Issuu on Google+

FEB 2017

FREE

VOL.24 NO.1

CUT THESE OUT AND SPREAD THE LOVE!

CAMP GUIDE


CUT THESE OUT AND SPREAD THE LOVE!

ILLUSTRATIONS BY:


EDITOR’S NOTE

Celebrate your Birthday at the Vermont Teddy Bear Factory! All parties include: • A private tour • A Make a Friend for Life® Bear for each child • Private party space staffed by a Vermont Ted d y Bear Ambassador. Ambassador.

Graham sporting a Camp Abnaki T-shirt

To learn about our party packages, visit packages, visit vermontteddybear.com/birthday-parties The Vermont Teddy Bear Company 6655 Shelburne Road, Shelburne, VT (802)985-3001 ext. 1700 • bearshop@vtbear.com

Ready, Set, Camp! My partner, Ann-Elise, and I bargained her down to two. Both kids wear their camp T-shirts all year long. Graham has a baseball cap he wears, too. They tell us camp stories when something reminds them of being there. Ann-Elise and I are so happy that our kids have found another community of caring adults and peers who can nurture their independence and boost their self-confidence. We initially found both Graham and Ivy’s camps at the Kids VT Camp and School Fair. We’ve discovered day programs for them there, too. Last year, the kids ended the summer navigating obstacles at a week-long parkour camp at Green Mountain Training Center in Williston. This year’s fair takes place on Saturday, February 4, from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. at the Hilton Burlington on Battery Street. Representatives from more than 50 camps and schools will be there to provide information and answer questions. If you’re going to the Penguin Plunge on the Burlington waterfront, stop by to see us afterward. This month’s issue also contains a camp guide, which includes camp directors’ favorite memories from last summer, to put you in the right frame of mind. Our next three issues will include camp guides. If you don’t sign up soon, they’ll remind you to get it done. You’ll find more articles — and a camp search tool — at kidsvt.com.

10/26/16 2:05 PM

up to

KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2017 KIDS VT

HAVE YOU SIGNED your kids up for summer camp yet? I know, it’s winter outside — the kids are in their ski and snowboard programs, playing basketball or hockey, or gearing up for wrestling season like mine (go Colchester Cobras!). But it’s time for parents to start thinking about what’s in store when school’s out. Camps can fill up quickly. Some offer early registration discounts, so there may even be a financial incentive. We’re fortunate in Vermont to have lots of options, from traditional sleepaway camps to skill-building specialty programs. If there’s something your children like to do, chances are there’s a camp here that offers it. I only went to camp a couple of times when I was a kid, but my son and daughter go every summer. They started off in day camp when they were 6 or 7, and first went to sleepaway camp at age 8 or 9. This will be Graham’s third summer sleeping away at Camp Abnaki, an all-boys camp in North Hero. He’s 11. I asked him what he liked about it last year, and he told me he liked being around other boys. He’s got two moms and a sister at home. “Even our dog is a girl!” he complained. Can’t say I blame him. Ivy, who will be 9 this summer, will return to Camp Hochelaga, an all-girls camp in South Hero. She spent a week there last summer. When I picked her up at the end of the session, she told me, matter-of-factly, that she wanted to spend three weeks there next time.

Untitled-7 1

CATHY RESMER, EXECUTIVE EDITOR 3

Untitled-34 1

1/26/17 11:06 AM


Planning to send the kids to camp this summer?

A Lifestyle Loan from NEFCU can help! Whether your child is going to art, soccer, science or adventure camp you can cover your camp expenses with a Lifestyle Loan from NEFCU.

Call 866-80-loans, visit nefcu.com or stop by any branch.

Local, affordable, and on your side™. 800-400-8790 · nefcu.com

866-80-LOANS · nefcu.com

Federally Insured by NCUA

1/25/17 10:10 AM

Untitled-6 1

1/19/17 3:10 PM

4

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2017

KIDSVT.COM

Untitled-4 1


VOL.24 NO .1

FEBRUARY 2017

DISCOUNTED

Editor’s Note....................................................................3 See & Say ..........................................................................6 Coloring Contest Winners .................................7 Writing Contest Winners....................................7 Bookworms: 2017 Preview .................................12 Habitat: Teeny-Tiny House .................................35 Birthday Club..................................................................37 Use Your Words: Crushing It ............................39

Native Language Learners...18

Culture schools help kids hold on to their heritage

It’s a SNAP...22

EAT. LEARN. PLAY Kids Beat .............................................................................8 One to Watch: Xavier Pigeon............................10 Fit Families: Statehouse Skating .................11 Checkup: Personal Boundaries.......................13 Balancing Act: Blair Marvin & Andrew Heyn............................................................14 Mealtime: Chicken Cordon Bleu ....................15 The Art of Cake Decorating ................................16 Destination Recreation: Play Café...............17

ARGAIN PRICES ! ALL AT B

Smugglers’ Notch Adaptive Program gets kids of all abilities onto the slopes

1186 Williston Rd. So. Burlington, VT 05403 (Next to the Alpine Shop) 802.863.0143 Open 7 days 10am-7pm cheeseandwinetraders.com

Summer Camp

CALENDAR Daily Listings ..................................................................24 Classes ..................................................................................25 Ongoing Exhibits ........................................................27 Playgroups ........................................................................28 Story Times ......................................................................32

CENTER PULLOUT What is your favorite memory from camp last summer?

Local greeting card company Tiny Gang Designs created these original Valentine’s Day cards for Kids VT. Cut them out and spread the love!

Writing Contest............................................................36 Puzzle Page ......................................................................37 Coloring Contest .........................................................38

children 18 months through 12 years of age.

cathy@kidsvt.com colby@kidsvt.com alison@kidsvt.com meredith@kidsvt.com brooke@kidsvt.com corey@kidsvt.com kaitlin@kidsvt.com brett@kidsvt.com

ext. 74 ext. 77 ext. 75 ext. 75 ext. 41 ext. 76 ext. 72 ext. 78

Editorial content in Kids VT is for general informational purposes. Parents must use their own discretion for following the advice in any editorial piece. Acceptance of advertising does not constitute service/product endorsement. Kids VT is a proud member of the Parenting Media Association. Kids VT distribution is audited for accuracy.

Contributing Writers: Darcie Abbene, Sarah Tuff Dunn, Janet Essman Franz, Sarah Galbraith, Astrid Hedbor Lague, Grace Per Lee, Mary Ann Lickteig, Ken Picard, Kymelya Sari, Jessica Lara Ticktin Photographers: Matthew Thorsen, Tristan Von Duntz, Jeb Wallace-Brodeur

A child-centered All inquiries: 802-479-0912 info@mscvt.org alternative education. ... dedicated the philosophy and All toinquiries: teachings of Maria Montessori

802-479-0912 info@mscvt.org

... dedicated to the philosophy and teachings of Maria Montessori

Illustrators: Stephanie Farrell, Hatiye Garip, Diane Sullivan, Katie Wilhite

KIDS VT

5

Da Capo Publishing shall not be held liable to any advertiser for any loss that results from the incorrect publication of its advertisement. If a mistake is ours, and the advertising purpose has been rendered valueless, Da Capo Publishing may cancel the charges for the advertisement, or a portion thereof as deemed reasonable by the publisher. Da Capo Publishing reserves the right to refuse any advertising, including inserts, at the discretion of the publishers.

Proofreaders Carolyn Fox Katherine Isaacs Elizabeth Seyler Production Manager John James Creative Director Don Eggert Designers Charlotte Scott Rev. Diane Sullivan Circulation Manager Matt Weiner Business Manager Cheryl Brownell

FEBRUARY 2017

© 2017 Da Capo Publishing Inc. All rights reserved.

Cathy Resmer Colby Roberts Alison Novak Meredith Coeyman Brooke Bousquet Corey Grenier Kaitlin Montgomery Brett Stanciu

A child-centered alternative education.

KIDSVT.COM

Copublisher/Executive Editor Copublisher Managing Editor Contributing Editor Art Director Marketing & Events Manager Account Executives Calendar Writer

Published 11x per year. Circulation: 25,000 at 600+ locations throughout northern and central Vermont.

1/24/17 3:47 PM

Providing aamixed-aged, Providing mixed-aged, developmental program for developmental program for children 18 months through 12 years of age.

STAFF & CONTRIBUTORS

k8v-CheeseTraders0217.indd 1

ON THE COVER

HANDS ON

P.O. Box 1184 Burlington, VT 05402 802-985-5482 kidsvt.com

ORGANIC SNACKS, CHIPS, YOGURTS, COOKIES, FOODS FOR KIDS, SOUPS, RICE, BARGAIN CHEESES, CLOSE-OUT WINES & NEW SURPRISES EVERYDAY!

k8v-MSCVT0217.indd 1

1/24/17 6:52 PM


SEE & SAY

Love Notes

Beat the Winter Blues

Like our interactive cover this month? Thank Katie Wilhite (left) and Stephanie Farrell (right). They’re childhood friends, originally from Shelburne. As kids, they made a pact to start their own greeting card company when they grew up. Many moons later, they made that dream a reality and are now banging out cards — one pun at a time — as part of their business, Tiny Gang Designs. Find more of their work at etsy.com/shop/tinygangdesigns.

Outdoor Skating Rinks

Many Vermont families hit the slopes at the first sign of snowfall. But skiing isn't for everyone. When you don't have a ski-resort season pass, figuring out fun, familyoriented winter activities can be a challenge. Last year, we asked Kids VT staff and contributors to recommend trips and activities — of the non-skiing variety — to spice up those long winter days. Their suggestions included outdoor and indoor options, and outings that take anywhere from a few hours to an entire weekend. Some adventures are educational, others are physical, and some are just plain fun.

LET THE GAMES BEGIN

In Fit Families (page 11), we write about the new skating rink on the Statehouse lawn in Montpelier. Looking for other open-air venues to glide on ice? Find them below. Lake Morey Resort, Fairlee, lakemoreyresort. com/activities/ winter-activities

Skatium, 40 Slow Rd., Waitsfield, madrivervalley. com/listing/skatiumoutdoor-ice-skating-rink

Camel’s Hump Middle School, Richmond

North Barre Outdoor Skating Rink, Treatment Plant Dr., Barre, facebook.com/ northbarrerink

Randolph Ice Rink, 26 Prince St., Randolph, randolphrec.wordpress.com/ randolph-winter-programs

Plainfield Recreation Field, Plainfield

Town Skating Rink 108 Shed Rd., Berlin, berlinvt.org/community/ recreation/town-skating-rink

Schoolhouse Commons, Marshfield

Newport City Skating Rink, Gardner Memorial Park, 129 Gardner Park Rd., Newport, newportrecreation.org/gardnermemorial-park.html

Four Seasons Park, St. Johnsbury

Don't Miss Out!

6

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2017 KIDSVT.COM

Find all the calendar listings for February on page 24.

CALENDAR

Owl Festival

Saturday, February 25, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., at the Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center in Quechee. 

Butterfly Pavilion

Saturday, February 11 -Monday, September 4, 10 a.m.-5 pm., at ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain in Burlington. 

Mother and Son Valentine Bowling

Saturday, February 11, Noon-1:30 p.m., at Twin City Lanes in Barre.

INTERNATIONAL ALLURE: MONTRÉAL

Plan a day at the Biodôme, then spend the day in Chinatown or window shopping on rue Sainte-Catherine. Book an afternoon at SkyVenture Montréal, an indoor skydiving place!

OLYMPIC-SIZE ADVENTURE: LAKE PLACID

The site of the 1932 and 1980 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, N.Y., is located just an hour and a half from Burlington. Spend the night at the Golden Arrow Lakeside Resort that overlooks Mirror Lake.

Spare Time is a family-friendly bowling alley and arcade in Colchester near Costco. For little ones, bumpers keep their bowling balls out of the gutter. There's also an arcade and a two-story laser tag arena.

STARGAZING AND POLAR BEARS

The Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium in St. Johnsbury is Vermont's first natural history museum. Stumbling upon a warthog and coming face-toface with a polar bear makes the experience feel more like poking around an explorer's attic than touring a stuffy museum.

SCIENCE AND BAKING

Have lunch at King Arthur Flour Bakery & Café. Then head to the Montshire Museum of Science for the rotating exhibits.Burn off energy by trudging from planet to planet in the scale model of the solar system outside.

A SOOTHING SWIM

Head to the Swimming Hole in Stowe for a little warmwater fun. The children's pool is heated and never gets deeper than three feet. A waterslide and several other giant water-fountain toys are fun for everyone.


Winners' Circle In the December/January issue, we asked kids to tell us about their resolutions for the coming year. The two winners each receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop in Burlington. Below are the winning entries.

Julia Neubelt, 10

Ambiana Glavin, 10

BURLINGTON

WORCESTER

Something that I would like to accomplish is to learn how to read music so it will help me to be in choir. Another thing I would like to accomplish is to learn to draw more realistic things. A way to achieve these goals are to study the music arts and ask to go to art classes. I love to do both of these things, so why not get better at them?

I believe there are many things I could improve or accomplish. I would like to become a better dancer and sister and to just keep being me!

Find this month’s writing prompt on page 36. The deadline is February 15. Happy writing!

COLORING CONTEST

This month, our hardworking contestants embraced the Arctic scene, using mixed mediums to fill their pages with an array of colors and funny conversation bubbles. Anna Hartwell, 5, painted her two walruses with pastel shades of blue and purple, topping off her masterpiece with sparkling glitter. Elle Gardner, 8, created a volcano — spouting steam, lava and comic books — around her creatures. Thanks for all your great submissions. Judging the coloring contest is a bright spot of the month for us here at Kids VT headquarters.

The winners of annual family memberships to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium are…

5 and under

“Winter Sparkle” Violet Marias, 5 UNDERHILL

HONORABLE MENTIONS For more than a decade, the Burlington Electric Department has sponsored an Energy Efficiency Calendar Contest, asking fourth graders in the six Queen City elementary schools to create a drawing that expresses what energy efficiency means to them. In December, the 13 winners of this year’s contest gathered for an American Flatbread pizza party and awards ceremony. The calendar cover was drawn by Connor Byam of Champlain Elementary School. Burlington Electric Department calendar contest winners

PARTY ON ICE

Caleb Nadeau, 10, Morgan WALRUS WORLD

Jacob Poginy, 8, Barton SISTER SEALS

Ella Daley, 4, Essex Junction CHILLIN’ OUT

Kayden Labelle, 6, Rochester ARCTIC ANTICS

RAINBOW VAMPIRE WALRUSES

Mason King, 6, Burlington SNAZZY HATS

Ella Stokey, 5, Essex Junction The Vermont Department of Health holds an annual poster contest, giving elementary and middle school students a chance to use art to help spread the word about the dangers of radon. This year, students at Edmunds Middle School in Burlington received first, second and third prize, as well as honorable mention. Addie DeLeonardis-Page, age 12, earned top honors for her “Radon on Your Radar?” poster. “I like to find real-world connections for students, and give them an audience outside of school,” said Edmunds teacher Daryl Kuhn.

6 to 8

Megan Peterson, 9, Richmond “Walrus Christmas” Oona Indulala Perry, 6 CASTLETON

PINK SKY AT NIGHT, SEAL’S DELIGHT

Marcus Enton, 5, Richmond JUST ME AND MY MOM

Luke Bushy, 6, Georgia HIDE-AND-SEEK SEALS

Jeff Bacon, 5, Glover SANTA PAWS

Sofia Graves, 9, South Burlington SEAL-TASTIC

Deena Badalyan, 10, South Burlington

TOP TITLES Catherine McKinney, 4, South Burlington “WALRUSES STARGAZING”

Emmie-lyn Elizarde, 8, Burlington

“2 Seals of Beauty” Hasan Azhar Kanim, 9 SOUTH BURLINGTON

Austin Shepard, 10, South Burlington

7

Find this month’s coloring contest on page 38. The deadline is February 15.

KIDS VT

“THE GREAT LIGHTS OF THE NORTH”

FEBRUARY 2017

9 to 12

“ZOOZOO AND ZEEZEE WALRUS”

KIDSVT.COM

Teacher of the Year Katherine McCann with Katherine McCann, a math teacher at alternate Rachael Potts (left) and finalist U-32 Middle and High School in East Corey Smith (right) Montpelier; has been selected as the 2017 Vermont Teacher of the Year, the Agency of Education announced in December. Also recognized were Rachael Potts, a special education and transition specialist at Harwood Union High School, and Corey Smith, a fourth-grade teacher at Proctor Elementary School. McCann is also Vermont’s candidate for the National Teacher of the Year award. This spring she’ll meet the president at a White House reception. “Teaching is an opportunity to make long-lasting, close, personal connections with young people, to make a difference in the lives of others,” she said.


THE CKS serves learners from pre-school (3 years old) through 8th grade

SCHOOLS

Valuable! Affordable! Inclusive! Innovative! Come see the benefits yourself!

Made With Love

Picture a serpentine crabapple tree covered in a patchwork of colorful yarn pieces. That’s what Burlington resident Carrie Napolitan envisions for a tree in front of her children’s school as Valentine’s Day approaches. Napolitan, mom to a second grader and a preschooler at Integrated Arts Academy at H.O. Wheeler in Burlington, is the organizer of PROJECT HEART VT, an idea that came to her in the aftermath of the presidential election. Feeling uncertain about what the future would bring — and hearing about students who felt similarly — Napolitan was inspired by a hot-pink yarn bombing art installation in Europe designed to bring attention to the plight of

Financial aid available!

136 Locust Street, Burlington, VT 862-6696 • www.cksvt.org admissions@cksvt.org facebook.com/cksvt

! l i a M Wee

Find information about local events and parenting resources every Thursday in the Kids VT Wee-Mail. Visit kidsvt.com/wee-mail to subscribe today. Wee-Mail sponsored by:

8v-Wee-Mail-0217.indd 1

B Y MERE D IT H CO E YM AN , J A N ET F RAN Z & A LISO N N OVAK

refugees. Community members are encouraged to knit or crochet colorful swatches of yarn, which will be wrapped and sewn together around the tree trunk and branches. Additionally, students at IAA will write positive messages on fabric hearts, which will be laminated and hung from the tree. The installation will stay up through the end of the school year and serve as “a reminder that IAA welcomes everyone,” said Napolitan, and is a “safe place and a loving place.”

—A.N.

To learn more about project heart VT, find it on Facebook or send contributions to PROJECT HEART, Integrated Arts Academy, 6 Archibald St., Burlington VT 05401.

1/26/17 2:30 PM

SNOW SPORTS

Check It Out

This winter, public library patrons in Franklin and Grand Isle counties can borrow snowshoes along with their books, thanks to a donation from RISEVT. The grassroots campaign, funded by Northwestern Medical Center, aims to promote healthy lifestyles by sponsoring nutritionand health-focused community and school events. Libraries in Enosburgh, Fairfax, Fairfield, Georgia, Highgate, St. Albans and Swanton each received eight to 12 pairs of snowshoes in kids’ and adult sizes, which can be checked out for several days at

8

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2017

KIDSVT.COM

k8v-ChristKing0217.indd 1

BEAT

1/26/17 5:21 PM

a time by anyone with a library card. Those taking advantage of the free equipment are encouraged to share their snowshoeing selfies on the RiseVT Facebook page. “I have been checking out books and snowshoes at the same time and I love it!” one Enosburgh resident posted on the page. “I can embark on adventures both mentally and physically.”

—J . F.

Contact participating libraries for more information on borrowing snowshoes. Learn more about RISEVT at risevt.com or facebook.com/risevt.

HEALTH

Got Milk? The benefits of breast milk are widely known. But when Mom’s own milk isn’t available, the World Health Organization and American Academy of Pediatrics agree that DONOR HUMAN MILK is the next best thing. Now, all newborns at the University of Vermont Medical Center are eligible for the “liquid gold” — previously reserved for babies in the neonatal intensive care unit. Hospital staff members were inspired to propose the change after noticing an uptick in patient requests and inquiries from pediatricians. Many patients, especially those wanting to exclusively breastfeed, are excited for the donor-milk option, said pediatrician and newborn nursery medical director Karin Gray. Already, demand is exceeding expectations. “We were thinking we’d use a bottle a day,” said Sandra Sperry, assistant nurse manager at UVM Medical Center’s


EAT. LEARN. PLAY.

ENTERTAINMENT

Kids TV 24-7 The television-viewing experience is a veritable all-you-can-eat buffet for kids these days. Vermont PBS is now expanding its offerings for the younger set with VERMONT PBS KIDS, a new channel devoted to round-the-clock children’s programming, which launched on January 16. The channel replaces Vermont PBS World and will only be available with certain cable packages. Voracious viewers can visit vermontpbs.org/kids for free live streaming of the station’s educational programming, featuring the Kratt Brothers, Daniel Tiger, Arthur and many more familiar friends. —A. N .

To stream VERMONT PBS KIDS, visit vermontpbs.org/kids.

Your child. Your orthodontist.

ORTHODONTICS

DRS. DRS.PETERSON, PETERSON,RYAN RYAN & & EATON EATON

Whether you’re considering clear aligners, retainers or today’s braces, an orthodontist is the smart choice. Orthodontists are specialists in straightening teeth and aligning your bite. They have two to three years of education beyond dental school. So they’re experts at helping you get a great smile—that feels great, too.

Braces for Children & Adults — champlainortho.net ST. ALBANS OFFICE 80 Mapleville Depot 527-7100

WILLISTON OFFICE 277 Blair Park Road 878-5323

k4t-ChamplainOrtho0215.indd 1

1/16/15 10:54 AM

Braces for Children and Adults Outstanding Academics • Inspired Learning Burlington Williston St. Albans 862-6721 878-5323 527-7100 www.champlainortho.net

Winter Open House • February 12 @ 3 p.m. Kindergarten Visiting Morning • February 21 (Pre-registration required)

Visit our website vtdayschool.org for more information. Email: info@vtdayschool.org. Phone: 495-5150 • 6701 Shelburne Road, Shelburne

KIDS VT

—M. C .

9

For more information about DONOR HUMAN MILK, visit hmbana.org.

Join us for Upcoming Events

FEBRUARY 2017

pays more than $5 per ounce for donor milk, while formula runs an average of $0.19 per ounce. MotherBaby Unit nurse manager Jennifer Robare used the NICU donor-milk budget to generate a proposal, which was swiftly approved by a supportive administration. “When I showed the benefits, the requests, the increase in patient satisfaction, all the stars aligned,” Robare said, “and we were able to roll it out.”

KIDSVT.COM

Mother-Baby Unit, “but we’ve used 28 bottles in the first 10 days of January.” The UVM Medical Center gets milk from nonprofit OhioHealth Mother’s Milk Bank, one of 18 banks in the United States and Canada approved by the Human Milk Banking Association of North America, which follows strict federal pasteurization and screening guidelines. One anticipated challenge was cost: The Medical Center

• Project-based Learning • Individual Learning Goals • Literacy & Math • STEM • Global Studies • Digital Literacy • Art • Music • Spanish • PE

k4t-vermontdayschool0217.indd 1

1/24/17 3:53 PM


Q ONE TO WATCH

BY MARY ANN LICKT E I G

Team Player

In sports and in life, a St. Albans teen supports inclusion XAVIER PIGEON IS a born advocate. The Bellows Free Academy St. Albans senior is copresident of Special Olympics Vermont’s Youth Activation Committee, he coaches in its Young Athletes Program, and he plays unified sports, where kids with and without intellectual disabilities compete on the same teams. “He’s just a natural,” said Kasia Bilodeau, assistant coordinator for BFA’s unified sports program. She explains that Xavier exudes inclusion, “and I don’t just mean on the afternoon when we meet; it’s a life.”  Like having brown hair, chocolatecolored eyes and speaking French at home, sticking up for others is part of who Xavier is. The second of two children of Canadian-born parents, Xavier has always been protective of his 19-year-old brother, Vinny, who has autism, said their mother, Josy-Ann Sarrazin. “He’s just caring,” she said. Just 15 months apart, Xavier helped Vinny learn letters and colors when they were young. He also wanted others to understand him; once when Vinny said something that offended another child, Xavier, then around 6, explained that his brother meant no harm. When Vinny got to high school and started playing unified sports, Xavier watched. It marked a role reversal for the brothers. “Vinny was always on the side, watching Xavier doing all kinds of

Xavier (right) with brother Vinny

NAME: XAVIER PIGEON AGE: 17 TOWN: ST. ALBANS

sports,” Sarrazin said. “And it’s always been difficult for Vinny, because of his disability, to keep up with the regular group.” But unified sports leveled the playing field. In 2014, Vinny’s basketball team competed in the Special Olympics USA Games, and Xavier followed him to New Jersey to cheer him on. Xavier also joined Vinny playing unified sports, participating in floor hockey, snowshoeing, basketball and bocce. For the first time, Sarrazin got to see her sons play on the same team, Vinny as an “athlete” and Xavier as a “partner” — Special Olympics’ names for team members with and without intellectual disabilities.

Last winter, the brothers won gold in the state snowshoe two-person relay race. The program has given Vinny, a quiet guitar and car aficionado, and Xavier, the self-described “loud, sporty, super-social one,” more than medals. “It gave me the doorway to have a connection with my brother,” Xavier said. “We have deeper conversations than we used to.” The brothers told their story at a Vermont State Athletic Directors Association meeting in 2015, which helped pave the way for the Vermont Principals’ Association to sanction unified basketball. Now it’s more like a traditional high school sport, with regularly scheduled games and a state championship. This month, after Xavier dips into icy Lake Champlain during SOVT’s Penguin Plunge fundraiser, he and Vinny will go to Washington, D.C., for Special Olympics Capitol Hill Day, where they will promote Special Olympics to Vermont’s congressional delegation.

SOVT named Vinny its 2015 Athlete of the Year and named Xavier its 2016 Unified Partner of the Year. “Xavier has always stood out as someone with a deep, personal commitment to helping others,” said SOVT president and CEO Lisa DeNatale. BFA’s Bilodeau agrees. In addition to seeing him play unified sports, she has watched Xavier in her classroom, where he mentors kids with intellectual disabilities, and in the school hallways, where he’s just their friend. “It’s completely authentic,” she said. “It’s not because it makes him look good or it’s a résumé builder.” In the fall, Xavier, a dual U.S.Canadian citizen, plans to go to college in Canada and to build a relationship between Special Olympics and whatever school he attends. After studying social work, human relations or education, he wants to become a police officer. He envisions waving to people from his cruiser, he said. “I want them to know that I’m someone they can run towards if there’s a problem, rather than run away from.” The 2017 Penguin Plunge takes place at Waterfront Park in Burlington on Saturday, February 4, starting at 11 a.m.; Stratton Mountain hosts a sister event on Saturday, March 25. Proceeds benefit Special Olympics Vermont. Find more information at penguinplunge.org.

VERMONT

FEBRUARY 2017

KIDSVT.COM

“One to Watch” shines a light on a young Vermonter who is going places. Know a local child or teen who’s recently done something amazing? Nominate him or her at kidsvt.com/vermont/kidsvtonetowatch/page.

Join your friends anytime! A new channel and live stream

10

KIDS VT

vermontpbs.org/kids Untitled-16 1

1/25/17 10:38 AM


Q FIT FAMILIES

BY SARA H GA L B RAIT H

EAT. LEARN. PLAY.

PHOTOS: TRISTAN VON DUNTZ

Statehouse Skating

THE IMAGE of community members skating together was on Montpelier resident Nate Hausman’s mind when he posed this question at a dinner party: “Wouldn’t it be cool to have an ice rink on the Statehouse lawn?” The guests concurred, and, with the encouragement of friends and community members, Hausman decided to make it happen. He formed a small committee and brought a proposal, dubbed “Put a Rink on It,” to decision makers in Montpelier, including the Department of Buildings and General Services and the Capitol Complex Commission, a committee responsible for the outside aesthetics of the Statehouse. The design group at Montpelier Alive, an economic development association, helped guide the proposal process. It took two years to navigate liability and fundraising issues — and some obstacles Hausman never imagined: “everything from bathrooms to parking to not taxing the tunnels that run underground below the Statehouse lawn,” he said. His committee cleared every hurdle, including raising

Norwich, VT | Open daily 10 am – 5 pm $10,000 for a contingency fund to cover any damage done to Statehouse property. Finally, in early January, the 40-by-80-foot Rink at Visit Mansfield Cooperative Untitled-10 1 1/25/17 10:28 AM State Street opened for skaters. It’s intended for open School in our new skating only; hockey and broomball are not permitted for safety reasons. Volunteers help with rink maintenance and Richmond location! supervision. One-room schoolhouse focused On a sunny but cold Martin Luther King Jr. Day, several on independent learning families navigated the rink. Some kids skated easily on their own, while newbies used crates or held parents’ hands for support. Smiles flashed all around. “I’m sure there are some tears, too, when they fall, but they get back up and keep going,” Hausman said. “Seeing little kids out there, finding their skating legs, it’s good to see.” Despite the challenges, Hausman said, he remained committed to the project because it was an opportunity to get people outside and to build community. Plus, he added, “It shows what just a few private citizens with an OPEN HOUSE DATES: idea can do.” K

2/3, Friday 5-7 | 2/11, Saturday 10-12 2/21, Tuesday 3-6

k8v-mansfieldcoop0217.indd 1

11

For more information, visit mansfieldcooperative.org or contact Julia Skonicki at learntoliberate@gmail.com

KIDS VT

“Fit Families” is a monthly feature that offers easy and affordable ways to stay active. Got an idea for a future FF? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

FEBRUARY 2017

The Rink at State Street is operated by the City of Montpelier, with help from Montpelier Alive and community volunteers. National Life Group Foundation and Vermont Mutual Insurance Group provide financial support. The rink is lit and monitored from 3 to 7 p.m., Wednesday through Friday, and from noon to 7 p.m. on weekends. Skating is free, and skaters can buy or rent skates at Onion River Sports at 20 Langdon Street in downtown Montpelier. montpelieralive.org/222/the-rink-at-state-street. Find a list of outdoor rinks on page 6.

• Individualized Learning Plans • Intimate class size • Serving grades 3-8

KIDSVT.COM

FROSTY FACTS

1/26/17 12:40 PM


✱ BOOKWORMS B Y BRE TT STAN CIU

Local Reads Children’s book authors abound in the Green Mountain State. What can we expect from local writers this year? Below, you’ll find a preview of titles hitting bookstores and library shelves in 2017. Special thanks to the Galaxy Bookshop in Hardwick and the Flying Pig Bookstore in Shelburne for letting us in on their most anticipated reads.

Julie C. Richards Photography

Faith—Academics—Service Open House February 15, 2017 8:30—11am Preschool-Grade 8

Follow us

www.mcschool.org Sponsored by the Sisters of Mercy of the Americas Untitled-35 1

1/17/17 10:41 AM

This month, South Burlington’s Jason Chin releases Grand Canyon, a tale of a father and daughter exploring the natural wonder. Weaving the canyon’s history into the storyline, this book bursts with info that will keep kids occupied for hours — including an intricate map. Save the date for Chin’s launch party at the Flying Pig Bookstore on Saturday, February 25, at 11 a.m. Leda Schubert, of Plainfield, teams up with illustrator Raúl Colón for Listen: How Pete Seeger Got America Singing, a picture book about the American folk hero who inspired people across the nation to become politically active. It’s slated for a June release. Kate Messner of nearby Plattsburgh, N.Y., has been busy. She has four new titles coming out in 2017 including Over and Under the Pond in March, a companion to her other nature-centered picture books. Illustrated by Christopher Silas Neal, Messner’s latest delves into the complex world of a mountain pond. In June, look for Fergus and Zeke, a new early-reader series illustrated by Heather Ross, featuring a classroom mouse and his streetwise buddy. Space lovers will be over the moon for Middlesex resident Tod Olson’s

Lost in Outer Space: The Incredible Journey of Apollo 13, released in January.

LEARN TO WINDSURF

Released last month, Middlebury graduate Katherine Arden’s ’s debut young-adult novel, The Bear and the Nightingale, whisks readers away to medieval Russia in a mixture of fairy tale and fantasy. The book features a heroine who must draw on her hidden talents to save her family.

OPEN MON-SAT 10-6 688 PINE ST, BURLINGTON

National Book Award winner and East Calais resident M.T. Anderson will release the youngadult novel Landscape With Invisible Hand in September. A satire about colonization on the future planet Earth, the story follows aspiring artist, Adam, and his girlfriend, Chloe, as they struggle for survival in a bizarre world. 

WND&WVS is offering weekly half-day windsurfing camps from June 19th through August 25th. The camp runs from 8:45 to 1:45 Monday through Friday followed by a free lunch at The Spot. Visit wndnwvs.com/play for more information or call 802 540-2529.

WNDNWVS.COM

802.540.2529

12

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2017

KIDSVT.COM

The nonfiction narrative — book two in Olson’s Lost series — tells about a rocket damaged 200,000 miles from Earth and includes crew photographs and diagrams of the spacecraft.

Untitled-22 1

1/25/17 2:40 PM


A

AL W

DO

RF S

CH OOL

Q CHECKUP W IT H L AURA S L ES A R • I N T ER V I EW C OM PI L ED A N D C ON D EN S ED B Y K EN P ICARD

R T ESY O F LAK

EC

HA

M

PL

IN

COU

How Do You Teach Kids About Personal Boundaries?

MANY ADULTS HAVE childhood memories of their parents saying something like, “Don’t be shy. Go kiss your grandfather hello!” But these requests can make kids feel uncomfortable. A new school of thought suggests that we should let children decide how and with whom they have physical contact. Laura Slesar, director of Kidpower Vermont, has taught lessons on personal safety and empowerment to more than 700 kids throughout Vermont, including her own. She helps her young students understand how to set boundaries and learn to take control of their own bodies. She builds on these concepts when talking with teens about dating and consent. Kidpower is an international nonprofit that runs workshops for children, teens and adults. Find more information and resources on this topic at kidpower.org. KIDS VT: At what age should parents start talking to their kids about physical boundaries? LAURA SLESAR: Right away. For parents of babies and toddlers, if they incorporate these boundary principles into their normal parenting, then it just becomes a part of the child’s normal vocabulary. KVT: Can you offer some examples? LS: In Kidpower, we say that our bodies belong to ourselves, but some things are not a choice, such as physical contact for health and safety

reasons. So with a baby or toddler you might say, “You don’t want to have your diaper changed, but this isn’t a choice, so we’ll change your diaper and then go back to playing.” Or, [for an older child], “I know you don’t want to go to the doctor today, but that’s not a choice because it’s for your health.”

Even touch for health and safety reasons should never be a secret. Laura Slesar, director of Kidpower Vermont

KVT: Are there specific rules that pertain to an environment that involves physical contact, such as an athletic field? LS: We teach kids that there are four rules around touch that involves play, teasing or affection, which are separate from health and safety. Touch that’s supposed to be fun, like wrestling and contact sports, must be the choice of each person playing; it must be safe; it must be allowed by the adults in charge; and it is never a secret. KVT: How do you teach these skills? LS: We do a lot of role-playing. It’s one thing to talk about these rules and another to act out scenarios. So, I’ll say, “OK, let’s pretend I’m your dentist and you don’t want to get a filling.” And I’ll say, “I’m sorry, but you have to do this because it’s for your health and your parents said it’s OK.” And then I’ll say,

“OK, what if the dentist says he wants to drill your teeth but tells you to not tell your parents. Is that OK?” The kids learn that even touch for health and safety reasons should never be a secret. Kids learn to say, “Stop or I’ll tell my parents!” KVT: How do you teach kids to say no? LS: We have a “no” game in which we practice saying no really quietly to each other, then get louder and louder until they’re yelling it. So they practice using a loud, strong, firm voice. We have them practice making stop signs and fences with their hands. They practice walking with assertiveness, confidence and awareness of their surroundings, so they learn to say no with both their voices and bodies. KVT: What do parents say to relatives or friends who get offended if their child doesn’t hug or kiss them? LS: I think it’s really important to back up the child in front of the other person so the child knows they’re doing the right thing. You can explain on behalf of your child what your family’s safety rule is. For example, you can say, “In our family, the rule is: Hugs are choices.” And then you can ask the kid to do something different, which the child might prefer. Maybe the child would like to high-five, sing a song, play catch or wave instead. What adults are generally looking for in those situations are positive ways to connect with that child. If they can find a substitute way to connect, then everybody is happy.

KVT: What if people say your child is being unfriendly? LS: If you’re doing something that a child perceives as unwanted, then it defeats the whole purpose of that hug or kiss. It can actually improve relationships to respect the child’s boundaries. If a child knows that a certain relative is always going to pinch their cheeks, and they hate it, they’re not going to look forward to that relative’s visit. They’ll be closer, not more distant, if they can find another way to connect. KVT: What do you say to critics who argue that this approach makes children think that everyone is a potential predator? LS: To me, it’s a basic issue of respect for the child and the integrity of his or her boundaries. If you teach kids that they always get a choice with everybody, even with the people they love, it will always serve them well. With people you love, you can choose to hug them today but not tomorrow. You can hug them now but not in five minutes. To me, it’s less fear-based to say that’s the rule all the time and not just with certain people. KVT: Do you give kids details about child abuse? LS: No, we keep the tone of the classes really upbeat, positive and fun. Even with parents, we don’t dwell on scary facts. But I would say, “Sometimes we have problems with people we know. Who’s ever been wrestling and started to feel like it’s getting too rough?” Scary statistics don’t help kids be safer; they just instill fear. Skills make them safer. K

Got health- and wellness-related questions? Send them to ideas@kidsvt.com.

KIDSVT.COM

Wanted: Kids' Stories!

FEBRUARY 2017

Winners get their stories published & a prize.

KIDS VT

vermontpbs.org/writers

13

Untitled-39 1

1/26/17 12:40 PM


Q BALANCING ACT

BY JESSICA LARA TICKTIN

Early Risers

A bread-baking pair on making dough and raising a son

here to get Phineas off the school bus, which is a luxury that we didn’t have before because we both did deliveries. I don’t get home from deliveries until around 5 p.m., but Andrew is always here. On dinner plans — or lack thereof:

BLAIR: We still struggle with the dinner thing

because we’re like, Oh, God, it’s six o’clock and Phineas is still playing and I am just rolling in from deliveries, and we’re like, What are we going to do? Last night we went to Lost Nation Brewing in Morristown. We probably do that a little more than we should. Our whole world is good, healthy food and supporting our local food economy, so that allows us to support our fellow food producers, too. On working and living together:

14

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2017

KIDSVT.COM

JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

ANDREW: [In bread making,] there’s the mixing

FOR BLAIR MARVIN AND ANDREW HEYN, baking bread is a lifestyle. Six days a week, the founders of Wolcott-based Elmore Mountain Bread turn out crusty loaves from the brick-oven bakery attached to their charming, two-bedroom home, which they share with their kindergarten-age son, Phineas. Heyn built a mill on their property, where they grind their own wheat. In addition, Marvin also recently became coowner of Fire Tower Pizza, which operates out of the Elmore Store. And Heyn runs the mill-building operation New American Stone Mills as part of the couple’s efforts to rebuild the local grain economy. Marvin and Heyn have purposely kept their business small — their deliveries span a 50-mile radius — to preserve the hands-on work they love so much and to spend more time with their son. Having one child also allows them the freedom to pursue passions outside of work, like traveling. Marvin is also quick to point out that they wouldn’t be able to maintain their rigorous work schedule without the help of her parents, who live in nearby Johnson and regularly care for Phineas. On the (early) morning routine: BLAIR: Monday, Wednesday and Friday are our baking and delivery days. Andrew and I both get up between 4:30 and 5 a.m. We head into the bakery and have certain tasks we get done, hopefully before Phineas wakes up. He has an alarm set for 6 a.m.

He comes right downParents: Andrew stairs, and he does this Heyn, 41, and Blair hilarious thing: He has Marvin, 36, coa little handle on the owners of Elmore bakery door, and he tries Mountain Bread to scare us. He always Son: Phineas, 5 comes up with a new way of announcing himself to us in the mornings, which is both adorable and terrifying at the same time! ANDREW: Blair is very jumpy. BLAIR: Yes, and Phineas has picked up on that. Our two bakers arrive at 6 a.m. also, so everyone is here then. At that point, Andrew tags out of the bakery and gets Phineas ready for school and takes him up to the bus. Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday are my mornings with Phineas and Andrew is in the bakery super early. So we each have our time with him before school. It’s a very nice split. On afternoon dad duty:

BLAIR: We have a very clear division of labor and

roles in our job, and that’s how we’ve always made it function. But it’s funny, with Phineas in there, that’s the one place where it’s like a wild card. Especially with him being in his first year of school, we are still trying to work it out. Because of New American Stone Mills — our other business building the mills — and having our full-time head baker here, Andrew is free to be home in the afternoons, so he’s always

and then there’s the baking, and in between is the shaping. The mixing is much more scientific and chemistry-based, and there’s a lot of math and scaling it out… BLAIR: Not my strong point! ANDREW: Which is my strong point, so it made more sense that I would do that. And the baking part is a lot more of the aesthetic skill and making the bread, and that suits Blair much better. BLAIR: We have this quote on the wall in the bakery that says: “Art without science is nothing,” and that rang true to us because it kind of spoke to what allowed our partnership in the bakery, what facilitated our success with working with one another. We have these two different strengths, and, by allowing each of us to focus in on the parts we enjoyed in that division of labor, it’s made it into a very smooth and orderly system. That balance has allowed us to function very happily over many years. On scheduling bread and bed:

ANDREW: After we eat dinner there is not much to

do in the bakery, maybe 10 or 15 minutes of stuff, so we are generally free to hang out in the evening and put Phineas to bed. BLAIR: Baking bread has a very strict schedule — it has no flexibility — so our life is based on this regimen around feeding the starters, building the fire. Everything is timed. Getting to the stores and restaurants at a certain time, that is the environment Phineas has grown up in, so he’s very receptive to that. Sometimes I’m like, Am I creating a monster here? He’s good with following the schedule, and he will say, “Uh, it’s seven o’clock. I’m tired. It’s time for me to go take my bath.” We eat dinner together and do the bedtime routine together. He gets two books; Andrew reads one, and I read the other. It’s important to have that focused time every day, just the three of us. It’s grounding for us all. K

In “Balancing Act,” we ask Vermont parents about the intersection of work and family life. Know parents we should interview? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.


Q MEALTIME BY A ST RID HEDBOR LAGUE

Cooking Up Romance IN THE COLD, DARK WINTER comes Valentine’s Day, a perfect time to show your family you love them with something delicious. When I think about romance, French food always springs to mind. And, while it may not be traditionally French, chicken cordon bleu, in all of its ooey-gooey glory, is perfect for the occasion. Many people think that “bleu” refers to blue cheese. False! Cordon bleu simply means “blue ribbon” — because the dish is so dang good it’s deserving of one. I’ve read that the original recipe was a veal cordon bleu, and that it may have been inspired by chicken Kiev (a butter- and herb-stuffed breaded chicken dish). According to my internet search, the first mention of chicken cordon bleu was in the New York Times in 1967. Regardless of its provenance, the dish certainly feels French to me. Plus, stuffing anything with cheese is always a win in my family. I used a very mild Swiss cheese when preparing this recipe because no one in my family, except me, really loves a good, strong Swiss. A three-step breading process — using flour, egg and breadcrumbs — ensures a super-crispy coating that doesn’t fall off of the chicken. A key to this recipe is getting the chicken nice and flat. If you don’t have

Chicken Cordon Bleu INGREDIENTS: 4 boneless, skinless chicken breasts 4 tablespoons Dijon mustard About 1/2 pound sliced smoked ham About 1/2 pound sliced Swiss cheese In the flour bowl: 1/2 cup flour 1 teaspoon pepper 1 teaspoon salt 1 teaspoon Herbes de Provence (or a mixture of dried savory, rosemary, thyme and marjoram) In the egg bowl: 2 eggs, beaten In the breadcrumb bowl: 1/2 cup plain breadcrumbs 1 tablespoon Herbes de Provence

DIRECTIONS: 1.

2.

a meat tenderizer, you can pound the chicken with a heavy cast-iron pan — it’s really fun! Think of it as a way to take out your pent-up aggression on the bird — not your loved ones. I served the finished dish alongside rice pilaf and spinach, and it was divine! Add candles and voilà: a romantic dinner. K

Put the chicken on a cutting board and cover with waxed or parchment paper. Flatten the chicken breasts using a meat tenderizer or a heavy cast-iron pan until they are very thin but not broken. You want to be able to roll them up. Spread 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard on each flattened chicken breast. Lay a few slices of ham on the chicken breast, followed by a few slices of cheese, then top with ham again. Roll each piece of chicken tightly around the filling and secure with toothpicks.

3.

Repeat with the remaining chicken.

4.

In three wide, flat bowls, prepare the breading station. In the first bowl, add flour and seasoning. In

the second, beat the eggs. In the final bowl, add the breadcrumbs and seasoning. 5.

Carefully dip each chicken roulade in flour, then egg and, finally, breadcrumbs. Place on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and chill in the refrigerator for at least 20 minutes, or as long as overnight. (Cover if it’s going to be in the fridge for a long period of time.) This chilling helps to keep the filling from leaking out while cooking.

6.

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Bake the chicken for about 35 minutes, or until the internal temperature is 165 degrees. Remove from the oven and let rest for about five minutes. Slice into rounds and serve with your favorite sides.

“Mealtime” is a feature about families and food. Got a topic you’d like us to explore? Email it to ideas@kidsvt.com.

m Great for fa

ug

arh o us

k8h-PalmersSugarHouse0217.indd 1

1/10/17 11:39 AM

Now accepting applications for the 2017-18 school year VERMONT COMMONS SCHOOL, GRADES 612 For more information, contact Jill Strawbridge at 802-865-8084 x 190 or jstrawbridge@vermontcommons.org k8h-vtcommonschool0217.indd 1

15

332 Shelburne-Hinesburg Road, Shelburne • 802-985-5054

GLOBAL RESPONSIBLILITY.

KIDS VT

Visit the goats at the petting zoo, watch sap being boiled and enjoy a walk in the forest.

We Ship Worldwide

COMMUNIT Y.

FEBRUARY 2017

SUGAR ON SNOW MAPLE COTTON CANDY HOT MAPLE SYRUP MAPLE CREAM COVERED DONUTS

lmer’s PaEst. 1867 S

• • • •

SCHOLARSHIP.

e

4& Open March pm undays 12-4 S & Saturdays ! s ilie

KIDSVT.COM

W! O N S N O R SUGA 5 - April 15 & 16

1/23/17 3:46 PM


Q THE ART OF

BY DARCIE ABBEN E

EAT. LEARN. PLAY.

Cake Decorating PHOTOS: JEB WALLACE-BRODEUR

EXCHANGING SWEET TREATS — from simple, heart-shaped sugar cookies to pink whoopie pies — is one of my family’s favorite ways to show love. Last month, we headed to Deb Papineau’s monthly cake-decorating class at her café, Deb’s Place, in Morrisville, to learn how to create a dessert that’s just as nice to look at as it is to eat. The day we visited the cozy bakery, around two dozen people of all ages and skill levels were there for the same reason: to decorate a premade, six-inch vanilla cake in a fancy Alice in Wonderland theme.

Working with Kids

16

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2017

KIDSVT.COM

It’s helpful to set expectations before you start decorating. Several parents at the workshop stressed the importance of being patient and abandoning perfectionist tendencies. In essence, focus on the process, not the product. “Start small and build on what kids can actually achieve,” advised Kathy Cookson of Morristown, who had attended several classes prior. Papineau said it’s also important to give guidance. In the class, she displayed one of her cakes as a model. “Some of the cakes don’t even look like mine at the end,” she said, “but it’s great for them to have a starting point.” Side projects for the littlest ones are good, too. Morristown resident Jaimie Welcome, a veteran of six cake-decorating classes, told me she often works on a masterpiece cake with her 6-year-old, Annabelle, while her 3-year-old daughter, Caroline, decorates her own cupcake. Following her advice, my younger daughter, 4-year-old Pippa, busied herself making her own flower creation while my husband and older daughter worked on the cake.

The Frosting Triumvirate

Papineau uses three types of frosting to create her impressive cakes. Her confections are first coated with buttercream frosting, then covered with a base layer of thinly rolled-out fondant to create a blank canvas for the decorator. The easily moldable fondant — popular because of its smooth, finished look — can be sculpted into different shapes. Adding a little water makes it sticky, while a bit of cornstarch makes it less so. If it dries out, a dab of Crisco softens it.

Jaimie Welcome and daughter Caroline Wrapping a cupcake in fondant Papineau’s Alice in Wonderland cake

CAKE HACKS Don’t have all the specialized materials you need to make a fancy cake? Use these common household items instead. • Use a pizza roller in place of an expensive fondant cutter, or cut fondant with kids’ scissors. • Grab a kids’ paintbrush to apply water to the fondant. • Use cookie cutters in place of fondant cutters. • Fill a piece of pantyhose with cornstarch to form a ball and use it to apply starch evenly to hands and work surface.

Deb Papineau

“This has to be the most forgiving stuff there is,” Papineau said of the fondant. She purchases larges tubs of the icing for classes but notes that there are lots of easy online recipes. Finishing touches are accomplished with royal icing. The hard white frosting is made by mixing beaten egg whites and powdered sugar, or, as a substitute, by melting white chocolate chips. This edible adhesive is used to attach trimmings and add a decorative element.

Technical Guidance

For structural support, Papineau uses popsicle sticks, small wooden dowels

and plastic straws to prop up decorations and stiffen shapes into place. Jaimie and Caroline Welcome molded white fondant between their fingers, wondering aloud how to make rabbit ears. “We were thinking it had to be thick so it would stand up,” Welcome said as Papineau approached. “Nope,” the baker said, grabbing a rolling pin. “Roll it out thin.” She flattened down the fondant, wrapped it around a toothpick and molded it into the shape of an ear. Covering cakes with fondant can result in tears and folds. Papineau suggests strategically placing decorations to cover them

TRY IT OUT Papineau’s next class is Sunday, February 12, from 10 a.m. to noon. Participants will make a Valentine’s Day-themed cake. For more info, call 888-6886 or visit debsplaceinfo.com.

up. Also, cupcakes affixed on a cake can create platforms for small scenes or be made into decorative features. On Papineau’s Alice and Wonderland-themed cake, for example, a pink fondant-covered cupcake turns into a teacup. K


Q DESTINATION RECREATION BY GRACE PE R L EE DETAILS

Play Café

La Tasse Gamine opens at 10 a.m., Tuesday to Sunday, and is closed on Monday. Closing times vary. The café caters to children ages 6 and under. Guests must make a minimum purchase of $7.50 Canadian, or pay a $3.50 fee to enjoy the play space.

La Tasse Gamine, 5658A Avenue du Parc, Montréal

PROS • Offers the luxury of eating or drinking something (while it’s hot!) as your children play nearby • Convenient location in the middle of a nice, walkable neighborhood close to many family-friendly Airbnb rentals • Great way to immerse your children in the French language • Affordable place to pass a few hours, particularly in winter

CONS • Some of the furniture and toys seem dingy GRACE PER LEE

• Basement location has little natural light • Food is inconsistent

FUN FAMILY ACTIVITIES abound in Montréal. But, with two children under the age of 4, I cherish downtime. So when my family heads north of the border, we stop at La Tasse Gamine. It’s one of several play cafés in the city — refuges where kids can safely play while parents sip their café au laits in relative peace. Located in the heart of the trendy Mile End neighborhood, the basement café is often packed with parents, babies and toddlers. Thankfully, a half wall contains a large play area with

everything from a school bus-themed play structure to dolls, trucks, blocks and a treasure box of dress-up clothes. Arriving after a long car ride, I hastily ordered lunch at the counter, then headed to the back to nurse 3-month-old George. We settled into a recliner, where I was able to watch my other son, 3-year-old Levi, as he explored the bus. My husband found a comfortable perch on a nearby couch. Riding toys — from walkers for the barely mobile to Big Wheels for older kids — are strewn about the

space. I plopped George into one of the many ExerSaucers, bouncy seats and Bumbos that provide resting spots for babies. Our lunch of waffles, fruit cups, a bagel with cream cheese, and a cappuccino and hot tea took about 20 minutes to arrive. In the past, I’d really enjoyed the food, but this time the waffles were overcooked and the fruit cup consisted of raisins and underripe cantaloupe. But we were there for the laid-back environment, not haute cuisine, so we didn’t mind.

With a cranky baby and a rambunctious toddler to contend with, it wasn’t exactly relaxing. But it would have been much worse had we tried to eat lunch elsewhere. Nobody in La Tasse Gamine cared that Levi was running around, or that George cried and spit up all over me. In fact, they didn’t even notice; they had their own kids to worry about. K

Local parents review a family-friendly attraction each month in “Destination Recreation.” Got a spot you’d like us to feature? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

It's a bird, it's a plane it's....

KIDSVT.COM

One to Watch

••

financial aid available ••

williston k8h-Bellwether0217.indd 1

and ring for u o T lling 8 Enro 017-1 r 2 the ol yea scho

17

1/26/17 3:45 PM

holistic approach

KIDS VT

8h-Kvt_OTW-0217.indd 1

preschool •-•6th grade

FEBRUARY 2017

Do you know a local kid (age 17 or under) who's recently done something amazing? Won a spelling bee? Invented something? Written an opera? Raised a bunch of money for a great cause? Tell us more! He or she could be featured as One to Watch in an upcoming issue of Kids VT. Visit Kidsvt.com to tell us about this local superhero.

1/6/17 1:50 PM


Native Language Learners Culture schools help kids hold on to their heritage

18

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2017

KIDSVT.COM

STORY BY KYMELYA SARI • PHOTOS BY MATTHEW THORSEN

Students making kimbap

Every Sunday, like many families, the Rancourts go to church. But after the morning service at Grace United Methodist Church in Essex Junction, Cindy Rancourt and her kids stick around. That’s when the church becomes the Green Mountain Korean Culture School. The school’s 23 students and their teachers have free rein of the entire church space, including its kitchen, for lessons in Korean language and culture. One Sunday afternoon in November, mom Cindy, son Nick, 15, and daughter, Hannah, 11, participated in tae kwon do practice. Along with about a dozen other students, they watched intently as the instructor deflected his assistant’s front kicks. Nick and Hannah fidgeted as they waited to demonstrate their moves. Like their mother, a South Korean native, the siblings have yellow belts in the Korean martial art. Half an hour later, Cindy changed out of her all-white tae kwon do uniform, known as a dobok. It was her turn to be the instructor. For the next 45 minutes, she taught the Korean language to a group of elementary and middle schoolers, including Hannah. They practiced numbers and played a game to learn antonyms. By the time school finished at 6 p.m., the Rancourts had spent almost the entire day at the church. But the kids didn’t seem to mind. “They feel so comfortable here,” Cindy said of her biracial children, whose father is white. “I don’t have to convince them [to be here].” Nick wasn’t always so at ease. When he was younger, his mom said, he struggled with his dual heritage. He spoke to her in Korean until he was

about 4 years old. Then one day he came home from preschool and told her, “Korean doesn’t work. My teacher and friends don’t understand it.” Another time, Cindy remembered speaking to Nick in Korean when she picked him up from school. He implored her: “Mom, don’t talk Korean in school.” “He didn’t want to be different,” she explained. “I was sad. I thought he was not proud of Korean culture, and even his Korean mom.” Things changed when Nick was in fifth grade. Cindy went to her son’s school in Essex to give a presentation on Korean culture and history. She also


Freedom of Speech When refugees settle in a new country, the focus is on helping them learn the language and adjust to unfamiliar surroundings. Often this means losing touch with their native language and culture. Research indicates that the language immigrants or refugee families arrive with is usually forgotten within three generations, said Shawna Shapiro, assistant professor of writing and linguistics at Middlebury College. In December of 2015, she conducted focusgroup discussions with refugee parents. “One of the things that came up very early in that conversation was children learning English but losing home languages,” she said. Khara Neopaney is witnessing this phenomenon in his Bhutanese community, members of whom started settling in Vermont in 2008 after spending almost two decades in refugee camps in Nepal. “When grandparents and grandchildren meet at home, they don’t have conversations,” said Neopaney. “Children only know English, and grandparents only know Nepali.” Neopaney started a Nepali language school in Burlington for Bhutanese children in April of last year.

It’s very hard to learn language without community. A “heritage language,” according to the Washington, D.C-based Center for Applied Linguistics, is “a language other than English that is spoken by an individual, family or community” and usually taught through community-based programs. It’s difficult for parents to teach a native language to their children without any outside help, said Shawna Shapiro, assistant professor of writing and linguistics at Middlebury College. And it gets harder when children

KYMELYA SARI

MICHELLE SCOTT

NATIVE LANGUAGE LEARNERS, P. 20 »

Green Mountain Korean Culture School teacher Yeonju Kim with students (clockwise) Andrew Kim, Nick Rancourt, Dan Lee, Sangmin Lee and Casey Sullivan

Tibetan Weekend School

Nepali language school

FEBRUARY 2017 KIDS VT

Tibetan weekend school, which currently enrolls eight students. This has led the younger generation to feel disconnected from their parents’ native language, he noted. Sometimes, academic institutions can provide help in developing curriculum. This way, immigrant and refugee communities — already faced with the challenges that come with building a new life — aren’t trying to figure out everything by themselves. This is what Middlebury’s Shapiro hopes to do with the Nepali language program that Neopaney coordinates. On Saturdays, the Nepali program runs concurrently with services organized by the Vermont Hindu Temple at the former St. Joseph School in Burlington’s Old North End. This way, parents can drop off their kids for class, then attend temple services next door, explained Neopaney. When Kids VT visited the school, Neopaney and his colleague, Somnath Dhakal, were teaching a class of about 10 students. They learned about the significance of Tihar, a Hindu festival, and later practiced the Nepali alphabet and forming words. Middlebury’s Center for Community Engagement has provided funds for materials and supplies, research assistants to help with curriculum development, and small stipends for adults involved in the program, said Shapiro. The program also received a grant from the Vermont Humanities Council, she said. Initially, no one from the Bhutanese community had time to develop curriculum, said Shapiro, so lessons were often put together on the fly. “Ideally, there would be a pre-mapped curriculum that has a sense of goals and direction for each week, plus assessment,” Shapiro explained, “It’s still a work-in-progress, but we are making progress.”

KIDSVT.COM

For the Bhutanese community, having their own language program means more than facilitating communication between generations. It’s a way to revive traditions like celebrating festivals and wearing their national clothing. In Bhutan, they were not allowed to practice their culture or speak their native language freely. “Here in this country of freedom, we are allowed to speak any language,” said Neopaney. “This is a great opportunity for every one of us in our community to preserve this language.” But most heritage language schools have small budgets, so they rely on volunteers. And parents may not have the time to teach their children their native tongue. “They’re busy with their own work,” said Pasang Thondup, who’s been teaching for five years at Vermont’s

COURTESY OF VERMONT HINDU TEMPLE

brought Choco Pie — a chocolate-covered cake with marshmallow cream that’s popular in South Korea — which was a big hit with his classmates. “Mom, I’m so proud to be Korean,” Nick told her afterward. The experience spurred Cindy to find a way for Nick to hold on to that feeling. She collaborated with a group of Korean women and the Korean pastor from the Grace United Methodist Church to set up a heritage language school. The Green Mountain Korean Culture School opened its doors in the fall of 2012. It’s the only Korean heritage language school in Vermont, though there are similar schools for Vermont’s Bhutanese, Tibetan, Vietnamese, Chinese and Burundian communities (see sidebar).

19


Jamie Two Coats Toyshop

New Collection Has Arrived!

CONTINUED FROM P. 19

Lo c at e d i n t h e of Shelburne 5 4 fa ll s r o a d M o n - S at 1 0 - 6 S u n da y 1 1 - 5 802-98 5-3221

k6h-JamieTwoCoats0217.indd 1

1/26/17 1:41 PM

Strong beginnings we do that here

Our highly experienced physicians, physician assistants and nurses are here to provide you a nurturing and supportive maternity journey. • Healthy Beginnings classes on pregnancy and baby preparation • Outstanding gynecologic and prenatal care from our attentive team • Private rooms in our birth center where families can room together • Supportive Family Birthing Center nurses who encourage skin-to-skin bonding and provide education on optimal infant feeding • We have earned Baby-Friendly and BCBS Blue Distinction Center + distinctions, recognizing quality and value in maternity care (802) 524-1040 Northwestern.org 133 Fairfield Street, St. Albans, VT 05478

Untitled-33 1

1/17/17 10:31 AM

We offer flexible, creative homeschooling curriculum for K–12, or enrollment in our fully accredited distance learning school. Start anytime during the year! An Oak Meadow Valentine!

20% off everything in our bookstore 10% off new enrollments Feb. 14 to 28 oakmeadow.com

20

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2017

KIDSVT.COM

Thinking about making a change? Try Oak Meadow!

Untitled-33 1

Native Language Learners

1/26/17 11:04 AM

become adolescents. “You just want them to talk to you, period,” she pointed out. “You don’t care in what language.” Having a designated program or school where kids can learn their parents’ first language raises its prestige, said Shapiro: “It sends the message that the language is important.” It can also become a community gathering space, she added. There aren’t many of those in Vermont, said Green Mountain Korean Culture School principal Young Shin. “Being in a Korean environment is not easy to come by,” she said. Shin estimated that big events held at the school, like a Korean food festival, have attracted up to 100 Koreans from around Vermont. That’s a large number in a state where Koreans make up a tiny fraction of a percent of the population. The principal believes it’s “very important” for her students to have a connection to their Korean heritage. “Wherever you go, you cannot completely forget [your culture],” said Shin, a mother of two adult children. Learning about their roots helps students develop a sense of identity and “be a stronger person,” she added. The school draws most of its students from Chittenden County. The kids are divided into six classes by age group, ranging from kindergarten to high school. Each student pays about $100 per semester. Besides studying tae kwon do and Korean, students learn how to play traditional musical instruments. During breaks, they get to make their own Korean snacks. At the end of the year, they showcase their skills at the annual Vermont International Festival. “I like it because we can show everyPrincipal Young Shin thing we learned. It’s not like we did everything for nothing,” said Hannah. “We get to perform, and it’s really fun.” Like Hannah and her brother, some of the

Korean school attendees are biracial. Others are second-generation Korean Americans or Korean adoptees. For Williston parents Eileen DeLuca and her husband, Matthew, the school has been “an invaluable resource.” The DeLucas adopted their two children from South Korea as infants. Nate, 8, and Maya, 6, have been attending Korean school for about four years. In that time, Korean culture has become a huge part of the family, said Eileen, a social worker at the University of Vermont Medical Center. Over the years, she’s learned how to prepare Korean dishes like kimchi and the noodle dish japchae. Nate and Maya sometimes take Korean snacks to their elementary school. They’re able to show their elementary school classmates how they write their birth names, which are now their middle names, in Korean. “That’s a real source of pride,” DeLuca noted. Adults can also attend classes at the Korean school. Although Michelle Scott of Burlington, who identifies as half Korean, grew up speaking Korean and lived in South Korea for five years, she still considers English her first language. She joined the small adult language class because she wants to support

Continued After Camp Guide...


r e C m amp m u S

! e e p p Yi SCIENCE OUTDOORS ARTS GYMNASTICS EDUCATION ANIMALS SPORTS

E X P L O R E

V E R M O N T

&

B E Y O N D !


2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE

JUNE 19 - AUGUST 25, 2017

egal

SUMMER

Camps

REGAL GYMNASTICS ACADEMY

2 CORPORATE DRIVE ESSEX, VT

DISCOVERY ADVENTURE CAMP JUNE 19-AUG 25 8AM-3:30PM After care available from 3:30PM - 5:30PM

Ages 3-7

Regal’s science -based summer camp is designed especially for children ages 3-7 years old! Daily activities will focus on sensory play and science experiments. 2 Day, 3 Day & 5 Day options Every day of fun-filled camp Includes: • 1 hour of instructional gymnastics • Open gym time • Cooperative games • Outdoor explorations & play • Theme-based experiments, stories, crafts & activities • Nutritious lunch and snacks provided

Instructional Gymnastics Camp JUNE 19-AUG 25 8AM-3:30PM After care available from 3:30PM - 5:30PM

Ages 6-14

Come experience all that Regal has to offer! Our full-day camp includes morning meeting, group warm-ups, daily instructed gymnastics, open gym, daily challenges, cooperative games, outdoor activities including water slides and arts & crafts. Children will showcase their skills in an end of week gymnastics exhibition!

Vermont Ninja Warrior Camp JUNE 26-AUG 25 8AM-3:30PM

Alternating weeks and After care available from 3:30PM - 5:30PM

Ages 7+

Our Ninja Camp is filled with a variety training from ninja warrior, parkour, trampoline, tumbling, free running, yoga. Outdoor activities including hiking and water slides. REGISTER N OW!

802-655-3300

WWW.REGALGYM.COM Untitled-32 1

1/26/17 10:58 AM

Untitled-30 1

1/26/17 10:52 AM


Visit our website for our

2017 Class Schedule

Green Mountain Youth Symphony

Creative Arts & Music Program August 6-12 @ Johnson State College

Early bird discount until March 11

teen performing arts

leah@gmys-vt.org • www.gmys-vt.org

camps with the best

Vermont’s only certified

Irish Dance School!

Talent Development Institute

k16t-GMYS0217.indd 1

All Ages…All Levels Did you enjoy watching Riverdance? Why not learn some of the steps!

of summer fun

Call or email to hold a spot in our summer camps! Classes offered in Colchester & Middlebury

Beth Anne McFadden T.C.R.G. (802) 999-5041 celtikutie@aol.com www.mcfaddenirishdance.com

k8v-McFadden0217.indd 1

BURLINGTON & EAST BURKE VERMONT FILMMAKING ACTING PHOTOGRAPHY DANCE MOUNTAIN BIKING MUSIC

WWW.SOCAPA.ORG

Cabin life promotes community and team work

1/25/17 10:37 AM

Celebrating 20 Years! Summer 2017

Summer Day Camp for Adopted Children & Teens

Johnson State College June 18-24 & June 25-July 1

TWO ONE-WEEK SESSIONS

For advanced students entering grades 4-9 who want to have fun while learning!

“TDI has provided an environment where being intelligent is encouraged … TDI has given me confidence to be myself outside the camp and introduced me to friends I look forward to seeing each year.” — Camper

TDIVERMONT.ORG • 802-658-9941 LUCYBOGUE@YAHOO.COM

1 1/25/17 16t-tdi0217.indd 10:27 AM

1/26/17 Untitled-9 12:00 PM 1

1/19/17 Untitled-15 11:54 AM 1

2017 July 10-14 & July 17-21 Stowe High School in Stowe, Vermont With bus service from Burlington, Williston & Waterbury FOR AGES 7 – 17 Visit our website for registration forms and information: www.camp4me.org | info@camp4me.org

1/13/17k16t-CampForMe0217.indd 1:04 PM 1

1/10/17 11:28 AM

TODAY

All-elective program encourages self-confidence and decision making.

Lego Engineering, Robotic Programming, Stop Motion Animation, Minecraft

Burlington, Essex Junction, South Burlington, Winooski Campers at Betsy Cox and Sangamon have real independence. They make ALL their own choices every activity period, every day.

Build it BIG! WWW.LETGOYOURMIND.COM k4t-SangamonBetsyCox1212.indd k4t-Sangamon1215.indd 1 1

11/28/12 12/4/15 9:56 4:15 AM PM

Untitled-19 1

1/25/17 1:43 PM


THE

2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE

SCHOOLHOUSE

Now enrolling grades K-8 for 2017-18

Untitled-50 1

1/28/16 4:31 PM

Observation Mornings: 2/9 &2/23 February and April Vacation Camps, too

www.theschoolousevt.org

A division of

Untitled-2 1

1/26/17 1:52 PM

Summer Camps!

Art, Music, Movement & More! info@artistreevt.org www.artistreevt.org

2095 Pomfret Road, South Pomfret, VT Untitled-17 1

om Fr ck! s o le Mi oodst 3 ly W

802.457.3500

TM

On

3/23/16 3:54 PM

WEEKLY SUMMER CAMPS

June 19-August 4, 2017

Ages 5-11, UVM Athletic Complex Register online go.uvm.edu/summercamp

SPONSORED BY TM

Untitled-52 1

11/30/16 11:00 AM

Untitled-11 1

1/25/17 10:29 AM


February Vacation Camp!

2017 SUMMER CAMPS STEM Leadership Camp (overnight camp) for girls entering grades 9-10

Vermont Tech | Randolph Center June 19-23, 2017 or July 10-14, 2017 learn more vtc.edu/rosies A fun, creative “hands-on” exploration summer camp with followup mentoring program. Activities and training help campers learn about leadership, skilled trades, and the STEM fields (science, technology, engineering & math).

FEBRUARY 27–MARCH 3 February break is all about wintry fun! Come sled down the Ti hill, hike/ snowshoe across campus, and create cool, seasonal art. Monday–Friday, 9 a.m.–3 p.m. Half or full week, Kids ages 6–10 $65 per child each day $300 for the full week To register email Mollie Trow at mtrow@shelburnemuseum.org or call 985.3346 x 3392.

11001011001110

CODERr fo CAMP girls 11001011001110

Green Mountain Conservation Camp

1/25/17 2:42 PM

for girls ages 13-16

Vermont Tech | Williston July 17-21, 2017 learn more vtc.edu/summer Coder Camp gives girls the chance to translate their creativity into computer programs using SCRATCH with loads of fun activities and field trips.

AeroCamp (day camp) for youth ages 12-18

Vermont Tech | Williston July 24-28, 2017 learn more vtc.edu/summer

shelburnemuseum.org Untitled-23 1

Coder Camp for Girls (day camp)

AeroCamp is for youth ages 12-18 who want to learn about the exciting and dynamic world of aviation and the training that can lead to a career flying airplanes. Untitled-8 1

1/25/17 10:26 AM

This Summer Let Nature Nurture...

SUMMER CAMPS & RECREATION Canoeing, fishing, archery, campfires and s’mores. What a great way to spend a week this summer. Discover Vermont’s wildlife and master outdoor skills. Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department offers one-week sessions for girls and boys, ages 12 to 14. Sessions run from June through August at two beautiful lake-side locations.

Register Today!

enjoyburlington.com | (802) 864-0123

Learn more at www.vtfishandwildlife.com Untitled-6 1

1/25/17 10:18 AM

Untitled-28 1

1/26/17 10:49 AM


2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE

r o y m f e r m o m e t i c r a o m v p a f l a r s u t o y s u s i m t m a e h r? W CAMP GUIDE

Winooski Valley Park District S.O.L.E. Camp, Burlington

COMPILED BY ALISON NOVAK ILLUSTRATIONS BY HATIYE GARIP

W armer days will be

here before we know it. In the meantime, we asked local camp directors and staff to reflect on their favorite moments from last summer. From streambed investigations to cannonball competitions, these are the memories that will last a lifetime.

Exploring the dried-up streambed with the campers was an amazing experience. Being able to investigate an environment that is usually inaccessible was inspiring for both campers and staff. LAUREN CHICOTE, PROGRAMS DIRECTOR

Farmhouse Center, Colchester Sunshine, smiles, cooking challenges, the pool and the old-fashioned Vermont farm. JOAN POWELL, OWNER

Camp For Me, Stowe As one of our art activities last summer, campers created a huge mural by painting their own hands in overlapping patterns and filling the geometric shapes with vibrant color. Camp For Me is a special place for adopted children and teens. We have diverse campers from so many different backgrounds, but at camp they come together and make something beautiful, like a mural that becomes bigger and more gorgeous than the sum of its parts. AMY CHAMBERS, DIRECTOR

Night Eagle Wilderness Adventures, Cuttingsville Watching campers beam with pride after working hard to get their first fires with flint and steel and bow drills. BRUCE MORETON, DIRECTOR

YWCA Camp Hochelaga, South Hero A young camper feeling proud that they made it through being homesick and wanted to stay an additional week. Her fellow campers and staff helped her to find the fun in camp. DONNA DIAZ, DIRECTOR

Dunkley’s Gymnastics Camp, South Hero Seeing enthusiastic returning campers run down the hill to get a hug from their bunkmates; hearing the “I Did It Bell” ring to signal a camper learned a new skill; hearing screaming campers cheering down at the waterfront the first time a camper got up waterskiing; listening to our international campers share about their home culture and having other kids really listen and ask questions during breakfast each morning.  RUTH DUNKLEY MCGOWAN, DIRECTOR

New Village Farm, Shelburne What I most get a kick out of is the big, raucous energy of the younger kids … They spend a lot of time in square rooms and boxes, and I love being part of giving them access to the great outdoors and watching them revel in the magic that is available out there in the heart of it all. MICHAELA RYAN, DIRECTOR

Girl Scouts of the Green and White Mountains, Thetford/Richmond Watching a child overcome their fear is one of the greatest things to witness as a camp staff. I saw this countless times last summer, whether it was making it one step higher than they thought they could on the climbing wall or leading a song in front of their peers for the first time. KAE ZAINO, OUTDOOR EXPERIENCE COORDINATOR

Community Sailing Center, Burlington My favorite memory is judging the cannonball competition during an all-camp Olympics last summer. On Fridays, the entire group of campers participates in a series of obstacles and challenges. The tasks vary each week, but the energy stays the same. MARY DOWD, PROGRAM DIRECTOR

Livery Horse Farm Camp, Hinesburg Every single time I saw the face of a child light up the first time they experienced the gentleness and loyalty of our camp horses. My favorite memories always include watching new souls take in what my family and I have been so lucky to take in for the past 24 years. KIM JOHANSEN, DIRECTOR

Shelburne Museum, Shelburne My favorite moment was when the campers built their own sodacan robots. They were so excited to exhibit them at the end of the day and show their parents all they learned. MOLLIE TROW, PROGRAMS ASSISTANT

Find these camps and many more at the Kids VT Camp and School Fair on Saturday, February 4, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at the Hilton Burlington on Battery Street.


2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE

Acr2528720295400963305598.pdf

1

1/25/17

10:23 AM

DAY CAMP

FARMHOUSE CENTER

SUMMER CAMP

VOICE

Outdoor and Enrichment Activities

BALLET

DANCE

FULL DAY CAMP

ACTING

M U S I C A L T H E AT E R

H I S TO RY

8am-5pm $250/week Ages 4-18

CLAYMATION

TODDLER DAYS

STREET DANCE

JAZZ

MOVIE

MAKING

FIL M RADIO SCIENCE

11am-3:30pm (MWF) (TThF) or full week $40/a day, Ages 3-6, 3 options

MOM'S DAY At Farm 9am-4pm $100 last Saturday of Month (includes farm gourmet lunch) SESSIONS INCLUDE: Equestrian activities, swimming, cooking, Untitled-11 arts, crafts, nature hikes and FUN!

1

10/29/15 10:15 AM

FOR AGES 4-19 plus adult & teen classes

REGISTER NOW

802-872-8712 • 802-399-6045 775 Poor Farm Road, Colchester farmhousecenter.org

Financial aid is available.

FLYNNARTS.ORG

Say you saw it in

k8v-FarmhouseCenter0217.indd 1

Untitled-7 1

1/25/17 10:24 AM

1/25/17 5:18 PM

LAKE ADVENTURE

CAMPS

Night Eagle Untitled-31 1

1/26/17 10:57 AM

Wilderness Adventures A unique summer camp for boys, ages 10-14, in the heart of Vermont’s Green Mountains tipi living ▲ nature crafts canoeing ▲ backpacking ▲ wilderness skills ▲ tracking atlatls ▲ ’hawk throwing swimming ▲ archery ▲ hiking ▲ cooperative work & play ▲ and much more! ▲

FREE SHUTTLE FROM

Call for a full brochure:

((802) 802) 773-7866 446-6100

Ag e s 7-16 INFO & REGISTRATION:

www.nighteaglewilderness.com k6h-NightEagle0112.indd 1

BURLINGTON AND MIDDLEBURY

1/4/12 2:01 PM

Untitled-3 1

lcmm.org 1/25/17 10:03 AM


OU

R2

MEEP T&

0T

HY

EA

R!

ASK

QUESTIO

CAM

NS

L SCHOO

AND

STAFF

Plan their next

SCIENCE

adventure!

OUTDOORS ARTS GYMNASTICS EDUCATION

Saturday, Feb. 4 10 A.M. - 2 P.M. Burlington Hilton

FREE!

KIDSVT.COM/FAIR

ANIMALS SPORTS

K1T-CampFair1216-2.indd 1

PRESENTED BY

12/2/16 10:08 AM


2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE • 2017 CAMP GUIDE

Planning a kids event? SUMMER SYMPHONY CAMP Fun introduction to symphony & jazz orchestra

List your event for free in the Kids VT monthy calendar. Submit your info by the 15th of the month online at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com

JUNE 26TH – 30TH COLCHESTER, VT

Winds, brass, percussion entering grades 6-9 Strings entering grades 5-9

Limited space available Early-bird discount

CAMP ABNAKI

REGISTRATION OPEN NOW • Overnight camp for boys that have completed grades 1-10 • 100 years on North Hero’s shores • Archery, sailing, camp fires, more • Learn skills, build confidence, have fun!

campabnaki.org The Y’s Community Partner

calendar

VISIT WWW.VYO.ORG FOR MORE INFO

GYMNASTICS, FREESTYLE, PARKOUR, AND NINJA SUMMER CAMPS!

k12v-VYO0217.indd 1

1/25/1712v-calendar.indd 1:41 PM 1

! R E M M U THINK S Think Untitled-12 1

1/25/17 10:34 AM

7/29/11 12:35 PM

YWCA VT Camp Hochelaga!

Visit GreenMountainTrainingCenter.com for more information

Residential and day camp for girls ages 6-17, in South Hero

260 Avenue D, Suite 30 • Williston (off Industrial Ave.) • 802-652-2454

HIRING FOR STAFF NOW! Information at: www.ywcavt.org • contactus@ywcavt.org • 802-862-7520

k6h-GreenMtnTraining0216.indd 1

1/29/16 10:27 AM

For kids who are wild about animals

For kids who wild animals! Forare kids who areabout wild about animals! Kids Ages 5-7: $195

New age group this year!

Kids Ages 8-10: $195

Week 3: Monday - Friday, Animal Adventures (ages 7-9)

Week 1: Monday-Friday, Animal Adventures (ages 7-9) July 24-28 Afternoons only still available! July 10-14

Session Four: 9 AM - 12 PM

July 13-17 ● July 20-24 Session One: 9only AM - 12 PMavailable! Afternoons still Session Five: 1 PM - 4 PM SummerWeek Safari 4: (ages 10-12)- Friday, Week 2: Monday Friday, Monday July 13-17 ● July 20-24

July 17-21 Full-day camp: A few slots available July 31-August 4 Session Two: 9 AM - 12 PM Session Six: - 12 PM July 27– July 31● Aug 3-79●AM Aug.10-14 Session Three: 1 PM - 4 PM Session Seven: 1 PM - 4 PM Register: (802) 862-0135 x 12 Full-day camp: A few available Or slots visit chittendenhumane.org.

Summer Safari (ages 10-12)

July 27– July 31● Aug 3-7 ● Aug.10-14 Register: (802) 862-0135 x 12 Or visit chittendenhumane.org.

k6h-HumaneSociety0217.indd 1

Kids Ages 11-12: $390 Week 5: Monday-Friday, August 7-11 Session Eight: 9 AM - 3 PM Week 6: Monday - Friday, August 14-18 Session Nine: 9 AM - 3 PM Before & after care hours are available. Scholarships funded by Redducs Foundation

Before & after care hours are available. Scholarships funded by

k6h-ywca0217indd.indd 1

1/23/17 3:42 PM

BEST. SUMMER. EVER. Y Summer Camps

• Boys and girls ages 5 - 16 • Burlington, Essex, Fairfax, Ferrisburgh, Georgia, North Hero, Waterbury

www.gbymca.org The Y’s Community Partner

Redducs Foundation

1/10/17 11:33 AM

Untitled-13 1

1/25/17 10:35 AM


Stay on Target

Summer Camp

Use this handy sheet to organize your summer. JUNE 19-23

JULY 24-28

JUNE 19-30

JUL 31AUG 4

JULY 3-7

Tuesday, July 4th

AUG 7-11

JULY 10-14

AUG 14-18

JULY 17-21

AUG 21-25

CLIP & SAVE

Building Confidence

New Village Farm Camps Farm & Garden Ages 5-10

April Vacation Field & Forest Ages 10-13 Teen Camp k8h-NewVillageFarmCamp0217.indd 1

Shelburne, VT www.NewVillageFarm.com 1/24/17 7:18 PM

802-586-2090 - HosmerPoint.com Untitled-34 1

1/17/17 10:36 AM


FREE EVENT !

Join us for a winter celebration for kids where it’s all about fun and snow!

Sun. Feb. 25th, 12 pm - 3 pm Robert Miller Recreation Center | 130 Gosse Court

Indoor and outdoor activities! Free snowshoeing and xc skiing, balloon creations, face painting. Meet some animals, make funny faces in a photobooth, do some crafts, and dance with Star 92.9 DJs. Play games with the Big Blue Trunk! Free yoga classes with Spark Youth Yoga! Yummy food for sale from Taco Trunk Allstars.

My kids and I look at every page — ads and calendar listings included — and read most articles every single month.

Thanks to Our Sponsors!

I just marvel at the very fine balance you've mastered at effectively delivering enough for parents of kids of all ages. I can't think of another publication that I read that does that — they each have a more limited life span for me. I find so much of value, clip lots of things, follow up on several of them each month. My copy after reading looks like I was cutting out words for a ransom note! Thank you, thank you, thank you to your hard-working, excellent team for creating a fantastic product and service for families!

Valerie Wood-Lewis

Burlington, COFOUNDER, FRONT PORCH FORUM

GET IN THE NEXT ISSUE! CALL 985-5482 TO ADVERTISE.

K2v-Testimonial0217.indd 1

WWW.ENJOYBURLINGTON.COM (802) 864-0123 1/26/17 1:25 PM

Untitled-38 1

1/26/17 11:41 AM


Now enrolling!

Summer Camp Programs Visit: heartworksvt.com/summer-programs

Heartworks PRESCHOOL

Tae kwon do class

Continued from page 20 the learning of her 8-year-old daughter, Ruby. “It’s very hard to learn language without community,” Scott pointed out. Scott said that her younger brother was fluent in Korean until they moved to the U.S. when he was 5 years old. Their parents didn’t push the siblings to continue to speak Korean. Her brother hasn’t retained much of the language.

I thought he was not proud of Korean culture, and even his Korean mom. CINDY RANCOURT

Endeavour

Infant to Pre-Kindergarten

Kindergarten - Fifth Grade

MIDDLE SCHOOL Sixth - Eighth Grade

Heartworks Preschools emphasize kindness, respect and a positive learning environment. Children have extensive time to play while engaged in learning. We offer an incredibly fun afternoon STEAM program, and an excellent Kindergarten Readiness program.

Renaissance students achieve academic excellence, develop a strong moral character, social and life skills in fun and engaging ways that bring joy to learning. Core academics, art, music, drama, French, Spanish, PE and character development occur inside and outside the classroom.

A rich and engaging academic and extracurricular program for 6th to 8th graders, the Endeavour experience supports the unique journey of discovery and exploration middle school students navigate with a special emphasis on building important social, emotional and life skills to ensure success in high school and college.

Shelburne, Burlington, Williston and Stowe Discover: heartworksvt.com

Learn: renaissancevt.com

k4t-Heartworks0217.indd 1

Explore: endeavourvt.com 1/26/17 11:59 AM

The 12,000 men and women who teach Vermont’s students are proud to be…

IN THE CLASSROOM EVERYDAY FOR YOUR CHILDREN KIDSVT.COM

vtnea.org

KIDS VT

Your public schools. Vermont’s most important resource.

FEBRUARY 2017

21

“He regrets it,” said Scott. Scott offers this advice to parents based on her own family’s experience: “Even though it seems in the short run [that] really immersing yourself and taking on all of the American culture is going to benefit your child — and I think it’s probably true — it’s really important to hang on to the culture that they came from and the language.” Successfully maintaining that bond takes a lot of work. Korean school principal Shin attributes the success of her school to the parents. “It’s actually the parents who have to bring [the children],” she pointed out. In addition, many of them teach at the school. Some help to prepare snacks. “It’s a communal thing,” she said. Since the parents aren’t certified Korean language teachers to begin with, they attend professional development workshops run by the National Association of Korean Schools. Two

of them took classes to receive their teaching certification. Cindy Rancourt is one of them. She described the semester-long online course as “really intense,” requiring about 20 hours of work per week. Although the Korean school has a lot working in its favor — from having a designated space to meet free of charge to having strong parental involvement — Shin is aware that her program has limitations, as well. To become fluent in a language, you really need to be immersed in it, she said. The students have only three hours of instruction each week. So she keeps her expectations realistic. “That’s not enough time to learn a language,” she said. Besides, as the children grow older, their attention often turns to other extracurricular activities, like sports. In the last few years, the school has had to change its schedule to accommodate students’ busy lives. Shin said that there’s still plenty of time for her students to master the Korean language. “When they get older, they could investigate on their own,” she said. For now, the main thing she wants students to take away from their experience at the school is positive feelings about their Korean heritage. “It’s for them to have an exposure and to have that basic interest,” she explained — “having that good memory [of ] what being Korean is all about.” Rancourt said the transformation in her son makes her happy. “My kids think everything from Korea is cool,” she said. Since the family started watching a Korean drama series about soldiers serving overseas missions, Nick has started using the phrase tahn kyul. It means “unity of power,” and a soldier says it when giving the salute. Said Rancourt, “My son’s ‘yes’ is tahn kyul now.” K

Renaissance

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

k4t-vtnea0212.indd 1

1/19/12 10:25 AM


PHOTOS COURTESY OF SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH

It’s a SNAP Smugglers’ Notch Adaptive Program gets kids of all abilities onto the slopes BY SARAH TUFF DUNN

22

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2017

KIDSVT.COM

S

even years ago, Emily Cogan couldn’t have imagined her foster son, Devin, being a confident, independent skier. “We had tried a couple of times to go with him, at age 11 and again at age 15,” said the Jeffersonville resident, “and it was really just too much to manage.” Devin, who is autistic, “didn’t have the coordination, and we didn’t have the training or physical capacity to support him,” Cogan said. Then she discovered the Smugglers’ Notch Adaptive Program, or SNAP, which brings Vermont’s outdoor sports to people of all abilities. Initially attracted to SNAP’s summer camps, the Cogans soon learned about the school’s Special Olympics winter program, which prepares participants to compete in the Special Olympics Winter Games. Devin decided to give it a try. Now 18, he’s skiing weekly without his parents and has earned a coveted slot on the Special Olympics team. “When we started our Special Olympics team, we only had four athletes,” said SNAP program manager Shawna Fatigate. “Now we have 16, and a wait list of five people.” In the last 10 years, participation in the Special Olympics Vermont Winter Games — which happens each March at Suicide Six ski resort in South Pomfret — has nearly quadrupled, to more than 400 competitors. The increase is due in part to adaptive efforts that focus on kids. “Special Olympics Vermont has seen significant growth in annual numbers at our athlete Winter Games, particularly from school-based programs,” said Liza Reed, marketing

Adaptive skiing at Smugglers’ Notch

and partnerships director for Special Olympics Vermont. SNAP isn’t the only program that caters to people with disabilities. Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports organization runs them at Bolton Valley, Sugarbush and Pico Mountain/ Killington (see sidebar). But Smugglers’ Notch has been operating SNAP independently since the late 1990s, first offering winter sports and then folding in summer activities. “Many guests don’t participate in sports on a regular basis, and this gets them outside, away from television and cellphones, and active,” said Fatigate, who helps oversee a full-time staff of five to eight in the winter, along with 16 to 20 part-time employees and more than 20 volunteers. “The way they benefit is infinite. We’re giving them a skill set they didn’t think they could get.” Alongside individuals with physical disabilities, said Fatigate, SNAP has seen a rise in kids with cognitive differences, like Devin. “The majority of our guests today fall into that category,” she said. “With developmental delays, chances are they can be a bit more physical and be on a bi-ski with hand outriggers, or no [special] equipment at all.” SNAP has tapped into a decadeslong phenomenon: the appeal of winter sports among athletes with disabilities, and the programs available to them. According to a 2015 report on national trends in adaptive sports, written by disability specialist


Garrett Richardson with instructor Andy Cook at Bolton Valley

We’re giving them a skill set they didn’t think they could get. SNAP PROGRAM MANAGER SHAWNA FATIGATE

SPORTS FOR EVERY BODY Founded in 1987, Killington-based Vermont Adaptive Ski & Sports recruits nearly 400 volunteers to serve kids and athletes with disabilities in a variety of activities ranging from kayaking and standup paddleboarding to sailing and cycling. In the winter, Vermont Adaptive offers alpine skiing, snowboarding, cross-country skiing, snowshoeing and group activities from late December through early April at Pico Mountain/Killington, Bolton Valley and Sugarbush. Shelburne’s Valerie Richardson enrolled her now 15-year-old son, Garrett, in the

Along with her days on the mountain, Del looks forward to what, for many, is the best part of the adventure: après-ski. For the Sliwka family, that means stopping at the Jeffersonville gas station for Del’s favorite treat — a hot dog — before cozying up by the fire back in Essex Junction. “It’s a content fatigue,” said Sliwka. “She feels so tired so often, and it’s frustrating, but when everybody goes skiing … We’re all tired. It’s communal. We’ve all exerted lots of energy, and we deserve to be tired.” 

KIDS VT

23

A half-day SNAP lesson, which includes rental equipment, is $85; full day is $125. Five-week lesson packages range from $375 to $994. New this season is an all-day February vacation camp that includes skiing, snowboarding, snowshoeing and swimming for $350 (not including equipment). Find more information at smuggs.com/pages/winter/kids/adaptiveprograms.php.

FEBRUARY 2017

a challenging first season to become a regular part of the Smuggs mountain scene. “I’m convinced that having one consistent coach every weekend allowed our son to grow immensely as a skier and with his other interactive skills,” Emily Cogan said. Along with the possibility of joining the Special Olympics team, SNAP participants can merge into Mitey Mites and other traditional group lessons and camps. The goals are inclusion, independence and the opportunity to socialize with peers. Thanks to SNAP, the Cogan family was able to take a family vacation to Mont-Tremblant last winter. “Devin was able to ski with us and enjoy exploring the mountain — that was huge,” said Cogan. “It’s pretty amazing that our child has this opportunity to be part of a sport that he wouldn’t normally be able to participate in. “Devin used to dread winter, and now he really looks forward to it,” she continued.

Bolton program eight years ago after a UPS driver saw Garrett on an adaptive bike and told the family about Vermont Adaptive. “He doesn’t like winter gear, and doesn’t have the language to tell us if he’s cold, so everyone must be careful that he doesn’t get too cold or even frostbit,” said Richardson of the challenges. The reward, however, is seeing Garrett “go as fast as possible” in a “fantastic winter activity,” said Richardson. “The volunteers know his favorite songs and can tell when it’s time to come in for a warm-up. Vermont Adaptive makes it an amazing place to give kids the opportunity to enjoy the snow.”

KIDSVT.COM

Adaptive skiing at Smugglers’ Notch

“My husband and I snowboard, so it’s something I wanted to explore,” said Sliwka “but we didn’t know what it would be like,” explaining that low muscle tone, leg braces, intense cramping and balance issues make participating in sports a challenge for Delaney. Then, three years ago, the family stumbled upon SNAP during a Burton event at Burlington’s ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain. Delaney, then 5, was elated when she realized she might be able to give winter sports a try. “Del was really into the idea of skiing, and we love to be outside as a family, so it was a no-brainer,” said Sliwka, who explained that while Del mountain bikes in warmer seasons (the family hosts a fundraiser called Del’s Ride each fall), she can feel cooped up in cold weather. “There are no times in the winter where Del will be outside all day,” said Sliwka, “except when she goes skiing.” Like all SNAP participants, Del was paired with an instructor who provides customized lessons and assists with adaptive equipment. Del uses a slider, which has four skis for added stability and tethers to an instructor, who can control speed and direction. She also uses a harness attached to an adult when she skis on the bunny hill. Her coach, Mark, “was so positive and into Delaney skiing,” recalled Sliwka of their first days at Smuggs, “that any worries we had about her ability were immediately eased. “They promote independence in a nurturing manner and ensure that everyone is having fun. They listen to their students and encourage them to push themselves,” she added. Since Del’s first lesson with Mark, she’s continued to ski with the coach, along with a volunteer named Dave. “A great pair of humans!” said Sliwka. Meanwhile, Devin worked closely with a coach through

COURTESY OF VALERIE RICHARDSON

Lisa McNiven, “Outdoor winter sports have the highest concentration of programs, with alpine downhill skiing at 49 and Nordic cross-country following close behind at 21.” McNiven suggests this may be because these programs were established early in the disability civil rights movement, and therefore gained a foothold over other areas. And while the Green Mountain State ranks behind states such as Colorado in the number of adaptive winter-sports programs it offers, more and more mono-skis, tandem skis and other specialized equipment are appearing alongside traditional skis and snowboards at Vermont resorts. This is a promising development for families like the Sliwka/Johnson family of Essex Junction. Katrina Sliwka and her husband, Ben Johnson, met in a wilderness program, so they expected their firstborn would enjoy the outdoors. But when their daughter, Delaney, took her first steps at 27 months and was eventually diagnosed with a rare neurological disorder called alternating hemiplegia of childhood, skiing seemed increasingly unlikely.


FEB

Sponsored by:

CALENDAR COURTESY OF EARTHWALK VERMONT

SPOTLIGHTS & LISTINGS BY BRETT STANCIU

24

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2017

KIDSVT.COM

r e tt Cri s e u l C

Ever wonder what wild critters have been running through your backyard? EarthWalk Vermont’s TRACKING WILDLIFE WORKSHOP will help answer that question. The afternoon outing is one of six Saturday events sponsored by the naturebased nonprofit, which offers a variety of educational programs for both children and adults. This month, families will explore the snow-covered terrain, learning how to identify tracks, scat, fur, noises and food remnants in the process. EarthWalk founder Angella Gibbons, who’ll lead the tracking workshop, says she created the organization to promote “a way of living and learning with awareness, kindness and care for all living things.” TRACKING WILDLIFE WORKSHOP: Saturday, February 11, 1-4 p.m., at EarthWalk Vermont, Goddard College, in Plainfield. $25 per adult; $10 for each adult-accompanied child aged 6-12; preregister. Info, 454-8500. earthwalkvermont.org

Like the University of Vermont Medical Center on Facebook and get weekly updates from Dr. First! See “First With Kids” videos at uvmhealth.org.


1 WEDNESDAY

Arts & Crafts

2016 Audubon Photography Awards Show: Prize photographs capture birds in their worlds, and educate the public about local avian wildlife and Audubon Vermont’s work. Through February 2. Main Street Landing, Burlington, Feb. 2, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Free. Info, 859-9222. Sensory Lab for Tots: Tiny tots try out selfguided art stations, including finger painting, modeling dough, moon sand and more. Ages 5 and under; adult supervision required. ArtisTree/ Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 9:30-11:30 a.m. $5. Info, 457-3500. Yarn Bombing: Community members of all ages and abilities get crafty with colored string to beautify our world through this globally trending street art. South Burlington Community Library, 3:30-5 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080.

Baby & Maternity

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: Mothers-to-be build strength, stamina, comfort and a stronger connection to their baby. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, 5:45-7:15 p.m. $15; $130 for 10-class pass. Info, 864-9642. Mom and Baby Yoga: Brand-new mamas and their littles relax, stretch and bond. Followed by a free mothers’ gathering. Yoga Mountain Center, Montpelier, 10:30-11:30 a.m. $15. Info, 223-5302. Mother’s Gathering: Moms and new babies spread out, sip tea, nurse and swap stories. Children under 2 welcome. Yoga Mountain Center, Montpelier, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 223-5302. Prenatal Method Postnatal Rehab: New moms gather for toning and relaxation. Prenatal Method Studio, Burlington, 10:30-11:30 a.m. $15. Info, 829-0211. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: Women prepare for birth through yoga with a focus on strengthening the body and mind. See prenatalmethod.com for class descriptions. Prenatal Method Studio, Burlington, 12:15-1:15 p.m. $15. Info, 829-0211.

Education

Reading Buddies: Young readers pair up with volunteers for literacy and laughs. Kindergarten and up. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester,

Class

List your class or camp here for only $20 per month! Submit the listing by February 15 at kidsvt.com or to classes@kidsvt.com.

Food

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: More than fifty vendors peddle produce, from fresh salad greens to apples and cider, alongside artisan cheese, homemade bread and other local products. All ages. Vermont Farmers Food Center, Rutland, 3-6 p.m. Free. Info, 342-4727.

Games

Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: Novice and experienced players put their imaginations together. Ages 10 and up. Regular attendance needed to follow the ongoing storyline. Jericho Town Library, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 899-4686.

Health & Fitness

Prenatal Empowerment Clinic: Mothers-to-be in all stages of pregnancy get guidance on health, nutrition and exercise. Hemmett Health, South Burlington, 12-12:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 879-1703. Yoga for Kids: Young yogis engage their energy and explore breathing exercises and relaxation poses. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

Library & Books

Dorothy’s List Book Club: Middle readers make merry conversation around DCF pick Nimona by Noelle Stevenson. Ages 8-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660. Lego Club: Young builders bust out the blocks and creativity in themed sessions. Follows the school calendar. Ages 6 and up. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 3:15-4:15 p.m. Free. Info, 422-9765. Read to a Dog: Little book lovers select stories to share with a furry friend. Ages 5-10. Fairfax Community Library, 3:15-4:15 p.m. Free; preregister for 15-minute time slot. Info, 849-2420.

Nature & Science

Science & Stories at ECHO: Preschoolers gather ’round for nature-inspired tales and activities. Ages 8 and under. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Regular museum admission, $11.50-14.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848.

2 THURSDAY

Arts & Crafts

Baby & Maternity

Essex La Leche League: Moms bring their little ones to a discussion of parenting and breastfeeding. Siblings welcome. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8 p.m. Free. Evolution Postnatal Yoga: Moms tote their precrawling kids to an all-levels flowing yoga class focused on bringing the body back to strength and alignment in a fun and nurturing environment. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, 10:45-11:55 a.m. $15; $130 for a 10class pass. Info, 864-9642. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1. 12:301:30 p.m. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See February 1. 4:30-5:30 p.m.

Education

Audubon Homeschool Program: Home-based learners use the outdoor classroom to explore a variety of seasonal topics, from insect life to bird habitat. Ages 6-8. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. $25; $15 each additional sibling; preregister. Info, 434-3068.

Games

Chess Club: Checkmate! Kids of all abilities scheme winning strategies. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3:15-4:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420. Lego Club: Mini-makers participate in surprise challenges with colorful interlocking blocks. Ages 6-10. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

Health & Fitness

Itty Bitty Public Skating: Tiny feet learn the art of sliding on ice through fun and games. Ages 2-5 with caregiver. Leddy Park, Burlington, 1011:30 a.m. $8 per family; $1 skate rentals. Info, 865-7558.

Library & Books

Food for Thought Teen Group: Young adults polish off pizza as they discuss library projects. Grades 7-12. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. Franklin Lego Thursdays: Young builders combine their creativity with the library’s supplies. All ages. Haston Library, Franklin, 2-5 p.m. Free. Info, 285-6505. Harry Potter Book Night: The Professors of Hogwarts: Young readers dressed up as wizards, witches and Muggles rally for an evening of games, readings and quizzes, with the Cafe at Phoenix Books serving magical specials. All ages. Phoenix Books, Essex Junction, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 872-7111. PJ Story Time: Children chill in their jammies while crafting and listening to stories. Ages 6 and under. Fairfax Community Library, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 849-2420.

Music

Preschool Music: Lively tunes with local musicians strike the right note among the wee crowd. Ages 5 and under with a caregiver. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Free; limited to one session per week per family. Info, 878-4918.

Nature & Science

An Evening of Bird Tales: The Friends of Missisquoi National Wildlife Refuge and the Saint Albans Museum entertain the audience with tales from the field and forest and answer birding questions. Refreshments served. All ages. Saint Albans Museum, St. Albans, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 527-7933.

3 FRIDAY

Baby & Maternity

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1. 8:159:15 a.m.

Fairs & Festivals

Colchester Winter Carnival: A talent show jumpstarts three days of frosty fun, sponsored by the Colchester Parks and Recreation Department. Other activities include horse-drawn hay rides, fat-bike demos, an inflatable obstacle course and a free Sunday open skate at Leddy Park. All ages. Colchester High School, 8:30 a.m.-3 p.m. $7; free for children under 3. Info, 264-5640.

Food

Kids in the Kitchen: Lotsa Pasta: Junior chefs roll out fresh noodles from scratch, then sample their results with butter and pesto. Healthy Living Market & Café, South Burlington, 4-5 p.m. $25. Info, 863-2569.

Games

Essex Junction Magic: The Gathering: Planeswalkers seek knowledge and glory in this trading-card game. New players welcome. Grades 6 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. Killington Magic: The Gathering: Novice and experienced players team up for card playing. Ages 8 and up. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 3:15-4:15 p.m. Free. Info, 422-9765. Lego Club: Youngsters build with plastic blocks and enjoy companionship. Ages 4-12. Craftsbury Public Library, Craftsbury Common, 3-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 586-9683.

Health & Fitness

Family Gym: Indoor playground equipment gives tumblers a chance to run free. Ages 7 and under. Greater Burlington YMCA, 10:15-11:45 a.m. $5-8 per family; free for members. Info, 862-9622.

Library & Books

All-Ages Story Time: Picture books, finger play and rhymes amuse all. Ages 5 and under. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. Early Bird Math Story Time: Little learners get going with math literacy through games and play. Ages 2-5. Richmond Free Library, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036. Family Story Time: Librarian and storyteller Molly Pease leads little ones in stories, crafts, music and more. Bridgeside Books, Waterbury, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 244-1441. Friday Free for All: Junior explorers investigate their world, from rocks to bugs. Ages 3-5. Charlotte Public Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 425-3864. Teen Advisory Board: Adolescents plan the “Pun Wars,” a community event hosted by teens in March. Grades 9 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Music

Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: Toe-tapping tunes captivate kiddies. Radio Bean, Burlington, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 660-9346. Music With Robert: Families sing along with a local legend. All ages. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

KIDS VT

2016 Audubon Photography Awards Show: See February 1. Art Monkeys: With rotating weekly themes, this drop-in class encourages children to explore color, paint, markers, oil pastels, clay, movement and the joy of creativity. Ages 18 months to 5 years. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 9:30-10:30 a.m. $12 per drop-in class; preregister. Info, 457-3500. Clay for Tots: Little potters practice, poke and play with a malleable medium. Ages 3-6. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 10:3011:15 a.m. $12 per drop-in class; preregister. Info, 457-3500. Paper Weaving: Artist Annette Hansen coaches crafters of all ages to create woven hearts and pennants. Children under 14 must be accompanied by an adult. Milton Municipal Complex, 6-8 p.m. $15. Info, 893-4922. Preschool Art Drop-In: Petite Picassos craft cool projects. Ages 6 months-5 years with

accompanying adult. BCA Center, Burlington, 9:30-11:30 a.m. $5-6. Info, 865-7166.

KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2017

Kids Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu: The future of our nation lays on the courage, confidence and determination of its people. Our Kids BJJ Program promotes self-esteem, self-confidence, character development and a physical outlet with discipline, cooperation with other children, respect for peers and adults, perseverance and a healthy lifestyle. Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu will help your kids to learn realistic bully-proofing and self-defense skills that they can use for the rest of their lives! Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu builds endurance, patience and self-respect. Give your kids the ability to get stronger, gain confidence and build resilience! Our sole purpose is to help empower people by giving them practices they can carry with them throughout life. Remember you are raising children, not flowers. First class is free! Please stop by our school at 55 Leroy Road, Williston; call 598-2839; visit our website vermontbjj.com or email julio@bjjusa.com to register your son or daughter! K

3:30-4:30 p.m. Free; preregistration appreciated but not required. Info, 264-5660. Tutoring: A high school student offers educational assistance. Math preferred, but other subjects available. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6956.

25

4 SATURDAY, P.26


FEB

CALENDAR

4 SATURDAY

Arts & Crafts

Craft a Card: Everyone is encouraged to drop in and create a card for their special someone. South Burlington Community Library, 10 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 652-7080. Craft School Saturday Drop-In: Artsy types provide seasonal masterpieces in this ever-changing weekly series. Projects available for pickup at a later date. Ages 5 and up with caregiver. Shelburne Craft School, 10-11 a.m. $10 per child. Info, 985-3648. Family Clay: Children and their parents make memories firing and glazing special pieces. All ages. ArtisTree/Purple Crayon, South Pomfret, 10 a.m.-noon, $20 per parent-child pair; $5 per additional family member; preregister. Info, 457-3500. Kids Building Workshop: Handy helpers learn do-it-yourself skills and tool safety as they construct seasonal projects. Ages 5-12. Home Depot, Williston, 9 a.m.-noon. Free; preregister at workshops.homedepot.com. Info, 872-0039. Maker Lab: Squishy Circuits: Hands-on kiddos use homemade play dough to design electronic sculptures that light up, move and make sounds. Ages 6-12. Milton Public Library, 10 a.m.-noon. Free; preregister. Info, 893-4644.

Health & Fitness

Education

Magic Morning: Families with young children spend a morning in the preschool and kindergarten and make wool-felted hearts, join circle time and enjoy a snack and puppet play. Ages 3-6 with families. Lake Champlain Waldorf School, Shelburne, 10-11:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 985-2827, ext. 212.

Fairs & Festivals

Colchester Winter Carnival: See February 3. ‘Kids VT’ Camp & School Fair: Parents and campers-to-be get personal attention and detailed information as representatives from dozens of camps and schools from Vermont and beyond present their programs. All ages. Hilton Burlington, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 864-5684.

Cleo the Therapy Dog: Canine and reading enthusiasts visit with a personable pooch from Therapy Dogs of Vermont. Ages 3 and up. Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 893-4644. Cocoa & Coloring: Community members of all ages drop in for warming cup of sweet stuff and an easy activity. South Burlington Community Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. First Saturday StoryTime: Little bookworms have a blast with stories, crafts and snacks. All ages. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 9-10 a.m. Free. Info, 472-5948. Jaquith Library Open House & Book Sale: The community comes out to celebrate its local library with music, refreshments, kid-friendly activities and a used book sale. All ages. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. Take Your Child to the Library Day: Families drop in for special crafts, snacks and activities, and wish Booker the Bear a happy birthday. All ages. Fairfax Community Library, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 849-2420.

Music

Vermont Violins Rug Concert: This intimate and family-friendly concert introduces little ones to music and instruments, followed by hot chocolate and cookies. Ages 6 and under with caregivers. Burlington Violin Shop, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 862-0349.

Nature & Science

Family Trek: Adventurous families bundle up and explore animal tracks and homes, enjoy hot cocoa and build a campfire together. Dress warmly. (See spotlight.) All ages. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 10 a.m.-noon. $4-5; free for children under 2; preregister. Info, 434-3068. Playdate! Winter on the Farm: Little ones have a hoot with indoor educational activities and a visit from a live owl. Ages 2-5, accompanied by an adult. Shelburne Farms, 9:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. $3-5 per child; free for adults; preregister. Info, 985-8686. Tour the Cosmos: This 50-minute live presentation takes the audience on a journey deep into

Multicultural Moves In the middle of winter, CIRQUE ZUMA ZUMA generates some heat in downtown Barre with a show that combines mime, magic, acrobatics and more. With performers hailing from Kenya and Tanzania, this unconventional troupe — 2011 finalists in “America’s Got Talent” — puts on a high-energy variety show to enthrall the crowd. Contortionists bend in unbelievable ways. South African gumboot dancing — created by miners to communicate when bosses forbid that they speak — mixes the political and the physical. Egyptian limbo dancing gives a glimpse into the culture of a faraway land. Through it all, live music keeps the beat — and audience members’ hearts — pounding. CIRQUE ZUMA ZUMA: Friday, February 10, 7:30 p.m., at the Barre Opera House in Barre. $16-38. All ages. Info, 476-8188. barreoperahouse.org

the universe. Ages 6 and up. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, 1:30 p.m. $6 plus regular museum admission, $7-9; free for children under 5. Info, 748-2372.

Parenting

Homebirth Gathering: Local homebirth midwives answer questions in a supportive setting, and ask participants to share birth stories and plans. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 234-1384.

5 SUNDAY

Baby & Maternity

Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See February 2, 12:151:30 p.m. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 1011:30 a.m.

Community

February Weekend: See February 4. Sleigh Rides: See February 4.

Fairs & Festivals

Library & Books

Read-A-Thon: Children’s activities, free books, prizes and a concert celebrate literacy. Ages 3-14. South Burlington Community Library, 1-3:30 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080.

Nature & Science

Discovery Sundays: Families have fun with hands-on science experiments and investigations, using wheels, towers, magnets, feathers, water and bubbles. All ages. Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center, Quechee, 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Regular museum admission, $12.50-14.50; free for children under 4. Info, 359-5001, ext. 228. Tour the Cosmos: See February 4.

Parenting

Creative and Effective Parenting and Grandparenting: Dr. Lewis First, Chief of Pediatrics at the UVM Children’s Hospital, presents a general pediatrician’s view of parenting, followed by a question and answer session and snacks. Temple Sinai, South Burlington, 10-11:30 a.m. Free; RSVP to register children for an interactive and simultaneous program. Info, 862-5125.

Colchester Winter Carnival: See February 3.

6 MONDAY

Health & Fitness

Baby & Maternity

Essex Open Gym: Energy-filled kids flip, jump and tumble in a state-of-the-art facility. Ages 6 and under, 1 p.m.; ages 7-12, 2:30 p.m.; ages 13 and up, 4 p.m. Regal Gymnastics Academy, Essex, 1-5:30 p.m. $8. Info, 655-3300. Family Gym: See February 3.

Submit your March events for print by February 15 at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com.

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 5:45-7 p.m. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See February 1.

Education

Homeschool Parent Meeting: Parents of homelearners socialize and swap stories and resources.

COURTESY OF OF CIRQUE ZUMA ZUMA

Library & Books

Dance Showcase: Graceful groups — including Aria Michaels Paradise, Ballet Viridis and Blue Moon Company — strut their stuff in a benefit performance for Puppets in Education. Black Box, Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center, Burlington, 7 p.m. $20-23. Info, 860-3349.

KIDSVT.COM

Sibshops for Siblings of Children with Special Needs: Sisters and brothers of special needs kids join together for a craft and group games, and share a meal and conversation. Ages 6-12. Older siblings welcome. Howard Center, Burlington, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $5 suggested donation; RSVP. Info, 876-5315.

Community

Dance

FEBRUARY 2017

Games

Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See February 1. 10:30-11:30 a.m.

February Weekend: Families check out farm animals wintering in barns, tour the historic 1890 farmhouse and enjoy activities. All ages. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Regular admission, $4-14; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355. Penguin Plunge: Stouthearted swimmers in creative costumes dunk themselves in Lake Champlain to raise funds for Special Olympics Vermont. Check-in begins at 9 a.m.; plunge at 11 a.m. and noon. Waterfront Park, Burlington. Free to watch. Info, 863-5222. Sleigh Rides: Giddy-up! Weather permitting, jingling horses trot visitors over the snow on a wintry tour of rolling acres. Rides leave every half hour; seats are first-come, first-served. All ages. Shelburne Farms, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. $8-10; free for children under 3. Info, 985-8442.

KIDS VT

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See February 1, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

EvoKids Saturday Yoga: Youngsters master basic yoga poses through games, songs and dance. Mindfulness activities improve focus and concentration. Ages 3-7. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, 10:30-11:15 a.m. $15. Info, 864-9642. New Mama Yoga: New and experienced moms tote their tiny ones to a relaxed and social class, followed by a playgroup. Bring a few blankets for your baby’s comfort. Ages 6 weeks to 6 months. Kula Yoga Center, Stowe, 11:45 a.m.-1 p.m. $16. Skate Your Winter Blues Away: This fundraiser for Robin’s Nest Children’s Center includes skate rentals for the slick stuff, a bake sale, games, crafts, warm drinks and special visits from Elsa and the Lake Monsters’ Champ. All ages. Leddy Park Arena, Burlington, 2-4 p.m. $24 per group of four. Info, 864-8191.

Baby & Maternity

26

Food


Vermont’s Premier South Burlington Community Library, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Milton Prekindergarten Programs Information Night: Families of children ages 3-4 learn about applying for next year’s preschool programs. Registration for programs opens March 10 at 8 a.m. Milton Elementary/Middle School, 6-7 p.m. Free. Info, 893-5589.

Health & Fitness

Itty Bitty Public Skating: See February 2.

Library & Books

Babies & Toddlers Rock: Little musicians ages 2 and under sing songs and engage in early literacy activities. Rutland Free Library, 10-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 773-1860. Essex Lego Club: Inventive kiddos press together plastic-piece creations. Ages 5-12. Essex Free Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 879-0313. Milton Legos at the Library: Junior builders bust out interlocking blocks. Snacks served. Grades K-5. Milton Public Library, 3:30-5 p.m. Free. Info, 893-4644. Pajama Story Time: Flannel-clad wee ones bring their stuffed pals for tales, crafts and a bedtime snack. All ages. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. Stories with Megan: Little listeners learn and

Ongoing Exhibits ECHO LEAHY CENTER FOR LAKE CHAMPLAIN, BURLINGTON

Info, 864-1848 ‘Butterflies, Live at ECHO’: A pavilion of fluttering creatures enchants visitors while they learn about these winged beauties’ lifecycle and how their natural environment can be protected. Saturday, February 11Labor Day. FAIRBANKS MUSEUM & PLANETARIUM. ST. JOHNSBURY

laugh. Ages 2-5. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216.

Audubon Nature Playgroup: Little ones and their caregivers explore the woods, meadows, beaver and peeper ponds while meeting new friends. Ages birth to 5 years. Open to Richmond, Huntington, and Hinesburg residents. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9:30-11 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 434-3068.

Hinesburg, 3-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 482-2878. Library Elementary Event Planners: Kids make plans for a March scavenger hunt and chow down on munchies. For middle school students. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. Read to a Dog: Pet-lovers peruse books with registered therapy pooches. All ages. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-4918. Read to Daisy the Therapy Dog: Book buffs bring a selection from home or borrow from the library to amuse an attentive canine. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4 p.m. Free; preregistration appreciated. Info, 878-6956. Spanish Musical Kids: Niños celebrate Latin American culture through tunes and games en español. Ages 1-5 with a caregiver. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 11-11:45 a.m. Free. Info, 865-7216. TinkerBelles: Curious kids learn about working women in the wide worlds of science, technology, engineering, arts and mathematics. Grades 3-5. Charlotte Public Library, 2:15 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 425-3864.

Parenting

Music

Music

Hardwick Music & Movement for Preschoolers: Educator Emily Lanxner gets the beat going with creative storytelling, movement and rhythm. Geared towards preschoolers, but all are welcome. Jeudevine Memorial Library, Hardwick, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 472-5948. Preschool Music: See February 2, 11 a.m. Spanish Musical Kids: Amigos learn Latin American songs and games with native Argentinian Constancia Gómez. Grades K and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Nature & Science

A Circle of Parents: Moms and dads come together to strengthen parenting skills and socialize. New Life Fellowship Church, Milton, 6:30-8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 498-0607. Nurturing Fathers Program: Dads returning to the community from incarceration or probation receive parenting support to improve communication, develop empathy, practice self-care and empower their families. Light dinner included. First United Methodist Church, Burlington, 5:307:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 498-0607.

7 TUESDAY

Arts & Crafts

Sewing Club: Aspiring seamstresses try out a sewing machine and stitch a project. Ages 10 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420.

Info, 748-2372 ‘X-Ray Vision: Fish Inside and Out’: This temporary exhibit from the Smithsonian Institution illustrates the history of evolution through the translucent images of ancient fish in an elegant union of science and art. Through May 2017.

Baby & Maternity

FLETCHER FREE LIBRARY, BURLINGTON

Dance

MONTSHIRE MUSEUM OF SCIENCE, NORWICH

Family Yoga Dance: Fitness-minded folks move and groove together. Ages 13 and under, with families welcome. Zenbarn Studio, Waterbury, 6-6:45 p.m. Suggested donation $10. Info, 505-1688.

Games

Library & Books

Be ready for your end of year performances, recitals, summer dance camps and intensives ~ We’re here to help you find everything you need on stage and off! Owned & operated by dedicated professional dancers

2035 Essex Rd. (RT 2A North) Williston, VT 05495 linesforthebody.com At the back of Honey Thai Restaurant parking lot

802.878.8988

8 WEDNESDAY

Arts & Crafts

Sensory Lab for Tots: See February 1. Teen Crochet Class: Novice hand-workers get k6v-LinesForTheBody0217.indd imaginative with yarn and a hooked needle. Ages 12 and up. Milton Public Library, 3:30-5 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 893-4644. Yarn Bombing: See February 1.

1

1/26/17 12:22 PM

Baby & Maternity

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1. Mom and Baby Yoga: See February 1. Mother’s Gathering: See February 1. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See February 1.

Education

Family Night: I Love Math!: Families stop by the library and have a blast with number stations and games. Ages 3-6. South Burlington Community Library, 4-7 p.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Tutoring: See February 1. Young Writers & Storytellers: Small ones spin their own yarns. Ages 5-11. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

Food

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See February 1.

Follow us on Instagram

@kids_vt

8 WEDNESDAY, P.28

12V-Kvt-Instagram-1216.indd 1

27

Crafternoon: Maker-minded kiddos create cool projects. Ages 7 and up. Carpenter-Carse Library,

Adoption Support Group: Families facing adoption issues and challenges join forces in a respectful setting. All welcome. Franklin County Seniors Center, St. Albans, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free. Info, 524-1700. Milton Nurturing Parent Program: Moms and dads deepen parent-child communication skills, discuss empathy and learn how to empower their families. A light dinner and childcare are included. Milton Family Community Center, 5:45-8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 498-0607. St. Albans Nurturing Parent Program: Moms and dads deepen parent-child communication skills, discuss empathy and learn how to empower their families. A light dinner and childcare are included. Church of the Rock, St. Albans, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 498-0607.

It’s that time of year again!

KIDS VT

Chess Club: Strategists enjoy competition and camaraderie. All ages. Sherburne Memorial Library, Killington, 3:15 p.m. Free. Info, 422-9765. Fairfax Family Game Night: Families take over the library’s tabletops for a fun evening. Ages 5 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 6-8 p.m. Free. Info, 849-2420. Lego Tuesdays: Young builders bust out blocks and get building. Children under 8 must be accompanied by an adult. Norwich Public Library, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 649-1184. Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Gaming Tuesdays: Players of all skill levels team up for card playing. All ages. Haston Library, Franklin, 4-7 p.m. Free. Info, 285-6505.

Parenting

Dance Apparel & Footwear

FEBRUARY 2017

Info, 649-2200 ‘Making Music: The Science of Musical Instruments’: The stories, ideas and science behind the creation of musical instruments mesmerize visitors. Through displays, videos and hands-on opportunities, music lovers make and play a variety of instruments, using Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics. All ages. Through September 4. 

Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See February 2, 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 4:155:30 p.m. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 4:30-5:30 p.m.

Preschool Music: Bitty ones dance and sing to a brisk beat. Ages 3-5. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 11:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

DANCE RETAILER

KIDSVT.COM

Info, 863-3403 ‘Exploring Human Origins’: This traveling exhibition developed by the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History explores our evolutionary journey through interactive kiosks, displays and videos, examining how walking upright, creating technology, eating new foods, brain enlargement, and developing language and complex societies makes us who we are. See fletcherfree.org for hours. (See spotlight, page 30.)

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

12/1/16 2:50 PM


FEB

CALENDAR

8 WEDNESDAY (CONTINUED)

Games

Colchester Dungeons & Dragons Night: Players don invented personas and use cleverness and luck to overcome challenges, defeat enemies and save the day. Beginners welcome. Ages 9-13. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6-7:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 264-5660. Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: See February 1. Lego Club: Budding builders construct creatively with colorful blocks. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420.

Health & Fitness

Prenatal Empowerment Clinic: See February 1. Yoga for Kids: See February 1.

Library & Books

Dorothy Canfield Fisher Group for Homeschooled Students: Books nominated for this esteemed award generate group discussion. Grades 4-8. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Family Fun Night: The whole family turns out for games, Legos, crafts and more. All ages. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 5-6:30 p.m. Free; pizza available with preregistration. Info, 482-2878. Green Mountain Book Award Book Discussion for Homeschooled Students: High-school homeschoolers spark lively conversation around Randall Munroe’s What If? Absurd Hypothetical Questions. Grades 9-12. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. Lego Club: See February 1. Red Clover Group for Homeschooled Students: Budding book lovers bury themselves in bibliophile activities. Grades K-3. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Music

Song Circle: Community Sing-Along: Songbirds raise their voices with singer/songwriter Heidi Wilson in the lead. All ages. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 6:45-8:15 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

Nature & Science

9 THURSDAY

Arts & Crafts

Clay for Tots: See February 2. Crafternoon: Crafty ones fashion Valentine’s Day cards. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. Photography Club: Amateur lens-lovers learn tips to improve their camera skills. Grades 6-8. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 4-5 p.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. Preschool Art Drop-In: See February 2. Teen.comm Valentine Project: Teens create seasonal gifts for shut-ins while consuming cookies and cocoa. Ages 12 and up. St. Albans Free Library, 3-5 p.m. Free. Info, 524-1507.

Baby & Maternity

Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See February 2. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 12:301:30 p.m. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 4:30-5:30 p.m.

Science & Stories at ECHO: See February 1.

Burlington Crawlers & Toddlers: VNA Family Room, 10:30 a.m.12:30 p.m. Free. Info, 862-2121. Burlington Playgroup: Robert Miller Community & Recreation Center, 9-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 578-6471. Cambridge Playgroup: Cambridge Elementary School, 9-11 a.m. Free. Info, 888-5229. Charlotte Playgroup: Charlotte Central School Early Education Program, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 338-7021. Milton Playgroup: Milton Public Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 893-1457. Morrisville Playgroup: Morristown Elementary School, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 888-5229. Open Gym: Central VT Gymnastics Academy, 10-11:30 a.m. $7. Info, 882-8324.

28

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2017

KIDSVT.COM

TUESDAY Bradford Playgroup: Grace United Methodist Church, 9-11 a.m. Free. Info, 685-2264, ext. 24. Burlington Dads’ Night: VNA Family Room, 4-7 p.m. Free. Info, 860-4420. Burlington New Moms Playgroup: Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, 12:15-2 p.m. Free. Info, 864-9642. Burlington Playgroup: See Monday, 9-10:30 a.m. Charlotte Babytime: Charlotte Public Library, first Tuesday of every month, 9-10 a.m. Free. Essex Junction Playgroup: Maple

WEDNESDAY ArtisTree Playgroup: ArtisTree/ Purple Crayon, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Free; donations accepted. Info, 457-3500. Burlington Infant Massage: VNA Family Room, 11 a.m.-noon, Free. Info, 862-2121. Burlington Playgroup: See Monday. Charlotte Playgroup: See Monday, 12:30-1:30 p.m. Colchester Playgroup: Colchester Village Meeting House, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 316-2918. Essex Baby Playgroup: Sunset Studio, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 876-7555. Fairfield Playgroup: Bent Northrop Memorial Library, 1011:30 a.m. Free. Info, 827-3945. Hinesburg Family Playtime: Hinesburg Town Hall, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Richmond Playgroup: Richmond Free Library, 8:45-10:15 a.m. Free. Info, 899-4415.

Education

Audubon Homeschool Program: Home-based learners use the outdoor classroom to explore a variety of seasonal topics, from measuring forests to aquatic ecosystems. Ages 9-12. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. $25; $15 each additional sibling; preregister. Info, 434-3068.

Games

Chess Club: See February 2. Lego Club: See February 2.

Itty Bitty Public Skating: See February 2.

Library & Books

Kids enjoy fun and games during these informal get-togethers, and caregivers connect with other local parents and peers. The groups are usually free and often include snacks, arts and crafts, or music. Most playgroups follow the school calendar. Contact the playgroup organizer for site-specific details. Street Recreation Center, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 876-7555. Jericho Playgroup: Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 899-4415. Johnson Baby Chat: Church of the Nazarene, fourth Tuesday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 888-3470. Winooski Playtime: O’Brien Community Center, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 655-1422. Wolcott Playgroup: Wolcott Depot Center Preschool, 9-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 888-5229.

Milton Community Dinner: A hot and healthy meal mixes with socializing to satisfy the community. All ages. Milton Middle School, 4:30-7 p.m. Free; donations appreciated. Info, 893-5501. Mother Up! Monthly Meet-up: Families discuss the realities of climate change, what that means on a local level and how to transition to a safer and healthier world. Vegetarian meal and childcare for ages 3 and under provided. All ages. Unitarian Universalist Society, Burlington, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free; RSVP. Info, 765-337-2778.

Health & Fitness

Playgroups

MONDAY

Community

Shelburne Playgroup: Trinity Episcopal Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. South Royalton Playgroup: United Church on the Green, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 685-2264, ext. 24. St. Johnsbury Toddler Time: St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 748-8291, ext. 303. THURSDAY Alburgh Playgroup: Alburgh Public Library, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426. Burlington Drop-In Family Play: VNA Family Room, 9 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 862-2121. Essex Junction Playgroup: See Tuesday. Hinesburg Baby Time: United Church of Hinesburg, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Johnson Playgroup: United Church of Johnson, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 888-5229. Milton Playgroup: See Monday. Montgomery Playgroup: Montgomery Town Library, 9-11 a.m. Free. Info, 527-5426. Morrisville Baby Chat: The Playroom, first Thursday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Info, 876-7555. Ohavi Zedek Synagogue Playgroup: Ohavi Zedek Synagogue, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 864-0218. Randolph Playgroup: St. John’s Church, 9:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 685-2264, ext. 24. Williston Play Time: Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 11 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 878-4918.

Winooski Playtime: See Tuesday. FRIDAY Colchester Playgroup: See Wednesday. Hinesburg Preschool Playgroup: Hinesburg Community School, 9-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 482-4946. Huntington Playgroup: Huntington Public Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 899-4415. Montgomery Tumble Time: Montgomery Elementary School, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 347-1780. Open Gym: See Monday. Randolph Toddler Time: Kimball Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 728-5073. Rutland Playgroup: Rutland Free Library, 9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 773-1860. Stowe Playgroup: Stowe Community Church, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 888-5229. Underhill Playgroup: Underhill Central School, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 899-4415. Williston Playgroup: Allen Brook School, first Friday of every month, 9:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 272-6509. SATURDAY Morrisville Baby Chat: Lamoille Family Center, second Saturday of every month, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 888-5229. Stowe Playgroup: Kula Yoga Center, 1-2 p.m. $10; or free with attendance at yoga class at 11:45 a.m. K

Submit your March events for print by February 15 at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com.

Franklin Lego Thursdays: See February 2. Read to Archie the Therapy Dog: An attentive canine listens to little people read. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:15-4 p.m. Free; preregistration appreciated. Info, 878-6956. St. Albans Library Legos: Aspiring architects engage in construction projects with their peers. St. Albans Free Library, 3-5 p.m. Free. Info, 524-1507.

Music

Preschool Music: See February 2.

10 FRIDAY

Baby & Maternity

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 8:159:15 a.m.

Community

Full Moon Sleigh Rides: Pat Palmer of Thornapple Farm and a team of Percheron draft horses hold the reins on a celestial ride under the winter sky. All ages. Shelburne Farms, 5:30, 6:05 & 6:40 p.m. $8-10; free for children under 3; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

Fairs & Festivals

Milton Winter Festival: This community celebration of the snowy season includes sled-dog and sleigh rides, a pancake breakfast, a chili cookoff and an Ice Crystal Ball. See miltonvt.org for a detailed schedule. All ages. Various locations, Milton, 6:30-8 p.m. Free; small fee for some activities. Info, 893-4922.

Food

Kids in the Kitchen: Conversation Hearts: Valentine-minded kiddos make sweet messages from homemade cookies. Healthy Living Market & Café, South Burlington, 4-5 p.m. $25. Info, 863-2569.

Games

Dungeons & Dragons: Players embark on invented adventures, equipped with their problem-solving skills. Grades 6 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. Killington Magic: The Gathering: See February 3. Lego Club: See February 3.


Family Gym: See February 3.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

Library & Books

Early Bird Math Story Time: See February 3. Family Story Time: See February 3. Friday Free for All: See February 3. Songs & Stories With Matthew: Musician Matthew Witten kicks off the morning with tunes and tales. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Music

Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See February 3. Music With Robert: See February 3.

Nature & Science

Montshire Unleashed: An Evening for Adults: The museum opens its doors after hours so grown-ups can let their inner curiosity go wild. Beer, wine and food available for purchase. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 6-9 p.m. $15 museum admission; free for members. Info, 649-2200.

Theater

Cirque Zuma Zuma: This African-style Cirque du Soleil gets the crowd cheering with juggling, tumbling, dancing, drumming and acrobatics. (See spotlight.) Barre Opera House, 7:30 p.m. $1638. Info, 476-8188.

11 SATURDAY

Arts & Crafts

2016 Audubon Photography Awards Show: Prize photographs capture birds in their worlds, and educate the public about local avian wildlife and Audubon Vermont’s work. Through February 15. All ages. The Skinny Pancake, Montpelier, 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Free. Info, 434-3068. Craft School Saturday Drop-In: See February 4. One-of-a-Kind Valentines: Art lovers mingle their imaginations with mixed-media materials to make unique messages. Ages 5 and up. Catamount Arts, St. Johnsbury, 10 a.m.-noon. Free; $5-10 donation suggested; preregister. Info, 7482600, ext. 108. Valentine’s Day Craft: The library’s activity room bustles with holiday handcrafts. St. Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 524-1507. Webby’s Art Studio: Scratching Records: Inspired by the museum’s exhibit, crafty kids turn an old record into original artwork. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Free with regular museum admission, $5-10; free for children under 5. Info, 985-3346.

Baby & Maternity

Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

Fairs & Festivals

Milton Winter Festival: See February 10, 8:30 a.m.-9 p.m.

Food

Burlington Winter Farmers Market: Local farmers, artisans and producers offer fresh and prepared foods, crafts, and more in a bustling indoor marketplace made merry with live music. All ages. UVM Davis Student Center, Burlington, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Free. Info, 310-5172. Norwich Winter Farmers Market: Local growers present produce, meats and maple syrup, complementing baked goods and crafts from area artists. All ages. Tracy Hall, Norwich, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 384-7447. Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See February 1. 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Games

Chess Club: Teen players teach novices new moves. All ages, but children 8 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6956.

Health & Fitness

EvoKids Saturday Yoga: See February 4. New Mama Yoga: See February 4. Salomon Snowcross Relays: Winter trail runners and nordic skiers have a blast with individual, team and kids’ relays. Hot chocolate, free use of gear and a raffle add to the excitement. Ages 5 and up. Sleepy Hollow Ski Center, Huntington, 10 a.m.-1 p.m. $25-40; free kids’ race for ages 5-12; preregister. Info, 238-0820.

Library & Books

Cocoa & Coloring: See February 4. ‘Round is a Tortilla’ Storytime: Little listeners soak up a story and savor a food activity courtesy of City Market. Ages 10 and under with caregivers. Phoenix Books, Burlington, 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 448-3350. Second Saturdays: This child-friendly afternoon, a collaboration between the Norwich Public Library and the Norwich Bookstore, celebrates reading with various themed activities. Check norwichlibrary.org for location. 1-2 p.m. Free. Info, 649-1184. Spanish Musical Playgroup: Rhymes, books, songs and crafts en español entertain niños. Snacks provided. Ages 5 and under. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.noon. Free. Info, 878-4918.

Music

For more than 50 years, Audubon Vermont has drawn nature lovers to its property, earning the title of oldest operating nature center in the state. With a mission focused on outdoor education, conservation and land stewardship, the organization’s FAMILY TREK welcomes repeat visitors and newbies alike to its 255 acres and five miles of trails. Explorers of all ages search out animal tracks and homes, discovering how furry and feathered creatures survive the northern snowy season. Along the way, small ones stop for steaming cocoa and a snack. And, in true winter fashion, the journey ends with a campfire to heat chilly hands. Bring extra layers of clothing and lots of questions about who roams in our winter woods. FAMILY TREK: Saturday, February 4, 10 a.m.-noon, at the Green Mountain Audubon Center in Huntington. $4-5; free for children under 2; preregister. Info, 434-3068. vt.audubon.org

Nature & Science

Corvid Community Naturalists: This monthly gathering explores Burlington’s urban wilds through the seasons. Bring a notebook, writing implement and your curiosity. Open to the community; ages 5 and up. Rock Point, Burlington, 9 a.m.-noon. Suggested donation $10; $20 per family. Info, 557-7127. Indoor Salad Gardening for Kids: Author and gardener Peter Burke hosts a family workshop on growing winter greens. Participants sample salad varieties and bring home their own planted tray. Ages 5 and up with adult. Shelburne Farms, 1011:30 a.m. $5-6; preregister. Info, 985-8686. Tour the Cosmos: See February 4. Tracking Wildlife Workshop: Naturalists take advantage of snow cover and learn how to spot and identify tracks, scat and more, while socializing with like-minded folks. (See spotlight.) Ages 6 and up; adult companion required for those under 12. EarthWalk Vermont, Goddard College, Plainfield, 1-4 p.m. $10-25. Info, 454-8500.

12 SUNDAY

Arts & Crafts

2016 Audubon Photography Awards Show: See February 11.

Baby & Maternity

Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See February 2, 12:151:30 p.m. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 1011:30 a.m.

Community

February Weekend: See February 4. Sleigh Ride Weeks: See February 11. Sleigh Rides: See February 4. Wintervale: Outdoor activities, local food and hot chocolate for purchase — plus three miles of groomed cross-country ski trails, with free rentals, weather permitting — await nature-loving Vermonters in Burlington’s backyard. All ages. Burlington’s Intervale, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Free. Info, 660-0440.

29

12 SUNDAY, P.30

KIDS VT

HopStop: Brendan Taaffe: This Vermont musician gets the crowd clapping with traditional songs, stories, assorted instruments and crankies – old-timey scrolling illustrations in a puppet theater. Ages 3 and up. Hopkins Center for the Arts, Hanover, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 603-646-2422.

Into the Woods

FEBRUARY 2017

February Weekend: See February 4. Kids Trade & Play: Families exchange clean and gently-used clothing and toys, size newborn to 12. Capital City Grange, Berlin, 9:30-11:30 a.m. $3 per family. Info, 337-8632. Lake Elmore Polar Splash: Community members “freeze for a reason” in this annual fundraiser for the Morrisville Rotary Club. Elmore State Park, Lake Elmore, 11 a.m. Free for spectators. Info, 318-7548. Mother & Son Valentine Bowling: Boys and their moms, female relatives or special friends celebrate Valentine’s Day by knocking down pins. Twin City Family Fun Center, Barre, 12-1:30 p.m. $18 per person for two games of bowling and snacks. Info, 225-8699.

Sleigh Ride Weeks: Winter lovers are ferried by horses through frozen farm fields, then check out the historic 1890 farmhouse and outbuildings. All ages. Billings Farm & Museum, Woodstock, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Regular museum admission, $4-14; free for children under 3. Info, 457-2355. Sleigh Rides: See February 4. Waffle Breakfast, Silent Auction & Winter Festival: A hearty breakfast satisfies hungry bellies. Kids’ activities begin at 9 a.m., including Mike & The Big Blue Trunk, crafts, music and a silent auction. All ages. Hinesburg Community School, 8 a.m.-noon. $4-6; free for children under 2; proceeds benefit Hinesburg Nursery School. Info, 482-3827.

KIDSVT.COM

Community

COURTESY OF AUDUBON VERMONT

Health & Fitness


FEB

CALENDAR

12 SUNDAY (CONTINUED)

Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See February 1.

14 TUESDAY

Dance

Community

HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY!

Dance, Sing & Jump Around: A lively intergenerational afternoon includes traditional dances, with instruction and healthy snacks. Ages 3 and up. Plainfield Town Hall Opera House, 3-4:30 p.m. Suggested donation $5; free for children. Info, 223-1509.

Fairs & Festivals

Milton Winter Festival: See February 10, 11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.

Health & Fitness

Parent Child Valentine Dance: Moms, dads and kids of all ages enjoy a night of dancing, refreshments and fun. Capitol Plaza, Montpelier, 6:30-8:30 p.m. $20-25 per couple; $5-7 each additional guest. Info, 225-8699. Sleigh Ride Weeks: See February 11.

Health & Fitness

Itty Bitty Public Skating: See February 2.

Library & Books

Discovery Sundays: See February 5. Tour the Cosmos: See February 4.

Babies & Toddlers Rock: See February 6. Essex Lego Club: See February 6. ‘Star Wars’ Club: Young fans channel the Force and chomp on popcorn. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 4:30-5:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956. Stories with Megan: See February 6.

13 MONDAY

Music

Essex Open Gym: See February 5. Family Gym: See February 3.

Nature & Science

Arts & Crafts

2016 Audubon Photography Awards Show: See February 11. Crafternoon: Artsy kiddos get imaginative with the library’s materials. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420. Crafts for Kids: Clever kiddos pursue artsy projects. Ages 5-10. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660.

Hardwick Music & Movement for Preschoolers: See February 6. Preschool Music: See February 2, 11 a.m. Spanish Musical Kids: See February 6.

Nature & Science

Audubon Nature Playgroup: See February 6.

Parenting

Nurturing Fathers Program: See February 6.

Baby & Maternity

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 5:45-7 p.m.

Arts & Crafts

2016 Audubon Photography Awards Show: See February 11.

Baby & Maternity

Burlington La Leche League: New moms bring their babies and questions to a breastfeeding support group. Older children welcome. Lending library available. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 10:15 a.m. Free. Info, 985-8228. Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See February 2, 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 4:155:30 p.m. La Leche League of the Northeast Kingdom: Expectant, novice and experienced moms join nursing experts for advice and support. Enter through the children’s section of the library. Siblings welcome. St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 720-272-8841. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 4:30-5:30 p.m.

COURTESY OF THE SMITHSONIAN NATIONAL MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

KIDSVT.COM FEBRUARY 2017 KIDS VT

30

Games

Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: See February 1.

Health & Fitness

Prenatal Empowerment Clinic: See February 1. Yoga for Kids: See February 1.

Library & Books

Games

Movies

Sleigh Ride Weeks: See February 11.

Dance

Lego Tuesdays: See February 7. Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Gaming Tuesdays: See February 7.

Music

Children’s Film Night: Cinema-lovers of all ages take in a short flick before community dinner is served. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, 5:30-6 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. Marshfield Family-Themed Movies: A wholesome flick fascinates viewers of all ages. Jaquith Public Library, Marshfield, third Wednesday of every month, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 426-3581.

Nature & Science

Milton Nurturing Parent Program: See February 7.

Science and Stories: Preschoolers rally ‘round for nature-inspired tales and activities. Ages 8 and under. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 10:30 a.m. Regular museum admission, $13.50-16.50; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848.

15 WEDNESDAY

Parenting

Preschool Music: See February 7.

Parenting

“EXPLORING HUMAN ORIGINS”: Saturday, February 18-Friday, March 17, at the Fletcher Free Library in Burlington. This exhibit is made possible thanks to grants from the John Templeton Foundation and the Peter Buck Human Origins Fund. Open daily; hours vary. Free. All ages welcome; geared to ages 7 and up. Info, 863-3403. fletcherfree.org

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See February 1.

Family Yoga Dance: See February 7.

Community

Read to Daisy the Therapy Dog: See February 7. Spanish Musical Kids: See February 7. TinkerBelles: See February 7.

The Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History comes to Burlington’s own Fletcher Free Library with “EXPLORING HUMAN ORIGINS,” a traveling exhibit that chronicles our species’ evolutionary journey. After participating in a competitive selection process, Fletcher Free was selected along with 19 other public libraries across the country to host the exhibit, which visually depicts the past through informational panels, videos, interactive displays and replicas of early human skulls. Designed to generate thoughtful dialogue about human evolution while taking into account differing cultural perspectives, the exhibit, according to the Smithsonian, delves into the questions of “who we are as a species and why it matters.”

Food

Baby Charms: Non-walking babies sing silly songs, dance and make music. South Burlington Community Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Lego Club: See February 1. Little One & Me Circle Time: Tiny tykes team together for movement, songs, play and snacks. Ages 5 and under. Jericho Town Library, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 899-4686. Pajama Story Time: Small ones cozy up for bedtime tales, cookies and milk. Ages 18 months-5 years. Burnham Memorial Library, Colchester, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 264-5660. Read to a Dog: See February 1.

Library & Books

Taking Root

visit K-8 classrooms and chat with staff. All ages. Mater Christi School, Burlington, 8:30-11 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 658-3992. Reading Buddies: See February 1. Tutoring: See February 1.

Arts & Crafts

2016 Audubon Photography Awards Show: See February 11. Sensory Lab for Tots: See February 1. Teen Crochet Class: See February 8. Yarn Bombing: See February 1.

Baby & Maternity

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1. Mom and Baby Yoga: See February 1. Mother’s Gathering: See February 1. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See February 1.

Breastfeeding Families Group: Nursing moms (and supportive dads, too!) gather for snacks and advice. Church of the Nazarene, Johnson, 11 a.m.1 p.m. Free. Info, 888-3470. Burlington Nurturing Parent Program: Moms and dads deepen parent-child communication skills, discuss empathy and learn how to empower their families. A light dinner and childcare are included. Integrated Arts Academy at H.O. Wheeler, Burlington, 5:30-7:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 498-0607.

16 THURSDAY

Arts & Crafts

Community

Preschool Art Drop-In: See February 2.

Education

Babywearing Playgroup: Moms with tiny tots swap stories and socialize. All ages. Evolution Prenatal & Family Yoga Center, Burlington, 1011:30 a.m. Free. Info, 899-0339. Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See February 2. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1. 12:301:30 p.m. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 4:30-5:30 p.m.

Sleigh Ride Weeks: See February 11.

Count Me In!: Preschoolers and their parents partake in hands-on activities to foster a love of math in their daily lives. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 6-7 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-4918. Mater Christi School Open House: Students and their parents interested in this private school

Submit your March events for print by February 15 at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com.

Baby & Maternity


Community

Sleigh Ride Weeks: See February 11.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

Food

Kids in the Kitchen: Alphabet Soup: Chefs-in-training master soup basics with veggies, letters and noodles, with a side of buttery garlic bread. Healthy Living Market & Café, South Burlington, 4-5 p.m. $25. Info, 863-2569.

Games

Family Story Time: See February 3. Friday Free for All: See February 3. Jiggity Jog: A musical meet-up includes singing, dancing and instrument playing. Ages 2-5. South Burlington Community Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 652-7080.

Movies

Chess Club: See February 2. Lego Club: See February 2.

Family Movie: Viewers enjoy a family-friendly film while feasting on free popcorn. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Health & Fitness

Music

Itty Bitty Public Skating: See February 2.

Library & Books

Franklin Lego Thursdays: See February 2. PJ Story Hour: Tykes in nightwear nestle together for nursery rhymes, snacks and crafts. St. Albans Free Library, 6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 524-1507. Read to Archie the Therapy Dog: See February 9.

Music

Preschool Music: See February 2.

Nature & Science

Bears! Oh My!: Wee ones walk, talk and eat like they’re furry and four-legged. Ages 3-5 with adult. Green Mountain Audubon Center, Huntington, 9-10:30 a.m. $8-10 per adult-child pair; $4 each additional child; preregister. Info, 434-3068.

Parenting

Parenting Workshop: Positive Discipline: Educator Scott Noyes leads a workshop about reasons not to use punishment, offering parents management techniques and suggestions for handling meltdowns and other challenging behaviors. Fairfax Community Library, 6:15-8 p.m. Free; preregister. On-site childcare available. Info, 849-2420.

17 FRIDAY

Baby & Maternity

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 8:159:15 a.m.

Community

Kids’ Night Out: While their parents appreciate time off, youngsters enjoy dinner, a movie and games. Grades K-6. David Gale Recreation Center, Stowe, 6-10 p.m. $15 per child. Info, 253-3054. Sleigh Ride Weeks: See February 11. The Vermont Flurry: Snow Sculpture Festival: This village green transforms into a winter and visual art wonderland in this three-day professional snow sculpting competition. Weather dependent. All ages. Woodstock Village Green, 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Free. Info, 457-3981.

Health & Fitness

Family Gym: See February 3.

Baby & Maternity

Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

Community

February Weekend: See February 4. Sleigh Ride Weeks: See February 11. Sleigh Rides: See February 4. The Vermont Flurry: Snow Sculpture Festival: See February 17.

Education

Engineer For a Day: Johnson State College’s Math Club members make a Middle Ages model trebuchet with maker-minded kids. Recommended for grades 7 and up. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 1-4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Food

‘Fancy Nancy’ Tea Party: Games, crafts and delicious warm drinks await elegantly dressed little ones. Ages 3-7. Milton Public Library, 1-3 p.m. Free; preregistration required. Info, 893-4644. Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See February 1, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Games

Chess Tournament: Junior strategists pursue three rounds of one-on-one games with trophies and medals for each age division. Grades K-8. Fairfax Community Library, 9 a.m.-noon. Free; preregistration recommended. Info, 849-2420.

Health & Fitness

EvoKids Saturday Yoga: See February 4. New Mama Yoga: See February 4.

Library & Books

Cleo the Therapy Dog: See February 4. Cocoa & Coloring: See February 4.

Music

Kat Wright and the Indomitable Soul Band: This band blends Memphis soul and new school R&B in a performance which heats the heart. Ages 6 and up. Spruce Peak Performing Arts Center, Stowe, 7:30 p.m. $20-35. Info, 760-4634.

31

All-Ages Story Time: See February 3. Early Bird Math Story Time: See February 3.

Craft School Saturday Drop-In: See February 4. Webby’s Art Studio: Tasty Treat: Avian and art lovers of all ages prepare a savory snack for the museum’s feathered friends. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Free with regular museum admission, $5-10; free for children under 5. Info, 985-3346.

KIDS VT

Library & Books

Arts & Crafts

FEBRUARY 2017

Killington Magic: The Gathering: See February 3. Lego Club: See February 3. Live-Action Role Play: LARPers create characters and plots for an amazing adventure of the imagination. For middle and high school students. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-5 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

18 SATURDAY

KIDSVT.COM

Games

Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See February 3. Music With Robert: See February 3.

18 SATURDAY, P.32 Untitled-27 1

1/26/17 10:48 AM


FEB

CALENDAR

18 SATURDAY (CONTINUED)

19 SUNDAY

Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See February 1.

Nature & Science

Baby & Maternity

Community

The Great Backyard Bird Count Open House: Ornithologists-in-training visit the museum’s feeding station, explore exhibits and learn more about the bird count, an annual four-day event. Bird monitoring walk at 8 a.m. All ages. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Regular museum admission, $3.50-7; free for members and children under 3. Info, 434-2167. Igloo Build: Bundled-up families learn to construct insulated, sturdy snow dwellings during this long-running Montshire tradition. All ages. Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich, 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m. Regular museum admission, $12-15; free for members and children under 2. Info, 649-2200. Tour the Cosmos: See February 4. What Do Owls Eat For Lunch?: Avian admirers make a mask, and discover what these birds devour by dissecting an owl pellet. Ages 5 and up with adult. Shelburne Farms, 10 a.m.-noon. $5-6; preregister. Info, 985-8686.

Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See February 2, 12:151:30 p.m. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 1011:30 a.m.

Community

February Weekend: See February 4. Sleigh Ride Weeks: See February 11. Sleigh Rides: See February 4. The Vermont Flurry: Snow Sculpture Festival: See February 17.

Health & Fitness

Essex Open Gym: See February 5. Family Gym: See February 3.

Nature & Science

Discovery Sundays: See February 5. Tour the Cosmos: See February 4.

Baby & Maternity

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 5:45-7 p.m.

MONDAY

32

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2017

KIDSVT.COM

Barre Children’s Story Hour: Aldrich Public Library, Tuesdays, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 476-7550. Essex Drop-In Story Time: Essex Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 879-0313. Hyde Park Story Time: Lanpher Memorial Library, 6 p.m. Free. Info, 888-4628. Northfield Children’s Story Time: Brown Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 485-4621. Richmond Baby Lap Time: Richmond Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036. Shelburne Story Time: Pierson Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 985-5124. St. Albans Story Hour: St. Albans Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 524-1507. Stowe Story Times for 2-3-Year-Olds: Stowe Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 253-6145. Waitsfield Story Time: Joslin Memorial Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 496-4205. Waterbury Baby & Toddler Story Time: Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 244-7036. Woodstock Baby Story Time: Norman Williams Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 457-2295. TUESDAY Alburgh Story Hour: Alburgh Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 796-6077. Barre Children’s Story Hour: See Monday. Colchester Toddler Story Time: Burnham Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 264-5660. Craftsbury Story Time: Craftsbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 586-9683. East Barre Story Time: East Barre Branch Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 476-5118. Essex Junction Baby & Toddler Story Time: Brownell Library, 9:10-9:30 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6956.

Health & Fitness

Itty Bitty Public Skating: See February 2.

Library & Books

Babies & Toddlers Rock: See February 6. Essex Lego Club: See February 6. Lab Girls: Young women explore science through hands-on experiments. Grades 6-12. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420.

Music

Hardwick Music & Movement for Preschoolers: See February 6.

Parenting

Nurturing Fathers Program: See February 6.

21 TUESDAY

20 MONDAY

Story Times

Sleigh Ride Weeks: See February 11.

Arts & Crafts

Plattsburgh Preschool Story Hour: Aspiring art connoisseurs and their caregivers listen to a

picture book, look at original works and create a project to take home. Ages 3-5. Plattsburgh State Art Museum, 10 a.m. Free; preregistration appreciated. Info, 518-564-2474.

Baby & Maternity

Breastfeeding Café: Moms nurse their babies, chat and ask for answers from a certified lactation consultant. Pregnant women, supportive dads and older siblings welcome. Ilsley Public Library, Middlebury, 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Free. Info, 349-3825. Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See February 2, 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 4:155:30 p.m. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 4:30-5:30 p.m.

Community

Sleigh Ride Weeks: See February 11.

Dance

Family Yoga Dance: See February 7.

Games

Lego Tuesdays: See February 7. Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Gaming Tuesdays: See February 7.

Early literacy skills get special attention during these read-aloud sessions. Some locations provide additional activities such as music, crafts or foreign-language instruction. Most story times follow the school calendar. Contact the story time organizers for site-specific details.

Essex Junction Preschool Story Time: Brownell Library, 10-10:45 a.m. Free; preregister. Info, 878-6956. Fairfax Preschool Story Time: Fairfax Community Library, 9:30-10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 849-2420. Highgate Story Time: Highgate Public Library, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 868-3970. Hinesburg Youngsters Story Time: CarpenterCarse Library, 9:30-10 a.m. Free. Info, 482-2878. Lyndonville Story Time: Cobleigh Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 626-5475. Milton Infant Story Time: Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 893-4644. Montpelier Story Time: Kellogg-Hubbard Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 223-3338. South Burlington Tiny Tot Time: South Burlington Community Library, 9:15 & 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Williston Story Time: Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918. Woodstock Preschool Story Time: Norman Williams Public Library, 10:30-11:15 a.m. Free. Info, 457-2295. WEDNESDAY Barnes & Noble Morning Story Time: Barnes & Noble, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 864-8001. Highgate Story Time: See Tuesday, 10 a.m. Hyde Park Story Time: See Monday, 10 a.m. Lyndonville Story Time: See Tuesday, 10:30 a.m. Marshfield Story Time & Playgroup: Jaquith Public Library, 10-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 426-3581. Milton Rhythm & Movement Toddler Story Time: Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 893-4644. Norwich Word Play Story Time: Norwich Public Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 649-1184. Quechee Story Time: Quechee Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 295-1232. Randolph Preschool Story Time: Kimball Public Library, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 728-5073.

Richmond Story Time: Richmond Free Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 434-3036. South Burlington Baby Book Time: South Burlington Community Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Stowe Story Time for 3-5-Year-Olds: Stowe Free Library, 10:15-11:15 a.m. Free. Info, 253-6145. Swanton Storytime: Swanton Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 868-7656. Warren Preschool Story & Enrichment Hour: Warren Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 595-2582.

THURSDAY

Bristol Story Time: Lawrence Memorial Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 453-2366. Franklin Story Time: Haston Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 285-6505. Hinesburg Youngsters Story Time: See Tuesday. Northfield Children’s Story Time: See Monday. Rutland Story Time: Rutland Free Library, 1010:45 a.m. Free. Info, 773-1860. Shelburne Musical Story Time: Pierson Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 985-5124. St. Albans Story Hour: See Monday. Vergennes Story Time: Bixby Memorial Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 877-2211. Waterbury Preschool Story Time: Waterbury Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 244-7036. Westford Story Time: Westford Public Library, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 878-5639. FRIDAY Brandon Story Time: Brandon Free Public Library, 2 p.m. Free. Info, 247-8230. Craftsbury Story Time: See Tuesday. Enosburg Mommy & Me Story Hour: Enosburgh Public Library, 9-10 a.m. Free. Info, 933-2328. Essex Musical Story Time: Essex Free Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 879-0313.

Submit your March events for print by February 15 at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com.

Georgia Preschool Story Time: Georgia Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 524-4643. Huntington Story Time: Huntington Public Library, 10:45 a.m. Free. Info, 434-4583. Killington Storytime: Sherburne Memorial Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 422-9765. Lincoln Story Time: Lincoln Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 453-2665. Milton Preschool Story Time: Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 893-4644. Montpelier Story Time: See Tuesday. Randolph Toddler Story Time: Kimball Public Library, 10:30-11 a.m. Free. Info, 728-5073. South Burlington Pajamarama: Barnes & Noble, 7 p.m. Free. Info, 864-8001. St. Johnsbury Story Time: St. Johnsbury Athenaeum, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 748-8291. Stowe Baby & Toddler Story Time: Stowe Free Library, 10:15-11:15 a.m. Free. Info, 253-6145. Swanton Storytime: See Wednesday. 10 a.m. Winooski Story Time: Winooski Memorial Library, 10:30-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 655-6424. SATURDAY Barre Story Time: Next Chapter Bookstore, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 476-3114. Burlington Story Time at Phoenix Books: Phoenix Books, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 872-7111. Colchester Saturday Drop-In Story Time: Burnham Memorial Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 264-5660. Enosburg Story Hour: Enosburgh Public Library, 10-11 a.m. Free. Info, 933-2328. Franklin Walk-in Story Hour: Haston Library, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 285-6505. Milton Drop-In Saturday Storytime: Milton Public Library, 10 a.m. Free. Info, 893-4644. Whole Book Approach Storytime: Phoenix Books, 11-11:30 a.m. Free. Info, 872-7111. K


Library & Books

Read to Daisy the Therapy Dog: See February 7. Read to Van Gogh the Cat: Feline fanciers sign up for literacy sessions with a furry friend. All ages. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 3:30-4:30 p.m. Free; preregister for a reading slot. Info, 878-4918. Spanish Musical Kids: See February 7. TinkerBelles: See February 7.

Novice cooks make meatballs and sauce from scratch, then devour sandwiches with garlic-slathered bread. Healthy Living Market & Café, South Burlington, 4-5 p.m. $25. Info, 863-2569.

Games

Lego Club: See February 2.

Music

Health & Fitness

22 WEDNESDAY

Library & Books

Preschool Music: See February 7.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

Itty Bitty Public Skating: See February 2.

Yarn Bombing: See February 1.

Franklin Lego Thursdays: See February 2. Read to Archie the Therapy Dog: See February 9. St. Albans Library Legos: See February 9.

Baby & Maternity

Music

Arts & Crafts

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1. Mom and Baby Yoga: See February 1. Mother’s Gathering: See February 1. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See February 1.

Preschool Music: See February 2.

Parenting

Young Writers & Storytellers: See February 8.

Parenting Workshop: Parent-Child Interactions & Self-Esteem: Educator Scott Noyes leads a workshop with topics including how adults talk with children, the difference between praise and encouragement, how to avoid self-defeating patterns and looking into a day in the life of a child. Fairfax Community Library, 6:15-8 p.m. Free; preregister. On-site childcare available. Info, 849-2420.

Food

24 FRIDAY

Community

Sleigh Ride Weeks: See February 11.

Education

Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See February 1.

Games

Colchester Dungeons & Dragons Night: See February 8. Jericho Dungeons & Dragons: See February 1. Lego Fun: Budding builders bust out the blocks. Grades K and up; kids under 5 are welcome to participate with adult supervision. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Health & Fitness

Prenatal Empowerment Clinic: See February 1. Yoga for Kids: See February 1.

Library & Books

Baby & Maternity

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 8:159:15 a.m.

Community

Sleigh Ride Weeks: See February 11.

Education

Fairbanks Homeschool Day: Students expand their scholastic horizons with a variety of programs. Call for specific topics and location. Grades K-8. Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium, St. Johnsbury, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. $8-10 includes museum admission; $5 for planetarium; one free adult per paying child. Info, 748-2372.

Lego Club: See February 1. STEM Club: Sciencey types challenge their imaginations with themed activities. Ages 6 and up. Fairfax Community Library, 3-4 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 849-2420.

Games

Nature & Science

Health & Fitness

Science and Stories: See February 15.

Parenting

Burlington Nurturing Parent Program: See February 15.

23 THURSDAY Preschool Art Drop-In: See February 2.

Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See February 2. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 12:301:30 p.m. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 4:30-5:30 p.m.

Community Food

Movies

Friday Afternoon Movie: Kids snuggle in for snacks and a screening. Children under 10 must be accompanied by a caregiver. Carpenter-Carse Library, Hinesburg, 3 p.m. Free. Info, 482-2878.

26 SUNDAY

Craft School Saturday Drop-In: See February 4. Webby’s Art Studio: Figurine Photoshoot: Inspired by the museum’s exhibits, lens-lovers of all ages make and photograph a miniature world. Shelburne Museum, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Free with regular museum admission, $5-10; free for children under 5. Info, 985-3346.

Baby & Maternity

Baby & Maternity

Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 10:30-11:30 a.m.

February Weekend: See February 4. Sleigh Ride Weeks: See February 11. Sleigh Rides: See February 4.

Community

Health & Fitness

‘Brrrlington’ Winter Bash: This winter celebration just for kids includes indoor and outdoor activities, including snowshoeing and XC skiing, live animals, games with Big Blue Trunk, and yoga classes for kids. Taco Trunk Allstars provides food for purchase. Robert Miller Community & Recreation Center, Burlington, 12-3 p.m. Free. Info, 881-7767. February Weekend: See February 4. Sleigh Ride Weeks: See February 11. Sleigh Rides: See February 4.

Food

Burlington Winter Farmers Market: See February 11. Norwich Winter Farmers Market: See February 11. Rutland Winter Farmers Market: See February 1, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Health & Fitness

EvoKids Saturday Yoga: See February 4. New Mama Yoga: See February 4.

Library & Books

Cocoa & Coloring: See February 4. Launch Party for Author Jason Chin: This Vermont writer and illustrator kicks off the book tour for his newest release, Grand Canyon, about a father and daughter on a journey discovering the past and present. The Flying Pig Bookstore, Shelburne, 11 a.m. Free. Info, 985-3999.

Movies

Family Movie Matinee: Families snuggle down, see a big-screen PG-rated flick and savor snacks. All ages. Milton Public Library, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 893-4644.

Nature & Science

Bird-Monitoring Walk: Eagle-eyed participants bring binoculars to search the museum’s property for fluttering feathers. Best for adults and older children. Birds of Vermont Museum, Huntington, 8-9 a.m. Free; donations welcome; preregister. Info, 434-2167. Butterfly Festival: Visitors step out of winter into a pavilion filled with flying tropical moths and butterflies, and try hands-on science-themed activities. All ages. ECHO Leahy Center for Lake Champlain, Burlington, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular museum admission, $11.50-14.50, plus $2; free for children under 3. Info, 864-1848. Community Connections and Seed Swap: Community members check out ‘Farm to School’ volunteer opportunities and exchange seeds. Fairfax Community Library, 11 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 849-2420. Forester for a Day: Kids don hard hats as they observe a woodsman fell a tree, then take to the woodshop for hands-on fun. Ages 5 and up with adult. Shelburne Farms, 10 a.m.-noon. $10-12 per adult-child pair; $5-6 each additional child; preregister. Info, 985-8686. Owl Festival: Visitors have a hoot unraveling the mysteries of this bird of prey through hands-on activities and games, both inside and outdoors. All

Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See February 2, 12:151:30 p.m. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 1011:30 a.m.

Community

Essex Open Gym: See February 5. Family Gym: See February 3.

Nature & Science

Butterfly Festival: See February 25. Discovery Sundays: See February 5. Tour the Cosmos: See February 4.

27 MONDAY

Arts & Crafts

Crafts for Kids: See February 13.

Baby & Maternity

Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 5:45-7 p.m. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See February 1.

Community

Bolton Family Activity Week: This winter celebration includes campfires and s’mores, magic shows, ice cream socials, kids’ movies, and balloon sculptures. Check boltonvalley.com for detailed schedule. Bolton Valley Resort, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Free. Info, 434-6804.

Library & Books

Babies & Toddlers Rock: See February 6. Essex Lego Club: See February 6. Stories with Megan: See February 6.

Movies

Vacation Movie: Kids relaxing on winter break enjoy a family-friendly flick while feasting on popcorn. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 2-4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

Music

Hardwick Music & Movement for Preschoolers: See February 6. Preschool Music: See February 2, 11 a.m.

Nature & Science

Audubon Nature Playgroup: See February 6. Butterfly Festival: See February 25.

Parenting

Nurturing Fathers Program: See February 6.

28 TUESDAY

Arts & Crafts

Art Monkeys: See February 2.

28 TUESDAY, P.34

33

Kids in the Kitchen: Meatball Submarines:

Early Bird Math Story Time: See February 3. Family Story Time: See February 3. Friday Free for All: See February 3. PBS Kids and Storytime: Younger viewers enjoy an animated show, munchies, crafts and games. Sponsored by Vermont PBS. South Burlington Community Library, 9:30 a.m. Free. Info, 652-7080. Songs & Stories With Matthew: See February 10.

Arts & Crafts

KIDS VT

Sleigh Ride Weeks: See February 11.

Library & Books

25 SATURDAY

ages. Vermont Institute of Natural Science Nature Center, Quechee, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Regular museum admission, $12.50-14.50; free for children under 4. Info, 359-5000. Tour the Cosmos: See February 4.

FEBRUARY 2017

Baby & Maternity

Family Gym: See February 3. Preschool Yoga with Danielle: Simple movement, stories and songs satisfy children ages 5 and under and their caregivers. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m. Free. Info, 878-4918.

Kids Music With Linda ‘Tickle Belly’ Bassick: See February 3.

KIDSVT.COM

Arts & Crafts

Dungeons & Dragons: See February 10. Killington Magic: The Gathering: See February 3. Lego Club: See February 3.

Music


FEB

CALENDAR Dance

28 TUESDAY (CONTINUED)

Baby & Maternity

Evolution Postnatal Yoga: See February 2, 11 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Evolution Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 4:155:30 p.m. Prenatal Method Prenatal Yoga: See February 1, 4:30-5:30 p.m.

Community

Bolton Family Activity Week: See February 27, 4-5 p.m.

Family Yoga Dance: See February 7.

Games

Mario Kart and more. All ages. Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m. Free. Info, 878-6956.

See Dr. First videos “First With Kids” at uvmhealth.org.

Drop-In Lego Day: Amateur architects snap together buildings of their own design. All ages. Children ages 8 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, Williston, 10:30 a.m.-noon. Free. Info, 878-4918. Lego Tuesdays: See February 7. Magic: The Gathering Drop-In Gaming Tuesdays: See February 7. Wii Fun: Gamers check out Wii Sports Resort,

Library & Books

TinkerBelles: See February 7.

Movies

Drive-In Movie Night: Fledgling auto owners decorate box cars, “drive” into the library’s theater and delight in a flick. Ages 4 and up. Milton Public Library, 6-8 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 893-4644. Kids’ Movie Matinee: A PG-rated film furnishes

amusement for families. St. Albans Free Library, 1 p.m. Free. Info, 524-1507.

Music

Preschool Music: See February 7.

Nature & Science

Butterfly Festival: See February 25.

Parenting

Adoption Support Group: Families facing adoption issues and challenges join forces in a respectful setting. Childcare and dinner provided. All welcome. Howard Center, Burlington, 5-6:30 p.m. Free; preregister. Info, 864-7467. 

Early Childhood Superheroes letsgrowkids.org Dayna Mazzola

Kelley Hackett

Ikey Spear

Tammara Laraway

Special Education Preschool Teacher Bennington

Child care Provider at Kelley’s DayBreak Childcare Waterbury Center

Children/Youth Services Coordinator Burlington

Owner/Director of TT’s Tots Morrisville

Superpower: Working as part of a diverse team to put the best interests of the child first.

Superpower: Wearing multiple hats successfully as a provider, business owner and parent.

Good deed done: Dayna fosters meaningful relationships with her students and supports the family as a whole.

Good deed done: As an advocate for the children she serves, Kelley has built a strong community centered around early childhood.

Dayna says: “One of my major focuses is to create a caring and respectful community of learners. Building trusting relationships is the foundation of my work.”

Kelley says: “I love the strong community network and bond with the families I serve. They become an extended piece of my own family.”

Superpower: The ability to connect with kids on their level. Good deed done: She leaves lasting marks of love and respect on hearts she’s helping to transform. Ikey says: “Kids are incredibly creative, resourceful and resilient. At the shelter, it makes me proud to see children learn and grow in new ways when in a safe environment.”

Superpower: Helping each of the kids in her program ages 19 months to 9 years reach their individual goals. Good deed done: Helping children realize they can do something that they’ve been working hard on independently. Tammara says: “My hope is for all children to have high-quality opportunities to grow and develop—to play and be curious for as long as possible!”

34

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2017

KIDSVT.COM

GOING ABOVE AND BEYOND FOR VERMONT KIDS

34h-letsgrowkids020117.indd 1

1/25/17 12:54 PM


Q HABITAT

B Y J AN E T E SSM AN FRANZ

SPONSORED BY

Student-Built Teeny-Tiny House FOR A $10 RAFFLE TICKET, a brand-new house in Shelburne could be yours. The catch? It’s a 6-by-7-foot room that lacks plumbing. However, the charming, peacockcolored domicile is architect-designed, fully insulated and has bamboo floors. And it was built by 19 teenagers. What started as a weeklong summer camp project turned into a three-month odyssey in construction and cooperation under the guidance of Alison and Joplin James, who run camps for kids and teens from their Shelburne home. The 14- through 18-year-old builders participate in the James’ year-round program, the Way of the Bard, which combines traditional storytelling, music, drama and dance. In June, the teens will travel to Ireland, where they’ll meet real bards, do community service, and walk the countryside sharing stories and music with people they meet — an adventure this group has been planning for four years. While searching for service projects to do in Ireland, Alison James found plans for tiny houses online. She envisioned the teens building one as a test run, to see if it could be done in a week. It ended up taking three months — a miscalculation that was worth the positive payoff. “Building a house themselves was transformative and empowering for these kids,” James said. The teens learned to follow blueprints, operate power tools and use math to solve problems. The project also toppled gender assumptions and demonstrated the importance of teamwork. And, in the end, the project will raise money for their journey. Proceeds from the raffle will cover some of the travel expenses in Ireland and help recoup the $5,000 construction costs. And though you probably can’t live in it, the teeny-tiny house is perfect for tea parties, meditating or backyard sleepovers. The Jameses will even deliver it to the winner, anywhere in the contiguous U.S. “We all had the same goal in mind, and we each had to do different things to get it all done,” said 17-year-old Addison White of South Learn more about the Burlington. “It’s a great Teeny-Tiny House, and purchase raffle tickets, at sense of achievement to have treewild.org/tiny-house. something physical that we built together.” K

TINY-HOUSE FEATURES • Live-edged cedar siding • Cedar-shingled roof with a copper ridge cap • Handcrafted arched doorway

• Bamboo floors

• Electrical hookup

• Beaded wallboards

• Ceramic space heater

• Five screened windows to let in natural light

• Insulated walls

• LED ceiling lights

• Fold-down twin bed

“Habitat” celebrates places where Vermont families live and play. Got a sweet space you’d like us to see? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com. 1 1/26/17 11:07 AM

Acr2528720295400961987705.pdf

This is Home.

KIDSVT.COM

THIS IS WHERE AWESOMENESS HAPPENS.

FEBRUARY 2017 KIDS VT

Untitled-35 1

HickokandBoardman.com | 802.863.1500 1/26/17 11:09 AM

35

Bringing Vermonters home for over 45 years.


Want to Quit Smoking? VCBH can help

The Vermont Center on Behavior and Health is conducting a study to help mothers quit smoking. With your participation, you could earn up to $1,310. If you have at least one child under the age of 12, you may qualify for this study. To see if you qualify, go online at http://j.mp/1MSDgeE to take our online survey or call (802) 656-1906 to learn more about this study.

HANDS ON

Writing Contest Sponsored by

Calling all poets! Love is in the air this month! Think about the people and things in your life that fill your heart. Write a poem honoring someone or something you love.

_______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ Untitled-28 1

2/25/16 11:09 AM

_______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________

KIDSVT.COM

Family Fun For All Ages

We’ll pick two winners and publish their names and poems in the next issue. Winners receive a $25 gift certificate to Crow Bookshop. Deadline to enter is February 15.

March 3–5, 2017 The Family Room attractions include: crafts, planting activities, and entertainers Mermaid Dalni Tails, Rick Adam’s One Man Band and No String Marionettes Treasure Hunt show. Come dressed as your favorite Peter Pan character! presenting sponsors PRODuceD By

36

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2017

CHAMPLAIN VALLEY EXPOSITION • ESSEX JUNCTION, VT

Untitled-9 1

For more information call 888-518-6484. Purchase tickets in advance at all Price Chopper stores, all Gardener’s Supply stores, or www.greenworksvermont.org

media sponsors

1/20/17 10:26 AM

Send your entries to: Kids VT, attn: Writing Contest, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

New Books, Used Books, Remainders at GREAT PRICES!

Name ________________________________ Age __________________________________ Town ________________________________ Email ________________________________ Phone ________________________________

14 Church Street Burlington crowbooks.com 862-0848


ANSWERS P. 39

PUZZLE PAGE Jumble

BY DAVID L. HOYT & JEFF KNUREK

Birthday Club These winners get gift certificates to:

The letters of these crazy words are all mixed up. To play the game, put them back into the right order so that they make real words you can find in your dictionary. Write the letters of each real word under each crazy word, but only one letter to a square.

Congratulations to these February Birthday Club winners! Marley lives in Burlington and turns 7 on February 15. He enjoys skiing, playing soccer, reading and doing difficult puzzles. He loves anything Wild Kratts- or Pokémon-related. Marley wins entry for two to Petra Cliffs’ Friday Night Kids Club.

You are now ready to solve this month’s Jumble For Kids. Study the picture for a hint. Then play around with the letters in the circles. You’ll find you can put them in order so that they make your funny answer.

CAROLINE lives in South Burlington and

turns 8 on February 3. She’s a curious and helpful girl who enjoys reading, writing, singing and riding her bike. She loves animals and little kids.

Puzzles4Kids

BY HELENA HOVANEC

Riddle Search — COMPUTER TERMS

Riddle Answer:

37

CHARLIE lives in Hinesburg and turns 10 on February 19. The silly and active fourth grader loves reading, skiing, and playing soccer and lacrosse. He can often be found running around the woods with his brother.

KIDS VT

NETWORK ONLINE PASSWORD PASTE PLUG-IN PRINT REBOOT SHIFT TRASH

XAVIER lives in Vergennes and turns 10 on February 19. He loves riding four-wheelers, dirt bikes and his horse and is a big fan of Minecraft. He enjoys helping his grandfather with chores, especially digging up stone using large construction equipment.

FEBRUARY 2017

CAPS LOCK CONTROL DESKTOP EDIT EMOJI EXIT KEY LAPTOP LOG OUT

Caroline, Xavier and Charlie each win a day pass to Petra Cliffs.

KIDSVT.COM

Look up, down and diagonally, both forward and backward, to find every word on the list. Circle each one as you find it. When all the words are circled, take the UNUSED letters and write them on the blanks below. Go from left to right and top to bottom to find the answer to this riddle: What do tired computer programmers do at the end of a workday?

To enter, submit information using the online form at posting.kidsvt.com/vermont/ BirthdayClub/Page. Just give us your contact info, your children’s names and birth dates, and a photo, and they’re automatically enrolled.

Print your answer here:

Maze

Join the Club!


COLORING CONTEST! Three winners will each receive an annual family membership to the Fairbanks Museum & Planetarium. Send Kids VT your work of art by February 15. Be sure to include the info at right with your submission. Winners will be chosen in the following categories: (1) ages 5 and younger, (2) ages 6-8 and (3) ages 9-12. Winners will be named in the March issue of Kids VT. Send your high-resolution scans to art@kidsvt.com or mail a copy to Kids VT, P.O. Box 1184, Burlington, VT 05402.

HANDS ON Title _______________________________________________ Artist _____________________________________________ Age _______________________________________________ Town _____________________________________________ Email _____________________________________________

38

KIDS VT

FEBRUARY 2017

KIDSVT.COM

Phone _____________________________________________


✱ USE YOUR WORDS B Y A L ISO N N OVAK

CALENDAR 8v-calendar.indd 1

12/2/16 10:14 AM

PUZZLE PAGE ANSWERS (SEE P. 37)

KIDS VT

39

“Use Your Words” is a monthly essay in which writers reflect on parenting and childhood. Got a story to share? Email us at ideas@kidsvt.com.

Submit your info by January 15 online at kidsvt.com or to calendar@kidsvt.com

JUMBLES BED. SOON. RINK. HOOK.

We knew each other when we were our truest selves, free from the affectations of adulthood.

List your events for free in the Kids VT monthly calendar.

FEBRUARY 2017

celebratory, a bunch of buzzed 23-year-olds just beginning their adult lives. Jeff and I locked eyes and started talking. I had recently returned from a year working at a bilingual school in Thailand and was about to start a teaching program in the South Bronx. Jeff was living in Astoria, Queens, with a college buddy, working at a big advertising agency. Later, during a post-reunion analysis with my high school friends, I told them sheepishly, “Jeff Novak, he looked pretty good.” A month and a half later, my childhood friend, Allie, and I threw ourselves an apartment-warming party in Manhattan. She had recently been in touch with Jeff for work and invited him. He showed up with a few other high school acquaintances, and, again, we slipped into easy conversation. This time we exchanged email addresses. Our first date was several weeks later — and it was a good one. This month, we’ll celebrate 13 years of marriage. There’s a mutual understanding, an unspoken trust, between childhood friends. Jeff and I share common points of reference: quirky teachers, hometown landmarks, and epic stories of kids fainting during the chorus concert or throwing up in class. And, even though we’re both pushing 40, when I look at Jeff, it’s not difficult to conjure that second grader with the gray sweat suit and puffy hair, the one who stuttered when he spoke in class and whose cheeks got extra ruddy after a kickball game. We knew each other when we weren’t yet fully formed, but in some ways were our truest selves, free from the affectations of adulthood. And we liked each other as kids — quirks and all — before we loved each other as husband and wife. Recently, I pressed Jeff on what was going through his head when we talked at the reunion. “When I saw you, it felt like you were very familiar,” he told me, “almost like a family kind of familiar.” Now, 16 years after that meeting, we’ve created our own family. Our son, Theo, just turned 7, and our daughter, Mira, is 9, the same age I was when I wrote that diary entry. Our kids know our story, and Mira once asked me if it was possible that she might marry someone in her fourth-grade class. I thought about how I never dreamed, when I was in fourth grade, that the boy I pined for on those diary pages would become my husband. That we’d spot each other outside the bathroom of a Chinese restaurant, see each other with fresh eyes and fall in love. “Maybe,” I told her. “You never know.” 

KIDSVT.COM

OVER THE HOLIDAYS, I found one of my childhood diaries, a relic of the ’80s with an abstract geometric design on its pink, plastic cover. The first entry is dated January 1, 1987 — two days short of my ninth birthday. A few pages in, amid lamentations about my parents, there’s a section titled “Jeff.” “He’s really cute. I hope he notices me a little more though,” it reads. “Jeff is a little bit dumber than me. Not bad. I try to impress him. But I know I should just be myself. I think he knows I like him.” Jeff and I first struck up a friendship two years before I wrote those words, when he moved from Winston-Salem, N.C., to Westchester County halfway through the school year and ended up in my second-grade class. In fourth grade, we were in the same class again, part of a table group who called ourselves the Whiz Kids. That was the year I got a horrible, short haircut, one that made me look like a boy. Jeff and I had similar light-brown hair, and we conspired to wear gray sweat suits on the same day so our teacher couldn’t tell us apart. It was one of those weird plans, fueled by kid logic, that I don’t think we ever put into action. In fifth grade we decided we were “going out.” There was no smooching, or even hand-holding, in our months-long relationship. But I do remember one touching gesture: Sitting on the school bus, waiting to pull away right before the holiday break, I saw Jeff motioning to me through the window. I went to the steps of the bus, and he handed me a poorly wrapped present and wished me a Merry Christmas. Returning to my seat, I unwrapped it to find a crushed shirt box with a scattering of candy and a big-eyed stuffed-animal dog inside. It was the first present I got from a boy — and I still have the dog. I broke up with Jeff later that year, in the middle of recess. Matter-of-factly, I told our friend, Dale, that I rated Jeff a two on a 10-point scale. She scurried away to convey the message to him on the kickball field. Jeff took the news in stride and, just like that, our courtship was over. In middle school, Jeff found his place in a popular, jocky crowd, while I formed close-knit friendships with a group of girls like me: conscientious and competitive about schoolwork. We both had serious relationships in high school. Jeff ’s was so serious, in fact, that he and his girlfriend were voted “Most Likely to Get Married.” There’s a huge picture of them kissing in our yearbook. In college, I fell in love with someone who later broke my heart. But then, at our five-year high school reunion, Jeff and I ran into each other outside the bathroom of David Chen’s Chinese Restaurant in Armonk, N.Y. The mood was

RIDDLE ANSWER: What do you call a sleeping Tyrannosaurus rex? —a “DINO-SNORE”

An elementary-school relationship, rekindled years later

RIDDLE SEARCH ANSWER: Go home and crash.

Crushing It

Planning a kids event?


Today’s Special:

Healthy Meals for Vermont Kids Making the Healthy Choice, the Easy Choice

Sugary drinks are the largest source of calories in kids’ diets.

Busy families on the run are grabbing meals out more often, and soda is usually the beverage served with kids’ meals. A child’s chance of becoming overweight increases every time they have a sugary drink. Parents need the healthy choice to be the easy choice. Vermont is already serving our kids better in schools and early childcare, where healthy drinks and meals are the default choice. Let’s serve our kids better at restaurants too. Learn more and get involved. Go to www.servingkidsbettervt.org or text HEALTHY to 52886

Untitled-9 1

12/1/16 12:06 PM


Kids VT, February 2017