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FEBRUARY 2018

FREE VOL.25 NO.1

Best buds share what makes their relationships special BY ERINN & SAM SIMON, PAGE 18

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FEBRUARY 2018 KIDSVT.COM

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EDITOR’S NOTE

Who was your best childhood friend?

STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS COPUBLISHER/EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Cathy Resmer

cathy@kidsvt.com COPUBLISHER

Colby Roberts

colby@kidsvt.com MANAGING EDITOR

Alison Novak

alison@kidsvt.com CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Lexy and Alison, 1982

Mary Ann Lickteig

maryann@kidsvt.com ART DIRECTOR

Brooke Bousquet brooke@kidsvt.com

MARKETING & EVENTS DIRECTOR

Corey Grenier

corey@kidsvt.com ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE

Kaitlin Montgomery kaitlin@kidsvt.com

CALENDAR WRITER

Brett Stanciu

brett@kidsvt.com PROOFREADERS

Carolyn Fox, Katherine Isaacs, Kara Torres PRODUCTION MANAGER

John James CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Don Eggert DESIGNERS

Kirsten Cheney, Rev. Diane Sullivan CIRCULATION MANAGER

Matt Weiner BUSINESS MANAGER

Cheryl Brownell CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Astrid Hedbor Lague, Grace Per Lee, Ken Picard, Erinn Simon, Autumn Spencer, Jessica Lara Ticktin, Katie Titterton PHOTOGRAPHERS

James Buck, Sam Simon, Matthew Thorsen ILLUSTRATORS

Rob Donnelly, Elisa Järnefelt

Published 11x per year. Circulation: 25,000 at 600+ locations throughout northern and central Vermont. © 2018 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.

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ALISON NOVAK, MANAGING EDITOR

My best friends when I was little were TARA and SAMANTHA. We took dance classes together for years. To this day, when I hear certain songs, it reminds me of singing in the back of one of our parents’ cars on the way to dance. BROOKE BOUSQUET, ART DIRECTOR I had a few best friends when I was growing up: my dog, HERBIE, who adopted me at the Humane Society when I was 5, my next door neighbor Smelly KELLY (my brothers’ nickname for her), and my sisters, MONICA and MARIE. DIANE SULLIVAN, DESIGNER

CONTRIBUTOR’S NOTE ELISA JÄRNEFELT (“Mom Takes Notes,” page 11) is a Finnish researcher and illustrator. While finishing her PhD in Boston, her husband, Nick, asked her to hike with him to the top of Mount Mansfield so she would think about something other than work for awhile. There, they talked about how cool it would be to move to Vermont someday. Four years later, Elisa and Nick welcomed a tiny Vermonter, Saga, in Burlington. Instead of keeping a baby book, Elisa makes simple illustrations about Saga’s developmental milestones and her own experience as a mom. Follow Elisa on Instagram at @aslittlecookingaspossible.

KIDS VT

here are all kinds of love stories. Lexy and I met as toddlers while finger painting with chocolate pudding at a progressive child-parent center in Philadelphia. We quickly became enamored with each other. Luckily, our moms became good friends, too. We attended the same preschool, went on family vacations to the Jersey Shore together and spent countless hours playing grocery store in her basement. We insisted that our mothers dress us alike, and we were occasionally mistaken for twins, much to our delight. When I was 5, my family moved to New York, but Lexy and I managed to stay in touch. We went on summer travel programs together in middle and high school, backpacked around Europe after our freshman year of college and trained for the New York City Marathon in our early twenties. We’ve seen each other through breakups and moves, marriage and pregnancy. Though she now lives in Brooklyn, we still manage to get our families together several times a year. And — in what feels like proof of the strong, unspoken connection we’ve cultivated over 38 years of friendship — when we do see each other, we’re often dressed alike. In this month’s issue, we celebrate the love between friends. Erinn and Sam Simon — themselves partners in life and creative work — interviewed and photographed pals with special bonds (“Friends Forever,” page 18). From 6-year-old Leo and his “County Road Grandma” Kitty, to Harry Potter-loving middle schoolers Lili and Quinn, their stories are unique but the sentiments they express will be familiar to anyone who’s ever had a true friend. Looking for a sweet Valentine’s Day treat? Flip to page 16 for Astrid Hedbor Lague’s recipe for a decadent crêpe cake. In the mood for a relaxing — and warm — outing with your preschooler? Katie Titterton explains why the Gardener’s Supply greenhouse in Williston is the place to be during the winter months in “Destination Recreation” (page 13). And on page 22, learn about a unique, long-running program at Champlain College that shows the love to single parents looking to earn a college degree. I’m also happy to introduce a new contributor, Elisa Järnefelt. Every other month, the talented illustrator will be sharing a drawing about some aspect of parenthood. This month, she reflects on what her family members do for each other without having to ask. February also marks the beginning of our camp guide, which runs through May. Starting on page 26, you’ll find tons of information about local summer camps, including a planning sheet you can use to keep track of what your kids are doing each week of the summer. Don’t forget to join us at our 21st annual Camp and School Fair, on Saturday, February 3, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., at the Hilton Burlington. We’d love to see you there.

With only eighteen months between us, MY SISTER and I shared the same room growing up, swapped library books and favorite T-shirts, and spent endless hours enmeshed in an imaginary world only the two of us inhabited. She’s still my closest friend. BRETT STANCIU, CALENDAR WRITER

FEBRUARY 2018

Editorial content in Kids VT is for general informational purposes. Parents must use their own discretion for following the advice in any editorial piece. Acceptance of advertising does not constitute service/product endorsement. Kids VT is a proud member of the Parenting Media Association. Kids VT distribution is audited for accuracy. Da Capo Publishing shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Da Capo Publishing may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Da Capo Publishing reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers.

Friends ’Til the End

My friend CELESTE and I met in preschool when we were 3 and have been friends ever since. We were both raised Catholic, share the name Celeste (my middle name) and have the same sense of humor. Now, instead of passing notes about funny church signs we’ve seen, we text photos of them. CATHY RESMER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR

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STAFF QUESTION

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FEBRUARY 2018 KIDSVT.COM

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ORTHODONTICS

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FEBRUARY 2018

Friends Forever

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CALENDAR

FEBRUARY

Best buds share what makes their relationships special

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Wintervale

OUTDOOR FESTIVITIES — including a chili cook-off, hot chocolate and maple tastings, kids’ activities, a bonfire, and free fat-bike, snowshoe and cross-country ski rentals — await nature-loving Vermonters in Burlington’s backyard. Sunday, February 25, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., weather permitting, at the Intervale Center in Burlington.

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Week to Week Kids VT Camp & School Fair: Parents and campers-to-be get detailed information from representatives from dozens of camps and schools from Vermont and beyond. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Hilton Burlington.

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Lake Elmore Polar Splash: Community members “freeze for a reason” in this annual fundraiser for the Morrisville Rotary Club. 11 a.m., Elmore State Park.

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Drag Queen Story Hour: Nikki Champagne and Emoji Nightmare share stories focused on individuality, activism and social responsibility. 11 a.m., Winooski Memorial Library.

FEBRUARY 2018

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Calendar 38 Daily Listings 39 Winter Festivals 40 Live Performances 41 Classes 42 Science & Nature 44 New Parents 46 Ongoing Exhibits

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22 JUST FOR KIDS Best Friend Search

It’s true that a dog is a person’s best friend. But pups might want to meet some other pals, as well. There are 16 animals pictured here, but all of their name tags got mixed up in the box below. Now some read across, some read down, and some are even on a diagonal! Can you find these words so that the canines and the critters can converse correctly? Basset Bat Beagle Bear Beaver Bee Bichon Bloodhound Bluejay Borzoi Boxer Buffalo Bull Bulldog Bunny Butterfly

KIDS VT

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FEBRUARY 2018

FREE VOL.25 NO.1

Best buds share what makes their relationships special BY ERINN & SAM SIMON, PAGE 18

Champlain College’s Single Parents Program

Snowboarder Extraordinaire

Crêpe Cake Recipe

KIDS VT

Kids Say What? Trending Parent Participation Throwback Pet Corner #InstaKidsVT

On the Cover

FEBRUARY 2018

Short Stuff Autumn Answers 6

& Winners Coloring Contest Winners Coloring Contest Puzzle Page Birthday Club Puzzle Answers

KIDSVT.COM

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Staff Question Contributor’s Note

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Just for Kids 47 Best Friend Search 48 Writing Contest 49 50

Columns Kids Beat 9 10 Habitat 11 Mom Takes Notes 12 Balancing Act 13 Destination Recreation 14 One to Watch 15 Bookworms 16 Mealtime 17 Checkup 51 Use Your Words

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FEBRUARY 2018

What do you hope your campers will learn this summer? CENTER SECTION

Welcome Editor’s Note 3

Writing Contest & Winners, p. 48 Coloring Contest Winners, p. 48 Coloring Contest, p. 49 Puzzle Page, p. 50 Birthday Club, p. 50 Puzzle Answers, p. 51

KIDSVT.COM

ROB DONNELLY

At Champlain College, a long-running program helps single parents defy the odds

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ORGANIC SNACKS, CHIPS, YOGURTS, COOKIES, FOODS FOR KIDS, SOUPS, RICE, BARGAIN CHEESES, CLOSE-OUT WINES & NEW SURPRISES EVERYDAY!

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Sam Simon took this sweet photo of best buddies Desmond, Anderson, Maxwell and Reeves.

Norwich, VT | Open daily 10 am – 5 pm

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TRENDING Vermont found no evidence of dangerous chemical contamination in testing of childcare programs located near dry cleaners. No news is good news!

AUTUMN ANSWERS

Should I give relationship advice to my teenager?

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2018

KIDSVT.COM

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y mother was dedicated to making sure we had accurate information about our bodies, including how babies are made. As a nurse, she understood that knowing the facts would help us make better decisions. Granted, she didn’t anticipate that I’d decide to sell the information to my Catholic elementary school classmates, but honestly, the market was strong and the money was good (right up until Sister Francis found out). While my mother hit it out of the park with the reproductive science, the only advice I ever got about falling in love, understanding and expressing my feelings, or how to be in a relationship was, “You’re too young.” The truth is, as uncomfortable as it makes us, our teens aren’t too young to have crushes or be interested in having a relationship. These are big, important milestones, and we don’t want to miss the opportunity to guide them through this rough and beautiful terrain. While it’s preferable to begin this conversation before your teen is actually in the thick of a relationship, it’s never too late for connection.

KIDS SAY WHAT?

A new print ad for Ikea includes a pregnancy test that, if positive, gives a discount on a crib . Yep, they want you to pee on it.

On GoodTherapy.org, a mental health resource, an article entitled “Nine Tips for Talking to Teens about Dating and Relationships” suggests helping your teen define the features of a healthy relationship – including mutual respect, honesty and communication. The article also advises discussing what emotional, physical and sexual abuse is and the associated warning signs. In 2017, Harvard Graduate School of Education’s Making Caring Common Project released “The Talk,” a report that surveyed more than 3,000 young adults over several years “in an effort to understand young people’s romantic and sexual experiences.” The key findings of the report tell a clear story: Large numbers of teens and young adults are unprepared for romantic love, and they lack the knowledge necessary to build respectful, emotional relationships. But they want to know how, and they wish someone would help them. In fact, “70% of the 18- to 25-year-olds who responded to our survey reported wishing they had received more information

“Ugh, Mom! This

from their parents about some emotional aspect of a romantic relationship.” Our teens aren’t born knowing what a healthy relationship is any more than they’re born knowing how babies are made. And yet, all of this information – from the biological to the emotional – is exactly what they need, and want, to learn from us. Maybe it’s uncomfortable, and maybe we wish our teens weren’t growing up so fast. But it’s not about us. It’s about helping our kids understand how to handle life’s toughest stuff, like being vulnerable, sharing love and surviving heartbreak. And take it from me: If our teens don’t get this crucial information from us, you can bet some enterprising kid out there is going to try to sell it to them at a premium.  In this monthly column, comedian, writer and mom Autumn Spencer answers tricky parenting questions. Have a question for Autumn? Send it to ideas@kidsvt.com.

homemade chicken-noodle soup tastes like dead-squirrel stew.” —RUBY, AGE 5

Five young Vermont rock climbers qualified for youth national championships in Salt Lake City this month. Rock on!

Sen. Tammy Duckworth of Illinois announced her pregnancy; the 49-year-old Army vet will be the first serving U.S. senator to give birth while in office. It’s about time.

Teens are filming themselves consuming brightly colored laundry detergent packets, as part of a dangerous stunt known as the “Tide Pod challenge.” Spoiler alert: It won’t end well.

Kids in Missouri tried to bribe their superintendent to call a snow day by leaving seven Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups on his doorstep. An accompanying note simply stated, “You know what to do.”


PARENT PARTICIPATION

PET CORNER

This month, we feature best-buddy photos and interviews in “Friends Forever” on page 18. Below, find a few more sweet friendship stories submitted by parents. I could not help but think of my daughter, Isabelle, and her best friend, Catherine. When we bought our first home in South Hero, we knew no one. Isabelle was 18 months old and is an only child. When we needed a new daycare, Catherine’s mom, Heather, opened a new in-home daycare. Izzy and Cat quickly became inseparable. Through their special friendship, Heather and I have become best friends. For the first time in my life, I feel like I have made a lifelong best friend myself.

My friend and I each have sixthgrade girls who have been wonderful friends since age 3 and second-grade boys who have been best buds since infancy! Even after my friend’s family moved to New York for four years, the kids remained friends, and when they moved back to Vermont two years ago, they picked up where they left off! The girls both share a love of horses, and the boys love winter sports and tae kwon do!

—GINA MCCLAIN

—BETH FRIESEN

The first friendship that comes to mind is my daughter Stella and her friend, Greta, who spent their days together here in our home from their toddler days until kindergarten. Now they are in first grade at different schools, but any time they get together, it’s as though they were never apart. My son, Henry, is 9. I love his bond with my dad. They text, call each other and plan fun days together. It’s a wonderful bond that fills both of their hearts,

Desiree Vatter shared this snapshot of her 2-year-old son, Abbott, with the family dog, Roy. “Roy not only has an incredible amount of energy to keep up with Abbott,” Vatter told us, “but also has the patience for his hugs and love!”

and mine! And lastly, my best friend is Hannah O’Brien. Our kids, all five of them together, are the “O’Brarretts.” They are closer than friends; they are more like siblings! They tease, they taunt, and they LOVE! —HONI BEAN BARRETT

#INSTAKIDSVT THROWBACK FEBRUARY 2016

HERE’S HOW:



Follow @kids_vt on Instagram.



Post your photos on Instagram with the hashtag #instakidsvt. We’ll select a photo to feature in the next issue.

ilovevermontbiking Just another day at the beach (it’s warm at the top of the climb in the sun).

KIDS VT

Read the full story at kidsvt.com/transgender

FEBRUARY 2018

Two years ago, we wrote about transgender kids and teens in Vermont. “You’re fighting your insides and your outsides and ... it’s just a huge struggle,” said then-17-year-old Marcus Pizer, describing the anxiety and anger he experienced before he came out to his parents.

KIDSVT.COM

Young & In Transition

Thanks for sharing your family photos with us using the hashtag #instakidsvt. We loved this picture from Prospect Mountain Nordic ski center in Woodford. Share a picture of your kids enjoying winter this month.

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BY A L I S ON N OVAK

COMMUNITY

The Next Generation Six years ago, Eliza Eaton of Weybridge was a stay-at-home mom of two kids under 2. “Most of my waking hours were spent trying to figure out what to do with those children,” she recounted. After driving past a sign for a spring carnival at a Middlebury church, she realized there was no central place for local parents to find information about family-focused happenings in the area. So she started one. In the spring of 2012, Eaton launched the website MINIBURY, an online calendar of kids’ events in and around Middlebury. Over the years, the site evolved to include listings for afterschool activities, a blog and a popular summer camp guide. In early 2017, Eaton, now with three children and an additional job, decided she was ready to move on from the site she singlehandedly maintained. “I was in a different place from when I started it,” she said. A team of local parents — Middlebury resident Megan James and Cornwall residents Conor Stinson and Linda January — recently decided to pick up where Eaton left off. James, the former managing editor of Kids VT and mom to 1- and 3-year-olds, explained that Stinson, a longtime friend, encouraged her to team up with him to purchase the site, which he relied on as a stay-at-home dad. The pair eventually joined forces with January, a parent of a young daughter and director of Middlebury’s Otter Creek Child Center. The trio acquired MiniBury in the fall of 2017. James said they’re currently working to keep the events calendar updated and to figure out how to divide responsibilities. Eaton “built a really incredible resource for this community,” James said. “We are all really excited to be keeping it alive.” Visit MiniBury at minibury.com or on Facebook at facebook.com/minibury.

Furry Fun

A clever new picture book by Burlington author and illustrator Harry Bliss gives kids and parents both reason to smile. With colorful, graphic illustrations and just a few words, GRACE FOR GUS chronicles the adventures of New York City second grader Grace. The tale begins in a classroom of Midtown Elementary, when Grace’s teacher asks students to contribute to the Gus Buddy Fund to purchase a friend for the class guinea pig. Grace, touched by the little mammal’s sweetness, embarks on a lively nighttime journey through the streets of Manhattan, busking with her violin in the 14th Street subway station, drawing caricatures on the outskirts of Central Park and showing off her acrobatic moves on the pole of a subway car. Funny details, like a restaurant sign that translates to “Too Expensive French Cuisine” and cameos by notable figures including Vincent van Gogh, Andy Warhol and Spike Lee, make for an engaging reading experience. And hearts will be warmed when a triumphant Grace surprises her class with a pile of cash for the Buddy Fund — the fruits of her very adventurous labor. Grace for Gus by Harry Bliss. Published by HarperCollins. $17.99. February 6 release date. Bliss will be at Flying Pig Bookstore in Shelburne in February. Visit flyingpigbooks.com for details.

CHILDCARE

Easier Access

KIDS VT

Learn more about Make Way for Kids at vermontbirthtofive.org.

FEBRUARY 2018

A new program aims to address Vermont’s childcare shortage by helping to create 500 new highquality childcare spaces in the state each year. MAKE WAY FOR KIDS is a project of Vermont Birth to Five, an organization focused on addressing gaps in childcare and supporting childcare providers. The quality of care in the state has increased over the last decade, said Vermont Birth to Five executive director Janet McLaughlin, thanks in part to STARS, the state’s Step Ahead Recognition System launched in 2004 to recognize high-quality childcare, preschool and after-school programs. Vermont Birth to Five, she explained, has been instrumental in helping providers participate in that program. But the availability of childcare remains a problem, she said. Forty-seven percent of Vermont infants and toddlers likely to need care don’t have access to regulated childcare, according to a 2017 report from Let’s Grow Kids, Vermont Birth to Five’s sister organization. And 79% of infants and toddlers in the state don’t have access to highquality childcare, those programs that are accredited and have earned four or five stars in the STARS program. Over the next year, Make Way for Kids will award at least $300,000 in grants to help expand existing programs, start up new programs, and support providers in attracting and training skilled educators. “We know there are many excellent providers throughout the state,” said McLaughlin. “We want to support as many of these projects as possible.”

KIDSVT.COM

New MiniBury owners, Stinson, James and January

BOOKS

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HABITAT BY BRE TT S TA N CI U MOLLY STANCIU

Skaters glide in the shadow of Woodbury Elementary School

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rink. This winter, Stratton held a 45-minute training session for volunteers, assigning them specific days to keep the ice clear. This fall, a few families built a 6-by-8 foot shelter to store community skates and hockey sticks. Future plans include a Hockey 101 clinic for Woodbury kids. Stratton explained the group chose the more labor-intensive, community-oriented option of COU RT E SY constructing a rink, rather OF W O than purchasing an assembled set-up, and credits the success of this project to numerous people — from the volunteer fire department to retired folks who stopped by to shovel. With no set hours and no fees, this small-town rink is put to good use by a variety of skaters, from solo adult gliders to teenagers playing pick-up hockey. Stratton described a magical evening when she, a friend and a crew of kids joined forces to clear the ice: “With the snow coming down in the streetlight,” she said, “it was amazing.”  BU

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Skating light for nighttime shelter skating. Early last winter, firefighters flooded the rink. A well-attended community skate night followed, which included donated s’mores fixings, cocoa, hot dogs — and lots of red-cheeked kids. A blazing fire contained in a portable pit kept skaters toasty. While the cold weather lasted, Woodbury Elementary School used the rink for outdoor physical education classes at least once a week, with some students enjoying additional ice time with classroom teachers. Thanks to a $650 Northeast Kingdom Kids on the Move grant, the skates found in the school were sharpened and cleaned, and helmets, new laces and colored labels

MOLLY STANCIU

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wo years ago, the Friends of Woodbury Elementary School — the school’s parent-teacher organization — discovered a stash of child-sized ice skates in the school’s basement. The find spurred the Friends’ desire to build an outdoor ice rink in their tiny town (population 906). Friends president Elizabeth Stratton enthusiastically headed up the project. After asking around town, Stratton discovered Woodbury once had a rink on a flat piece of village property owned by the local Ladies’ Auxiliary. Guided by online research, the group created plans for a 32-by-64 foot ice rink. The Friends received the go-ahead from the Auxiliary, access to the fire department’s water and hoses to flood the rink, and the adjacent elementary school’s blessing. Volunteers leveled the site with heavy equipment. A grant from the Woodbury Fund, a nonprofit supporting town-based projects, enabled organizers to purchase materials — including a plastic liner, pressure-treated lumber for the rink’s perimeter and a few shovels and squeegees. A skilled parent hooked up electricity to a nearby pole, providing

HOOL TARY SC

Small-Town Ice Rink

“Habitat” celebrates places where Vermont families live and play. Got a sweet space you want us to see? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

$1,570 IN GRANT FUNDS SUPPLIED:

pairing skates with students were also purchased. In the first year, community members took turns shoveling the

Pressure-treated wood for the rink’s sides, purchased from a local lumber yard

A plastic liner sourced from nicerink.com

Shovels and squeegees for everyday maintenance (The school lends its snow blower when major clearing is needed.)

A wooden Woodbury Community Ice Skating Rink sign


MOM TAKES NOTES B Y E L I S A J Ä RN E F E LT

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efore I became a parent, I worried about love. I had read that sometimes the bond between mother and child takes a long time to form. The moment my daughter, Saga, was born, I forgot to worry. I was too captivated by her — her long fingers, big eyes, dark hair and the sound of her cry that, unlike all other babies’ cries, did not sound like a cry at all, but like the pleasant voice of my child. Eight months later, it turns out that it is not feeling love toward her that is hard. It is being kind to myself. A baby does not come with a clear rule book, making being a perfect parent impossible. After giving up on my longing for perfection, I have come to see our family as a sports team of sorts. Those moments of calm when the needs of each member are met, that is when we score a goal. -EJ

KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2018 KIDS VT

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BALANCING ACT B Y J E S S I CA L A RA TI C K T IN JAMES BUCK

A Model of Care A pair of doctors on maintaining hectic schedules, fostering a child and being supported by a “third parent”

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t’s almost 6:30 on a weekday evening as Janet Kirwan pulls into the driveway and makes her way along the snowy footpath to her stately red brick house in the Hill Section of Burlington. She enters the foyer and joins her husband, Paul Crainich, who has already lit a fire in the hearth of their comfortable and elegant living room. He has just returned from taking the kids skiing during his day off from work and their day off from school. The aroma of spaghetti and meatballs draws Kirwan into the kitchen, where she finds Susan Brean, the kids’ nanny for the past dozen years, just finishing up dinner preparations. Kirwan and Crainich chat with Brean, briefing her on the next day’s schedule. As full-time doctors who are often on call, the couple rely on Brean to act, essentially, as a third parent to their four children. From October 2016 until December 2017, the family also had a foster daughter living with them. By picking up the kids from school and driving them to afternoon activities, grocery shopping, preparing meals and taking care of the family’s two dogs, Brean helps keep the big and busy household running smoothly. On varying schedules and needs: Janet: Our schedules are different every day. So, we can work for 24 hours at a time, or I can be on call for a week at a time, and Paul works 12hour shifts. Susan pretty much always helps out from 2 to 6:30 p.m. Susan: It depends on what day it is and what time the kids get out of school, or what needs to be done, like grocery shopping. Janet: The schedule has changed so many times over the years.

DAD: Paul Crainich, 47, hospitalist at Central Vermont Medical Center

NANNY: Susan Brean, 44

MOM: Janet Kirwan, 48, intervention cardiologist at University of Vermont Medical Center

DAUGHTER: Aoife, 11

SONS: Hugo,12, Oscar, 9, Oliver, 8

Susan: At one point, I was here 50 hours a week! Janet: There is endless work to be done. On their different strengths: Janet: I love the sports and the adolescent kids and their homework and their relationships. And Susan spent so many hours reading to them — which is probably why they do so well in school. And playing board games with them, and arts and crafts, and sitting on the floor with them. Susan: [When] they were younger … we didn’t really go anywhere. If you didn’t keep them busy, that’s when trouble happened! On the nanny-kid bond: Janet: They treat Susan like they treat us — no-holds-barred. It’s like they have three parents. Susan: Yeah, I would say three parents. I don’t have kids of my own, and I think of them as my kids! I always say my kids. Janet: And so you should! And when you see them do well at school, do you think you’ve contributed a ton to that? Because I think you have! On parenting as doctors: Janet: While our family is more

important than anything else, Hugo’s soccer is not more important than my patient’s heart attack or Paul’s patient’s stroke, so there is that balance. Paul: Yeah. Janet: So the less important kids’ stuff would definitely come after the patient stuff. Paul: But there’s carpooling situations we’ve tried to get into as well. Janet: The carpool is always an issue because when I am on call, if I get a call, I have to go. So it’s one thing ditching my own kid, like, OK, you aren’t going to soccer today, but I can’t ditch four other kids. There were a lot of things that I felt I couldn’t fully participate in because I was on the phone or about to get a call. On deciding to become a foster family: Janet: I had been down at the school … Just seeing how some of the kids are struggling so much … and how little we had to do to keep our kids happy and healthy and engaged in school. So I thought if there was a kid who was in trouble, that maybe we could help out temporarily. Paul: We thought, since we were out of the preschool stage, maybe helping a child in the same age bracket as

Top row: Janet, Oscar, Susan, Oliver Bottom row: Hugo, Paul, Aoife

our kids would be a good idea, and it turned out that she was a year older [than Hugo]. Janet: I had read there was a need for these kids who were slightly older. You just never know how long they will stay. It could be days; it could be many months. With our foster daughter, we found a perfect fit. She was a great girl. How fostering a child changed them: Janet: I felt we did something of value. Having been so hyper-focused on just ourselves and our kids and getting through the day and tennis lessons and swim practice, sometimes it just felt like it was too much. Paul: It was kind of shortsighted. We weren’t seeing this whole other side and [our foster daughter] helped open things up for us. And I think our kids got this too, on their own sort of level. Janet: Yes, on their own level. They are a resilient bunch, and I don’t think they overthink things. They each developed their own individual relationships with her. K In “Balancing Act,” we ask Vermont parents about the intersection of work and family life. Know parents we should interview? Email us at ideas@ kidsvt.com.


DESTINATION RECREATION BY K AT I E T I T T ER TO N

Gardener’s Supply Company 472 Marshall Avenue, Williston

It’s easy to relax, breathe deeply and let the orchids and ferns transport you to greener days.

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PHOTOS: KATIE TITTERTON

and spot-on kids’ lunch menu. Three bucks gets young diners a PB&J, grilled cheese, or bagel and cream cheese. Double the price and the meal comes with milk or a juice box, popcorn and a cookie. Russ is still unfamiliar with the Happy Meal concept, so when his sandwich was delivered with a little plastic donkey, he was astonished by the unexpected gift. For adults who aren’t already familiar with Garden of Eatin’ for post-shopping snacks or work lunches, the veggie-loaded, soup-andsandwich-focused menu does not disappoint. In warmer weather, kids can run up and down the outdoor aisles between the shrubs and fruit trees

and burn energy on the outdoor play structure. But even on a run-of-themill, freezing weekday, the greenhouse is a relaxing destination. Russ was perfectly happy to lean over the side of the koi pond, peering down at the fish and talking about the things he noticed, taking an occasional break for a bite of sandwich. And I was perfectly happy to feel warm, damp air on my nasal passages and take in the season’s low light, without a winter jacket.  In “Destination Recreation,” local parents review family-friendly attractions. Got a spot you think we should feature? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

KIDS VT

in the background. Plants range from familiar houseplants like peace lilies and spider plants to air plants encased in soil-free glass bulbs and vividly colored, spiky bromeliads — making it a particularly appealing place for little ones with short attention spans. The environment provides a good opportunity to play category games like “What color?”, “Short or tall?” and “Which one has spots?” Because every inch of the greenhouse is filled with plants, it’s probably better to visit during quieter hours if your kid’s energy level or coordination makes you wary of stepping into a place filled with dirt and pottery. Even so, Emily McCarthy, a staff member at the store’s Garden of Eatin’ Café, said that on weekends, the place fills up with families. Unlike a regular sit-down restaurant, McCarthy pointed out, brunch in the greenhouse offers plenty of distractions and opportunities for kids to explore while parents eat and engage in grown-up talk. The in-house café has a simple

FEBRUARY 2018

Gardener’s Supply Company’s Williston Garden Center & Outlet is open Monday-Saturday, 9 a.m.-6 p.m. and Sunday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. The center hosts a monthly Saturday Kids Club with hands-on projects like worm composting and fairy-house construction. Membership is free; preregistration is required, and some programs have a fee. Find more information at gardeners.com/ vermont-kids-club.

Russ in the greenhouse

KIDSVT.COM

oaking up some warmth and humidity in the Gardener’s Supply greenhouse in Williston, an arrangement of cacti transported me to one of my first childhood memories: falling butt-first The koi pond into a similarly spiky greenhouse display as a toddler. Fortunately, my own 2-year-old, Russ, was less interested in prickly succulents than just about everything else. The indoor koi pond, for starters. The stone pool, built into the front corner of the greenhouse, is filled with fat, orange fish swimming under fanciful sculptures and bonsai trees, with a cascading fountain in the center. Café tables ring the outside. In our family, we call the pet store the “free aquarium.” Using that logic, Gardener’s Supply could be called a free botanical garden. It’s easy to relax, breathe deeply and let the orchids and ferns transport you to greener days while global music plays

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PHOTOS COURTESY OF NICK CITRO

ONE TO WATCH B Y M A RY A N N L I CKT E IG

Born to Ride

A young teen spins and soars to snowboard success

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said. “It’s just fun to be on the mountain with your friends.” On a sub-zero December day, he hiked to a rail to practice it, over and over, for an hour with his longtime private coach, Nick Citro. Because of extreme cold and wind, Stowe had just one lift running, and most programs had been canceled, but Hans kept at it. Other teens might choose to sleep in and play video games. “This is my video game,” Hans said. Raised in the shadow of Mount Mansfield, in a house five minutes from the lift lines, he seems destined for it. Undoubtedly flipping in utero, he was a breech baby born in November of 2003. It was the first snowstorm of the season, mom Sandy said. “And my husband thought that boded well for his future.” As a toddler, Hans climbed onto the backs of armchairs and flung himself onto the ottoman. When he got older, he skipped flights of stairs and jumped from landing to landing. He started skiing down the driveway when he was 2. Age 4 brought the time he duct taped his high-top sneakers to a plastic board to hop around on pillows and furniture. And kindergarten brought a gentle admonition from his teacher: It’s not a playground in here. Thank God for the mountains. Hans skied and snowboarded until he was 7, when he started snowboarding exclusively and qualified

for the first of seven straight trips to the USA Snowboard and Freeski Association’s National Snowboarding Championships. An all-mountain rider who has competed in all six main snowboard events in the past, Hans will focus on three this winter: boardercross, slopestyle and rail jam. What are his goals? “Short term, is just to get better,” he said. “And long term, see where it takes me. And if that takes me to bigger competitions ... then I go there. And if I just want to keep it one of these lifelong, have-fun sports, then that’s where it takes me.” The Stowe Middle School eighth grader is homeschooled in the winter so he can train four hours a day, six or seven days week, in Vermont, then go to Colorado to train for six weeks. A formidable challenge arose when, at age 2 1/2, Hans was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Managing the condition requires finger sticks every three hours, round the clock, to check blood-sugar levels. Each carb consumed needs to be accounted for.

“It’s huge,” his dad said. But, early on, he and Sandy adopted the motto, “Say yes.” Say yes to everything to which you would say yes if your child did not have diabetes. Still, it can be scary putting Hans on the mountain. He’s entirely covered, making it hard to tell if he’s not feeling well. The testing equipment can freeze. A couple of times, his blood sugar dropped too low, and he headed down the wrong trail. Hans takes it all in stride. When asked to participate in a panel discussion about having diabetes, he said, “What am I going to say to them, Mom? I just go out and play and ride like I don’t have it, and I have really supportive parents.” And that’s what they intend to be. Bryan had hoped that his son would share his own love for snowboarding, but, he said, he and Sandy knew nothing about the world of snowboard competition until Hans entered it. “He’s the one who took it and ran with it.” K

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2018

KIDSVT.COM

wo-time overall national snowboarding champion Hans Huber talked his way onto his first snowboard at age 4. He was skiing with his parents at Stowe Mountain Resort. While they ate lunch, he walked to the demo shop, a few yards away, and came back with boots, a board and a smile. His mom offered to pay for a demo, but the clerk wouldn’t take any money. Your son’s been in here for the last couple of weeks asking about this board, he said. Let him try it. So dad Bryan Huber, an avid rider himself, took Hans out and gave him a lesson, “and he started linking turns,” Bryan said, “and that was it.” Now 14, the Stowe native is on track to become a world-class athlete. He has ridden with members of the U.S. snowboard team, trained at Utah Olympic Park and, in December, spent a day riding for fun in Austria with his dad and two-time Olympic gold medalist Seth Wescott. “Hans is the most accomplished snowboard athlete we currently work with,” said Jason Trask, founder and president of Green Mountain Academy in Stowe. Drive, confidence, private coaching and parental support have brought him this far. So has his ability to remember — even in competition — that snowboarding is, first and foremost, fun. “It’s like an adrenaline rush,” Hans

NAME: Hans Huber AGE: 14 TOWN: Stowe

Explore worlds both real and imagined through works of art ranging from 19th century marionettes to contemporary installations.

February 17– June 3, 2018

shelburnemuseum.org Puppets: World on a String is underwritten by Donna and Marvin Schwartz and the Stiller Family Foundation.

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BOOKWORMS BY B RE TT S TA N CI U

Read Early, Read Often ver wonder if it’s worthwhile to read Goodnight Moon to your toddler for the umpteenth time? The short answer, according to national early literacy program 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten, is yes. The longer answer is that numerous studies show the more young children are exposed to language before starting school, the more likely they’ll flourish academically. Helping kids develop regular reading habits may produce even greater outcomes, according to the National Endowment for the Arts’ 2007 report of American reading habits. “Regular reading

We asked Comiskey and Kristine B. Caldwell, youth librarian at Jericho’s Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, to share their favorite titles for toddlers and preschoolers. Comiskey recommends: •

I Ain’t Gonna Paint No More! by Karen Beaumont, illustrated by David Catrow

The Book With No Pictures by B. J. Novak

This is a Ball by Beck & Matt Stanton

Caldwell recommends:

A Sick Day for Amos McGee by Philip C. Stead, illustrated by Erin E. Stead

The Red Book by Barbara Lehman

Good Night, Gorilla by Peggy Rathmann

The Snowy Day by Ezra Jack Keats

Lilly’s Purple Plastic Purse by Kevin Henkes

Mr. Tiger Goes Wild by Peter Brown

The Three Pigs by David Wiesner

 Nature Trails

not only boosts the likelihood of an individual’s academic and economic success — facts that are not especially surprising — but it also seems to awaken a person’s social and civic sense,” states the report, titled, “To Read or Not To Read: a Question of National Consequence.” Liza L. Comiskey, Highgate’s town librarian, is an enthusiastic champion of 1,000 Books Before Kindergarten, which launched in 2013. The program’s premise is appealingly simple, she explains. Caregivers aim to read 1,000 books with their child before they start elementary school. Its website — 1000booksbeforekindergarten. org — offers instructions in English and Spanish and printable sheets, so families can keep track of the books they’ve read together. Parents who prefer to keep an electronic log can download a free app that lets users scan the barcodes of books they’ve read.

To sweeten the deal, Highgate Library rewards little literati with small prizes each time they finish 100 books. Other libraries across the state put their own twist on the program. Comiskey encourages busy parents to “sit down with your child and take that time” to read together every day. If your 3-year-old insists on reading Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? every night, don’t despair. He or she is learning language and story structure, and each of those readings counts as a book read. While 1,000 books may seem like an intimidating goal at first, one book a day adds up to 365 books per year. And whether or not families hit that target might be beside the point. The real payoff is helping your kids develop a lifelong love of reading. K

 Aquarium WWW.MONTSHIRE.ORG 802.649.2200

! l i a M Wee

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Find information about local events and parenting resources every Thursday in the Kids VT Wee-Mail. Visit kidsvt.com/wee-mail to subscribe today. Wee-Mail sponsored by:

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 Daily Activities at the Science Discover Lab

FEBRUARY 2018

The Quiet Book by Deborah Underwood, illustrated by Renata Liwska

 150+ Hands-On Exhibits

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© DREAMSTIME.COM/ KONSTANTIN YUGANOV

E

BOOK RECOMMENDATIONS TO GET YOU STARTED

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MEALTIME B Y A S T RI D H E D BOR L A GUE

Chocolate-Raspberry Crêpe Cake

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2018 KIDSVT.COM

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ecause we live so close to the French-speaking province of Québec, most Vermonters are probably familiar with the magic that is a crêpe. Stuffed with sweet or savory fillings, crêpes are super versatile and a nice departure from traditional American pancakes. When I was a teenager, my family took a trip to Montréal to celebrate my sister’s birthday and found ourselves at a crêperie. When we informed the waiter about the special occasion, he presented my sister with a crêpe topped with a flaming sparkler. That was a memorable experience. When I first saw a crêpe cake years later, I thought of my sister and that spectacular crêpe. Also called Mille Crêpes (or “a thousand crêpes”), the layered confection is sure to impress. It’s a bit labor-intensive, but it isn’t too difficult once you master the technique of swirling batter onto your pan and gently flipping the paper-thin crêpes. You can layer this cake with a variety of fillings — from pastry cream to nuts, fruit compotes and curds to ganache. For my own creation, I decided to go with alternating layers of chocolate ganache and a mixture of raspberry jam and mascarpone cheese. These flavors complement each other, and they don’t overwhelm the delicate crêpes. Crêpe batter is simple. It works best if you let it sit for at least an hour after making it. This resting period helps relax the gluten in the batter, and it minimizes air bubbles, resulting in more evenly textured crêpes. Though stores sell specialized (and expensive!) crepe pans, I found that a well-seasoned, lowsided, cast-iron frying pan is perfect for the job. Ganache is one of those delicacies that sounds more complicated than it actually is. All it requires is some good dark chocolate and cream. When hot, the ganache can be used as a glaze. Cool it slightly, and it is a wonderful filling. Let

it cool even further, and it can be rolled into balls to make decadent chocolate truffles. I made this cake to serve a crowd, but you could make a more petite dessert for two — perfect for Valentine’s Day — using a round cookie cutter, or even a canning lid, to cut small circles out of your crêpes and layer them. For an extra decadent treat, try coating the whole cake with a thin layer of ganache. Traditionally, this cake would have about 20 layers. I lost count while stacking, though, and ended up with a whopping 27! If you’d like, make extra crêpes and enjoy them for dinner with savory fillings, such as ham, mushroom, or spinach and cheese. Crêpes can also be frozen for later use. Separate them with wax or parchment paper, then wrap the whole stack in the same material, and freeze it in a plastic bag. You can thaw crêpes individually, and they offer a welcome alternative to sandwiches in your kids’ school lunches. Bon appétit! 

INGREDIENTS Crêpe batter: • 1/2 cup + 1 tablespoon butter, melted (plus extra butter for the pan) • 6 eggs • 2 1/4 cups low-fat milk • 1 1/2 cups water • 3 cups flour

Chocolate ganache: • 500 grams dark chocolate • 1 cup heavy cream

Raspberry-mascarpone filling: • 8 ounces mascarpone cheese • 2 cups raspberry jam

Garnish: • Fresh raspberries • Confectioners’ sugar

ANDY BRUMBAUGH

Celebrate with layers of flavor

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DIRECTIONS 1. To make the crêpes, melt the butter, then blend it with the eggs, milk, water and flour using a mixer or a hand whisk. Make sure the batter is smooth, with no lumps. Refrigerate for at least an hour, up to overnight. 2. Heat a heavy, nonstick frying pan or a well-seasoned cast-iron pan (8 to 10 inches in diameter, with low sides) over medium heat. Melt a small pat of butter in the pan, then spoon in about 1/4 cup of batter, swirling the pan to evenly coat the surface. Cook just until the batter looks dry on top (about 30 to 60 seconds), then carefully flip using a spatula. Cook on the second side for about 20 to 30 seconds, then transfer the finished crêpe to a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Continue the process until the batter is gone. 3. To make the ganache, break the chocolate into small pieces. Heat the cream, either in a pan or microwave, until it is just about to boil. Add the chocolate to the cream and stir until the chocolate is completely melted and smooth. (If the chocolate doesn’t melt entirely, put the bowl containing the mixture over a pot of boiling water

and stir until melted.) Cool the ganache to room temperature. If it gets too stiff, you can reheat it. 4. To make the raspberrymascarpone filling, heat the jam for about 30 seconds in a pan or microwave, then whisk it into the mascarpone until wellblended. Refrigerate until you’re ready to assemble the cake. 5. To assemble the cake, place a crêpe on your cake plate and top with 3 or 4 tablespoons of cooled ganache, spreading it evenly. Place a second crêpe on top of the ganache, lining up the edges of the crêpes. Top the second crêpe with 3 or 4 tablespoons of the raspberrymascarpone filling, then top with another crêpe. Repeat until you have about 20 layers. 6. Finish the cake with a few fresh raspberries, securing them to the cake by dipping the bottom in a little ganache. Allow the cake to rest in the refrigerator, covered loosely with tin foil, at least an hour, up to overnight. This lets the layers set and the flavors meld. 7. When ready to serve, dust the top of the cake with confectioners’ sugar and cut into thin slices.


CHECKUP WIT H D R. L E WI S F I RS T • I N T E RV I E W C O M PIL ED AN D C O N DEN S ED B Y K EN PIC AR D

How should parents address kids’ requests for piercings or tattoos? O

KVT: Why not? LF: Because the piercing gun isn’t sterile and is difficult to clean well, there is a risk that germs can be transferred from one individual to the next person getting a piercing with this device. Instead, the person doing the piercing should be using a disposable needle and sterile piercing device that’s used only once.

KVT: Who should do the piercing? LF: It should be done by professionals. If it’s a piercing and tattoo salon, it should be one licensed by the state. Some pediatricians will do piercings. But whether it’s done in a medical office or in the mall, parents should ensure that the person doing the piercing uses sterile, disposable gloves, that they clean the ears prior to piercing and that there’s some

KVT: What are the most common complications from ear piercings? LF: Parents should watch for bleeding, inflammation and redness. If the site looks inflamed or oozes pus, parents should see a health care professional who can help remove the earring, which may be difficult to remove when the ear is inflamed, and then prescribe treatment with an antibiotic.

KVT: What kinds of earrings should be used initially? LF: The first set of earrings or posts should be made of gold or stainless steel, which are less likely to cause allergic reactions or infections. Avoid metal alloys, especially those containing nickel.

a Rutland Creative Economy Initiative

KVT: Do body piercings pose greater health risks? LF: Some studies suggest that one out of three piercings outside the soft tissue of the ear results in a complication. That could be a minor infection, but it could also be significant bleeding, cyst formation, scarring or even trauma. With regard to tongue piercings, the biggest complications we see are bleeding and swelling of the tongue, the latter of which can cause a serious airway obstruction. KVT: Any advice for parents if their older child or teen asks for a tattoo? LF: One of the most important things that parents can do is help their teens understand the seriousness of their decision and that they should “think before they ink.” All tattoo parlors in Vermont require written consent of a minor’s parent or guardian. If young people still want to go through with it, parents should work with them to find a state-regulated parlor that has sanitary conditions and will discuss care of the tattoo site before, during and after tattooing. That means using disposable gloves, new needles and unused ink that hasn’t been diluted with unsterile water, which can cause infection. KVT: Anything else? LF: Parents should be mindful of teens with excessive piercings or body art, especially if it’s not artistic tattooing, but scarring or cutting. That’s not body art. We call that nonsuicidal self-injury, which may be a sign of undiagnosed anxiety, depression or another mental health issue. If it looks like a youth has an impulse to cut, burn, scratch or scar without the intent to beautify, parents should seek advice from a health care professional right away. K

Tues, Thurs, Fri & Sat 10am-4pm, Sun 1-4pm; Closed Mon & Wed Admission $5 per person • Memberships available 11 Center St., Downtown Rutland, Vt • 802-282-2678

Explore. Create. Imagine. Hands-on exhibits created for families to play together. www.wonderfeetkidsmuseum.org

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Bring Learning Home! Discover Oak Meadow’s creative, adaptable homeschooling curriculum for K-12, or enroll in our accredited distance school for one-to-one teacher support.

• Follow our 36-week print curriculum for a comprehensive experience, or customize to meet student needs and interests. • Enroll full time and earn an Oak Meadow diploma, or take individual courses for transferable credit.

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KIDS VT: What’s your professional opinion on piercing an infant’s ears? LEWIS FIRST: I prefer to see parents wait until a child is old enough to ask for pierced ears and mature enough to care for them themselves. That said, if parents still want to do it for their infants, I would recommend not having the ears pierced until the child is at least 6 months old, when the immune system is fairly well developed. This reduces the risk of infection, which is the most common complication from piercings. Children should also have all their immunizations current, particularly for tetanus and hepatitis.

W nderfeet Kids’ Museum

FEBRUARY 2018

way to minimize the pain through a numbing cream or ice in a washcloth. The most important thing is, the person doing the piercing should not use a piercing gun.

www.rutlandrec.com/winterfest

KIDSVT.COM

nce considered a red flag for high-risk behaviors among teens, body art no longer carries the stigma it once did. By the time they are 21, nearly four in 10 people will have a piercing somewhere besides their ears. And nearly one in five college students has a tattoo, according to data shared in a 2017 report on tattooing and piercing published in Pediatrics, the journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Dr. Lewis First, chief of pediatrics at the University of Vermont Children’s Hospital, offers parents some measured advice on what to do if their kids want to get a piercing or a tattoo.

Celebrate Winter with us at Rutland WinterFest

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Best buds share what makes their relationships special BY ERINN SIMON • PHOTOS BY SAM SIMON Lili, 11, South Burlington, and Quinn, 11, Burlington

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2018

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Sixth graders Lili and Quinn don’t remember the first time they met; they weren’t quite 2. Lili’s family was new to Burlington, and her mom, June Shen-Epstein, emailed a local stay-at-home mom’s club about a playgroup. Quinn’s mom, Rachel Shelley, responded. Upon meeting, they discovered that their kids were born only a week apart. The toddlers immediately hit it off and have been hanging out regularly ever since. Shelley said she assumed the pair would drift apart as they approached middle school, as friends of the opposite sex often do. But the relationship between the two, who share Chinese heritage and an intense love of Harry Potter, has only grown stronger. Said Shelley, “I’ve often thought that if they had been born in the same state, I would worry that they had been twins separated at birth.”

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Kids VT: What makes your friendship unique? Lili: We go to different schools... Quinn: ...but we still manage to get time together. Lili: And everyone in our family is friends now, because of us. Our dads — Quinn: Yeah, our dads are friends now. Lili: A lot of people at my school say, Oh, you like each other. Quinn: — but it’s not that kind of like. Lili: Yeah. We’re friends.

Quinn got me a wand and he kept pointing it around and going Zzzzzzt! — like zapping with it. And we just kept doing it to each other. So that’s what started it. Another year, whenever we were in a picture together, we would both raise our eyebrows up and say, Wah Wahhh!

He’s funny, and we can always come up with something to do when we’re together. Even if we just read.

KVT: I heard you have -LILI an annual insidejoke tradition. Lili: Yeah, we always have a birthday inside joke. It started a long time ago. We always go to Koto for our birthday dinner, because our birthdays are so close together — Quinn: — and then we decided we’d do inside jokes there. Lili: We normally bring each other presents on that day. So this one time,

KVT: What do you like most about each other? Quinn: We’re never bored. We always have something to do or talk about. I always want to talk to her about whatever funny thing that happened during the week, or the month, or the day since we saw each other. Lili: He’s funny, and we can always come up with something to do when we’re together. Even if we just read. Quinn: And she’s really smart. Lili: Thanks. You’re smart, too!


They share your interests, secrets, jokes and adventures. They’ve got your back. They get on your nerves. They just get you. This Valentine’s Day, we celebrate the love between friends.

Leo, 6, Essex, and Kitty, 67, East Montpelier Until recently, Teal Church’s family lived half a mile from Kitty Wilson on County Road in East Montpelier. Wilson — who has grandchildren of her own but is known as “County Road Grandma” by Teal and her son, Leo — has been there for Leo since he was a baby, watching him overnight when his younger sister was born, picking him up from preschool and stopping by on weeknights to lend a hand. Wilson also helps Church with her dog rescue business, Good Karma Rescue, and they talk multiple times a day. “She’s just in the fold,” Church said. And though Leo’s family relocated to Essex this past summer, “the bond is still there,” Church said. Leo “tears up often when we talk about our old home and of course, Kitty, and has visited her as often as he can.” Kids VT: How did you meet? Leo: I don’t know. Mama, do you remember? We both lived on County Road for… how long?  Ten years! Kitty: Right. Well, you lived there for five and a half years.  I can still remember your mama coming out for the first time with you after you were born, and I thought, Oh, wow! You were the most beautiful little baby. I am a total sucker for babies anyway, but Leo was just so beautiful, with these huge blue eyes!

KIDS VT

KVT: One last question. How old are you both? Leo: 6. Kitty: I’m 67, I’ll be 68 soon. Leo: 67, then 68, then 69 and then 30! Kitty: Sounds good to me!

FEBRUARY 2018

KVT: What’s a memorable time you had together? Kitty: Remember the apples? And the red wagon? It was a heavy-duty apple year so I got out my red wagon; remember that? All the neighbors on County Road have apples, and it was a really bountiful year, so we just piled them up around Leo!  I think Leo’s mom made enough applesauce to feed the family for years. Also, when your sister was born, you stayed with me; remember that? And when we went to see your sister for the first time in the hospital, we

KVT: What do you like most about each other? Kitty: He’s funny, and he’s kind, and he has a milliondollar smile. And he still has those same big blue eyes he had the first time I saw him. Leo: (with a sticky pad and a marker) Kitty, how do you write your name? I want to write our names. For the paper.

-KITTY

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KVT: What makes your friendship special? Kitty: I just love spending time with him. I’d be driving home in the evening, and my car would just sort of keep going past my driveway, and I’d go up to their place so I could see Leo. Leo: She makes me grilled cheese. Kitty: I did get a phone message from Leo’s dad once because Leo wanted me to know that my grilled cheeses were much better than his dad’s!

looked at her, and she was so tiny under the warming light. She was waving a tiny hand around and, Leo, do you remember what you said? Leo: What? Kitty: You said, “When is she gonna be born?” Leo: giggles hysterically

I am a total sucker for babies anyway, but Leo was just so beautiful, with these huge blue eyes!

19 FRIENDS FOREVER, P. 20»


Friends Forever CONTINUED FROM P. 19

Desmond, 9, Colchester; Anderson, 9, Maxwell, 7, and Reeves, 5, Hinesburg

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2018

KIDSVT.COM

Laura Howard and Dana Sehovic met 15 years ago at work, before they had husbands and kids. In fact, Sehovic met her husband at Howard’s wedding; he was a friend of the groom. When the women ended up pregnant with boys at the same time, they said they just knew their kids would have a connection. Both 9 years old now, Howard’s son, Anderson, and Sehovic’s son, Desmond, have grown up together. Howard describes their bond as “brotherly.” When Howard welcomed two more sons to her family, they also became like siblings to Desmond, an only child. Said Howard, “You could say that these boys are connected through a kinship between our families that was founded long before they were born.”

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Kids VT: How did you meet? Desmond: Well, Anderson’s parents were good friends with my parents, and that’s how we first met. We knew each other since we were babies. Anderson: And then my brothers got born, so they were just part of it. Desmond: And then every time Anderson and I were playing, they’d just say, OK, they’re playing, so we’ll just kind of cruise in there. Anderson: Yeah, Max and Reeves are always there. Desmond: Sometimes me and Anderson lock the door on them. Reeves: But we always find a way to get in. KVT: What can you tell me about each other? Desmond: We pretty much like a lot of the same stuff. Anderson: Desmond’s funny. And we’re both in the same grade, even though we’re not in the same school. Desmond: And Anderson is weird. Maxwell and Reeves: (laughing) He is weird!! Anderson: We live in different towns, so we see each other only like two times a month.

Reeves: Anderson likes football and baseball, and he calls me Squeak-o! Maxwell: Desmond is really nice. But he also likes to drag me on the floor!

Desmond doesn’t have brothers, so we’re his brothers.

KVT: What’s a memorable time you had together? Anderson: We did the Adventure Games together. Desmond: Yeah, it’s like a race with this series of challenges, and you have to complete them as fast as you can. Like one where you shoot water balloons at people.

Reeves: You have to jump on these rafts over a river! Anderson: And you have to bike uphill for two miles! Desmond: Also, -REEVES we went to Cape Cod together, and we hiked a lot together. That was fun. Maxwell: And we, like, all hung out and... just sat together. (There is a moment of quiet as they all consider this.) Desmond: We sat together?! (Laughing) Maxwell, that is lame!

KVT: What makes your friendship unique? Desmond: Well, we do a lot of things together. Like sleepovers. Anderson: If I go to Desmond’s house, everybody goes. Reeves: It’s great when Desmond comes to our house. Maxwell: Yeah, he’s like part of our family. And even when we don’t see each other for a long time, when we do see each other, it’s like no time has passed. Reeves: Yeah, he doesn’t have brothers, so we’re his brothers.


Me and Cora, we fight like sisters and then five minutes later we’re good again.

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Emma and Cora met in dance class at age 2, but didn’t become close friends until they were 4. Now they spend almost every day of the week together, practicing jazz, ballet and lyrical dance at Dance Works Academy in Milton. Emma has type 1 diabetes, and Cora knows the ins and outs of helping her manage her condition. “Cora knows how to check Emma’s blood sugar, recognize when she has low or high blood sugar, and is there to support and help her whenever is needed,” Emma’s mother, Jenn Foster explained. “Cora accepts Emma for exactly who she is, and is patient with all she endures.” Kids VT: What makes your friendship special? Emma: We dance together — a lot. Cora: We have class together Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Sunday. Emma: Also, I think some friends, if they get into an argument, they stay in that argument for a week or two. But me and Cora, we fight like sisters and then, five minutes later, we’re good again.

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preschool •-•6th grade holistic approach ••

financial aid available ••

williston Emma: We said yes, and then they gave us wristbands so we could go to this place called the Drop Zone right by the stage. And we were so close, we could reach up and touch Katy Perry!

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Outstanding Academics • Inspired Learning • Project-based Learning • Individual Learning Goals • Literacy & Math • STEM • Global Studies • Digital Literacy • Art • Music • Spanish • PE

Join us for Upcoming Events

Winter Open House • February 11 @ 3 p.m. Kindergarten Visiting Morning • February 15 @ 9 a.m. (Pre-registration required)

Visit our website vtdayschool.org for more information. Email: info@vtdayschool.org. Phone: 495-5150 • 6701 Shelburne Road, Shelburne k4t-vermontdayschool0218.indd 1

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KIDS VT

KVT: How does Cora help with your diabetes, Emma? Emma: With diabetes, I need to check my blood-sugar level and skip the last 10 minutes of lunch to go to the nurse. I have to count my carbs. When [my blood sugar is] high, I get thirsty and tired, and when [it’s] low, I get hungry and sassy. Cora: I’ll go on her [insulin] pump, and she’ll tell me what to do to help figure out her carbs. Emma: Our school has a Kids Walk, and last year during it, I got really low and had to sit. Cora went to get my kit and got me a juice. Jenn (Emma’s mom): Cora knew what Emma needed and sprung right into action and then just stayed with her. It was amazing. And Cora was just like, “What’s the big deal? I just got her what she needed!” But to a mom, it was really special to see their friendship in action like that. 

and r ring Tou lling fo 8 Enro 017-1 r 2 a e e h t ol y o h c s

FEBRUARY 2018

KVT: Tell me about an adventure you had together. Cora: Well, we went to see Katy Perry together over the summer. Emma: We were going to get T-shirts. Cora: Right. And we saw these two people, and they asked us if we loved Katy Perry, and we said yes. And they asked us if we had good seats. And we said yes. But then they asked us if we wanted even better seats.

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KIDSVT.COM

KVT: What do you like best about your friend? Emma: She’s really funny and kind, and she’s easy to talk to. Cora: She’s funny, and I can just be normal around her. I don’t have to act nice! I mean, you know, I don’t have to act like there’s a teacher around me when we’re together.

for entire family … babies, kids, mom & dad

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Solo Act

At Champlain College, a long-running program helps single parents defy the odds BY GRACE PER LEE

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2018

KIDSVT.COM

I

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ILLUSTRATIONS BY ROB DONNELLY

n 2016, Emma Longe was working long hours cutting hair to support her daughter, Kayleigh, then 4. With another baby on the way, she hoped to find a more lucrative career with a better schedule, so she could spend more time with her children, but that would mean going back to college. After graduating from Burlington High School, Longe attended community college briefly, but dropped out at age 19, when Kayleigh was born. Through friends, she learned about an unusual initiative at Champlain College designed specifically for students like her. The Burlington school’s Single Parents Program — one of only 11 such programs in the country, according to the program’s case manager, Hilary Watson — helps pave the way for single moms and dads who want to earn a college degree. It provides them with free tuition, a case manager, tutoring and access to funds to help cover unexpected expenses. Longe enrolled and is now in her fourth semester, majoring in accounting and minoring in event management. Each weekday, she wakes before sunrise to get herself and her kids ready, shuttling them across Chittenden County to

1-year-old Carson’s childcare, three towns over. Then, she drives back to Burlington to drop Kayleigh off at kindergarten and head to campus. For the next seven hours, she’s either attending classes at Champlain or working as a paid accounting intern for Housing Vermont, where she spends 10 hours a week. From 4:30 to 5:30 p.m., she’s picking up her children and driving them home for dinner. “I’m really into my Crock-Pot these days,” Longe said, with a laugh. The children are bathed and in bed by 7:30 p.m., then Longe puts on her student hat again, often studying until midnight. Longe is part of a growing demographic — in fact single parents are one of the fastest growing segments in higher education. The rate of single parents enrolling in college more than doubled between 1999-2000 and 2011-2012, according to the Institute for Women’s Policy Research (IWPR). That mirrors a spike in single-parent households nationally over the last five decades. According to the United States Census Bureau, from 1960 to 2016, the percentage of children living with only their mother nearly tripled from 8 to 23 percent, and the percentage of children living with just their father rose from 1 to 4 percent. In Vermont, Census Bureau estimates show that 33,800 kids — 29 percent — were living in single-parent households in 2016. But for single-parent students like Longe, national drop-out rates are high: Only 28 percent of single mothers who entered college between 2003 and 2009 earned a degree or certificate within six years, according to the IWPR. Holden Thorp, provost at Washington University in St. Louis and co-author of the forthcoming book, Our Higher


Calling: Rebuilding the Partnership Between America and Its Colleges and Universities, told Slate in September 2017 that beginning a degree but not finishing it is “the worst thing that can happen to a student in higher education.” Not only have they likely taken time out of the workforce and away from their families, many of these students are now burdened with the debt of a college education, without any of the benefit. “If you don’t finish, you’re better off not going at all.”

Just

28%

HOW IT ALL BEGAN Champlain’s Single Parents Program helps defy such staggering odds. Launched 30 years ago, under the leadership of Gov. Madeleine Kunin,

8% >> 23% and the percentage of children living with just their father rose from

1

% >>

4

%**

In Vermont

29%

of kids were living in single-parent households in 2016** *Source: Institute for Women’s Policy Research **Source: U.S. Census Bureau

KIDS VT

SOLO ACT, P. 24 »

In the U.S. from 1960 to 2016, the percentage of children living with only their mother rose from

FEBRUARY 2018

In a speech to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the Single Parents Program, Morse elaborated on their rationale. “Sallie and I were motivated by the devastating reality that the poorest segment of Vermont’s population was single women with children under 6 years old. Also, one of the most important factors in determining a child’s success is the education level of the mother,” Morse said. “Many of these women had a desire to work, but often got caught in the revolving door of the social welfare department.” Tapping resources in their agencies, the pair started the Reach Up program, which is still in existence. It provides services, case management and funds to help parents gain job skills and find work so they can better support their

KIDSVT.COM

it boasts an 88 percent graduation rate and has 650 graduates to date, about 90 percent of whom are women. The program was started in 1987, after Kunin tasked Gretchen Morse, then Vermont’s secretary of Human Services, and Sallie Soule, then head of the state’s Department of Employment and Training (now the Department of Labor), to help women move out of the cycle of poverty. Backed by research that showed that young women living in poverty lacked the supports to stay in jobs, Morse and Soule looked to find a solution.

of single mothers who entered college between 2003 and 2009 earned a degree or certificate within six years*

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G Think Outside

now enrolling for K-8 for 18-19 and vacation camps

y Observation mornings

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feb. 8 & feb. 22

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KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2018

CONTINUED FROM P. 23

children. Soule and Morse also set up a meeting with Champlain to try to persuade the college to create a program for single parents. Because of Champlain’s small size and focus on career readiness, Morse recounted, they thought the college would be a good fit. The college agreed. Over the years, government funding for the program has dried up. But, Morse said, “the early success of the single parents themselves, and the basic concept of the program were solid enough to keep it going.” In 2016, the program costs the school $545,000. Nearly 86% of that was covered through grants from private foundations and donations.

She loves knowing that Mommy has to go to school, too, and that

the reason we go to school is so that we can learn and one day have a good job that we enjoy.

Kids have questions. We find answers.

KIDS VT

Solo Act

EMMA LONGE

A podcast for curious kids.

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Program case manager Watson said she regularly fields calls from prospective students around the country who’ve heard about the program. Native Vermonters often enroll after spending time in other states. “Our students know that their end goal is their degree and their job that is going to bring them meaning and fulfillment and stability, and joy in their life for themselves and their families,” Watson said. “Our students are so dedicated — they have no shortage of reasons to work really hard.”

A TAILOR-MADE EXPERIENCE Applicants to Champlain’s Single Parents Program must have already been accepted to the college through the regular application process and applied for and received government-funded Pell Grants, which — unlike loans — don’t need to be repaid. After that, the college covers their remaining tuition — roughly $27,348 per student, per year. The number of students in the program varies from year to year; currently 32 are enrolled. The on-campus financial aid center helps students find lenders to get low-interest student loans to help cover living expenses and childcare costs. Last year, the Stiller Family Foundation gave the program a grant to repay all of those loans for current students. The college has also established a “Save the Day” fund to help single-parent students with unexpected expenses. Recent graduate John Quinlan benefited from the fund when he was enrolled in the program, after his family lost everything in an apartment fire. “Homeless, down, and out — they were there to help with financial gift cards to grocery stores, gas cards, etcetera,” he said.  “It was a huge help.” Support is more than financial. Each single-parent student is matched with a case manager who helps them create and carry out an educational plan, adjusting it along the way as necessary. Students also have access to free tutoring and career advisement. Professors provide extended, flexible office hours to students with childcare and school pick-up constraints and have even allowed students to participate in class via Skype when they are home with sick children. Quinlan said that the academic tutoring he received in the program helped more than his grades. It kept him going. “Without the assistance, it could have affected not only my grades — it would have been an impact on my overall morale moving forward,” he explained.


The Vermont Cub Project

A COMMUNITY OF PEERS AND ADVOCATES Champlain offers several events that foster a sense of community among program participants. They start with a private orientation to give incoming single-parent students a chance to meet each other, as well as academic and financial advisors and technical support staff. Monthly drop-in lunch socials give students an opportunity to speak with case managers, get help with homework and connect with each other. Quinlan spoke highly of these gatherings. “They added some very desired personal touch to the program,” he said. “The group was always upbeat and extremely supportive.” Once a year, the highly anticipated holiday party brings students and their families together to celebrate the year’s achievements, complete with presents for the children collected from faculty and the greater Burlington community. Through the college’s holiday sponsorship program, additional anonymous donors purchase gifts for students and their families. “This program truly transforms what can be a stressful time of the year into a magical one for our students and their kids,” Watson said.

THE RIPPLE EFFECT

Visit VermontTeddyBear.com/cub-project to register!

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WE’RE HERE FOR YOU, EVERY STEP OF THE WAY. WIC provides healthy food, nutrition education, and personalized support to pregnant women, moms and their babies, and kids up to five years old. Come meet with our nutritionists and peer counselors – they’re ready to listen and share information. If you’re a family of four with a household income up to $3793/month, or your child is covered by Dr. Dynasaur then WIC is for you. Income guidelines vary based on family size.

This institution is an equal opportunity provider. Untitled-7 1

KIDS VT

Sign up for WIC today! Call 8OO-649-4357 or visit healthvermont.gov/wic

FEBRUARY 2018

Champlain has made to single parents has created a brighter future for many. It “has made a remarkable difference in the lives of so many women that we have worked with,” she wrote. Nadia Mitchell is proof of the program’s success. Mitchell, Champlain’s associate director of admissions and adjunct professor of event management, is the daughter of an early Single Parents Program graduate. Her mother, Adline Robertson, received a business degree from Champlain in the early ’90s, while raising three children and caring for her ailing mother. She went on to earn a master’s degree in public administration from the University of Vermont and worked for many years at local nonprofits, including United Way and the Chittenden Emergency Food Shelf. “My mom has been able to accomplish so much, I really can never come up with an excuse about anything,” said Mitchell, a mother of two. “She just took on everything: within the community, her home, her family, all while completing a degree and doing what she needed to do for herself. That’s the legacy that I’m following.” K

Through this project, every Vermonter four years of age can come to our Bear Shop in Shelburne and pick up a FREE best friend (up to $39.99). Come be a part of this great new program today!

KIDSVT.COM

Accessible quality education doesn’t just help the parents who earn degrees. It benefits their children. “A mother’s college attendance has a significant effect on a number of child educational outcomes, including vocabulary, reading and math scores, and college attendance,” reports the IWPR. Longe is proud of the example she’s setting for her now-5-year-old daughter, Kayleigh. “She loves knowing that Mommy has to go to school, too,” Longe said, “and that the reason we go to school is so that we can learn and one day have a good job that we enjoy.” Barbara Rachelson, executive director of family-support agency Lund, said the commitment

Champlain’s Single Parents Program is one of just 11 similar programs in the country. It has an 88% graduation rate and 650 graduates to date.

Vermont Teddy Bears are more than fur & stuffing. Everyday we see Bears come to life in the arms of children, and we knew we needed to share this love with our fellow Vermonters. This is why we created The Vermont Cub Project.

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V E R M O N T

&

B E Y O N D

26

YMCA Camp Abnaki in North Hero

MATTHEW THORSEN

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2018

KIDSVT.COM

E X P L O R E


D Vermont Ballet Theater School Center for Dance presents Celebration of Dance 2018

Classes & Camps

Our annual showcase of talent from ages 4 through pre-professional will dance their way onto the Flynn Main Stage in Burlington for 2 exciting performances,

• Week-long ballet themed camps for ages 3-9; Cinderella, Sleeping Beauty, Nutcracker and more!

Saturday May 26, 2018 at 1:00 & 6:30 pm. For show & ticket information visit www.vbts.org.

2018 SUMMER

• Week-long ballet Mini-Intensive for ages 12-18, for the serious dancer looking to stay in shape for various summer-long intensives

Lego Engineering, Robotic Programming, Stop Motion Animation, Minecraft

• Weekly ballet classes for young dancers - adults - beginner - advanced • Ongoing yoga and fitness classes for adults

VBT Summer Intensive 2018 Auditions Sat. March 10th for ages 8 & up. Visit website or call for details! This summer come dance with the best at VBTS! For schedule and enrollment information, visit us at WWW.VBTS.ORG, or call 878-2941, or email INFO@VBTS.ORG k4t-VBTS-0218.indd 1

Lake Champlain Maritime Museum's Lake Adventure Camps: 8 weeks of fun for kids in grades 2-12. Adventures of all sorts in and around Lake Champlain.

1/17/18 10:29 AM

Guess who's going to Lake Adventure Camp!

CAMP GUIDE 2018

But word is getting out!

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Lake Adventure Camps are this summer's best kept secret.

1/24/18 10:57 AM

www.LetGoYourMind.com

KIDSVT.COM

Shuttle stops in Burlington, Shelburne, Vergennes and Middlebury. Learn more and register today at camps.lcmm.org!

FEBRUARY 2018

Vergennes, Vermont - (802) 475-2022 x105

KIDS VT

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BEST. SUMMER. EVER.

CAMP ABNAKI • Overnight camp for boys that have completed grades 1-10 • 100 years on North Hero’s shores • Archery, sailing, camp fires, more • Learn skills, build confidence, have fun!

Y Summer Camps

• Boys and girls ages 5 - 16 • Burlington, Essex, Fairfax, Ferrisburgh, Georgia, North Hero, Underhill, Waterbury

gbymca.org/camp

campabnaki.org

The Y’s Community Partner

The Y’s Community Partner

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For kids are wild about animals For kidswild who are wild about animals! For kidswho who are about animals! Kids Ages 5-7: $195

Kids Ages 8-9: $390

Animal Adventures (ages 7-9) Week 1: Adventures Monday - Friday, July 9 -still 13 available! Week 3: Monday - Friday, July 23 - 27 Animal (ages 7-9) Afternoons only Session One: 8:30AM - 12:30PM Session Three: 9AM - 3PM July 13-17 ● July 20-24

TM

Afternoons only still available! Week 2: Monday - Friday, July 16 - 20 Summer Safari (ages 10-12) JulySession 13-17 ●Two: July8:30AM 20-24 - 12:30PM

Week 4: Monday - Friday, July 30 - August 3

Full-day camp: A few slots available Session Four: 9AM - 3PM July 27– July 31● Aug 3-7 ● Aug.10-14

CAMP GUIDE 2018

Summer Safari (ages 10-12)

WEEKLY SUMMER CAMPS

June 18-August 3, 2018 Entering K-6th Grades, UVM Athletic Complex

Register: (802) 862-0135 x 12

Kids Ages 10-12: $390 Full-day camp: A few Or slots available visit chittendenhumane.org. Week 5: Monday - Friday, July 27– July 31● Aug 3-7 ● Aug.10-14

Before & after care hours are available. Scholarships funded by Redducs Foundation

Before & after care hours are August 6 - 10 available. Five: 9 AM - 3 PM Register: (802) 862-0135 x Session 12 Scholarships funded by Week 6: Monday - Friday, Or visit chittendenhumane.org. Redducs Foundation August 13 - 17 Session Six: 9 AM - 3 PM

Register online NOW! go.uvm.edu/summercamp 1/22/18 9:37 AM

FEBRUARY 2018

KIDSVT.COM

k6h-HumaneSociety0218.indd 1

STARTING JUNE 18

KIDS VT

FOR AGES 6-18 • OPENINGS STILL AVAILABLE

SPONSORED BY TM

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Green Mountain Youth Symphony

Green Mountain Conservation Camp

Talent Development

Institute

Creative Arts & Music Program

JOHNSON STATE COLLEGE

August 5-11 @ Northern Vermont University- Johnson

Early bird discount until March 10

This Summer Let Nature Nurture...

June 24-30 &/or July 1-7, 2018 Serving advanced and gifted students entering grades 4-9 for 21 years!

802-658-9941 LUCY@TDIVERMONT.ORG

leah@gmys-vt.org • www.gmys-vt.org

New Village Farm Camps

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April Vacation Camp Farm & Garden Ages 5-11 CIT & Crew

Canoeing, fishing, archery, campfires and s’mores. What a great way to spend a week this summer. Discover Vermont’s wildlife and master outdoor skills. Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department offers one-week sessions for girls and boys, ages 12 to 14. Sessions run from June through August at two beautiful lake-side locations.

Ages 12+

www.NewVillageFarm.com Shelburne, VT

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Summer Design

Cyber Security and Cyber Defense Camp

Bring your ideas to life in a week-long design program at the only NAAB accredited architecture school in Northern New England!

Learn about information security, digital forensics, online protection and how to defend against cyber attacks.

• Learn, explore, and experiment as you study architecture with your peers and faculty mentors.

• An intensive introduction to data security and cyber forensics. • Hands-on exercises in a cyber security “War Room.” • An outdoor cyber treasure hunt with rogue WiFi hotspots. • Cyber table-top exercises in real world locations where you combat cyber attacks; surprise cyber forensic Center of Academic Excellence challenges with prizes. in Information

• Studio, seminar, and hands-on learning to improve your design-build skills and enhance your portfolio. • Workshops, lectures, demonstrations and off-campus field trips plus extracurricular activities. • Open to all junior and senior students effective Fall 2018.

$875 per student

includes tuition, room and board expenses, studio supplies, and transportation for field trips.

FREE for all participants. Check online after March 1 for more info. profschools.norwich.edu/business/gen-cyber-camp/

158 Harmon Drive • Northfield, VT • k2h-Norwich0218 1

Assurance Education and

Center of Digital Forensics Excellence designated by the Department of Defense

Ranked #2

as the “Best School for Cybersecurity” in the U.S. by

www.norwich.edu 1/25/18 10:18 AM

KIDS VT

Application deadline: April 25, 2018. To apply, visit profschools.norwich.edu/architectureart/summer-camp-application/

GenCyber@NU is funded by a grant from the National Security Agency and National Science Foundation. Open to Fall 2018 juniors or seniors.

FEBRUARY 2018

July 2018

KIDSVT.COM

July 8 – 14, 2018

CAMP GUIDE 2018

Architecture + Art

NORWICH UNIVERSITY SUMMER CAMPS

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After care available from 3:30PM - 5:30PM Ages 3-7 Regal’s science-based summer camp is designed especially for children ages 3-7 years old! Daily activities will center/focus around sensory play and science experiments. 2 Day, 3 Day & 5 Day options

JUNE 25 - AUGUST 24, 2018

2 CORPORATE DRIVE ESSEX, VT

DISCOVERY ADVENTURE CAMP

Cedar Circle Farm

JUNE 25 - AUGUST 24, 2018

EAST THETFORD, VERMONT

SUMMER DAY CAMP!

kids ages 6–11

6 week-long sessions in

July & August

learn on the farm & dig in to fun!

P SIGN U ! E ONLIN

1/25/18 10:22 AM

CAMP GUIDE 2018

Camps

2 CORPORATE DRIVE ESSEX, VT

Vermont Ninja Warrior Camp Instructional Gymnastics Camp

DISCOVERY ADVENTURE CAMP

Visit GreenMountainTrainingCenter.com for more information

ages Swinging, 3-7 yearsClimbing, old! Daily activities will center/focus around sensory play Hanging, Leaping, Balancing and OBSTACLES !!! and science experiments. 2 Day, 3 Day & 5 Day options

Vermont Ninja Warrior Camp

802-655-3300

Instructional Gymnastics Camp Vermont Ninja Warrior Camp WWW.REGALGYM.COM JUNE 25-AUG 24 8AM-3:30PM JUNE 25-AUG 24 8:30AM-3:30PM

Every day of fun-filled camp includes: After care available from 3:30PM - 5:30PM k4t-RegalGym0218.indd• 11 hour 1/25/18 After available from 3:30PM - 5:30PM ofcare instructional gymnastics Ages 6-14 Ages or 10+, see weekly detail • Open gym7+ time Come experience all thatgames Regal has to offer! Our full-day camp includes Cooperative Swinging,•meeting, Climbing, Hanging, Leaping,daily Balancing and OBSTACLES !!! morning group warm-ups, instructed gymnastics, open • Outdoor explorations & play gym, daily challenges, cooperative games, outdoor activities including • Theme-based experiments, crafts activities water slides and arts & crafts. Children willstories, showcase their & skills in an • Nutritious and snacks provided end of week gymnasticslunch exhibition!

802-655-3300

WWW.REGALGYM.COM

Visit us at the Kids VT Camp Fair in February!

11:08 AM

802-655-3300

Instructional Gymnastics Camp WWW.REGALGYM.COM 260 Avenue D, Suite 30 • Williston (off Industrial Ave.) • 802-652-2454 k6h-GMTC0218.indd 1

Night Eagle Wilderness Adventures

1/24/18 10:38 AM

260 Avenue D, Suite 30 • Williston (off Industrial Ave.) • 802-652-2454

JUNE 25-AUG 24 8:30AM-3:30PM

After care available from 3:30PM - 5:30PM After care available from 3:30PM - 5:30PM Ages 6-14 Ages 7+ or 10+, see weekly detail

Come experience all that Regal has toBalancing offer! Our full-day camp Swinging, Climbing, Hanging, Leaping, and OBSTACLES !!! includes morning meeting, group warm-ups, daily instructed gymnastics, open gym, daily challenges, cooperative games, outdoor activities including water slides and arts & crafts. Children will showcase their skills in an end of week gymnastics exhibition!

WWW.REGALGYM.COM

tipi living ▲ nature crafts canoeing ▲ backpacking ▲ wilderness skills ▲ tracking atlatls ▲ ’hawk throwing swimming ▲ archery ▲ hiking ▲ cooperative work & play ▲ and much more! ▲ ▲

Vermont Ninja Warrior Camp JUNE 25-AUG 24 8:30AM-3:30PM

OPENINGS AVAILABLE IN:

After care available from 3:30PM - 5:30PM Ages 7+ or 10+, see weekly detail

June 8-10 Adult Camp: Age 21+ Swinging, Climbing, Hanging, Leaping, Balancing and OBSTACLES !!! June 23 Intro: Age 5-11 June 16-17 Smirklings: Age 6-11 June 24-29 Session I: Age 8-16 July 1-6 Session II: Age 8-16 July 8-20 Session III: Age 8-16

802-655-3300

Call for a full brochure:

((802) 802) 773-7866 446-6100

WWW.REGALGYM.COM www.smirkus.org

www.nighteaglewilderness.com k6h-NightEagle0218.indd 1

Vermont Ninja Warrior Camp JUNE 25-AUG 24 8AM-3:30PM

An unforgettable circus camp experience 802-655-3300 for kids of all ages and skill levels.

A unique summer camp for boys, ages 10-14, in the heart of Vermont’s Green Mountains

FEBRUARY 2018

KIDSVT.COM

After care available from 3:30PM - 5:30PM • 1 hour instructional gymnastics JUNEof25-AUG 24 8AM-3:30PM • Open gym time Ages 3-7 care available from 3:30PMespecially - 5:30PM Regal’s science-based summer camp is designed for children • After Cooperative games ages 3-7 years old! Daily activities will center/focus around sensory play • Outdoor explorations & 6-14 play Ages and science•experiments. Day, 3 Day &stories, 5 Day options Theme-based2experiments, crafts & activities Come experience all thatlunch Regaland hassnacks to offer! Our full-day camp includes • Nutritious provided Every day of fun-filled camp morning meeting, group warm-ups, daily instructed gymnastics, open gym,includes: daily challenges, outdoor activities including • 1 hour cooperative of instructionalgames, gymnastics water slides and arts & crafts. • Open gym time Children will showcase their skills in an JUNE exhibition! 25-AUG end of week gymnastics • Cooperative games 24 8AM-3:30PM After care available from 3:30PM - 5:30PM • Outdoor explorations & play JUNE 25-AUG 8AM-3:30PM • Theme-based experiments, stories, crafts & activities Ages24 6-14 After carelunch available 3:30PM - 5:30PM • Nutritious and from snacks provided Come experience all that RegalAges has to3-7 offer! Our full-day camp includes morning meeting, group warm-ups, daily instructed gymnastics, open Regal’s science-based summer camp is designed especially children gym, daily challenges, cooperative games, outdoor activitiesfor including ages 3-7 years old! Daily activities will 8:30AM-3:30PM center/focus around sensory play water slides and arts & crafts. Children will showcase their skills in an JUNE 25-AUG 24 and of science 2 Day, 3 Day & 5 Day options JUNE 25-AUG 24 8AM-3:30PM end weekexperiments. gymnastics exhibition! After care available from 3:30PM - 5:30PM After care available from 3:30PM - 5:30PM Every day ofAges fun-filled 7+camp or 10+, Agessee 6-14weekly detail includes: • 1 hour of instructional gymnastics Swinging, Hanging, Leaping, Balancing and OBSTACLES ComeClimbing, experience all that Regal has24 to offer! Our full-day camp includes !!! JUNE 25-AUG 8AM-3:30PM • Opengroup gym time morning meeting, warm-ups, daily instructed gymnastics, open After care available from 3:30PM 5:30PM • Cooperative games gym, daily challenges, cooperative24 games, outdoor activities including JUNE 25-AUG 8:30AM-3:30PM Outdoor & play Ages 3-7 water slides•and arts care &explorations crafts. Children will showcase their skills in an After available from 3:30PM Theme-based experiments, stories,- 5:30PM crafts & activities endscience-based of week• gymnastics exhibition! Regal’s summer camp is designed especially for children Ages 7+ or 10+, see weekly detail • Nutritious lunch and snacks provided

GYMNASTICS, FREESTYLE, PARKOUR, AND NINJA WARRIOR

FREESTYLE, PARKOUR AND NINJA WARRIOR TRAINING!

KIDS VT

SUMMER

DISCOVERY ADVENTURE CAMP

CEDARCIRCLEFARM.ORG • 802.785.4737 eric@cedarcirclefarm.org • EAST THETFORD, VT k6h-CedarCircleFarm0218 1

egal

and science experiments. 2 Day, 3 Day & 5 Day options DISCOVER Y ADVENTURE CAMP Every day of fun-filled JUNE camp 25-AUGGymnastics 24 8AM-3:30PM Instructional 2includes: CORPORATE DRIVE ESSEX, Camp VT

Instructional Gymnastics Camp

Our small camp community works and plays together, learning about organic agriculture and the natural world.

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Every day of fun-filled camp includes: • 1 hour of instructional gymnastics • Open gym 25-AUG time JUNE 24 8AM-3:30PM • Cooperative After care games available from 3:30PM - 5:30PM • Outdoor explorations play Ages&3-7 • Theme-based experiments, stories, crafts for & activities Regal’s science-based summer camp is designed especially children Nutritious lunch andwill snacks provided ages 3-7•years old! Daily activities center/focus around sensory play

12/14/17 10:50 AM

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MMMUSD CESU

Summer Camps Mt. Bike, Kayak, Hike, Swim, Rock Climb, and more!

Are you looking for an exciting outdoor adventure opportunity for your children (6-14 years old) this summer? MMMUSD Summer Camps were designed with that focus in mind.  Our camps provide high quality camp experiences that begin/end each day locally in Richmond and Jericho to make access to camps as easy as possible for families. During your child’s camp experience he or she will get to explore some of the many outdoor treasures that Vermont has to offer. We will take scenic bike rides, kayak, hike, swim, paddle board, and explore nature in many of the most beautiful destinations in the state.

2018 Camp Schedule Week #1 February 26th-March 22nd

Week #5 July 16th-20th

Week #2 June 18th-22nd

Week #6 July 30th-August 3rd

Week #3 June 25th-29th

Week #7 August 6th-10th

Week #4 July 9th-13th

Week #8 August 13th-17th

(Ski & Snowboard Camp)

(Bike Camp Level 1, Circus Camp JES) (Bike Camp Level 2) (Outdoor Adventure Camp)

(Water Adventure Camp) (Bike Camp Level 1) (Bike Camp Level 2) (Outdoor Adventure Camp, All-Sports Camp JES)

Camp Hours: 8:00am-4:00pm (Exstended Hours Available) Location: RES & JES (Richmond and Jericho Elementary Schools) Cost: $300 per Camper per week Register: vtoutdooradventures.com Questions: brian.godfrey@cesuvt.org Limit of 30 Campers per week

(First come first serve, $100 deposit to reserve spot, checks made out to RES attn Sumer camp) k4t-MMMUSD0218.indd 1

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2018 LeAP! Learn and Play Summer Camp at Shelburne Museum

CAMP GUIDE 2018

June 25–29 The Vermonter’s Way Ages 9–11

KIDSVT.COM

July 2–6 and 9–13 Art Adventurers Ages 4–6 July 16–20 Wild Wild West Ages 7–10

FEBRUARY 2018

July 23–27 Learn to Sew–In the Kitchen Ages 8–11 July 30–August ––August 3 Learn to Sew–Totes Ages 10–12

KIDS VT

August 14–18 Quilt Camp Ages 8–12 Online registration at shelburnemuseum.org/camps.

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Young Rembrandts After school Art Enrichment Drawing Classes for K-6 Young Rembrandts teaches drawing skills using a see-touch-do method that all children can succeed with, learn from and love! Students Can Expect - A new exciting lesson every week - Improved core art skills - To have fun! Parents Can Expect - Increased attention to detail - Improved fine motor skills

To learn more or to find a class in your area, link to:

YOUNGREMBRANDTS.COM

No afterschool drawing classes at your school or in your community? Find out how easy it is to bring our awardwinning, educational, kid-friendly focused program to your location. Contact your local program director, Michelle Kessler at 802.363.7522 or michelle.kessler@youngrembrandts.com

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REGISTER FOR NEW VILLAGE FARM SUMMER CAMPS TODAY!

THIS WE E K Fiber Arts Week CAMP GUIDE 2018

Clay Week JUNE 18-22

Culinary Week Craft and Construct Week JULY 2-13

Marsh Week JULY 16-20

KIDSVT.COM

JULY 23-27

Clay Week

JULY 30 - AUGUST 3

Culinary Week AUGUST 6-10

Craft and Construct Week FEBRUARY 2018

This year’s summer camps are all about joy, curiosity and belonging: the joy of participating in the performing arts with friends new and old, the curiosity sparked when we try new things and visit new places, and the sense of belonging we build together while we dance, sing, act, make music videos and more — all building towards end-of-camp showcases, where we welcome our friends and families to celebrate our artistic, creative accomplishments.

JUNE 25-29

Fiber Arts Week

AUGUST 13-17

Marsh Week AUGUST 20-24

SELLING TICKETS? • Fundraisers • Festivals • Plays

WE CAN HELP!

KIDS VT

COMPILED BY ALISON NOVAK ILLUSTRATIONS BY HATIYE GARIP

-JESS HANDRIK, DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION, FLYNN CENTER FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS, BURLINGTON

JUNE 11-15

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What do you hope your campers will learn this summer?

• No cost to you • Local support

• Sports • Concerts

• Built-in promotion • Custom options

MADIE AHRENS 865-1020 ext. 10 tickets@sevendaysvt.com

SEVENDAYSTICKETS.COM

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1/25/18 12:30 PM

We have a lot of fun and exciting mountain bike activities to focus on this summer, but we are always adapting to our changing society, too. From a community perspective, we will pay more attention to camper respect — camper to camper, girl to boy, boy to girl, counselor to camper, camper to counselor, etc. Last summer, we added in some focus on trail protection and maintenance, and we will spend some more time in that area this summer. -TAG CARPENTER, OPERATIONS MANAGER, CATAMOUNT OUTDOOR FAMILY CENTER, WILLISTON

I hope our campers learn how to be themselves and explore new interests. -CHRISSY CARTER, OWNER/ DIRECTOR, CAMP BIRCH HILL, NEW DURHAM, NEW HAMPSHIRE

Of course, we would love campers to come away with an increased level of skill in gymnastics, water sports, archery, cooking, art, dance, woodworking, or whatever their focus and choice of activities will be. However, our first target is for all campers to be immersed in gaining confidence in themselves as independent young women and men, learning to be kind, to be brave, to care about others as well as themselves, learning about being a good friend and making camp friends, increasing leadership skills, and learning and caring about our environment and camping. -RUTH DUNKLEY MCGOWAN, OWNER/DIRECTOR, DUNKLEY’S GYMNASTICS CAMP, SOUTH HERO

Not only do we aim to provide children with memorymaking, friendshipgrowing and learningand-doing experiences but, overall, we hope our campers learn to love being Parks & Rec kids! -DIANA WOOD, MARKETING AND OUTREACH MANAGER, BURLINGTON PARKS, RECREATION & WATERFRONT, BURLINGTON

We hope that campers will learn the humane treatment of all types of animals and have a better understanding of the shelter world. -ERIN ALAMED, DIRECTOR OF VOLUNTEER AND COMMUNITY OUTREACH, CAMP PAW PAW (HUMANE SOCIETY OF CHITTENDEN COUNTY), SOUTH BURLINGTON

We wish for our campers to learn, through farm chores, guilds and games, the beauty and joy of participating in the living world around us. We hope to illuminate the connections between land, plants, animals and people that nurture and sustain healthy communities, through the magic and fun of summer on the farm. -ETHAN TISCHLER, DIRECTOR, CAMP BREAD & BUTTER (BREAD & BUTTER FARM), SHELBURNE

Camp brings out the best in people. It is a place where kids and staff can let their guard down and truly be themselves! It’s a place where a cabin of 12 kids enters the week as strangers and leaves as best friends. Our goal is that somewhere between canoeing in the middle of Branch Lake, testing your limits at the ropes course and sitting and having good conversation in the arts and crafts cabin, every camper learns how to find acceptance, new experiences and friendships that last a lifetime. JAYCI FOURNIER, ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, BANGOR YMCA WILDERNESS CENTER AT CAMP JORDAN, ELLSWORTH, MAINE


IMAGINE, INNOVATE, BE INSPIRED!

GRADES 3-6 | JULY 16-20 mansfieldcooperative.org/camp-spark.html

-EMILY SCHÄFER, DIRECTOR, CAMP STONEWALL, THOMPSON, CONNECTICUT

-ANDREA CIRABISI, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, FRIENDS OF CAMP LITTLE NOTCH, FORT ANN, NEW YORK

-JORDAN OLSON, STAFF MEMBER, UVM ADVENTURE DAY CAMP, BURLINGTON

We hope that each camper learns new skills, makes new friends, and embraces our character value traits of Caring, Honesty, Respect and Responsibility. Campers and staff spend their time at camp in a natural setting, without technology, where they develop a sense of belonging and a connection to the camp community, and experience practical ways to live our camp motto, “Help the Other Fellow.” -JON KUYPERS, DIRECTOR, YMCA CAMP ABNAKI, NORTH HERO

We hope all campers leave with a love of circus and a sense that they have found a safe place in which to express their authentic selves. Circus as an art form presents a multitude of ways in which children can explore their own creative ideas as well as offering physical challenges for all campers, from the reticent beginner to the advanced athlete. In this physically and emotionally safe environment, campers of all ages will be given the opportunity to thrive as individuals as they immerse themselves in the world of circus. -MARY BLOUIN AUFFERT, DIRECTOR, SMIRKUS CAMP (CIRCUS SMIRKUS), GREENSBORO

1/18/18 3:58 PM

Summer Day Camp for Adopted Children & Teens 2018 TWO ONE-WEEK SESSIONS

July 9-13 & July 16-20 Stowe High School in Stowe, Vermont With bus service from Burlington, Williston & Waterbury FOR AGES 7 – 17 Visit our website for registration forms and information: www.camp4me.org | info@camp4me.org

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1/22/18 3:34 PM

teen performing arts

camps with the best

of summer fun

BURLINGTON & EAST BURKE VERMONT FILMMAKING ACTING PHOTOGRAPHY DANCE MOUNTAIN BIKING MUSIC

WWW.SOCAPA.ORG Untitled-28 1

KIDS VT

We want campers to get outside, be curious and brave, try something new, be artistic and creative, try a new adventure, and make a new friend. We want them to learn they matter.

-BETH EVARTS, PR/ COMMUNICATIONS SPECIALIST, GIRL SCOUTS OF THE GREEN AND WHITE MOUNTAINS

k16-MansfieldCoop0218.indd 1

FEBRUARY 2018

AMY CHAMBERS, DIRECTOR, CAMP FOR ME, STOWE

This summer, campers will have a well-rounded experience. Campers will swim, go on adventures in Burlington, partake in arts and crafts, and learn new sports and games. We offer a variety of different clubs throughout the summer, which are selected by counselors based on the interest of the campers. Kiddos will work together to earn different awards throughout the week like the famous “Sweepy Cat” award, which is given to the group that demonstrates being most tidy and clean throughout the week.

KIDSVT.COM

I hope kids will learn that there are others who share adoption stories as well, and they aren’t alone. We’ll also learn lots of fun games in the woods, how to play GaGa Ball and what makes the best Slip ’n Slide.

Campers will develop their leadership skills in a girl-only community through our girlled camp activities where campers can choose their adventure and try new things, explore the great outdoors, make awesome new friends, and enjoy camp activities, such as outdoor cooking, boating, archery, horseback riding, learning survival skills, discovering nature, swimming, kayaking and so much more! You don’t have to be a previous Girl Scout to come to camp!

CAMP GUIDE 2018

We hope our campers learn that the “coolest” thing you can be is yourself. With opportunities to choose from among 50 activities per day and with daily contact with family at home, our kids deliberately test and shape their identities. They try new things, find new passions and maybe even experience some “safe” failures. Fostering a unique combination of independence and comfort among all our kids — especially those new to us — is what we do best. And we hope every child can finish their camp experience proud of who they found themselves to be, looking forward to sharing that same open, awesome side of themselves with their camp and beyond-camp families.

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SUMMER ON THE LAKE

Fun Starts June 25th

2018 Sailing, Paddling & More Scholarships Available

commmunitysailingcenter.org

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Nature games, sharing stories, earth crafts, singing, fire skills, wood carving, wild edibles, and more! Goddard College Campus, Plainfield, VT

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GET READY FOR SUMMER! Sign Up for Camps & Recreation Programs Cabin life promotes community and team work

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2018

KIDSVT.COM

CAMP GUIDE 2018

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All-elective program encourages self-confidence and decision making.

Campers at Betsy Cox and Sangamon have real independence. They make ALL their own choices every activity period, every day.

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2018

WINDSURFING

CAMP

WND&WVS is offering weekly half-day windsurfing camps from Jun 18th through Aug 24th at our brand new BURLINGTON SURF CLUB location. The camp runs from 8:45 am to 1:45 pm, Monday through Friday followed by a free lunch from THE SPOT. Visit WNDNWVS.COM/PLAY or call 802 540-2529 for more information.

February Vacation Camps! Come make Winter Olympic inspired creations at ArtisTree’s fun-filled February vacation camps! Morning and afternoon sessions for ages 5-8 and 9-12.

Korean Mask Making Olympic Sled Making Design an Olympic Team Logo Year of the Dog: Dog Portraits Korean Decorative Arts and Crafts and MORE!

Register online at

www.artistreevt.org

or call (802) 457-3500

2095 POMFRET RD. SOUTH POMFRET, VT Untitled-10 1

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Residential Camp for girls 6-17 1 & 2 week sessions, off-site camping trips, leadership programs, friendships that last a lifetime

Day Camp for girls 6-17

Empowering girls and women through residential and day camp programs since 1919 688 PINE ST, BURLINGTON Untitled-32 1

WNDNWVS.COM

Register Today

ywcavt.org (802) 862-7520

Located on Lake Champlain in South Hero, VT

802.540.2529 1/25/18 1:32 PM

Mon-Fri 8am-5pm, transportation, breakfast and lunch included

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Residential Camp for girls 6-17 1 & 2-Week Residential Camps

Empowering girls and women through residential and day camp programs since 1919

Mon-Fri 8am-5pm, transportation,

breakfast and lunch included Sliding Scale Tuition

Register Today (802) 862-7520

Located on Lake Champlain in South Hero, VT

1 & 2 week sessions, off-site camping trips, leadership programs, friendships that last a lifetime

Day Camp for girls 6-17

Register Today

Building Confidence, Building Community ywcavt.org (802) 862-7520 hosmerpoint.com | 802-586-2090 Located on Lake Champlain in

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1/25/18 11:52 AM

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South Hero, VT

1/17/18 10:31 AM

KIDS VT

Empowering girls and women through residential and day camp programs since 1919

Mon-Fri 8am-5pm, transportation, breakfast and lunch included

FEBRUARY 2018

Residential Camp for girls 6-17

KIDSVT.COM

ywcavt.org

CAMP GUIDE 2018

Day Camp girls5-8 6-17 Day Camp for for Ages

1 & 2 week sessions, off-site camping trips, leadership Wilderness for that Teens programs,Treks friendships last a lifetime

35


Take Aim

Use this handy sheet to plan your summer camp schedule. Find a downloadable version at kidsvt.com/campplanner CKS serves learners from pre-school (3 years old) through 8th grade

Valuable! Affordable! Inclusive! Innovative! Come see the benefits yourself!

JUNE 18-22

JULY 23-27

JUNE 25-29

JUL 30AUG 3

136 Locust Street, Burlington, VT 862-6696 • www.cksvt.org admissions@cksvt.org facebook.com/cksvt

1/18/18 4:35 PM

JULY 2-6

Tuesday, July 4th

AUG 6-10

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2018

KIDSVT.COM

CAMP GUIDE 2018

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CLIP & SAVE

Financial aid available!

JULY 9-13

AUG 13-17

JULY 16-20

AUG 20-24

Nature Camp Programs Pre-K to 8th Grade vinsweb.org/nature-camp Contact us at 802.359.5000 or camps@vinsweb.org Membership Discounts Available! Locations in Quechee, South Pomfret, Washington, VT and Hanover, NH

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OU

R2

1ST

YE

AR

!

Join us at America’s Family Resort for the ultimate in Summer fun! Choose from our traditional camp program... ...or one of our special interest camps— including High Adventure or Survival Camp.

AND

Saturday, February 3

10 A.M. - 2 P.M. Burlington Hilton FREE!

Available Monday - Friday, June 18 - August 18, 2018 Eight weekly sessions. Free shuttle service included from Burlington, Essex, Underhill, Jericho, Stowe, Fairfax, Morrisville, Johnson and more!

1.800.523.2754

kidsvt.com/fair

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STEM Leadership Camp (overnight camp)

MEET

Vermont Tech | Randolph Center July 8-12, 2017 learn more vtc.edu/rosies

CAMP &

SCHOOL

A fun, creative “hands-on” exploration summer camp with followup mentoring program. Activities and training help campers learn about leadership, skilled trades, and the STEM fields (science, technology, engineering & math).

STAFF

EDUCATION

11001011001110

ANIMALS SPORTS

11001011001110

for girls ages 12-16

Vermont Tech | Williston July 16-20, 2018 learn more vtc.edu/coder Coder Camp gives girls the chance to translate their creativity into computer programs using SCRATCH with loads of fun activities and field trips.

AeroCamp (day camp)

PRESENTED BY

for youth ages 12-18

AeroCamp is for youth ages 12-18 who want to learn about the exciting and dynamic world of aviation and the training that can lead to a career flying airplanes. k2v-CampFair0218.indd 1

1/25/18 3:12 PM

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KIDS VT

Vermont Tech | Williston July 30-August 3, 2018 learn more vtc.edu/aerocamp

FEBRUARY 2018

CODERr fo CAMP girls

Coder Camp for Girls (day camp)

KIDSVT.COM

GYMNASTICS

for girls entering grades 9-10

CAMP GUIDE 2018

OUTDOORS

QUESTIONS

ARTS

11/30/17 10:32 AM

2018 SUMMER CAMPS

ASK

SCIENCE

smuggs.com/kidsvt

37


CALENDAR

FEBRUARY

SPONSORED BY:

Wintervale

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2018

KIDSVT.COM

OUTDOOR FESTIVITIES — including a chili cook-off, hot chocolate and maple tastings, kids’ activities, a bonfire, and free fat-bike, snowshoe and cross-country ski rentals — await nature-loving Vermonters in Burlington’s backyard. Sunday, February 25, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., weather permitting, at the Intervale Center in Burlington.

38

Week to Week SAT

Kids VT Camp & School Fair: Parents and campers-to-be get detailed information from representatives from dozens of camps and schools from Vermont and beyond. 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Hilton Burlington.

SAT

Lake Elmore Polar Splash: Community members “freeze for a reason” in this annual fundraiser for the Morrisville Rotary Club. 11 a.m., Elmore State Park.

SAT

Drag Queen Story Hour: Nikki Champagne and Emoji Nightmare share stories focused on individuality, activism and social responsibility. 11 a.m., Winooski Memorial Library.

FEB 3

FEB 10

FEB 17

Like the University of Vermont Medical Center on Facebook and get weekly updates from Dr. First! See “First With Kids” videos at uvmhealth.org.


SUBMIT YOUR MARCH EVENTS FOR PRINT BY FEBRUARY 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

1 Thursday

St. Albans Winter Carnival

CHITTENDEN Audubon Homeschool Program: Homebased learners use the outdoor classroom to explore a variety of seasonal topics, from insect investigations to wilderness skills. Ages 6-8. Parent attendance optional. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., $20-25; preregister. Info, 434-3068. Babytime: Infants through pre-walkers have a ball with books, rhymes, songs and socializing. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:15-10:45 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Harry Potter Book Night: This 4th annual worldwide event focuses the fun around Fantastic Beasts, with games, activities, readings and quizzes. Witches, wizards and muggles of all ages welcomed. Phoenix Books, Essex Junction, 6-7:30 p.m. Info, 872-7111. FREE

Itty Bitty Public Skating: Tiny feet learn the art of sliding on ice through jolly games. Ages 2-5 with caregiver. Leddy Park, Burlington, 10-11:30 a.m., $8 per family, $1 skate rentals. Info, 865-7558. Read to Archie the Therapy Dog: An attentive canine listens to little people read. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4:15 p.m.; preregistration appreciated. Info, 878-6956. FREE Williston Preschool Music: Lively tunes with local musicians strike the right note among the wee crowd. Ages 5 and under with a caregiver. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m., limited to one session per week per family. Info, 878-4918. FREE FRANKLIN Chess Club: Checkmate! Kids of all ability levels scheme winning strategies. Fairfax Community Library, 3:15-4:15 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

FREE

Franklin Lego Thursdays: Kiddie constructionists combine their creativity with the library’s supplies. Haston Library, Franklin, 2-5 p.m. Info, 285-6505. FREE

show kicks off three days of frosty fun, sponsored by the Colchester Parks and Recreation Department. Other activities include horse-drawn hay rides, a chili cook-off, laser tag, arts and crafts, an inflatable obstacle course, and a free Sunday open skate at Leddy Park. See colchestervt.gov/663/Winter-Carnival for full schedule. Colchester High School,

FRIDAY, FEB. 2, SATURDAY, FEB. 3, AND SUNDAY, FEB. 4, $7; free for children under

3. Info, 264-5640.

ORCHARD VALLEY WINTER FAIRE: The snowy season is fêted with storytelling, puppet shows, crafts, a bonfire and sleigh rides — weather permitting. Orchard Valley Waldorf School, East Montpelier, SATURDAY, FEB. 3, 10 A.M.-2 P.M., free admission; fees for activities; lunch and snacks available for purchase. Info, 456-7400. SHELBURNE WINTERFEST: Outdoor

activities, crafts and tasty treats reward the hearty folks who brave the chilly temps for outdoor fun. Shelburne Farms, SATURDAY, FEB. 3, NOON-3 P.M., free admission; donations accepted for Shelburne Parks & Recreation. Info, 985-8686.

ICE ON FIRE FESTIVAL: The community pays tribute to winter with a 2 p.m. puppet processional parade, games, outdoor theater, singing, storytelling and a huge closing bonfire at 4:30 p.m. Bring a mug; costumes, shakers, rattles, bells and drums encouraged. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, SUNDAY, FEB. 4, 2-5 P.M., suggested $1-5 donation. Info, 223-1242. MILTON WINTER FESTIVAL: This

community celebration of the snowy season includes sled dog and sleigh rides, a pancake breakfast, a chili cook-off and an Ice Crystal Ball. See miltonvt.org for a detailed schedule. Various locations, Milton, FRIDAY, FEB. 9, SATURDAY, FEB. 10, AND SUNDAY, FEB.11, small fee for some activities. Info, 893-4922. ‘BRRRLINGTON’ WINTER BASH: This

winter shindig just for kids includes indoor and outdoor activities, including crafts, live animals, games with Big Blue Trunk, music and dancing. Robert Miller Community & Recreation Center, Burlington, SATURDAY, FEB. 10, NOON-3 P.M. Info, 540-1058. FREE

COMMUNITY DAY: DEEP WINTER STORYTELLING: Families pay tribute to the

cold season with a community potluck, followed by folktales of hope and renewal shared by EarthWalk Mentors. Plainfield Town Hall Opera House, SATURDAY, FEB. 10, 4:30-7 P.M. Info, 454-8500. FREE MARDI GRAS MASQUERADE: Mardi Gras aficionados come together for creole food and drink, coupled with creative activities of mask-making, beading and other crafts. Highland Center for the Arts, Greensboro, TUESDAY, FEB. 13, 6-7:30 P.M., suggested $5-10 donation; food and drink available for purchase; RSVP requested. Info, 533-9370. THE VERMONT FLURRY: SNOW SCULPTURE FESTIVAL: This village green transforms

into a winter and visual art wonderland in this three-day professional snow sculpting competition. Weather dependent. Woodstock Village Green, FRIDAY, FEB. 16, SATURDAY, FEB. 17, AND SUNDAY, FEB. 18, 10 A.M.-10 P.M. Info,

457-3981. FREE

CHINESE NEW YEAR CELEBRATION & OPEN HOUSE: Families celebrate Chinese

culture with puppet making, Mahjong playing, folktales and more. Lake Champlain Waldorf School, Shelburne, SATURDAY, FEB. 17, 10 A.M.-NOON; preregister. Info, 985-2827, ext. 212. FREE

ST. ALBANS WINTER CARNIVAL: Saturday night fireworks start Sunday’s festivities, including horse-drawn wagon rides, family activities and games, a Flag Football Snow Bowl, a Duct Tape Derby, and much more fun. Hard’ack Recreation Area, St. Albans, SATURDAY, FEB. 17 AND SUNDAY, FEB. 18, 11 A.M.-3 P.M.; food available for purchase. Info, 524-1500. FREE

WINTERVALE: Outdoor fun – including a chili cook-off, maple and hot chocolate tastings, nature walks, a bonfire, free rentals of fat bikes, snowshoes and skis, and groomed trails, weather permitting — awaits nature-loving Vermonters in Burlington’s backyard. Burlington’s Intervale, SUNDAY, FEB. 25, 11 A.M.-3 P.M.; local food and hot drink available for purchase. Info, 660-0440. FREE

Family Painted Pottery: Dads, moms and kids enjoy an instructional and creative evening together. Davis Studio, South Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m., $25 per person; preregister. Info, 425-2700. Family Wheel Drop-In: Parents and kids form clay sculptures with assistance from staff and try out the pottery wheel. BCA Studios, Burlington, 5-7 p.m., $9-10 per participant, $5 additional for each piece fired and glazed. Info, 865-7157. GroovaRoo: Moms, dads and caregivers bust a move in this beginners’ class led by certified babywearing dance teacher Kadina. For children 6 weeks to toddlers. Please wear comfortable exercise clothes and shoes; bring water and an approved baby carrier. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10-11 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: Toe-tapping tunes captivate kiddies. Radio Bean, Burlington, 11 a.m. Info, 660-9346. FREE Magic: The Gathering: Planeswalkers seek knowledge and glory in this trading-card game. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6-8 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Preschool Yoga with Danielle: Small ones stretch and relax. Ages 2 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Teen Advisory Board: Teens tackle library projects. Grades 9 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Tot Yoga: Mamas, papas and small ones stretch themselves with stories, songs and silliness. Ages 2-5. Jericho Town Library, Friday, 3-4 p.m.; preregistration required. Info, 899-4686. FREE ORLEANS Craftsbury Lego Club: Petite ones build with plastic blocks and chat companionably. Ages 4-12. Craftsbury Public Library, Craftsbury Common, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 586-9683. FREE

KIDS VT

RUTLAND Harry Potter Book Night: This 4th annual worldwide event focuses the fun around Fantastic Beasts, with games, activities, readings and quizzes. Witches, wizards and muggles of all ages welcomed. Phoenix Books Rutland, 6-7 p.m. Info, 855-8078. FREE

COLCHESTER WINTER CARNIVAL: A talent

CHITTENDEN Family Gym: Indoor playground equipment gives tiny tumblers a chance to run free. Ages 7 and under. Greater Burlington YMCA, 10:1511:45 a.m., $5-8 per family; free for members. Info, 862-9622.

FEBRUARY 2018

LAMOILLE Tot Time: Wee ones move and groove in pop-up forts, a ball pit, a small bounce house and more. Caregiver supervision required. David Gale Recreation Center, Stowe, 10-11 a.m., $5 per child. Info, 253-6138.

Winter Festivals

CALEDONIA A Book, A Pizza and a Movie: Middle schoolers make merry conversation about The Giver over pizza, then relax and enjoy a bigscreen viewing of the movie version. Grades 5-8. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 5:30-8 p.m.; preregister. Info, 745-1391. FREE

KIDSVT.COM

St. Albans Circle of Parents for Foster & Adoptive Families: Parents share childrearing stories to strengthen skills and build strong families. Franklin County Senior Center, St. Albans, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 524-1700. FREE

2 Friday

Fairfax PJ Story Time: Children chill in their jammies while listening to stories. Fairfax Community Library, 6-7 p.m. Info, 849-2420.

WASHINGTON Kid Parent Yoga: Kids and caretakers warm up individually and then partake in partnerbased practices in a playful setting. Ages 4-11. Om Studio, Montpelier, 3:30-4:15 p.m., $15 per adult-child pair, $50 for 5 weeks; preregister. Info, 324-1737.

2 FRIDAY, P.40

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CALENDAR FEBRUARY 2 Friday (cont.) WASHINGTON Montpelier Mother Up! Monthly Meet-Up: Families discuss the realities of climate change, what that means on a local, state and national level, and how to create a more just and nature-friendly world. Vegetarian dinner and childcare offered. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; RSVP requested. Info, 229-0041. FREE WINDSOR Bethel First Friday Flicks: Families flock together for free films on the first Friday of each month. Seating available or bring blankets and beanbags. Bethel Town Hall, Friday, 6:30-8:30 p.m., donations accepted; popcorn and drinks available for purchase. Info, 234-6305. FREE Branch Out Teen Night: Teens enjoy time together with monthly themed activities. Grades 7-12. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 6 p.m. Info, 457-3500. FREE

Phoenix Books Story Time: ‘Escargot’: Little listeners take in an amusing tale about a picky eater, then participate in a healthy food activity presented by City Market. Ages 6 and under. Phoenix Books, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 448-3350. FREE Read to Cleo the Therapy Dog: Canine and reading enthusiasts visit with a personable pooch. Milton Public Library, 10 a.m.; preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Storytime for Kids en Français: French native and experienced teacher, Caroline Juneau, leads little ones in an immersion storytime, from beginners to bilinguals. Ages 2-10. Alliance Français of the Lake Champlain Region, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m., $5, $2 for each additional sibling; free for members. Info, 881-8826. Valentine Needle Felting: Artist Annette Hansen teaches crafty-types of all skill levels to make pins, ornaments and garlands — or their own creative choice. Ages 8 and up; children under 12 must be accompanied by an adult. Milton Town Offices, 9:30 a.m.-noon, $19 person includes materials; preregister. Info, 893-4922.

Webby’s Art Studio: The museum’s temporary and permanent exhibits inspire specialized art activities for all ages. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., free with museum admission. Info, 985-3346. Weekend Fun at Vermont Teddy Bear Company: Families enjoy indoor fun with a factory tour, sit down to tea with the bears and check out the coloring area. Vermont fouryear-olds who preregister for the Vermont Cub Project receive a free teddy bear for a best friend. Vermont Teddy Bear Company, Shelburne, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 985-1643. FREE FRANKLIN St. Albans Open Gym Fun: Moms, dads and kiddos beat the winter blues together with an inside morning of weekly rotating play equipment and group games. Ages 2-14. Adult caregiver required. St. Albans City Hall, 9-11 a.m., $5-8. Info, 524-1500. Take Your Child to the Library Day: Families drop in for a scavenger hunt and special children’s crafts. Fairfax Community Library, 9:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Info, 849-2420. FREE

3 Saturday CALEDONIA Caledonia Winter Farmers Market: Freshly baked goods, veggies, handmade crafts, meat and maple syrup figure prominently in displays of Vermont wares. St. Johnsbury Welcome Center, Saturday, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 592-3088. FREE CHITTENDEN Kids VT Camp & School Fair: Parents and campers-to-be get personal attention and detailed information as representatives from dozens of camps and schools from Vermont and beyond present their programs. Hilton Burlington, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 864-5684. FREE

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2018 KIDSVT.COM

EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: Youngsters master basic yoga poses through games, songs and dance. Mindfulness activities improve focus and concentration. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, 11:45 a.m.12:30 p.m., $15. Info, 899-0339.

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Family Game Afternoon: Host Oliver Dienz takes over the library’s tabletops with board challenges for all ages and abilities. Snacks served, too. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 1:30-3:30 p.m. Info, 985-5124. FREE Groundhog Day Story Time: Stories, music, games and a craft about this famous furry creature amuse youngsters. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Kids Building Workshop: Handy helpers learn do-it-yourself skills and tool safety as they construct seasonal projects. Ages 5-12. Home Depot, Williston, 9 a.m.-noon; preregister at workshops.homedepot.com. Info, 872-0039. FREE Penguin Plunge: Stouthearted swimmers in creative costumes dunk themselves in Lake Champlain to raise funds for Special Olympics Vermont. Cool School Plunge at 11 a.m.; Burlington Plunge at noon. Waterfront Park, Burlington, free to watch. Info, 861-0278.

RUTLAND Rutland Winter Farmers Market: More than 50 vendors peddle produce, fresh salad greens, apples and cider, artisan cheeses, homemade breads, and other local products. Vermont Farmers Food Center, Rutland, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 342-4727. WASHINGTON Capital City Winter Farmers Market: Root veggies, honey, maple syrup and crafts change hands at an indoor off-season celebration of locavorism. Montpelier City Center, Saturday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 223-2958. Jaquith Library Open House & Book Sale: The community comes out to celebrate its local library with music, refreshments, kid-friendly activities and a used book sale. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE WINDSOR Family Clay: Children and their parents make memories firing and glazing special pieces. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, Saturday, 10 a.m.-noon, $20 per parent-child pair, $5 per additional family member. Info, 457-3500.

4 Sunday CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: Energy-filled kids flip, jump and tumble in a state-of-the-art facility. Ages 6 and under, 1 p.m.; ages 7-12, 2:30 p.m.; ages 13 and up, 4 p.m. Regal Gymnastics Academy, Essex, 1-5:30 p.m., $8-14. Info, 655-3300.

Live Performances MIDDLE EASTERN DANCE CLUB AND SOYEYA AFRICAN DANCE TROUPE: Two

Dartmouth College student dance groups perform works from the Arab world and Zimbabwe, Ghana and other African nations. The audience of all ages learns a little about these dances and tries a few moves, too. Hopkins Center for the Arts, Hanover, SATURDAY, FEB. 3, 11 A.M. Info, 603-646-2422. FREE RAISE YOUR VOICE: WonderArts Vermont

pairs up with the Hazen Union student group Stand-Up for an evening of poetry, rap, stories and dance dedicated to social justice. Performers include Bobby Farlice Rubio of Trittium Well, local poets, musicians and students. Ages 10 and up. Heartbeet Community Center, Hardwick, FRIDAY, FEB. 9, 7-9 P.M., suggested $10-20 donation; proceeds benefit Stand-Up; RSVP requested. Info, 533-9370. ‘CINDERELLA’: Rodgers and

Hammerstein’s version of the rags-to-riches classic story enchants the audience with pumpkin carriages and glass slippers brought to life through extravagant costumes, scenery and choreography. Flynn MainStage, Burlington, TUESDAY, FEB. 13, 7:30 P.M., $25-80. Info,

863-5966.

DANCE SHOWCASE: A bevy of graceful

groups — including Bryce Dance Company of New York City, Celtic Company from Green Mountain Performing Arts, Jeh Kulu Dance and Drum Theater, and many more — strut their stuff in a benefit performance for Vermont Family Network and Puppets in Education. Black Box, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, SATURDAY, FEB. 17, 7 P.M., $25-28; free for children under 1. Info, 876-5315, ext. 247.

KINGDOM ALL-STARS: Northeast Kingdom

middle and high school student singers and multi-instrumentalists get the crowd cheering with their popular and rock music performance. Fuller Hall, St. Johnsbury, WEDNESDAY, FEB. 21, 10:30 A.M. & 1 P.M., $4. Info, 748-2600, ext. 2. ‘PETER AND THE STARCATCHER’: Theater

lovers soak up the humorous backstory behind the children’s classic tale, Peter Pan, in this UVM production of the other side of Neverland. Royall Tyler Theatre, UVM, Burlington,

‘Cinderella’

THURSDAY, FEB. 22, 7:30 P.M., FRIDAY, FEB. 23, 7:30 P.M. AND SATURDAY, FEB. 24, 2 & 7:30 P.M., $10-28. Info,

656-3131.

Family Concert: Laura Heaberlin and Taylor Smith perform jointly as Cricket Blue, entertaining the audience with their musical and songwriting skills, influenced by artists ranging from Anaïs Mitchell to Dylan Thomas. Deborah Rawson Memorial Library, Jericho, 2 p.m. Info, 899-4962. FREE Family Gym: See February 2. Jewish Camp Fair and Bagel Brunch: Eden Village Camp presents information about their summer camp program, with representatives from other Jewish camps available to answer questions from prospective parents. Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 864-0218. FREE WASHINGTON Dance, Sing & Jump Around: Young movers and groovers delight in a lively afternoon with instruction and live music. Liz Benjamin and Ethan Guiles callers. Ages 3-8 with adult caregivers. Plainfield Town Hall Opera House, 3-4:30 p.m., suggested donation $5; free for children. Info, 223-1509.

5 Monday CHITTENDEN Itty Bitty Public Skating: See February 1. Milton Circle of Parents: Moms and dads meet to strengthen parenting skills and socialize, with a focus on guardianship. New Life Fellowship Church, Milton, 6:30-8 p.m.; preregister. Info, 498-0607. FREE Pajama Story Time: Flannel-clad wee ones tote their stuffed toys for tales. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6:30 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE


SUBMIT YOUR MARCH EVENTS FOR PRINT BY FEBRUARY 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM Stories with Megan: Little listeners learn and laugh. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Williston Preschool Music: See February 1, 11 a.m. RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: Mini-musicians ages 2 and under sing songs and engage in early literacy activities. Rutland Free Library, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 773-1860. FREE

6 Tuesday CHITTENDEN Creative Tuesdays: Young artists involve their imaginations with interesting materials. Kids under 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 3:15-4:45 p.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Library Elementary Event Planners: Junior helpers plan events for elementary students and savor snacks. Grades 6-8. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

WASHINGTON Capoeira: Families train together in this Spanish Musical Kids: Niños celebrate Afro-Brazilian martial art which combines Latin American culture through dance, acrobatics tunes and games en español. Ages and music. Zenbarn 1-5 with a caregiver. Fletcher Free Studio, Waterbury, Library, Burlington, 11-11:45 a.m. Info, 4:30-5:30 p.m., 865-7216. FREE $12, $15 per class includes Kids Winooski Lego Club: Budding builders Check out our Yoga at 3:30 p.m.; bust out plastic-block creations with preregister. Info, bountiful the weekly Lego challenge. Free 244-8134. list at meals available for ages 18 and under.

Looking for a playgroup?

Kids Yoga: kidsvt.com/ Winooski Memorial Library, 3-6 p.m. Youngsters stretch playgroups Info, 655-6424. FREE for strength FRANKLIN and flexibility, Adoption Support Group: Families building focus facing adoption issues and challenges join and self-esteem. Ages 5-12. Zenbarn Studio, forces in a respectful setting. All welcome. Waterbury, 3:30-4:15 p.m., $12, $15 per class Franklin County Senior Center, St. Albans, includes Capoeira at 4:30 p.m.; preregister. 5:30-7:30 p.m. Info, 524-1700. FREE Info, 244-8134.

Sewing Club: Bracelets: Aspiring seamstresses fashion fabric bracelets in this two-part class. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE RUTLAND Chess Club: Strategists of all skill levels partner up for playing. Ages 6 and up. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 3-4 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE WASHINGTON Maker Program: Crafty kiddos dig into different projects using the library’s materials and mentoring. Ages 8-11. Waterbury Public Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 244-7036. FREE

WINDSOR Norwich Lego Tuesdays: Junior builders bust out blocks and get busy. Children under 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Norwich Public Library, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 649-1184. FREE

7 Wednesday CHITTENDEN Family Game Day: Grownups and youngsters rally for a weekly round of tabletop fun. Free meals available for ages 18 and under. Winooski Memorial Library, 3-6 p.m. Info, 655-6424. FREE

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. FFL Bookworms: Third and fourth graders get together for lively reading and discussion around chapter books celebrating diversity. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 3:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 865-7216. FREE Read to Daisy the Therapy Dog: Book buffs bring a selection from home or borrow from the library to amuse an attentive canine. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m.; preregister online. Info, 878-6956. FREE Reading Buddies: Little literati pair up with volunteers for literacy and laughs. Kindergarten and up. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-4:30 p.m.; preregistration appreciated but not required. Info, 264-5660. FREE Yoga for Kids: Young yogis engage their energy and explore breathing exercises and relaxation poses with professional instructor Melissa Nutting. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE 7 WEDNESDAY, P.42

Classes List your class or camp here for only $20 per month! Submit the listing by February 15 to classes@kidsvt.com.

pregnancy and prepare for birth with stretching, strengthening and relaxation in prenatal yoga — and then bring your body back to balance and strength in postnatal yoga. Join our community of mothers at any point in your pregnancy, and 6 weeks or later in your postpartum time (until baby is crawling). No yoga experience necessary. Prenatal Yoga: Saturdays, 11:30 am; Sundays, 10:15 a.m.; Mondays, 5:45 p.m.; Tuesdays, 4:15 p.m.; Wednesdays, 5:45 p.m.; Thursdays, 12:30 p.m.; Fridays, 8:15 a.m. Postnatal Yoga: Sundays, 12:15 p.m.; Tuesdays, 10 a.m.; Thursdays, 10:45 a.m.; Fridays, 8:15 a.m.; Fridays, noon (postnatal core). Drop-ins welcome, $15/ class, $130/10 class pass or $75/monthly unlimited. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, 20 Kilburn St., Burlington. Info, evolutionprenatalandfamily.com, 899-0339.

into our EvoKids Yoga Saturday class for ages 3-7 or our Friday EveryBody Family Yoga for ages 5 and up, and enjoy a blend of yoga poses, games and mindfulness activities. EvoKids Saturdays, 11:45am12:30 pm, ages 3-7; EveryBody Yoga Fridays, 3:30-4:15 pm, ages 5 and up. $15/ class, $65/5 class pass. Location:  Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center,  20 Kilburn St., Burlington.  Info,  evolutionprenatalandfamily.com, 899-0339.

BRAZILIAN JIU-JITSU: The future of our nation lies in the courage, confidence and determination of its people. Our Kids BJJ Program promotes self-esteem, self-confidence, character development and a physical outlet with discipline, cooperation with other children, respect for peers and adults, perseverance and a healthy lifestyle. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu will help your kids to learn realistic bullyproofing and self-defense skills that they can use for the rest of their lives! Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu builds endurance, patience and self-respect. Give your kids the ability to get stronger, gain confidence and build resilience! Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them practices they can carry with them throughout life. Remember you are raising children, not flowers. First class is free! Please stop by our school at 55 Leroy Road, Williston. Info, 598-2839, visit our website vermontbjj.com or email julio@bjjusa.com to register your son or daughter!

KIDS VT

POTTERY WHEEL: This day is all about learning the basics of the ever-popular pottery wheel. Students will have all day to get their hands into clay, spinning it into small bowls or cups to be fired and glazed by the studio. All items will be dishwasher safe and lead-free. All basic supplies are included. Students must bring their bag lunch, and snacks will be provided. Ages 6-11. Monday, April 23, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. or Friday, April 27, 8-3 p.m. $70/$63 BCA members. BCA Studios, 405 Pine Street, Burlington. Info, 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

PRENATAL & POSTNATAL YOGA CLASSES AT EVOLUTION PRENATAL & FAMILY YOGA CENTER: Have a more comfortable

DROP-IN KIDS YOGA AT EVOLUTION PRENATAL & FAMILY YOGA CENTER: Drop

FEBRUARY 2018

CRAZY CREATURES: Create awe-inspiring creatures out of the pages of your favorite book, from your favorite movie or your imagination. Will your creature have two or four heads? Will it be an animal or vegetable? You get to decide in this fun one-day camp that lets you get creative through drawing, painting and craft. All basic supplies are included. Students must bring their bag lunch, and snacks will be provided. Ages 6-8. Wednesday, April 25, 8-3 p.m. $70/$63 BCA members. BCA Studios, 405 Pine Street, Burlington. Info, 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

MINI WORLDS: Shrink down with us and create small beautiful worlds. Campers will be encouraged to explore a variety of craft media to develop tiny, intricate terrariums, doll houses or fairy worlds. All basic supplies are included. Students must bring their bag lunch, and snacks will be provided. Ages 6-11. Thursday, April 26, 8 a.m.-3 p.m. $70/$63 BCA members. BCA Studios, 405 Pine Street, Burlington. Info, 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

HIGH SCHOOL PHOTOGRAPHY: Tell your story with photographs in this six-week session for high school students! Students will explore their ideas, go on group photo shoots, process and print digital photos and zines in our digital lab, experiment with film photography in our darkroom and participate in supportive discussions and critiques. All supplies and cameras provided. Scholarships are available. No experience required. Ages 14-18. Fridays, February 2-March 16 (no class March 2), 4:30-6:30 p.m. $150/$135 BCA Members. BCA Studios, 405 Pine Street, Burlington. Info, 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

KIDSVT.COM

PAINTING: This one-day camp is designed for the young painter who wants to go beyond the typical tempera. Join us at BCA’s painting studio to experiment with watercolors and acrylic on paper or canvas, large or small. Have fun while learning new techniques that will help you make even better paintings. All basic supplies are included. Students must bring their bag lunch, and snacks will be provided. Ages 6-11. Tuesday, April 24, 8-3 p.m. $70/$63 BCA members. BCA Studios, 405 Pine Street, Burlington. Info, 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

PHOTOGRAPHY: Explore photography in our black and white darkroom and digital lab! Campers will go on guided photo shoots and will create prints in this fun, hands-on day. All basic supplies are included. Students must bring their bag lunch, and snacks will be provided. Ages 9-11. Wednesday, April 25, 8-3 p.m. $70/$63 BCA members. BCA Studios, 405 Pine Street, Burlington. Info, 865-7166, burlingtoncityarts.org.

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CALENDAR FEBRUARY 7 Wednesday (cont.)

Science & Nature MONTSHIRE MAKERS: Middle school

inventors use their imaginations and the museum’s materials to create cool projects, with different monthly themes. Grades 6-9. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, FIRST FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 6:30-8 P.M., $8-15; preregistration encouraged. Info, 649-2200. SNOW SCULPTURE SPECTACULAR: Lovers of snow and outdoor fun fashion ephemeral sculptures from cold, white stuff, complementing the garden’s art. All ages. Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site, Cornish, SATURDAY, FEB. 3, 10 A.M.-NOON; preregister. Info, 457-3368. FREE TOUR THE COSMOS: This 50-minute live presentation takes the audience on a journey deep into the universe. Ages 6 and up. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, SATURDAYS AND SUNDAYS, 1:30 P.M., $6 plus regular museum admission, $7-9; free for children under 5. Info, 748-2372. ROBIN’S NEST NATURE PLAYGROUP:

Little explorers and their caregivers discover the sights and sounds of the forest and field, while learning how the natural environment can be used as an adventurous classroom. Dress in outdoor clothing; bring a snack and water. Ages 5 and under. North Branch Nature Center, Montpelier, MONDAY, FEB. 5, AND MONDAY, FEB. 19, 10 A.M.-NOON, donations welcome. Info, 229-6206. SCIENCE & STORIES AT ECHO: Preschoolers

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2018 KIDSVT.COM

rally ’round for nature-inspired tales and activities. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, WEDNESDAYS, 10:30 A.M., regular museum admission, $11.50-14.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848.

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KIDS NATURE CONNECTION: Led by educator and Pathfinders Nature Connection founder Per Eisenman, curious kids start a fire with a bow drill, search for animal tracks and signs, whittle and play in the woods. Ages 6-10. Champlain Valley Cohousing, Charlotte, SATURDAY, FEB. 10, 9-10 A.M.; preregister. Info, 401-285-3426. FREE

SLEIGH RIDE WEEKS: Horses ferry winter

lovers through frozen farm fields. Riders then tour the dairy farm and historic house and enjoy hands-on activities and cookies. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, FEB. 10-25, 10 A.M.-4 P.M., regular museum admission, $4-15; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355.

BOOKS AND BEYOND! SCIENCE FOR PRESCHOOLERS: Children’s literature and

hands-on science activities engage eager youngsters. Ages 3-5 with caregiver. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, MONDAY, FEB. 12, 10:15 & 11:30 A.M., regular museum admission, $12-15; free for children under 2. Info, 649-2200.

FRANKLIN Fit Moms: Expectant mamas work out together, preparing for labor with cardio, strength, stretching and breathing. Northwestern Medical Center, St. Albans, 5:30-6:30 p.m. Info, 288-1141. FREE

POP-UP NESTLINGS:

Naturalists-in-training and their caregivers have a blast with winter learning activities, including hiking, observing, collecting, questioning, exploring and more. Dress for the weather. Ages 3-6. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, SECOND TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:30-11:30 A.M., regular museum admission, $3.50-7; free for members and children under 3; preregistration encouraged. Info, 434-2167.

WHO’S HOOTING? PRESCHOOL PROGRAM:

Avian enthusiasts swoop into the world of the most mysterious flying mousetraps to learn more about their hunting habits, feathers and sounds, and discover what’s in an owl pellet. Ages 3-5. Audubon Vermont, Huntington, THURSDAY, FEB. 15, 9-10:30 A.M., $8-10 per adult-child pair, $4 each additional child; preregister. Info, 434-3068. FAMILY OWL PROWL: Find out whoooo’s

living in the woods. Weather permitting, participants explore the wintry world on snowshoes and warm up with hot cocoa. Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center, Quechee, FRIDAY, FEB. 16, 6:30-8:30 P.M., $12.50-16; preregister. Info, 359-5000. THE GREAT BACKYARD BIRD COUNT AT VINS:

Naturalists young and old count flying creatures and enjoy activities to improve birding skills and help these feathered friends in our communities. Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center, Quechee, FEB. 17-19, 10 A.M.-4 P.M., regular museum admission, $13-15; free for children under 4. Info, 359-5000.

IGLOO BUILD: Bundled-up families learn

to construct insulated, sturdy snow dwellings during this long-running Montshire tradition with igloo-building expert Dr. Bert Yankielun. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, SATURDAY, FEB. 17, 10:30 A.M.-2 P.M., regular museum admission, $12-15; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200. OPEN MUSEUM FOR THE GREAT BACKYARD BIRD COUNT: Avian aficionados drop in and

share their savvy. Novice birders learn how they can participate in the count, get help identifying feathered friends and check out the museum’s field guides. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, SATURDAY, FEB. 17, 10 A.M.-3 P.M., admission by donation. Info, 434-2167. PLAYDATE! WINTER ON THE FARM: Little

ones drop-in and have a hoot with indoor educational activities and a visit from a live owl. Ages 2-5, accompanied by an adult. Shelburne Farms, SATURDAY, FEB. 17, 9:30 A.M.-1:30 P.M., $5-7 per child; free for adults; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

Read to a Dog: Little bibliophiles select stories to share with a furry friend. Ages 5-10. Fairfax Community Library, 3:15-4:15 p.m.; preregister for 15-minute time slot. Info, 849-2420. FREE

ANIMALS IN WINTER: MARSH-BILLINGSROCKEFELLER WINTER BREAK DAY CAMP:

Junior naturalists devote a day to learning about animal activities in winter, searching for signs of wildlife and playing imaginative and educational games inside and outdoors. Ages 8-10. Marsh-BillingsRockefeller National Historical Park, Woodstock, TUESDAY, FEB. 20, 9 A.M.-4 P.M.; preregister. Info, 457-3368, ext. 222. FREE BIRD-MONITORING WALK: Eagle-eyed

participants bring binoculars to search the museum’s property for fluttering feathers. Best for adults and older children. Please bring your own binoculars. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, SATURDAY, FEB. 24, 8-9 A.M., donations welcome; preregister. Info, 434-2167. FREE

FEBFEST: This school vacation week, the museum electrifies visitors with hands-on activities exploring electrons and light through squishy circuits and family-friendly science-based demonstrations throughout the day. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, FEB. 24-MARCH 6, 10 A.M.-5 P.M., regular museum admission, $11.50-14.50; free for members and children under 3. Info, 864-1848. FORESTER FOR A DAY: Kids don hard hats as they observe a woodsman fell a tree, then take to the woodshop for hands-on fun. Ages 5 and up with adult. Shelburne Farms, SATURDAY, FEB. 24, 10 A.M.-NOON, $3-7; preregister. Info, 985-8686. OWL FESTIVAL: Curious naturalists of all ages have a hoot learning about these amazing creatures, current owl research and VINS’s rehabilitation program through stories and crafts. Come in costume as your favorite owl, too. Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center, Quechee, SATURDAY, FEB. 24, AND SUNDAY, FEB. 25, 10 A.M.-4 P.M., regular museum admission, $13-15; free for children under 4. Info, 359-5000. ANIMALS IN WINTER: SAINT-GAUDENS WINTER BREAK DAY CAMP: Junior

naturalists devote a day to learning about animal activities in winter, searching for signs of wildlife and playing imaginative and educational games inside and outdoors. Ages 8-10. Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site, Cornish, TUESDAY, FEB. 27, 9 A.M.-4 P.M.; preregister. Info, 457-3368, ext. 222. FREE

RUTLAND Killington Lego Club: Busy kiddos build with plastic blocks, inspired by a weekly theme. Ages 6 and up; children under 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 3-4 p.m. Info, 422-9765. FREE

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See February 3, 3-6 p.m. ORANGE Randolph Lego Wednesdays: Aspiring architects construct creatively while chatting. Kimball Public Library, Randolph, 2:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 728-5073. FREE WINDSOR Sensory Lab for Tots: Wee ones explore selfguided art stations, including finger painting, modeling dough, moon sand and more. Ages 5 and under; adult supervision required. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 9:30-11:30 a.m., $5 per family. Info, 457-3500. Story and Yoga Time with Angel: Angel Rubino of the North Chapel Spiritual Exploration for Children and Families Committee leads little ones and caregivers in storytelling, movement, meditation and more. Ages 2-6 with adult. Norman Williams Public Library, Woodstock, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 457-2295. FREE

8 Thursday CHITTENDEN Audubon Homeschool Program: Homebased learners use the outdoor classroom to explore a variety of seasonal topics, from forests and trees to wildlife tracking. Ages 9-12. Parent attendance is optional. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., $20-25; preregister. Info, 434-3068. Babytime: See February 1. Dorothy Canfield Fisher Book Discussion: Little literati chat about DCF pick The Bitter Side of Sweet by Tara Sullivan. Grades 4-8. Milton Public Library, 6:30-7:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Itty Bitty Public Skating: See February 1. Kids Concert with Mr. Ethan: Rhythm lovers revel in musical merriment, songs and dancing with a special local guest from Music for Sprouts. All ages. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 4 p.m. Info, 482-2878. FREE Milton Community Dinner: A hot and healthy meal mixes with socializing to satisfy the community. Milton Middle School, 4:30-7 p.m., donations appreciated. Info, 893-4111. FREE


SUBMIT YOUR MARCH EVENTS FOR PRINT BY FEBRUARY 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM Read to a Dog: Pet-lovers peruse books with registered therapy pooches. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3:30-4:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 878-4918. FREE Read to Archie the Therapy Dog: See February 1. SoundCheck: Hosted by slam poet Rajnii Eddins, The Young Writers Project and Burlington City Arts sponsors a writing workshop for adolescent authors and an open mic at 7 p.m. Pizza provided. Burlington City Arts, 6-8:15 p.m. Info, 865-7166. FREE Spanish Storytime: Wee ones and caregivers cozy in for stories, songs and games en español. Ages 5 and under. CarpenterCarse Library, Hinesburg, 9:30-10 a.m. Info, 482-2878. FREE Ukulele Kids: Musical ones join Joe to sing and play to traditional children’s songs. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:3011:15 a.m. Info, 865-7216. FREE Williston Preschool Music: See February 1. FRANKLIN Chess Club: See February 1. Father-Daughter Gala: In this elegant evening, girls dance and dine with the special man in their life. A fun silent auction adds enjoyment. St. Albans City Hall, 6:30-8:30 p.m., $50 per couple; proceeds benefit the St. Albans Recreation Department; preregister. Info, 524-1500. Franklin Lego Thursdays: See February 1. Olympic Craft: Just in time for this year’s opening ceremonies, kids create their own awesome glasses. St. Albans Free Library, 4 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE St. Albans Library Legos: Eager architects engage in construction projects with their peers. St. Albans Free Library, 3-5 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE WASHINGTON History for Homeschoolers: Eager learners launch into history-related activities organized around monthly themes. Ages 7-12. Check vermonthistory.org for specific details. Vermont History Museum, Montpelier, 1-3 p.m., $6.50-8; preregister. Space is limited. Info, 828-1413.

CALEDONIA PBS Kids! Film: Preschoolers and their caregivers enjoy an educational flick while filling up on free popcorn. Catamount Arts, St. Johnsbury, 9:30-10:30 a.m.; preregister. Info, 748-2600, ext. 111. FREE

Family Gym: See February 2. Family Wheel Drop-In: See February 2.

GroovaRoo: See February 2.

Live-Action Role Play: LARPers create characters and plots in an amazing and imaginary adventure. Grades 6 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-5 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Music with Raph: Melody lovers of all ages play and sing. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Preschool Yoga with Danielle: Simple movement, stories and songs satisfy children ages 5 and under and their caregivers. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE ORLEANS Craftsbury Lego Club: See February 2.

10 Saturday CALEDONIA All-in-One Valentines Workshop: Artsy ones make valentines using many materials. Ages 7 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Outback Artspace, St. Johnsbury, 9:30-11:30 a.m.; preregistration required for unaccompanied children. Info, 748-2600, ext. 108. FREE Poetry Slam Workshop: Literary-minded participants learn how to compose poems for competitive performances. Ages 12 and up. Catamount Arts, St. Johnsbury, 9 a.m.-noon. Info, 748-2600, ext. 108. FREE Pop-Up Valentines: Local crafter Ellen Bresler shares simple techniques for threedimensional paper masterpieces. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 10 a.m.-noon. Info, 472-5948. FREE CHITTENDEN Author Sarah Dillard: This Waitsfield writer shares her new story about forming true friendships. Ages 4 to 8. Phoenix Books, Essex Junction, 11-11:30 a.m. Info, 872-7111. FREE Burlington Winter Farmers Market: Local farmers, artisans and producers offer fresh and prepared foods, crafts and more in a bustling indoor marketplace made merry with live music. UVM Davis Student Center, Burlington, Saturday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Info, 310-5172. EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: See February 3. Harry Potter Club: Wizardry and witchcraft experts dig into discussion and trivia. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2-3 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Italian Carnevale Maskmaking: Families have fun with a hands-on carnival celebration and craft creation. Children under 11 must be accompanied by an adult. Shelburne Town Hall, noon-2:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 985-5124. FREE Movies at the Library: Film lovers snuggle down, see a big-screen PG-rated flick and savor snacks. Milton Public Library, 1-4 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE

LAMOILLE Lake Elmore Polar Splash: Community members “freeze for a reason” in this annual fundraiser for the Morrisville Rotary Club. Elmore State Park, Lake Elmore, 11 a.m., free for spectators. Info, 318-7548.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See February 5.

RUTLAND Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See February 3.

WASHINGTON Capoeira: See February 5.

WASHINGTON Kids Trade & Play: Families exchange clean and gently-used clothing and toys, size newborn to 12. Capital City Grange, Berlin, Saturday, 9:30-11:30 a.m., $3 per family. Info, 831-337-8632.

Parent Child Valentine Dance: Moms, dads and kids of all ages enjoy a night of dancing, refreshments and fun. Capitol Plaza, Montpelier, 6:30-8:30 p.m., $20-25 per couple, $5-7 each additional guest; preregister; 500 tickets available. Info, 225-8699.

WINDSOR Norwich Winter Farmers Market: Local growers present produce, meats and maple syrup, complementing baked goods and crafts from area artists. Tracy Hall, Norwich, Saturday, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 384-7447.

11 Sunday CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See February 4. Family Gym: See February 2. Mater Christi Winter Open House: Prospective parents of boys and girls in preschool through eighth grade check out classrooms and chat with teachers and staff at this private school open to all faiths and beliefs. Mater Christi School, Burlington, 1-2:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 658-3992. FREE RUTLAND Open Poetry Mic: Literary lovers of all ages listen to original works or sign up at the door to read their own creations. Phoenix Books Rutland, 2-4 p.m. Info, 855-8078. FREE

12 Monday CALEDONIA ‘The Man on the Moon: Pan Twardowski’: Young library-goers soak up this Polish story, learn some 14th-century history and customs, and enjoy a craft and refreshments. Ages 4-12. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 1 p.m. Info, 745-1391. FREE CHITTENDEN Itty Bitty Public Skating: See February 1. Queer Care Support: Adult family members and caregivers of queer and/or questioning youth swap stories and resources in a supportive space. Adults only. Outright Vermont, Burlington, 6:30-8 p.m. Info, 865-9677. FREE Stories with Megan: See February 5. Williston Preschool Music: See February 1, 11 a.m. FRANKLIN Crafternoon: Needle-Felted Hearts: Artsy youngsters fashion fancy valentines. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE

Kids Yoga: See February 5.

13 Tuesday CHITTENDEN Crafternoon: Valentines: Kiddos craft creative cards for friends and family. Ages 5-10. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 2-3 p.m. Info, 482-2878. FREE Creative Tuesdays: See February 6. Shelburne Magic: the Gathering: Host Matt Malenczak guides gamers ages 11 and up. Pierson Library, Shelburne, 3:30 p.m. Info, 985-5124. FREE Spanish Musical Kids: See February 6. STEAM Tuesdays: Eager youngsters engage with inventive science, technology, engineering, art and math projects. Check online for specific program details. Best for grades 1 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Winooski Lego Club: See February 6. FRANKLIN Sewing Club: Bracelets: See February 6. LAMOILLE Tot Time: See February 1. WASHINGTON Maker Program: See February 6. WINDSOR Norwich Lego Tuesdays: See February 6.

14 Wednesday CHITTENDEN Dorothy’s List Group for Homeschooled Students: Books nominated for this esteemed award generate group discussion. Come with a description of an object important to you. Grades 4-8. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Drop-In Healthy Valentine’s Day Snacks for Kids: Hungry tykes have fun fashioning kabobs from heart-shaped fruit, while parents partake of coffee. City Market/Onion River Co-op (Burlington South End), Burlington, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 540-6400. FREE Family Game Day: See February 7. 14 WEDNESDAY, P.44

KIDS VT

Friday Afternoon Movie: Kids of all ages snuggle in for snacks and a big-screen feature. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 3 p.m. Info, 482-2878. FREE

Kids Night Out: While parents take some needed time off, kids delight in dinner and fun. Ages 3-12. Greater Burlington YMCA, 6-8:30 p.m., $10-19; preregister. Info, 862-9622.

FRANKLIN St. Albans Open Gym Fun: See February 3.

FEBRUARY 2018

CHITTENDEN Dungeons & Dragons: Players embark on invented adventures, equipped with their problem-solving skills. Grades 6 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See February 2.

Weekend Fun at Vermont Teddy Bear Company: See February 3.

KIDSVT.COM

9 Friday

Homeschool Project Day: Out-of-classroom students partake of projects together. Milton Public Library, 1 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE

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CALENDAR FEBRUARY

New Parents

MORRISVILLE BABY CHAT: Parents with

babies socialize, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Lamoille Family Center, Morrisville, SECOND SATURDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M.

ESSEX LA LECHE LEAGUE: Moms bring their bitty ones to a discussion of parenting and breastfeeding. Siblings welcome. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, FIRST THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 6:30-8 P.M. Info, 879-0313. FREE EVOLUTION POSTNATAL YOGA: Moms tote

their pre-crawling kids to an all-levels flowing yoga class focused on bringing the body back to strength and alignment in a relaxed and nurturing environment. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, SUNDAYS, 12:15-1:30 P.M.,

TUESDAYS, 11 A.M.-12:15 P.M., THURSDAYS, 10:45-11:55 A.M., AND FRIDAYS, 8:15-9:15 A.M. & NOON-1 P.M., $15 or $130 for a 10-class

pass. Info, 899-0339.

EVOLUTION PRENATAL YOGA: Mothers-to-be

build strength, stamina, comfort and a stronger connection to their baby. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, SUNDAYS, 10-11:30 A.M., MONDAYS, 5:45-7 P.M., TUESDAYS, 4:15-5:30 P.M., WEDNESDAYS, 5:45-7 P.M., THURSDAYS, 12:30-1:30 P.M., FRIDAYS, 8:15-9:15 A.M., AND SATURDAYS, 11:30 A.M.-12:30 P.M., $15 or

BOSOM BUDDIES: New and expectant mothers, babies and supportive grandmas rally in a relaxed evening, when peers and professionals answer mothering and breastfeeding questions. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, FIRST MONDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 5:30-7 P.M. Info, 371-4415. FREE

BOSOM BUDDIES TOO: Nursing mamas of

toddlers and mobile wee ones socialize and swap supportive stories and advice with peers and professionals. Babies welcome. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, FIRST TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 5:30-7 P.M. Info, 371-4415. FREE MOM AND BABY YOGA: Brand-new mamas

and their littles relax, stretch and bond. Followed by a free mothers’ gathering at 11:30 a.m. Embodied, Montpelier, TUESDAYS, 10:30-11:30 A.M., $11. Info, 223-5302.

PRENATAL YOGA: Moms-to-be stretch and bend. Embodied, Montpelier, TUESDAYS, 6-7:15 P.M., $16 per drop-in class. Info, 778-0300.

$130 for 10-class pass. Info, 899-0339. HOW TO BREASTFEED PRENATAL CLASS:

Info, 888-5229.

BURLINGTON LA LECHE LEAGUE: New

moms bring their babies and questions to a breastfeeding support group. Older children welcome. Lending library available. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, SECOND TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:15 A.M. Info, 985-8228. FREE LA LECHE LEAGUE OF THE NORTHEAST KINGDOM: Expectant, novice and

experienced moms join nursing experts for advice and support. Enter through the children’s section of the library. Siblings welcome. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, SECOND TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10:30 A.M.-NOON. Info, 720-272-8841. FREE LA LECHE LEAGUE OF CENTRAL VERMONT:

Breastfeeding mamas swap stories and support each other, with a professional available for consultation. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, THIRD THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-11:30 A.M. Info, 595-7953. FREE NURSING BEYOND A YEAR: In a supportive

setting, mothers discuss the joys and challenges of breastfeeding of children approaching one-year-old and beyond. Good Beginnings, Montpelier, THIRD

FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-11:30 A.M.

Expectant mamas and their partners learn the basics of breastfeeding, how to get off to the best start with their baby and where to find assistance when needed. Central Vermont Medical Center, Berlin, FIRST

Info, 595-7953. FREE

TODDLER LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETING:

Moms who are nursing beyond a year share stories and solutions to nighttime parenting, mealtime tips, biting, weaning and other topics. St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, Middlebury, THIRD MONDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 1:30-2:30 P.M. Info, 388-0363.

THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 8-9:30 A.M. AND FOURTH TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 4:30-6 P.M.;

preregister. Info, 371-4415. FREE

FREE

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2018 KIDSVT.COM

HYDE PARK BABY CHAT: Parents

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with babies mingle, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Lanpher Memorial Library, Hyde Park, FIRST THURSDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M. Info, 888-5229.

BREASTFEEDING CAFÉ: Mamas nurse

their babies, chat and ask for answers from a certified lactation consultant. Pregnant women, supportive dads and older siblings welcome. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, THIRD TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 11:30 A.M.-1 P.M. Info, 349-3825. FREE

PRENATAL METHOD PRENATAL YOGA:

Women prepare for birth through yoga, with a focus on strengthening the body and mind. See prenatalmethod.com for class descriptions. Prenatal Method Studio, Burlington, MONDAYS, 12:15-1:15 P.M., TUESDAYS, 4:30-5:30 P.M., WEDNESDAYS, 12:15-1:15 P.M., THURSDAYS, 4:30-5:30 P.M., AND SATURDAYS, 10:30-11:30 A.M., $15. Info,

829-0211.

NEW PARENTS PLAYGROUP: Families with

very small ones support each other, with assistance from staff. Birth Journeys, Burlington, FIRST AND THIRD FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M., suggested donation $3. Info, 233-7909.

BREASTFEEDING FAMILIES GROUP: Nursing

BURLINGTON EARLY MONTHS INFANT MASSAGE: This mother-infant group

includes baby massage and postpartum new mama support. The Janet S. Munt Family Room, Burlington, WEDNESDAYS, 11 A.M.-NOON. Info, 862-2121. MIDDLEBURY LA LECHE LEAGUE MEETING AND PLAYGROUP: Families with infants

and toddlers socialize and swap nursing stories. Junebug Mother and Child, Middlebury, FIRST WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10 A.M. Info, 388-1055. FREE

MAMA’S CIRCLE BARRE: This supportive

gathering brings moms of new babies and toddlers together to foster friendship through unique-but-shared experiences. Yoga Barre, SECOND FRIDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-11:30 A.M. Info, 595-7953. FREE

moms (and supportive dads, too!) gather for snacks and advice. Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, THIRD WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 11 A.M.-1 P.M. Info, 888-3470. FREE

JOHNSON BABY CHAT: Parents with babies mingle, learn more about developmental needs and expectations, and have the opportunity to ask questions of a maternal health specialist. Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, FOURTH TUESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 10-11:30 A.M. Info, 888-5229. FREE MOMMY GROUP: Breastfeeding peer

counselor Angela Scavo hosts mamas and answers questions in a relaxed setting. Middlebury Recreation Center, FOURTH WEDNESDAY OF EVERY MONTH, 9:30-10:30 A.M. Info, 349-9084. FREE

14 Wednesday (cont.) FFL Bookworms: See February 7. Green Mountain Book Award Book Discussion for Homeschooled Students: High-school homeschoolers spark lively conversation around their favorite pick of the year. Grades 9-12. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Kindermusik Demo Class: Rachel Smith, Kindermusik Instructor, and little ones dance, sing, explore instruments, exercise their imaginations and build school-readiness skills. Ages 5 and under with adult participation required. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.; preregister. Info, 878-4918. Read to Daisy the Therapy Dog: See February 7. Red Clover Group for Homeschooled Students: Budding book lovers bury themselves in bibliophile activities. Grades K-3. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Yoga for Kids: See February 7. FRANKLIN Fairfax Lego Club: Amateur architects construct creatively with colorful blocks. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE Fit Moms: See February 7. History & Homeschoolers: The library teams up with the Saint Albans Museum Director, Alex Lehning, for a history-based miniseries for home learners. Copies of The St. Albans Raid for this session are available at the library. St. Albans Free Library, 1 p.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

RUTLAND Killington Lego Club: See February 7. Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See February 3, 3-6 p.m. ORANGE Randolph Lego Wednesdays: See February 7. WASHINGTON History for Homeschoolers: See February 8. WINDSOR Sensory Lab for Tots: See February 7. Story and Yoga Time with Angel: See February 7.

15 Thursday CHITTENDEN Burlington Mother Up! Monthly Meet-up: Families discuss the realities of climate change, what that means on a local level, and how to transition to a safer and healthier world. Vegetarian meal and childcare for ages 3 and under provided. Unitarian Universalist Society, Burlington, 5:30-7:30 p.m.; RSVP requested. Info, 881-2270. FREE Itty Bitty Public Skating: See February 1. Milton PJ Story Time: Small tots in jammies snuggle in for stories, songs and crafts, Ages 3-6. Milton Public Library, 6-6:45 p.m. Info, 893-4644. FREE Read to Archie the Therapy Dog: See February 1.


SUBMIT YOUR MARCH EVENTS FOR PRINT BY FEBRUARY 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM Read to Van Gogh the Cat: Feline fanciers sign up for literacy sessions with a furry friend. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3:30-4:30 p.m.; preregister for a reading slot. Info, 878-4918. FREE Williston Preschool Music: See February 1. FRANKLIN Chess Club: See February 1. Family STEAM Night: Moms, dads and kids team up for activities around science, technology, engineering, art and/or math, with a theme this month of magnets. Fairfax Community Library, 6:30-7:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE Franklin Lego Thursdays: See February 1. LAMOILLE Tot Time: See February 1. WASHINGTON AB2: Books Come to Life: This Active Body-Active Brain class, led by a literacy professional, combines reading and movement. Babies through preschoolers. Waterbury Public Library, 10:15 a.m. Info, 244-7036. FREE

16 Friday CHITTENDEN Essex Story Time: Library lovers listen to picture books, and have a ball with puppets, songs and rhymes. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:30 a.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Family Gym: See February 2. Family Movie: Viewers enjoy a familyfriendly flick while feasting on free popcorn. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Family Paint Night: Moms, dads and kids take pleasure in painting together with themed suggestions. Davis Studio, South Burlington, 6-7:30 p.m., $25 per person; preregister. Info, 425-2700. Family Wheel Drop-In: See February 2. GroovaRoo: See February 2. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See February 2.

ORLEANS Craftsbury Lego Club: See February 2.

Yoga for Kids: See February 7.

CALEDONIA Caledonia Winter Farmers Market: See February 3. CHITTENDEN ‘Fancy Nancy’ Tea Party: Games, crafts and delicious warm drinks await elegantly dressed little ones. Ages 3-7. Milton Public Library, 1-3 p.m.; preregistration required. Info, 893-4644. FREE

Drag Queen Story Hour: Local drag queens Nikki Champagne and Emoji Nightmare share stories focused on individuality, activism, gender, creativity, expression and social responsibility. All ages. Winooski Memorial Library, 11 a.m. Info, 655-6424. FREE EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: See February 3. Family Art Saturday: Families drop in and ignite their imaginations with a current exhibit, then get hands-on with an artistic endeavor. Burlington City Arts, 11 a.m.-1 p.m. Info, 865-7166. FREE Family Game Afternoon: See February 3. Family Yoga: Parents and children partake in the pleasure of movement together, through songs, games and stories. Ages 1 to 5. Iyengar Yoga Center of Vermont, Burlington, 3:30-4:30 p.m., $12 per adult-child pair, $5 each additional child; preregistration recommended. Info, 379-3789. Read to Cleo the Therapy Dog: See February 3.

FRANKLIN Fit Moms: See February 7. See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. True North: A Guide to Your Best Parenting: Beth Martell, parenting coach, shares her savvy with grown-ups about the power of role modeling, the process of brain maturation, how to set expectations and limits for toddlers to teens and how to communicate to reduce conflict. Women’s Room, Burlington, 2-3:30 p.m., $20; preregister. Info, 881-4161.

19 Monday CHITTENDEN Itty Bitty Public Skating: See February 1. FRANKLIN Lab Girls: Hands-on scientific experiments and explorations empower young women. Grades 4-8. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See February 5. WASHINGTON Capoeira: See February 5. Kids Yoga: See February 5.

Webby’s Art Studio: See February 3. Weekend Fun at Vermont Teddy Bear Company: See February 3. FRANKLIN Highgate Volunteer Fire Department Annual Sliding Party: The whole family has a fling with winter fun, flying down snowy hills and filling up on hot dogs and cocoa. Carter Hill, Highgate, 1-4 p.m. Info, 868-3970. FREE St. Albans Open Gym Fun: See February 3. RUTLAND Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See February 3. WASHINGTON Capital City Winter Farmers Market: See February 3.

18 Sunday CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See February 4. Family Gym: See February 2. Family Purim Celebration: Merrymakers of all ages revel in general raucousness, mask making, a bouncy castle, carnival games, music and a costume contest. Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, Burlington, 9:30-11:30 a.m., donations appreciated. Info, 864-0218. FREE

CHITTENDEN Creative Tuesdays: See February 6.

STEM Club: Sciencey types challenge their imaginations with themed activities. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE RUTLAND Killington Lego Club: See February 7. Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See February 3, 3-6 p.m. ORANGE Randolph Lego Wednesdays: See February 7. WASHINGTON Kids’ Movies: Cinema-lovers of all ages take in a short flick before community dinner is served. A full-length, off-the-beaten-track film screens at 7 p.m. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 5:30 p.m. Info, 426-3581. FREE WINDSOR Story and Yoga Time with Angel: See February 7.

22 Thursday CHITTENDEN Babytime: See February 1. Itty Bitty Public Skating: See February 1. Read to a Dog: See February 8. Read to Archie the Therapy Dog: See February 1. Ukulele Kids: See February 8.

Spanish Musical Kids: See February 6.

Williston Preschool Music: See February 1.

STEAM Tuesdays: See February 13.

FRANKLIN Chess Club: See February 1.

Winooski Lego Club: See February 6. FRANKLIN Spanish Story Hour: Bilingual Stories: Little listeners soak up stories, songs and activities en español. Ages 6 and under. Fairfax Community Library, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Info, 849-2420. FREE WASHINGTON Maker Program: See February 6. WINDSOR Norwich Lego Tuesdays: See February 6.

21 Wednesday CHITTENDEN Chess Club: Smart players check out this strategy game and improve their skills with rooks, pawns and knights. All ages and experience levels. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 5:30-7 p.m. Info, 878-4918. FREE Circle Time: Storyteller and musician, Katie Coons, gets little ones moving through song, play, rhyming games, craft and snack. Ages 5 and under. Jericho Town Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Info, 899-4686. FREE

Franklin Lego Thursdays: See February 1. St. Albans Library Legos: See February 8.

23 Friday CHITTENDEN Dungeons & Dragons: See February 9. Family Gym: See February 2. Family Wheel Drop-In: See February 2. GroovaRoo: See February 2. Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See February 2. Live-Action Role Play: See February 9. Music with Raph: See February 9. Preschool Yoga with Danielle: See February 9. Yoga Storytime: Little yogis blend body movement with books. Ages 2-5. Richmond Free Library, 11 a.m. Info, 434-3036. FREE ORLEANS Craftsbury Lego Club: See February 2.

KIDS VT

Skate Your Winter Blues Away: This fundraiser for Robin’s Nest Children’s Center includes skate rentals for the slick stuff, a bake sale, games, crafts, warm drinks and special visits from Elsa and the Lake Monsters’ Champ. Leddy Park Arena, Burlington, 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m., $8 per person, $25 per group of four; includes rental skates. Info, 864-8191.

20 Tuesday

Read to a Dog: See February 7.

FEBRUARY 2018

LAMOILLE Kids’ Night Out: While their parents appreciate time off, youngsters enjoy dinner, a movie and themed activities. Grades K-5. David Gale Recreation Center, Stowe, 6-10 p.m., $15 per child; drop-ins welcome. Info, 253-6138.

Read to Daisy the Therapy Dog: See February 7.

KIDSVT.COM

Lego Fun: Budding builders bring out the blocks. Children under age 8 must be accompanied by a responsible caregiver. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

17 Saturday

Family Game Day: See February 7. FFL Bookworms: See February 7. 24 SATURDAY, P.46

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SUBMIT YOUR MARCH EVENTS FOR PRINT BY FEBRUARY 15 AT KIDSVT.COM OR CALENDAR@KIDSVT.COM

CALENDAR FEBRUARY 24 Saturday

28 Wednesday

CHITTENDEN Burlington Winter Farmers Market: See February 10. EvoKids Saturday Drop-In Yoga: See February 3. Webby’s Art Studio: See February 3. Weekend Fun at Vermont Teddy Bear Company: See February 3. FRANKLIN St. Albans Open Gym Fun: See February 3. RUTLAND Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See February 3. ORLEANS Block Printing with Ceilidh Kane: Artists of all ages carve linoleum blocks, coat their creations with ink and make images on fabric and paper. Young participants should be accompanied by an adult. Craftsbury Town Hall, 1-3 p.m., $15-20; RSVP requested. Info, 533-9370.

25 Sunday CHITTENDEN Essex Open Gym: See February 4. Family Gym: See February 2. WINDSOR Norwich Winter Farmers Market: See February 10, 9 a.m.-1 p.m.

26 Monday

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2018

KIDSVT.COM

CALEDONIA School Vacation Week Classes: Artist and educator Heidi Lyons offers a variety of art options for students on school break. Ages 5-8 and ages 9 and up. See website for details. Outback Artspace, St. Johnsbury, 10 a.m.-noon & 1-3 p.m., $10-15; scholarships available. Info, 748-2600, ext. 2.

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CHITTENDEN Chess Club: Players of all ages pursue a game of strategy. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Pajama Story Time: Little ones in PJs nestle in for stories and snacks. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6-6:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956.

CALEDONIA Junk Instrument Making: Vermont Vaudeville’s Justin Lander makes musical instruments from common household items and garbage — and teaches kids how to devise their own unique noisemakers. Ages 7 and up. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 10 a.m. Info, 472-5948. FREE

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org. CHITTENDEN Burlington Circle of Parents for Adoptive & Guardianship Families: Moms and dads come together to socialize about their parenting experiences and strengthen skills. Childcare and dinner included without fee. Howard Center, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 864-7467. FREE

School Vacation Week Classes: See February 26.

Creative Tuesdays: See February 6. Drop-In Lego Day: Amateur architects snap together buildings of their own design. Children ages 8 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Info, 878-4918. FREE Interactive Movie Night: Wizards-in-training follow a special movie with a script and participate with provided props. Ages 11 and up. Milton Public Library, 5:30-7:45 p.m.; preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Shelburne Magic: the Gathering: See February 13. Spanish Musical Kids: See February 6. Vacation Movie: Kids relaxing on school break enjoy a family-friendly flick while feasting on popcorn. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2-4:10 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Looking for a story time?

WASHINGTON Capoeira: See February 5. Kids Yoga: See February 5.

27 Tuesday CALEDONIA School Vacation Week Classes: See February 26.

photographs capture birds in their worlds and educate the public about local avian wildlife and Audubon’s work. Through February 6. FREE

Family Game Day: See February 7. LGBT+ Drop-In Group: LGBT+ teens and allies socialize with peers and propose projects to increase awareness. Grades 8 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE Maker Lab: Hands-on experimenting entertains entrepreneurial engineers. Grades 5-8. Milton Public Library, 3:30-4:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 893-4644. FREE Quarto Tournament: Strategy-lovers put their deductive reasoning skills to use. Ages 8 and up. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 1:30 p.m.; preregister. Info, 865-7216. FREE

RUTLAND Killington Lego Club: See February 7. Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See February 3, 3-6 p.m.

Stories with Megan: See February 5.

RUTLAND Babies & Toddlers Rock: See February 5.

2017 AUDUBON PHOTOGRAPHY AWARDS SHOW: Prize

Little Explorer Nature Adventure Program: Eager naturalists-in-training search out the secrets of the world with Kurt Valenta and his hands-on nature approach, in various community sites during the school year. Ages 3-10 with parent participation. Highgate Public Library, Highgate Center, 9:15 a.m.; preregister. Info, 868-3970. FREE

Check out our voluminous list at kidsvt.com/storytime

Winooski Lego Club: See February 6. FRANKLIN Snowflake Craft: Children of all ages participate in paper creations celebrating winter. St. Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Info, 524-1507. FREE

Winter Beach Party: Little ones beat the cabin fever blues with beach-themed stories, crafts, music, snacks and activities for ages 2-8. BYO beach attire and towel. Fairfax Community Library, 10-11:15 a.m.; preregister. Info, 849-2420. FREE WINDSOR Norwich Lego Tuesdays: See February 6.

ORANGE Randolph Lego Wednesdays: See February 7. WINDSOR Sensory Lab for Tots: See February 7.

MONTSHIRE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE, NORWICH Info, 649-2200 PLAYING AROUND: ENGINEERING AND TOYS: Curious explorers dig

into scientific concepts through playing. Activities include an inside examination of classic childhood toys — Jack-in-the-box, Hokey Pokey Elmo and Etch A Sketch — and creative building with Big Blue Blocks and Tinker Toys. Regular museum admission, $12-15; free for children under 2. Through March 25. THE LIGHT AROUND US: Inquisitive visitors learn about light through experimenting with lenses and mirrors, changing the color of everyday objects, separating white light into colors, discovering what lies beyond the visible spectrum and more. Regular museum admission, $12-15; free for children under 2. Through May 2.

SHELBURNE MUSEUM, SHELBURNE Info, 985-3346, ext. 3395 SWEET TOOTH: THE ART OF DESSERT: This mixed media exhibit serves up a feast for the eyes, exploring our insatiable desire for sugary stuff through paintings, prints, sculptures and more. Winter museum admission, $5-10; free for children under 5. Through February 18. PUPPETS: WORLD ON A STRING:

Storytelling and the visual arts collide in this immersive, multimedia exhibit from 19th century marionettes to contemporary digital installations. Animals speak, shadows come alive, and politicians face critics, by artists including Jim Henson, Peter Schumann and Andy Warhol. Regular museum admission, $5-10; free for members and children under 5. Through June 3.

Story and Yoga Time with Angel: See February 7. 

Say you saw it in

house-2.3x.8-orange.indd 1

ECHO LEAHY CENTER FOR LAKE CHAMPLAIN, BURLINGTON Info, 864-1848 MY SKY: Astronomy lovers explore the sun, moon and stars in this immersive exhibit which encourages scientific skills such as observing, noticing patterns, predicting, imagining and more. Regular museum admission, $11.50-14.50; free for children under 3. Through May 6. MAIN STREET LANDING, BURLINGTON Info, 864-7999

FRANKLIN Fit Moms: See February 7.

FREE

Williston Preschool Music: See February 1, 11 a.m.

CHITTENDEN Beads, Beads, Beads: Crafty kiddos go crazy creating earrings, brooches, necklaces, bracelets and more. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2-3 p.m. Info, 878-6956. FREE

Ongoing Exhibits

5/25/12 9:40 AM


JUST FOR KIDS

Writing Contest & Winners, p. 48 Coloring Contest Winners, p. 48 Coloring Contest, p. 49 Puzzle Page, p. 50 Birthday Club, p. 50 Puzzle Answers, p. 51

Best Friend Search

It’s true that a dog is a person’s best friend. But pups might want to meet some other pals, as well. There are 16 animals pictured here, but all of their name tags got mixed up in the box below. Now some read across, some read down, and some are even on a diagonal! Can you find these words so that the canines and the critters can converse correctly?

KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2018

Basset Bat Beagle Bear Beaver Bee Bichon Bloodhound Bluejay Borzoi Boxer Buffalo Bull Bulldog Bunny Butterfly

KIDS VT

47


COLORING CONTEST WINNERS

JUST FOR KIDS

Writing Contest

SPONSORED BY

President’s Day is a holiday observed on the third Monday of February. It was established in 1885 to recognize George Washington’s birthday. Imagine that you become president one day. Write about what you would do to try to improve peoples’ lives.

Kids’ works of art were filled with gliding ice skates and glittering snowflakes this month. Interestingly, some young artists saw the drawing as a bear, while others considered it a cat. Eightyear-old Maya’s teddy danced through the season’s first snowfall under a turquoise sky. Elizah, 12, dressed up a Santa bear in a cherry-red suit, with pasted-on jewels for extra flair. Five-year-old Blakely’s furry friend skated on blue ice, with a fluttering rainbow scarf trailing behind. Marvelous work, kids. We can’t wait to see your imaginative creations this month!

HONORABLE MENTIONS FESTIVE FELINE

Jaxon Keane, 9, Orange

The winners of annual family memberships to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium are…

“Mrs. Paddington Ice Skating!” Zac Zalewski, 5

5& under

STOWE

NEW YEAR’S SHINDIG

Audrey Neilson, 9, Charlotte A DELICIOUS DINNER

Olivia Neilson, 7, Charlotte SUPER MAMA CAT

Remington Brockett, 4, Berlin HAPPY AT HOGWARTS

Zoey Copp, 12, Brownington We’ll pick two winners and publish their submissions in the next issue. Winners receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop. Deadline to enter is February 15. Send your entries to: Kids VT, attn: Writing Contest, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

RAINBOW BEAR Name ________________________________

Lauren Hill, 7, Ferrisburgh

Age __________________________________

ELF WITH A SCARF

Town ________________________________

Hazel Abetti, 10, Concord

Email ________________________________

HOORAY FOR HOCKEY

Phone ________________________________

Sullivan Martaniuk, 8, Colchester SKIING AT THE NORDIC CENTER

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2018

KIDSVT.COM

Maëlle Remsen, 3, Middlebury

48

WRITING WINNERS In our December/January Issue, we asked kids to describe what they’d build with an unlimited amount of snow. Below, find the imaginative winning entries. Sophie and Harper each receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop in Burlington.

Sophie Freebern, 8 RICHMOND

t, and I would build a snow for uld wo It IC! it would be EP g, and have a thick snow ceilin like in r oo fl the a snowflake in tle! cas ice ) zen Fro m (fro Elsa’s of de ma be The walls would ough. ice, so you could see thr and on s, rie sto o It would be tw room my be uld wo d on sec the and library.

Harper Kring, 9 HINESBURG

If I had the ability to use all of the snow in the world to build anythin g in the world, I would build Hogwarts castle from Harry Potter. It would have rooms with fluffy snow cushions and soft snow bedding. And they would have snow tables to eat their meals at. For classrooms, they would have lots of snow spel l books and snow wands to cast spells. There would be snow cake s with hot honey and they would drink melted snow. For fun, they would build snowmen and make snowballs to have a snowball fight. If someone was being mean, then they would go to the snow dungeon and not get to eat a good meal. And now, since you know about what I would build, I will see if I can buil d it on a snowy day!

“Skating With Teddy” Naya Vaughan, 8 SOUTH HERO

6 to 8

COCOA CREATURE

Marit Teubert, 4, Morrisville HAPPY HUES

Luna Gordon, 5, Glover AWESOME OLYMPIAN

Rylee Preston, 7, Tupper Lake, NY

TOP TITLES “BEAR WALKS SOUTH FOR THE WINTER”

Lane Fortune, 4, Georgia

“MY FRIEND, THE BEAR, IS RUNNING THROUGH THE SNOW”

Esme Olsen, 6, Shelburne “DONUT GLORY”

Marin Walsh, 9, Shelburne

“Ice Skating” Kelman Pirie, 10 TOPSHAM

9 to 12


Coloring Contest! Three winners will each receive an annual family membership to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium. Send Kids VT your work of art by February 15. Be sure to include the info at right with your submission. Winners will be chosen in the following categories: (1) ages 5 and younger, (2) ages 6-8 and (3) ages 9-12. Winners will be named in the March issue of Kids VT. Send your high-resolution scans to art@kidsvt.com or mail a copy to Kids VT, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

Title _______________________________________ Sponsored by

Artist _____________________________________ Age ______________ Town _________________ Email _____________________________________ Phone _____________________________________

KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2018 KIDS VT

49


Birthday Club

JUST FOR KIDS BY DAVID L. HOYT & JEFF KNUREK

The letters of these crazy words are all mixed up. To play the game, put them back into the right order so that they make real words you can find in your dictionary. Write the letters of each real word under each crazy word, but only one letter to a square.

n LUCAS lives in Burlingto 16. ary and turns 3 on Febru o wh all ofb He’s a cuddly go ng gli ug sn es, jok g loves tellin with ga yo ing do s, cat ee his thr tools Mom and building with d. Da th wi in the woodshop d to Lucas wins a $50 gift car er. est lch Co in e Spare Tim

EVERETT lives

Print your answer here:

Everett, Lilee and Eleanor each win $10 gift cards to Spare Time.

Riddle Answer:

ANSWERS P. 51

Essex Junction and turns 8 on February 20. She has a zest for life, and loves to tap dance and be silly. Her nickname is even Silly Lilee!

ELEANOR is from Grand Isle and turns 8 on February 20. She’s an inquisitive, exuberant girl who enjoys dancing, reading and skiing. She loves to spend time with friends and family and plan parties. Untitled-8 1

SPARE TIME COLCHESTER • 215 LOWER MOUNTAIN VIEW DRIVE • 802-655-2720 • WWW.SPARETIMECOLCHESTER.COM

KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2018 KIDS VT

50

Look up, down and diagonally, both forward and backward, to find every word on the list. Circle each one as you find it. When all the words are circled, take the UNUSED letters and write them on the blanks below. Go from left to right and top to bottom to find the answer to this riddle: What kind of money do snowmen use?

EXPENSES INCOME NICKEL PENNY QUARTER RATE SAFE SAVINGS STOCKS TAX

Just give us your contact info, your children’s names and birth dates, and a photo, and they’re automatically enrolled.

LILEE lives in

BY HELENA HOVANEC

Riddle Search — MONEY

BALANCE BANK BILL BUSINESS CENT CHANGE CHECKS DIME DOLLAR ECONOMICS

To enter, submit information using the online form at kidsvt.com/birthday-club

No cash value. Can only be redeemed by Birthday Child’s Parent. Must present Golden Ticket at Birthday Party Check-in Before the start of Birthday Party. One Golden Ticket per birthday party. Book your birthday party and enjoy by: June 30, 2018

Puzzles4Kids

Join the Club!

BIRTHDAY CHILD IS FREE!

You are now ready to solve this month’s Jumble For Kids. Study the picture for a hint. Then play around with the letters in the circles. You’ll find you can put them in order so that they make your funny answer.

in Hinesburg and turns 4 on February 15. He loves singing, grilled cheese sandwiches and outer space. He also enjoys performing “shows” that star characters from “Paw Patrol,“ “Rescue Bots” and whoever else might be needed for an adventure.

Congratulations to these February Birthday Club winners!

Present this Golden Ticket at the start of your party

Jumble

10/24/17 12:39 PM


USE YOUR WORDS BY GRA CE P E R L E E

Planning a kids event?

PUZZLE PAGE ANSWERS

SEE “JUST FOR KIDS” SECTION FOR PUZZLES

FEBRUARY 2018 KIDS VT

I started by scheduling a night away from it all at a local hotel. I spent much of the time just sitting in the enormous bathtub, willing myself not to listen for the baby. But I managed to get almost eight hours of sleep that night. It felt amazing. Then I arranged for another night off, at a lake house with a friend, and that was heaven. We just sat on the dock and talked for hours; I felt like myself again. For my 40th birthday, I took a whole week off, flying to Las Vegas to catch up with old friends by the pool. While walking around downtown Vegas, I ended up seeing a fortuneteller. “You keep trying to leave your problems behind,” she said, holding my hands and looking into my eyes, “but then you get home and they’re still there.” OK, that’s probably true for most people in Vegas, but still, it spoke to me. I began to realize that self-care wasn’t about escaping my life. It was about making time for myself in my life. So when I got home from my trip, I started to do just that. When my mother-in-law asked what the baby wanted for his first birthday, I told her he’d like a NutriBullet, and soon I was drinking

CALENDAR

JUMBLES

My go-to self-care skills include binging on Netflix and candy and biting my fingernails.

green smoothies every day. Whereas before my meals consisted of a handful of whatever the kids hadn’t eaten — leftover oatmeal, frozen waffles, cold noodles — now I took time to prepare something nourishing for myself. I noticed I had more energy and more patience. Then I started going to a gym that offers childcare, which means that every time I visit, I get an hour and a half entirely to myself. I usually end my workout with a luxurious five-minute shower and trip to the sauna, without anyone screaming or proudly pointing at their poo in the toilet. It’s like a miniature vacation, built right into my day. I am kinder to myself in other ways. I’m spending less time cleaning and cooking, and worrying about other people’s feelings. This past month, I weaned my youngest about four months earlier than I’d planned. I hated to do it, but taking breast milk off the menu means he’s finally able to sleep through the night — something I desperately needed him to do. So here I am, four decades in, finally learning a bit about how to love and care for myself — though the term “self-care” still makes me cringe, maybe because of the privilege it implies. I realize not everyone has the resources to take time for themselves. My mother certainly didn’t. But I also think that most women are socialized to never even consider the option that loving and caring for themselves, apart from keeping up their appearance, might be worthwhile. As mothers, we’re expected to take a back seat to our family’s needs, stopping only to have a giant glass of merlot in the evening, while scrolling through Pinterest for bigger and better ideas on how to serve them. Well, screw that. I’m here for my kids, of course. And for my husband and friends and family, as much as I can be. But “as much as I can” is shifting a bit as I learn to make room for something just as important: myself. K

HEN. TOOK. FIVE. LONG.

I ran out of nails to bite. My hair began to fall out. Thanks to some abdominal injuries from pregnancy, my back hurt almost constantly. Add to that my immense frustration at the gut I’d been unable to lose since having the baby, and I was kind of a mess. At one point, fighting a mild case of mastitis, I began to fantasize that it would get worse, and I might end up in the hospital for a “vacation.” I realized that something needed to change.

KIDSVT.COM

hese days, every other magazine touts methods for “self-care,” encompassing everything from hot yoga with goats to eating hemp seeds to creating a vision board. It’s a term most of us didn’t grow up with. I know I didn’t. My mother raised three kids on her own, and I’m pretty sure that if you’d said “self-care” in her presence, she would have paused just long enough to light another cigarette and exhale in your face before turning back to cook dinner. The only time she put herself first was when she got sick, which ended up happening quite a bit. Her asthma and smoking led to recurrent bouts of pneumonia, which were often followed by deep depression. This would lead her to check out mentally for weeks, sometimes months, at a time. As children do, I learned from her example. In my teens and 20s, I also handled stress by checking out — not because of depression or illness but with the help of alcohol and an assortment of drugs. And it worked for me — for a while. Cut to present day. I’m a fairly responsible 40-year-old with a family and a mortgage. My body doesn’t handle drugs or alcohol like it used to. Besides, as a mother of two sons, ages 4 and 1, I try to model better coping strategies. But here’s the problem: I never developed better coping strategies. When it comes to dealing with stress, my go-to self-care skills include binging on Netflix and candy and biting my fingernails. A year and a half ago, my husband and I had our second child. Making that transition with our very sensitive older son was humbling, to say the least. Then, I decided to stay home with the baby. As a one-income family, our bills began to pile up. So I picked up freelance writing work and, soon, I was sleeping even less than before. Also, Trump was elected, adding to my existing fears of just what kind of world we had brought these children into.

RIDDLE ANSWER:

T

The golfer wanted to wear his favorite socks, but he had a —HOLE IN ONE.

How I learned to take care of myself

List it for free in the Kids VT monthy calendar. Submit your March event by February 15th online at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com

RIDDLE SEARCH ANSWER: Cold cash.

Self Love, Actually

51 51


SUMMER 2018 AT THE FLYNN

Performing Arts Camps

AGES 4-19 plus adult & teen classes

REGISTER NOW

FLYNNARTS.ORG

802.652-4537

Kids VT, February 2018  

Friends Forever: Best Buds Share What Makes Their Relationships Special; Champlain College's Single Parents Program; Snowboard Extraordinair...

Kids VT, February 2018  

Friends Forever: Best Buds Share What Makes Their Relationships Special; Champlain College's Single Parents Program; Snowboard Extraordinair...

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