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OCTOBER 2017

FREE

THE

N O I T A V INN ISSUE

Inside ECHO’s Latest Exhibit PAGE 14

Windsor’s American Precision Museum PAGE 30

Raising Media Savvy Kids PAGE 32

VOL.24 NO.09


Vermont Ballet Theater and School CENTER FOR DANCE 2017-2018 CLASS REGISTRATION Now Open!!

Ballet • Pointe Modern • Jazz Lyrical Contemporary Hip-Hop • Yoga • Pilates Cardio and more. Ages 3-Adult, Beginner-Pre-Professional Register at vbts.org today!

Vermont’s Own

TWO LOCATIONS! Essex Campus: 21 Carmichael Street, Suite 203 Shelburne Campus: 4066 Shelburne Road

Nutcracker

returns to the Flynn on Dec. 16 & 17!

“Simply the Best” Main Office: 802-878-2941 The Dance Shop at VBTS: 802-879-7001 www.vbts.org • info@vbts.org

Tickets on sale soon at flynntix.org.

Official School of Vermont Ballet Theater, Winner of Readers Choice Award Best Ballet School, Alexander Nagiba Director. Untitled-3 1

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OCTOBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

PARENTS: Let Your Kids Get Creative After School MAKE THINGS

PAINT • DRAW

ACT

HAVE FUN

WEAR FUNKY COSTUMES

WORK ON A TEAM

DANCE • PERFORM WEAR MAKEUP HAVE FUN WITH FRIENDS

Are you looking for an exciting, educational program for your children? A program that will challenge them to reach higher levels of creativity and that teaches students there is more than one way to solve a problem?

KIDS VT

Would you like to work with kids as their Team Manager?

THE PROGR IS KID-DRI AM TEAM POWVEN & ERED!

Contact Pat Dilego at 578-0998 or vtdicreativity@gmail.com DI in Vermont www.vtdi.org

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KIDSVT.COM OCTOBER 2017 KIDS VT

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at the flynn

Season Sponsor

family series

daniel tiger’s neighborhood live! workshops Wednesday, October 11 music together Monday mornings through 12/4. chicago children’s Join 9:30-10:15 am or 10:30-11:15 am New sessions in January & April. theatre Ages 3+

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Red Kite Treasure Adventure Sunday, October 22 Ages 4+ | Sensory Friendly

OCTOBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

a christmas carol Friday, December 8

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Thursday, May 3

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KIDS VT

Wednesday, May 9 Ages 3+ | Sensory Friendly

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ENGAGING ACTIVE LEARNERS ANNUAL CONFERENCE Integrating Creativity into Curriculum

Wednesday, Dec. 13, 8 am-3 pm

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A R T S

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INN VTHAET ISSUE ION STAFF QUESTION

EDITOR’S NOTE

STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS

What was your most memorable Halloween costume?

COPUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Cathy Resmer

cathy@kidsvt.com COPUBLISHER

Colby Roberts

colby@kidsvt.com

I was INSPECTOR GADGET one year. My dad built a helicopter coming out of my hat using PVP pipes.

MANAGING EDITOR

Alison Novak

alison@kidsvt.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

COREY GRENIER, MARKETING AND EVENTS DIRECTOR

Meredith Coeyman meredith@kidsvt.com ART DIRECTOR

Brooke Bousquet brooke@kidsvt.com

MARKETING & EVENTS DIRECTOR

Corey Grenier

corey@kidsvt.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Kaitlin Montgomery

Alison, circa 1983

kaitlin@kidsvt.com

CALENDAR WRITER

Brett Stanciu

brett@kidsvt.com PROOFREADERS

Katherine M. Isaacs, Kara Torres PRODUCTION MANAGER

John James CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Don Eggert DESIGNERS

Kirsten Cheney, Rev. Diane Sullivan, Richele Young CIRCULATION MANAGER

Matt Weiner BUSINESS MANAGER

Cheryl Brownell CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Katherine M. Isaacs, Mary Ann Lickteig, Ken Picard, Heather Polifka-Rivas, Kristen Ravin, Autumn Spencer, Sarah Stewart Taylor, Jessica Lara Ticktin PHOTOGRAPHERS

Andy Brumbaugh, James Buck, Jim Deshler, Matthew Thorsen ILLUSTRATOR

Marc Nadel

Published 11x per year. Circulation: 25,000 at 600+ locations throughout northern and central Vermont. © 2017 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.

When I was 10, I wanted to be a robot, but procrastinated making my costume and discovered that I couldn’t hold my candy bag open while wearing a big box. My mom hastily fashioned a creative HERSHEY’S KISS COSTUME using tinfoil and bent coat hangers. I had a strip of paper that said “Hershey’s” hanging from my collar. I thought it looked great — until a guy asked me if I was dressed up as leftovers. CATHY RESMER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR

CONTRIBUTOR’S NOTE SARAH STEWART TAYLOR (“Tool Time,” page 30) is a fiction writer and journalist who lives in Hartland with her husband, three children, and a growing number of chicken and sheep. She loves going on adventures and introducing her kids to quirky aspects of Vermont history. Find her at sarahstewarttaylor.com.

KIDS VT

ALISON NOVAK, MANAGING EDITOR

DIANE SULLIVAN, DESIGNER AND COLORING CONTEST CREATOR

OCTOBER 2017

Editorial content in Kids VT is for general informational purposes. Parents must use their own discretion for following the advice in any editorial piece. Acceptance of advertising does not constitute service/product endorsement. Kids VT is a proud member of the Parenting Media Association. Kids VT distribution is audited for accuracy. Da Capo Publishing shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Da Capo Publishing may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Da Capo Publishing reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers.

I

’m a child of the eighties. Growing up, I built with bristle blocks, not Minecraft blocks. If I had a question, I would crack open my trusty World Book encyclopedia. When a teacher assigned a research report on Ponce de León or blue whales, I’d roam the dusty stacks of the local library, looking for every book on the subject I could find. Accessing newspaper articles from the past meant turning to a behemoth contraption called the microfiche machine. Now when my kids want answers, they turn to tech. “Siri, how many days until February fourth,” my son recently implored the iPad, trying to figure out precisely how long he had to wait until his 8th birthday. When my 10-year-old daughter needs inspiration for Halloween costumes, she turns to Google Images. Getting information is quicker and more convenient than I ever could have imagined when I was a kid. But it also raises a whole host of questions. How do we raise our kids to think critically about online information? How do we teach them to identify whether something is an ad or an article, or comes from a credible source? In this month’s Innovation Issue, I talked to local librarians about their role in helping kids become educated consumers and users of digital information (“Fact Finders,” page 32). Innovation doesn’t always involve computers. Sarah Stewart Taylor traveled to the American Precision Museum in Windsor, and nearby manufacturing hub Springfield, with her three kids to explore the state’s past as a center of machine-tool innovation (“Tool Time, page 30). Sarah Tuff Dunn writes about a Vermont educator who’s bringing the maker movement to kids in rural Vermont (page 28). And Brett Stanciu highlights an afterschool program in Hardwick that encourages creative thinking through tinkering (page 16). Flip to page 34 for our events calendar, full of family events in October, ranging from Halloween happenings to fun runs. We hope it’s just the right amount of information to make your family’s life easier, and more fun.

KIDSVT.COM

P.O. BOX 1184 • BURLINGTON, VT 05402 802-985-5482 • KIDSVT.COM

Information Age

I was the youngest of eight kids, so my costumes were ODDS AND ENDS that were left over from what somebody else once wore. In other words ... all my costumes were the best!

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PRESENTS

ORTHODONTICS

D R S . P E T E R S O N , R YA N & E AT O N

HALLOWEEN CANDY BUY BACK! Bring us your candy and we will give YOU $1 for each pound of candy and donate $1 for each pound to Vermont Food Bank.

November 25th • 10Am, 12pM & 2pM November 26th • 10aM & 12pM

Everyone who brings in candy will be entered in a raffle for a $50 Amazon gift card!

riDes lEave From maiN stReet laNding iN buRlingtOn. enJoy tHe riDe froM buRlingTon tO chArlotTe anD bacK agaIn, singIng cArols, readIng hOlidaY stoRies And eNjoyiNg a Treat or tWo!

Nov. 1,2,3, and 7th both offices 8-5p Nov. 6 Williston 8-5p Nov. 8 Both offices 8-3p Nov. 9 St. Albans 8-2p

guEst aPpearAnces from sanTa, frOsty thE snOwman and moRe. alL proCeeds from jiNgle belL exPress go tO the locaL roNald mcdoNald hoUse chAritiEs of buRlingTon pRograMs.

Public Welcome!

Braces for Children & Adults ST. ALBANS OFFICE 80 Maple Depot 802-527-7100

moRe inFormaTion About Rmhc can Be foUnd oN our websiTe: wWw.Rmhcvt.oRg

WILLISTON OFFICE 277 Blair Park Road 802-878-5323

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Outstanding Academics • Inspired Learning

KIDS VT

OCTOBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

Core Academics • STEM • Global Studies • Digital Literacy • Art • Music Spanish • PE • Project based learning• Individual Learning Goals

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N ovember 9-12, 2017 November

Join us for our Fall Open House on Sunday, November 5th @ 3 pm

Tickets: $24-$42 802 86-FLYNN flynntix.org

We “TRIPLE-DOG-DARE” you!

Student/senior discounts at some performances; group rates available

Visit our website vtdayschool.org for more information. Email: info@vtdayschool.org. Phone: 802-495-5150 6701 Shelburne Road, Shelburne k4t-VTDaySchool1017.indd 1

Flynn MainStage s! Fe een atu t Burlington, VT rin h& g 13 out y talente t d Vermon

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Generous support from

Media partner

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INN VHAETIO N ISSUE T

MATTHEW THORSEN

OCTOBER 2017

Writing Contest & Winners .........24 Coloring Contest Winners ............24 Coloring Contest .................................25 Puzzle Page .............................................26 Birthday Club .........................................26 Puzzle Answers ....................................47

JUST FOR KIDS

ese & wine Your chaend m ore! place

Jim-Jam’s Jack-O-Lantern-O-Matic

Kid Inventor Jim-Jam won’t lift a finger to carve a jack-o-lantern, but he’ll lower a toe! Stepping on a pedal, Jim-Jam (A) tilts a pitcher (B), which spills milk (C) onto Lynx (D), who doesn’t know that you shouldn’t cry over it. Tears (E) fill the bucket, making the seesaw (F) lift, releasing Jack-in-the-Box (G). This shakes the toadstool (H), causing the toad (I) to fire the cannon (J), which launches a coconut (K) onto a strength tester (L). The ringing bell makes Jitters the Butler (M) trip over Poodle’s plush pillow (N), upending the doggie bowl (O), which flings poodle chow (P) onto the canvas (Q). Intellectual Oriole (R) declares in the microphone (S) that the new painting is a masterpiece, and the megaphone (T) magnifies the message so much that it cracks open a safe (U). Money (V) tumbles out, causing a gold prospector (W) to dance for joy. Famed sculptor Pokey McDrill with his jackhammer, Bill (X) thinks that tapping must be from another woodpecker, and is inspired to carve a happy face into a perfectly plump pumpkin (Y). But what about (Z)? That’s the sound Jim-Jam makes while he naps!

KIDSVT.COM OCTOBER 2017 KIDS VT

23

28

Just for Kids 23 Halloween Machine 24 Writing Contest

Maker on the Move Lucie deLaBruere wants all of Vermont’s students to be tuned in to tech

Tool Time

24 25 26 47

30

Windsor’s American Precision Museum traces Vermont’s innovative past

& Winners Coloring Contest Winners Coloring Contest Puzzle Page Birthday Club Puzzle Answers

CALENDAR

OCTOBER

SPONSORED BY:

Spooky Steps Costumed competitors of all running abilities race through the Capital City’s downtown during the AUTUMN ONION 5K. Sunday, October 29, 9 a.m, at Onion River Sports in Montpelier.

Discounts on Natural, GlutenFree and KidFriendly Foods ARGAIN PRICES ! ALL AT B

1186 Williston Rd. So. Burlington, VT 05403 (Next to the Alpine Shop) 802.863.0143 Open 7 days 10am-7pm cheeseandwinetraders.com 8/12/16 4:22 PM

OCTOBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

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Week to Week SAT

KIDS VT

OCT 7

34

Fact Finders Welcome 5 Editor’s Note

Short Stuff Autumn Answers 8

SAT

OCT 21

Rug Concert: Young classical music enthusiasts are introduced to instruments and singers in an informal setting at Elley-Long Music Center in Colchester.

Calendar 34 Daily Listings 35 Halloween Events 36 Live Performances 37 Classes 38 Science & Nature 40 New Parents 41 Ongoing Exhibits 44 Story Times 46 Playgroups On the Cover

CKS serves learners from pre-school (3 years old) through 8th grade

Valuable! Affordable! Inclusive! Innovative! Come see the benefits yourself!

Financial aid available!

In this photo by James Buck, friends Tenzin and Jigmed explore a spaceship station at ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain’s Innovation Playground exhibit.

136 Locust Street Burlington, VT 862-6696 www.cksvt.org admissions@cksvt.org facebook.com/cksvt

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KIDS VT

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Calendar Clues Kids Say What? Trending Parenting Hacks Throwback Pet Corner #InstaKidsVT

Fall Festival with Ballet Vermont & Mister Chris : Families celebrate the season with song and dance at Bread & Butter Farm in Shelburne.

OCTOBER 2017

Staff Question Contributor’s Note

Columns 11 Kids Beat 13 One to Watch 14 Destination Recreation 15 Balancing Act 16 The Art of 17 Checkup 19 Bookworms 20 Fit Familes 21 Mealtime 47 Use Your Words

SAT

OCT 14

KIDSVT.COM

Librarians’ tips for helping kids make sense of online information

32

Forest Fantasy with Wonderfeet: Lovers of whimsy create tiny dwellings and fairy-themed crafts at Camp Betsey Cox in Pittsford.

Like the University of Vermont Medical Center on Facebook and get weekly updates from Dr. First! See “First With Kids” videos at uvmhealth.org.

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TRENDING

What is proper trick-or-treating etiquette?

KIDS VT

OCTOBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

H

8

alloween is that special time of year when parents turn a blind eye to every health and safety lesson we strive to instill in our children. Here kid, dress up like Joan Rivers, head out into the night and demand candy from strangers! (What? Not everyone’s parents make their 10-year-old aspiring comedian walk around saying “Trick-or-treat! Can we tawk here?!”) Moms and dads get a little wacky come October 31st. Maybe it’s all those pumpkinspice lattes. Maybe it’s that we know a long, dark winter is looming. Whatever the reason, we’re making eyeball fruit punch, watching “DIY gaping wound” tutorials on YouTube and paying way too much for plastic costumes at Party City. How do we reconcile this temporary madness with helping our kids make good decisions and retain a modicum of self-control? Talk with them

about Halloween safety and etiquette. Self-proclaimed “manners mentor” Maralee McKee offers an extensive list of trick-ortreating tips. First and

AUTUMN ANSWERS foremost, costumes are required. Halloween’s not just a sugary land-grab. Historically, sweet treats were meant to placate wandering spirits. Costumes don’t have to be elaborate or expensive, but should be good enough to acknowledge that we’re all playing a part in this holiday theater. Among McKee’s other suggestions: Assume that each house has a one-piece limit; don’t dig around in the bowl for “the good stuff ”; don’t offer your opinion of the candy choices; say “Thank you!” every time. Julia Elliott, editor in chief at Detroit-based Metro Parent,

Calendar Clues

Saturday, October 7, ‘MADAILA ON THE MOUNTAIN’, 1-5 p.m., at the Middlebury Snow Bowl in Hancock. Saturday, October 14: ENCHANTED FOREST, 4-8 p.m., at Hubbard Park in Montpelier. Sunday, October 29,

HALLOWEEN BIKE RIDE,

1:30-4 p.m., at City Hall Park in Burlington.

points out that Halloween etiquette applies to adults as well. If you plan to drive your children to another neighborhood, park your car and accompany your gaggle of ghosts. Cruising slowly along behind them is creepy, and not in a good way. Elliott is also clear: Give out actual treats. No life was ever changed by an apple received on Halloween. Kids get piles of candy in exchange for showing up on your doorstep looking adorable, hilarious or terrifying. Stick to the program, people. As always, the most important thing to remember is that you’re the parent — on Halloween, and every other day. Decide what sort of etiquette you think is relevant and important, and make sure your kids understand your rules — before the sugar rush kicks in.  In this monthly column, comedian, writer and mom Autumn Spencer answers tricky parenting questions. Have a question for Autumn? Send it to ideas@kidsvt.com.

KIDS SAY WHAT?

“Mom, I love your body.

You are good to snuggle but you can also break a table. —HENRY, AGE 6

Big-box chain Toys “R” Us files for bankruptcy. Lucky for us Vermonters, we’ve got some great local toy shops to fill the void. Kellogg’s releases limitededition Unicorn Froot Loops in the U.K. Just what kids need... another sugary cereal. Twelve-year-old ventriloquist takes home million dollar prize as winner of America’s Got Talent. Time for your kids to cultivate their voice-throwing skills? Good Day, Good Night — a never-beforepublished picture book by the late author Margaret Wise Brown — to be released this month. In case you were a little sick of reading Goodnight Moon for the two-millionth time. American Academy of Pediatrics releases its first clinical report on tattooing, piercing and scarification in adolescents and young adults. Does it include a list of tattoos you’ll regret getting when you’re 40? A 47-yearold man suffering from a chronic cough had a Playmobil plastic traffic cone removed from his lungs. He inhaled the thing when he was 7!


PARENTING HACKS PET CORNER

This month, we asked parents to share school lunch ideas that go beyond the cheese sandwich. Send your parenting hacks to ideas@kidsvt.com. I got this idea from [website] Weelicious: A slice of bread with the crust cut off, then rolled flat with a rolling pin. Smear with cream cheese. Then super thinly sliced veggies layered at one end. Sugar snap peas, carrots, peppers, celery, etc. Roll it like sushi. Then slice into bite sizes. My son loves these and they fit great in a bento box lunch. It also works well with sunbutter and jelly. Also, the tortilla version with peanut butter and banana is a hit too.

Spinach applesauce mini muffins. Great for snack time! My little guy loves them.

Sushi tacos. We send them with rice in a thermos and a package of those seaweed snacks in the Asian food aisle. So easy and so good. —MEGAN RUDY

—MELISSA There’s really nothing special SENESAC here — just a turkey sandwich — but presentation makes all Hummus with the difference. sliced baguette or egg —EMILY FISCHL salad with cilantro. Add cut-up fruit or homemade pear or apple sauce. Sofi Gonella shared this cute feline photo via Facebook. “My daughter, Gretta, and our cat, Napi,” she wrote. “We were celebrating Napi’s birthday!”

—SHEILA SPENCER

—LISA MARIE BERRY

THROWBACK OCTOBER 2016

#INSTAKIDSVT THE

INN VATION ISSUE



Follow @kids_vt on Instagram.



Post your photos on Instagram with the hashtag #instakidsvt. We’ll select a photo to feature in the next issue.

@meredithtested Started our

day picking up trash at Blanchard Beach in Burlington, Vermont for #internationalcoastalcleanup day.

KIDS VT

Read the full story at kidsvt.com/ tabletopgames.

HERE’S HOW:

OCTOBER 2017

In last year’s October issue, Megan James talked to Scott Gemignani, owner of community game space and store Tinker & Smithy in Middlebury, about his favorite fun and educational board games for families. Gemignani views non-electronic games as an antidote to our society’s collective screen addiction. “There are no Saturday morning cartoons,” he says of his household. “We sit down in front of the fire, and we play a game.”

KIDSVT.COM

The Art of... Tabletop Games

Thanks for sharing your family photos with us using the hashtag #instakidsvt. We loved this picture showing you’re never too young to help beautify your community. Share a picture of your kids in the pumpkin patch or dressed up for Halloween this month.

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Timber Lane Pediatrics

We’ve been providing pediatric care in the Burlington area for over 40 years. Our physicians and staff continue to dedicate themselves to the health and care of infants, children and adolescents from birth through age 22. Our goal is to provide you with the best medical care for your family. We are accepting new patients at our 3 locations.

51 Timber Lane, South Burlington, VT 05403 To make an appointment, please call 802-864-0521

1127 North Ave., Burlington, VT 05408 To make an appointment, please call 802-846-8100

11 Haydenberry Drive, Suite 103, Milton, VT 05468 To make an appointment, please call 802-893-1200

Checkout our website – www.timberlanepeds.com

OCTOBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

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4/26/16 1:22 PM

VERMONT STUDENT PASS * FOR $89

KIDS VT

Kindergarten through 12th grade students get unlimited access to Pico Mountain’s 57 trails all season. (866) 667 PICO

picomountain.com

*Price increases to $109 after Dec. 17, 2017. All season passes are subject to 7% applicable state and local taxes. Get more information online at picomountain.com

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B Y M E RE D I T H C O EY M AN & A L IS O N N OVAK

BOOKS

Bernie for Beginners

Anyone who has seen Bernie on the stump will recognize the mantras in BERNIE SANDERS GUIDE TO POLITICAL REVOLUTION, released in August as a young-adult counterpart to his book Our Revolution.. The guide’s epigraph — “Never ever lose your sense of outrage” — is a rallying cry to America’s young people, whom Vermont’s junior senator calls “the smartest, most idealistic and least prejudiced generation in the modern history of the United States.” Each straight-talking chapter takes on a yuuuge topic, from universal health care to climate change. Throughout the text, phrases like “In my view,” and “To my mind,” weave around statistics, highlighted vocabulary words and bipartisan studies, suggesting that Sanders trusts young readers to form their own views. Sidebars with Sanders’ tweets and infographics that look more like concert posters than charts about the wage gap and carbon emissions give the text a hip feel. As the foreword reminds readers, “Democracy is not a spectator sport.” —MC

SCHOOLS

Students at the Center

Students are an underutilized resource when it comes to creating positive change in schools. That’s a driving force behind Champlain Valley Union High School teacher Stan Williams’ focus on student-centered learning, an approach to teaching that gives kids decision-making power and choice in the classroom. The humanities teacher and instructional coach is the sole Vermont recipient of a 2017 LAWRENCE W. O’TOOLE TEACHER LEADERSHIP AWARD, given to innovative public high school teachers in New England by the Nellie Mae Education Foundation. Along with the recognition comes a sweet sum of $15,000, which Williams has already begun putting to good use. He’s started a Think Tank class at CVU, along with teaching partner Emily Rinkema, where students will delve into educational research and learn about how the brain works, then identify and carry out personalized projects to improve the school and district. He’s also bringing Think Tank Clubs to the four middle schools in Champlain Valley School District. And Williams plans to organize an end-of-year education symposium — where middle and high school kids will be the teachers, and adults will be the students. —AN Learn more about CVU’s Think Tank class at cvuthinktank.weebly.com.

Bernie Sanders Guide to Political Revolution: Henry Holt & Co., 240 pages, $16.99.

GIVING BACK

Diapers for Days Dee Physical Therapy’s annual GREAT DIAPER DRIVE — a project that collects disposable diapers for families served by the Committee on Temporary Shelter (COTS) — doesn’t officially start until late October. But the event’s organizer, Jason Fitzgerald, secured his biggest donation ever this summer. Burlington-based Seventh Generation pledged 57,994 diapers — more than the drive has ever collected in one year — which they delivered to Dee’s South Burlington office by 18-wheeler. During the two-month event, Fitzgerald hopes to collect another 40,000 nappies, which he’ll use to build a wall of diapers in the Dee office before donating them to COTS in December. In addition to contributions from former and current patients, businesses including Shelburne Supermarket, Hannaford Brothers supermarkets, Leonardo’s Pizza, and Bouchard & Sons Garage have also donated money, labor and goods to help the effort. Said Fitzgerald: “The community has been amazing.” —AN Dee Physical Therapy Great Diaper Drive kickoff party, Wednesday, October 25, from 12:30-1:30 p.m. at their South Burlington office (23 San Remo Dr.). Diapers can be dropped off at Dee’s South Burlington, Shelburne or Hinesburg offices during business hours until Monday, December 18.

Fitzgerald in front of the wall of diapers


Saturday, October 28th 2-6 pm | Oakledge Park

G DELTA DENTAL" smile power'"

KIDS VT

OCTOBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

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Have a spooktacular good time on a hayride and wandering through the haunted walk. There will be a costume contest, and music, games, food trucks and fun for everyone.

9/27/17 10:27 AM

THE PERFECT VERMONT BOOT!

The event is FREE and the haunted walk is wheelchair-accessible! Produced by: Sponsored by:

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We carry the largest selection in the area. Youth styles too!

BURLINGTON

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COLCHESTER

SHELBURNE

ST ALBANS

* Selection varies by store. 9/20/17 11:13 AM


ONE TO WATCH BY M A RY A N N L I CKT E I G

Rock Star

The sky’s the limit for this teen climber

B

en Blackmore keeps scaling new heights. Literally. The day before Kids VT caught up with the 16-year-old Charlotte rock climber, he’d successfully bouldered Touching the Sky, one of the most difficult climbs at Smugglers’ Notch. In contrast to sport climbing, which requires harnesses and clipping to bolts along the route, bouldering involves short climbs without a harness. Ben does both. In the U.S., the difficulty of bouldering

RSE THO EW

“One to Watch” shines a light on a young Vermonter who is going places. Know a local child or teen who’s recently done something amazing? Nominate him or her at kidsvt.com/ vermont/kidsvtonetowatch/page.

for the story and a chance to win a copy of Tale of Three Gunboats

KIDS VT

MA TTH

Curious?

OCTOBER 2017

climbs, called problems, is rated with the V Scale, which ranges from V0, the easiest, to V16. Touching the Sky is a V12. Although exact ranks fluctuate dayto-day, Ben falls among the top 10 junior climbers, and the top 100 adults in the country. He’s received endorsements from chalk-bag maker BetaLabs, and climbing-shoe manufacturer Evolv. A member of the Youth Pro Team at Petra Cliffs in Burlington, he has competed in four national competitions. Just getting there requires qualifying at local, regional and divisional levels. Before Ben came along, it had been nearly 15 years since Petra Cliffs sent a climber to nationals. In July, Ben narrowly missed the final round in the sport climbing nationals. “He’s definitely a well-rounded climber,” said Sam Edson, Ben’s coach for three years. He stays cool and confident in competition and inspires the other kids on his team. “He’s the best climber in the entire gym, really,” Edson said. Ben started climbing when his mom enrolled him and his sister in Petra Cliffs’ summer

Now enrolling ages 3-12.

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NAME: BEN BLACKMORE AGE: 16 TOWN: CHARLOTTE

www.mscvt.org

camp. Petra Cliffs co-owner Andrea Charest suggested the siblings might like to participate on the gym’s rock climbing team. They joined A child-centered alternative when Ben was around 10. His sister eventually education, dedicated to the left to focus on horseback riding, but Ben took philosophy and teachings of to it, said his mom, Jeanne Blackmore. “I mean, Maria Montessori. just really voraciously took to it, and he’s been doing it ever since.” The Champlain Valley Union High School junior has climbed in France, Greece, the Virgin *A prequalified, 5 STAR Islands, Tennessee, Montana, California and “every nook and cranny of New England,” and program accepting Act 166/ he has befriended climbers of all ages, his mom Universal PreK funding. said. He quit skiing, track and cross-country to focus on climbing, but continues to run to build endurance and keep his weight down. At 5-feet, 8-inches and 125 pounds, one wouldn’t guess that he is, as his mom says, “abBarre, VT surdly strong.” Except for occasional chocolate All inquiries: croissants, he won’t touch junk food, mindful of maintaining a good strength-to-weight ratio. info@mscvt.org With his side-parted, wavy, auburn hair and his or (802)-479-0912 tortoise shell glasses, he looks bookish, more Clark Kent than Superman. Until he grabs hold of a rock. He seems to stick to it, even when his face is horizontal k8v-MSCVT0917.indd 1 8/15/17 3:18 PM to the rock and his back is to the ground. He reaches, scrambles and, when vertical, hops both hands swiftly up its surface. His legs may stretch for a toe hold, fold under him like a frog or swing like a pendulum as he hangs, momentarily, from his fingertips. Not a climber herself — “In fact, I’m scared of heights,” Ben’s mom said — she describes climbing as being cerebral. “You have to think of a problem that seems very unsolvable and find a way to solve it.” When he’s climbing, Ben said, the rest of the world melts away. His mind quiets as he focuses on holds and piecing movements together. Finishing a climb that’s at or above his level and standing on top of it, “that’s like the best feeling ever,” Ben said. And he does so with little fanfare. “One awesome thing about Ben is he doesn’t really have much of an ego around climbing,” Charest said, unlike climbers she’s dubbed “the bros.” They’re the guys who go shirtless and yell Yeah! when they finish a climb. “Ben could outclimb any of these people, but he’s very unassuming,” Visit she said, “kind of an undercover crusher.”  www.lcmm.org/3gunboats/

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DESTINATION RECREATION BY H E AT H ER P O L IFK A - R IVA S

Innovation Playground

DEBRIEF

complexity of the task was a turnoff for Ruby, my son, husband and another museum visitor joined forces to figure out the game. I’m not entirely sure they mastered it, but it was fun to watch them try.

OCTOBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

We paid our admission, got our hands stamped and headed into the temporary installation. A room filled with large foam blocks and emanating beeps, blurps and pings greeted us. Ruby immediately started to doodle at a water painting staTHE tion, while Henry found ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, a shadow puppet light ISSUE 1 College Street, Burlington box and began creating an elaborate world. The exhibit, created in partnership with Champlain College Emergent Media Center and Generator maker space, is divided into different experiential stations that celebrate play and its role in encouraging innovation. A sensorpowered projector allows users to “paint” brightly colored designs on a large screen, while a cardboard-box rocket ship connected to a digital display makes kids feel like they’re actually cruising through space. Ruby OUR MISSION hopped into the box to give it a try. To enjoy a fun, casual family outing When she leaned left or right, the ship free of bickering and whining. on the screen followed her movements, enabling her to bob and weave THE AGENTS through an asteroid field. The activity even included pew pew laser sound Heather: Yours truly. Stay-at-home effects. Full disclosure: Both my mom, chief organizer of the PolifkaA digital husband and I had to resist the urge to drawing Rivas household. Always up for an push Ruby out of the way so that we station adventure and challenge. could have a turn. The exhibit showcased work Karl: The husband. Eternal optimist of cajoling even to agree on getting in designed by local college students, as long as he is well caffeinated. the car. Once at his destination, his prompting me to wonder if perhaps Ruby: The 5-year-old daughter. ’tude changes and he usually enjoys Henry’s video-gaming obsession Generally loves to hang with Mom himself and, gulp, even his parents’ might serve him well someday. and Dad but occasionally needs the company. One such activity required users to promise of a creemee for additional interact with three items — a rocking motivation. LOCATION horse, a ship steering wheel and a Henry: The 9-year-old son. A homeThe newly opened Innovation set of bongos — to try and move a body on the weekends who needs a lot Playground exhibit at ECHO. small square to a target. While the

INN V ATION

Foam blocks

By the end of our visit, the four of us were totally engrossed in building a huge robot creature with the giant blue foam blocks scattered around the space. Ruby held up the body, Karl and I wrestled with some of the larger pieces and Henry dashed around looking for antenna parts. It was a great opportunity to be playful, creative and collaborative as a family. In fact, I can’t remember the last time we all got along this well. Mission accomplished. K Innovation Playground runs through January 15, 2018. As of September 30, the exhibit also includes a maker space with a rotating set of STEM-based programs — on topics from circuits to robots — that encourage tinkering and play. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain is open year-round from 10:00 am to 5:00 pm, except for Thanksgiving and Christmas Eve and day. Admission is free for ECHO members and kids age 2 and under; $11.50 for children ages 3-17; and $14.50 for adults. Vermont residents get $2 off the price of admission.

In “Destination Recreation,” local parents review family-friendly attractions. Got a spot you think we should feature? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

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BALANCING ACT BY J E S S I CA L A RA TI CKTI N

Life Lessons

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INN VATION ISSUE

Two educators on tech, commuting and teaching teens responsibility JIM DESHLER

put your initial next to it and then a check mark when it’s done. I make the list on Friday night or Saturday morning and the chores have to be done by dinner on Saturday. [The kids] tend to pick the same things, so they get really good at it! Dave: Usually we let them sign up first, then Michelle and I will sign up after them. I think giving kids options eases the pain of chores.

T

KIDS: Son, Nick, 17, and daughter, Carissa, 15 pick something up for dinner on the way home, Michelle can text me and I know what the heck to get so I can make dinner. There’s a lot of texting, which helps to coordinate when we are in different places.

In “Balancing Act,” we ask Vermont parents about the intersection of work and family life. Know parents we should interview? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

KIDS VT

On choosing chores: Michelle: We try to demonstrate family responsibility for the house, so the kids have to mow or clean the bathrooms or mop the floor, and we all have to pitch in. We are list makers, so I will make a list of all the chores that need to happen and everybody picks two. And you

On the desire for more unplanned time: Michelle: I wish there was an extra hour every day that was unscheduled, where we could do the family dinners, because almost every time we sit down together we have really good, lively conversations. We have kids with great senses of humor and they tell funny stories, so if I could have one additional hour between 5 and 7 p.m., that would be what I would want. Not on the weekends, not late at night — the kids tuck me in now! It’s completely different now that they are older. K

OCTOBER 2017

Michelle: Google Calendar! Man, I love that thing. We have a Szabo family calendar. Carissa’s dance classes are in there, Nick’s senior pictures on Thursday are in there, and my and Dave’s late nights are in there. We’ve had great success with a paper calendar in the past, and then we’d start going places and we couldn’t always have the calendar. It’s been a transition to get the kids to look at [Google Calendar], but they do now. Eventually I will get my recipes into the calendar and people can just pull that up with a link to the recipe. I’m not there yet, but that’s my goal!

Dave: There are three other people who live in the area who go up to Swanton, so I carpool and drive once or twice a week, which is nice. The difference between my commute and Michelle’s is that I go up Route 104 and there’s no one. Michelle hits the traffic going to Williston. It’s good because [during the carpool] we talk — not about school — we just debrief and talk about other things, which puts me in a more relaxed mood when I come in.

Michelle: Sick days and appointments have always been me. I have more flexibility in my job. If something comes up at 8:50 a.m., well, that’s second period in a middle school so he can’t just go in a little bit late or they’d have to get a sub. And if the kids get sick now and it’s not a violent illness, they can stay home by themselves.

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On being plugged in: Dave: I think technology has really helped balance things out. If I need to

DAD: Dave Szabo, 47, 8th grade teacher at Missisquoi Valley Union Middle/High School in Swanton

On the value of a long commute: Michelle: I listen to so many audio books. I get so much reading done! It’s phenomenal. My alone time is really my time to and from work. I cherish that time. It’s 45 minutes at the beginning and end of my day where almost all the time I can just … (big sigh).

he Szabo family’s almost 200-year-old farmhouse is situated amid the rolling green hills of Lamoille County. The pastoral landscape is peaceful, with just the occasional sound of traffic from nearby Route 15. On the September evening of my visit, laughter spilled out of the open kitchen window. Once inside, the whole Szabo clan welcomed me with a warm hello. But before we even sat down to talk, the teenagers had disappeared — Carissa to a dance class in Morrisville; Nick to do homework in his room. Such is life with independent older children, Michelle and Dave said. Nick can drive now, so their roles as parents have shifted from chauffeurs and organizers to providers of guidance and support. As educators — Michelle is a program manager at the Stern Center, and Dave is an 8th grade social studies teacher — they know that being organized and responsible is important, and try to model these traits for their kids.

MOM: Michelle Szabo, 46, program manager for instruction at the Stern Center for Language and Learning in Williston

On work flexibility: Dave: I try to prioritize the family but Michelle, you know, is the center of it and makes it run. I don’t have a lot of flexibility in my job and sometimes I choose not to have it (laughter from both of them). You know, that doctor or dentist appointment, I’m like, Michelle, sounds like you can take care of that (more laughter).

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THE ART OF B Y B R ET T S TAN C IU

Tinkering G

ive a kid an assortment of washers, wire, buttons and string, and chances are she’ll spontaneously begin creating, no instruction required. That’s the ethos behind the Tinkering Project, which encourages kids to use familiar materials to make new things. The initiative is run by Vermont Afterschool, a public-private statewide partnership that supports innovative learning opportunities for kids that extend beyond the school day. With a grant from the Silicon Valley-based Noyce Foundation, Vermont Afterschool has brought tinkering-themed afterschool classes to 24 Vermont schools over the past two years. Norwich’s Montshire Museum of Science trains staff, who experience firsthand the excitement and frustration of tinkering. Kits on topics like circuitry are provided to participating sites, but the initiative encourages using recycled materials, like scrap paper and nuts and bolts. Tracy Truzansky, Vermont Afterschool’s project manager for training, describes tinkering as the “beautiful intersection between science and art.” In a world so heavily “planned or programmed,” she says, the open-ended, child-centered activity

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offers children the freedom to “mess around with stuff ” without rigid guidelines or rules. Through making things, students explore scientific concepts. By building a spinning top from bolts and washers, for example, kids begin to understand center of gravity. By playing around with a battery, wires and a motor, they learn about electricity. On a recent Tuesday afternoon, a dozen third through sixth graders at Hardwick Elementary School’s Afterschool REACH! Program were offered two tinkering project options: build a tower that can hold a book six inches above the table, or design a six-inch long bridge for a Matchbox car. The tricky part? The students could only use paper, tape and scissors. Undaunted, the budding engineers quickly got to work. One child taped together rolled-up paper tubes and said seriously, “I’m just trying to figure this out.” Two others assembled a covered bridge and a road edged with paper rocks. Adults hung back, observing and asking questions like, “Do you think a little more tape would make that stronger?” The room’s atmosphere was

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OCTOBER 2017

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Constructing a tower

lively with conversation and busy hands. Thirty minutes into the activity, a diverse array of projects took shape. A cluster of boys piled books, bags of chips and water bottles on a tall tower, adding items until the paper columns toppled. Another group raced Matchbox cars over bridges, comparing strength. “It took so long,” said one girl who’d just built a large bridge, “but it was totally worth it.” Surveying the creations, afterschool coordinator Nicole Miller summed up the activity’s appeal: “Kids like it when there’s no right or wrong answer.”  To learn about Vermont Afterschool and the Tinkering Project, visit vermontafterschool.org.


CHECKUP WIT H D R. L E WI S F I RS T • I N T E RV I E W C O M PIL ED AN D C O N DEN S ED B Y K EN PIC AR D

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INN VATION ISSUE

What should parents know about nonconventional medical therapies? N

ot long ago, many pediatricians were skeptical, and even dismissive, of any form of treatment not covered in medical school. But doctors have begun to broaden their thinking as more evidence-based studies reveal the effectiveness of nonconventional and non-Western therapies. Last month, the American Academy of Pediatrics published a report that examined the effectiveness of various natural remedies and mind-body therapies when they’re used in conjunction with mainstream medical care. The report found that one in every three adults, and one in 10 children, use some form of complementary nonconventional therapy — such as massage, meditation, acupuncture or herbal supplements — to treat medical ailments. We talked to Dr. Lewis First, head of pediatrics at University of Vermont Children’s Hospital, about the report’s key findings, and his advice to parents interested in nonconventional therapies.

KVT: How do complementary therapies differ from alternative therapies? LF: Alternative therapies are used instead of conventional care and are not integrated into conventional medicine, while complementary therapies are. KVT: What are the risks associated with alternative therapies? LF: Some alternative therapies can delay evidence-based conventional care that can effectively treat a serious medical problem. For example, if someone opts for a mind-body alternative treatment for a child with cancer and ignores the appropriate use of chemotherapy, surgery or radiation that can successfully treat the tumor, that’s something we’d like to prevent. As pediatricians, we want to integrate complementary therapies into conventional therapies in ways that provide a patient-centered approach in an evidence-based fashion that does not harm the child. When you use one at the expense of the other, you’re doing a disservice to both the child and the parent.

Guided imagery can help kids reduce stress, treat abdominal pain and even manage obesity.

OCTOBER 2017

KVT: Just because something is natural doesn’t mean it’s safe, correct? LF: Correct. We know that some herbal products can make problems

worse when taken in conjunction also useful in relieving headaches, with certain prescription medica- reducing bedwetting and reining in tions. Taking St. John’s Wort while impulsive behavior. Guided imagery, you’re also taking a prescription a form of meditation, can help kids antidepressant can reduce stress, treat actually make you recurrent abdominal more depressed. This pain and even is not to say that manage obesity. Yoga parents shouldn’t use has been shown to be natural remedies at all effective for treating on their children. But stress and pain, as it’s good to talk to your has acupuncture. pediatrician or other While we may not child health care proknow exactly why vider to ensure that acupuncture works, the combination of we do know that if the natural product it’s done by a trained DR. LEWIS FIRST with a conventional practitioner, it medication will be can be effective in beneficial and safe. treating bedwetParents should also ting, tic disorders, keep in mind that the U.S. Food and headaches, migraines and even some Drug Administration classifies herbal aspects of cerebral palsy. And, for kids remedies as foods and not drugs. So who are afraid of needles, acupressure when you buy these products, there is can work, too. no guarantee of their purity, potency, safety or effectiveness. KVT: What about hypnosis? LF: Hypnosis has been used sucKVT: What about mind-body cessfully to help children deal with therapies? bedwetting, irritable bowel syndrome, LF: The good news is, mind-body anxiety, depression, post-traumatic therapies are generally safe, stress disorder and even the pain particularly when used associated with some medical to address issues such procedures. as pain and anxiety. Biofeedback — or the use KVT: What’s the takeaway for of electronic monitors parents and caregivers? or sensors to help people LF: Our biggest concern is that regulate certain bodily parents are afraid to talk or ask functions — has been about these therapies with their shown to be very helpful doctors and health care providers. As in teaching kids with pediatricians, we are willing to share asthma how to control what we know with parents and their breathing. It’s together make sure those therapies are always in the best interests of the child. We want to respect where families are at, ask about the therapies they’re using or considering, and then learn about them together. 

KIDSVT.COM KIDS VT

KIDS VT: What are some examples of complementary therapies that have been shown to be effective in children? LEWIS FIRST: Let’s start with natural products. We’ve found, for example, that fish oil taken by pregnant mothers may help in the brain development of the baby, and may also help children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) when used in conjunction with conventional medications or behavioral strategies. Probiotics — or foods and dietary supplements that contain beneficial microorganisms — have been shown to shorten the duration of some infectious cases of diarrhea in children and may also help relieve some abdominal pain. Probiotics have

also been helpful in the neonatal intensive care unit in reducing and possibly preventing serious intestinal complications that can occur in premature babies.

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BOOKWORMS BY BRE TT S TA N CI U

A Writer’s World I

first encountered the Vermont Reads Program in 2006, when Hardwick’s Buffalo Mountain Co-op handed out free copies of Natalie Kinsey-Warnock’s As Long As There Are Mountains. In this middle school novel, the young main character’s father is injured in a logging mishap; coincidentally, my 8-year-old daughter’s father had recently experienced a near-fatal chainsaw accident. My daughter was both terrified and entranced with the book, emphasizing for me literature’s draw, even for the youngest readers and listeners. Jacqueline Woodson’s Brown Girl Dreaming is the 2017 Vermont Reads pick (see sidebar). The lyrical memoir-in-verse of a young girl becoming a writer has received numerous awards, including a National Book Award and a Newbery Honor Award. Woodson’s personal story unfolds within the wider cultural context of an extended family in the turbulent 1960s and 70s, and their migratory journey from South Carolina to New York. From her home in Brooklyn, Woodson graciously spent time talking with Kids VT about writing and growing up, in advance of her October 23 talk at Burlington High School.

“What would it look like if we asked the whole state to read a book together?” That question inspired the Vermont Reads program, said Amy Cunningham, director of community programs at the Vermont Humanities Council. Now in its 15th year, the initiative has a simple premise. Each year, the Humanities Council chooses a well-written book, accessible to a range of literacy levels, with ample material to serve as a springboard for what Cunningham calls, “big, fat, meaty conversations.” Communities design their own projects around the book and collaboration between organizations, like schools and libraries, is encouraged. Vermont Reads’ 2018 selection is Bread and Roses, Too by Katherine Paterson. For more information, visit vermonthumanities.org.

Jacqueline Woodson hosts an author talk on Monday, October 23, 6 p.m., at Burlington High School. Geof Hewitt, Slam Poet Laureate of Vermont, leads a community dramatic reading of Brown Girl Dreaming on Thursday, October 26, 6:30-8:30 p.m., at the Waterbury Public Library.

KIDS VT

KVT: The importance of the past and family are profound threads in Brown Girl Dreaming. Could you talk about the connections between the past and family? JW: Family is part of home, and home is so important. As a child, I straddled Ohio and South Carolina. In the south, safety was in the family, and home was where we had everything we needed — food, shelter, safety, stories, religion. The family stories were very important, because we learned where

KVT: Brown Girl Dreaming is about a young girl discovering her own unique brilliance, through writing. What advice would you give to young people who are searching to develop their own particular gifts? JW: I visit kindergarten and first grade classes, and when I ask kids what they want to be, all the hands go up. But as kids get older, fewer hands go up. Their aspirations to be dancers or ice skaters or fairy princesses are stamped out of them. They’re told their aspirations are not realistic. I didn’t try to make a whole bunch of money. I didn’t get caught up in that game. I had really bad jobs, but all the time I was writing. We’re so often sold an illusion of what we should be doing. Instead, we should move through the fear of What if I fail? What if I don’t make enough money? Remember what you love and what makes you feel passionate, and hold on to that. 

VERMONTERS READ

OCTOBER 2017

KVT: In the book, you describe yourself as a slow reader. How did this help you become a writer? JW: By reading slowly and rereading books, I was studying other writers and learning how they did what they did, although of course I didn’t realize it at the time. I loved so many things I read that I took ownership through memory, and that led me to understand how to write.

KVT: You’ve said that, as a child, you didn’t read books about yourself, your neighborhood or your family, because your library lacked a diversity of literature. What was it like to grow up reading books that didn’t reflect your life? JW: Literature tells your story and gives you a sense of your own legitimacy. Not finding myself in literature, I wondered if my story wasn’t relevant. I was getting mad, because I wondered Where am I? I didn’t understand. Did my brown body not belong in the narrative? When I finally read (Mildred Taylor’s) Roll of Thunder, Hear My Cry, I knew that was what I was looking for. One of the many reasons I began to write was to fill that absent space. As a child, literature that did reflect my life was mostly written for older people — like Langston Hughes or James Baldwin. Every African American in a book in my third grade classroom lived in the 19th or early 20th century, and enslavement was always part of the narrative. And it was always nonfiction.

KVT: Your books delve into complex issues with such depth and grace, but you also write about children facing difficult circumstances — such as meth addiction — that make some adults very uncomfortable. Could you explain why you write about what you do? JW: I write for young people, and I know adults have their own fears and challenges in understanding others, whether it’s sexuality or abuse or religion, and what they’re struggling with in their own mind they often put on their children. Transparency is the biggest gift adults can give kids. I know some parents try to protect their children, but that ends up negating that children live in the real world. A gift adults can give to themselves is to read these books or, better yet, read with children. I believe my books will end up in the hands of people who need to read them. Other people’s fears can’t be about the work I’m doing.

KIDSVT.COM

KIDS VT: Congratulations on Brown Girl Dreaming being chosen as the 2017 Vermont Reads pick. Can you talk about what this means to you? JACQUELINE WOODSON: When I was writing Brown Girl Dreaming, I had no idea what the book’s outcome would be and that it would be so well liked — especially in a state like Vermont, which is pretty white. Vermont is doing its work, and showing windows into the wider world.

we had come from. I didn’t see this as a child, of course, but as an adult I realized my family had come through the Jim Crow South, so they had a sense, We survived that, so we can survive anything.

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FIT FAMILIES B Y K R IS T E N R AV I N

Tot-Friendly Trails I

Virginia enjoys a snack break

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OCTOBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

Kristen and Virginia explore the maypole

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More nature walks suitable for families • Otter View Park, Weybridge St., Middlebury, maltvt.org This 15-acre park offers universally accessible pathways, including a cattaillined boardwalk leading to the Otter Creek. • Volunteers Green, Bridge St., Richmond Close-up views of the Winooski River reward amblers of all ages who traverse the short, flat dirt path on the park’s perimeter.

• North Branch Nature Center, 713 Elm St., Montpelier, northbranchnaturecenter.org Those looking to experience the outdoors make strides around a loop of less than one mile with links to Hubbard Park and North Branch River Park. • Babcock Nature Preserve, Baker Rd., Eden One thousand acres, a bog and three ponds, oh my! Owned and cared for by Johnson State College, this open-to-the-public forest also serves as an outdoor classroom.

love hiking with my 1-year-old daughter, Virginia, but I’m in no shape to carry her up steep inclines. So on a sunny day in early September, we set out with my friend, Rachel, to tackle a trail suitable for both toddlers and adults: the Watershed Center trails near the Bristol/New Haven border. The Watershed Center is a citizen-supported nonprofit promoting conservation and stewardship on five parcels of property in Addison County, covering just over A “mega cairn” 1,000 acres. As on the trail the organization’s president Geoff Davis told me over the phone, the center’s nine-person volunteer board of directors maintains the trail system, which is accessible via Plank Road. That’s where we parked (carpooling is encouraged), slathered on sunscreen, grabbed our water bottles and got a move on. A short distance up the path we found a trailhead kiosk with a map and a “Wanted” poster for sinister-looking yet harmless Eastern Ratsnakes. An adjacent flier explained that the Watershed Center is working with local biologists to track this rare reptile, and asked hikers to report any encounters. I snapped a photo of the map, which came in handy since there are no signs marking the different trails along the way. Folks can also contact the Watershed Center through its website for a paper copy. With Virginia in my backpack carrier, Rachel and I figured we could hoof it up the Main Trail and back down the Ridge Trail for a total of around four miles. As we left the kiosk, a group of passing hikers pointed out a bright green ophidian camouflaged at the path’s edge. The sighting was no surprise: Due to what Davis describes as its “wrinkly” terrain, a result of ancient seabed

floor being “thrust up” over time, the land is rich with a diversity of species, from mushrooms to newts. We hit a few minor roadblocks — including a fallen tree that served as a perfect bench for a snack break — but the terrain was manageable for little legs. Photo-worthy pit stops included the smooth-as-glass Norton Brook Reservoir and a large domeshaped stone assemblage that I nicknamed a “mega cairn.” Another eyecatching item was a maypole braided with colored ribbon that Davis explained was left over from the Watershed Center’s Beltane celebration. The springtime soirée, along with a winter solstice party, happen annually and are open to the public. On the day of our outing, we reveled in the summer-like weather. Still, I envisioned how beautiful our surroundings would be come autumn and winter. The trails are open year-round and, according to Davis, can accommodate everything from walking and wildlife viewing to snowshoeing and cross-country skiing (no mountain bikes or motorized vehicles, though). What words of advice did Davis have for experiencing the Watershed Center trails? “Listen to the sounds of the forest,” he told me. “Get on your hands and knees and dig in the dirt.” Based on the muddy shoes, dirty knees and big smile that Virginia brought home that afternoon, I’m guessing my pint-size hiker would agree. K The Watershed Trails (4783 Plank Rd., Bristol) are free and open to the public, seven days a week. For more information, visit thewatershedcentervt.org.


MEALTIME BY A ST RI D H E D B OR L A GUE

Bubble and Squeak & Mushy Peas Oddly named, delicious English specialties

T

Alas, it wasn’t the right season for bubble and squeak, so we didn’t get to sample the authentic version. But I did talk to local folks and read through recipes, and I believe that my version sticks pretty close to the traditional one. The mushy peas we tasted on our trip ranged from something akin to thick pea soup (probably made the traditional way, with dried marrowfat peas) to a bright, flavorful purée. We all preferred the latter preparation, so that’s the recipe I tried to emulate. I served the peas right alongside my bubble & squeak patty, topped with a lovely poached egg, another item we ate many times on our trip. Despite its reputation, we were mostly impressed with the food we encountered in the UK. Much like in Vermont, we found that people were passionate about locally sourced, fresh ingredients, which makes a huge difference in the final product. If you can’t take the jaunt across the pond yourself, try this culinary journey instead. K

MUSHY PEAS

Ingredients: • 10 ounces peas, fresh or frozen (I used English peas) • 1/2 cup water • 1 tablespoon butter • Juice from 1 lemon • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh mint • 2 teaspoons salt • 1 tablespoon heavy cream

Directions: Boil peas in water, with butter, until quite soft, about 10 minutes. Mash together with lemon juice, mint, salt and cream until they are mostly puréed, but a few whole pea pieces remain. Serve as a side dish.

BUBBLE AND SQUEAK PATTIES (makes about 16) • 1 pound russet potatoes • 2 teaspoons salt (to taste) • 4 slices bacon, cut into bite-size pieces • 1 onion, diced • 1 clove garlic • 10 ounces shaved Brussels sprouts or chopped, cooked cabbage • 2 tablespoons butter • 1 teaspoon pepper

KIDSVT.COM OCTOBER 2017 KIDS VT

Peel potatoes and cut into approximately one-inch pieces. Boil in salted water until soft, about 15 minutes. Mash and set aside. Preheat a large cast-iron or nonstick frying pan to medium heat and add bacon. As it begins to brown, add onion and garlic and cook until fragrant. Next add the Brussels sprouts or cabbage. Cook, stirring occasionally, until slightly browned, about 5 minutes. Transfer the mixture to a bowl, add the cooked potato and pepper, and mash together until blended. Form into patties, about three inches in diameter. Add about 1 teaspoon of butter to a frying pan, on medium heat. Once butter is melted, fry the patties in batches, until nicely browned, about three minutes per side. Serve as a main dish, a side or even as breakfast, topped with a poached egg.

PHOTOS: ANDY BRUMBAUGH

he British are not exactly known for their haute cuisine. In fact, if you ask someone where to get good food in England, they might direct you to an Indian restaurant. However Brits do have a few famous dishes, and they often have truly colloquial names. Take bubble and squeak. Though it may sound like something straight out of a witch’s cauldron, à la Macbeth, it’s actually a pan-fried mixture of leftover vegetables from a roast dinner, named for the sound of frying cabbage. Then there are mushy peas — a traditional accompaniment to fish and chips, ideally served with a splash of malt vinegar. The name calls to mind overcooked, bland baby food, but the side dish can actually be quite verdant and tasty, especially when spiked with lemon and mint. On a recent family trip to the United Kingdom — my kids’ first foray into overseas travel — we had a chance to try mushy peas, along with many other local specialties (and, yes, we also had spectacular Indian food).

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2 017 T A L E N T S H O W F O R

CASTING CALL!

VERMONT’S RISING STARS

Auditions held Saturday, November 11, noon-3 p.m. on the Higher Ground stage. Live show takes place in December. To participate you must try out in front of a panel of judges. Visit kidsvt.com/talentshow to register your act.

SPONSORED BY:


JUST FOR KIDS

Writing Contest & Winners..........24 Coloring Contest Winners.............24 Coloring Contest..................................25 Puzzle Page..............................................26 Birthday Club..........................................26 Puzzle Answers.....................................47

Jim-Jam’s Jack-O-Lantern-O-Matic

Kid Inventor Jim-Jam won’t lift a finger to carve a jack-o-lantern, but he’ll lower a toe! Stepping on a pedal, Jim-Jam (A) tilts a pitcher (B), which spills milk (C) onto Lynx (D), who doesn’t know that you shouldn’t cry over it. Tears (E) fill the bucket, making the seesaw (F) lift, releasing Jack-in-the-Box (G). This shakes the toadstool (H), causing the toad (I) to fire the cannon (J), which launches a coconut (K) onto a strength tester (L). The ringing bell makes Jitters the Butler (M) trip over Poodle’s plush pillow (N), upending the doggie bowl (O), which flings poodle chow (P) onto the canvas (Q). Intellectual Oriole (R) declares in the microphone (S) that the new painting is a masterpiece, and the megaphone (T) magnifies the message so much that it cracks open a safe (U). Money (V) tumbles out, causing a gold prospector (W) to dance for joy. Famed sculptor Pokey McDrill with his jackhammer, Bill (X) thinks that tapping must be from another woodpecker, and is inspired to carve a happy face into a perfectly plump pumpkin (Y). But what about (Z)? That’s the sound Jim-Jam makes while he naps!

KIDSVT.COM OCTOBER 2017 KIDS VT

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COLORING CONTEST WINNERS

JUST FOR KIDS

Writing Contest

SPONSORED BY

Halloween is fast approaching! What is the best costume you’ve ever worn? Give a detailed description of what it looked like. How did you choose that particular costume? How did you feel while wearing it? Attach a drawing of yourself in the costume if you’d like.

Brilliant bunnies skated under the stars and maneuvered among skyscrapers in this month’s stellar submissions. Eleven-year-old Eddie’s hare, dressed in a black suit and red tie, whizzed by a brick house under a bright blue sky. Colored circles jazzed up 7-year-old Josephine’s green background. Her stylish rabbit sported a rose-colored dress and ruby pendant. Hadley, 4, used watercolors to decorate her critter with vibrant rainbows. Phenomenal work, young artists. Send us your most inspired creations again this month!

The winners of annual family memberships to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium are…

HONORABLE MENTIONS

“Skateboarding in the Stars” Asher Weissberger, 5

FREE WHEELIN’

Rylee Preston, 6, Lake Placid, N.Y.

5& under

WINOOSKI

TALENTED TRICKSTER

Julian Oleniak, 6, Ripton BUNNY ON A BOARD

Althea Broderick, 5, Charlotte RAPPER RABBIT

Isabelle Schwendler, 9, Shelburne CANDY CORN CRAZINESS

Izzy Gil, 9, Montpelier We’ll pick two winners and publish their names and poems in the next issue. Winners receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop. Deadline to enter is October 15. Send your entries to: Kids VT, attn: Writing Contest, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

Name ________________________________ Age __________________________________ Town ________________________________ Email ________________________________ Phone ________________________________

ROLLIN’ DOWN THE ROAD

Kaisa Remsen, 4, Shoreham SWEET POPSICLE LAND

Aidyn Peters-Smith, 8, South Burlington RAINBOW ROCK

Ziva Baker, 8, Westford

“Lucky Skillz” Sophia Horton, 6

6 to 8

SOUTH BURLINGTON

KIDS VT

OCTOBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

CANDY CRUSH

24

Hayden Boren, 10, Winooski

WRITING WINNERS

SKATING TO SCHOOL

In last month’s issue, we asked kids to write about their favorite teacher. Below, find the winning entries. Adela and Annika each receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop in Burlington.

Adela Grimm, 8 CHARLOTTE

de is my Mrs. Brady in first gra r. che tea favorite ughtful. She is really nice and tho was did she ng thi fun st The mo ers with us. make tissue paper flow rt inside, hu s get e eon som When love her so I . ide she hurts in the ins much. by how She made me less scared . me ted for she com

Annika Vogl, 10 ROCHESTER, N.Y.

The best teacher I’ve had is Mr. Conway because he loves to read books to my class. He is also a great teacher because he lets us help him sell popcorn to the school and he lets us have extra recess or “end of the day” recess. And most of all because he is cool and he is nice. That is why Mr. Conway is the best teacher I’ve ever had.

Lumia Beeli, 9, South Burlington FLOWER POWER

Madeline Kolb, 3, Charlotte PRETTY IN PURPLE

Harper Merchant, 4, Lyndonville

TOP TITLES “PETE’S HARE”

Ana Corriveau, 4, Underhill “HERE GOES NOTHING”

Ella Romond, 8, Ferrisburgh “SKATEBOARDING BEFORE SUNSET”

Kaydence White, 11, Bristol

“Skateboarding with Aliens” Haley Heath, 9 UNDERHILL

9 to 12


Coloring Contest!

Three winners will each receive an annual family membership to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium. Send Kids VT your work of art by October 15. Be sure to include the info at right with your submission. Winners will be chosen in the following categories: (1) ages 5 and younger, (2) ages 6-8 and (3) ages 9-12. Winners will be named in the November issue of Kids VT. Send your high-resolution scans to art@kidsvt.com or mail a copy to Kids VT, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

Title _______________________________________ Sponsored by

Artist _____________________________________ Age ______________ Town _________________ Email _____________________________________ Phone _____________________________________

KIDSVT.COM OCTOBER 2017 KIDS VT

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JUST FOR KIDS

Jumble

BY DAVID L. HOYT & JEFF KNUREK

The letters of these crazy words are all mixed up. To play the game, put them back into the right order so that they make real words you can find in your dictionary. Write the letters of each real word under each crazy word, but only one letter to a square.

Birthday Club Congratulations to these

October Birthday Club winners!

VINNY lives in Granville and turn s 9 on October 5. He loves riding his four wheeler, playing soccer, snowmobiling and tinkering with trucks with his dad. He also enjoys spending time with his dog, Gigi.

You are now ready to solve this month’s Jumble For Kids. Study the picture for a hint. Then play around with the letters in the circles. You’ll find you can put them in order so that they make your funny answer.

HANNAH lives in Colchester and turns 10 on October 2. The artistmusician-athlete loves trying new things and is currently trying to decide what will be next.

Print your answer here:

Puzzles4Kids

BY HELENA HOVANEC

OCTOBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

Riddle Search — LET’S PLAY FOOTBALL Look up, down and diagonally, both forward and backward, to find every word on the list. Circle each one as you find it. When all the words are circled, take the UNUSED letters and write them on the blanks below. Go from left to right and top to bottom to find the answer to this riddle: Where do gardeners play football?

KIDS VT

BENCH DIVE DRIVE FIELD GOAL FREE KICK GOALPOST GRIDIRON 26 HALFTIME

HIKE HUDDLE PUNT REPLAY SNAP STADIUM TOUCHDOWN YARD LINE

PENELOPE lives in Swanton and turns 4 on October 8. She enjoys reading and playing outside with her two sisters. She is excited to start preschool and hockey this year.

SEBASTIAN lives in Jeffersonville and turns 7 on October 9. He’s a Cub Scout who likes karate, soccer, skiing, camping and playing with friends.

Riddle Answer:

Join the Club! ANSWERS P. 47

To enter, submit information using the online form at kidsvt.com/birthday-clubJust give us your contact info, your children’s names and birth dates, and a photo, and they’re automatically enrolled.


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Maker on the Move Lucie deLaBruere wants all of Vermont’s students to be tuned in to tech

BY SARAH TUFF DUNN

KVT: What’s your earliest memory of technology? LdLB: I asked for a tape recorder for Christmas. I was totally fascinated that this thing that was about this big that had wheels on it would actually tape your voice and play it back to you. That was my big present. I remember hiding it in the back of the couch and putting it on record for when some of my five sisters were around. KVT: And then you went to UVM, and SUNY Oswego, and Marlboro for your masters? LdLB: Yes. I grew up in a family where I was the first generation to go to college — my father offered me a car if I did not go to college, because it was cheaper than the typewriter I wanted. My grandmother would say, “What are you going to do with those grades?” People in general didn’t go to college, especially girls. So teachers had a great influence on my life. And college was challenging because of the financial aspect. I funded it all myself. My big treat was Carbur’s [Restaurant in Burlington] on Wednesday nights. I’d save up $5, and if I got my homework done I’d get a Dutch mint hot chocolate.

KIDS VT

OCTOBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

Lucie deLaBruere works with a teen on coding and circuitry

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t’s the Friday afternoon before Art Hop, and the Generator maker space in Burlington’s South End is buzzing with the sounds of sawing, clanking and drilling. Another noise joins the mix: the laughter of education technology specialist Lucie deLaBruere, who has been a member here since the Generator opened three years ago. A native of West Charleston in the Northeast Kingdom, deLaBruere, 58, was one of the first in her family to go to college; Her eyes brighten as she recalls instructors who encouraged her to pursue learning. She got a bachelor’s degree in secondary education, concentrating in social studies, then went back to school years later to earn

Lucie deLaBruere

a master’s of science in internet engineering from Marlboro College. In her 30-some-year career, deLaBruere has led the charge in bringing the maker movement to Vermont students. After teaching business, career and technical education, and technology integration in the NEK, she now devotes her time to her blog, Learning With Lucie (learningwithlucie. blogspot.com), where she writes about everything from sewing to coding to working a 3D printer. She also logs thousands of miles in EMMA, her van turned mobile maker space, bringing things like power tools, soldering stations and laser cutters to kids in all corners of Vermont (See “Have EMMA, Will Travel”

sidebar). And she leads workshops for educators interested in bringing maker spaces and innovative technology to their schools. Kids VT decided to quiz the teacher about why tech makes her tick. KIDS VT: What inspired you to choose teaching as a lifelong pursuit? LUCIE DELABRUERE: I guess I enjoy learning. Even 30 years into my career, I’ll step back and say, ‘Why am I doing this?’ Yesterday my head was hurting about a laser cutter — not getting it just right. And my husband said, ‘Because you like learning, remember?’ Yeah, that’s why my website is called Learning with Lucie.


PHOTOS: MATTHEW THORSEN

they can apply for higher-paying jobs. And we want a world filled with inventions and solutions to problems that work for both men and women. Plus, creating and making with technology is an easy way to build a feeling of empowerment.

DeLaBruere (right) and Maker Faire attendees in front of EMMA

KVT: What was it like to return to the Northeast Kingdom to teach? LdLB: When the internet first came to the Northeast Kingdom — that totally changed what it was like to be a teacher. CompuServe had been a long-distance phone call! My kids came back from that summer, and I had a curriculum plan because I had learned how to use the network. There were no IT people, so I had to learn how to fix everything. The kids discovered Linux and put penguin

screen savers on all the computers. It was like the Reformation. All of a sudden it totally changed how high kids could reach. And I wanted to keep up with them, which is why I decided to get my master’s in internet engineering. KVT: Why is teaching girls so important to you? LdLB: Well, it increases their income potential. When young women feel confident with their technology skills,

KVT: Can you share an anecdote of a student who made an impact on you? LdLB: One year, we were in week two of the fall semester when a girl named Heidi approached me after class to tell me that she didn’t speak in front of groups, so she couldn’t complete part of an assignment. She told me she realized she might get a zero. I respected her choice, but did everything I could to build her confidence. Two years later, Heidi not only had built her own computer as her senior project in my class, but she was also the president of Vermont Future Business Leaders of America, which meant that she spoke in front of hundreds of teens at state conferences. Heidi ended up majoring in outdoor recreation at Castleton, and got her first work-study job in the IT department helping troubleshoot computer problems for other students. She now lives in Alaska, where she has been a field engineer for the Plate Boundary Observatory.

HAVE EMMA, WILL TRAVEL

INN VATION ISSUE KVT: You’re still teaching through Learning with Lucie and EMMA, but how did you transition out of the classroom? LdLB: Seven years ago I got married to a man with wanderlust who convinced me to go on the road with him. So I left the house, the family, the job, and we now live out of a bus half the year, and in Colchester on Malletts Bay. We love the travel. KVT: What is one of the biggest challenges for you today? LdLB: Rural doesn’t scale. It’s hard to drive 90 minutes to these areas. How can I, as a sole practitioner, partner with organizations that are more positioned to have a collective impact?

OCTOBER 2017 KIDS VT

KVT: What keeps you rooted in Vermont? LdLB: I love that we are flexible and nimble, and that we have had personalized learning. The whole state is catching on to what we were doing in the classroom 20 years ago, thanks to Act 77 [which created the 2013 Flexible Pathways Initiative to support the implementation of personalized learning plans]. I was part of a tribe that believed in this, and that’s pretty cool stuff. Small classrooms mean that nobody gets lost, and that they have opportunities with technology. My twin boys are now professional musicians in New York City, playing Carnegie Hall, the White House, all over the world, and they went through public school here. This was from Vermont teachers. You can make it happen. 

KIDSVT.COM

DeLaBruere’s Maker Faire booth

“The maker movement is such a perfect fit for today’s educational goals,” says Lucie deLaBruere. But what about rural towns not yet touched by the trend? In 2015, she decided to bring the maker movement to kids in rural Vermont by retrofitting a van with tools, materials and processes to create a mobile maker space dubbed EMMA, which stands for “Everyone May Make Anywhere.” DeLaBruere drives EMMA to schools throughout Vermont to “introduce creating and making opportunities to under-represented populations,” she writes on EMMA’s website (minimakerbus.org). Last year, the Tarrant Institute for Innovative Education, the UVM Foundation and Google funded a project that brought EMMA to rural middle schools to advance the maker-centered learning conversation. As a freelance educator, she is also hired by school districts to model maker-focused lessons for teachers. DeLaBruere says it’s her hope that she can train “a new generation of educators who can include creating and making as part of learning” and help build “the next generation of innovators.”

THE

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Windsor’s American Precision Museum traces Vermont’s innovative past n a recent trip to the American Precision Museum in Windsor, my 7-year-old daughter carefully examined a gunstock lathe. When I explained that the machine was used in the nineteenth century to carve out a precise part for a gun, her eyes widened. “It’s like a 3D printer,” she said. She was right. A type of duplicating machine, the lathe allowed gunmakers — and then other kinds of manufacturers — to create uniform parts that could be quickly exchanged or replaced on the battlefield. Vermont, we learned, is where many important machine tools were invented. In the second half of the nineteenth century, the towns of Windsor and Springfield were at the center of innovations in manufacturing. Machine shops in the Connecticut River Valley pioneered tools that could precisely cut or grind parts for other machines — advances that made mass production possible.

THE

OCTOBER 2017 KIDS VT

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display, as well as small-scale models of lathes and milling machines that appeal to kids’ love of miniatures. Most machines are off-limits to little hands, but there are gears and tools that kids can try out. Even better, the museum recently added features for young visitors, including a Junior Machinist Apprentice program, with a scavenger hunt that encourages kids to explore. My 12-year-old son loved filling out the Junior Machinist passport, going to different exhibits to answer questions about the various lathes and milling machines. When he finished, he got a 3D-printed badge in the shape of a gear. The younger kids enjoyed the museum’s Learning Lab, where containers of blocks, Popsicle sticks and cups entice young engineers to create sturdy, weight-bearing structures.

A tool demo at the Precision Museum

COURTESY OF SARAH STEWART TAYLOR

KIDSVT.COM

N IO T A INN V ISSUE

With so much focus on engineering and innovation in schools, I wanted to show my kids — ages 12, 9 and 7 — that their own backyard was home to some of the most inspired inventors of our country’s past. The American Precision Museum digs into this history. It’s located in the original Robbins & Lawrence Armory building, named after Samuel E. Robbins and Richard S. Lawrence, who in 1845, along with their partner Nicanor Kendall, signed on to manufacture 10,000 rifles for the American government. Problem was, they didn’t have the staff or the space to fulfill the order. So they built a new workshop, powered by a dam on Mill Brook, and got to work. The tools they invented made rifle manufacturing more efficient than ever before. And in 1851, six of their firearms, made with interchangeable parts, were shown at the Great Exhibition in the Crystal Palace in London, leading to a commission from the British government. When we visited, the museum’s hulking metal contraptions and ceiling draped with machinery belts gave us a vivid sense of what it would have been like to work in an early American machine tool shop. Many of the original machines are on

BY SARAH STEWART TAYLOR

A bridge attached to the former Fellows Gear Shaper Company factory in Springfield

The museum got my kids thinking about how to solve problems in new ways. I asked them to think of “problems” around our house, and what technologies might help us be more productive. Ideas included cleaning robots, cat-feeding machines, a babysitter robot, and “an oven with arms that cuts up food and then cooks it for you.” The exhibits show how the machine-tool industry spread out from Windsor. After Robbins and Lawrence went bankrupt, Jones & Lamson Machine Company took over the building. That company made sewing machines, also with interchangeable parts, until the Civil War forced them to make military weapons. Later it moved down the river to Springfield, where some of the world’s most famous machine-tool companies — like the Fellows Gear Shaper Company and the Bryant Chucking Grinder Company — were also headquartered.

COURTESY OF THE PRECISION MUSEUM

Tool Time


COURTESY OF SARAH STEWART TAYLOR

Exploring the telescope next to Hartness House

• 2017 Model Engineering Show and Maker Space: Saturday, October 28, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., at the American Precision Museum and Windsor Recreation Center. Includes a family maker space, demonstrations and model machines. americanprecision.org • Springfield Steampunk Festival, held in September, draws aficionados of steampunk — a mash-up of Victorian dress and fanciful and imaginative future technology. Attendees can tour the tunnels, observatory and telescope museum at Hartness House as part of the event. springfieldvtsteampunkfest. com • The Stellafane Convention is an annual summer gathering for telescope makers and enthusiasts inspired by James Hartness’ legacy. stellafane.org

RELATED BOOKS • Rosie Revere, Engineer by Andrea Beaty • Engineering for Every Kid by Janice VanCleave • Kids Inventing! A Handbook for Young Inventors by Susan Casey • Girls Think of Everything: Stories of Ingenious Inventions by Women by Catherine Thimmesh

A milling machine at the Precision Museum

KIDS VT

COURTESY OF THE PRECISION MUSEUM

• The American Precision Museum (196 Main St., Windsor) is open daily from 10 a.m-5 p.m., May 27 to October 31. americanprecision.org • The Windsor Station Restaurant & Barroom (26 Depot Ave., Windsor), located in the old railroad station (the train still stops outside!), is a great place for dinner or lunch. windsorstationvt.com • The Fellows Gear Shaper Company building is now known as 100 River Street in Springfield. You can see the exteriors of many other machine-tool shops around town. • Hartness House Inn (30 Orchard St., Springfield) is a historic inn and tavern located in a Victorian mansion. The tavern is open for dinner Wednesday-Sunday, and brunch on weekends. hartnesshouse.com • Stellafane, the clubhouse of the Springfield Telescope Makers, hosts an open house the weekend of October 13-14. stellafane.org

EVENTS FOR MACHINISTS IN TRAINING

OCTOBER 2017

The Precision Museum offers a “Traveling Education Kit” that educators and parents can use to explore this part of Vermont history. Access it at americanprecision.org/education/ traveling-education-kit.

DYNAMIC DESTINATIONS

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We decided to follow the path of these inspired machinists, and drove down to Springfield along Interstate 91. Following the twists and turns of the Connecticut River and its offshoots, it’s easy to see why this area became a manufacturing hub. As we drove down Springfield’s Main Street along the Black River, we noticed places where dams or natural features created waterfalls, where manufacturers could harness the power of the water to turn early machines. Downtown, the former Fellows Gear Shaper Company rises up on the far side of the Black River, a huge brick building with an updated bridge that replaced one that once carried streams of workers across the river at the end of their shifts. We walked across the bridge to explore the old factory — which now houses a microbrewery, arts space and health clinic — and tried to imagine the building vibrating with the power of all those machine tools. The devices created in Springfield were central to the American auto industry, and to the production of airplane parts and sophisticated military instruments used in World War II. Local legend says that because Springfield was such an important manufacturing center, it was high — perhaps No. 7 — on Hitler’s list of bombing targets. James Hartness, a machinist at Jones & Lamson, was a brilliant inventor who pioneered a new kind of metalworking lathe that was crucial

to automobile manufacturing. He would go on to patent many more important inventions in the machinetool industry, and to serve as the 58th governor of Vermont. Hartness had another interest — and I told the kids I would take them to his house so they could figure out what it was. Hartness House, now an inn, is a grand stone and wood-trimmed mansion on a hill high above Springfield. Next to the house, there’s a structure that looks like a large white shoe with something sticking out of it. We walked around the strange building, trying to figure it out. Finally, someone said, “The top looks like a telescope.” An equatorial plane Turret Telescope to be exact, invented by Hartness, who loved astronomy. He created an elbow telescope with a prism that bent the light at a 90-degree angle, allowing the telescope to rotate while the viewer sat in a structure designed for the purpose. This way, astronomy buffs — who were used to standing outside in the cold in order to track stars in the sky — could gaze at the constellations from the comfort of the indoors. Hartness House contains secret tunnels that he used to reach his telescopes and observatories, now a telescope museum that can be toured by inn guests by appointment. Driving home along the river, we talked about the inventions we’d learned about, and what inspired them. Sometimes inventors are driven by a desire to work faster or to make more of a particular product. Sometimes they’re driven by a disruptive event, like the Civil War. Other times innovation is practical, borne of the simple desire to stay cozy and warm. 

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pon entering the Burlington High School library, visitors confront a large multimedia display that’s intended to provoke and challenge them. It focuses on the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, in August and the violence that erupted afterward. One enlarged photo shows white supremacist demonstrators carrying tiki torches. Another captures the moment when several people were thrown into the air by a car that slammed through a crowd of counter-protesters. Another shows a candlelight vigil. All three are positioned around an American flag. Also on display are an array of books, from nonfiction texts about hate crimes and extremist groups to the graphic novel March by U.S. Congressman and civil rights champion John Lewis. The books surround a computer monitor showing a Politico story from August 24 titled “Our left-right media divide told through Charlottesville.” It’s an analysis of articles that left- and right-leaning Twitter users shared during and after the events there. It shows that liberal-leaning users shared a CNN story promising to reveal “Donald Trump’s incredibly unpresidential statement on Charlottesville.” Meanwhile, conservativeleaning Tweeters shared a Fox News article

Librarians’ tips for helping kids make sense of online information BY ALISON NOVAK entitled “Trump condemns ‘egregious display of hatred, bigotry and violence’ in Charlottesville.” How are these articles different from each other? Which is more accurate? Why did they resonate with different audiences, and what does this pattern suggest about the health of our democracy? The exhibit prompts teachers and students to consider those questions, and serves as a resource to help them explore those topics. It’s also indicative of how some school libraries are evolving in the digital age. Shannon Walters, Burlington High School’s teacher librarian and technology integration specialist created the display. Librarians are in the information business, she explained. That includes teaching kids how to access, analyze and use it across different subjects. In the days of

encyclopedias, almanacs and the Dewey Decimal System, that was a relatively straightforward task. But with an unlimited and constant flow of information online, it’s become much more complicated. Donna Sullivan-Macdonald, library media and instructional technology specialist at Orchard School in South Burlington and president of the Vermont School Library Association, concurs. Teaching kids strategies for accessing and evaluating information “is much different than when I first became a librarian,” more than two decades ago, she wrote via email. “The availability of much more sophisticated electronic resources means that I need to spend much more time on evaluating the quality of the material and its ethical use.” Though our kids are commonly referred to as “digital natives” who’ve never experienced a world without the internet, research shows that they still have a lot to learn about navigating that world. A recent Stanford University study of middle, high school and college students in 12 states showed that, across the board, students’ civic online reasoning — their “ability to judge the credibility of information that floods young people’s smartphones, tablets and computers” — was “bleak.” One illuminating finding: At the middle school level, more than 80 percent of students believed that a native advertisement on Slate’s homepage — which resembles an article but is paid for by an advertiser to promote their product and


are already marinating in them through family conversations, social media and the press.” Emma Chaffee, editor in chief of Burlington High School’s award-winning student newspaper the BHS Register, suggests that actually making media has helped her understand it better. “When we’re creating it ourselves, we have to be so careful and make sure our opinions aren’t in there and it’s just the facts,” she said. Kids VT recently talked with librarians Walters, Sullivan-Macdonald and Blauvelt about the specific methods and resources they use to teach kids how to be savvy consumers of information in the 21st century.

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IDENTIFYING A CREDIBLE SOURCE

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Walters uses allsides.com,, a news service that shows how current issues from singlepayer health care to North Korea are written about in left-, center- and right-leaning publications, to show that “there are

Walters calls the personal information about students that’s on the internet a tattoo, rather than a footprint, because of its permanence. She asks students to closely consider what they’re posting about themselves online, as well as what their friends and family are posting about them, and encourages them to speak up if they object to something being shared. Prospective employers often do internet searches when considering a candidate for a job, she reminds them. Walters says she tries to model this with her own teenagers, which means not tagging them or referring to them by name in her own social media posts. For fourth and fifth graders, Sullivan-Macdonald uses Common Sense Media’s Digital Passport program (commonsense.org/education/digitalpassport), which helps students learn about topics like what’s appropriate to share online, and how to take action if they or their friends are cyberbullied. Blauvelt suggests that parents create an account on Common Sense Media, where they can learn more about many different topics related to media literacy, from guidelines for social media use to setting screen time limits. 

OCTOBER 2017

THINKING ABOUT PERSONAL AND MEDIA BIAS

BEING AWARE OF ‘DIGITAL TATTOOS’

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labeled as “sponsored ISSUE content” — was a real news story. Amy Blauvelt, library media specialist at Tuttle Middle School in South Burlington, said teaching kids to evaluate online information is one of her most challenging jobs. That’s because middle schoolers often lack the critical-thinking skills to judge the accuracy, relevance and reliability of what they find on the web, she said. “They do a Google search, and take the first source they see.” So how can parents and educators help kids become critical consumers of this vast trove of digitized info? The Burlington High School library display suggests one approach: Address tricky topics, like identifying deceptive or biased news, head on. Vermont Secretary of Education Rebecca Holcombe echoed this in a memo she sent to educators. When teachers asked how they should address the events in Charlottesville, she wrote, “Don’t be afraid to tackle hard issues: your students

Walters teaches high school students the CRAAP Test, originated by the California State University system, to help students evaluate information. It’s an acronym that represents the five things to consider when judging whether something is credible and useful: currency, or the timeliness of the information; relevance, or how important it is to the task at hand; authority, or the source of the information; accuracy, or the reliability, truthfulness and correctness of the information; and purpose, or the reason the information exists. Find the test here: http://ucsd.libguides.com/ preuss/webeval Walters also uses images — like a photo from National Geographic that at first appears to show camels but in fact depicts the camels’ shadows — to illustrate the importance of looking at something critically and asking questions. Sometimes, that process leads people to change their minds. She also shows students hoax websites — like “Save the Pacific Northwest Tree Octopus” (zapatopi.net/ treeoctopus) — and has conversations about how to tell the site is a spoof. Last year, Sullivan-Macdonald piloted Google’s Be Internet Awesome program (beinternetawesome.withgoogle.com) with third graders, which focuses on the fundamentals of digital citizenship and explores the idea that people and situations online aren’t always what they seem.

smart people articulating arguments from many sides.” Walters and Blauvelt subscribe to pro/con databases — Gale’s Opposing Viewpoints in Context is one example — that present different sides of controversial topics. Walters also talks to students about the concept of the “filter bubble,” the idea that people often aren’t even exposed to information that challenges their worldview because web companies tailor news and search results to personal tastes. She illustrates this by having students search the same topic and seeing the different results that come up based on their search patterns. She recommends Eli Pariser’s TED Talk, “Beware online ‘filter bubbles’” for an introduction to this topic.

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CALENDAR

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Spooky Steps

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Costumed competitors of all running abilities race through the Capital City’s downtown during the AUTUMN ONION 5K. Sunday, October 29, 9 a.m, at Onion River Sports in Montpelier.

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Forest Fantasy with Wonderfeet: Lovers of whimsy create tiny dwellings and fairy-themed crafts at Camp Betsey Cox in Pittsford.

SAT

OCT 14

Fall Festival with Ballet Vermont & Mister Chris : Families celebrate the season with song and dance at Bread & Butter Farm in Shelburne.

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OCT 21

Rug Concert: Young classical music enthusiasts are introduced to instruments and singers in an informal setting at Elley-Long Music Center in Colchester.

Like the University of Vermont Medical Center on Facebook and get weekly updates from Dr. First! See “First With Kids” videos at uvmhealth.org.


SUBMIT YOUR NOVEMBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY OCTOBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

3 Tuesday CHITTENDEN Creative Tuesdays: Young artists involve their imaginations with recycled materials. Kids under 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 3-4 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Dorothy’s List Book Club: Middle readers make merry conversation around DCF pick Projekt 1065 by Alan Gratz. Ages 8-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Spanish Musical Kids: Niños celebrate Latin American culture through tunes and games en español. Ages 1-5 with a caregiver. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:45 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Winooski Lego Club: Budding builders bust out plastic-block creations with the weekly Lego challenge. Winooski Memorial Library, 3-6 p.m. Info, 655-6424. FREE FRANKLIN Adoption Support Group: Families facing adoption issues and challenges join forces in a respectful setting. All welcome. Franklin County Seniors Center, St. Albans, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Info, 524-1700. FREE Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Tuesdays: Gamers of all abilities team up for card playing. Haston Library, Franklin, 4-7 p.m. Info, 285-6505. FREE Music & Movement With Ellie: Toddlers and preschoolers jump around to jolly tunes. Ages 5 and under. Highgate Public Library, Highgate Center, 10 a.m. Info, 868-3970. FREE RUTLAND Chess Club: Strategists of all skill levels partner up for playing. Ages 6 and up. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 3-4 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE

FREE

4 Wednesday

4 WEDNESDAY, P.36

NIGHTMARE VERMONT: This interactive,

theatrical haunted house scares the socks off visitors. Ages 13 and up. Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, FRIDAYS,

7-11 P.M., AND SATURDAYS, 2-6 & 7-11 P.M., THROUGH OCT. 28., $13-15. A portion of

proceeds benefits Camp Exclamation Point. MILTON INDEPENDENT MONSTER MILE:

Halloween enthusiasts run, walk or stroll on a 1.1 mile village course, with a selftimed 5K option. Costume prizes awarded. Check-in at 2:30 p.m. Bombardier Park, Milton, SATURDAY, OCT. 21, 3 P.M., $5-15, family of five $20, $5 each additional member. Info, 893-2028. SPOOKYVILLE VERMONT: Hundreds of jack-o-lanterns evoke the season’s essence during this family-friendly walk. Ages 8 and under with adult supervision. Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, SATURDAY, OCT. 21, SUNDAY, OCT. 22, AND SATURDAY, OCT. 28, 10 A.M.-2 P.M., $8-10.

Camp Exclamation Point receives some proceeds. Info, 355-3107. HALLOWEEN CELEBRATION: Creative

costumes add flair to this safe night of treats, games, crafts, a spooky maze and more. Preschoolers to grade 4 and their families. Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, WEDNESDAY, OCT. 25, 5-6:30 P.M. Info, 878-1375. FREE TRICK OR TROT 3/5K WALK OR RUN AND KIDS’ FUN RUN: Runners race through a scary

course in costumes. Fun Run obstacle course at 4:30 p.m. 5K is 5 p.m. Supervised childcare and Halloween games provided during the adult run. The Monster Bash follows with pizza and party by donation at the Warren School. Warren Elementary School, FRIDAY, OCT. 27, 4:30-6 P.M., $5-25; food available for purchase; proceeds benefit the Warren PTO. Info, 496-2487.

HALLOWEEN HOWL: Families enjoy

HALLOWEEN BIKE RIDE: Cyclists in costume wheel their way through town in a parade with a “Shared Streets, Not Scared Streets” theme beginning at 2 p.m., ending at a secret party location with music, prizes and mirth for all. Burlington City Hall Park, SUNDAY, OCT. 29, 1:30-4 P.M. Info, 864-0123. FREE

own pumpkins with provided tools and stencils, get cozy by a crackling bonfire and gather sugary and not-so-sweet treats. Bombardier Park, Milton, FRIDAY, OCT. 27, 6-8 P.M. Info, 893-4922. FREE hayrides and a haunted walk, with games, music and fun for all. Oakledge Park, Burlington, SATURDAY, OCT. 28, 2-6 P.M. Info, 881-7767. FREE HALLOWEEN HUSTLE 5K AND KIDS’ RUN:

Runners decked out in holiday attire hoof it to the finish line in short road races. Prizes awarded by age group and for best costume. Maple Street Park, Essex Junction, SATURDAY, OCT. 28, 9 A.M., $12-15 5K registration, $5 for kids race, or free with a registered runner in the 5K. Info, 878-1375. HOOTS AND HOWLS: This educational nature-based day features snakes, skulls and bones, storytelling by ecologist and musician Michael Caduto, crafts, and ooey-gooey seasonal fun. Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center, Quechee,

sizes and running abilities race through the Capital City’s downtown. Prizes given for the best costumes. Strollers welcome. Registration opens at 7:30 a.m. Onion River Sports, Montpelier, SUNDAY, OCT. 29, 9 A.M.-NOON, $5-20. Info, 229-9409.

HAUNTED HAPPENINGS: From the magical

to the mystical, kids don fantasy-themed costumes and trick-or-treat on the museum’s grounds. Shelburne Museum, SUNDAY, OCT. 29, 10 A.M.-1 P.M., $7 per person; free for children under 3. Info, 985-3346. HEALTHY HALLOWEEN SNACKS FOR KIDS: Youngsters and

caregivers drop in and delight in making seasonal snacks, including pretzel and cheese broomsticks, clementine ‘pumpkins’ and fruit monster faces. Coffee and music add to the merriment. City Market, Burlington,

SATURDAY, OCT. 28, 10 A.M.-5 P.M., regular

museum admission, $13-15; free for kids under 4. Info, 359-5000. HORSES FOR HOPE HALLOWEEN CELEBRATION: Dressed-up youngsters

ask for treats from horses, play games, pursue arts and crafts and more. A riding demonstration at 1:30 p.m. is followed by a luminary ceremony. Enniskerry Farm, Colchester, SATURDAY, OCT. 28, 10 A.M.-2:30 P.M., $5 per child, includes trick-ortreating and pony ride; fees for additional activities and items; all proceeds go to the American Cancer Society. Info, 999-8519. A FAMILY HALLOWEEN: All Hallow’s Eve

inspires pumpkin carving, doughnutson-a-string, wagon rides, animal programs and “not-too-scary” stories. Costume parades at noon and 2 p.m. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, SUNDAY, OCT. 29, 10 A.M.-5 P.M., regular museum admission, $4-15; free for children under 3 or in costume when accompanied by an adult. Info, 457-2355.

SUNDAY, OCT. 29, 10 A.M.-1 P.M. AND TUESDAY, OCT. 31, 9:30-11:30 A.M. Info, 861-9700. FREE

MIDDLEBURY SPOOKTACULAR: Little ghosts,

ghouls and goblins spread over the town green for games, prizes, music and face painting, with a children’s trick-or-treat parade as a finale. Middlebury Green, SUNDAY, OCT. 29, 1-3 P.M. Info, 388-4126. FREE THE GREAT PUMPKIN WALK: Bright-eyed pedestrians admire glowing hand-carved squash of all sizes and shapes. Maple Street Park, Essex Junction, MONDAY, OCT. 30, 6-8:30 P.M. Info, 878-1375. FREE HALLOWEEN TRICKS & TREATS: Kids in costumes make merry among the museum’s collection of creatures. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, TUESDAY, OCT. 31, 4-8 P.M. Info, 748-2372. FREE MONTPELIER HALLOWEEN PARTY: Little

goblins, ghosts and other costumed kids celebrate a not-too-spooky afternoon with games, goodies and a special guest at 2 p.m. Montpelier High School, TUESDAY, OCT. 31, 1-2:30 P.M. Info, 225-8699. FREE

STOWE HALLOWEEN PARTY: Costumed kids

enjoy spooky games, music, food and a photo booth before heading out for candy. Stowe Elementary School, TUESDAY, OCT. 31, 4:30-6 P.M., gaming fees may apply. Info, 253-6138. FREE

KIDS VT

ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: Crafts, cheeses, breads, veggies, eggs and more vie for spots in shoppers’ totes. Middlebury VFW, 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

autumn celebration ferries folks into the park via hay wagon rides. Guided tours lead families through candle-lit paths to stages of storytelling, music, fire and magic, with an opportunity to admire the park’s 50’ fire-illuminated tower. Hubbard Park, Montpelier, SATURDAY, OCT. 14, 4-8 P.M., $4-10, $20-25 per family; proceeds benefit Montpelier Parks. Info, 223-7335.

AUTUMN ONION 5K: Ghouls and ghosts of all

OCTOBER 2017

MULTIPLE VT LOCATIONS Virtual College Fair: Prospective college students and their parents chat with admission reps from the comfort of their computer screen. See snowyowltutoring.com for specific school and program info. Various locations, 6:30-8 p.m. Info, 299-9642. FREE

ENCHANTED FOREST: This night-time

TRUNK OR TREAT & PUMPKINS IN THE PARK: Costumed kiddos carve up their

KIDSVT.COM

WINDSOR Lego Tuesdays: Junior builders bust out blocks and get busy. Children under 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Norwich Public Library, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 649-1184. FREE

5K GLOW RUN: The spooky season kicks off with runners dressed in illuminated costumes, followed by prizes, music and merriment. Kids’ free glow run starts at 5 p.m. at Taylor Park, St. Albans, SATURDAY, OCT. 7, 6-7 P.M., $22. Info, 524-1500.

WASHINGTON Maker Program: Crafty kiddos dig into different projects using the library’s materials and mentoring. Ages 8-11. Waterbury Public Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 244-7036.

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CALENDAR OCTOBER 4 Wednesday (cont.) CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: Freshly baked goods, veggies, beef and maple syrup figure prominently in displays of “shop local” options. Danville Village Green, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 592-3088. CHITTENDEN Family Game Day: Families rally for a weekly round of tabletop fun. Winooski Memorial Library, 3-6 p.m. Info, 655-6424. FREE

Prema Agni: A Heart-Opening Experience for Kids: Children of all ages and their caregivers drop in and discover how to draw the Prema Agni, an energy-healing symbol. Railyard Yoga Studio, Burlington, 1:30-3 p.m. Info, 495-9435. FREE

CALEDONIA Lego Club: Fledgling architects construct collaboratively with colorful blocks. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 3-5 p.m. Info, 472-5948. FREE

Reading Buddies: Little bookworms pair up with volunteers for literacy and laughs. Kindergarten and up. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-4:30 p.m.; preregistration appreciated.. Info, 264-5660. FREE Yoga for Kids: Young yogis engage their energy and explore breathing exercises and relaxation poses with professional instructors. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE FRANKLIN Music & Movement With Ellie: See October 3.

OCTOBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

RUTLAND Lego Club: Busy kiddos create with plastic blocks, inspired by a weekly theme. Ages 6 and up; children under 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 3-4 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE Rutland Farmers Market: Local vendors peddle farm-fresh produce and fruits, handcrafted breads, artisan cheese and more at this outdoor emporium. Downtown Rutland, 3-6 p.m. Info, 342-4727. ORANGE Lego Wednesdays: Aspiring architects construct creatively while chatting. Kimball Public Library, Randolph, 2:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 728-5073. FREE WASHINGTON Fall Foliage Buy Local Market: The Capital City Farmers Market celebrates the harvest season with local foods and handmade goods on the State House lawn. State House Lawn, Montpelier, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 793-8347. Walk-Through Wednesday at Orchard Valley: Parents checking out an alternative eduction for their children tour classrooms for grades 1-8, a mixed-age kindergarten, and the Farm & Forest program. Orchard Valley Waldorf School, East Montpelier, 8:30-10:30 a.m.; preregister by noon on the preceding day. Info, 456-7400. FREE

5 Thursday

CHITTENDEN Audubon Homeschool Program: Homebased learners use the outdoor classroom to explore a variety of seasonal topics, from insect investigations to wilderness skills. Ages 6-8. Parent attendance optional. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., $20-25; preregister. Info, 434-3068.

Hinesburg Lego Club: Imaginative kids get creative with colorful blocks. Ages 5-10. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 482-2878. FREE

Babytime: Tiny tots have a ball with books, rhymes. songs and socializing. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:15-10:45 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Milton Giant Pumpkin Growing Contest Finale: Enormous squash compete for the heaviest title. Milton Farmers Market, 4:30-7 p.m. Info, 893-4922.

Colchester Lego Club: Mini-makers participate in surprise challenges with interlocking toys. Ages 6-10. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE

P.M., SATURDAYS, 2 & 7:30 P.M., AND SUNDAYS, 2 P.M., THROUGH OCT. 29., $35-44.50. Info,

862-1497.

WINOOSKI WEDNESDAYS: City folks sprawl out on an autumn evening with live music from the Devon McGarry Band and free meals for kids under 18. Rain location is the Monkey House. Rotary Park, Winooski, WEDNESDAY, OCT. 4, 6-8 P.M.; food and drink available to purchase. Info, 777-1621. FREE ‘TO KILL A MOCKINGBIRD’: Harper Lee’s

cherished coming-of-age story engages the audience by exploring themes of racial inequality, class, gender and family, in this educational program performed by the New Repertory Theatre’s Classic Repertory Company. Chandler Music Hall, Randolph, THURSDAY, OCT. 5, 10 A.M., $7; preregister. Info, 728-6464.

MADAILA ON THE MOUNTAIN: This

acclaimed pop band teams ups with local youth bands in a festive afternoon including food trucks, fall foliage chairlift rides, kids’ activities and more, as a fundraiser for United Way of Addison County. Middlebury College Snow Bowl, Hancock, SATURDAY, OCT. 7, 1-5 P.M., $12-18; free for children under 13. Info, 388-6124. ‘DANIEL TIGER’S NEIGHBORHOOD LIVE!’:

Mister Rogers’ legacy lives on as Daniel Tiger dons his red sweater and takes the audience on an interactive musical journey via trolley through the Neighborhood of Make-Believe. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, WEDNESDAY, OCT. 11, 6 P.M., $15-75. Info, 863-5966.

Read to Archie the Therapy Dog: An attentive canine listens to little people read. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4 p.m.; preregistration appreciated. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Food for Thought Teen Group: Young adults polish off pizza as they ponder library projects. Grades 7-12. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4-5 p.m. Info, 878-4918.

Williston Preschool Music: Lively tunes with local musicians strike the right note among the wee crowd. Ages 5 and under with a caregiver. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.; limited to one session per week per family. Info, 878-4918. FREE

FREE

Live Performances

‘FUN HOME’: Produced by Vermont Stage, this musical portrays a daughter’s determination to know her enigmatic dad, based on Alison Bechdel’s best-selling graphic memoir. Ages 12 and up. FlynnSpace, Burlington, WEDNESDAYS-FRIDAYS, 7:30

Milton Farmers Market: Farmers, foodies and crafters come together to celebrate the bounty of the growing season. Hannaford Supermarket, Milton, 3:30-7 p.m. Info, 893-1009.

COURTESY OF THE FLYNN CENTER

MULTIPLE VT LOCATIONS Virtual College Fair: See October 3.

FREE

KIDS VT

Woodstock Market on the Green: Fresh vegetables, farm eggs, local meats and cheeses, cut flowers, and seasonal fruits and berries represent the best of the growing season, with the accompaniment of live music. Woodstock Village Green, 3-6 p.m. Info, 457-3555.

Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: Novice and experienced players put their imaginations together. Ages 10 and up. Regular attendance needed to follow the ongoing storyline. Jericho Town Library, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Info, 899-4686. FREE

Read to Daisy the Therapy Dog: Book buffs bring a selection from home or borrow from the library to amuse an attentive canine. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4 p.m.; preregistration appreciated. Info, 878-6956.

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WINDSOR Sensory Lab for Tots: Wee ones try out selfguided art stations, including finger painting, modeling dough, moon sand and more. Ages 5 and under; adult supervision required. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 9:30-11:30 a.m., $5. Info, 457-3500.

David Gonzalez

‘ANIMALESCO: ANIMAL TALES FROM AROUND THE GLOBE’: What happens when a

chicken meets a crocodile? Using verbal narrative, mime and realistic sound effects, performer Antonio Rocha brings the animal kingdom to life with audience participation and lots of clowning around. Ages 3 and up. Hopkins Center for the Arts, Hanover, SATURDAY, OCT. 14, 11 A.M. Info, 603-646-2422. FREE

‘CUENTOS: TALES FROM THE LATINO WORLD’:

Writer and storyteller David Gonzalez mesmerizes the audience with his fantastical characters and stories from the Spanish-speaking world, including the Caribbean, South America and his home base of the Bronx. Live music adds to the marvel. Ages 8 and up. Hopkins Center for the Arts, Hanover, SUNDAY, OCT. 15, 3 P.M., $13-23. Info, 603-646-2422. FAMILY FRINGE: Kids and adults take in an afternoon of off-the-beaten-track theater, featuring puppets, storytelling, improv comedy and music. Off Center for the Dramatic Arts, Burlington, SUNDAY, OCT. 15, 4-6 P.M., $5-12. Info, 716-640-4639. RED KITE TREASURE ADVENTURE: Audience

members join the Chicago Children’s Theatre in this interactive performance geared toward young people on the autism spectrum. Based on chivalrous characters from an E. Nesbit novel, this adventurous story unwinds in a relaxed setting. Chase Studio, Burlington, SUNDAY, OCT. 22, 11 A.M., 2 & 4 P.M., $15-25. Info, 863-5966.

FRANKLIN Fairfax PJ Story Time: Children chill in their jammies while listening to stories. Fairfax Community Library, 6-7 p.m. Info, 849-2420. FREE

Franklin Lego Thursdays: Kiddie constructionists combine their creativity with the library’s supplies. Haston Library, Franklin, 2-5 p.m. Info, 285-6505. FREE RUTLAND Fair Haven Farmers Market: Fresh produce, meat, greens, and locally-made maple products swell shoppers’ totes. Fair Haven Park, 3-6 p.m. Info, 342-4727. WASHINGTON Kids Cartooning Club: In this six-week program, aspiring artists get going with a mini-lesson, then free draw their own creations. Ages 8-12. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE WINDSOR Clay for Tots: Little potters practice, poke and play with a malleable medium. Ages 3-6. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 10:30-11:15 a.m., $12 per drop-in class. Info, 457-3500.

6 Friday CALEDONIA Hardwick Farmers Market: Local produce, plants, artisan cheese, syrup and more fill shoppers’ market baskets. Diverse dinner fare available. Atkins Field, Hardwick, 3-6 p.m. CHITTENDEN Baby Yoga: Mamas and papas stretch themselves and their wee ones, strengthening general health and gross motor skills. Ages 1 and under. Jericho Town Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregistration required. Info, 899-4686. FREE Family Gym: Indoor playground equipment gives tiny tumblers a chance to run free. Ages 7 and under. Greater Burlington YMCA, 10:1511:45 a.m., $5-8 per family; free for members. Info, 862-9622. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: Toe-tapping tunes captivate kiddies. Radio Bean, Burlington, 11 a.m. Info, 660-9346. FREE


Classes List your class or camp here for only $20 per month! Submit the listing by October 15 at kidsvt.com or to classes@ kidsvt.com. UPCOMING ‘PARENTING YOU’ WORKSHOP: Does your child push

your buttons? Are you parenting defensively? Parents! You are definitely not alone! Discover the secrets to empowered parenting. Hint: It’s not about your child! Children benefit by how well parents know and take care of themselves. Kimberly Hackett, MA, LMHC is a parent coach, educator and writer who has developed a new model of parenting focused on parent leadership and personal growth. Space is limited. $25. OCT. 21, 9 A.M.-NOON, DeMena’s, 44 Main St., Montpelier. NOV. 18, 9 A.M.-NOON, North End Studios, 294 N. Winooski Ave., Burlington. Info/registration: kimberlyhackett.com BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU: The future of our nation lies in the courage, confidence and determination of its people. Our Kids BJJ Program promotes self-esteem, selfconfidence, character development and a physical outlet with discipline, cooperation with other children, respect for peers and adults, perseverance and a healthy lifestyle. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu will help your kids to learn realistic bully-proofing and self-defense skills that they can use for the rest of their lives! Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu builds endurance, patience and selfrespect. Give your kids the ability to get stronger, gain confidence and build resilience! Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them practices they can carry with them throughout life. Remember you are raising children, not flowers. First class is free! Please stop by our school at 55 Leroy Road, Williston; call 598-2839; visit our website vermontbjj.com or email julio@bjjusa.com to register your son or daughter!

Teen Advisory Board: Adolescents socialize about library projects and savor snacks. Grades 9 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

Wed Sun Wed-Sun Sept. 1st to Oct. 31st 10:00 5:00 10:00-5:00 750 Sibley Rd, East Montpelier 802-249-1223

ORLEANS Lego Club: Petite ones build with plastic blocks and chat companionably. Ages 4-12. Craftsbury Public Library, Craftsbury Common, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 586-9683. FREE WASHINGTON Author Reading: M. T. Anderson: This award-winning local author reads from his futuristic new novel, Landscape With Invisible Hand, as part of the Capital City’s art walk festivities. Bear Pond Books, Montpelier, 5 p.m. Info, 229-0774. FREE

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Cardboard Challenge: Creative constructions of all ages combine their imagination and the library’s cardboard, glue guns and extra materials. Waterbury Public Library, 1-5 p.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE Montpelier Mother Up! Monthly Meet-Up: Families discuss the realities of climate change, what that means on a local, state and national level, and how to create a more just and nature-friendly world. Vegetarian dinner and childcare offered. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; RSVP requested. Info, 229-0041. FREE WINDSOR Branch Out Teen Night: Young adults make the most of an evening together while watching ‘The Marvelous Wonderettes.’ The Grange Theatre, South Pomfret, 6-9:45 p.m. Info, 457-3500. FREE

ART, THEATRE, MUSIC + MOVEMENT Classes for Preschoolers, Homeschoolers, Afterschool, Teens, & Adults!

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The Vermont Cub Project

First Friday White River Junction: The city stays open late in this community jamboree of live music and artist receptions. Downtown, White River Junction. Foodways Fridays: Guests tour the heirloom garden, then watch as veggies make their way into historic recipes prepared in the 1890 farmhouse kitchen. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., regular museum admission, $4-15; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

Vermont Teddy Bears are more than fur & stuffing. Everyday we see Bears come to life in the arms of children, and we knew we needed to share this love with our fellow Vermonters. This is why we created The Vermont Cub Project. Through this project, every Vermonter four years of age can come to our Bear Shop in Shelburne and pick up a FREE best friend (up to $39.99). Come be a part of this great new program today!

7 Saturday ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See October 4. CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: Freshly baked goods, veggies, beef and maple syrup figure prominently in displays of “shop local” options. St. Johnsbury Farmers Market, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 592-3088. CHITTENDEN Burlington Farmers Market: Growers and artisans offer fresh and ready-to-eat foods, crafts and more in a bustling marketplace. Burlington City Hall Park, 8:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 310-5172.

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Visit VermontTeddyBear.com/cub-project to register!

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6/22/17 2:00 PM

KIDS VT

LAMOILLE Stowe Foliage Arts & Crafts Festival: Multicolored leaves set a stunning scene for juried artwork, live music, great food, craft demonstrations and face painting. Topnotch Resort, Stowe, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., $10-12; free for children. Info, 425-3399.

PYO apples & pumpkins pumpkins. Free hayrides & pumpkin-chunkin' on weekends

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OCTOBER 2017

Richmond Farmers Market: Vendors peddle handheld pies, dinner delectables, homemade pickles, just-picked produce and much more at this lively showcase of locavorism. Volunteers Green, Richmond, 3-6 p.m. Info, 391-0806.

2nd Annual nnual CORN MAZE

KIDSVT.COM

Magic: The Gathering: Planeswalkers seek knowledge and glory in this trading-card game. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6-8 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Peck Farm Orchard

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CALENDAR OCTOBER 7 Saturday (cont.) EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: Youngsters master basic yoga poses through games, songs and dance. Mindfulness activities improve focus and concentration. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, 11:45 a.m.12:30 p.m., $15. Info, 899-0339. James Wakefield Rescue Row: Over 100 youths race in a series of heats along the Burlington Waterfront, in commemoration of the heroic 1876 rescue of General Butler by James Wakefield and his son. Races begin at 9:30 a.m. Perkins Pier, Burlington. Info, 475-2022, ext. 113. FREE

Kids Building Workshop: Handy helpers learn do-it-yourself skills and tool safety as they construct seasonal projects. Ages 5-12. Home Depot, Williston, 9 a.m.-noon; preregister at workshops.homedepot.com. Info, 872-0039. FREE Lunafest Women’s Short Film Festival: Cinema buffs take in flicks with topics ranging from motherhood and mental growth to relationships, aging and health, with guest speaker Karen Newman – world-class triathlete, cancer and eating disorder survivor, author and dietitian. Main Street Landing, Burlington, 6:30-10 p.m., $40; proceeds benefit Girls on the Run Vermont and Breast Cancer Prevention Partners. Info, 246-1476.

Science & Nature NATURE’S FOOTPATH: A COMMUNITY WALKING PROGRAM: Woods

lovers of all abilities enjoy an informative wander. Wear hiking boots; pack water and a snack. David Gale Recreation Center, Stowe, WEDNESDAY, OCT. 4, AND WEDNESDAY, OCT. 18, 8:30-11 A.M., $5. Info, 253-6138. SCIENCE & STORIES AT ECHO:

Preschoolers rally ‘round for nature-inspired tales and activities. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington,

WEDNESDAYS, 10:30 A.M., THROUGH OCT. 25., regular museum

admission, $11.50-14.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848.

MONTSHIRE MAKERS: Middle

school inventors use their imagination and the museum’s materials to create cool projects, with different monthly themes. Grades 6-9. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, FRIDAY, OCT. 6, 6:30-8 P.M., $8-15; preregistration encouraged. Info, 649-2200.

KIDS VT

OCTOBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

DEAD CREEK WILDLIFE DAY:

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Natural wonders wow youngsters during this day dedicated to wild things, hosted by pros from Vermont Fish & Wildlife, Otter Creek Audubon Society and local sportsmen’s clubs. Pack up the family and the binoculars for a full or drop-in day of birdwatching, canoeing and numerous nature-based activities. Dead Creek Wildlife Management Area, Addison, SATURDAY, OCT. 7, 7 A.M.-4 P.M. Info, 828-1000. FREE FALL FAMILY FUN DAY: This family-

owned dairy farm opens its doors for folks to meet the goats, cows, chickens and ducks, with cheese-tasting, face painting and a scavenger hunt, too. Boston Post Dairy, Enosburg Falls,

SATURDAY, OCT. 7, 10 A.M.-2 P.M.

Info, 933-2749. FREE

FOREST FANTASY WITH WONDERFEET: Whimsy lovers of

all ages dressed in forest-themed costumes create tiny dwellings and fairy arts and crafts in a magical woods, while music and dance make more merriment. Camp Betsey Cox, Pittsford, SATURDAY, OCT. 7, 12-3:30 P.M., $7, $30 for a family of 5. Info, 282-2678. HAYRIDES TO THE PUMPKIN PATCH:

Families have fun on a wagon ride to the pick-your-own field. Weather permitting. Sam Mazza’s Farm Market, Colchester,

SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS, 10 A.M.-4 P.M., THROUGH OCT. 8., fee charged. Info, 655-3440. Maze by Moonlight TOUR THE COSMOS:

Milton Fire Station Open House: Families join fire safety week with Sparky the Dog, tower truck rides, safety demonstrations, music and refreshments. Milton Fire Station, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 891-8080. FREE

Shelburne Farmers Market: Musical entertainment adds merriment to this exchange of local fruits, veggies, herbs, crafts, maple syrup and more. Shelburne Village Green, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 482-4279.

Read to Cleo the Therapy Dog: Canine and reading enthusiasts visit with a personable pooch. Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE

Smuggs’ Ski & Snowboard Swap: Skiers and riders of all ages get great deals on winter gear. Consignment drop-off Friday, October 6, 6-8 p.m. Located at Tarrant Recreation Center, St. Michael’s College, Colchester, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Info, 644-1177. FREE

Saturday Drama Club: Junior thespians create a character, spin a story, and put on a performance, all in three hours. Ages 7-11. Old North End Community Center, Burlington, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., $15. Info, 355-1461.

PUMPKIN FESTIVAL AT CEDAR CIRCLE FARM: Families see orange

at this quintessential fall farm affair, featuring pumpkin picking, cider pressing, storytelling, live music and horse-drawn wagon rides. Kid-centered activities include live birds of prey from VINS, corn-husk doll making, fairy house creations, a hay bale climb and more. Green event; bring your own place setting. Cedar Circle Farm & Education Center, East Thetford, SUNDAY, OCT. 8, 10 A.M.-3 P.M., suggested donation $10-15 per car; food and drink available to purchase. Info, 785-4737.

WHO WALKS THESE WOODS?:

Expert tracker Mike Kessler leads an inquisitive trek into our landscape. Ages 7 and up. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, SECOND SUNDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 1-3 P.M., THROUGH OCT. 8., regular

immersion experience for high school girls features hands-on workshops and active stations highlighting careers in the skilled trades and science, technology, engineering and math fields. Vermont Technical College, Randolph, THURSDAY, OCT. 12, 8 A.M.-2:30 P.M., $20; preregister. Info, 622-0400, ext. 151.

AUTUMN WAGON RIDE WEEKEND:

Foliage enthusiasts of all ages enjoy a narrated horse-drawn wagon tour through a colorful landscape, then engage in farm-based activities, including programs with Jersey cows and Southdown sheep. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, SATURDAY, OCT. 14, AND SUNDAY, OCT. 15, 10 A.M.-5 P.M., regular

museum admission, $4-15; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

BEAUTIFUL TREE WALK:

SUNDAY, OCT. 15, 1-4 P.M.

Info, 426-3581. FREE

TERRIFIC TRACTORS & OTHER COOL MACHINES:

AND SUNDAYS, 1:30 P.M., $6 plus regular

DISCOVERY SUNDAYS: Families have fun with hands-on science experiments and investigations, using wheels, towers, magnets, feathers, water and bubbles. Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center, Quechee, SUNDAYS, 11:30 A.M.-2 P.M., regular museum admission, $13-15; free for children under 4. Info, 359-5001, ext. 228.

WOMEN CAN DO STEM & TRADES CONFERENCE: This one-day career

Local naturalist Brett Engstrom shares his savvy with woods lovers during a stroll through the Stranahan Town Forest. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield,

This 50-minute live presentation takes the audience on a journey deep into the universe. Ages 6 and up. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, SATURDAYS

museum admission, $7-9; free for children under 5. Info, 748-2372.

The Cat in the Hat Turns 60½: The famous feline in the striped hat stops by storytime for a birthday visit and photo-op snapping. Phoenix Books, Essex Junction, 11 a.m.-noon. Info, 872-7111. FREE

museum admission, $3.50-7; free for children under 3; preregister. Info, 434-2167. NESTLINGS FIND NATURE:

Preschoolers discover how songbirds grow, using imaginative play, books, crafts, and nature walks and activities. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, SECOND AND FOURTH TUESDAYS OF EVERY MONTH, 10:30-11:30 A.M., THROUGH OCT. 24, regular museum admission,

$3.50-7; free for children under 3. Info, 434-2167.

Future farmers climb aboard a collection of colossal machines that can get the job done. Shelburne Farms, SUNDAY, OCT. 15, 10 A.M.-4 P.M., regular museum admission, $5-8; free for children under 3. Info, 985-8686.

TREE WALK: Master naturalist Jacob Holzberg-Pill leads an autumn walk with curious tree lovers of all ages. Rock Point, Burlington, SUNDAY, OCT. 15, 10 A.M.-NOON. Info, 864-0123. FREE BOOKS AND BEYOND! SCIENCE FOR PRESCHOOLERS: Children’s

literature and hands-on science activities engage eager youngsters. Ages 3-5 with caregiver. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, MONDAY, OCT. 16, 10:15 & 11:30 A.M., regular museum admission, $12-15; free for children under 2. Info, 649-2200.

SEASON OF CHANGE: Little ones

explore the hard work of how wild critters prepare for chilly weather by finding and hiding food and building a home. Ages 3-5 with caregiver. Audubon Vermont, Huntington, THURSDAY, OCT. 19, 9-10:30 A.M., $8-10 adultchild pair, $4 each additional child; preregister. Info, 434-3068.

VERMONT TECH JAM: Tech-savvy teens and their parents make connections at this career and tech expo, with dozens of Vermont’s most innovative companies and organizations, panel discussions and workshops. Champlain Valley Expo, Essex Junction, FRIDAY, OCT. 20, 10 A.M.-5 P.M., AND SATURDAY, OCT. 21, 10 A.M.-3 P.M. Info,

864-5684. FREE

SPINY SOFTSHELL TURTLE NESTING BEACH WORK DAY: Families pull

up plant growth to prepare for next June’s turtle-egg-laying season. Arrive before 11 a.m. as location may change. Bring lunch, a trowel and work gloves. North Hero State Park, SATURDAY, OCT. 21, 10 A.M.-4 P.M. Info, 288-9570. FREE

FLEDGLINGS FIGURE IT OUT: Each month, junior avian admirers tackle a new bird puzzle, while exploring the wild world. Ages 5-10; siblings welcome. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington,

FOURTH SUNDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 2-3 P.M., THROUGH OCT. 22, regular

museum admission, $3.50-7; free for children under 3. Info, 434-2167.

MAZE BY MOONLIGHT: Get lost!

Using a flashlight as a guide, visitors search for hidden stations in the Fort’s corn maze after dark. Last ticket sold at 9 p.m. Fort Ticonderoga, N.Y.,

FRIDAY, OCT. 27, AND SATURDAY, OCT. 28, 7-10 P.M., $10. Info,

518-585-2821.

BIRD-MONITORING WALK:

Eagle-eyed participants bring binoculars to search the museum’s property for fluttering feathers. Best for adults and older children. Please bring your own binoculars. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, SATURDAY, OCT. 28, 8-9 A.M., donations welcome; preregister. Info, 434-2167. FREE


SUBMIT YOUR NOVEMBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY OCTOBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM Williston Fire Department Open House: The community comes out for firefighter intros, a station tour, touch-a-truck fun, carseat safety inspections and free fire hats and hot dogs. Williston Fire Department, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 878-5622. FREE GRAND ISLE Harvest Fest Market: Local veggies, handmade crafts and freshly-prepared food satisfy shoppers. Live music and special entertainment add to the enjoyment. St. Rose of Lima Parish, South Hero, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. LAMOILLE Celebrate Fall: The community checks out what Green Mountain Technology and Career Center students are up to on the farm, with live music, free local eats, children’s art projects and a guided tour at 1 p.m. with ecologist Liz Thompson and foresters Dan Kilborn and Rick Dyer. Brewster Uplands West Farm, Jeffersonville, 11:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Info, 851-1587. FREE Local Harvest Dinner: Lamoille Union Farm to School program celebrates autumn with local food, live music and lots of neighbors. Lamoille Union High School, Hyde Park, 5:30 p.m., suggested donation $10. Info, 888-1238. Stowe Foliage Arts & Crafts Festival: See October 6. RUTLAND Art in the Park: Outdoor art and craft demonstrations and vendors, local food, and children’s activities combine in a weekend devoted to creativity. Main Street Park, Rutland, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Info, 775-0356. FREE Rutland Farmers Market: See October 4, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. ORLEANS Craftsbury Common Farmers Market: Locals load up on garden-fresh produce, Vermont-made crafts, baked goods and more. Craftsbury Common, 10 a.m.-1 p.m.

Global Cardboard Challenge: Inspired by the Imagination Foundation, this worldwide building event champions the creativity of every child. Supplies, refreshments and inspiration provided. Ages 5-12. WonderArts Vermont, Greensboro, 1-3 p.m. Info, 533-9370. FREE

WASHINGTON Capital City Farmers Market: Veggies, honey, maple syrup and more change hands at a celebration of farm-grown food and handmade crafts. Downtown Montpelier, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 223-2958. Kung Fu: Athletes of all ages and abilities develop sound mind and body skills through traditional instruction. Ages 7 and up. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m., $10 suggested donation. Info, 505-1688. Montpelier Child’s Garden Fall Festival: Families bring a picnic from home and revel in autumnal activities, including apple pressing, dyeing with native plants and walking on a woods trail. Child’s Garden Early Childhood Center, Montpelier, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Info, 456-7400. FREE Waitsfield Farmers Market: Saturday shoppers search out handmade crafts and local produce, meat and maple products, while enjoying lunch fare and live music in this grassy outdoor venue. Mad River Green, Waitsfield, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. WINDSOR Family Clay: Children and their parents make memories firing and glazing special pieces. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 10 a.m.-noon, $20 per parent-child pair, $5 per additional family member. Info, 457-3500. Harvest Weekend: Visitors help prepare the farm for winter with root veggie harvesting, and celebrate the season’s bounty with a husking bee and a barn dance with live music. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-5 p.m., regular museum admission, $4-15; free for children under 3; seasonal food and drink available for purchase. Info, 457-2355.

8 Sunday CHITTENDEN Champlain Valley Buddy Walk: Community members walk to raise awareness and funds for programs benefiting people with Down syndrome and their families. Registration opens at noon. Battery Park, Burlington, 1 p.m., $8-10 per person, maximum $30 per family; no registration necessary for children ages 10 and under. Info, 355-4206. East Charlotte Tractor Parade: Antique and modern farm vehicles rumble down Spear Street amidst a town party with food, live music, pony rides and children’s games. Spear Street, Charlotte, 11 a.m. Info, 425-4444. FREE Essex Open Gym: Energy-filled kids flip, jump and tumble in a state-of-the-art facility. Ages 6 and under, 1 p.m.; ages 7-12, 2:30 p.m.; ages 13 and up, 4 p.m. Regal Gymnastics Academy, Essex, 1-5:30 p.m., $8-14. Info, 655-3300. Family Concert: The Michele Fay Band serenades with original and traditional Americana music. Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, Jericho, 2 p.m. Info, 899-5433. FREE Family Gym: See October 6. Smuggs’ Ski & Snowboard Swap: See October 7, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Winooski Farmers Market: Local produce, farm goods, artisan crafts, kids activities and tunes come together on the banks of the Winooski River. Champlain Mill, Winooski, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. LAMOILLE Stowe Farmers Market: Live music and agricultural and craft vendors make for a bustling atmosphere. Stowe Farmers Market, 10:30 a.m.-3 p.m. Info, 279-3444. Stowe Foliage Arts & Crafts Festival: See October 6. RUTLAND Art in the Park: See October 7, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. WASHINGTON Marshfield Harvest Festival: This familyfriendly fall shindig includes cider pressing, field games, a historic slideshow of Marshfield, a book sale and a chili cook-off. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.; lunch available for $4-8. Info, 426-3581. FREE Montpelier Kids Cup and Fall Festival: Young athletes ages 10 and under take a one-mile loop at noon, followed by a 1 p.m. 5K. Games, food for sale and family activities furnish more festivities. Montpelier High School, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., $25 per child runner, no charge for accompanying adults; proceeds benefit Montpelier schools’ students and teachers. Info, 404-308-0510. WINDSOR Harvest Weekend: See October 7.

9 Monday CHITTENDEN Colchester Preschool Music: Bitty ones dance and sing to a brisk beat. Ages 3-5. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 11:30 a.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Crafts for Kids: Clever kiddos pursue artsy projects. Ages 5-10. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE Queer Care Support: Adult family members and caregivers of queer and/or questioning youth swap stories and resources in a supportive space. Adults only. Outright Vermont, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Info, 865-9677. FREE 9 MONDAY, P.40

OCTOBER 2017

SpookyvilleVermont.org for advance tickets and info OCTOBER 21-22 AND OCTOBER 28 • 10AM TO 2PM

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KIDS VT

Enjoy a hayride, haunted mansion, kooky characters, and ghostly dance in Vermont’s spookiest village at the Champlain Valley Expo. BE PART OF THE SHOW! Volunteer to Act, Guide, or Craft: info@SpookyvilleVermont.org

KIDSVT.COM

Introducing the Champlain Valley’s biggest Halloween Event!

Proudly benefitting our signature charity!

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CALENDAR OCTOBER 9 Monday (cont.) RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: Mini-musicians ages 2 and under sing songs and engage in early literacy activities. Rutland Free Library, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 773-1860. FREE

WASHINGTON Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup: Little explorers and their caregivers discover the sights and sounds of the forest and field, while learning how the natural environment can be used as an adventurous classroom. Dress in outdoor clothing. Ages 5 and under. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 10 a.m.noon, donations welcome. Info, 229-6206.

New Parents

10 Tuesday CHITTENDEN Creative Tuesdays: See October 3. Early Literacy STEM Skills For Childcare Providers: Preschool providers develop different ways to include science, technology, engineering and mathematics in their programs with a focus on “building.” Refreshments served. Adults only. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6:30-8 p.m.; preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE

ESSEX LA LECHE LEAGUE: Moms bring their bitty ones to a discussion of parenting and breastfeeding. Siblings welcome. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, FIRST THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 6:30-8 P.M. FREE

BOSOM BUDDIES TOO: Nursing

mamas of toddlers and mobile wee ones socialize and swap supportive stories and advice with peers and professionals. Babies welcome. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin,

FIRST TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 5:30-7 P.M. Info, 371-4415. FREE EVOLUTION POSTNATAL YOGA:

Moms tote their pre-crawling kids to an all-levels flowing yoga class focused on bringing the body back to strength and alignment in a relaxed and nurturing environment. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington,

SUNDAYS, 12:15-1:30 P.M., TUESDAYS, 11 A.M.-12:15 P.M.,THURSDAYS, 10:45-11:55 A.M., FRIDAYS, 8:15-9:15 A.M., AND FRIDAYS, NOON-1 P.M.,

KIDS VT

OCTOBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

$15; $130 for a 10-class pass. Info, 899-0339.

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EVOLUTION PRENATAL YOGA:

Mothers-to-be build strength, stamina, comfort and a stronger connection to their baby. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington,

SUNDAYS, 10:15-11:45 A.M., MONDAYS, 5:45-7 P.M., TUESDAYS, 4:15-5:30 P.M., WEDNESDAYS, 5:45-7 P.M., THURSDAYS, 12:30-1:30 P.M., FRIDAYS, 8:15-9:15 A.M., AND SATURDAYS, 11:30 A.M.-12:30 P.M.,

$15; $130 for 10-class pass. Info, 899-0339.

PRENATAL METHOD PRENATAL YOGA: Women

prepare for birth through yoga, with a focus on strengthening the body and mind. See prenatalmethod. com for class descriptions. Prenatal Method Studio, Burlington, MONDAYS, 12:15-1:15 P.M.,TUESDAYS, 4:30-5:30 P.M., WEDNESDAYS, 12:15-1:15 P.M., THURSDAYS, 4:30-5:30 P.M., AND SATURDAYS, 10:30-11:30 A.M., $15.

Info, 829-0211.

PRENATAL YOGA: Expectant mamas ease pregnancy through breath work, poses and preparation for labor and delivery, in a safe and supportive atmosphere. Iyengar Yoga Center of Vermont, Burlington, TUESDAYS, 4:15-5:15 P.M., $20. Info, 379-7389. EARLY MONTHS INFANT MASSAGE GROUP: Brand-new parents

spend time with their babies and mingle with other families. The Janet S. Munt Family Room, Burlington, WEDNESDAYS, 11 A.M.NOON. Info, 862-2121. FREE MIDDLEBURY LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETING AND PLAYGROUP:

Families with infants and toddlers socialize and swap nursing stories. Junebug Mother and Child, Middlebury, FIRST

WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10 A.M. FREE

MOM AND BABY YOGA: Brand-new

mamas and their littles relax, stretch and bond. Followed by a free mothers’ gathering at 11:30 a.m. Embodied, Montpelier, WEDNESDAYS, 10:30-11:30 A.M., $15. Info, 223-5302.

HOW TO BREASTFEED PRENATAL CLASS: Expectant mamas and

their partners learn the basics of breastfeeding, how to get off to the best start with their baby and where to find assistance when needed. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, FIRST THURSDAY

OF EVERY MONTH, 8-9:30 A.M., AND FOURTH TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 4:30-6 P.M.; preregister.

Info, 371-4415. FREE

HYDE PARK BABY CHAT: Parents

with babies mingle, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Lanpher Memorial Library, Hyde Park, FIRST THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M. Info, 888-5229.

BIRTH LOVE FAMILY FEST: Birthing

and parenting experiences are explored through workshops, yoga with Susan Cline Lucey, support circles for grownups, live music with singer/songwriter Myra Flynn, kids’ activities, including the SunCommon bounce house, and much more. An after party meets at Bolton Valley’s Fireside Flatbread with live music by Conscious Roots. Lotus Mountain Inn, Bolton, SATURDAY, OCT. 7, 9 A.M.-6 P.M., $15-25; free for children under 13. Info, 847-814-9503. BURLINGTON LA LECHE LEAGUE:

New moms bring their babies and questions to a breastfeeding support group. Older children welcome. Lending library available. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, SECOND TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:15 A.M. Info, 985-8228. FREE LA LECHE LEAGUE OF THE NORTHEAST KINGDOM: Expectant,

novice and experienced moms join nursing experts for advice and support. Enter through the children’s section of the library. Siblings welcome. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, SECOND TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:30 A.M.-NOON.

Info, 720-272-8841. FREE

Milton Nurturing Parent Program: Moms and dads deepen parent-child communication skills, discuss empathy and learn how to empower their families. A light dinner and childcare is included. Milton Family Community Center, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 498-0607. FREE Read to Willy Wonka the Chocolate Lab: A certified reading pooch listens patiently to emerging readers. Ages 3-10. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4:15 p.m.; preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Spanish Musical Kids: See October 3.

STROLLER STRIDES: Parents roll

their wee ones along an easy stretch and enjoy some social time. Meet at the bike path entrance behind the Stowe Community Church. Stowe Recreation Path, TUESDAY, OCT. 10, AND TUESDAY, OCT. 24, 9-10 A.M., $5. Info, 253-6148. BREASTFEEDING SUPPORT GROUP:

Nursing mamas (and soon-to-be mothers) make the most of La Leche League support while socializing with other moms and wee ones. Norman Williams Public Library, Woodstock, SECOND FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:30 A.M.-NOON. Info, 457-2295. FREE

MORRISVILLE BABY CHAT: Parents

with babies socialize, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Lamoille Family Center, Morrisville, SECOND SATURDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M. Info, 888-5229.

PREGNANCY & BABY EXPO: More than 40 vendors showcase their services related to pregnancy, birth and parenting, complete with demos and giveaways. Sheraton Hotel & Conference Center, Burlington, SATURDAY, OCT. 14, 10 A.M.-2 P.M., $5; free for children. Info, 592-3391. POSTPARTUM PREPARATION PACKAGE: A professional leads

expectant mothers in planning for their birth recovery and bonding with their infant. Topics include perineal care, sleep, setting up a meal train, postpartum simplifying, attachment parenting and more. Aldrich Public Library, Barre,

MONDAY, OCT. 2, MONDAY, OCT. 16, AND MONDAY, OCT. 23, 6-8 P.M.;

preregister. Info, 595-7953. FREE TODDLER LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETING: Moms who are nursing

beyond a year share stories and solutions to nighttime parenting, mealtime tips, biting, weaning and other topics. St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, Middlebury, THIRD MONDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 1:30-2:30 P.M. Info, 388-0363. FREE

BREASTFEEDING CAFÉ: Mamas nurse their babies, chat and ask for answers from a certified lactation consultant. Pregnant women, supportive dads and older siblings welcome. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, THIRD TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 11:30 A.M.-1 P.M. Info, 349-3825. FREE

BREASTFEEDING FAMILIES GROUP:

Nursing moms (and supportive dads, too!) gather for snacks and advice. Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, THIRD WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 11 A.M.-1 P.M. Info, 888-3470. FREE

LA LECHE LEAGUE OF CENTRAL VERMONT: Breastfeeding mamas

swap stories and support each other, with a professional available for consultation. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, THIRD

THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:3011:30 A.M. Info, 999-7143. FREE CENTRAL VERMONT NURSING BEYOND A YEAR: Mothers discuss

the joys and challenges of breastfeeding, including nighttime parenting, weaning, healthy eating habits and setting limits, in a supportive setting. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, THIRD

FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:3011:30 A.M. Info, 999-7143. FREE TRAINING CAMP FOR DADS:

Dads-to-be get professional parenting guidance, with covered topics including postpartum leave, home preparation for birth, bottle versus breastfeeding, a father’s role in baby care and emotional support. Aldrich Public Library, Barre, SATURDAY, OCT. 21, 9 A.M.-1 P.M.; preregister. Info, 595-7953. FREE JOHNSON BABY CHAT: Parents with babies mingle, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, FOURTH TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M. Info, 888-5229. FREE

MOMMY GROUP: Breastfeeding peer counselor Angela Scavo hosts mamas and answers questions in a relaxed setting. Middlebury Recreation Center, FOURTH WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-10:30 A.M. Info,

349-9084. FREE


SUBMIT YOUR NOVEMBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY OCTOBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM STEAM Tuesdays: Eager youngsters engage with inventive science, technology, engineering, art and math projects. Check online for details. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 485-4621. FREE Winooski Lego Club: See October 3. FRANKLIN Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Tuesdays: See October 3. Music & Movement With Ellie: See October 3. WASHINGTON Book Launch Party for Katherine Paterson: This local Newbery Medal and National Book Award-winning author reads from her new children’s novel about a young Cuban teenager who volunteers for Fidel Castro’s national literacy campaign and travels into the impoverished countryside to teach others how to read. Bear Pond Books, Montpelier, 7 p.m. Info, 229-0774. FREE Maker Program: See October 3. WINDSOR Lego Tuesdays: See October 3. MULTIPLE VT LOCATIONS Virtual College Fair: See October 3.

11 Wednesday ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See October 4. CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: See October 4. CHITTENDEN Burlington Nurturing Parent Program: Moms and dads deepen parent-child communication skills, discuss empathy and learn how to empower their families. A light dinner and childcare is included. The Janet S. Munt Family Room, Burlington, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 498-0607. FREE

Family Game Day: See October 4. Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: See October 4.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. WINDSOR Sensory Lab for Tots: See October 4. Woodstock Market on the Green: See October 4.

12 Thursday CALEDONIA Lego Club: See October 5. CHITTENDEN Audubon Homeschool Program: Homebased learners use the outdoor classroom to explore a variety of seasonal topics, from forests and trees to wildlife tracking. Ages 9-12. Parent attendance is optional. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., $20-25; preregister. Info, 434-3068. Babytime: See October 5. Burlington Mother Up! Monthly Meet-up: Families discuss the realities of climate change, what that means on a local level, and how to transition to a safer and healthier world. Vegetarian meal and childcare for ages 3 and under provided. Unitarian Universalist Society, Burlington, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Info, 765-3372778. FREE Colchester Lego Club: See October 5. Dorothy Canfield Fisher Book Discussion: Little literati chat about DCF pick The Inn Between by Marin Cohen. Milton Public Library, 6:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Hinesburg Lego Club: See October 5. Milton Farmers Market: See October 5. Read to a Dog: Pet lovers peruse books with registered therapy pooches. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3:30-4:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 878-4918. FREE

Read to Archie the Therapy Dog: See October 5.

Read to Daisy the Therapy Dog: See October 4.

Ukulele Kids: Musical ones try out instruments and dance to traditional children’s songs. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE

Yoga for Kids: See October 4. Young Writers & Storytellers: Small ones spin their own yarns. Ages 5-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4-5 p.m. Info, 264-5660. FREE

RUTLAND Lego Club: See October 4. Recycled Paper Beads: Kid crafters of all ages create necklaces. Brandon Free Public Library, 3:30 p.m. Info, 247-8230. Rutland Farmers Market: See October 4.

St. Albans Library Legos: Eager architects engage in construction projects with their peers. St. Albans Free Library, 3-5 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE RUTLAND Fair Haven Farmers Market: See October 5. WASHINGTON Kids Cartooning Club: See October 5.

ORANGE Lego Wednesdays: See October 4. 12 THURSDAY, P.42

HELEN DAY ART CENTER, STOWE Info, 253-8358 SELFIES: Artwork from emerging and well-known artists, including the late Andy Warhol, investigate the idea of selfportraits through the lens of photography, painting and other media. Donations accepted. Through November 11. FREE ‘EXPOSED’: National and local outdoor

sculpture of all sizes and shapes spreads through the town of Stowe. Through October 21. FREE

HENRY SHELDON MUSEUM OF VERMONT HISTORY, MIDDLEBURY Info, 388-2117 DRAW ME A STORY‚ TELL ME A TALE: Vermont Children’s Book Illustrators & Authors: Illustrations and artwork from 18 Green Mountain authors and artists, including Mary Azarian’s garden-inspired alphabet drawings and Phoebe Stone’s colorful animals, delight museum visitors. Through October 15.

Camel’s Hump School Richmond, VT Saturday, Nov. 4 8am-4pm Sunday, Nov. 5 10am-2pm CONSIGNMENT NOV. 3RD Season Pass Rate $295 Family of any size

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JUSTIN MORRILL HOMESTEAD, STRAFFORD Info, 828-3051 THE FRUITS OF TIME: HEIRLOOM APPLES, THEN AND NOW: The story of this

seasonal sweet, now in an heirloom renaissance, is explored through photographs, illustrations, historical interpretation and narratives, including 15 watercolors from the USDA’s historic collection. $6. Through October 15. PECK FARM ORCHARD, EAST MONTPELIER Info, 249-1223 PECK FARM ORCHARD CORN MAZE: Festive fall families have fun on the farm with a leafy puzzle, PYO apples and pumpkins and free hayrides and pumpkin chunkin’ on weekends. $5 per walking person for corn maze. Through October 31.

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SHELBURNE MUSEUM, SHELBURNE Info, 985-3346, ext. 3395 SWEET TOOTH: THE ART OF DESSERT: This mixed media exhibit serves up a feast for the eyes, exploring our insatiable desire for sugary stuff through paintings, prints, sculptures and more. $7-24; free for members and children under 5. Through February 18.

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FRANKLIN Franklin Lego Thursdays: See October 5.

FORT TICONDEROGA, N.Y. Info, 518-585-2821 A CORN MAZE ADVENTURE: Get lost! Families navigate their way through a life-size puzzle in the shape of this historic fort while searching for history clues among the stalks. Regular museum admission, $10-23; free for children under 5. Fall weekends through October 15.

SKI & RIDE SALE

OCTOBER 2017

FRANKLIN Music & Movement With Ellie: See October 3.

Williston Preschool Music: See October 5.

ECHO LEAHY CENTER FOR LAKE CHAMPLAIN, BURLINGTON Info, 864-1848 INNOVATION PLAYGROUND: In this exhibit embracing lifelong play as a tool for technological, social and artistic invention, visitors of all ages unleash their imaginations by building with giant blue blocks, exploring virtual galaxies in a cardboard spaceship and experimenting in a fully-equipped maker space. Regular museum admission, $11.50-14.50; free for children under 3. Through January 15.

KIDSVT.COM

Prema Agni: A Heart-Opening Experience for Kids: See October 4.

Ongoing Exhibits

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CALENDAR OCTOBER 12 Thursday (cont.) Windows on Waldorf: Prospective students and their families tour this grades 1-8 school. Student work showcases the core curriculum. Orchard Valley Waldorf School, East Montpelier, 6:30-8 p.m.; preregister by noon on the previous day. Info, 456-7400. FREE WINDSOR Clay for Tots: See October 5. MULTIPLE VT LOCATIONS Virtual Town Hall With Secretary Tebbetts: Politically-minded people attend an online town hall-style meeting and ask questions of Vermont’s Secretary of Agriculture, with particular input from school-age children. Various locations, 1-2 p.m. Info, 299-9642. FREE

13 Friday CALEDONIA Hardwick Farmers Market: See October 6. CHITTENDEN Dungeons & Dragons: Players embark on invented adventures, equipped with their problem-solving skills. Grades 6 and up. Please call the library to join. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Family Gym: See October 6. Homeschool Project Day: Out-of-classroom students partake of projects together. Milton Public Library, 1 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See October 6. Live-Action Role Play: LARPers create characters and plots in an amazing and imaginary adventure. For middle and high school students. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-5 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Preschool Yoga with Danielle: Simple movement, stories and songs satisfy children ages 5 and under and their caregivers. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE Richmond Farmers Market: See October 6. Teddy Bear Sleepover: Kids drop off their favorite stuffed friends before 5 p.m. Friday, then return at 10 a.m. the following morning for brunch and a slideshow about their animals’ nighttime adventures. Ages 2-7 with caregiver. Milton Public Library. Info, 893-4644. LAMOILLE Kids’ Night Out: While their parents appreciate time off, youngsters enjoy dinner, a movie and games. Grades K-5. David Gale Recreation Center, Stowe, 6-10 p.m., $15 per child. Info, 253-6138. ORLEANS Lego Club: See October 6. WINDSOR Foodways Fridays: See October 6.

14 Saturday ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See October 4. CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: See October 7. CHITTENDEN ‘Bruce’s Big Move’: Story Time & Visit: Little ones listen to the misadventures of a curmudgeonly creature who shares his home with four geese and three rowdy mice, and then he sets off to find some peace and quiet. Ages 6 and under. Phoenix Books, Essex Junction, 11 a.m.-noon. Info, 872-7111. Burlington Farmers Market: See October 7. EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: See October 7.

Fall Festival with Ballet Vermont and Mister Chris: Autumn lovers celebrate the season with Ballet Vermont’s butterflies, bumble bees, caterpillars and ladybugs, including dance activities for all. Mr. Chris sings selections throughout the day, with a finale of lullabies and dancing fireflies at dusk. Bread and Butter Farm, Shelburne, 3-6:30 p.m., $20, $65 for a pack of 4 tickets; food and drink available for purchase. Info, 985-9200. Family Game Strategy Afternoon: Pierson Library takes over the town hall tabletops with board challenges for all ages and abilities. Shelburne Town Hall, 1:30-4 p.m. Info, 985-5124. FREE Saturday Drama Club: See October 7. Saturday Story Time: Bibliophiles soak up picture book stories, songs and puppets. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Shelburne Farmers Market: See October 7. Spanish Musical Playgroup: Rhymes, books and songs en español entertain niños. Snack and playtime included. Ages 5 and under. NonSpanish speakers welcome. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE Star Wars Reads Day: This national event kicks off with famed character appearances, Star Wars-themed crafts and books. Costumes encouraged. Phoenix Books, Burlington, 1-3 p.m. Info, 448-3350. FREE Teddy Bear Sleepover: See October 13, 10 a.m. FRANKLIN Little Explorer Nature Adventure Program: Eager naturalists-in-training search out the secrets of the world with Kurt Valenta and his hands-on nature approach, in various community sites during the school year. Ages 3-10 with parent participation. Highgate Public Library, Highgate Center, 9:15 a.m.; preregister. Info, 868-3970. FREE

ORANGE Arts Bus Gala Event: Fans of this traveling art studio, music space and free library admire a digital showcase of summer artwork, meet Art Bus teachers and listen to readings by National Book Award winners William Alexander, M.T Anderson and Katherine Paterson. Chandler Music Hall, Randolph, 7-9 p.m., $30 per individual, $50 per couple. Info, 272-2762. ORLEANS Vermont Reindeer Fall Festival: Little ones meet the real-deal Rudolph and other farm animals. Hay rides, a bouncy house, pony rides, a nature trail and craft fair add to the amusement. Vermont Reindeer Farm, West Charleston, 10 a.m.-3 p.m., $5; free for children under age 1; lunch available for sale. Info, 754-9583. WASHINGTON Cabot Apple Pie Festival: Townsfolk sample fruit pastries and lunch fare, check out the pie contest and browse crafts during this sweet event. Cabot School, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. Info, 563-3396. FREE Capital City Farmers Market: See October 7. Kids Trade & Play: Families exchange clean and gently-used clothing and toys, size newborn to 12. Capital City Grange, Berlin, 9:30-11:30 a.m., $3 per family. Info, 831-337-8632. Kung Fu: See October 7. On the Land: Families check out this alternative school’s Farm & Forest mixed-age kindergarten and afternoon program for grades 1-8. Activities include hiking, weaving, native agriculture exploration, meet and greet with goats and sheep, and bread oven baking. Orchard Valley Waldorf School, East Montpelier, 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 456-7400. FREE Waitsfield Farmers Market: See October 7.

RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See October 4, 9 a.m.-2 p.m.

KIDS VT

OCTOBER 2017

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October 29 10 a.m.–1 p.m.

shelburnemuseum.org

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SUBMIT YOUR NOVEMBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY OCTOBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM MULTIPLE VT LOCATIONS Vermont Open Studio Weekend: Artists and craftspeople throughout the state swing open their studio doors. Visit vermontcrafts. com for participating locations and maps for self-guided tours. Various locations statewide. Info, 223-3380. FREE

15 Sunday CHITTENDEN ‘The Princess Bride’ 30th Anniversary: This 1987 film enchants the audience with its fairy-tale adventure about a young man who battles an evil kingdom to find his one true love. Palace 9 Cinemas, South Burlington, 2 & 7 p.m., $12.50. Info, 864-5610. Essex Open Gym: See October 8. Family Gym: See October 6. Harvest Fun Run/Walk for Sustainability: Fleet feet romp through farm fields in 1K and 5K races followed by family activities, healthy snacks and pumpkin prizes. Proceeds benefit the Sustainability Academy at Lawrence Barnes. Burlington Intervale Center, 9-11:30 a.m., $5-15, $30 per family. Info, 861-9700. LAMOILLE Harvest Fest: Families fête the fall season with festivities including fairy house, crown and wand building, hay bale fun, face painting, candle making, cider pressing, pumpkin painting, live music and more. Ages 12 and under with caregivers. Mountain River School, Stowe, 11 a.m.-4 p.m., $10, $30 per family; free for children under 3. Info, 253-7881. Stowe Farmers Market: See October 8. ORLEANS Vermont Reindeer Fall Festival: See October 14.

WASHINGTON North Branch Nature Center Grand Opening Ceremony: The nature center dedicates its new addition, celebrating with live music by Colin McCaffrey, refreshments and a community thank you. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 3-5 p.m.; RSVP requested. Info, 229-6206. FREE MULTIPLE VT LOCATIONS Vermont Open Studio Weekend: See October 14.

Little One & Me Circle Time: Tiny tykes team together for movement, songs, play and snacks. Ages 5 and under. Jericho Town Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 899-4686. FREE See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

17 Tuesday CHITTENDEN Creative Tuesdays: See October 3.

16 Monday

Spanish Musical Kids: See October 3.

CHITTENDEN Chess Club: Players of all ages pursue a game of strategy. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Colchester Preschool Music: See October 9. Lego Robotics: Mark Sherwin of SciTech4Kids teaches eager engineers simple programming and how to make a robot with Lego Mindstorms. Grades 3-5. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3-4:15 p.m.; preregister. Info, 878-4918. FREE Stories with Megan: Little listeners learn and laugh. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Williston Preschool Music: See October 5, 11 a.m.

WASHINGTON History of Racism: Netdahe Stoddard leads a discussion about the historical roots of racism and the current importance of identifying, examining and confronting racism in our country. Ages 12 and up. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 3:15 p.m. Info, 426-3581. Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup: See October 9.

Read to Daisy the Therapy Dog: See October 4. Vermont Reads: Folks of all ages share in a potluck and an intergenerational book discussion of Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson, a memoir of a young girl growing up in the turbulent 1960s and 70s. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

STEAM Tuesdays: See October 10.

Yoga for Kids: See October 4.

Winooski Lego Club: See October 3.

FRANKLIN Music & Movement With Ellie: See October 3.

FRANKLIN Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Tuesdays: See October 3. Music & Movement With Ellie: See October 3.

RUTLAND Lego Club: See October 4. Rutland Farmers Market: See October 4.

WASHINGTON Maker Program: See October 3.

ORANGE Lego Wednesdays: See October 4.

WINDSOR Lego Tuesdays: See October 3.

WASHINGTON Movie Night: An off-the-beaten-track flick fascinates viewers. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE

MULTIPLE VT LOCATIONS Virtual College Fair: See October 3.

18 Wednesday

RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See October 9.

Prema Agni: A Heart-Opening Experience for Kids: See October 4.

CHITTENDEN ‘The Princess Bride’ 30th Anniversary: See October 15. Chess Club: Smart players check out this strategy game and improve their skills with rooks, pawns and knights. All ages and experience levels. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE Family Game Day: See October 4.

WINDSOR Sensory Lab for Tots: See October 4.

19 Thursday CALEDONIA Lego Club: See October 5. CHITTENDEN Babytime: See October 5. Colchester Lego Club: See October 5.

Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: See October 4. 19 THURSDAY, P.44

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CALENDAR OCTOBER 19 Thursday (cont.) Giant Games: Eager kiddos pursue pastimes of gigantic proportions. Ages 8-10. Milton Public Library, 2 p.m.; preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Hinesburg Lego Club: See October 5. Read to a Dog: See October 12. Williston Preschool Music: See October 5. FRANKLIN Franklin Lego Thursdays: See October 5. RUTLAND Fair Haven Farmers Market: See October 5.

WASHINGTON Books Come to Life: This Active Body-Active Brain class, led by a literacy professional, combines reading and movement. Babies through preschoolers. Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE Kids Cartooning Club: See October 5.

20 Friday CHITTENDEN Edible Haunted Houses: Clever crafters create spooky dwellings of munchable materials. Ages 7-10. Milton Public Library, 1 p.m.; preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Family Gym: See October 6.

Story Times Early literacy skills get special attention during these readaloud sessions. Some locations provide additional activities such as music, crafts or foreign-language instruction. Most story times follow the school calendar. Contact the organizers for site-specific details. MONDAY

BARRE CHILDREN’S STORY HOUR:

Aldrich Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 476-7550.

CHARLOTTE K-1 STORYTIME:

BARRE CHILDREN’S STORY HOUR:

COLCHESTER PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Burnham Memorial

Library, 10:30 a.m.; preregister. Info, 264-5660.

FRANKLIN STORY TIME: Haston

Craftsbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 586-9683.

HYDE PARK STORY TIME: Lanpher

Memorial Library, 6 p.m. Info, 888-4628.

NORTHFIELD CHILDREN’S STORY TIME: Brown Public Library, 10-11

OCTOBER 2017 KIDSVT.COM

COLCHESTER TODDLER STORY TIME:

ESSEX DROP-IN STORY TIME: Essex

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 285-6505.

a.m. Info, 485-4621.

RICHMOND BABY LAP TIME:

Richmond Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 434-3036. SHELBURNE STORY TIME: Pierson

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 985-5124.

CRAFTSBURY STORY TIME:

EAST BARRE STORY TIME: East

Barre Branch Library, 10 a.m. Info, 476-5118.

ESSEX JUNCTION BABY & TODDLER STORY TIME: Brownell Library,

9:10-9:30 a.m. Info, 878-6956.

ESSEX JUNCTION PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Brownell Library,

10-10:45 a.m. Info, 878-6956.

FAIRFAX STORY HOUR: Fairfax Community Library, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 849-2420.

ST. ALBANS STORY HOUR: St. Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507.

HIGHGATE STORY TIME: Highgate

STOWE STORY TIMES FOR 2-3YEAR-OLDS: Stowe Free Library,

HINESBURG YOUNGSTERS STORY TIME: Carpenter-Carse Library,

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 868-3970.

10:15-11:15 a.m. Info, 253-6145.

9:30-10 a.m. Info, 482-2878.

WAITSFIELD STORY TIME: Joslin

LYNDONVILLE STORY TIME:

Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 496-4205.

WOODSTOCK BABY STORY TIME:

KIDS VT

Charlotte Public Library, 2:15-3:15 p.m. Info, 425-3864. Burnham Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m.; preregister. Info, 264-5660.

Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313.

44

See Monday.

Norman Williams Public Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 457-2295. TUESDAY

ALBURGH STORY HOUR: Alburgh

Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 796-6077.

Cobleigh Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 626-5475.

MILTON INFANT STORY TIME: Milton

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

MONTPELIER STORY TIME: Kellogg-

Hubbard Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 223-3338.

Family Movie: Viewers enjoy a familyfriendly stop-motion animated tale while feasting on free popcorn. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Junior Hogwarts Breakout Day: Harry Potter fans sign up to solve clues and complete this mysterious escape-room-style caper. Teens take the 4:30 p.m. session. Ages 6-18. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 10 & 11:30 a.m., 1, 2:30 & 4:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 264-5660. FREE Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See October 6. Lego Fun: Budding builders bring out the blocks. Children under age 8 must be accompanied by a responsible caregiver. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

WILLISTON STORY TIME: Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918. WOODSTOCK PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Norman Williams Public

Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Info, 457-2295. WEDNESDAY

BARNES & NOBLE STORYTIME:

Barnes & Noble, South Burlington,11 a.m. Info, 864-8001.

Spooky Movie: Young film-lover fun with free popcorn and a PG-rated flick featuring three 17th-century witches who are resurrected in modern-day Salem by an unsuspecting boy. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 828-6956. FREE ORLEANS Lego Club: See October 6. WASHINGTON Vampire Movie Night: Film lovers get primed for the holiday with spooky flicks. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 7 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE WINDSOR Foodways Fridays: See October 6.

THURSDAY

BRISTOL STORY TIME: Lawrence

Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 453-2366.

COLCHESTER PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: See Monday.

KILLINGTON STORYTIME:

Sherburne Memorial Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 422-9765. LINCOLN STORY TIME: Lincoln

Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 453-2665.

MILTON PRESCHOOL STORY TIME:

HINESBURG YOUNGSTERS STORY TIME: See Tuesday.

Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

NORTHFIELD CHILDREN’S STORY TIME: See Monday.

Tuesday.

MONTPELIER STORY TIME: See

RUTLAND STORY TIME: Rutland

Free Library, 10-10:45 a.m. Info, 773-1860.

RANDOLPH TODDLER STORY TIME:

ESSEX JUNCTION PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: See Tuesday. HIGHGATE STORY TIME: See

SHELBURNE MUSICAL STORYTIME:

RICHMOND EARLY BIRD MATH STORYTIME: Richmond Free

ST. ALBANS STORY HOUR: See

SOUTH BURLINGTON PAJAMARAMA:

Tuesday.

HYDE PARK STORY TIME: See

Monday, 10 a.m.

LYNDONVILLE STORY TIME: See

Tuesday, 10:30 a.m.

MARSHFIELD STORY TIME & PLAYGROUP: Jaquith Public

Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 426-3581.

MILTON RHYTHM & MOVEMENT TODDLER STORY TIME: Milton

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

NORWICH WORD PLAY STORY TIME:

Norwich Public Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 649-1184. QUECHEE STORY TIME: Quechee

Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 295-1232.

Pierson Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 985-5124.

Monday.

WATERBURY PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Waterbury Public Library,

10 a.m. Info, 244-7036.

WESTFORD STORY TIME: Westford Public Library, 11 a.m. Info, 878-5639.

FRIDAY

BRANDON STORY TIME: Brandon

Free Public Library, 3 p.m. Info, 247-8230. CHARLOTTE PRESCHOOL STORYTIME: Charlotte Public

Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 425-3864.

CRAFTSBURY STORY TIME: See

RANDOLPH PRESCHOOL STORY TIME: Kimball Public Library, 11

Tuesday.

RICHMOND STORY TIME: Richmond

a.m. Info, 728-5073.

Free Library, 10 a.m. Info, 434-3036.

SWANTON STORYTIME: Swanton Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 868-7656. VERGENNES STORY TIME: Bixby

Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 877-2211.

WARREN PRESCHOOL STORYTIME:

Warren Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 595-2582.

Kimball Public Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Info, 728-5073.

Library, 11 a.m. Info, 434-3036.

Barnes & Noble, 7 p.m. Info, 864-8001.

ST. JOHNSBURY STORY TIME: St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m. Info, 748-8291. STOWE BABY & TODDLER STORY TIME: Stowe Free Library, 10:15-

11:15 a.m. Info, 253-6145.

SWANTON STORYTIME: See

Wednesday.

WINOOSKI STORY TIME: Winooski

Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 655-6424. SATURDAY

COLCHESTER SATURDAY DROP-IN STORY TIME: Burnham Memorial

Library, 10 a.m. Info, 264-5660.

ENOSBURG MOMMY & ME STORY HOUR: Enosburgh Public Library,

ENOSBURG STORY HOUR:

9-10 a.m. Info, 933-2328.

Enosburgh Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Info, 933-2328. FREE

ESSEX JUNCTION ALL-AGES STORY TIME: Brownell Library, 10-10:30

MILTON DROP-IN SATURDAY STORYTIME: Milton Public Library,

ESSEX MUSICAL STORY TIME: Essex

SATURDAY STORY TIME AT PHOENIX BOOKS: Phoenix

a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 879-0313.

GEORGIA PRESCHOOL STORY TIME:

Georgia Public Library, 10 a.m. Info, 524-4643. HUNTINGTON STORY TIME:

Huntington Public Library, 10:45 a.m. Info, 434-4583.

10 a.m. Info, 893-4644.

Books, Burlington, 11 a.m. Info, 448-3350. FREE


SUBMIT YOUR NOVEMBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY OCTOBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

21 Saturday

Read to Willy Wonka the Chocolate Lab: See October 10.

ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See October 4.

Spanish Musical Kids: See October 3.

CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: See October 7.

Winooski Lego Club: See October 3.

CHITTENDEN Burlington Farmers Market: See October 7. EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: See October 7.

Music & Movement With Ellie: See October 3.

Movies at the Library: Families snuggle down, see a big-screen PG-rated flick and savor snacks. Milton Public Library, 1 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE

WINDSOR Lego Tuesdays: See October 3.

Read to Cleo the Therapy Dog: See October 7. Saturday Drama Club: See October 7. RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See October 4, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. WASHINGTON Capital City Farmers Market: See October 7. Kung Fu: See October 7. Montpelier Ski and Skate Sale: The Montpelier Recreation Department sponsors a winter-prep sale offering lightlyused skiing and boarding equipment. Drop off gear Friday, October 20, from 9 a.m.-7 p.m., and shop on Saturday. Montpelier High School, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 225-8694.

22 Sunday CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See October 8. Family Gym: See October 6.

23 Monday CHITTENDEN Colchester Preschool Music: See October 9. Crafts for Kids: See October 9. Jacqueline Woodson Author Talk: The 2017 Vermont Reads author of Brown Girl Dreaming discusses her journey as a writer and shares stories of her creative process, followed by a book signing. Burlington High School, 6 p.m. Info, 262-1356. FREE Stories with Megan: See October 16. Williston Preschool Music: See October 5, 11 a.m. RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See October 9.

24 Tuesday CHITTENDEN Creative Tuesdays: See October 3.

Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: See October 4. Prema Agni: A Heart-Opening Experience for Kids: See October 4. Read to Daisy the Therapy Dog: See October 4. Yoga for Kids: See October 4. Young Writers & Storytellers: See October 11. FRANKLIN Music & Movement With Ellie: See October 3. RUTLAND Lego Club: See October 4. Rutland Farmers Market: See October 4. ORANGE Lego Wednesdays: See October 4. WINDSOR Sensory Lab for Tots: See October 4.

26 Thursday CALEDONIA Lego Club: See October 5. CHITTENDEN Babytime: See October 5. Colchester Lego Club: See October 5. Decorating Zombie Cookies: Teens try their hands at creating tasty holiday treats. Ages 12-18. Milton Public Library, 6:30 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE Read to a Dog: See October 12. Spooky Stories: Young listeners snuggle together and savor stories of the season shared by Linda Costello. Grades 2 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:15 p.m. Info, 828-6956. FREE

Kids Cartooning Club: See October 5.

Young Rembrandts teaches drawing skills using a see-touch-do method that all children can succeed with, learn from and love!

CHITTENDEN Dungeons & Dragons: See October 13.

Students Can Expect - A new exciting lesson every week - Improved core art skills - To have fun! Parents Can Expect - Increased attention to detail - Improved fine motor skills

Family Gym: See October 6. Family Paint Night: Moms, dads and kids take pleasure in painting together with themed suggestions. Ages 5 and up with participating parent. Davis Studio, South Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m., $25; preregister. Info, 425-2700.

To learn more or to find a class in your area, link to:

YOUNGREMBRANDTS.COM

No afterschool drawing classes at your school or in your community? Find out how easy it is to bring our awardwinning, educational, kid-friendly focused program to your location. Contact your local program director, Michelle Kessler at 802.363.7522 or michelle.kessler@youngrembrandts.com

Friday Afternoon Movie: Kids of all ages snuggle in for snacks and a seasonal screening. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 3 p.m. Info, 482-2878. FREE Halloween Yoga: Wee ones in costumes check out simple poses, stories and songs. Ages 5 and under. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See October 6.

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8/25/17 11:43 AM

Live-Action Role Play: See October 13. Yoga Storytime: Little yogis blend body movement with books. Ages 2-5. Richmond Free Library, 11 a.m. Info, 434-3036. FREE ORLEANS Lego Club: See October 6. WASHINGTON Author Reading: Will Alexander: This National Book Award-winning author shares his new middle school novel, a delightfully spooky tale about two kids who try to save their town by resurrecting its ghosts. Followed by a signing and holiday treats. Bear Pond Books, Montpelier, 7 p.m. Info, 229-0774. FREE Vampire Movie Night: See October 20. WINDSOR Foodways Fridays: See October 6.

RUTLAND Fair Haven Farmers Market: See October 5.

After school Art Enrichment Drawing Classes for K-6

27 Friday

Williston Preschool Music: See October 5.

St. Albans Library Legos: See October 12.

8/21/17 11:07 AM Young Rembrandts

k16t- hathawayfarm0917.indd 1

WINDSOR Clay for Tots: See October 5.

Ukulele Kids: See October 12. FRANKLIN Franklin Lego Thursdays: See October 5.

Pick your Admission $12 Adults own $10 Kids 4-11 & Seniors pumpkin! Open 10-5 – Closed Tuesdays Moonlight Madness in September & October every Saturday night with admission until 9pm. 741 Prospect Hill Rd, Rutland Town, VT hathawayfarm.com • 802.775.2624

28 Saturday ADDISON Middlebury Farmers Market: See October 4. CALEDONIA Caledonia Farmers Market: See October 7. 28 SATURDAY, P.46

Say you saw it in

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KIDS VT

Halloween Crafternoon: Miniature artists make masks for the upcoming seasonal shindig. Ages 3-10; children under 5 must be accompanied by an adult. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 2:15-3:15 p.m.; preregister. Info, 482-2878. FREE

CHITTENDEN Family Game Day: See October 4.

WASHINGTON Community Dramatic Reading of ‘Brown Girl Dreaming’: Slam Poet Laureate of Vermont, Geof Hewitt, leads an inspiring and literary evening around the 2017 Vermont Reads pick, a memoir-in-verse of a young girl growing up in the south and becoming a writer. Waterbury Public Library, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE

Lots of Cool Farm Games ... Giant Corn Pit, Toddler John Deere Tractors & Bouncy Cows Livestock Barn * Play Area * Mini Maze

OCTOBER 2017

WASHINGTON Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup: See October 9.

25 Wednesday

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

KIDSVT.COM

Lego Robotics: See October 16.

12 acre “75 Years on Hathaway Farm” Maze

STEAM Tuesdays: See October 10. FRANKLIN Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Tuesdays: See October 3.

HATHAWAY FARM & CORN MAZE You’re Lost… You’re Laughin’… You’re LOVIN’ it!

9/26/17 3:37 PM

45 5/25/12 9:40 AM


SUBMIT YOUR NOVEMBER EVENTS FOR PRINT BY OCTOBER 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

CALENDAR OCTOBER 28 Saturday (cont.) CHITTENDEN Burlington Farmers Market: See October 7. EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: See October 7. Family Game Strategy Afternoon: See October 14. Harry Potter Alliance: Fantasy fans rally together in Voldemort Can’t Stop the Rock. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 2-3:30 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Harry Potter Club: Wizardry and witchcraft experts dig into discussion and trivia. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Mercy Bazaar: This festive sale features homegrown/canned goods including pickles, jams and jellies, relish and horseradish, plus a substantial selection of household and knitted items, fudge, toys and holiday decorations. Mater Christi School, Burlington, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 658-5494. FREE Saturday Drama Club: See October 7. LAMOILLE Saturday Night Meltdown: The hottest teen night in town sparkles with ice skating, pizza, live DJs, disco lights and more. Ages 13 and up. Stowe Arena, 7-9 p.m., $11. Info, 253-6138. RUTLAND Rutland Farmers Market: See October 4, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. ORLEANS Day of the Dead Maker Day: Clever kids create decorations for the upcoming Día de Los Muertos Celebration on November 1. Ages 5-12. WonderArts Vermont, Greensboro, 1-3 p.m. Info, 533-9370. FREE

Playgroups Kids enjoy fun and games during these informal gettogethers, and caregivers connect with other local parents and peers. The groups are usually free and often include snacks, arts and crafts, or music. Most playgroups follow the school calendar. Contact the organizer for site-specific details. MONDAY

BURLINGTON CRAWLERS AND TODDLERS: Janet S. Munt

Parent-Child Center, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Info, 862-2121. BURLINGTON PLAYGROUP:

Robert Miller Community & Recreation Center, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 578-6471.

KIDS VT

OCTOBER 2017

KIDSVT.COM

CAMBRIDGE PLAYGROUP:

46

ESSEX JUNCTION PLAYGROUP:

Maple Street Recreation Center, 9-11 a.m. Info, 878-1375. EVOLUTION NEW FAMILY PLAYGROUP: Evolution

Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, 11:15 a.m.-1:15 p.m. Info, 899-0339.

SOUTH BURLINGTON PLAYGROUP:

Cambridge Elementary School, 9-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229.

Ascension Lutheran Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 489-0410.

MILTON PLAYGROUP: Milton

O’Brien Community Center, 9-9:30 a.m. Info, 655-1422.

Public Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 893-1457.

MORRISVILLE PLAYGROUP:

River Arts, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229. OPEN GYM: Central VT Gymnastics Academy, 10-11:30 a.m., $7. Info, 882-8324.

TUESDAY

BRADFORD PLAYGROUP: Grace

United Methodist Church, 9-11 a.m. Info, 685-2264, ext. 24.

BROOKFIELD PLAYGROUP: First

Congregational Church of Brookfield, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 685-2264.

BURLINGTON FATHERS AND CHILDREN TOGETHER: Janet S.

Munt Parent-Child Center, 4-7 p.m. Info, 862-2121.

BURLINGTON PLAYGROUP: See

Monday.

WINOOSKI BABY PLAYTIME:

WINOOSKI PLAYTIME: O’Brien

WASHINGTON Capital City Farmers Market: See October 7. Kung Fu: See October 7.

29 Sunday CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See October 8. Family Gym: See October 6. WASHINGTON Dance, Sing & Jump Around: Dancers of all ages decked out in Halloween dress delight in a lively intergenerational afternoon with instruction and live music. Plainfield Town Hall Opera House, 3-4:30 p.m., suggested donation $5; free for children. Info, 223-1509.

FREE

WILLISTON PLAYGROUP:

Studio Ghibli: ‘Spirited Away’: This dubbed fantasy film features a courageous young girl who calls upon hidden creatures and sorcery to save her parents. Palace 9 Cinemas, South Burlington, 7 p.m., $12.50. Info, 864- 5610.

United Church of Northfield, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292. PURPLE CRAYON PLAY GROUP:

WINOOSKI PLAYTIME: See

RICHMOND PLAYGROUP:

COLCHESTER PLAYGROUP: See

ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, 9:3011:30 a.m., donations accepted. Info, 457-3500. Richmond Free Library, 8:4510:15 p.m. Info, 899-4415. SOUTH ROYALTON PLAYGROUP:

United Church on the Green, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 685-2264. THURSDAY

ALBURGH PLAYGROUP: Alburgh

Public Library, 9:30 a.m. Info, 796-6077.

BURLINGTON DROP-IN FAMILY PLAY: The Janet S. Munt Family

Room, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 862-2121.

DADS AND KIDS PLAYGROUP:

See Tuesday.

HINESBURG BABY TIME: United

Church of Hinesburg, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 482-4946.

BURLINGTON PLAYGROUP: See

MILTON PLAYGROUP: See

COLCHESTER PLAYGROUP:

MONTPELIER PLAYGROUP: St.

Sunset Studio, 10-11 a.m. Info, 878-1375.

John’s Church, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 685-2264.

Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 11 a.m.-noon. Info, 878-4918.

NORTHFIELD PLAYGROUP:

JOHNSON PLAYGROUP: United Church of Johnson, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229.

ESSEX BABY PLAYGROUP:

Lego Robotics: See October 16.

SOUTH BURLINGTON PLAYGROUP: See Tuesday.

Munt Family Room, 11 a.m.noon. Info, 862-2121.

Colchester Village Meeting House, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 316-2918.

Halloween Stories: Themed tales, crafts and bedtime snacks send costume- or pajama-clad kiddos off to sleep. Stuffed animals welcomed. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6:30 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE

HINESBURG FAMILY PLAYTIME:

Hinesburg Town Hall, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 482-4946.

WEDNESDAY

Monday.

Halloween Party: Ghoulish games, crafts and treats rock this costumed holiday. For families with children ages 10 and under. Milton Public Library, 3:30-5 p.m.; preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE

Pajama Story Time: Little ones in PJs nestle in for stories and snacks. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-7 p.m. Info, 878-6956.

Northrop Memorial Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 827-3945.

ESSEX JUNCTION PLAYGROUP:

BURLINGTON EARLY MONTHS INFANT MASSAGE: The Janet S.

CHITTENDEN Colchester Preschool Music: See October 9.

RANDOLPH PLAYGROUP: St.

Family Center of Washington County, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 262-3292.

Aldrich Public Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 476-7550.

30 Monday

FAIRFIELD PLAYGROUP: Bent

Community Center, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 655-1422.

BARRE BABY PLAYGROUP:

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

Monday.

Augustine Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292. OHAVI ZEDEK SYNAGOGUE PLAYGROUP: Ohavi Zedek

Synagogue, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 864-0218.

Tuesday. FRIDAY

Wednesday.

FAIRFAX PLAYGROUP: United

Church of Fairfax, second Friday of every month, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 524-6554.

HINESBURG PRESCHOOL PLAYGROUP: Hinesburg

Community School, 9-10:30 a.m. Info, 482-4946.

HUNTINGTON PLAYGROUP:

Huntington Public Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 899-4415.

OPEN GYM: See Monday. RUTLAND PLAYGROUP: Rutland

Free Library, 9:30 a.m. Info, 773-1860.

STOWE PLAYGROUP: Stowe Community Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 888-5229. UNDERHILL PLAYGROUP:

Underhill Central School, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 899-4415. SATURDAY

MONTPELIER SATURDAY PLAYGROUP: Family Center of

Washington County, 9:30-11 a.m. Info, 262-3292.

STOWE PLAYGROUP: Kula Yoga Center, 1-2 p.m., $10 or free with attendance at yoga class at 11:45 a.m.

Stories with Megan: See October 16.

Williston Preschool Music: See October 5, 11 a.m. RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See October 9. WASHINGTON Robin’s Nest Nature Playgroup: See October 9.

31 Tuesday CALEDONIA The Haunted Library: Little ones in holiday gear get goodies at the spooky library. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 5 p.m. Info, 472-5948. CHITTENDEN Circle of Parents for Adoptive & Guardianship Families: Moms and dads come together to socialize about their parenting experiences and strengthen skills. Childcare and dinner included. Howard Center, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 864-7467. FREE Halloween Face Painting: Teen volunteers match younger ones’ faces to their costumes in preparation for trick-or-treating. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6955. FREE STEAM Tuesdays: See October 10. Winooski Lego Club: See October 3. FRANKLIN Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Tuesdays: See October 3. Music & Movement With Ellie: See October 3. WASHINGTON Maker Program: See October 3. WINDSOR Lego Tuesdays: See October 3. 


USE YOUR WORDS BY KAT H E RI N E M . I S A A CS

Fledglings

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KIDSVT VT KIDS

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“Use Your Words” is a monthly essay in which writers reflect on parenting and childhood. Got a story to share? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

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OCTOBER2017 2017 OCTOBER

The photo on my computer background shows Rachel effortlessly leaping along a dock, her legs and feet in perfect position. She has always been graceful and strong, but the discipline and stamina required years of ballet training. All the driving, all the scheduling, all the classes, practices, rehearsals — they appear to have paid off. I won’t pretend I’ve loved every minute of parenting. There were plenty of days when defenestration looked like an appealing option. (Luckily, I could never decide whether it was better to pitch myself out the window or someone smaller.) And I can’t pretend I didn’t have it easy. I’ve had to make choices between my career and my family, but never between my job and my kids. Their father and I didn’t stay married to each other, but he supported us

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FOX. PACK. DRIP. FLIP.

Parenthood never ends, but this chapter of it has.

all the way through, for which I am immensely grateful. Parenthood never ends, but this chapter of it has. I’m facing my “redundancy” — as the Brits call it when they’ve been laid off — with some trepidation. As parents, we spend the early years cataloging firsts and just trying to keep everyone alive. In the middle, we’re watching our children discover who they really are, but we still think we have some chance of influencing that (spoiler alert: not so much). By the time they’re leaving home, we’ve gotten used to not having them around as much, and — with luck — they’ve turned into people we really like, at least some of the time. In the two years since Rachel moved out, I’ve enjoyed my one-onone time with Adam. Much more reserved by nature, he’s opened up occasionally since his sister left, and he’s become more used to me grilling him about what’s going on in his world. With just the two of us at home, we’ve had the chance to get to know each other better. Next on my list is getting to know myself again. For the first time in 22 years, I am living entirely on my own. While I enjoy time to myself, I also struggle with being alone. Without another person to distract me, will I retreat into my own world and wear a hole in the couch where I work, relax, read and surf the web? Without children around, will I take too much advantage of not having to set a good example? I have the freedom now to find out — to reinvent myself, entirely to please myself. I’m still struggling to figure out what that might look like, and it feels like a heady charge. But right this minute, I’ve got a sunny afternoon, a kayak, and time to explore my own new world. K

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and capable of navigating the adult world with an enviable outward poise. Most of that is their own doing, but I like to believe that their parents helped. If nothing else, we didn’t wreck them. I remember another day, another ball game; Adam was pitching. He hit a batter, threw seven balls in a row, walked in a run. A few years before, I would have been dreading his foul mood on the ride home. But in that game, he shook it off, got a couple more outs, and the inning was over. At bat a few innings later, he smacked a solid double into right centerfield and pumped his fist as he rounded first. I wondered, for the umpteenth time, how my children came by their athleticism.

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he pile of shoes by the door is smaller now; there’s no cello blocking the file cabinet; it takes most of a week to fill the dishwasher. Three people live here, but two of them have headed off to have their own adventures in the world. I’ve been preparing for this for months. Last spring, I remember sitting in the grandstand at Montpelier’s Recreation Field, looking on as my son, Adam, and his friends warmed up for a high school baseball game — Adam tossed the ball to Richard, Richard to Andrew, Andrew tossed it back to Adam. They scooped it up and threw it with ease, teasing each other when someone bobbled a ball. Across the parking lot from left field, I saw Little Leaguers taking batting practice and running the bases on the smaller field. Indistinguishable at a distance, they could easily have been the 10- or 12-year-old selves of the boys in front of me. Looking down the first-base line, I could see the Farm League field, where 7- and 8-year-olds swung wildly at coach-pitched balls and flubbed routine grounders. I saw ghost images on that field, too, where Richard, Andrew and Adam, now high school graduates, played together as first graders. I blinked back tears and focused instead on the game starting in front of me. My life recently has been full of my two kids’ lasts and almost-lasts. Rachel’s last high school concerts and ballet performances were two years ago, before she went off to college. This spring, it was Adam’s last concerts, last plays, last ball games. All of them reminding me of how far I’ve come from the overwhelming days of diapers and car seats and nursing. I look around at parents still in the trenches and think that I could have done better for my kids: I didn’t read to them enough; I should have controlled my temper better; I should have remembered to feed them lunch more and cookies less. But I also take satisfaction in knowing that Rachel and Adam are confident, competent

What can you catch but not throw? —A COLD

T

RIDDLE SEARCH ANSWER: AT THE ROSE BOWL.

Watching my children fly away

47 27


BRING YOUR

P R E S E N T S

TECH-SAVVY TEENS! OCTOBER 20 & 21 • CHAMPLAIN VALLEY EXPO, ESSEX JCT. • FREE

Connect with Vermont’s fastest-growing and most innovative companies at this rockin’ career and tech expo. F E AT U R I N G P R E S E N TAT I O N S O N :

• • • •

POWERED BY

Cybersecurity Data science Robotics and Industry 4.0 Job training and STEM programs WITH SPEAKERS FROM:

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Kids VT — October 2017  

The Innovation Issue: Inside ECHO's Latest Exhibit; Windsor's American Precision Museum; Raising Media Savvy Kids

Kids VT — October 2017  

The Innovation Issue: Inside ECHO's Latest Exhibit; Windsor's American Precision Museum; Raising Media Savvy Kids

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