: See September 1. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See September 1. Milton Homeschool Project Day: Out-ofclassroom learners share projects. Milton Public Library, 1 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE

8 FRIDAY, P.38

KIDS VT

ORANGE Lego Wednesdays: Aspiring architects construct creatively while chatting. Kimball Public Library, Randolph, 2:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 728-5073. FREE

artists in making some big prints with heavy machinery at Sushi Yoshi in Stowe. A great time for all! Saturday, September 16, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Rain date: Sunday, September 17. Sushi Yoshi parking lot, Mountain Road, Stowe. $20. Info: 253-8358, education@helenday. com or helenday.com.

DIY HALLOWEEN COSTUMES: Students will create one-of-a-kind Halloween costumes that will blow away those store-bought costumes and impress their friends. Cut, sew and craft your way to the best Halloween ever!  Basic materials are provided; please bring two ideas of what you want to dress up as, and any material or old clothes to help create your costume. Students must also bring a bag lunch and snacks. Parents are invited to a costume parade at 3 p.m. Registration required. Ages 6-12. Friday, October 20, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. BCA Studios, 405 Pine St., Burlington. $88/person, $79.20/BCA members. Info: burlingtoncityarts.org or 865-7157.

SEPTEMBER 2017

FRANKLIN Music & Movement With Ellie: See September 5.

6TH ANNUAL STEAMROLLER PRINTMAKING WORKSHOP: Join fellow families and

KIDSVT.COM

Reading Buddies: Little bookworms pair up with volunteers for literacy and laughs. Kindergarten and up. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-4:30 p.m.; preregistration appreciated but not required. Info, 264-5660. FREE

List your class or camp here for only $20 per month! Submit the listing by September 15 at kidsvt.com or to classes@kidsvt.com.

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CALENDAR

SEPTEMBER 8 Friday (cont.)

Science & Nature FALL MIGRATION BIRD WALK: From warblers to vireos, tanagers to thrushes, birders of all skill levels keep an ear out for migrating songbirds. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, Fridays, 7:30-9 a.m. Through Sep. 29, $10; free for members and kids. Info, 229-6206. ARCHAEOLOGY ADVENTURES: NATIVE AMERICAN POTTERY WORKSHOP: Little

hands get muddy making pinch pots and coil bowls with archaeologist and potter Charlie Paquin. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, Saturday, Sep. 2, 1-3 p.m., regular museum admission, $13.50-16.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848.

KIDSVT.COM SEPTEMBER 2017

PROGRAMS FOR PRESCHOOLERS: Farm

activities wow little learners with themed stories, hands-on activities and a special visit to the barn. Ages 3 and up. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, Wednesdays, 9-10:30 a.m. Through Sep. 27, $3-5; preregister. Info, 457-2355. rally ‘round for nature-inspired tales and activities. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, Wednesdays, 10:30 a.m. Through Sep. 27, regular museum admission, $11.50-14.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848.

TOUR THE COSMOS: This 50-minute

WAGON-RIDE WEDNESDAYS: Horse-drawn

SCIENCE & STORIES AT ECHO: Preschoolers

live presentation takes the audience on a journey deep into the universe. Ages 6 and up. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, Saturdays and Sundays, 1:30 p.m, $6 plus regular museum admission, $7-9; free for children under 5. Info, 748-2372.

rides deliver delight to the whole family. Admission includes all farm programs and activities. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, Wednesdays, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Through Sep. 27, regular museum admission, $4-15; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

ARCHAEOLOGY ADVENTURES: ARTIFACT ROADSHOW AND FLINT-KNAPPING DEMONSTRATION: Fledgling prehistorians

WHO WALKS THESE WOODS?: Expert

DISCOVERY SUNDAYS: Families have fun

KIDS VT

Naturalists-in-training drop in and gently catch, tag and release these black-andorange migrants. Bring a net if you have one. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, Wednesday, Sep. 6, and Wednesday, Sep. 13, 3:30-5:30 p.m., $3-5. Info, 229-6206.

RAPTORS IN RESIDENCE: The mysteries surrounding birds of prey are revealed as visitors come face-to-face with live feathered creatures. All ages. Shelburne Farms, Tuesdays, Thursdays, Saturdays, 1-1:30 p.m. Through Sep. 16, regular museum admission, $5-8; free for children under 3. Info, 985-8686.

dive into ancient history with archaeologist and potter Charlie Paquin and check out how Native Americans shaped projectile points. Bring in your own ancient finds for experts to identify. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, Sunday, Sep. 3, 1-3 p.m., regular museum admission, $13.50-16.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848.

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MONARCH BUTTERFLY TAGGING:

with hands-on science experiments and investigations, using wheels, towers, magnets, feathers, water and bubbles. Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center, Quechee, Sundays, 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m., regular museum admission, $13-15; free for children under 4. Info, 359-5001, ext. 228. MICROSCOPIC INVESTIGATIONS: Curious

families discover the mysteries of hidden worlds using hand lenses and microscopes. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, Sunday, Sep. 3, 11-11:30 a.m., regular museum admission, $14-17; free for children under 2. Info, 649-2200. STRAW ROCKETS: Fanciers of flight

fashion and fly their own rockets. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, Monday, Sep. 4, 11-11:30 a.m., regular museum admission, $14-17; free for children under 2. Info, 649-2200.

tracker Mike Kessler leads an inquisitive trek into our landscape. Ages 7 and up. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington,

Preschool Yoga with Danielle: Simple movement, stories and songs satisfy children ages 5 and under and their caregivers. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE CRITTER CONSTRUCTION: Hold onto your hard hat! Preschoolers explore different styles of animal structures, from bird nests to beaver lodges, then create their own cozy hideaway. Ages 3-5 with adult companion. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, Thursday, Sep. 21, 9-10:30 a.m., $8-10 per adult-child pair, $4 for each additional child; preregister. Info, 434-3068. CHAMPLAIN MINI MAKER FAIRE: Tech

enthusiasts celebrate the DIY mindset at this quirky science fair featuring robotics, student experiments, arts and crafts, and more. Shelburne Farms,

Saturday, Sep. 23, and Sunday, Sep. 24, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., $8-15; free for ages 10 and

under. Info, 863-5956.

GIANT PUMPKIN WEIGH-IN: Oversize

gourds battle it out for the heavyweight title. Onlookers enjoy hayrides, applecider doughnuts and the corn maze. Sam Mazza’s Farm Market, Colchester, Saturday, Sep. 23, 12-3 p.m., fees for some activities. Info, 655-3440. FREE

Ken Benton instructs curious eaters how to identify and sustainably harvest a smorgasbord of ripening plants, including fox grapes, chokecherry and beaked hazelnut. Participants prepare and consume a wild-based lunch and pack up some creations to take home. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, Saturday, Sep. 16, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., $20-25; preregister. Info, 229-6206.

9 Saturday ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See September 2. CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: See September 2.

EvoKids Yoga Open House: Fitness-minded youth sample stretching classes. Check Facebook page for specific times for age groups. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, 10:30 a.m.-2:45 p.m. Info, 899-0339. FREE

ORIENTEERING: With a map and compass,

FLEDGLINGS FIGURE IT OUT: Each month, junior avian admirers tackle a new bird puzzle while exploring the wild world. Ages 5-10; siblings welcome. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, fourth

FALL WILD EDIBLE WORKSHOP: Naturalist

NEW YORK Homeschool Day: Students soak up history in this day devoted to home-learning programming, including musket and cannon demonstrations. Grades K-12. Fort Ticonderoga, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m., $6 per student with one free parent, additional adults $14; preregister. Info, 518-585-6370.

Saturdays and Sundays, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Through Oct. 8, fee charged. Info, 655-3440.

NESTLINGS FIND NATURE: Preschoolers discover how songbirds grow, using imaginative play, books, crafts and nature walks and activities. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, second

admission, $3.50-7; free for children under 3. Info, 434-2167.

WINDSOR Foodways Fridays: See September 1.

CHITTENDEN Burlington Farmers Market: See September 2.

have fun on a wagon ride to the pickyour-own field. Weather permitting. Sam Mazza’s Farm Market, Colchester,

admission, $3.50-7; free for children under 3; preregister. Info, 434-2167.

and fourth Tuesdays of every month, 10:3011:30 a.m. Through Oct. 24, regular museum

ORLEANS Lego Club: See September 1.

HAYRIDES TO THE PUMPKIN PATCH: Families

trekkers of all skill levels find their way across the terrain. Beginners’ clinic from 9-10 a.m.; courses open at 10 a.m. Children under 10 must be accompanied by an adult. Shelburne Farms, Saturday, Sep. 23, 9 a.m.-noon, $5-6; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

second Sunday of every month, 1-3 p.m. Through Oct. 8, regular museum

Richmond Farmers Market: See September 1.

Sunday of every month, 2-3 p.m. Through Oct. 22, regular museum admission, $3.50-7;

free for children under 3. Info, 434-2167. CATERPILLARFEST!: Sam Jaffe, naturalist

and photographer, and his staff share hundreds of native critters with admiring youngsters, including the largest, spiniest, wackiest and weirdest species hidden in our backyards. Hands-on learning includes outdoor field bug walks and monarch butterfly tagging activities. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, Saturday, Sep. 30, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., $5-10; food and drink available by donation. Info, 229-6206. HAWK WALK: Late-migrating raptors provide an eyeful on a leisurely stroll. Bring your binoculars. Live bird presentation at 10 a.m. Ages 10 and up. Shelburne Farms, Saturday, Sep. 30, 7:30 a.m., $5; preregister; space is limited to 12 participants. Info, 985-8686.

Saturday Drama Club: See September 2. Shelburne Farmers Market: See September 2. Spanish Musical Playgroup: Rhymes, books and songs en español entertain niños. Snack and playtime included. Ages 5 and under. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 878-4918. FREE FRANKLIN Little Explorer Nature Adventure Program: Preschoolers and their parents search out the secrets of the natural world with Mr. K. Highgate Public Library, Highgate Center, 9:15 a.m.; preregister. Info, 868-3970. FREE GRAND ISLE Champlain Island Farmers Market: See September 2. RUTLAND Origami Peace Cranes Storytime: Writer, illustrator and creator of the Peace Crane Project, Sue DiCicco shares her picture book, followed by audience participation in a paper folding project. Phoenix Books Rutland, 3-4 p.m. Info, 855-8078. FREE Rutland Farmers Market: See September 2. ORLEANS Craftsbury Common Farmers Market: See September 2. WASHINGTON Capital City Farmers Market: See September 2.


SUBMIT YOUR OCTOBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY SEPTEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

2017 Class Schedule

Kids Trade & Play: Families exchange clean and gently-used clothing and toys, size newborn to 12. Capital City Grange, Berlin, 9:30-11:30 a.m., $3 per family. Info, 831-337-8632. Kung Fu: Athletes of all ages and abilities develop sound mind and body skills through traditional instruction. Ages 7 and up. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m., $10 suggested donation. Info, 505-1688. Waitsfield Farmers Market: See September 2. WINDSOR Traditional Craft Saturdays: See September 2. NEW YORK Brown’s Raid: Reenactment: The historic 1777 surprise attack on the fort is replicated in a two-day battle with costumes, music and artifacts. Fort Ticonderoga, 9:30 a.m.-5 p.m., regular museum admission, $10-23; free for children under 5. Info, 518-585-2821.

10 Sunday CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See September 3. Family Gym: See September 1. PJ Library Family Fun: Families get ready for Rosh Hashanah with a kid-friendly Tashlich celebration including apple picking, easy hiking, stories, songs and socializing. Ages 1-8 with caregivers. Shelburne Orchards, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Info, 233-9697. FREE Winooski Farmers Market: See September 3. LAMOILLE Stowe Farmers Market: See September 3. WASHINGTON Barn Dance: Live music, hayrides, games, a silent auction and a fall pie share make for family fun. Beard’s Barn, Waterbury Center, 2-5 p.m., $20 per family; proceeds benefit the Children’s Room. Info, 244-5605.

11 Monday CHITTENDEN A Circle of Parents: Moms and dads come together to strengthen parenting skills and socialize. New Life Fellowship Church, Milton, 6:30-8 p.m.; preregister. Info, 498-0607. FREE Colchester Preschool Music: Bitty ones dance and sing to a brisk beat. Ages 3-5. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 11:30 a.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Crafts for Kids: Clever kiddos pursue artsy projects. Ages 5 and up. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Queer Care Support: Adult family members and caregivers of queer and/ or questioning youth swap stories and resources in a supportive space. Adults only. Outright Vermont, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Info, 865-9677. FREE Stories with Megan: Little listeners learn and laugh. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Vermont’s only certified

Irish Dance School! All Ages…All Levels Did you enjoy watching Riverdance? Why not learn some of the steps! Call or email to hold a spot in our summer camps! Classes offered in Colchester & Middlebury

Beth Anne McFadden T.C.R.G. (802) 999-5041 celtikutie@aol.com www.mcfaddenirishdance.com

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Williston Preschool Music: See September 7, 11 a.m. RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: Mini-musicians ages 2 and under sing songs and engage in early literacy activities. Rutland Free Library, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 773-1860. FREE WASHINGTON Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup: Little explorers and their caregivers discover the sights and sounds of the forest and field, while learning how the natural environment can be used as an adventurous classroom. Dress in outdoor clothing. Ages 5 and under. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 10 a.m.-noon, donations welcome. Info, 229-6206.

preschool •-•6th grade holistic approach ••

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DANISH WOOLEN DELIGHT

12 Tuesday CHITTENDEN Tuesday Night Trail Running: See September 5.

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Winooski Lego Club: See September 5.

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FRANKLIN Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Gaming Tuesdays: See September 5.

Swiss-made HOCOSA long-underwear in 100% merino wool or 70/30% wool/silk blend.

Music & Movement With Ellie: See September 5.

LANACare organic wool nursing pads and baby apparel.

KbT, GOTS, IVN Certifications

12 TUESDAY, P.40

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KIDS VT

PJ Library Family Fun: Families get ready for Rosh Hashanah with a kidfriendly Tashlich celebration including easy hiking, stories, songs and socializing. Meet at the Old Shelter if weather is inclement. Ages 1-8 with caregivers. Hubbard Park, Montpelier, 3:30-5 p.m. Info, 223-0583. FREE

See a Shipwreck Without Getting Wet!

NEW YORK Brown’s Raid: Reenactment: See September 9.

SEPTEMBER 2017

Hebrew School Open House: Parents check out educational opportunities for kids ages 4-12, while youngsters enjoy an exploratory morning of games and stories. Beth Jacob Synagogue, Montpelier, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 505-3657. FREE

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

KIDSVT.COM

Cabot Rides the Ridges: Biking buffs enjoy a picturesque 10K cycling tour, while more experienced riders navigate 30-100K courses. A feast of local foods follows. Races begin at 8 a.m.; check website for details. Cabot School, $20-40, $60 per family, after Sept. 3, add $15, $10 for non-rider’s lunch; proceeds benefit Cabot Connects. Info, 563-3338.

ROV Shipwreck Tours

Visit our website for our

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CALENDAR

SEPTEMBER

12 Tuesday (cont.) WASHINGTON Maker Program: Crafty kiddos dig into different projects using the library’s materials and mentoring. Ages 8-11. Waterbury Public Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 244-7036. FREE WINDSOR Lego Tuesdays: See September 5.

13 Wednesday

14 Thursday CALEDONIA Lego Club: See September 7. CHITTENDEN Audubon Homeschool Program: Home-based learners use the outdoor classroom to explore a variety of seasonal topics, from forests and trees to wildlife tracking. Ages 9-12. Parent attendance is optional. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., $20-25; preregister. Info, 434-3068.

CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: See September 6.

Family Game Day: See September 6. Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: See September 6. Young Writers & Storytellers: Small ones spin their own yarns. Grades K-5. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4-5 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE

Thursdays, 10:45-11:55 a.m., Fridays, 8:15-9:15 a.m., Fridays, noon-1 p.m., and Sundays, 12:151:30 p.m., $15 or $130 for a 10-class pass.

Info, 899-0339.

EVOLUTION PRENATAL YOGA: Mothers-to-be

build strength, stamina, comfort and a stronger connection to their baby. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, Mondays, 5:45-7 p.m., Tuesdays,

Music & Movement With Ellie: See September 5.

PRENATAL METHOD PRENATAL YOGA:

KIDSVT.COM

WINDSOR Sensory Lab for Tots: Tiny tots try out selfguided art stations, including finger painting, modeling dough, moon sand and more. Ages 5 and under; adult supervision required. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 9:30-11:30 a.m., $5. Info, 457-3500.

SEPTEMBER 2017

ORANGE Lego Wednesdays: See September 6.

Woodstock Market on the Green: See September 6.

KIDS VT

their pre-crawling kids to an all-levels flowing yoga class focused on bringing the body back to strength and alignment in a relaxed and nurturing environment. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, Tuesdays, 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m.,

4:15-5:30 p.m., Wednesdays, 5:45-7 p.m., Thursdays, 12:30-1:30 p.m., Fridays, 8:15-9:15 a.m., Saturdays, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., and Sundays, 10-11:30 a.m., $15 or $130 for a

RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See September 2, 3-6 p.m.

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EVOLUTION POSTNATAL YOGA: Moms tote

FRANKLIN Fairfax Lego Club: Budding builders construct creatively with colorful blocks. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

GRAND ISLE Champlain Island Farmers Market: See September 6.

MULTIPLE VT LOCATIONS Virtual Town Hall with Governor Phil Scott: Politically-minded people attend an online town hall-style meeting and ask questions of Vermont’s governor, with particular input from school-age children. Various locations statewide, 1-2 p.m.; preregister. Info, 299-9642. FREE

Dorothy Canfield Fisher Book Discussion: Little literati chat about Some Kind of Courage by Dan Gemeinhart. Milton Public Library, 6:30-7:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE

Burlington Mother Up! Monthly Meet-up: Families discuss the realities of climate change, what that means on a local level, and how to transition to a safer and healthier world. Vegetarian meal and childcare for ages 3 and under provided. Unitarian Universalist Society, Burlington, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Info, 765-337-2778.

Jericho Farmers Market: See September 7.

10-class pass. Info, 899-0339.

Women prepare for birth through yoga, with a focus on strengthening the body and mind. See prenatalmethod.com for class descriptions. Prenatal Method Studio, Burlington, Mondays, 12:15-1:15 p.m., Tuesdays, 4:30-5:30 p.m., Wednesdays, 12:15-1:15 p.m., Thursdays, 4:30-5:30 p.m., and Saturdays, 10:30-11:30 a.m., $15. Info,

829-0211.

BOSOM BUDDIES TOO: Nursing mamas of

toddlers and mobile wee ones socialize and swap supportive stories and advice with peers and professionals. Babies welcome. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, first Tuesday of every month, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 371-4415. FREE PRENATAL YOGA: Expectant mamas ease pregnancy through breath work, poses and preparation for labor and delivery, in a safe and supportive atmosphere. Iyengar Yoga Center of Vermont, Burlington, Tuesdays, 4:15-5:15 p.m., $20. Info, 379-7389. MIDDLEBURY LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETING AND PLAYGROUP: Families with infants

and toddlers socialize and swap nursing stories. Junebug Mother and Child, Middlebury, first Wednesday of every month, 10 a.m. FREE

MOM AND BABY YOGA: Brand-new mamas

and their littles relax, stretch and bond. Followed by a free mothers’ gathering at 11:30 a.m. Embodied, Montpelier, Wednesdays, 10:30-11:30 a.m., $15. Info, 223-5302.

Lego Club: See September 7. Milton Farmers Market: See September 7.

FREE

LA LECHE LEAGUE OF THE NORTHEAST KINGDOM: Expectant, novice and

New Parents

ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See September 2.

CHITTENDEN Fairy Workshop: Whimsy lovers share a storytime, stir Fairy Soup and stroll along Sparkle Walk. Bring a snack. Ages 3-4. Orrgle Hill Farm, Essex Junction, 9-11:30 a.m., $15 per child, $5 per additional sibling; preregister.

Bikes & Bites: Festive-minded folks walk, ride or roll into the park for a fête of live music, games and food trucks. Veterans Memorial Park, South Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Info, 846-4108.

experienced moms join nursing experts for advice and support. Enter through the children’s section of the library. Siblings welcome. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum,

ESSEX LA LECHE LEAGUE: Moms bring their bitty ones to a discussion of parenting and breastfeeding. Siblings welcome. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, first Thursday of every month, 6:30-8 p.m., FREE HOW TO BREASTFEED PRENATAL CLASS:

Expectant mamas and their partners learn the basics of breastfeeding, how to get off to the best start with their baby and where to find assistance when needed. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, first Thursday of every month, 8-9:30

a.m. and fourth Tuesday of every month, 4:30-6 p.m.; preregister. Info, 371-4415. FREE

HYDE PARK BABY CHAT: Parents with babies

mingle, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Lanpher Memorial Library, Hyde Park, first Thursday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 888-5229.

MORRISVILLE BABY CHAT: Parents with babies mingle, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Lamoille Family Center, Morrisville, second Saturday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 888-5229. BOSOM BUDDIES: New and expectant

mothers, babies and supportive grandmas rally in a relaxed evening, when peers and professionals answer mothering and breastfeeding questions. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, Monday, Sep. 11, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 371-4415. FREE BURLINGTON LA LECHE LEAGUE: New

moms bring their babies and questions to a breastfeeding support group. Older children welcome. Lending library available. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, second Tuesday of every month, 10:15 a.m. Info, 985-8228. FREE

second Tuesday of every month, 10:30 a.m.noon. Info, 720-272-8841. FREE CENTRAL VERMONT NURSING BEYOND A YEAR: Mothers discuss the joys and

challenges of breastfeeding, including nighttime parenting, weaning, healthy eating habits and setting limits, in a supportive setting. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, third Friday of every month, 9:3011:30 a.m. Info, 999-7143. FREE TODDLER LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETING:

Moms who are nursing beyond a year share stories and solutions to nighttime parenting, mealtime tips, biting, weaning and other topics. St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, Middlebury, third Monday of every month, 1:30-2:30 p.m. Info, 388-0363. FREE BREASTFEEDING CAFÉ: Mamas nurse their babies, chat and ask for answers from a certified lactation consultant. Pregnant women, supportive dads and older siblings welcome. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, third Tuesday of every month, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 349-3825. FREE BREASTFEEDING FAMILIES GROUP: Nursing

moms (and supportive dads, too!) gather for snacks and advice. Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, third Wednesday of every month, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 888-3470. FREE LA LECHE LEAGUE OF CENTRAL VERMONT:

Breastfeeding mamas swap stories and support each other, with a professional available for consultation. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, third Thursday of every month, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 999-7143. FREE

JOHNSON BABY CHAT: Parents with babies mingle, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, fourth Tuesday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 888-5229. MOMMY GROUP: Breastfeeding peer counselor Angela Scavo hosts mamas and answers questions in a relaxed setting. Middlebury Recreation Center, fourth Wednesday of every month, 9:30-10:30 a.m.

Info, 349-9084. FREE


SUBMIT YOUR OCTOBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY SEPTEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM Ukulele Kids: Musical ones try out instruments and dance to traditional children’s songs. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Williston Preschool Music: See September 7. FRANKLIN Lego Thursdays: See September 7. St. Albans Library Legos: Eager architects engage in construction projects with their peers. St. Albans Free Library, 3-5 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE RUTLAND Fair Haven Farmers Market: See September 7. WINDSOR Clay for Tots: Little potters practice, poke and play with a malleable medium. Ages 3-6. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 10:30-11:15 a.m., $12 per drop-in class. Info, 457-3500.

15 Friday CALEDONIA Hardwick Farmers Market: See September 1. CHITTENDEN ArtsRiot Truck Stop Burlington: See September 1. Burger Night: See September 1. Champlain Elementary Harvest Fest: Families kick off the school year with fall festivities, including grilled corn and hot dogs, pizza from the wood-fired oven, an obstacle course, cider pressing, bikepowered smoothies and more. Champlain Elementary School, Burlington, 5-7 p.m. Info, 373-2431. FREE Family Gym: See September 1. Friday Free for All: See September 1. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See September 1. Richmond Farmers Market: See September 1.

ORLEANS Lego Club: See September 1.

16 Saturday ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See September 2.

CHITTENDEN Burlington Farmers Market: See September 2.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. Fairy Workshop 2: Whimsy lovers share a storytime, stir Fairy Soup and stroll along Sparkle Walk. Bring a snack. Ages 5 and up. Orrgle Hill Farm, Essex Junction, 9-11:30 a.m., $15 per child, $5 per additional sibling; preregister. Milton Touch a Truck: Beep, beep! Kids climb aboard awesome autos and chat with their drivers. Bombardier Park, Milton, 9 a.m.-noon. Info, 893-4922. FREE Read to Cleo The Therapy Dog: Canine and reading enthusiasts visit with a personable pooch. Ages 3 and up. Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE

Open Daily, Sept. 3 thru Oct. 31

Different Activities each Weekend. Visit Us on Facebook for details

GIANT PUMPKIN WEIGH-IN

Visit Sampson, Annie, Pedro, Joey & JoJo at Our Petting Zoo

Sat. Sept. 23, 1-3 p.m.

HAYRIDES TO THE PUMPKIN PATCH

ES, FRUIT PI EADS , BR COOKIES IN & MORE RY! OUR BAKE

VERMONT & SPECIALTY FOOD PRODUCTS MAPLE SYRUP, HONEY, JAMS, MUSTARDS, DRESSINGS & MORE

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277 Lavigne Rd., Colchester • M-Sa 7am-8pm • Su 7am-6pm sammazzafarms.com • See our monthly sale coupon! • MC/Visa/Disc

Saturday Drama Club: See September 2.

k6h-SamMazza0917.indd 1

Shelburne Farmers Market: See September 2.

VERMONT

FRANKLIN Highgate Cross Country Kids Fun Run: Amateur athletes take their marks in three age-divided starts, beginning at 8:30 a.m. Grades 6 and under. Highgate Sports Arena, Highgate Center, 8 a.m., $1 per runner. Info, 868-3970. GRAND ISLE Champlain Island Farmers Market: See September 2. LAMOILLE Steamroller Printmaking: Helen Day Art Studio hosts a drop-in workshop where families produce big prints with heavy machinery. Rain date September 17. Sushi Yoshi, Stowe, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., $20 includes 3 prints and $20 gift certificate to Sushi Yoshi; preregister. Info, 253-8358. RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See September 2. ORLEANS Craftsbury Common Farmers Market: See September 2. WASHINGTON Capital City Farmers Market: See September 2. Kung Fu: See September 9. Waitsfield Farmers Market: See September 2.

8/24/17 1:41 PM

SWIM

PRIVATE & GROUP LESSONS UVM Indoor Pool Session starts September 10 Register by September 4 Winter session registration opens December 1

SCHOOL

GO.UVM.EDU/VTSWIMSCHOOL

WOMEN ON

WEIGHTS Six-week total body conditioning course designed specifically for women. All levels welcome.

WINDSOR Traditional Craft Saturdays: See September 2.

Six-week strength & conditioning courses designed to gain overall physical fitness. Early morning, evening, and weekend options!

GO.UVM.EDU/STRENGTHSCHOOL

Adult & Pediatric CPR, AED, and First Aid Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers Water Safety Instructor

17 Sunday ADDISON TAM Trek: Runners lace up to raise funds to support the Trail Around Middlebury in 2-, 6- and 18-mile distances, followed by refreshments and festivities. Fun Run at 10 a.m. Wright Park, Middlebury, 8 a.m., $45; free for children under 13. Info, 388-1007.

weekends starting Sept 23

Farm Market • Bakery • Greenhouses

Register now for certification courses

GO.UVM.EDU/CERTIFICATIONS TM

802.656.4483 UVM.EDU/RECREATION

KIDS VT

CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: See September 2.

WEEKENDS

SEPTEMBER 2017

WINDSOR Foodways Fridays: See September 1.

MAZZA’S 6 MILE CORN MAZE

HARVEST FUN

KIDSVT.COM

LAMOILLE Kids’ Night Out: While their parents appreciate time off, youngsters enjoy dinner, a movie and games. Grades K-5. David Gale Recreation Center, Stowe, 6-10 p.m., $15 per child. Info, 253-6138.

HEY KIDS! COME ON OUT & HAVE SOME FUN

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CALENDAR

SEPTEMBER

17 Sunday (cont.) CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See September 3. Family Gym: See September 1. Family Walking Tour: Abenaki Life on the Winoskitegok: Archaeologist Brennan Gauthier heads up a kid-friendly stroll along the Winooski River (also known as the Winoskitegok or Onion River) and shares stories about what life was like for Native Americans in Winooski before Ira Allen’s appearance. Winooski Mill Museum, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 828-3051. FREE

Sing with us! Vermont Youth Chorale Grades 5-8

Join us on Sunday 9/10 from 10-12 for our Opening Day Celebration!

8/16/17 2:11 PM

Early literacy skills get special attention during these read-aloud sessions. Some locations provide additional activities such as music, crafts or foreign-language instruction. Most story times follow the school calendar. Contact the organizers for site-specific details. MONDAY BARRE CHILDREN’S STORY HOUR: Aldrich Public Library,

10:30 a.m. Info, 476-7550.

ESSEX DROP-IN STORY TIME:

Essex Free Library, 10:3011:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313.

FRANKLIN STORY TIME:

Haston Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 285-6505.

A Hebrew school for thoughtful, active learning

HYDE PARK STORY TIME:

Lanpher Memorial Library, 6 p.m. Info, 888-4628.

Exploring Jewish heritage, tradition and community through Hebrew, art, stories, music, and service projects

NORTHFIELD CHILDREN’S STORY TIME: Brown Public

Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 485-4621.

Dynamic programming for ages pre-K through teen

10 Harrison Ave, Montpelier, VT bethjacobvt.org • 802-505-3657 Contact: learning@bethjacobvt.org

8/22/17 Young Rembrandts

KIDSVT.COM SEPTEMBER 2017 KIDS VT

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After school Art Enrichment Drawing Classes for K-6 Young Rembrandts teaches drawing skills using a see-touch-do method that all children can succeed with, learn from and love! Students Can Expect - A new exciting lesson every week - Improved core art skills - To have fun! Parents Can Expect - Increased attention to detail - Improved fine motor skills

No afterschool drawing classes at your school or in your community? Find out how easy it is to bring our awardwinning, educational, kid-friendly focused program to your location. Contact your local program director, Michelle Kessler at 802.363.7522 or michelle.kessler@youngrembrandts.com

8/25/17 11:43 AM

MILTON RHYTHM & MOVEMENT TODDLER STORY TIME: Milton

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

NORWICH WORD PLAY STORY TIME: Norwich Public

Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 649-1184.

CRAFTSBURY STORY TIME:

RANDOLPH PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Kimball Public Library,

EAST BARRE STORY TIME: East

RICHMOND STORY TIME:

FAIRFAX STORY HOUR: Fairfax

SWANTON STORYTIME:

Craftsbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 586-9683.

Barre Branch Library, 10 a.m. Info, 476-5118. Community Library, 9:3010:30 a.m. Info, 849-2420. HIGHGATE STORY TIME:

Highgate Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 868-3970.

HINESBURG YOUNGSTERS STORY TIME: Carpenter-Carse

Library, 9:30-10 a.m. Info, 482-2878.

LYNDONVILLE STORY TIME:

11 a.m. Info, 728-5073.

Richmond Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 434-3036.

Swanton Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 868-7656.

VERGENNES STORY TIME:

Bixby Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 877-2211.

WARREN PRESCHOOL STORYTIME: Warren Public

Library, 10 a.m. Info, 595-2582. THURSDAY

NORTHFIELD CHILDREN’S STORY TIME: See Monday.

STOWE STORY TIMES FOR 2-3-YEAR-OLDS: Stowe Free

Library, 10:15-11:15 a.m. Info, 253-6145. WAITSFIELD STORY TIME:

Joslin Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 496-4205.

WOODSTOCK BABY STORY TIME: Norman Williams

Public Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 457-2295.

TUESDAY ALBURGH STORY HOUR:

Alburgh Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 796-6077.

BARRE CHILDREN’S STORY HOUR: See Monday.

10 a.m. Info, 524-4643.

HUNTINGTON STORY TIME:

Sherburne Memorial Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 422-9765.

Quechee Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 295-1232.

MONTPELIER STORY TIME:

Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507.

GEORGIA PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Georgia Public Library,

Huntington Public Library, 10:45 a.m. Info, 434-4583.

SHELBURNE STORY TIME:

ST. ALBANS STORY HOUR: St.

ESSEX MUSICAL STORY TIME:

Essex Free Library, 10:3011:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313.

QUECHEE STORY TIME:

HINESBURG YOUNGSTERS STORY TIME: See Tuesday.

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 244-7036.

YOUNGREMBRANDTS.COM

Stowe Farmers Market: See September 3.

Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

WATERBURY BABY & TODDLER STORY TIME: Waterbury

To learn more or to find a class in your area, link to:

LAMOILLE Chris Ludington Memorial Trail Run/ Walk: The community comes out to run or walk 5K or 10K on scenic trails. Registration opens at 8 a.m. Trapp Family Lodge, Stowe, 9 a.m., $20-25; proceeds benefit the Chris Ludington Scholarship Fund.

Cobleigh Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 626-5475.

Pierson Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 985-5124.

3:03 PM

Winooski Farmers Market: See September 3.

RICHMOND BABY LAP TIME:

Richmond Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 434-3036.

Central Vermont’s Jewish Community Since 1913

k12v-BethJacob0917.indd 1

Open Streets BTV: Festive-minded folks explore miles of Burlington’s urban streets on bike and on foot in a safe and car-free environment, while enjoying healthy and family-oriented activities. Burlington South End, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Info, 540-2593. FREE

Story Times

No experience necessary

Visit www.vyo.org for more information

k12v-VYO0917.indd 1

Let’s Grow Kids Song & Dance: Community members in support of a strong start for each child learn the song and dance for the “Kids Out Loud” Flash Mob & Concert event, scheduled for October 1 in Burlington. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 2 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

MILTON INFANT STORY TIME:

Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 223-3338.

WILLISTON STORY TIME:

Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918.

WOODSTOCK PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Norman

Williams Public Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 457-2295.

WEDNESDAY BARNES & NOBLE STORYTIIME:

Barnes & Noble, 11 a.m. Info, 864-8001. HIGHGATE STORY TIME: See

Tuesday.

HYDE PARK STORY TIME: See

Monday, 10 a.m.

LYNDONVILLE STORY TIME:

See Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.

MARSHFIELD STORY TIME & PLAYGROUP: Jaquith

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 426-3581.

BRISTOL STORY TIME:

Lawrence Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 453-2366.

KILLINGTON STORYTIME:

LINCOLN STORY TIME: Lincoln Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 453-2665. MILTON PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Milton Public Library,

10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

MONTPELIER STORY TIME: See

Tuesday.

RANDOLPH TODDLER STORY TIME: Kimball Public Library,

10:30-11 a.m. Info, 728-5073.

RICHMOND EARLY BIRD MATH STORYTIME: Richmond

Free Library, 11 a.m. Info, 434-3036. SOUTH BURLINGTON PAJAMARAMA: Barnes &

Noble, 7 p.m. Info, 864-8001. ST. JOHNSBURY STORY TIME:

St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m. Info, 748-8291.

RUTLAND STORY TIME:

STOWE BABY & TODDLER STORY TIME: Stowe Free

ST. ALBANS STORY HOUR: See

SWANTON STORYTIME: See

Monday.

Wednesday.

WATERBURY PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Waterbury

WINOOSKI STORY TIME:

Rutland Free Library, 10-10:45 a.m. Info, 773-1860.

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 244-7036.

WESTFORD STORY TIME:

Westford Public Library, 11 a.m. Info, 878-5639. FRIDAY BRANDON STORY TIME:

Library, 10:15-11:15 a.m. Info, 253-6145.

Winooski Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 655-6424.

SATURDAY COLCHESTER SATURDAY DROP-IN STORY TIME:

Burnham Memorial Library, 10 a.m. Info, 264-5660.

ENOSBURG STORY HOUR:

Brandon Free Public Library, 3 p.m. Info, 247-8230.

Enosburgh Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 933-2328.

CRAFTSBURY STORY TIME: See

MILTON DROP-IN SATURDAY STORYTIME: Milton Public

Tuesday.

ENOSBURG MOMMY & ME STORY HOUR: Enosburgh

Public Library, 9-10 a.m. Info, 933-2328.

Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

SATURDAY STORY TIME AT PHOENIX BOOKS: Phoenix

Books, 11 a.m. Info, 448-3350.


SUBMIT YOUR OCTOBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY SEPTEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

18 Monday CHITTENDEN Colchester Preschool Music: See September 11. Stories with Megan: See September 11. Williston Preschool Music: See September 7, 11 a.m. FRANKLIN Crafternoon: Painted Leaves: Artsy youngsters assemble a festive fall garland from autumn leaves. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See September 11. WASHINGTON Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup: See September 11.

19 Tuesday CHITTENDEN Tuesday Night Trail Running: See September 5. Winooski Lego Club: See September 5. FRANKLIN Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Gaming Tuesdays: See September 5. Music & Movement With Ellie: See September 5. WASHINGTON Maker Program: See September 12. WINDSOR Lego Tuesdays: See September 5.

20 Wednesday ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See September 2. CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: See September 6.

Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: See September 6. Little One & Me Circle Time: Tiny tykes team together for movement, songs, play and snacks. Ages 5 and under. Jericho Town Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 899-4686. FREE

GRAND ISLE Champlain Island Farmers Market: See September 6.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

WASHINGTON Just-For-Fun Movies: A wholesome flick fascinates viewers of all ages. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE

ORLEANS Lego Club: See September 1.

WINDSOR Sensory Lab for Tots: See September 13.

WINDSOR Foodways Fridays: See September 1.

Woodstock Market on the Green: See September 6.

21 Thursday CALEDONIA Lego Club: See September 7. CHITTENDEN Jericho Farmers Market: See September 7. Lego Club: See September 7. Milton Farmers Market: See September 7. Williston Preschool Music: See September 7. FRANKLIN Family STEAM Night: Moms, dads and kids team up for activities around science, technology, engineering, art and/or math, with a theme this month of apples and gravity. Fairfax Community Library, 6:30-7:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE Lego Thursdays: See September 7. PJ Story Hour: Tykes in nightwear snuggle in for nursery rhymes, snacks and crafts. St. Albans Free Library, 6:30 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE RUTLAND Fair Haven Farmers Market: See September 7. WASHINGTON Books Come to Life: This Active BodyActive Brain class, led by a literacy professional, combines reading and movement. Babies through preschoolers. Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE WINDSOR Clay for Tots: See September 14.

22 Friday CALEDONIA Hardwick Farmers Market: See September 1. CHITTENDEN ArtsRiot Truck Stop Burlington: See September 1. Family Gym: See September 1. Friday Free for All: See September 1. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See September 1. Preschool Yoga with Danielle: See September 8. Richmond Farmers Market: See September 1, 3-6 p.m.

23 Saturday ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See September 2. Northeastern Open Atlatl Championship Weekend: As part of Vermont Archaeology Month, history buffs participate in or peruse this ancient hunting technique of throwing darts. Children’s activities, exhibits, workshops and demonstrations on knapping and other crafts and skills round out the day. Chimney Point State Historic Site and Museum, Addison, 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., $5-8; free for children under 15. Info, 759-2412. CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: See September 2. CHITTENDEN Burlington Farmers Market: See September 2. EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: Youngsters master basic yoga poses through games, songs and dance. Mindfulness activities improve focus and concentration. Ages 3-7. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m., $15. Info, 899-0339. Harry Potter Alliance: Fantasy fans rally together in Voldemort Can’t Stop the Rock. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 2-3:30 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Movies at the Library: Families snuggle down, see a big-screen PG-rated flick and savor snacks. Milton Public Library, 1 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE Saturday Drama Club: See September 2. Shelburne Farmers Market: See September 2. The Color Run: 5K runners lace up for this noncompetitive event and get dosed with a palette of colors. Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, 10 a.m., $39.99-44.99; a portion of proceeds benefit the Chill Foundation for underserved youth. GRAND ISLE Champlain Island Farmers Market: See September 2.

» facebook.com/kidsvt

HATHAWAY FARM & CORN MAZE You’re Lost… You’re Laughin’… You’re LOVIN’ it! 12 acre “75 Years on Hathaway Farm” Maze Lots of Cool Farm Games ... Giant Corn Pit, Toddler John Deere Tractors & Bouncy Cows Livestock Barn * Play Area * Mini Maze Pick your Admission $12 Adults own $10 Kids 4-11 & Seniors pumpkin! Open 10-5 – Closed Tuesdays Moonlight Madness in September & October every Saturday night with admission until 9pm. 741 Prospect Hill Rd, Rutland Town, VT hathawayfarm.com • 802.775.2624

k16t- hathawayfarm0917.indd 1

8/21/17 11:07 AM

www.mscvt.org A child-centered alternative education, dedicated to the philosophy and teachings of Maria Montessori.

Now enrolling ages 3-12. *A prequalified, 5 STAR program accepting Act 166/ Universal PreK funding.

RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See September 2. ORLEANS Craftsbury Common Farmers Market: See September 2. WASHINGTON Capital City Farmers Market: See September 2.

Barre, VT

All inquiries: info@mscvt.org or (802)-479-0912

23 SATURDAY, P.44 k8v-MSCVT0917.indd 1

KIDS VT

FRANKLIN Music & Movement With Ellie: See September 5.

(We like you, too!)

SEPTEMBER 2017

Family Game Day: See September 6.

ORANGE Lego Wednesdays: See September 6.

Like us on Facebook.

KIDSVT.COM

CHITTENDEN Chess Club: Smart players check out this strategy game and improve their skills with rooks, pawns and knights. All ages and experience levels. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See September 2, 3-6 p.m.

43

8/15/17 3:18 PM


CALENDAR

SEPTEMBER

23 Saturday (cont.) Kung Fu: See September 9. Waitsfield Farmers Market: See September 2. MULTIPLE VT LOCATIONS Museum Day Live!: Numerous historic sites and museums across the state open their doors to the public free of charge during this national event sponsored by Smithsonian magazine. Visit smithsonian.com/ museumdaylive to search for participating locations. Various locations statewide. Info, museumday@si.edu. FREE

24 Sunday CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See September 3. Family Gym: See September 1. Winooski Farmers Market: See September 3. LAMOILLE Stowe Farmers Market: See September 3.

WASHINGTON Maker Program: See September 12.

FRANKLIN Music & Movement With Ellie: See September 5.

WINDSOR Lego Tuesdays: See September 5.

STEM Club: Sciencey types challenge their imaginations with themed activities. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

27 Wednesday ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See September 2.

RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See September 2, 3-6 p.m.

CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: See September 6.

ORANGE Lego Wednesdays: See September 6.

CHITTENDEN Family Game Day: See September 6.

WINDSOR Sensory Lab for Tots: See September 13. Woodstock Market on the Green: See September 6.

Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: See September 6. Yoga for Kids: Young yogis engage their energy and explore breathing exercises and relaxation poses with professional instructors. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Young Writers & Storytellers: See September 13.

Playgroups

Crafts for Kids: See September 11.

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

FRANKLIN Lab Girls: Young women empower themselves by exploring science through hands-on experiments. Grades 6-12. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

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Kids enjoy fun and games during these informal gettogethers, and caregivers connect with other local parents and peers. The groups are usually free and often include snacks, arts and crafts, or music. Most playgroups follow the school calendar. Contact the organizer for site-specific details. MONDAY AUDUBON NATURE PLAYGROUP:

RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See September 11.

Green Mountain Audubon Center, 9:30-11 a.m.; preregister. Info, 434-3068.

WASHINGTON Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup: See September 11.

BURLINGTON FAMILY PLAY: Janet

S. Munt Parent-Child Center, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 862-2121.

BURLINGTON PLAYGROUP:

26 Tuesday CHITTENDEN Circle of Parents for Adoptive & Guardianship Families: Moms and dads come together to socialize about their parenting experiences and strengthen skills. Childcare and dinner included without fee. Howard Center, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 864-7467. FREE

Robert Miller Community & Recreation Center, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 578-6471.

CAMBRIDGE PLAYGROUP:

Cambridge Elementary School, 9-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229.

MILTON PLAYGROUP: Milton

Public Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 893-1457.

MORRISVILLE PLAYGROUP:

River Arts, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229.

BROOKFIELD PLAYGROUP: First

Congregational Church of Brookfield, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 685-2264.

BURLINGTON DROP-IN FAMILY PLAY: VNA Family Room, 9

Milton Farmers Market: See September 7. Ukulele Kids: See September 14. Williston Preschool Music: See September 7. FRANKLIN Lego Thursdays: See September 7. St. Albans Library Legos: See September 14, 3-5 p.m. RUTLAND Fair Haven Farmers Market: See September 7. WINDSOR Clay for Tots: See September 14.

29 Friday CALEDONIA Hardwick Farmers Market: See September 1.

Northrop Memorial Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 827-3945.

HINESBURG FAMILY PLAYTIME:

Hinesburg Town Hall, 10-11:30 a.m. PURPLE CRAYON PLAY GROUP:

Parent-Child Center, 4-7 p.m. Info, 862-2121. WINOOSKI BABY PLAYTIME:

O’Brien Community Center, 9-9:30 a.m. Info, 655-1422.

WINOOSKI PLAYTIME: O’Brien

Community Center, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 655-1422.

WEDNESDAY

Winooski Lego Club: See September 5.

TUESDAY

COLCHESTER PLAYGROUP:

FRANKLIN Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Gaming Tuesdays: See September 5.

BRADFORD PLAYGROUP: Grace

BURLINGTON PLAYGROUP: See

Monday.

Colchester Village Meeting House, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 316-2918.

RANDOLPH PLAYGROUP: St.

John’s Church, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 685-2264.

RICHMOND PLAYGROUP:

WINOOSKI PLAYTIME: See

Richmond Free Library, 8:4510:15 a.m. Info, 899-4415. SOUTH ROYALTON PLAYGROUP:

United Church on the Green, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 685-2264. THURSDAY

ALBURGH PLAYGROUP: Alburgh

BURLINGTON DROP-IN FAMILY PLAY: See Tuesday.

FATHERS AND CHILDREN TOGETHER: Janet S. Munt

Synagogue, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 864-0218.

WILLISTON PLAY TIME: Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 11 a.m.-noon. Info, 878-4918.

EVOLUTION NEW FAMILY PLAYGROUP: Evolution Prenatal

& Family Yoga Center, 11:15 a.m.-1:15 p.m. Info, 899-0339.

OHAVI ZEDEK SYNAGOGUE PLAYGROUP: Ohavi Zedek

ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, 9:3011:30 a.m., donations accepted. Info, 457-3500.

a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 862-2121.

OPEN GYM: Central VT Gymnastics Academy, 10-11:30 a.m., $7. Info, 882-8324.

United Methodist Church, 9-11 a.m. Info, 685-2264, ext. 24.

FAIRFIELD PLAYGROUP: Bent

Public Library, 9:30 a.m. Info, 796-6077.

Spanish Musical Kids: Niños celebrate Latin American culture through tunes and games en español. Ages 1-5 with a caregiver. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:45 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Music & Movement With Ellie: See September 5.

Lego Club: See September 7.

29 FRIDAY, P.46

CHITTENDEN Colchester Preschool Music: See September 11.

Williston Preschool Music: See September 7, 11 a.m.

CALEDONIA Lego Club: See September 7. CHITTENDEN Jericho Farmers Market: See September 7.

25 Monday

Crafts with Mrs. Dulac: Eager artsy kiddos pursue a hands-on project. Ages 7-10. Milton Public Library, 2 p.m.; preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE

28 Thursday

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

DADS AND KIDS PLAYGROUP:

Family Center of Washington County, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 262-3292.

ESSEX JUNCTION PLAYGROUP:

Maple Street Recreation Center, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 876-7555.

HINESBURG BABY TIME: United

Church of Hinesburg, 10-11:30 a.m.

JOHNSON PLAYGROUP: United

Tuesday.

FRIDAY BURLINGTON PLAYGROUP: See

Monday.

COLCHESTER PLAYGROUP: See

Wednesday.

HINESBURG PRESCHOOL PLAYGROUP: Hinesburg

Community School, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 482-4946.

HUNTINGTON PLAYGROUP:

Huntington Public Library, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 899-4415.

OPEN GYM: See Monday. RUTLAND PLAYGROUP: Rutland Free Library, 9:30 a.m. Info, 773-1860. STOWE PLAYGROUP: Stowe Community Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229. UNDERHILL PLAYGROUP:

Underhill Central School, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 899-4415.

Church of Johnson, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229.

SATURDAY

MILTON PLAYGROUP: See

MONTPELIER SATURDAY PLAYGROUP: Family Center of

Monday.

MONTPELIER PLAYGROUP: St. Augustine Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292.

Washington County, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292.

STOWE PLAYGROUP: Kula Yoga Center, 1-2 p.m., $10, or free with attendance at yoga class at 11:45 a.m.


SUBMIT YOUR OCTOBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY SEPTEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

ART ҉ academics FRENCH ҉ NATURE 'PE W

Ongoing Exhibits ECHO LEAHY CENTER FOR LAKE CHAMPLAIN, BURLINGTON Info, 864-1848 BUTTERFLIES, LIVE AT ECHO: A pavilion of flying creatures enchants visitors who learn about these winged beauties’ life cycle and how their natural environment can be protected. Regular museum admission, $13.5016.50; free for children under 3. Through September 4. INNOVATION PLAYGROUND: In this exhibit embracing lifelong play as a tool for technological, social and artistic invention, visitors of all ages unleash their imaginations by building with giant blue blocks, exploring virtual galaxies in a cardboard spaceship and experimenting in a fully-equipped maker space. Regular museum admission, $11.50-14.50; free for children under 3. Through January 15.

FAIRBANKS MUSEUM & PLANETARIUM, ST. JOHNSBURY Info, 748-2372 BUTTERFLY TENT: This living exhibit features fluttering painted ladies, monarchs, red admirals and more, including info about the life stages of these winged beauties and tips for creating a home butterfly garden. $7-9; free for children under 5. Open until the first frost. ‘WE ARE THE INSECTS’: The traveling live exhibit from Montréal’s Insectarium features a batch of beetles, tarantulas, scorpions, cockroaches, stick insects and more in cases for up-close viewing. $7-9; free for children under 5. Through September 20.

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HENRY SHELDON MUSEUM OF VERMONT HISTORY, MIDDLEBURY Info, 388-2117 DRAW ME A STORY‚ TELL ME A TALE:

Vermont Children’s Book Illustrators & Authors: Illustrations and artwork from 18 Green Mountain authors and artists delight visiting adults and children, including Mary Azarian’s garden-inspired alphabet drawings and Phoebe Stone’s colorful animals. Through October 15.

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JUSTIN MORRILL HOMESTEAD Info, 828-3051 THE FRUITS OF TIME: HEIRLOOM APPLES, THEN AND NOW: The story

of this seasonal sweet, now in an heirloom renaissance, is explored through photographs, illustrations, historical interpretation and narratives, including 15 watercolors from the USDA’s historic collection. $6. Through October 15.

MONTSHIRE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE, NORWICH Info, 649-2200 MAKING MUSIC: The Science of Musical Instruments: The stories, ideas and science behind the creation of musical instruments mesmerize visitors. Through displays, videos and hands-on opportunities, music lovers make and play a variety of instruments, using Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. Regular museum admission, $14-17; free for children under 2. Through September 4.

Art, Theatre, Music + Movement Classes for

Preschoolers, Homeschoolers, Afterschool, Teens, & Adults!

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Vermont Commons School Scholarship. Community. Global Responsibility.

Open House

Sunday, Oct. 15th, 1PM

PECK FARM ORCHARD, EAST MONTPELIER Info, 249-1223

Grades 6-12

PECK FARM ORCHARD CORN MAZE:

Festive fall families have fun on the farm with a leafy puzzle, PYO apples and pumpkins and free hayrides and pumpkin chuckin’ on weekends. $5 per person; free for children under 3. Through October 31. SHELBURNE MUSEUM, SHELBURNE Info, 985-3346, ext. 3395 SWEET TOOTH: THE ART OF DESSERT:

This mixed media exhibit serves up a feast for the eyes, exploring our insatiable desire for sugary stuff through paintings, prints, sculptures and more. $7-24; free for members and children under 5. Through February 18.

RSVP to Jill Strawbridge, Director of Admissions at jstrawbridge@vermontcommons.org k8h-VTcommons0917.indd 1

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Peck Farm Orchard

2nd Annual nnual CORN MAZE PYO apples & pumpkins pumpkins. Free hayrides & pumpkin-chunkin' on weekends

Wed Sun Wed-Sun Sept. 1st to Oct. 31st 10:00 5:00 10:00-5:00 750 Sibley Rd, East Montpelier 802-249-1223

KIDS VT

SELFIES: Artwork from emerging and well-known artists, including the late Andy Warhol, investigate the idea of self-portraits through the lens of photography, painting and other media. Donations accepted. Through November 11. FREE

SEPTEMBER 2017

HELEN DAY ART CENTER, STOWE Info, 253-8358 ‘EXPOSED’: National and local outdoor sculpture of all sizes and shapes spreads through the town of Stowe. Through October 21. FREE

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KIDSVT.COM

FORT TICONDEROGA, N.Y. Info, 518-585-2821 A CORN MAZE ADVENTURE: Get lost! Families navigate their way through a life-size puzzle in the shape of this historic fort while searching for history clues among the stalks. Regular museum admission, $10-23; free for children under 5. Through August 28; fall weekends through October 9.

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CALENDAR

SUBMIT YOUR OCTOBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY SEPTEMBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

SEPTEMBER

29 Friday (cont.) CHITTENDEN ArtsRiot Truck Stop Burlington: See September 1. Family Gym: See September 1. Friday Free for All: See September 1. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See September 1. Richmond Farmers Market: See September 1, 3-6 p.m.

ORLEANS Lego Club: See September 1.

CHITTENDEN Burlington Farmers Market: See September 2.

WINDSOR Foodways Fridays: See September 1.

EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: See September 23.

30 Saturday

Saturday Drama Club: See September 2. Shelburne Farmers Market: See September 2.

ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See September 2.

GRAND ISLE Champlain Island Farmers Market: See September 2.

CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: See September 2.

RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See September 2.

ORLEANS Craftsbury Common Farmers Market: See September 2. WASHINGTON Capital City Farmers Market: See September 2. Kung Fu: See September 9. Waitsfield Farmers Market: See September 2. K

Early Childhood Superheroes

KIDS VT

SEPTEMBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

Going Above and Beyond for Vermont Kids

Johanna Page Hometown: Burlington Role: Paraeducator, Burlington Area Programs

Lori Pinsonneault Hometown: Bennington Role: Community-based Child Care Support Services Coordinator

Superhero power: Reaching hard to reach kids. Johanna has a unique ability to connect with kids who are struggling in one way or another and help them come around.

Superhero power: Kindness, patience, soft spoken nature, compassion and eagerness to share her love of books and reading with children.

Johanna says: "I wish all children and families had equal acess to high-quality early care and learn­ ing opportunities, where not only kids, but also parents could learn and thrive."

Lori says: "It is such a pleasure to have the opportunity to work with so many amazing and dedicated child care providers who spend their days caring for our children and their families!"

Mandi Menard Hometown: St. Albans Role: Program Director & Lead Preschool Teacher

Laurie Metcalfe Hometown: Bennington Role: Executive Director, Northshire Day School

Superhero power: A great sense of humor! Finding humor every­ where helps Mandi, her colleagues and the children in her care get through the hard parts of the day. Mandi says: "I love building strong relationships with the chil­dren, getting to know their inter­ests and then using that informa­tion to plan new activities that they are really excited about."

Superhero power: The ability to support teachers in their day-to-day work as a mentor and guide, and help them to see the impact of their work - which is sometimes hard to see as it hap­ pens slowly over time - but can be incredibly powerful. Laurie says: ''I'll tell you, there is nothing better than a hug from a one year old in the morning. It's the best way to start your day!"

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USE YOUR WORDS BY J ORD A N A D A M S

Planning a kids event?

Crash Course

Adulthood gets redefined when two cars collide

PUZZLE PAGE ANSWERS

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SEE P. 23 FOR PUZZLES

KIDS VT

FLIPPED OUT

When the coin landed heads 10 times in a row, the kids —

RIDDLE ANSWER:

PUP. PICK. MELT. FOOD.

JUMBLES

“Use Your Words” is a monthly essay in which writers reflect on parenting and childhood. Got a story to share? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

CALENDAR

RIDDLE SEARCH ANSWER: Sweet dreams.

scared kid in trouble like he’d never known. I actually felt bad for him. Jason’s dad thanked me for my call — likely because I’d saved his insurance premiums from skyrocketing. As I recapped the situation and explained my thought process, he seemed grateful that I chose parental justice over the traditional kind. I have no idea if Jason received a punishment, but I got the impression that he would not be driving for at least the foreseeable future. I headed out feeling like I had done the right thing. My clarity and decisiveness — and the way I stood up for myself — left me feeling more like an adult than ever before in my life. But over the years, I’ve come to view that night a bit differently. I still stand by my decision to call Jason’s parents, but most of my actions were not those of a responsible adult. I ran a red light, drove at double the speed limit in a residential area and chased an unknown person. What would I have done if Jason had been belligerent, or armed? I didn’t consider any of that at the time. I also realize that the scared kid I reprimanded that night could easily have been a younger version of myself. And that the threshold into adulthood I once imagined doesn’t exist. Our lives are made up of a series of decisions, each affected by the last. Sometimes we stupidly sideswipe a car. Sometimes we chase down a driver who wronged us. Hopefully we learn something. There won’t ever be a magic moment of total and complete maturity. This realization is what makes me feel like I might actually be growing up. K

SEPTEMBER 2017

Adrenaline pumped through me as I sped after my assailant. I flashed my headlights and honked my horn, but the driver still didn’t pull over — until I brazenly passed the car and pulled in front of it at a stop sign. I stepped out of my whip to confront the driver. He turned out to be a baby-faced, relatively clean-cut teenage boy, probably a freshly licensed 16-year-old. Let’s call him Jason. “You hit my car, you little dipsh*t,” I yelled. “I know,” he said, gazing down toward his shoes. “Why didn’t you stop?” “I was going to.” “When? You should’ve stopped immediately.” “I know, I just … I didn’t know what to do.” I rolled my eyes and inspected my ride. Sure enough, she was sporting a brand new dent and a small crack in the rear taillight. I told Jason I was going to call the cops. He nodded his head and seemed to accept his fate. But then I stopped to think. Was calling the police the right choice? After all, no one was hurt and the new damage blended perfectly with the old. I certainly wasn’t going to take her into the shop over minimal surface scars. I never had before. Also, I wondered how long this process would take. I didn’t want to be late for the concert. Given that this was a non-emergency situation, and the fact that Charlotte doesn’t have its own police department, there was no way of knowing exactly who would show up, or how long we’d be waiting. Then I thought of a consequence that was both fair and exacting. “Take out your phone,” I ordered. Jason obliged. “Now, dial your parents.” A few seconds later, I was explaining what had just happened to Jason’s father. He told me he’d drive over and address the situation. While we waited for his dad to arrive, Jason displayed genuine remorse. He was on the verge of tears as he sought my forgiveness. He admitted he got swept up in his fear and panicked. He wasn’t some punk trying to skirt consequences, just a

KIDSVT.COM

espite being solidly in my mid-thirties, I’ve only recently started to feel like a grown-up. I spent many years waiting for a definitive moment that would propel me across the threshold into adulthood. But it was something far less conventional than home ownership, marriage or having kids that made me think I’d arrived. A few years ago, I was driving through my hometown of Charlotte, on my way to a show at Higher Ground in South Burlington. The town’s only stoplight is at the intersection of Route 7 and Ferry Road, and, after a certain hour, there isn’t much traffic. But on this particular evening, a driver was following closely behind me. As I approached the intersection, the light changed to yellow. I considered careening through, but chose to stop. The driver behind me had other plans. Rather than wait out the light, the slightly sporty sedan passed me on the right and sped toward the intersection. That’s when I heard metal scrape metal, and felt a sharp jolt. The driver had clipped my car. Are you kidding me? I thought. Now we’re going to have to call the police and exchange insurance info. As I watched the car zoom through the red light, I assumed it would pull over so we could handle the situation — like adults. But it kept going. As its glowing taillights disappeared up the road, incredulity and rage washed over me. Oh, hell no, I thought. You’re not getting away that easily. I jammed on the gas, blew through the red light and tore after the driver. My car was by no means fancy. My trusty 2000 Dodge Neon had dents, nicks, scratches and a couple of minor cracks in the windshield. She was rusty, the cassette player no longer worked and the cabin had an ineffable “old car” smell. She was basically motorized garbage, but she was my baby, and I loved her. Despite being rough around the edges, she got me where I needed to go. Still, it wasn’t the damage to my car that made me snap. It was the principle: You don’t hit another vehicle and then just drive away. Not my vehicle, anyway.

SILLY SCHOOL BUS ANSWERS: 1. Fireman 2. Shark fin 3. Periscope 4. Destination (Australia) 5. Apple 6. Walrus driver 7. Rose 8. Basketball 9. Comb 10. Train cowcatcher 11. Drawbridge 12. Toothpaste 13. School spelled “Skool” 14. Scuba diver 15. Mona Lisa 16. Nut and bolt 17. Wind-up key

D

Submit your info by September 15 online at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com

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Kids VT — September 2017  

The Back to School Issue